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Sample records for plant glyoxylate reductases

  1. Glyoxylate Reductase Isoform 1 is Localized in the Cytosol and Not Peroxisomes in Plant Cells

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    Steven L. K. Ching; Satinder K. Gidda; Amanda Rochon; Owen R. van Cauwenberghe; Barry J. Shelp; Robert T. Mullen

    2012-01-01

    Glyoxylate reductase (GLYR) is a key enzyme in plant metabolism which catalyzes the detoxification of both photorespiratory glyoxylate and succinic semialdehdye,an intermediate of the γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) pathway.Two isoforms of GLYR exist in plants,GLYR1 and GLYR2,and while GLYR2 is known to be localized in plastids,GLYR1 has been reported to be localized in either peroxisomes or the cytosol.Here,we reappraised the intracellular localization of GLYR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana L.Heynh (ecotype Lansberg erecta) using both transiently-transformed suspension cells and stably-transformed plants,in combination with fluorescence microscopy.The results indicate that GLYR1 is localized exclusively to the cytosol regardless of the species,tissue and/or cell type,or exposure of plants to environmental stresses that would increase flux through the GABA pathway.Moreover,the C-terminal tripeptide sequence of GLYR1,-SRE,despite its resemblance to a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal,is not sufficient for targeting to peroxisomes.Collectively,these results define the cytosol as the intracellular location of GLYR1 and provide not only important insight to the metabolic roles of GLYR1 and the compartmentation of the GABA and photorespiratory pathways in plant cells,but also serve as a useful reference for future studies of proteins proposed to be localized to peroxisomes and/or the cytosol.

  2. Ancient Plant Glyoxylate/Succinic Semialdehyde Reductases: GLYR1s Are Cytosolic, Whereas GLYR2s Are Localized to Both Mitochondria and Plastids

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    Barry J. Shelp

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant NADPH-dependent glyoxylate/succinic semialdehyde reductases 1 and 2 (GLYR1 and GLYR2 are considered to be involved in detoxifying harmful aldehydes, thereby preserving plant health during exposure to various abiotic stresses. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two GLYR isoforms appeared in the plant lineage prior to the divergence of the Chlorophyta and Streptophyta, which occurred approximately 750 million years ago. Green fluorescent protein fusions of apple (Malus x domestica Borkh., rice (Oryza sativa L. and Arabidopsis thaliana [L.] Heynh GLYRs were transiently expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum L. suspension cells or Arabidopsis protoplasts, as well in methoxyfenozide-induced, stably transformed Arabidopsis seedlings. The localization of apple GLYR1 confirmed that this isoform is cytosolic, whereas apple, rice and Arabidopsis GLYR2s were localized to both mitochondria and plastids. These findings highlight the potential involvement of GLYRs within distinct compartments of the plant cell.

  3. New insights into the mechanism of substrates trafficking in Glyoxylate/Hydroxypyruvate reductases.

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    Lassalle, Louise; Engilberge, Sylvain; Madern, Dominique; Vauclare, Pierre; Franzetti, Bruno; Girard, Eric

    2016-02-11

    Glyoxylate accumulation within cells is highly toxic. In humans, it is associated with hyperoxaluria type 2 (PH2) leading to renal failure. The glyoxylate content within cells is regulated by the NADPH/NADH dependent glyoxylate/hydroxypyruvate reductases (GRHPR). These are highly conserved enzymes with a dual activity as they are able to reduce glyoxylate to glycolate and to convert hydroxypyruvate into D-glycerate. Despite the determination of high-resolution X-ray structures, the substrate recognition mode of this class of enzymes remains unclear. We determined the structure at 2.0 Å resolution of a thermostable GRHPR from Archaea as a ternary complex in the presence of D-glycerate and NADPH. This shows a binding mode conserved between human and archeal enzymes. We also determined the first structure of GRHPR in presence of glyoxylate at 1.40 Å resolution. This revealed the pivotal role of Leu53 and Trp138 in substrate trafficking. These residues act as gatekeepers at the entrance of a tunnel connecting the active site to protein surface. Taken together, these results allowed us to propose a general model for GRHPR mode of action.

  4. An engineered pathway for glyoxylate metabolism in tobacco plants aimed to avoid the release of ammonia in photorespiration

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    Carvalho Josirley de FC

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The photorespiratory nitrogen cycle in C3 plants involves an extensive diversion of carbon and nitrogen away from the direct pathways of assimilation. The liberated ammonia is re-assimilated, but up to 25% of the carbon may be released into the atmosphere as CO2. Because of the loss of CO2 and high energy costs, there has been considerable interest in attempts to decrease the flux through the cycle in C3 plants. Transgenic tobacco plants were generated that contained the genes gcl and hyi from E. coli encoding glyoxylate carboligase (EC 4.1.1.47 and hydroxypyruvate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.22 respectively, targeted to the peroxisomes. It was presumed that the two enzymes could work together and compete with the aminotransferases that convert glyoxylate to glycine, thus avoiding ammonia production in the photorespiratory nitrogen cycle. Results When grown in ambient air, but not in elevated CO2, the transgenic tobacco lines had a distinctive phenotype of necrotic lesions on the leaves. Three of the six lines chosen for a detailed study contained single copies of the gcl gene, two contained single copies of both the gcl and hyi genes and one line contained multiple copies of both gcl and hyi genes. The gcl protein was detected in the five transgenic lines containing single copies of the gcl gene but hyi protein was not detected in any of the transgenic lines. The content of soluble amino acids including glycine and serine, was generally increased in the transgenic lines growing in air, when compared to the wild type. The content of soluble sugars, glucose, fructose and sucrose in the shoot was decreased in transgenic lines growing in air, consistent with decreased carbon assimilation. Conclusions Tobacco plants have been generated that produce bacterial glyoxylate carboligase but not hydroxypyruvate isomerase. The transgenic plants exhibit a stress response when exposed to air, suggesting that some glyoxylate is diverted away from

  5. Evolution of plant defense mechanisms. Relationships of phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases to pinoresinol-lariciresinol and isoflavone reductases.

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    Gang, D R; Kasahara, H; Xia, Z Q; Vander Mijnsbrugge, K; Bauw, G; Boerjan, W; Van Montagu, M; Davin, L B; Lewis, N G

    1999-03-12

    Pinoresinol-lariciresinol and isoflavone reductase classes are phylogenetically related, as is a third, the so-called "isoflavone reductase homologs." This study establishes the first known catalytic function for the latter, as being able to engender the NADPH-dependent reduction of phenylcoumaran benzylic ethers. Accordingly, all three reductase classes are involved in the biosynthesis of important and related phenylpropanoid-derived plant defense compounds. In this investigation, the phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase from the gymnosperm, Pinus taeda, was cloned, with the recombinant protein heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme reduces the benzylic ether functionalities of both dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol and dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol, with a higher affinity for the former, as measured by apparent Km and Vmax values and observed kinetic 3H-isotope effects. It abstracts the 4R-hydride of the required NADPH cofactor in a manner analogous to that of the pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases and isoflavone reductases. A similar catalytic function was observed for the corresponding recombinant reductase whose gene was cloned from the angiosperm, Populus trichocarpa. Interestingly, both pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases and isoflavone reductases catalyze enantiospecific conversions, whereas the phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase only shows regiospecific discrimination. A possible evolutionary relationship among the three reductase classes is proposed, based on the supposition that phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases represent the progenitors of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and isoflavone reductases.

  6. Evolution of the enzymes of the citric acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle of higher plants. A case study of endosymbiotic gene transfer.

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    Schnarrenberger, Claus; Martin, William

    2002-02-01

    The citric acid or tricarboxylic acid cycle is a central element of higher-plant carbon metabolism which provides, among other things, electrons for oxidative phosphorylation in the inner mitochondrial membrane, intermediates for amino-acid biosynthesis, and oxaloacetate for gluconeogenesis from succinate derived from fatty acids via the glyoxylate cycle in glyoxysomes. The tricarboxylic acid cycle is a typical mitochondrial pathway and is widespread among alpha-proteobacteria, the group of eubacteria as defined under rRNA systematics from which mitochondria arose. Most of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes, and several have been previously shown to branch with their homologues from alpha-proteobacteria, indicating that the eukaryotic nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. Here, we investigate the individual evolutionary histories of all of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle using protein maximum likelihood phylogenies, focusing on the evolutionary origin of the nuclear-encoded proteins in higher plants. The results indicate that about half of the proteins involved in this eukaryotic pathway are most similar to their alpha-proteobacterial homologues, whereas the remainder are most similar to eubacterial, but not specifically alpha-proteobacterial, homologues. A consideration of (a) the process of lateral gene transfer among free-living prokaryotes and (b) the mechanistics of endosymbiotic (symbiont-to-host) gene transfer reveals that it is unrealistic to expect all nuclear genes that were acquired from the alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria to branch specifically with their homologues encoded in the genomes of contemporary alpha-proteobacteria. Rather, even if molecular phylogenetics were to work perfectly (which it does not), then some nuclear-encoded proteins that were acquired from the alpha

  7. Denitrification by plant roots? New aspects of plant plasma membrane-bound nitrate reductase.

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    Eick, Manuela; Stöhr, Christine

    2012-10-01

    A specific form of plasma membrane-bound nitrate reductase in plants is restricted to roots. Two peptides originated from plasma membrane integral proteins isolated from Hordeum vulgare have been assigned as homologues to the subunit NarH of respiratory nitrate reductase of Escherichia coli. Corresponding sequences have been detected for predicted proteins of Populus trichocarpa with high degree of identities for the subunits NarH (75%) and NarG (65%), however, with less accordance for the subunit NarI. These findings coincide with biochemical properties, particularly in regard to the electron donors menadione and succinate. Together with the root-specific and plasma membrane-bound nitrite/NO reductase, nitric oxide is produced under hypoxic conditions in the presence of nitrate. In this context, a possible function in nitrate respiration of plant roots and an involvement of plants in denitrification processes are discussed.

  8. Properties of serine: glyoxylate aminotransferase purified from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Kendziorek; Andrzej Paszkowski

    2008-01-01

    The photorespiratory enzyme L-serine: glyoxylate aminotransferase (SGAT; EC 2.6.1.45) was purified from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. The final enzyme was approximately 80% pure as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with silver staining. The identity of the enzyme was confirmed by LC/MS/MS analysis.The molecular mass estimated by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-150 under non-denaturing conditions, mass spectrometry (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization/time of flight technique) and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was 82.4 kDa,42.0 kDa, and 39.8 kDa, respectively, indicating dimer as the active form. The optimum Ph value was 9.2. The enzyme activity was inhibited by aminooxyacetate and β-chloro-L-alanine both compounds reacting with the carbonyl group of pyridoxal phosphate. The enzyme's transaminating activity with L-alanine and glyoxylate as substrates was approximately 55% of that observed with L-serine and glyoxylate, The lower Km value (1.25 Mm) for L-alanine, compared with that of other plant SGATs, and the kcat/Km(Ala) ratio being approximately 2-fold higher than kcat/Km(Ser) suggested that, during photorespiration, Ala and Ser are used by Arabidopsis SGAT with equal efficiency as amino group donors for glyoxylate. The equilibrium constant (Keq), derived from the Haldane relation, for the transamination reaction between L-serine and glyoxylate with the formation of hydroxypyruvate and glycine was 79.1, strongly favoring glycine synthesis. However, it was accompanied by a low Km value of 2.83 Mm for glycine. A comparison of some kinetic properties of the studied enzymes with the recombinant Arabidopsis SGATs previously obtained revealed substantial differences. The ratio of the velocity of the transamination reaction with L-alanine and glyoxylate as substrates versus that with L-serine and glyoxylate was 1:1.8 for the native enzyme, whereas it was 1: 7 for the recombinant SGAT

  9. Structural characterization and functional validation of aldose reductase from the resurrection plant Xerophyta viscosa.

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    Singh, Preeti; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2014-11-01

    Aldose reductases are key enzymes in the detoxification of reactive aldehyde compounds like methylglyoxal (MG) and malondialdehyde. The present study describes for first time the preliminary biochemical and structural characterization of the aldose reductase (ALDRXV4) enzyme from the resurrection plant Xerophyta viscosa. The ALDRXV4 cDNA was expressed in E. coli using pET28a expression vector, and the protein was purified using affinity chromatography. The recombinant protein showed a molecular mass of ~36 kDa. The K M (1.2 mM) and k cat (14.5 s(-1)) of the protein determined using MG as substrate was found to be comparable with other reported homologs. Three-dimensional structure prediction based on homology modeling suggested several similarities with the other aldose reductases reported from plants. Circular dichroism spectroscopy results supported the bioinformatic prediction of alpha-beta helix nature of aldose reductase proteins. Subcellular localization studies revealed that the ALDRXV4-GFP fusion protein was localized both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The E. coli cells overexpressing ALDRXV4 exhibited improved growth and showed tolerance against diverse abiotic stresses induced by high salt (500 mM NaCl), osmoticum (10 % PEG 6000), heavy metal (20 mM CdCl2), and MG (5 mM). Based on these results, we propose that ALDRXV4 gene from X. viscosa could be a potential candidate for developing stress-tolerant crop plants.

  10. Functional plasticity and catalytic efficiency in plant and bacterial ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases.

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    Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Arakaki, Adrián K; Cortez, Néstor; Carrillo, Néstor

    2004-05-06

    Ferredoxin (flavodoxin)-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are ubiquitous flavoenzymes that deliver NADPH or low potential one-electron donors (ferredoxin, flavodoxin, adrenodoxin) to redox-based metabolisms in plastids, mitochondria and bacteria. Two great families of FAD-containing proteins displaying FNR activity have evolved from different and independent origins. The enzymes present in mitochondria and some bacterial genera are members of the structural superfamily of disulfide oxidoreductases whose prototype is glutathione reductase. A second group, comprising the FNRs from plastids and most eubacteria, constitutes a unique family, the plant-type FNRs, totally unrelated in sequence with the former. The two-domain structure of the plant family of FNR also provides the basic scaffold for an extended superfamily of electron transfer flavoproteins. In this article we compare FNR flavoenzymes from very different origins and describe how the natural history of these reductases shaped structure, flavin conformation and catalytic activity to face the very different metabolic demands they have to deal with in their hosts. We show that plant-type FNRs can be classified into a plastidic class, characterised by extended FAD conformation and high catalytic efficiency, and a bacterial class displaying a folded FAD molecule and low turnover rates. Sequence alignments supported this classification, providing a criterion to predict the structural and biochemical properties of newly identified members of the family.

  11. Function of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) in plant development and under biotic/abiotic stress

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    Leterrier, Marina; Chaki, Mounira; Airaki, Morad; Valderrama, Raquel; Palma, José M; Barroso, Juan B

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, it was established that the class III alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH3) enzyme, also known as glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH; EC 1.2.1.1), catalyzes the NADH-dependent reduction of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and therefore was also designated as GSNO reductase. This finding has opened new aspects in the metabolism of nitric oxide (NO) and NO-derived molecules where GSNO is a key component. In this article, current knowledge of the involvement and potential function of this enzyme during plant development and under biotic/abiotic stress is briefly reviewed. PMID:21543898

  12. Molecular Properties and Functional Divergence of the Dehydroascorbate Reductase Gene Family in Lower and Higher Plants.

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    Yuan-Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, which reduces oxidized ascorbate, is important for maintaining an appropriate ascorbate redox state in plant cells. To date, genome-wide molecular characterization of DHARs has only been conducted in bryophytes (Physcomitrella patens and eudicots (e.g. Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, to gain a general understanding of the molecular properties and functional divergence of the DHARs in land plants, we further conducted a comprehensive analysis of DHARs from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii, gymnosperm Picea abies and monocot Zea mays. DHARs were present as a small gene family in all of the land plants we examined, with gene numbers ranging from two to four. All the plants contained cytosolic and chloroplastic DHARs, indicating dehydroascorbate (DHA can be directly reduced in the cytoplasm and chloroplast by DHARs in all the plants. A novel vacuolar DHAR was found in Z. mays, indicating DHA may also be reduced in the vacuole by DHARs in Z. mays. The DHARs within each species showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, subcellular localizations, and enzymatic characteristics. This study provides new insights into the molecular characteristics and functional divergence of DHARs in land plants.

  13. Aldo-keto reductase enzymes detoxify glyphosate and improve herbicide resistance in plants.

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    Vemanna, Ramu S; Vennapusa, Amaranatha Reddy; Easwaran, Murugesh; Chandrashekar, Babitha K; Rao, Hanumantha; Ghanti, Kirankumar; Sudhakar, Chinta; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Makarla, Udayakumar

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, concerns about the use of glyphosate-resistant crops have increased because of glyphosate residual levels in plants and development of herbicide-resistant weeds. In spite of identifying glyphosate-detoxifying genes from microorganisms, the plant mechanism to detoxify glyphosate has not been studied. We characterized an aldo-keto reductase gene from Pseudomonas (PsAKR1) and rice (OsAKR1) and showed, by docking studies, both PsAKR1 and OsAKR1 can efficiently bind to glyphosate. Silencing AKR1 homologues in rice and Nicotiana benthamiana or mutation of AKR1 in yeast and Arabidopsis showed increased sensitivity to glyphosate. External application of AKR proteins rescued glyphosate-mediated cucumber seedling growth inhibition. Regeneration of tobacco transgenic lines expressing PsAKR1 or OsAKRI on glyphosate suggests that AKR can be used as selectable marker to develop transgenic crops. PsAKR1- or OsAKRI-expressing tobacco and rice transgenic plants showed improved tolerance to glyphosate with reduced accumulation of shikimic acid without affecting the normal photosynthetic rates. These results suggested that AKR1 when overexpressed detoxifies glyphosate in planta. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pharmacologically tested aldose reductase inhibitors isolated from plant sources—A concise report

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    D.K.Patel; R.Kumar; K.Sairam; S.Hemalatha

    2012-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR),a cytosolic,monomeric oxidoreductase,is a key enzyme in the polyol pathway which controls the conversion of glucose to sorbitol.The accumulation of sorbitol by the activation of AR enzymes in lens,retina,and sciatic nerves leads to the cause of diabetic defects resulting in various secondary complications,viz.retinopathy,neuropathy,nephropathy and Alzheimer's disease.Thus,reduction of the polyol pathway flux by AR inhibitors could be a potential therapeutic opening in the treatment and prevention of diabetic complications.At present,the AR inhibitors belong to two different chemical classes.One is the hydantoin derivatives,such as Sorbinil,Dilantin,and Minalrestat,and the other is the carboxylic acid derivatives,such as Epalrestat,Alrestatin,and Tolrestat.However,it is known that most of these synthethic compounds have unacceptable side-effects.Well known medicinal plants like Chrysanthemum indicum,Chrysanthemum morifolium,Prunus mume,Myrcia multiflora,Centella asiatica,and Salacia reticulata,Salacia oblonga,and Salacia chinensis exhibited potent AR inhibitory activity.The present review summarizes the list of plant material,and their isolated phytoconstituents which have been tested for their AR inhibitory activity.This litreature review covers the period to 2011,and a total of 72 plants are listed.

  15. Inhibitory effect of two Indian medicinal plants on aldose reductase of rat lensin vitro

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    Rajesh Kumar; Dinesh Kumar Patel; Damiki Laloo; Krishnamurthy Sairam; Siva Hemalatha

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To assesse the inhibitory effect of alcoholic extract of two Indian medicinal plants namelyCeasalpinia digyna Rottler and, Alangium lamarckii Thwaits on aldose reductase(AR) of rat lens.Methods: Rats lens were enucleated through posterior approach and their homogenate was prepared and centrifuged to obtain a clear supernatant for the determination ofAR activity and protein content.Results:The alcoholic extract of Ceasalpinia digyna andAlangium lamarckii had a potent inhibitory effect on the lensAR enzyme. TheIC50 values of alcoholic extract of the selected plants were calculated and were (46.29±11.17)and(106.00±5.11) μg/mL, respectively. Quercetin was used as a positive control and itsIC50value was (2.95±1.53)μg/mL.Conclusions:Thus, it is concluded that alcoholic extracts of the selected plant exhibit significant inhibitory effects on AR in the rat lensin vitro.

  16. Sulfite Reductase Protects Plants against Sulfite Toxicity1[W][OA

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    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Brychkova, Galina; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Plant sulfite reductase (SiR; Enzyme Commission 1.8.7.1) catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide in the reductive sulfate assimilation pathway. Comparison of SiR expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Rheinlands Ruhm’) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants revealed that SiR is expressed in a different tissue-dependent manner that likely reflects dissimilarity in sulfur metabolism between the plant species. Using Arabidopsis and tomato SiR mutants with modified SiR expression, we show here that resistance to ectopically applied sulfur dioxide/sulfite is a function of SiR expression levels and that plants with reduced SiR expression exhibit higher sensitivity than the wild type, as manifested in pronounced leaf necrosis and chlorophyll bleaching. The sulfite-sensitive mutants accumulate applied sulfite and show a decline in glutathione levels. In contrast, mutants that overexpress SiR are more tolerant to sulfite toxicity, exhibiting little or no damage. Resistance to high sulfite application is manifested by fast sulfite disappearance and an increase in glutathione levels. The notion that SiR plays a role in the protection of plants against sulfite is supported by the rapid up-regulation of SiR transcript and activity within 30 min of sulfite injection into Arabidopsis and tomato leaves. Peroxisomal sulfite oxidase transcripts and activity levels are likewise promoted by sulfite application as compared with water injection controls. These results indicate that, in addition to participating in the sulfate assimilation reductive pathway, SiR also plays a role in protecting leaves against the toxicity of sulfite accumulation. PMID:23221833

  17. Azospirillum Inoculation Alters Nitrate Reductase Activity and Nitrogen Uptake in Wheat Plant under Water Deficit Conditions

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    N. Aliasgharzad N. Aliasgharzad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water deficit stress usually diminishes nitrogen uptake by plants. There are evidences that some nitrogen fixing bacteria can alleviate this stress by supplying nitrogen and improving its metabolism in plants. Four Azospirillum strains, A. lipoferum AC45-II, A. brasilense AC46-I, A. irakense AC49-VII and A. irakense AC51-VI were tested for nitrate reductase activity (NRA. In a pot culture experiment using a sandy loam soil, wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Sardari were inoculated with these bacterial strains and three ranges of soil water potential (W1: -10 to -20, W2: -40 to -50 and W3: -65 to -75 kPa were applied to the pots. All strains were positive in NRA test and the highest (7.63mg NO2-N.L-1.48h-1 was recorded for AC49-VII and the least (0.23mg NO2-N.L-1.48h-1 was belong to AC51-VI. Leaf and root NRA, root and shoot nitrogen concentrations, and dry weights of root and shoot decreased by increasing water deficit stress. All four bacterial strains caused a significant enhancement in root NRA and in each water deficit level, the higher root NRA was recorded in AC46-I and AC49-VII inoculated plants. The highest leaf NRA was achieved by AC49-VII. The mean increment of root NRA by bacterial strains was 171% compared to the non-bacterial plants. Moreover, at the highest level of water deficit stress, the highest dry weight and nitrogen concentration in root and shoot were obtained by AC46-I and AC49-VII treatments.

  18. Both plant and bacterial nitrate reductases contribute to nitric oxide production in Medicago truncatula nitrogen-fixing nodules.

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    Horchani, Faouzi; Prévot, Marianne; Boscari, Alexandre; Evangelisti, Edouard; Meilhoc, Eliane; Bruand, Claude; Raymond, Philippe; Boncompagni, Eric; Aschi-Smiti, Samira; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud

    2011-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling and defense molecule of major importance in living organisms. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, NO production has been detected in the nitrogen fixation zone of the nodule, but the systems responsible for its synthesis are yet unknown and its role in symbiosis is far from being elucidated. In this work, using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we explored the enzymatic source of NO production in M. truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti nodules under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. When transferred from normoxia to hypoxia, nodule NO production was rapidly increased, indicating that NO production capacity is present in functioning nodules and may be promptly up-regulated in response to decreased oxygen availability. Contrary to roots and leaves, nodule NO production was stimulated by nitrate and nitrite and inhibited by tungstate, a nitrate reductase inhibitor. Nodules obtained with either plant nitrate reductase RNA interference double knockdown (MtNR1/2) or bacterial nitrate reductase-deficient (napA) and nitrite reductase-deficient (nirK) mutants, or both, exhibited reduced nitrate or nitrite reductase activities and NO production levels. Moreover, NO production in nodules was found to be inhibited by electron transfer chain inhibitors, and nodule energy state (ATP-ADP ratio) was significantly reduced when nodules were incubated in the presence of tungstate. Our data indicate that both plant and bacterial nitrate reductase and electron transfer chains are involved in NO synthesis. We propose the existence of a nitrate-NO respiration process in nodules that could play a role in the maintenance of the energy status required for nitrogen fixation under oxygen-limiting conditions.

  19. Structural and transcriptional analysis of plant genes encoding the bifunctional lysine ketoglutarate reductase saccharopine dehydrogenase enzyme

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    Gu Yong Q

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the dietary essential amino acids, the most severely limiting in the cereals is lysine. Since cereals make up half of the human diet, lysine limitation has quality/nutritional consequences. The breakdown of lysine is controlled mainly by the catabolic bifunctional enzyme lysine ketoglutarate reductase - saccharopine dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH. The LKR/SDH gene has been reported to produce transcripts for the bifunctional enzyme and separate monofunctional transcripts. In addition to lysine metabolism, this gene has been implicated in a number of metabolic and developmental pathways, which along with its production of multiple transcript types and complex exon/intron structure suggest an important node in plant metabolism. Understanding more about the LKR/SDH gene is thus interesting both from applied standpoint and for basic plant metabolism. Results The current report describes a wheat genomic fragment containing an LKR/SDH gene and adjacent genes. The wheat LKR/SDH genomic segment was found to originate from the A-genome of wheat, and EST analysis indicates all three LKR/SDH genes in hexaploid wheat are transcriptionally active. A comparison of a set of plant LKR/SDH genes suggests regions of greater sequence conservation likely related to critical enzymatic functions and metabolic controls. Although most plants contain only a single LKR/SDH gene per genome, poplar contains at least two functional bifunctional genes in addition to a monofunctional LKR gene. Analysis of ESTs finds evidence for monofunctional LKR transcripts in switchgrass, and monofunctional SDH transcripts in wheat, Brachypodium, and poplar. Conclusions The analysis of a wheat LKR/SDH gene and comparative structural and functional analyses among available plant genes provides new information on this important gene. Both the structure of the LKR/SDH gene and the immediately adjacent genes show lineage-specific differences between monocots and dicots, and

  20. Dynamics of the active site architecture in plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases catalytic complexes.

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    Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L; López-Rivero, Arleth; Tondo, María Laura; Orellano, Elena G; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Medina, Milagros

    2014-10-01

    Kinetic isotope effects in reactions involving hydride transfer and their temperature dependence are powerful tools to explore dynamics of enzyme catalytic sites. In plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases the FAD cofactor exchanges a hydride with the NADP(H) coenzyme. Rates for these processes are considerably faster for the plastidic members (FNR) of the family than for those belonging to the bacterial class (FPR). Hydride transfer (HT) and deuteride transfer (DT) rates for the NADP(+) coenzyme reduction of four plant-type FNRs (two representatives of the plastidic type FNRs and the other two from the bacterial class), and their temperature dependences are here examined applying a full tunnelling model with coupled environmental fluctuations. Parameters for the two plastidic FNRs confirm a tunnelling reaction with active dynamics contributions, but isotope effects on Arrhenius factors indicate a larger contribution for donor-acceptor distance (DAD) dynamics in the Pisum sativum FNR reaction than in the Anabaena FNR reaction. On the other hand, parameters for bacterial FPRs are consistent with passive environmental reorganisation movements dominating the HT coordinate and no contribution of DAD sampling or gating fluctuations. This indicates that active sites of FPRs are more organised and rigid than those of FNRs. These differences must be due to adaptation of the active sites and catalytic mechanisms to fulfil their particular metabolic roles, establishing a compromise between protein flexibility and functional optimisation. Analysis of site-directed mutants in plastidic enzymes additionally indicates the requirement of a minimal optimal architecture in the catalytic complex to provide a favourable gating contribution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

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    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  2. The Xerophyta viscosa aldose reductase (ALDRXV4) confers enhanced drought and salinity tolerance to transgenic tobacco plants by scavenging methylglyoxal and reducing the membrane damage.

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    Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Preeti; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Upadhyaya, Chandrama Prakash; Roy, Suchandra Deb; Hohn, Thomas; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2013-06-01

    We report the efficacy of an aldose reductase (ALDRXV4) enzyme from Xerophyta viscosa Baker in enhancing the prospects of plant's survival under abiotic stress. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing ALDRXV4 cDNA showed alleviation of NaCl and mannitol-induced abiotic stress. The transgenic plants survived longer periods of water deficiency and salinity stress and exhibited improved recovery after rehydration as compared to the wild type plants. The increased synthesis of aldose reductase in transgenic plants correlated with reduced methylglyoxal and malondialdehyde accumulation and an elevated level of sorbitol under stress conditions. In addition, the transgenic lines showed better photosynthetic efficiency, less electrolyte damage, greater water retention, higher proline accumulation, and favorable ionic balance under stress conditions. Together, these findings suggest the potential of engineering aldose reductase levels for better performance of crop plants growing under drought and salt stress conditions.

  3. Evolution of glyoxylate cycle enzymes in Metazoa: evidence of multiple horizontal transfer events and pseudogene formation

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    Finogenova Tatiana V

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glyoxylate cycle is thought to be present in bacteria, protists, plants, fungi, and nematodes, but not in other Metazoa. However, activity of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes, malate synthase (MS and isocitrate lyase (ICL, in animal tissues has been reported. In order to clarify the status of the MS and ICL genes in animals and get an insight into their evolution, we undertook a comparative-genomic study. Results Using sequence similarity searches, we identified MS genes in arthropods, echinoderms, and vertebrates, including platypus and opossum, but not in the numerous sequenced genomes of placental mammals. The regions of the placental mammals' genomes expected to code for malate synthase, as determined by comparison of the gene orders in vertebrate genomes, show clear similarity to the opossum MS sequence but contain stop codons, indicating that the MS gene became a pseudogene in placental mammals. By contrast, the ICL gene is undetectable in animals other than the nematodes that possess a bifunctional, fused ICL-MS gene. Examination of phylogenetic trees of MS and ICL suggests multiple horizontal gene transfer events that probably went in both directions between several bacterial and eukaryotic lineages. The strongest evidence was obtained for the acquisition of the bifunctional ICL-MS gene from an as yet unknown bacterial source with the corresponding operonic organization by the common ancestor of the nematodes. Conclusion The distribution of the MS and ICL genes in animals suggests that either they encode alternative enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle that are not orthologous to the known MS and ICL or the animal MS acquired a new function that remains to be characterized. Regardless of the ultimate solution to this conundrum, the genes for the glyoxylate cycle enzymes present a remarkable variety of evolutionary events including unusual horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to animals. Reviewers Arcady Mushegian

  4. Glyoxylate, a New Marker Metabolite of Type 2 Diabetes

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    Victoria J. Nikiforova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is characterized by a variety of metabolic impairments that are closely linked to nonenzymatic glycation reactions of proteins and peptides resulting in advanced glycation end-products (AGEs. Reactive aldehydes derived from sugars play an important role in the generation of AGEs. Using metabolite profiling to characterize human plasma from diabetic versus nondiabetic subjects we observed in a recent study that the reactive aldehyde glyoxylate was increased before high levels of plasma glucose, typical for a diabetic condition, could be measured. Following this observation, we explored the relevance of increased glyoxylate in diabetic subjects and in diabetic C57BLKS/J-Leprdb/db-/- mice in the pathophysiology of diabetes. A retrospective study using samples of long-term blood donors revealed that glyoxylate levels unlike glucose levels became significantly elevated up to 3 years prior to diabetes diagnosis (difference to control P=0.034. Elevated glyoxylate levels impact on newly identified mechanisms linking hyperglycemia and AGE production with diabetes-associated complications such as diabetic nephropathy. Glyoxylate in its metabolic network may serve as an early marker in diabetes diagnosis with predictive qualities for associated complications and as potential to guide the development of new antidiabetic therapies.

  5. New evidence of similarity between human and plant steroid metabolism: 5alpha-reductase activity in Solanum malacoxylon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Fabiana; Danza, Giovanna; Guarna, Antonio; Cini, Nicoletta; Racchi, Milvia Luisa; Serio, Mario

    2003-01-01

    The physiological role of steroid hormones in humans is well known, and the metabolic pathway and mechanisms of action are almost completely elucidated. The role of plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids, is less known, but an increasing amount of data on brassinosteroid biosynthesis is showing unexpected similarities between human and plant steroid metabolic pathways. Here we focus our attention on the enzyme 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR) for which a plant ortholog of the mammalian system, DET2, was recently described in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that campestenone, the natural substrate of DET2, is reduced to 5alpha-campestanone by both human 5alphaR isozymes but with different affinities. Solanum malacoxylon, which is a calcinogenic plant very active in the biosynthesis of vitamin D-like molecules and sterols, was used to study 5alphaR activity. Leaves and calli were chosen as examples of differentiated and undifferentiated tissues, respectively. Two separate 5alphaR activities were found in calli and leaves of Solanum using campestenone as substrate. The use of progesterone allowed the detection of both activities in calli. Support for the existence of two 5alphaR isozymes in S. malacoxylon was provided by the differential actions of inhibitors of the human 5alphaR in calli and leaves. The evidence for the presence of two isozymes in different plant tissues extends the analogies between plant and mammalian steroid metabolic pathways.

  6. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  7. Crystal structures of Aedes aegypti alanine glyoxylate aminotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qian; Robinson, Howard; Gao, Yi Gui; Vogelaar, Nancy; Wilson, Scott R; Rizzi, Menico; Li, Jianyong

    2006-12-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75A high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1A resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  8. Crystal Structure of the FAD-Containing Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase from the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

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    María Laura Tondo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have solved the structure of ferredoxin-NADP(H reductase, FPR, from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, responsible for citrus canker, at a resolution of 1.5 Å. This structure reveals differences in the mobility of specific loops when compared to other FPRs, probably unrelated to the hydride transfer process, which contributes to explaining the structural and functional divergence between the subclass I FPRs. Interactions of the C-terminus of the enzyme with the phosphoadenosine of the cofactor FAD limit its mobility, thus affecting the entrance of nicotinamide into the active site. This structure opens the possibility of rationally designing drugs against the X. axonopodis pv. citri phytopathogen.

  9. Overexpressing 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR in the lactococcal mevalonate pathway for heterologous plant sesquiterpene production.

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    Adelene Ai-Lian Song

    Full Text Available Isoprenoids are a large and diverse group of metabolites with interesting properties such as flavour, fragrance and therapeutic properties. They are produced via two pathways, the mevalonate pathway or the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP pathway. While plants are the richest source of isoprenoids, they are not the most efficient producers. Escherichia coli and yeasts have been extensively studied as heterologous hosts for plant isoprenoids production. In the current study, we describe the usage of the food grade Lactococcus lactis as a potential heterologous host for the production of sesquiterpenes from a local herbaceous Malaysian plant, Persicaria minor (synonym Polygonum minus. A sesquiterpene synthase gene from P. minor was successfully cloned and expressed in L. lactis. The expressed protein was identified to be a β-sesquiphellandrene synthase as it was demonstrated to be functional in producing β-sesquiphellandrene at 85.4% of the total sesquiterpenes produced based on in vitro enzymatic assays. The recombinant L. lactis strain developed in this study was also capable of producing β-sesquiphellandrene in vivo without exogenous substrates supplementation. In addition, overexpression of the strain's endogenous 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase (HMGR, an established rate-limiting enzyme in the eukaryotic mevalonate pathway, increased the production level of β-sesquiphellandrene by 1.25-1.60 fold. The highest amount achieved was 33 nM at 2 h post-induction.

  10. Cloning and functional characterization of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase gene from Withania somnifera: an important medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Nehal; Gupta, Parul; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal is one of the most valuable medicinal plants synthesizing a large number of pharmacologically active secondary metabolites known as withanolides, the C28-steroidal lactones derived from triterpenoids. Though the plant has been well characterized in terms of phytochemical profiles as well as pharmaceutical activities, not much is known about the biosynthetic pathway and genes responsible for biosynthesis of these compounds. In this study, we have characterized the gene encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34) catalyzing the key regulatory step of the isoprenoid biosynthesis. The 1,728-bp full-length cDNA of Withania HMGR (WsHMGR) encodes a polypeptide of 575 amino acids. The amino acid sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis suggest that WsHMGR has typical structural features of other known plant HMGRs. The relative expression analysis suggests that WsHMGR expression varies in different tissues as well as chemotypes and is significantly elevated in response to exposure to salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and mechanical injury. The functional color assay in Escherichia coli showed that WsHMGR could accelerate the biosynthesis of carotenoids, establishing that WsHMGR encoded a functional protein and may play a catalytic role by its positive influence in isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  11. Salicylic Acid Protects Nitrate Reductase Activity, Growth and Proline in Amaranth and Tomato Plants during Water Deficit

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    C. E. Umebese

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Seedlings of Amaranthus hybridus cv. NHAC-3 (large green, amaranth and Lycopersicum esculentum cv. Roma (tomato were subjected to 7 days water stress at Early Vegetative (EV, Late Vegetative (LV, Early Flowering (EF and Late Flowering (LF stages of growth to study the impact on leaf water potential (ψw, Nitrate Reductase Activity (NRA, growth (plant height, shoot and root biomass and proline content of both plants. Approach: Two concentrations of salicylic acid (1 and 3 mM SA were applied to stressed plants to study the level of protection given by SA to the plants. Leaf ψw was significantly reduced (p = 0.05 during stress treatment at nearly all stages of growth in both plants. Leaf ψw was in the range -0.25 to -1.42 (unstressed and -1.45 to -2.02 (stressed in tomato plants while in amaranth it was -0.7 to -1.62 (unstressed and -1.62 to -2.68 (stressed. As 3 mM SA increased leaf ψw to values close to the control (unstressed plants. NRA was significantly (p = 0.05 reduced by stress treatment at the LV stage of amaranth, EF stage of tomato and LF stage of both plants. Results: Thus, the reduction of NRA was more pronounced at the reproductive stage of both plants. As 3 mM SA was effective in maintaining NRA at levels similar to the control in both plants. Stress treatment reduced plant height significantly (p = 0.05 at the vegetative stages of both plants and 3 mM was also effective in keeping plant height similar to the control. Though shoot biomass was affected by water stress, SA treatment was not very effective in preserving the biomass during stress. Root biomass of plants was reduced by stress treatment at the reproductive stage and only tomato plants responded positively to 3 mM SA. Proline content was only slightly increased at all stages of growth in stressed plants but 3 mM SA induced a two-fold increase in proline content at the vegetative stage of tomato (EV and LV and significant increases (p = 0.05 at almost

  12. Phylogenetic analysis, structural evolution and functional divergence of the 12-oxo-phytodienoate acid reductase gene family in plants

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    Wang Hongbin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductases (OPRs are enzymes that catalyze the reduction of double-bonds in α, β-unsaturated aldehydes or ketones and are part of the octadecanoid pathway that converts linolenic acid to jasmonic acid. In plants, OPRs belong to the old yellow enzyme family and form multigene families. Although discoveries about this family in Arabidopsis and other species have been reported in some studies, the evolution and function of multiple OPRs in plants are not clearly understood. Results A comparative genomic analysis was performed to investigate the phylogenetic relationship, structural evolution and functional divergence among OPR paralogues in plants. In total, 74 OPR genes were identified from 11 species representing the 6 major green plant lineages: green algae, mosses, lycophytes, gymnosperms, monocots and dicots. Phylogenetic analysis showed that seven well-conserved subfamilies exist in plants. All OPR genes from green algae were clustered into a single subfamily, while those from land plants fell into six other subfamilies, suggesting that the events leading to the expansion of the OPR family occurred in land plants. Further analysis revealed that lineage-specific expansion, especially by tandem duplication, contributed to the current OPR subfamilies in land plants after divergence from aquatic plants. Interestingly, exon/intron structure analysis showed that the gene structures of OPR paralogues exhibits diversity in intron number and length, while the intron positions and phase were highly conserved across different lineage species. These observations together with the phylogenetic tree revealed that successive single intron loss, as well as indels within introns, occurred during the process of structural evolution of OPR paralogues. Functional divergence analysis revealed that altered functional constraints have occurred at specific amino acid positions after diversification of the paralogues

  13. Characterization of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase from Brassica and Lactuca spp. and its modulation during plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichá, Tereza; Činčalová, Lucie; Kopečný, David; Sedlářová, Michaela; Kopečná, Martina; Luhová, Lenka; Petřivalský, Marek

    2016-12-08

    Cellular homeostasis of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), a major cache of nitric oxide bioactivity in plants, is controlled by the NADH-dependent S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) belonging to the family of class III alcohol dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.1). GSNOR is a key regulator of S-nitrosothiol metabolism and is involved in plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. This study was focused on GSNOR from two important crop plants, cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis, BoGSNOR) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa, LsGSNOR). Both purified recombinant GSNORs were characterized in vitro and found to exists as dimers, exhibit high thermal stability and substrate preference towards GSNO, although both enzymes have dehydrogenase activity with a broad range of long-chain alcohols and ω-hydroxy fatty acids in presence of NAD(+). Data on enzyme affinities to their cofactors NADH and NAD(+) obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry suggest the high affinity to NADH might underline the GSNOR capacity to function in the intracellular environment. GSNOR activity and gene expression peak during early developmental stages of lettuce and cauliflower at 20 and 30 days after germination, respectively. GSNOR activity was also measured in four other Lactuca spp. genotypes with different degree of resistance to biotrophic pathogen Bremia lactucae. Higher GSNOR activities were found in non-infected plants of susceptible genotypes L. sativa UCDM2 and L. serriola as compared to resistant genotypes. GSNOR and GSNO were localized by confocal laser scanning microscopy in vascular bundles and in epidermal and parenchymal cells of leaf cross-sections. The presented results bring new insight in the role of GSNOR in the regulation of S-nitrosothiol levels in plant growth and development.

  14. Analysis of the combined effects of lanthanum and acid rain, and their mechanisms, on nitrate reductase transcription in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Binxin; Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2017-04-01

    Rare earth element (REE) pollution and acid rain are major global environmental concerns, and their spatial distributions overlap. Thus, both forms of pollution combine to act on plants. Nitrogen is important for plant growth, and nitrate reductase (NR) is a key plant enzyme that catalyzes nitrogen assimilation. Studying the combined effects of REEs and acid rain on plant nitrogen-based nutrients has important environmental significance. Here, soybean (Glycine max) plants, commonly used for toxicological studies, were exposed to lanthanum (La), a REE, and acid rain to study the NR activities and NR transcriptional levels in the roots. To explain how the pollution affected the NR transcriptional level, we simultaneously observed the contents of intracellular La and nutrient elements, protoplast morphology, membrane lipid peroxidation and intracellular pH. A combined treatment of 0.08mmol/L La and pH 4.5 acid rain increased the NR activity, decreased the NR transcriptional level, increased the intracellular nutrient elements' contents and caused deformations in membrane structures. Other combined treatments significantly decreased the aforementioned parameters and caused serious damage to the membrane structures. The variation in the amplitudes of combined treatments was greater than those of individual treatments. Compared with the control and individual treatments, combined treatments increased membrane permeability, the malondialdehyde content, and intracellular H(+) and La contents, and with an increasing La concentration or acid strength, the change in amplitude increased. Thus, the combined effects on NR gene transcription in soybean seedling roots were related to the intracellular nutrient elements' contents, protoplast morphology, membranous lipid peroxidation, intracellular pH and La content.

  15. IRON REDUCTASE SYSTEMS ON THE PLANT PLASMA-MEMBRANE - A REVIEW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOOG, PR; BRUGGEMANN, W

    1994-01-01

    Higher plant roots, leaf mesophyll tissue, protoplasts as well as green algae are able to reduce extra-cellular ferricyanide and ferric chelates. In roots of dicotyledonous and nongraminaceous, monocotyledonous plants, the rate of ferric reduction is increased by iron deficiency. This reduction is

  16. IRON REDUCTASE SYSTEMS ON THE PLANT PLASMA-MEMBRANE - A REVIEW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOOG, PR; BRUGGEMANN, W

    1994-01-01

    Higher plant roots, leaf mesophyll tissue, protoplasts as well as green algae are able to reduce extra-cellular ferricyanide and ferric chelates. In roots of dicotyledonous and nongraminaceous, monocotyledonous plants, the rate of ferric reduction is increased by iron deficiency. This reduction is a

  17. Fat-to-glucose interconversion by hydrodynamic transfer of two glyoxylate cycle enzyme genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzo F

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The glyoxylate cycle, which is well characterized in higher plants and some microorganisms but not in vertebrates, is able to bypass the citric acid cycle to achieve fat-to-carbohydrate interconversion. In this context, the hydrodynamic transfer of two glyoxylate cycle enzymes, such as isocytrate lyase (ICL and malate synthase (MS, could accomplish the shift of using fat for the synthesis of glucose. Therefore, 20 mice weighing 23.37 ± 0.96 g were hydrodinamically gene transferred by administering into the tail vein a bolus with ICL and MS. After 36 hours, body weight, plasma glucose, respiratory quotient and energy expenditure were measured. The respiratory quotient was increased by gene transfer, which suggests that a higher carbohydrate/lipid ratio is oxidized in such animals. This application could help, if adequate protocols are designed, to induce fat utilization for glucose synthesis, which might be eventually useful to reduce body fat depots in situations of obesity and diabetes.

  18. Disequilibrium of flavonol synthase and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase expression associated tightly to white versus red color flower formation in plants

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    Ping eLuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flower colour is the main character throughout the plant kingdom. Though substantial information exists regarding the structural and regulatory genes involved in anthocyanin and flavonol biosynthesis, little is known that what make a diverse white versus red color flower in natural species. Here, the contents of pigments in seven species from varied phylogenetic location in plants with red and white flowers.were determined. Flavonols could be detected in red and white flowers, but anthocyanins were almost undetectable in the white cultivar. Comparisons of expression patterns of gene related to the flavonoid biosynthesis indicated that disequilibrium expression of flavonol synthase (FLS and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR genes determined the accumulation of flavonols and anothcyanins in both red and white flowers of seven species. To further investigate the role of such common regulatory patterns in determining flower color, FLS genes were isolated from Rosa rugosa (RrFLS1, Prunus persica (PpFLS and Petunia hybrida (PhFLS, and DFR genes were isolated from Rosa rugosa (RrDFR1 and Petunia hybrida (PhDFR. Heterologous expression of the FLS genes within tobacco host plants demonstrated conservation of function, with the transgenes promoting flavonol biosynthesis and inhibiting anthocyanin accumulation, so resulting in white flowers. Conversely, overexpression of DFR genes in tobacco displayed down-regulation of the endogenous NtFLS gene, and the promotion of anthocyanin synthesis. On this basis, we propose a model in which FLS and DFR gene-products compete for common substrates in order to direct the biosynthesis of flavonols and anthocyanins, respectively, thereby determining white versus red coloration of flowers.

  19. Permeability of the peroxisomal membrane: lessons from the glyoxylate cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eKunze

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glyoxylate serves as intermediate in various metabolic pathways, although high concentrations of this metabolite are toxic to the cell. In many organisms glyoxylate is fed into the glyoxylate cycle. Enzymes participating in this metabolism are located on both sides of the peroxisomal membrane. The permeability of this membrane for small metabolites paves the way for exchange of intermediates between proteins catalyzing consecutive reactions. A model, in which soluble enzymes accumulate in close proximity to both ends of pore-like structures forming a transmembrane metabolon could explain the rapid and targeted exchange of intermediates. The metabolites passing the membrane differ between the three model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana and Candida albicans, which reflects the ease of evolutionary adaptation processes whenever specific transporter proteins are not involved. The atypical permeability properties of the peroxisomal membrane together with a flexible structural arrangement ensuring the swift and selective transport across the membrane might represent the molecular basis for the functional versatility of peroxisomes.

  20. Insights into ascorbate regeneration in plants: investigating the redox and structural properties of dehydroascorbate reductases from Populus trichocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallement, Pierre-Alexandre; Roret, Thomas; Tsan, Pascale; Gualberto, José M; Girardet, Jean-Michel; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas; Hecker, Arnaud

    2016-03-15

    Dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs), enzymes belonging to the GST superfamily, catalyse the GSH-dependent reduction of dehydroascorbate into ascorbate in plants. By maintaining a reduced ascorbate pool, they notably participate to H2O2 detoxification catalysed by ascorbate peroxidases (APXs). Despite this central role, the catalytic mechanism used by DHARs is still not well understood and there is no supportive 3D structure. In this context, we have performed a thorough biochemical and structural analysis of the three poplar DHARs and coupled this to the analysis of their transcript expression patterns and subcellular localizations. The transcripts for these genes are mainly detected in reproductive and green organs and the corresponding proteins are expressed in plastids, in the cytosol and in the nucleus, but not in mitochondria and peroxisomes where ascorbate regeneration is obviously necessary. Comparing the kinetic properties and the sensitivity to GSSG-mediated oxidation of DHAR2 and DHAR3A, exhibiting 1 or 3 cysteinyl residues respectively, we observed that the presence of additional cysteines in DHAR3A modifies the regeneration mechanism of the catalytic cysteine by forming different redox states. Finally, from the 3D structure of DHAR3A solved by NMR, we were able to map the residues important for the binding of both substrates (GSH and DHA), showing that DHAR active site is very selective for DHA recognition and providing further insights into the catalytic mechanism and the roles of the additional cysteines found in some DHARs.

  1. Coordinated regulation of ammonium assimilation and carbon catabolism by glyoxylate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A; Rodríguez, L; Folch, J; Soberón, M; Olivera, H

    1987-09-01

    The activities of citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7) and NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) (EC 1.4.1.4) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were inhibited in vitro by glyoxylate. In the presence of glyoxylate, pyruvate and glyoxylate pools increased, suggesting that glyoxylate was efficiently transported and catabolized. Pyruvate accumulation also indicates that citrate synthase was inhibited. A decrease in the glutamate pool was also observed under these conditions. This can be attributed to an increased transamination rate and to the inhibitory effect of glyoxylate on NADP+-dependent GDH. Furthermore, the increase in the ammonium pool in the presence of glyoxylate suggests that NADP+-dependent GDH was being inhibited in vivo, since the activity of glutamine synthetase did not decrease under these conditions. We propose that the inhibition of both citrate synthase and NADP+-dependent GDH could form part of a mechanism that regulates the internal 2-oxoglutarate concentration.

  2. [Molecular characterization of a HMG-CoA reductase gene from a rare and endangered medicinal plant, Dendrobium officinale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Ji-Tao; Zhang, Da-Wei; Zhang, Gang; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2014-03-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate in mavalonic acid pathway, which is the first committed step for isoprenoid biosynthesis in plants. However, it still remains unclear whether HGMR gene plays a role in the isoprenoid biosynthesis in Dendrobium officinale, an endangered epiphytic orchid species. In the present study, a HMGR encoding gene, designed as DoHMGR1 (GenBank accession JX272632), was identified from D. officinale using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) methods, for the first time. The full length cDNA of DoHMGR1 was 2 071 bp in length and encoded a 562-aa protein with a molecular weight of 59.73 kD and an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.18. The deduced DoHMGR1 protein, like other HMGR proteins, constituted four conserved domains (63-561, 147-551, 268-383 and 124-541) and two transmembrane motifs (42-64 and 85-107). Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that DoHMGR1 had high identity (67%-89%) to a number of HMGR genes from various plants and was closely related to Vanda hybrid cultivar, rice and maize monocots. Real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis revealed that DoHMGR1 was expressed in the three included organs. The transcripts were the most abundant in the roots with 2.13 fold over that in the leaves, followed by that in the stems with 1.98 fold. Molecular characterization of DoHMGR1 will be useful for further functional elucidation of the gene involving in isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway in D. officinale.

  3. Plant sterol metabolism. Δ7-Sterol-C5-Desaturase (STE1/DWARF7), Δ5,7-Sterol-Δ7-Reductase (DWARF5) and Δ24-Sterol-Δ24-Reductase (DIMINUTO/DWARF1) show multiple subcellular localizations in Arabidopsis thaliana (Heynh) L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestro, Daniele; Andersen, Tonni Grube; Schaller, Hubert;

    2013-01-01

    to contribute to cellular sterol homeostasis. To further document cellular aspects of sterol biosynthesis in plants, we addressed the question of the subcellular localization of the enzymes implicated in the final steps of the post-squalene biosynthetic pathway. In order to create a clear localization map...... of steroidogenic enzymes in cells, the coding regions of ¿(7)-sterol-C(5)-desaturase (STE1/DWARF7), ¿(24)-sterol-¿(24)-reductase (DIMINUTO/DWARF1) and ¿(5,7)-sterol-¿(7)-reductase (DWARF5) were fused to the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lines deficient...... in the corresponding enzymes. All fusion proteins were found to localize in the endoplasmic reticulum in functionally complemented plants. The results show that both ¿(5,7)-sterol-¿(7)-reductase and ¿(24)-sterol-¿(24)-reductase are in addition localized to the plasma membrane, whereas ¿(7)-sterol-C(5)-desaturase...

  4. Properties of nitrogen fertilization are decisive in determining the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the activity of nitrate reductase in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ranran; Du, Shaoting

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric CO2 is predicted to double by the end of this century. The response of higher plants to an increase in atmospheric CO2 often includes a change in nitrate reductase (NR) activity. In a recent study, we showed that, under elevated CO2 levels, NR induction in low-nitrate plants and NR inhibition in high-nitrate plants are regulated by nitric oxide (NO) generated via nitric oxide synthases. This finding provides an explanation for the diverse responses of plants to elevated CO2 levels, and suggests that the use of nitrogen fertilizers on soil will have a major influence on the nitrogen assimilation capacity of plants in response to CO2 elevation.

  5. The elicitor-inducible alfalfa isoflavone reductase promoter confers different patterns of developmental expression in homologous and heterologous transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, A; Dixon, R A; Paiva, N L

    1994-01-01

    In legumes, the synthesis of infection- and elicitor-inducible antimicrobial phytoalexins occurs via the isoflavonoid branch of the phenylpropanoid pathway. To study transcriptional regulation of isoflavonoid pathway-specific genes, we have isolated the gene encoding isoflavone reductase (IFR), which is the enzyme that catalyzes the penultimate step in the synthesis of the phytoalexin medicarpin in alfalfa. Chimeric gene fusions were constructed between 765- and 436-bp promoter fragments of the IFR gene and the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene and transferred to alfalfa and tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Both promoter fragments conferred elicitor-mediated expression in cell suspension cultures derived from transgenic plants of both species and fungal infection-mediated expression in leaves of transgenic alfalfa. Developmental expression directed by both promoter fragments in transgenic alfalfa was observed only in the root meristem, cortex, and nodules, which is consistent with the accumulation of endogenous IFR transcripts. However, in transgenic tobacco, expression from the 765-bp promoter was observed in vegetative tissues (root meristem and cortex, inner vascular tissue of stems and petioles, leaf tips, and stem peripheries adjacent to petioles) and in reproductive tissues (stigma, placenta, base of the ovary, receptacle, seed, tapetal layer, and pollen grains), whereas the 436-bp promoter was expressed only in fruits, seed, and pollen. These data indicate that infection/elicitor inducibility of the IFR promoter in both species and developmental expression in alfalfa are determined by sequences downstream of position -436, whereas sequences between -436 and -765 confer a complex pattern of strong ectopic developmental expression in the heterologous species that lacks the isoflavonoid pathway. PMID:7866024

  6. Species-specific expansion and molecular evolution of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR gene family in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available The terpene compounds represent the largest and most diverse class of plant secondary metabolites which are important in plant growth and development. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34 is one of the key enzymes contributed to terpene biosynthesis. To better understand the basic characteristics and evolutionary history of the HMGR gene family in plants, a genome-wide analysis of HMGR genes from 20 representative species was carried out. A total of 56 HMGR genes in the 14 land plant genomes were identified, but no genes were found in all 6 algal genomes. The gene structure and protein architecture of all plant HMGR genes were highly conserved. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the plant HMGRs were derived from one ancestor gene and finally developed into four distinct groups, two in the monocot plants and two in dicot plants. Species-specific gene duplications, caused mainly by segmental duplication, led to the limited expansion of HMGR genes in Zea mays, Gossypium raimondii, Populus trichocarpa and Glycine max after the species diverged. The analysis of Ka/Ks ratios and expression profiles indicated that functional divergence after the gene duplications was restricted. The results suggested that the function and evolution of HMGR gene family were dramatically conserved throughout the plant kingdom.

  7. Disulfide bond formation and folding of plant peroxidases expressed as inclusion body protein in Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase negative strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, K; Ostergaard, L; Welinder, K G

    1999-01-01

    and the vector/host combination. The choice of E. coli strain in particular affects the yield of active peroxidase obtained in the folding step. Thus, the yield of active ATP N peroxidase can be increased 50-fold by using thioredoxin reductase negative strains, which facilitate the formation of disulfide bonds...

  8. Plant sterol metabolism. Δ(7-Sterol-C5-desaturase (STE1/DWARF7, Δ(5,7-sterol-Δ(7-reductase (DWARF5 and Δ(24-sterol-Δ(24-reductase (DIMINUTO/DWARF1 show multiple subcellular localizations in Arabidopsis thaliana (Heynh L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Silvestro

    Full Text Available Sterols are crucial lipid components that regulate membrane permeability and fluidity and are the precursors of bioactive steroids. The plant sterols exist as three major forms, free sterols, steryl glycosides and steryl esters. The storage of steryl esters in lipid droplets has been shown to contribute to cellular sterol homeostasis. To further document cellular aspects of sterol biosynthesis in plants, we addressed the question of the subcellular localization of the enzymes implicated in the final steps of the post-squalene biosynthetic pathway. In order to create a clear localization map of steroidogenic enzymes in cells, the coding regions of Δ(7-sterol-C(5-desaturase (STE1/DWARF7, Δ(24-sterol-Δ(24-reductase (DIMINUTO/DWARF1 and Δ(5,7-sterol-Δ(7-reductase (DWARF5 were fused to the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP and transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lines deficient in the corresponding enzymes. All fusion proteins were found to localize in the endoplasmic reticulum in functionally complemented plants. The results show that both Δ(5,7-sterol-Δ(7-reductase and Δ(24-sterol-Δ(24-reductase are in addition localized to the plasma membrane, whereas Δ(7-sterol-C(5-desaturase was clearly detected in lipid particles. These findings raise new challenging questions about the spatial and dynamic cellular organization of sterol biosynthesis in plants.

  9. [Nitrogenase, hydrogenase and nitrate reductase activities, oxygen consumption, and ATP content in nodules formed by strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum 128C53 and 300 in symbiosis with pea plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedmar, E J; Olivares, J

    1986-10-01

    The nitrogenase activity, nitrate reductase activity and oxygen uptake as well as the hydrogen incorporation and ATP content were examined in the root nodules and bacteroids, respectively, formed by Rhizobium leguminosarum strains 128C53 (hydrogenase positive) and 300 (hydrogenase negative) in symbiosis with Pisum sativum plants grown in the presence of 2 mM KNO3. The strain 128C53 showed the greatest values for all parameters analyzed, except for the nitrate reductase activity, which was higher for the strain 300. Similarly, nodule nitrate reductase activity in strain 300 was greater than that in strain 128C53 when plants grew in the absence of combined nitrogen. In general, the highest values were obtained when determinations were made after 7 hours of plant illumination. However, the hydrogenase activity of strain 128C53 and the nitrate reductase activities of both strains increased with the light period, reaching a maximum after 14 hours of illumination. These results suggest that the benefits derived from the superior symbiotic properties and from the presence of hydrogenase activity in strain 128C53 could be counteracted by the higher rates of the nodule nitrate reductase activity in strain 300.

  10. Nitrate Reductase: Properties and Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitrate Reductase (NR) is a rating-limit and key enzyme of nitrate assimilation in plants ,so ,NR activity is important for growth,development and the dry matter accumulation of plants. The regulation of NR activity appears to be rather complex and many studies have been devoted to the description of regulation and properties,but in this paper we focus on the properties and regulation of NR in higher plants.

  11. Generation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate from acetate in higher plants: Detection of acetoacetyl CoA reductase- and PHB synthase- activities in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Hirohisa; Shiraki, Mari; Inoue, Eri; Saito, Terumi

    2016-08-20

    It has been reported that Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is generated from acetate in the rice root. However, no information is available about the biosynthetic pathway of PHB from acetate in plant cells. In the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 (R. eutropha), PHB is synthesized from acetyl CoA by the consecutive reaction of three enzymes: β-ketothiolase (EC: 2.3.1.9), acetoacetyl CoA reductase (EC: 1.1.1.36) and PHB synthase (EC: 2.3.1.-). Thus, in this study, we examined whether the above three enzymatic activities were also detected in rice seedlings. The results clearly showed that the activities of the above three enzymes were all detected in rice. In particular, the PHB synthase activity was detected specifically in the sonicated particulate fractions (2000g 10min precipitate (ppt) and the 8000g 30min ppt) of rice roots and leaves. In addition to these enzyme activities, several new experimental results were obtained on PHB synthesis in higher plants: (a) (14)C-PHB generated from 2-(14)C-acetate was mainly localized in the 2000g 10min ppt and the 8000g 30min ppt of rice root. (b) Addition of acetate (0.1-10mM) to culture medium of rice seedlings did not increase the content of PHB in the rice root or leaf. (c) In addition to C3 plants, PHB was generated from acetate in a C4 plant (corn) and in a CAM plant (Bryophyllum pinnatum). d) Washing with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) strongly suggested that the PHB synthesized from acetate was of plant origin and was not bacterial contamination.

  12. Cell organelles from crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) plants : I. Enzymes in isolated peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, M; Burkhard, C; Schnarrenberger, C

    1978-01-01

    Cell organelles were isolated from the CAM plants Crassula lycopodioides Lam., Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Sedum rubrotinctum R.T. Clausen by isopycnic centrifugation in sucrose gradients. The inclusion of 2.5% Ficoll in the grinding medium proved to be essential for a satisfactory separation of cell organelles during the subsequent centrifugation. Peroxisomes, mitochondria, and whole and broken chloroplasts were at least partially resolved as judged by marker-enzyme-activity profiles. The isolated peroxisomes contained activities of glycollate oxidase, catalase, hydroxypyruvate reductase, glycine aminotransferase, serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase, comparable to activities found in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf peroxisomes. In contrast to spinach, however, only little, if any, particulate malate dehydrogenase activity could be attributed to isolated peroxisomes of the three CAM plants.

  13. Protein Homeostasis Defects of Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase: New Therapeutic Strategies in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel L. Pey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase catalyzes the transamination between L-alanine and glyoxylate to produce pyruvate and glycine using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP as cofactor. Human alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme expressed in the hepatocytes, the main site of glyoxylate detoxification. Its deficit causes primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare but severe inborn error of metabolism. Single amino acid changes are the main type of mutation causing this disease, and considerable effort has been dedicated to the understanding of the molecular consequences of such missense mutations. In this review, we summarize the role of protein homeostasis in the basic mechanisms of primary hyperoxaluria. Intrinsic physicochemical properties of polypeptide chains such as thermodynamic stability, folding, unfolding, and misfolding rates as well as the interaction of different folding states with protein homeostasis networks are essential to understand this disease. The view presented has important implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies based on targeting specific elements of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase homeostasis.

  14. Plant sterol metabolism. Δ7-Sterol-C5-Desaturase (STE1/DWARF7), Δ5,7-Sterol-Δ7-Reductase (DWARF5) and Δ24-Sterol-Δ24-Reductase (DIMINUTO/DWARF1) show multiple subcellular localizations in Arabidopsis thaliana (Heynh) L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestro, Daniele; Andersen, Tonni Grube; Schaller, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Sterols are crucial lipid components that regulate membrane permeability and fluidity and are the precursors of bioactive steroids. The plant sterols exist as three major forms, free sterols, steryl glycosides and steryl esters. The storage of steryl esters in lipid droplets has been shown...... to contribute to cellular sterol homeostasis. To further document cellular aspects of sterol biosynthesis in plants, we addressed the question of the subcellular localization of the enzymes implicated in the final steps of the post-squalene biosynthetic pathway. In order to create a clear localization map...... of steroidogenic enzymes in cells, the coding regions of ¿(7)-sterol-C(5)-desaturase (STE1/DWARF7), ¿(24)-sterol-¿(24)-reductase (DIMINUTO/DWARF1) and ¿(5,7)-sterol-¿(7)-reductase (DWARF5) were fused to the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lines deficient...

  15. The Gene Encoding Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase Is a Candidate for the anthocyaninless Locus of Rapid Cycling Brassica rapa (Fast Plants Type).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendell, Douglas L; Vaziri, Anoumid; Shergill, Gurbaksh

    2016-01-01

    Rapid cycling Brassica rapa, also known as Wisconsin Fast Plants, are a widely used organism in both K-12 and college science education. They are an excellent system for genetics laboratory instruction because it is very easy to conduct genetic crosses with this organism, there are numerous seed stocks with variation in both Mendelian and quantitative traits, they have a short generation time, and there is a wealth of educational materials for instructors using them. Their main deficiency for genetics education is that none of the genetic variation in RCBr has yet been characterized at the molecular level. Here we present the first molecular characterization of a gene responsible for a trait in Fast Plants. The trait under study is purple/nonpurple variation due to the anthocyaninless locus, which is one of the Mendelian traits most frequently used for genetics education with this organism. We present evidence that the DFR gene, which encodes dihyroflavonol 4-reductase, is the candidate gene for the anthocyaninless (ANL) locus in RCBr. DFR shows complete linkage with ANL in genetic crosses with a total of 948 informative chromosomes, and strains with the recessive nonpurple phenotype have a transposon-related insertion in the DFR which is predicted to disrupt gene function.

  16. S-nitrosoglutathione reductases are low-copy number, cysteine-rich proteins in plants that control multiple developmental and defense responses in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengbao eXu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR is believed to modulate effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species through catabolism of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO. We combined bioinformatics of plant GSNOR genes, localization of GSNOR in Arabidopsis thaliana, and microarray analysis of a GSNOR null mutant to gain insights into the function and regulation of this critical enzyme in nitric oxide homeostasis. GSNOR-encoding genes are known to have high homology across diverse eukaryotic taxa, but contributions of specific conserved residues have not been assessed. With bioinformatics and structural modeling, we show that plant GSNORs likely localize to the cytosol, contain conserved, solvent-accessible cysteines, and tend to be encoded by a single gene. Arabidopsis thaliana homozygous for GSNOR loss-of-function alleles exhibited defects in stem and trichome branching, and complementation with GFP-tagged GSNOR under control of the native promoter quantitatively rescued these phenotypes. GSNOR-GFP showed fluorescence throughout Arabidopsis seedlings, consistent with ubiquitous expression of the protein, but with especially high fluorescence in the root tip, apical meristem and flowers. At the cellular level we observed cytosolic and nuclear fluorescence, with exclusion from the nucleolus. Microarray analysis identified 99 up- and 170 downregulated genes (≥2-fold; p ≤ 0.01 in a GSNOR null mutant compared to wild type. Six members of the plant specific, ROXY glutaredoxins and three BHLH transcription factors involved in iron homeostasis were strongly upregulated, supporting a role for GSNOR in redox and iron metabolism. One third of downregulated genes are linked to pathogen resistance, providing further basis for the reported pathogen sensitivity of GSNOR null mutants. Together, these findings indicate GSNOR regulates multiple developmental and metabolic programs in plants and offer insight into putative routes of post-translational GSNOR regulation.

  17. Overexpression of isocitrate lyase-glyoxylate bypass influence on metabolism in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijer, Susan Lisette; Otero, José Manuel; Olivares Hernandez, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    glyoxylate would increase, leading to excess formation of malate and succinate compared to the wild-type. However, metabolic network analysis showed that an increased icl expression did not result in an increased glyoxylate bypass flux. The analysis did show a global response with respect to gene expression......In order to improve the production of succinate and malate by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger the activity of the glyoxylate bypass pathway was increased by over-expression of the isocitrate lyase (icl) gene. The hypothesis was that when isocitrate lyase was up-regulated the flux towards......, leading to an increased flux through the oxidative part of the TCA cycle. Instead of an increased production of succinate and malate, a major increase in fumarate production was observed. The effect of malonate, a competitive inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), on the physiological behaviour...

  18. Multiple adaptive losses of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase mitochondrial targeting in fruit-eating bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Huihui; Yuan, Xinpu; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zhang, Shuyi

    2012-06-01

    The enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT) functions to detoxify glyoxylate before it is converted into harmful oxalate. In mammals, mitochondrial targeting of AGT in carnivorous species versus peroxisomal targeting in herbivores is controlled by two signal peptides that correspond to these respective organelles. Differential expression of the mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) is considered an adaptation to diet-specific subcellular localization of glyoxylate precursors. Bats are an excellent group in which to study adaptive changes in dietary enzymes; they show unparalleled mammalian dietary diversification as well as independent origins of carnivory, frugivory, and nectarivory. We studied the AGT gene in bats and other mammals with diverse diets and found that the MTS has been lost in unrelated lineages of frugivorous bats. Conversely, species exhibiting piscivory, carnivory, insectivory, and sanguinivory possessed intact MTSs. Detected positive selection in the AGT of ancestral fruit bats further supports adaptations related to evolutionary changes in diet.

  19. Influence of nitrate on oxalate- and glyoxylate-dependent growth and acetogenesis by Moorella thermoacetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifritz, Corinna; Fröstl, Jürgen M; Drake, Harold L; Daniel, Steven L

    2002-12-01

    Oxalate and glyoxylate supported growth and acetate synthesis by Moorella thermoacetica in the presence of nitrate under basal (without yeast extract) culture conditions. In oxalate cultures, acetate formation occurred concomitant with growth and nitrate was reduced in the stationary phase. Growth in the presence of [(14)C]bicarbonate or [(14)C]oxalate showed that CO(2) reduction to acetate and biomass or oxalate oxidation to CO(2) was not affected by nitrate. However, cells engaged in oxalate-dependent acetogenesis in the presence of nitrate lacked a membranous b-type cytochrome, which was present in cells grown in the absence of nitrate. In glyoxylate cultures, growth was coupled to nitrate reduction and acetate was formed in the stationary phase after nitrate was totally consumed. In the absence of nitrate, glyoxylate-grown cells incorporated less CO(2) into biomass than oxalate-grown cells. CO(2) conversion to biomass by glyoxylate-grown cells decreased when cells were grown in the presence of nitrate. These results suggest that: (1) oxalate-grown cells prefer CO(2) as an electron sink and bypass the nitrate block on the acetyl-CoA pathway at the level of reductant flow and (2) glyoxylate-grown cells prefer nitrate as an electron sink and bypass the nitrate block of the acetyl-CoA pathway by assimilating carbon via an unknown process that supplements or replaces the acetyl-CoA pathway. In this regard, enzymes of known pathways for the assimilation of two-carbon compounds were not detected in glyoxylate- or oxalate-grown cells.

  20. Characterization of a bifunctional glyoxylate cycle enzyme, malate synthase/isocitrate lyase, of Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masami; Nishimura, Masaaki; Inoue, Kengo; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Inui, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    The glyoxylate cycle is a modified form of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which enables organisms to synthesize carbohydrates from C2 compounds. In the protozoan Euglena gracilis, the key enzyme activities of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS), are conferred by a single bifunctional protein named glyoxylate cycle enzyme (Euglena gracilis glyoxylate cycle enzyme [EgGCE]). We analyzed the enzymatic properties of recombinant EgGCE to determine the functions of its different domains. The 62-kDa N-terminal domain of EgGCE was sufficient to provide the MS activity as expected from an analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence. In contrast, expression of the 67-kDa C-terminal domain of EgGCE failed to yield ICL activity even though this domain was structurally similar to ICL family enzymes. Analyses of truncation mutants suggested that the N-terminal residues of EgGCE are critical for both the ICL and MS activities. The ICL activity of EgGCE increased in the presence of micro-molar concentrations of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Acetyl-CoA also increased the activity in a mutant type EgGCE with a mutation at the acetyl-CoA binding site in the MS domain of EgGCE. This suggests that acetyl-CoA regulates the ICL reaction by binding to a site other than the catalytic center of the MS reaction.

  1. Monodehydroascorbate reductase gene, regulated by the wheat PN-2013 miRNA, contributes to adult wheat plant resistance to stripe rust through ROS metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hao; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Qiong; Fu, Yanping; Feng, Chuanxin; Wang, Bing; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2014-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most destructive wheat diseases worldwide. Varieties with adult plant resistance (APR) maintain effective and durable disease resistance. APR to stripe rust in wheat cultivar XZ9104 (XZ) is associated with extensive hypersensitive cell death and production of reactive oxygen species in the host. MDHAR is an important gene in the AsA-GSH cycle, and it plays an important role in maintaining the reduced pool of AsA scavenging hydrogen peroxide. microRNAs (miRNAs) were shown to engage in post-transcriptional regulation by degrading target mRNAs or repressing gene translation in plants responding to abiotic/biotic stresses. Previously, two novel miRNAs (1136-P3 and PN-2013) were isolated in wheat and the target gene of them was determined using degradome sequencing technology. In this study, the target gene was isolated and characterized as TaMDHAR, a monodehydroascorbate reductase gene. We first demonstrated that the target gene could be cleaved by these two miRNAs in tobacco leaves experimentally. However, TaMDHAR was regulated by PN-2013, not 1136-P3, in wheat-Pst adult incompatible interaction according to the expression patterns. The TaMDHAR knockdown resulted in improved wheat resistance to Pst at the seedling stage, with no influence on 1136-P3 and PN-2013 expression. The TaMDHAR knockdown resulted in a much greater H2O2 accumulation and lower APX and CAT activities together with higher expression in several PR genes. We deduced that TaMDHAR could contribute to the APR of XZ through ROS metabolism as regulated by the AsA-GSH cycle.

  2. Spectral, thermal and X-ray studies on some new bis-hydrazine metal glyoxylates and bis-hydrazine mixed metal glyoxylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikram, L. [Department of Chemistry, Government Arts College, Ooty, The Nilgiris, Udhagamandalam 643002 (India); Sivasankar, B.N. [Department of Chemistry, Government Arts College, Ooty, The Nilgiris, Udhagamandalam 643002 (India)]. E-mail: sivabickol@yahoo.com

    2007-01-01

    Bis-hydrazine complexes of metal glyoxylates and mixed metal glyoxylates of 3d-metal ions of the formula M(OOCCHO){sub 2}(N{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, where M = Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn or Cd and M{sub 1/3}Co{sub 2/3}(OOCCHO){sub 2}(N{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, where M = Mg, Mn, Ni, Zn or Cd, respectively, have been prepared and studied. The compositions of the complexes have been determined by chemical analyses. The magnetic moments and electronic spectra suggest a high-spin octahedral geometry for the metal complexes. Infrared spectral data indicate the bidentate bridging by hydrazine molecules and monodentate coordination by glyoxylate ions in both the metal and mixed metal compounds. Thermogravimetry and differential thermal analyses in air have been used to study the thermal behaviour of the complexes. The simultaneous TG-DTA traces of all the complexes show multi-step deg.radation and the final products are found to be the respective metal oxides in the case of metal complexes and metal cobaltites in the case of mixed metal complexes. The final residues were identified by their X-ray powder diffraction patterns. X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the complexes including mixed metal complexes are almost superimposable with in each of the series indicating isomorphism. The metal cobaltites MCo{sub 2}O{sub 4}, where M = Mg, Mn, Ni, Zn or Cd were also prepared by decomposing the respective mixed metal complex in a pre-heated silica crucible at about 300 deg. C, and their identities were confirmed by chemical analyses, infrared spectra and X-ray powder diffraction.

  3. Subcellular localization and expression of multiple tomato gamma-aminobutyrate transaminases that utilize both pyruvate and glyoxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Shawn M; Di Leo, Rosa; Van Cauwenberghe, Owen R; Mullen, Robert T; Shelp, Barry J

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) catalyses the breakdown of GABA to succinic semialdehyde. In this report, three GABA-T isoforms were identified in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plant. The deduced amino acid sequences of the three isoforms are highly similar over most of their coding regions with the exception of their N-terminal regions. Transient expression of the individual full-length GABA-T isoforms fused to the green fluorescent protein in tobacco suspension-cultured cells revealed their distinct subcellular localizations to the mitochondrion, plastid or cytosol, and that the specific targeting of the mitochondrion- and plastid-localized isoforms is mediated by their predicted N-terminal presequences. Removal of the N-terminal targeting presequences from the mitochondrion and plastid GABA-T isoforms yielded good recovery of the soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli when they were co-expressed with the GroES/EL molecular chaperone complex. Activity assays indicated that all three recombinant isoforms possess both pyruvate- and glyoxylate-dependent GABA-T activities, although the mitochondrial enzyme has a specific activity that is significantly higher than that of its plastid and cytosolic counterparts. Finally, differential expression patterns of the three GABA-T isoforms in reproductive tissues, but not vegetative tissues, suggest unique roles for each enzyme in developmental processes. Overall, these findings, together with recent information about rice and pepper GABA-Ts, indicate that the subcellular distribution of GABA-T in the plant kingdom is highly variable.

  4. Glyoxylate carboligase lacks the canonical active site glutamate of thiamine-dependent enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplun, Alexander; Binshtein, Elad; Vyazmensky, Maria; Steinmetz, Andrea; Barak, Ze'ev; Chipman, David M; Tittmann, Kai; Shaanan, Boaz

    2008-02-01

    Thiamine diphosphate (ThDP), a derivative of vitamin B1, is an enzymatic cofactor whose special chemical properties allow it to play critical mechanistic roles in a number of essential metabolic enzymes. It has been assumed that all ThDP-dependent enzymes exploit a polar interaction between a strictly conserved glutamate and the N1' of the ThDP moiety. The crystal structure of glyoxylate carboligase challenges this paradigm by revealing that valine replaces the conserved glutamate. Through kinetic, spectroscopic and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we show that although this extreme change lowers the rate of the initial step of the enzymatic reaction, it ensures efficient progress through subsequent steps. Glyoxylate carboligase thus provides a unique illustration of the fine tuning between catalytic stages imposed during evolution on enzymes catalyzing multistep processes.

  5. Hydrolysis of chickpea proteins with Flavourzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose gels improves functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Mar Yust, María; del Carmen Millán-Linares, María; Alcaide-Hidalgo, Juan María; Millán, Francisco; Pedroche, Justo

    2013-06-01

    Chickpea protein isolate was hydrolyzed using Flavourzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose beads by multipoint covalent attachment. This Flavourzyme-glyoxyl derivative, produced after 1 h of immobilization at 4 °C followed by 5.5 h at room temperature, presented approximately 51% of the endoprotease activity of Flavourzyme but was around 700 times more stable than soluble enzyme. Chickpea protein hydrolysates ranging from 1% to 10% degree of hydrolysis were produced and their chemical composition was very close to that of protein isolate used as starting material. Solubility, oil absorption, emulsifying activity and stability, and foaming capacity and stability were determined. All protein hydrolysates showed higher solubility than intact proteins, especially at pHs near isoelectric point of native chickpea proteins. Moreover, all hydrolysates had better functional properties, except emulsifying activity, than the original protein isolate.

  6. The glyoxylate pathway contributes to enhanced extracellular electron transfer in yeast-based biofuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenova, Yolina; Hubenova, Eleonora; Slavcheva, Evelina; Mitov, Mario

    2017-08-01

    This study provides a new insight into our understanding of yeast response to starvation conditions (sole acetate as carbon source) and applied polarization and offers important information about the role of the glyoxylate cycle in the carbohydrate synthesis and extracellular charge transfer processes in biofuel cells. The biosynthetic capabilities of yeast C. melibiosica 2491 and the up/down-regulation of the glyoxylate cycle are evaluated by modifying the cellular metabolism by feedback inhibition or carbohydrate presence and establishing the malate dehydrogenase activity and carbohydrate content together with the electric charge passed through bioelectrochemical system. 10mM malate leads to a decrease of the produced quantity of electricity with ca. 55%. At the same time, 24-times lower intracellular malate dehydrogenase activity is established. At polarization conditions the glyoxylate pathway is up-regulated and huge amount of malate is intra-converted into oxaloacetate. The yeasts are able to synthesize carbohydrates from acetate and a part of them is used for the electricity generation. It is recognized that the enhanced charge transfer in acetate fed yeast-based biofuel cell is implemented by secreted endogenous mediator and changes in the cellular surface redox activity depending on the addition of carbohydrate in the medium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Glyoxylate cycle and metabolism of organic acids in the scutellum of barley seeds during germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhenguo; Marsolais, Frédéric; Bernards, Mark A; Sumarah, Mark W; Bykova, Natalia V; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2016-07-01

    During the developmental processes from dry seeds to seedling establishment, the glyoxylate cycle becomes active in the mobilization of stored oils in the scutellum of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seeds, as indicated by the activities of isocitrate lyase and malate synthase. The succinate produced is converted to carbohydrates via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and to amino acids via aminotransferases, while free organic acids may participate in acidifying the endosperm tissue, releasing stored starch into metabolism. The abundant organic acid in the scutellum was citrate, while malate concentration declined during the first three days of germination, and succinate concentration was low both in scutellum and endosperm. Malate was more abundant in endosperm tissue during the first three days of germination; before citrate became predominant, indicating that malate may be the main acid acidifying the endosperm. The operation of the glyoxylate cycle coincided with an increase in the ATP/ADP ratio, a buildup of H2O2 and changes in the redox state of ascorbate and glutathione. It is concluded that operation of the glyoxylate cycle in the scutellum of cereals may be important not only for conversion of fatty acids to carbohydrates, but also for the acidification of endosperm and amino acid synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The induction of microsomal NADPH:cytochrome P450 and NADH:cytochrome b(5) reductases by long-term salt treatment of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankova, Liliana; Ivanov, Sergei; Alexieva, Vera

    2007-09-01

    We studied the effect of salinity on the activity of microsomal NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR, EC 1.6.2.4) and NADH:ferricytochrome b(5) oxidoreductase (B5R, EC 1.6.2.2) in two dicotyledonous plant species differing in their sensitivity to salt, cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Ogosta) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Dobrujanski 7). A significant inhibition of fresh weight of salt-treated bean plants was observed, while cotton was affected to a much lesser degree. NaCl application resulted in a significant increase in the activity of both reductases, but was more pronounced in salt-tolerant cotton. We suppose that alterations in B5R and CPR activities may be targeted to the maintenance of membrane lipids. Most probably, plants use both enzymes (B5R and CPR) and their respective electron donors (NADH and NADPH) to reduce cytochrome b(5), which can donate reducing equivalents to a series of lipid-modification reactions such as desaturation and hydroxylation.

  9. Use of the modified viral satellite DNA vector to silence mineral nutrition-related genes in plants: silencing of the tomato ferric chelate reductase gene, FRO1, as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is potentially an attractive reverse-genetics tool for studies of plant gene function, but whether it is effective in silencing mineral nutritional-related genes in roots has not been demonstrated. Here we report on an efficient VIGS system that functions in tomato roots using a modified viral satellite DNA (DNAmβ) associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV). A cDNA fragment of the ferric chelate reductase gene (FRO1) from tomato was inserted into the DNAmβ vector. Tomato roots agro-inoculated with DNAmβ carrying both a fragment of FRO1 and TYLCCNV used as a helper virus exhibited a significant reduction at the FRO1 mRNA level. As a consequence, ferric chelate reductase activity, as determined by visualization of the pink FeBPDS3 complex was significantly decreased. Our results clearly demonstrated that VIGS system can be employed to investigate gene function associated with plant nutrient uptake in roots.

  10. Use of the modified viral satellite DNA vector to silence mineral nutrition-related genes in plants: silencing of the tomato ferric chelate reductase gene, FRO1, as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE XiuXia; JIN ChongWei; LI GuiXin; YOU GuangYi; ZHOU XuePing; ZHENG ShaoJian

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is potentially an attractive reverse-genetics tool for studies of plant gene function, but whether it is effective in silencing mineral nutritional-related genes in roots has not been demonstrated. Here we report on an efficient VIGS system that functions in tomato roots using a modified viral satellite DNA (DNAmβ) associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV). A cDNA fragment of the ferric chelate reductase gene (FRO1) from tomato was inserted into the DNAmβ vector. Tomato roots agro-inoculated with DNAmβ carrying both a fragment of FRO1 and TYLCCNV used as a helper virus exhibited a significant reduction at the FRO1 mRNA level. As a consequence, ferric chelate reductase activity, as determined by visualization of the pink FeBPDS3complex was significantly decreased. Our results clearly demonstrated that VIGS system can be employed to investigate gene function associated with plant nutrient uptake in roots.

  11. Loss of alpha-tocopherol in tobacco plants with decreased geranylgeranyl reductase activity does not modify photosynthesis in optimal growth conditions but increases sensitivity to high-light stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasses, T; Grimm, B; Koroleva, O; Jahns, P

    2001-08-01

    The enzyme geranylgeranyl reductase (CHL P) catalyses the reduction of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to phytyl diphosphate in higher-plant chloroplasts and provides phytol for both chlorophyll (Chl) and tocopherol synthesis. The reduction in CHL P activity in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants is accompanied by the reduction in total Chl and tocopherol content and the accumulation of geranylgeranylated Chl (ChlGG). The photosynthetic performance and the susceptibility to photo-oxidative stress have been investigated in these transgenic plants. The reduced total Chl content in Chl P antisense plants resulted in the reduction of electron transport chains per leaf area without a concomitant effect on the stoichiometry, composition and activity of both photosystems. However, Chl P antisense plants were much more sensitive to light stress. Analyses of Chl fluorescence quenching indicated an increased photoinhibitory quenching at the expense of the pH-dependent fluorescence quenching after short illumination (15 min) at moderate light intensities. Prolonged illumination (up to 1 h) at saturating light intensities induced an increased photoinactivation from which the Chl P antisense plants could not recover or could only partially recover during a subsequent low light phase. Our data imply that the presence of ChlGG has no influence on harvesting and transfer of light energy in either photosystem. However, the reduced tocopherol content of the thylakoid membrane is a limiting factor for defensive reactions to photo-oxidative stress.

  12. Glyoxyl-disulfide agarose: a tailor-made support for site-directed rigidification of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Cesar A; de las Rivas, Blanca; Grazú, Valeria; Montes, Tamara; Guisán, José Manuel; López-Gallego, Fernando

    2011-05-09

    A new strategy has been developed for site-directed immobilization/rigidification of genetically modified enzymes through multipoint covalent attachment on bifunctional disulfide-glyoxyl supports. Here the mechanism is described as a two-step immobilization/rigidification protocol where the enzyme is directly immobilized by thiol-disulfide exchange between the β-thiol of the single genetically introduced cysteine and the few disulfide groups presented on the support surface (3 μmol/g). Afterward, the enzyme is uniquely rigidified by multipoint covalent attachment (MCA) between the lysine residues in the vicinity of the introduced cysteine and the many glyoxyl groups (220 μmol/g) on the support surface. Both site-directed immobilization and rigidification have been possible only on these novel bifunctional supports. In fact, this technology has made possible to elucidate the protein regions where rigidification by MCA promoted higher protein stabilizations. Hence, rigidification of vicinity of position 333 from lipase 2 from Geobacillus thermocatenulatus (BTL2) promoted a stabilization factor of 33 regarding the unipunctual site-directed immobilized derivative. In the same context, rigidification of penicillin G acylase from E. coli (PGA) through position β201 resulted in a stabilization factor of 1069. Remarkably, when PGA was site-directed rigidified through that position, it presented a half-life time of 140 h under 60% (v/v) of dioxane and 4 °C, meaning a derivative eight times more stable than the PGA randomly immobilized on glyoxyl-disulfide agarose. Herein we have opened a new scenario to optimize the stabilization of proteins via multipoint covalent immobilization, which may represent a breakthrough in tailor-made tridimensional rigidification of proteins.

  13. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao (NYMEDCO)

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  14. Production of tartrates by cyanide-mediated dimerization of glyoxylate: a potential abiotic pathway to the citric acid cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butch, Christopher; Cope, Elizabeth D; Pollet, Pamela; Gelbaum, Leslie; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Liotta, Charles L

    2013-09-11

    An abiotic formation of meso- and DL-tartrates in 80% yield via the cyanide-catalyzed dimerization of glyoxylate under alkaline conditions is demonstrated. A detailed mechanism for this conversion is proposed, supported by NMR evidence and (13)C-labeled reactions. Simple dehydration of tartrates to oxaloacetate and an ensuing decarboxylation to form pyruvate are known processes that provide a ready feedstock for entry into the citric acid cycle. While glyoxylate and high hydroxide concentration are atypical in the prebiotic literature, there is evidence for natural, abiotic availability of each. It is proposed that this availability, coupled with the remarkable efficiency of tartrate production from glyoxylate, merits consideration of an alternative prebiotic pathway for providing constituents of the citric acid cycle.

  15. Camphene, a Plant-Derived Monoterpene, Reduces Plasma Cholesterol and Triglycerides in Hyperlipidemic Rats Independently of HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Peroulis, Nikolaos; Pantazis, Panayotis; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Background Central to the pathology of coronary heart disease is the accumulation of lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides, within the intima of arterial blood vessels. The search for drugs to treat dislipidemia, remains a major pharmaceutical focus. In this study, we evaluated the hypolipidemic properties of the essential oil from Chios mastic gum (MGO). Methodology/Principal Findings The hypolipidemic effect of MGO was investigated in naïve as well as in rats susceptible to detergent-induced hyperlipidemia. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined using commercial kits. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase activity was measured in HepG2 cell extracts using a radioactive assay; cellular cholesterol and cholesterol esters were assessed using gas chromatography. MGO administration into naïve rats resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the constitutive synthesis of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. In hyperlipidemic rats, MGO treatment had also a strong hypolipidemic effect. By testing various components of MGO, we show for the first time that the hypolipidemic action is associated with camphene. Administration of camphene at a dose of 30 µg/gr of body weight in hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a 54.5% reduction of total cholesterol (p<0.001), 54% of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (p<0.001) and 34.5% of triglycerides (p<0.001). Treatment of HepG2 cells with camphene led to a decrease in cellular cholesterol content to the same extend as mevinolin, a known HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. The hypolipidemic action of camphene is independent of HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. Conclusions Given the critical role that the control of hyperlipidemia plays in cardiovascular disease, the results of our study provide insights into the use of camphene as an alternative lipid lowering agent

  16. Camphene, a plant-derived monoterpene, reduces plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in hyperlipidemic rats independently of HMG-CoA reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Peroulis, Nikolaos; Pantazis, Panayotis; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Central to the pathology of coronary heart disease is the accumulation of lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides, within the intima of arterial blood vessels. The search for drugs to treat dislipidemia, remains a major pharmaceutical focus. In this study, we evaluated the hypolipidemic properties of the essential oil from Chios mastic gum (MGO). The hypolipidemic effect of MGO was investigated in naïve as well as in rats susceptible to detergent-induced hyperlipidemia. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined using commercial kits. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase activity was measured in HepG2 cell extracts using a radioactive assay; cellular cholesterol and cholesterol esters were assessed using gas chromatography. MGO administration into naïve rats resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the constitutive synthesis of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. In hyperlipidemic rats, MGO treatment had also a strong hypolipidemic effect. By testing various components of MGO, we show for the first time that the hypolipidemic action is associated with camphene. Administration of camphene at a dose of 30 µg/gr of body weight in hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a 54.5% reduction of total cholesterol (pcholesterol (ptriglycerides (pcholesterol content to the same extend as mevinolin, a known HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. The hypolipidemic action of camphene is independent of HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. Given the critical role that the control of hyperlipidemia plays in cardiovascular disease, the results of our study provide insights into the use of camphene as an alternative lipid lowering agent and merits further evaluation.

  17. Covalent attachment of lipases on glyoxyl-agarose beads: application in fruit flavor and biodiesel synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Adriano A; de Castro, Heizir F; Giordano, Raquel L C

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare biocatalysts to catalyze the synthesis of butyl butyrate by esterification reaction, and the synthesis of biodiesel by transesterification of palm and babassu oils with ethanol. Lipase preparations Lipolase® (TLL1) and Lipex® 100 L (TLL2) from Thermomyces lanuginosus and Lipase AK from Pseudomonas fluorescens (PFL) were immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose beads prepared by activation with glycidol (Gly) and epichlorohydrin (Epi). The influence of immobilization time, lipase source and activating agents on the catalytic activity of the biocatalysts were evaluated in both aqueous and organic media. TLL1 immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose by 24 h of incubation resulted biocatalysts with high hydrolytic activity (varying from 1347.3 to 1470.0 IU/g of support) and thermal-stability, around 300-fold more stable than crude TLL1 extract. The maximum load of immobilized TLL1 was around 20 mg of protein/g of support. The biocatalyst prepared exhibited high activity and operational stability on the butyl butyrate synthesis by esterification after five successive cycles of 24 h each (conversion around 85-90%). Immobilized TLL1 and PFL were active in the synthesis of biodiesel by transesterification reaction. Maximum transesterification yield (≥98.5% after 48 h of reaction at 45°C) was provided by using palm oil as feedstock.

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans AGXT-1 is a mitochondrial and temperature-adapted ortholog of peroxisomal human AGT1: New insights into between-species divergence in glyoxylate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa-Torres, Noel; Calvo, Ana C; Oppici, Elisa; Titelbaum, Nicholas; Montioli, Riccardo; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Cellini, Barbara; Salido, Eduardo; Pey, Angel L

    2016-09-01

    In humans, glyoxylate is an intermediary product of metabolism, whose concentration is finely balanced. Mutations in peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (hAGT1) cause primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1), which results in glyoxylate accumulation that is converted to toxic oxalate. In contrast, glyoxylate is used by the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans through a glyoxylate cycle to by-pass the decarboxylation steps of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and thus contributing to energy production and gluconeogenesis from stored lipids. To investigate the differences in glyoxylate metabolism between humans and C. elegans and to determine whether the nematode might be a suitable model for PH1, we have characterized here the predicted nematode ortholog of hAGT1 (AGXT-1) and compared its molecular properties with those of the human enzyme. Both enzymes form active PLP-dependent dimers with high specificity towards alanine and glyoxylate, and display similar three-dimensional structures. Interestingly, AGXT-1 shows 5-fold higher activity towards the alanine/glyoxylate pair than hAGT1. Thermal and chemical stability of AGXT-1 is lower than that of hAGT1, suggesting temperature-adaptation of the nematode enzyme linked to the lower optimal growth temperature of C. elegans. Remarkably, in vivo experiments demonstrate the mitochondrial localization of AGXT-1 in contrast to the peroxisomal compartmentalization of hAGT1. Our results support the view that the different glyoxylate metabolism in the nematode is associated with the divergent molecular properties and subcellular localization of the alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase activity.

  19. Camphene, a plant-derived monoterpene, reduces plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in hyperlipidemic rats independently of HMG-CoA reductase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Vallianou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Central to the pathology of coronary heart disease is the accumulation of lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides, within the intima of arterial blood vessels. The search for drugs to treat dislipidemia, remains a major pharmaceutical focus. In this study, we evaluated the hypolipidemic properties of the essential oil from Chios mastic gum (MGO. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The hypolipidemic effect of MGO was investigated in naïve as well as in rats susceptible to detergent-induced hyperlipidemia. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined using commercial kits. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity was measured in HepG2 cell extracts using a radioactive assay; cellular cholesterol and cholesterol esters were assessed using gas chromatography. MGO administration into naïve rats resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the constitutive synthesis of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. In hyperlipidemic rats, MGO treatment had also a strong hypolipidemic effect. By testing various components of MGO, we show for the first time that the hypolipidemic action is associated with camphene. Administration of camphene at a dose of 30 µg/gr of body weight in hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a 54.5% reduction of total cholesterol (p<0.001, 54% of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol (p<0.001 and 34.5% of triglycerides (p<0.001. Treatment of HepG2 cells with camphene led to a decrease in cellular cholesterol content to the same extend as mevinolin, a known HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. The hypolipidemic action of camphene is independent of HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. CONCLUSIONS: Given the critical role that the control of hyperlipidemia plays in cardiovascular disease, the results of our study provide insights into the use of camphene as an alternative lipid

  20. Enzymatic mechanism of oxalate production in the TCA and glyoxylate pathways using various isolates of Antrodia radiculosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.M. Jenkins; S.V. Diehl; C.A. Clausen; F. Green

    2011-01-01

    Brown-rot fungi produce oxalate in large amounts; however, levels of accumulation and function vary by species. Copper-tolerant fungi, like Antrodia radiculosa, produce and accumulate high levels of oxalate in response to copper. Oxalate biosynthesis in copper-tolerant fungi has been linked to the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycles. Within these two cycles...

  1. Gene Expression and Silencing Studies in Phytophthora infestans Reveal Infection-Specific Nutrient Transporters and a Role for the Nitrate Reductase Pathway in Plant Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ah-Fong, Audrey M. V.; Davis, Carol; Andreeva, Kalina; Judelson, Howard S.

    2016-01-01

    To help learn how phytopathogens feed from their hosts, genes for nutrient transporters from the hemibiotrophic potato and tomato pest Phytophthora infestans were annotated. This identified 453 genes from 19 families. Comparisons with a necrotrophic oomycete, Pythium ultimum var. ultimum, and a hemibiotrophic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, revealed diversity in the size of some families although a similar fraction of genes encoded transporters. RNA-seq of infected potato tubers, tomato leaves, and several artificial media revealed that 56 and 207 transporters from P. infestans were significantly up- or down-regulated, respectively, during early infection timepoints of leaves or tubers versus media. About 17 were up-regulated >4-fold in both leaves and tubers compared to media and expressed primarily in the biotrophic stage. The transcription pattern of many genes was host-organ specific. For example, the mRNA level of a nitrate transporter (NRT) was about 100-fold higher during mid-infection in leaves, which are nitrate-rich, than in tubers and three types of artificial media, which are nitrate-poor. The NRT gene is physically linked with genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR), which mobilize nitrate into ammonium and amino acids. All three genes were coregulated. For example, the three genes were expressed primarily at mid-stage infection timepoints in both potato and tomato leaves, but showed little expression in potato tubers. Transformants down-regulated for all three genes were generated by DNA-directed RNAi, with silencing spreading from the NR target to the flanking NRT and NiR genes. The silenced strains were nonpathogenic on leaves but colonized tubers. We propose that the nitrate assimilation genes play roles both in obtaining nitrogen for amino acid biosynthesis and protecting P. infestans from natural or fertilization-induced nitrate and nitrite toxicity. PMID:27936244

  2. Antioxidant Activity and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activities of the Polycondensate of Catechin with Glyoxylic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Geng

    Full Text Available In order to investigate polymeric flavonoids, the polycondensate of catechin with glyoxylic acid (PCG was prepared and its chemically antioxidant, cellular antioxidant (CAA and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were evaluated. The DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities and antiproliferative effect of PCG were lower than those of catechin, while PCG had higher CAA activity than catechin. In addition, PCG had very high α-glucosidase inhibitory activities (IC50 value, 2.59 μg/mL in comparison to catechin (IC50 value, 239.27 μg/mL. Inhibition kinetics suggested that both PCG and catechin demonstrated a mixture of noncompetitive and anticompetitive inhibition. The enhanced CAA and α-glucosidase inhibitor activities of PCG could be due to catechin polymerization enhancing the binding capacity to the cellular membrane and enzymes.

  3. Suvanine Sesterterpenes from a Tropical Sponge Coscinoderma sp. Inhibit Isocitrate Lyase in the Glyoxylate Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Hyoung Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The glyoxylate cycle is a sequence of anaplerotic reactions catalyzed by the key enzymes isocitrate lyase (ICL and malate synthase (MLS. Mutants of Candida albicans lacking ICL are markedly less virulent in mice than the wild-type. Suvanine sesterterpenes (1−9 isolated from a tropical sponge Coscinoderma sp. were evaluated for their inhibitory activities toward recombinant ICL from C. albicans. These studies led to the identification of a potent ICL inhibitor, suvanine salt (2, which possesses a sodium counterion and displays an inhibitory concentration value (IC50 of 6.35 μM. The growth phenotype of ICL deletion mutants and semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analyses indicated that compound 2 inhibits the ICL mRNA expression in C. albicans under C2-carbon-utilizing conditions. The present data highlight the potential for suvanine sesterterpenes treatment of C. albicans infections via inhibition of ICL activity.

  4. Kinetic modeling of tricarboxylic acid cycle and glyoxylate bypass in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and its application to assessment of drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Indira

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting persistent tubercule bacilli has become an important challenge in the development of anti-tuberculous drugs. As the glyoxylate bypass is essential for persistent bacilli, interference with it holds the potential for designing new antibacterial drugs. We have developed kinetic models of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glyoxylate bypass in Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and studied the effects of inhibition of various enzymes in the M. tuberculosis model. Results We used E. coli to validate the pathway-modeling protocol and showed that changes in metabolic flux can be estimated from gene expression data. The M. tuberculosis model reproduced the observation that deletion of one of the two isocitrate lyase genes has little effect on bacterial growth in macrophages, but deletion of both genes leads to the elimination of the bacilli from the lungs. It also substantiated the inhibition of isocitrate lyases by 3-nitropropionate. On the basis of our simulation studies, we propose that: (i fractional inactivation of both isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 is required for a flux through the glyoxylate bypass in persistent mycobacteria; and (ii increasing the amount of active isocitrate dehydrogenases can stop the flux through the glyoxylate bypass, so the kinase that inactivates isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and/or the proposed inactivator of isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 is a potential target for drugs against persistent mycobacteria. In addition, competitive inhibition of isocitrate lyases along with a reduction in the inactivation of isocitrate dehydrogenases appears to be a feasible strategy for targeting persistent mycobacteria. Conclusion We used kinetic modeling of biochemical pathways to assess various potential anti-tuberculous drug targets that interfere with the glyoxylate bypass flux, and indicated the type of inhibition needed to eliminate the pathogen. The advantage of such an

  5. Contribution of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the glyoxylate shunt in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to succinic acid production during dough fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammad N; Aslankoohi, Elham; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2015-07-02

    Succinic acid produced by yeast during bread dough fermentation can significantly affect the rheological properties of the dough. By introducing mutations in the model S288C yeast strain, we show that the oxidative pathway of the TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt contribute significantly to succinic acid production during dough fermentation. More specifically, deletion of ACO1 and double deletion of ACO1 and ICL1 resulted in a 36 and 77% decrease in succinic acid levels in fermented dough, respectively. Similarly, double deletion of IDH1 and IDP1 decreased succinic acid production by 85%, while also affecting the fermentation rate. By contrast, double deletion of SDH1 and SDH2 resulted in a two-fold higher succinic acid accumulation compared to the wild-type. Deletion of fumarate reductase activity (FRD1 and OSM1) in the reductive pathway of the TCA cycle did not affect the fermentation rate and succinic acid production. The changes in the levels of succinic acid produced by mutants Δidh1Δidp1 (low level) and Δsdh1Δsdh2 (high level) in fermented dough only resulted in small pH differences, reflecting the buffering capacity of dough at a pH of around 5.1. Moreover, Rheofermentometer analysis using these mutants revealed no difference in maximum dough height and gas retention capacity with the dough prepared with S288C. The impact of the changed succinic acid profile on the organoleptic or antimicrobial properties of bread remains to be demonstrated.

  6. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael

    1992-01-01

    can replace light in eliciting an increase of nitrate reductase mRNA accumulation in dark-adapted green Arabidopsis plants. We show further that sucrose alone is sufficient for the full expression of nitrate reductase genes in etiolated Arabidopsis plants. Finally, using a reporter gene, we show......Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression....... Located in the cytosol, nitrate reductase obtains its reductant not from photosynthesis but from carbohydrate catabolism. This relationship prompted us to investigate the indirect role that light might play, via photosynthesis, in the regulation of nitrate reductase gene expression. We show that sucrose...

  7. Increased production of wax esters in transgenic tobacco plants by expression of a fatty acid reductase:wax synthase gene fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Selcuk; Hofvander, Per; Dutta, Paresh; Sun, Chuanxin; Sitbon, Folke

    2015-12-01

    Wax esters are hydrophobic lipids consisting of a fatty acid moiety linked to a fatty alcohol with an ester bond. Plant-derived wax esters are today of particular concern for their potential as cost-effective and sustainable sources of lubricants. However, this aspect is hampered by the fact that the level of wax esters in plants generally is too low to allow commercial exploitation. To investigate whether wax ester biosynthesis can be increased in plants using transgenic approaches, we have here exploited a fusion between two bacterial genes together encoding a single wax ester-forming enzyme, and targeted the resulting protein to chloroplasts in stably transformed tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) plants. Compared to wild-type controls, transgenic plants showed both in leaves and stems a significant increase in the total level of wax esters, being eight-fold at the whole plant level. The profiles of fatty acid methyl ester and fatty alcohol in wax esters were related, and C16 and C18 molecules constituted predominant forms. Strong transformants displayed certain developmental aberrations, such as stunted growth and chlorotic leaves and stems. These negative effects were associated with an accumulation of fatty alcohols, suggesting that an adequate balance between formation and esterification of fatty alcohols is crucial for a high wax ester production. The results show that wax ester engineering in transgenic plants is feasible, and suggest that higher yields may become achieved in the near future.

  8. New active site oriented glyoxyl-agarose derivatives of Escherichia coli penicillin G acylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terreni Marco

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immobilized Penicillin G Acylase (PGA derivatives are biocatalysts that are industrially used for the hydrolysis of Penicillin G by fermentation and for the kinetically controlled synthesis of semi-synthetic β-lactam antibiotics. One of the most used supports for immobilization is glyoxyl-activated agarose, which binds the protein by reacting through its superficial Lys residues. Since in E. coli PGA Lys are also present near the active site, an immobilization that occurs through these residues may negatively affect the performance of the biocatalyst due to the difficult diffusion of the substrate into the active site. A preferential orientation of the enzyme with the active site far from the support surface would be desirable to avoid this problem. Results Here we report how it is possible to induce a preferential orientation of the protein during the binding process on aldehyde activated supports. A superficial region of PGA, which is located on the opposite side of the active site, is enriched in its Lys content. The binding of the enzyme onto the support is consequently forced through the Lys rich region, thus leaving the active site fully accessible to the substrate. Different mutants with an increasing number of Lys have been designed and, when active, immobilized onto glyoxyl agarose. The synthetic performances of these new catalysts were compared with those of the immobilized wild-type (wt PGA. Our results show that, while the synthetic performance of the wt PGA sensitively decreases after immobilization, the Lys enriched mutants have similar performances to the free enzyme even after immobilization. We also report the observations made with other mutants which were unable to undergo a successful maturation process for the production of active enzymes or which resulted toxic for the host cell. Conclusion The desired orientation of immobilized PGA with the active site freely accessible can be obtained by increasing

  9. Discovery of pinoresinol reductase genes in sphingomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Y; Kamimura, N; Nakajima, M; Hishiyama, S; Hara, H; Kasai, D; Tsuji, Y; Narita-Yamada, S; Nakamura, S; Katano, Y; Fujita, N; Katayama, Y; Fukuda, M; Kajita, S; Masai, E

    2013-01-10

    Bacterial genes for the degradation of major dilignols produced in lignifying xylem are expected to be useful tools for the structural modification of lignin in plants. For this purpose, we isolated pinZ involved in the conversion of pinoresinol from Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6. pinZ showed 43-77% identity at amino acid level with bacterial NmrA-like proteins of unknown function, a subgroup of atypical short chain dehydrogenases/reductases, but revealed only 15-21% identity with plant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. PinZ completely converted racemic pinoresinol to lariciresinol, showing a specific activity of 46±3 U/mg in the presence of NADPH at 30°C. In contrast, the activity for lariciresinol was negligible. This substrate preference is similar to a pinoresinol reductase, AtPrR1, of Arabidopsis thaliana; however, the specific activity of PinZ toward (±)-pinoresinol was significantly higher than that of AtPrR1. The role of pinZ and a pinZ ortholog of Novosphingobium aromaticivorans DSM 12444 were also characterized.

  10. Peroxisomal alanine: glyoxylate aminotransferase AGT1 is indispensable for appressorium function of the rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijai Bhadauria

    Full Text Available The role of β-oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle in fungal pathogenesis is well documented. However, an ambiguity still remains over their interaction in peroxisomes to facilitate fungal pathogenicity and virulence. In this report, we characterize a gene encoding an alanine, glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT1 in Magnaporthe oryzae, the causative agent of rice blast disease, and demonstrate that AGT1 is required for pathogenicity of M. oryzae. Targeted deletion of AGT1 resulted in the failure of penetration via appressoria; therefore, mutants lacking the gene were unable to induce blast symptoms on the hosts rice and barley. This penetration failure may be associated with a disruption in lipid mobilization during conidial germination as turgor generation in the appressorium requires mobilization of lipid reserves from the conidium. Analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein expression using the transcriptional and translational fusion with the AGT1 promoter and open reading frame, respectively, revealed that AGT1 expressed constitutively in all in vitro grown cell types and during in planta colonization, and localized in peroxisomes. Peroxisomal localization was further confirmed by colocalization with red fluorescent protein fused with the peroxisomal targeting signal 1. Surprisingly, conidia produced by the Δagt1 mutant were unable to form appressoria on artificial inductive surfaces, even after prolonged incubation. When supplemented with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(++pyruvate, appressorium formation was restored on an artificial inductive surface. Taken together, our data indicate that AGT1-dependent pyruvate formation by transferring an amino group of alanine to glyoxylate, an intermediate of the glyoxylate cycle is required for lipid mobilization and utilization. This pyruvate can be converted to non-fermentable carbon sources, which may require reoxidation of NADH generated by the β-oxidation of fatty acids to NAD(+ in

  11. BisGMA/TEGDMA dental nanocomposites containing glyoxylic acid modified high-aspect ratio hydroxyapatite nanofibers with enhanced dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Xu, Changqi; Wang, Yong; Shi, Jian; Yu, Qingsong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of the glyoxylic acid (GA) modification of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanofibers on their dispersion in bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) dental composites and also investigate the mechanical properties, water absorption, and water solubility of the resulting dental resins and composites. Scanning/Transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images showed that microsized HAP nanofiber bundles could be effectively broken down to individual HAP nanofibers with an average length of ~15 μm after the surface modification process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) characterization confirmed glyoxylic acid was chemically grafted on the HAP nanofiber surface, hypothetically by reacting with the amine group on HAP nanofiber surface. The enhanced dispersion of HAP nanofibers in dental matrix led to increased biaxial flexural strength (BFS) compared with the corresponding dental resins and composites filled with untreated HAP nanofibers. In addition, impregnation of small mass fractions of the glyoxylic acid modified HAP nanofibers into the BisGMA/TEGDMA dental resins (5wt%, 10wt%) or composites (2wt%, 3wt%) could also substantially improve the BFS in comparison with the controls(pure resins or dental composites filled with silica particles alone). Larger mass fractions could not further increase the mechanical property or even degrade the BFS values. Water behavior testing results indicated that the addition of glyoxylic acid modified HAP nanofibers resulted in higher water absorption and water solubility values which is not preferred for clinical application. In summary, well dispersed HAP nanofibers and their dental composites with enhanced mechanical property have been successfully fabricated but the water absorption and water solubility of such dental composites need to be

  12. BisGMA/TEGDMA dental nanocomposites containing glyoxylic acid modified high-aspect ratio hydroxyapatite nanofibers with enhanced dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Liang; Xu, Changqi; Wang,Yong; Shi, Jian; Yu, Qingsong; Li, Hao

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of the glyoxylic acid (GA) modification of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanofibers on their dispersion in bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) dental composites and also investigate the mechanical properties, water absorption, and water solubility of the resulting dental resins and composites. Scanning/Transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images showed that microsized HAP nanofiber bundle...

  13. Molecular requirements for peroxisomal targeting of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase as an essential determinant in primary hyperoxaluria type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztián Fodor

    Full Text Available Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme, of which various missense mutations lead to irreversible kidney damage via primary hyperoxaluria type 1, in part caused by improper peroxisomal targeting. To unravel the molecular mechanism of its recognition by the peroxisomal receptor Pex5p, we have determined the crystal structure of the respective cargo-receptor complex. It shows an extensive protein/protein interface, with contributions from residues of the peroxisomal targeting signal 1 and additional loops of the C-terminal domain of the cargo. Sequence segments that are crucial for receptor recognition and hydrophobic core interactions within alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase are overlapping, explaining why receptor recognition highly depends on a properly folded protein. We subsequently characterized several enzyme variants in vitro and in vivo and show that even minor protein fold perturbations are sufficient to impair Pex5p receptor recognition. We discuss how the knowledge of the molecular parameters for alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase required for peroxisomal translocation could become useful for improved hyperoxaluria type 1 treatment.

  14. Asymmetric Glyoxylate-Ene Reactions Catalyzed by Chiral Pd(II Complexes in the Ionic Liquid [bmim][PF6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Sun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The room temperature ionic liquid [bmim][PF6] was employed as the reactionmedium in the asymmetric glyoxylate-ene reaction of α-methyl styrene (4a with ethylglyoxylate using chiral palladium(II complexes as the catalysts. [Pd(S-BINAP(3,5-CF3-PhCN2](SbF62 (1b showed the highest catalytic activity. Under the reaction conditionsof 40 oC, 0.5 h, and 1b/4a molar ratio of 0.05, ethyl α-hydroxy-4-phenyl-4-pentenoate wasobtained in excellent chemical yield (94 % with high enantioselectivity (70 %. Otherα-hydroxy esters can also be obtained in high chemical yields and enantioselectitiesthrough the glyoxylate-ene reactions of alkenes with glyoxylates catalyzed by 1b in[bmim][PF6]. Moreover, the ionic liquid [bmim][PF6] which contained the palladium(IIcomplex could be recycled and reused several times without significant loss of the catalyticactivity.

  15. ELECTROLESS COPPER PLATING ON FRAXINUS MANDSHURICA VENEER USING GLYOXYLIC ACID AS REDUCING AGENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Wang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Copper coating was deposited on Fraxinus mandshurica veneers for preparing EMI shielding composite by electroless plating using glyoxylic acid as reducing agent in the solution. XPS and SEM were used to analyze the activation process. It was found that a continuous chitosan membrane was loaded on the wood surface. XPS results showed that Pd(II ions were chemically adsorbed on a chitosan membrane on the wood surface through an N-Pd σ coordination bond. After reduction, part of Pd(II absorbed formed very little Pd(0 particles on the chitosan-treated wood surface. The activated wood veneers were immersed into a plating bath in which copper film was successfully initiated. The coatings were characterized by SEM-EDS, XPS, and XRD. The metal deposition, surface resistivity, and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness were measured. The morphology of the coating was uniform, compact, and continuous. The wood grains were preserved on the plated wood veneer, which had a copper-like color and sheen. EDS, XPS, and XRD results indicated that the coating consisted of Cu0 with crystalline structure. The surface resistivity and copper deposition reached 175.14 mΩ•cm-2 and 21.66 g/m2 when the veneer was pretreated with 0.8 % chitosan for 8 min and plated for 30 min at 55 oC. The plated veneers exhibited good electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of over 60 dB in frequency ranging from10 MHz to 1.5 GHz.

  16. Imine reductases (IREDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas-Sanchez, Juan; France, Scott P; Montgomery, Sarah L; Aleku, Godwin A; Man, Henry; Sharma, Mahima; Ramsden, Jeremy I; Grogan, Gideon; Turner, Nicholas J

    2017-04-01

    Imine reductases (IREDs) have emerged as a valuable new set of biocatalysts for the asymmetric synthesis of optically active amines. The development of bioinformatics tools and searchable databases has led to the identification of a diverse range of new IRED biocatalysts that have been characterised and employed in different synthetic processes. This review describes the latest developments in the structural and mechanistic aspects of IREDs, together with synthetic applications of these enzymes, and identifies ongoing and future challenges in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY DURING HEAT SHOCK IN WINTER WHEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimenko S.B.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates are the basic source of nitrogen for the majority of plants. Absorption and transformation of nitrates in plants are determined by external conditions and, first of all, temperature and light intensity. The influence of the temperature increasing till +40 0С on activity of nitrate reductase was studied. It is shown, that the rise of temperature was accompanied by sharp decrease of activity nitrate reductase in leaves of winter wheat, what, apparently, occurred for the account deactivations of enzyme and due to its dissociation.

  18. Functional expression of a putative geraniol 8-hydroxylase by reconstitution of bacterially expressed plant CYP76F45 and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase CPR I from Croton stellatopilosus Ohba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintupachee, Siriluk; Promden, Worrawat; Ngamrojanavanich, Nattaya; Sitthithaworn, Worapan; De-Eknamkul, Wanchai

    2015-10-01

    While attempting to isolate the enzyme geranylgeraniol 18-hydroxylase, which is involved in plaunotol biosynthesis in Croton stellatopilosus (Cs), the cDNAs for a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase(designated as CYP76F45) and an NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (designated as CPR I based on its classification) were isolated from the leaf. The CYP76F45 and CsCPR I genes have open reading frames (ORFs) encoding 507- and 711-amino acid proteins with predicted relative molecular weights of 56.7 and 79.0 kDa,respectively. Amino acid sequence comparison showed that both CYP76F45 (63–73%) and CsCPR I (79–83%) share relatively high sequence identities with homologous proteins in other plant species.Phylogenetic tree analysis confirmed that CYP76F45 belongs to the CYP76 family and that CsCPR I belongs to Class I of dicotyledonous CPRs, with both being closely related to Ricinus communis genes. Functional characterization of both enzymes, each expressed separately in Escherichia coli as recombinant proteins,showed that only simultaneous incubation of the membrane bound proteins with the substrate geraniol (GOH) and the coenzyme NADPH could form 8-hydroxygeraniol. The enzyme mixture could also utilize acyclic sesquiterpene farnesol (FOH) with a comparable substrate preference ratio (GOH:FOH) of 54:46. The levelsof the CYP76F45 and CsCPR I transcripts in the shoots, leaves and twigs of C. stellatopilosus were correlated with the levels of a major monoterpenoid indole alkaloid, identified tentatively as 19-Evallesamine,that accumulated in these plant parts. These results suggested that CYP76F45 and CPR I function as the enzyme geraniol-8-hydroxylase (G8H), which is likely to be involved in the biosynthesis of the indole alkaloid in C. stellatopilosus [corrected].

  19. The effect of ionic and non-ionic surfactants on the growth, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase activities of Spirodela polyrrhiza (L. Schleiden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Buczek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion into the medium of 5 mg•dm-3 of non-ionic (ENF or ionic (DBST surfactant caused 50-60% inhibition of nitrite reductase MR activity in S. polyrrhiza. At the same time, increased accumulation of NO2- in the plant tissues and lowering of the total and soluble protein contents were found. DBST also lowered the nitrate reductase (NR activity and the dry mass of the plants.

  20. Distribution of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activity among microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kouji; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Yoda, Koji; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Nimura-Matsune, Kaori; Mura, Kiyoshi; Tokue, Chiyoko; Katoh, Tetzuya; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Youichi

    2004-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin (Prx) constitutes a large family of enzymes found in microorganisms, animals, and plants, but the detection of the activities of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductases (peroxiredoxin reductases) in cell extracts, and the purification based on peroxide reductase activity, have only been done in bacteria and Trypanosomatidae. A peroxiredoxin reductase (NADH oxidase) from a bacterium, Amphibacillus, displayed only poor activities in the presence of purified Prx from Saccharomyces or Synechocystis, while it is highly active in the presence of bacterial Prx. These results suggested that an enzyme system different from that in bacteria might exist for the reduction of Prx in yeast and cyanobacteria. Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activities were detected in cell extracts of Saccharomyces, Synechocystis, and Chlorella, and the enzyme activities of Saccharomyces and Chlorella were induced under vigorously aerated culture conditions and intensive light exposure conditions, respectively. Partial purification of Prx-linked peroxidase from the induced yeast cells indicated that the Prx-linked peroxidase system consists of two protein components, namely, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. This finding is consistent with the previous report on its purification based on its protein protection activity against oxidation [Chae et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269, 27670-27678 (1994)]. In this study we have confirmed that Prx-linked peroxidase activity are widely distributed, not only in bacteria species and Trypanosomatidae, but also in yeast and photosynthetic microorganisms, and showed reconstitution of the activity from partially purified interspecies components.

  1. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-07-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems.

  2. (+)-Pinoresinol/(+)-lariciresinol reductase from Forsythia intermedia. Protein purification, cDNA cloning, heterologous expression and comparison to isoflavone reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkova-Kostova, A T; Gang, D R; Davin, L B; Bedgar, D L; Chu, A; Lewis, N G

    1996-11-15

    Lignans are a widely distributed class of natural products, whose functions and distribution suggest that they are one of the earliest forms of defense to have evolved in vascular plants; some, such as podophyllotoxin and enterodiol, have important roles in cancer chemotherapy and prevention, respectively. Entry into lignan enzymology has been gained by the approximately 3000-fold purification of two isoforms of (+)-pinoresinol/(+)-lariciresinol reductase, a pivotal branchpoint enzyme in lignan biosynthesis. Both have comparable ( approximately 34.9 kDa) molecular mass and kinetic (Vmax/Km) properties and catalyze sequential, NADPH-dependent, stereospecific, hydride transfers where the incoming hydride takes up the pro-R position. The gene encoding (+)-pinoresinol/(+)-lariciresinol reductase has been cloned and the recombinant protein heterologously expressed as a functional beta-galactosidase fusion protein. Its amino acid sequence reveals a strong homology to isoflavone reductase, a key branchpoint enzyme in isoflavonoid metabolism and primarily found in the Fabaceae (angiosperms). This is of great evolutionary significance since both lignans and isoflavonoids have comparable plant defense properties, as well as similar roles as phytoestrogens. Given that lignans are widespread from primitive plants onwards, whereas the isoflavone reductase-derived isoflavonoids are mainly restricted to the Fabaceae, it is tempting to speculate that this branch of the isoflavonoid pathway arose via evolutionary divergence from that giving the lignans.

  3. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of total carbon, dicarboxylic acids and glyoxylic acid in the tropical Indian aerosols: Implications for sources and photochemical processing of organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Swaminathan, T.; Tachibana, Eri

    2011-09-01

    The tropical Indian aerosols (PM10) collected on day- and nighttime bases in winter and summer, 2007 from Chennai (13.04°N; 80.17°E) were studied for stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of total carbon (TC), individual dicarboxylic acids (C2-C9) and glyoxylic acid (ωC2). δ13C values of TC ranged from -23.9‰ to -25.9‰ (-25.0 ± 0.6‰; n = 49). Oxalic (C2) (-17.1 ± 2.5‰), malonic (C3) (-20.8 ± 1.8‰), succinic (C4) (-22.5 ± 1.5‰) and adipic (C6) (-20.6 ± 4.1‰) acids and ωC2 acid (-22.4 ± 5.5‰) were found to be more enriched with 13C compared to TC. In contrast, suberic (C8) (-29.4 ± 1.8‰), phthalic (Ph) (-30.1 ± 3.5‰) and azelaic (C9) (-28.4 ± 5.8‰) acids showed smaller δ13C values than TC. Based on comparisons of δ13C values of TC in Chennai aerosols to those (-24.7 ± 2.2‰) found in unburned cow-dung samples collected from Chennai and isotopic signatures of the particles emitted from point sources, we found that biofuel/biomass burning are the major sources of carbonaceous aerosols in South and Southeast Asia. The decrease in δ13C values of C9 diacid by about 5‰ from winter to summer suggests that tropical plant emissions also significantly contribute to organic aerosol in this region. Significant increase in δ13C values from C4 to C2 diacids in Chennai aerosols could be attributed for their photochemical processing in the tropical atmosphere during long-range transport from source regions.

  4. Structural implications of a G170R mutation of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase that is associated with peroxisome-to-mitochondrion mistargeting

    OpenAIRE

    Djordjevic, Snezana; Zhang, Xiaoxuan; Bartlam, Mark; Ye, Sheng; Rao, Zihe; Danpure, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of the G170R mutant form of human alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase has been determined at 2.6 Å resolution. This mutation is associated with enzyme mistargeting in the hereditary kidney-stone disease primary hyperoxaluria type 1.

  5. NADPH-Thioredoxin Reductase C Mediates the Response to Oxidative Stress and Thermotolerance in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp PCC7120

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Riego, Ana M.; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Galmozzi, CarlaV.; Florencio, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thiioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of t

  6. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K; Gang, David R; Halls, Steven C; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-12-12

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  7. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L.; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Gang, David R.; Halls, Steven C.; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  8. 乙醛酸化学镀铜工艺%An Electroless Copper Plating Process Using Glyoxylate as Reductant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨防祖; 姚光华; 周绍民

    2012-01-01

    An electroless copper plating process using glyoxylate as reductant was developed, structure and surface morphology of the deposit were also studied. The bath composition and operating conditions were: 28.0g/L CuSO4·5H2O,44.0g/L EDTA·2Na,10.0mg/L α,α' -bipyridyl,10.0mg/L potassium ferrocy-anide,9.2g/L glyoxylate,pH 11.5 ~ 12.5,temperature 40~50℃. Experimental results showed that:the electroless copper plating bath was quite stable; the copper deposition rate would increased in case of bath temperature and copper sulfate concentration increased; the bath stability would decreased due to lower activation energy of copper deposition in case of higher temperature; the qualified copper coating could be obtained only at a proper bath pH range of 11.5 ~12.5; the copper deposition rate would not be affected by concentrations of glyoxylate and complexing agent evidently, whereas excessive content of glyoxylate would cause the bath stability decreased; the copper coating had a FCC mixed crystal structure with blocky grains 、pink/bright appearance and good ductility.%研究了以乙醛酸为还原剂的化学镀铜工艺、镀层结构和形貌.其镀液组成和操作条件为:28.0 g/L CuSO4·5H2O,44.0 g/L EDTA-2Na,10.0 mg/L α,α'-联吡啶,10.0 mg/L亚铁氰化钾,9.2g/L乙醛酸,pH为11.5 ~12.5,θ为40 ~ 50℃.实验结果表明,化学镀铜溶液较稳定;镀液温度和硫酸铜质量浓度提高,铜沉积速率增大;较高的镀液温度下,化学镀铜反应的活化能较低,镀液稳定性下降;镀液pH在11.5~12.5可获得较好的铜镀层;随乙醛酸和络合剂质量浓度提高,铜沉积速率变化不大,但过量的乙醛酸导致镀液的稳定性降低;铜镀层为面心立方混晶结构,呈光亮的粉红色块状形貌,有较高的韧性.

  9. Trametes versicolor carboxylate reductase uncovered

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, Margit; Winkler, Christoph K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The first carboxylate reductase from Trametes versicolor was identified, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme reduces aromatic acids such as benzoic acid and derivatives, cinnamic acid, and 3-phenylpropanoic acid, but also aliphatic acids such as octanoic acid are reduced. Graphical abstract

  10. Measurement of nitrite reductase in leaf tissue of Vigna mungo : A new method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R C; Bose, B; Mukerji, D; Mathur, S N; Srivastava, H S

    1979-12-01

    The enzyme nitrite reductase (EC 1.6.6.4) is generally assayed in terms of disappearance of nitrite from the assay medium. We describe a technique which allowed estimation of the enzyme level in leaf tissues of Vigna mungo (L). Hepper in terms of the release of the product (NH3) of the enzyme reaction. The technique is offered as an alternative, possibly more convenient method for assay of nitrite reductase in plant tissue in vivo.

  11. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin reductase from Populus trichocarpa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs contribute to poplar defense mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses. Transcripts of PA biosynthetic genes accumulated rapidly in response to infection by the fungus Marssonina brunnea f.sp. multigermtubi, treatments of salicylic acid (SA and wounding, resulting in PA accumulation in poplar leaves. Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR are two key enzymes of the PA biosynthesis that produce the main subunits: (+-catechin and (--epicatechin required for formation of PA polymers. In Populus, ANR and LAR are encoded by at least two and three highly related genes, respectively. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized genes PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 from P. trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Populus ANR1 and LAR1 occurr in two distinct phylogenetic lineages, but both genes have little difference in their tissue distribution, preferentially expressed in roots. Overexpression of PtrANR1 in poplar resulted in a significant increase in PA levels but no impact on catechin levels. Antisense down-regulation of PtrANR1 showed reduced PA accumulation in transgenic lines, but increased levels of anthocyanin content. Ectopic expression of PtrLAR1 in poplar positively regulated the biosynthesis of PAs, whereas the accumulation of anthocyanin and flavonol was significantly reduced (P<0.05 in all transgenic plants compared to the control plants. These results suggest that both PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 contribute to PA biosynthesis in Populus.

  12. Thioredoxin and NADP-thioredoxin reductase from cultured carrot cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. C.; Cao, R. Q.; Kung, J. E.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    Dark-grown carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue cultures were found to contain both protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system--NADP-thioredoxin reductase and the thioredoxin characteristic of heterotrophic systems, thioredoxin h. Thioredoxin h was purified to apparent homogeneity and, like typical bacterial counterparts, was a 12-kdalton (kDa) acidic protein capable of activating chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) more effectively than fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). NADP-thioredoxin reductase (EC 1.6.4.5) was partially purified and found to be an arsenite-sensitive enzyme composed of two 34-kDa subunits. Carrot NADP-thioredoxin reductase resembled more closely its counterpart from bacteria rather than animal cells in acceptor (thioredoxin) specificity. Upon greening of the cells, the content of NADP-thioredoxin-reductase activity, and, to a lesser extent, thioredoxin h decreased. The results confirm the presence of a heterotrophic-type thioredoxin system in plant cells and raise the question of its physiological function.

  13. Structural and functional diversity of ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliverti, Alessandro; Pandini, Vittorio; Pennati, Andrea; de Rosa, Matteo; Zanetti, Giuliana

    2008-06-15

    Although all ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases (FNRs) catalyze the same reaction, i.e. the transfer of reducing equivalents between NADP(H) and ferredoxin, they belong to two unrelated families of proteins: the plant-type and the glutathione reductase-type of FNRs. Aim of this review is to provide a general classification scheme for these enzymes, to be used as a framework for the comparison of their properties. Furthermore, we report on some recent findings, which significantly increased the understanding of the structure-function relationships of FNRs, i.e. the ability of adrenodoxin reductase and its homologs to catalyze the oxidation of NADP(+) to its 4-oxo derivative, and the properties of plant-type FNRs from non-photosynthetic organisms. Plant-type FNRs from bacteria and Apicomplexan parasites provide examples of novel ways of FAD- and NADP(H)-binding. The recent characterization of an FNR from Plasmodium falciparum brings these enzymes into the field of drug design.

  14. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases.

  15. Steroid 5β-Reductase from Leaves of Vitis vinifera: Molecular Cloning, Expression, and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Mona; Munkert, Jennifer; Campa, Manuela; Malnoy, Mickael; Martens, Stefan; Müller-Uri, Frieder

    2015-11-25

    A steroid 5β-reductase gene corresponding to the hypothetical protein LOC100247199 from leaves of Vitis vinifera (var. 'Chardonnay') was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein showed 5β-reductase activity when progesterone was used as a substrate. The reaction was stereoselective, producing only 5β-products such as 5β-pregnane-3,20-dione. Other small substrates (terpenoids and enones) were also accepted as substrates, indicating the highly promiscuous character of the enzyme class. Our results show that the steroid 5β-reductase gene, encoding an orthologous enzyme described as a key enzyme in cardenolide biosynthesis, is also expressed in leaves of the cardenolide-free plant V. vinifera. We emphasize the fact that, on some occasions, different reductases (e.g., progesterone 5β-reductase and monoterpenoid reductase) can also use molecules that are similar to the final products as a substrate. Therefore, in planta, the different reductases may contribute to the immense number of diverse small natural products finally leading to the flavor of wine.

  16. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, glyoxylic acid and glyoxal in tropical aerosols: implications for photochemical processes of organic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelyus L. Mkoma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropical aerosols of PM2.5 and PM10 were collected at a rural site in Morogoro, Tanzania (East Africa, and analysed for stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C of dicarboxylic acids (C2–C9, glyoxylic acid (ωC2 and glyoxal (Gly using gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometer. PM2.5 samples showed that δ13C of oxalic (C2 acid are largest (mean, −18.3±1.7‰ followed by malonic (C3, −19.6±1.0‰ and succinic (C4, −21.8±2.2‰ acids, whereas those in PM10 are a little smaller: −19.9±3.1‰ (C2, −20.2±2.7‰ (C3 and −23.3±3.2‰ (C4. The δ13C of C2–C4 diacids showed a decreasing trend with an increase in carbon numbers. The higher δ13C values of oxalic acid can be explained by isotopic enrichment of 13C in the remaining C2 due to the atmospheric decomposition of oxalic acid or its precursors. δ13C of ωC2 and Gly that are precursors of oxalic acid also showed larger values (mean, −22.5‰ and −20.2‰, respectively in PM2.5 than those (−26.7‰ and −23.7‰ in PM10. The δ13C values of ωC2 and Gly are smaller than those of C2 in both PM2.5 and PM10. On the other hand, azelaic acid (C9; mean, −28.5‰ is more depleted in 13C, which is consistent with the previous knowledge; that is, C9 is produced by the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids emitted from terrestrial higher plants. A significant enrichment of 13C in oxalic acid together with its negative correlations with relative abundance of C2 in total diacids and ratios of water-soluble organic carbon and organic carbon further support that a photochemical degradation of oxalic acid occurs during long-range transport from source regions.

  17. Remote Stereoinduction in the Acylation of Fully-Substituted Enolates: Tandem Reformatsky/Quaternary Claisen Condensations of Silyl Glyoxylates and β-Lactones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greszler, Stephen N.; Malinowski, Justin T.

    2010-01-01

    Reformatsky reagents react sequentially with silyl glyoxylates and β-lactones to give highly functionalized Claisen condensation products. A heretofore undocumented instance of stereochemical 1,4-induction results in efficient transmission of β-lactone stereochemistry to the emerging fully-substituted stereocenter. Second-stage transformations reveal that the five heteroatom-containing functionalities embedded within the products are entirely chemo-differentiated, a circumstance that permits rapid assembly of the leustroducsin B core substructure. PMID:21087044

  18. Soybean nitrate reductase activity influenced by manganese nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Damien P., Heenan; Lindsay C., Campbell; Department of Agronomy and Horticultural Science, University of Sydney

    1980-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation by soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merrill cvv. Lee and Bragg] was investigated in plants grown in solution culture at manganese concentrations of 0, 1.8 and 275 μM and at day-night temperatures of 33-28℃ and 22-17℃. Manganese deficiency occurred in plants of both cultivars grown at 0 μM Mn; under these conditions, leaf nitrate concentration increased in both cultivars and nitrate reductase activity in vivo but not in vitro was reduced. High solution Mn (275 μM) produced sympt...

  19. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Bok Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  20. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  1. MULTI-POINT IMMOBILIZATION OF PENICILLIN G ACYLASE ON SILICA-GLYOXYL: INFLUENCE OF THE DEGREE OF ACTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEREIRA G.H.A.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-point immobilization, by an intense enzyme-support attachment, may increase the operational stability of a biocatalyst. Penicillin G acylase has many applications, from the hydrolysis of penicillin G (production of 6-aminopenicillanic acid to the synthesis of semi-synthetic antibiotics. The application of this technique in macroporous silica involves support activation with 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimetoxysilane, followed by acidic hydrolysis and oxidation with sodium periodate. The aldehyde-glyoxyl groups so formed react subsequently with the enzyme. The degree of activation affects the yield and stability of the enzyme immobilization. For 20 UI of enzyme, the results show an immobilization yield equal to 100%, whenever there are more than 140 m Eq of aldehyde groups/g of dry silica. The immobilized enzyme half-life is 23 minutes at 60ºC; under the same conditions, the soluble enzyme has no residual activity after a few minutes. The increase in the degree of activation does not lead to higher stability, which indicates the negative influence of sub-products, formed during the activation of the support

  2. Mathematical models for determining metabolic fluxes through the citric acid and the glyoxylate cycles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by 13C-NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Dinh, S; Bouet, F; Huynh, Q T; Herve, M

    1996-12-15

    We propose, first, a practical method for studying the isotopic transformation of glutamate or any other metabolite isotopomers in the citric acid and the glyoxylate cycles; second, two mathematical models, one for evaluating the flux through the citric acid cycle and the other for evaluating the flux through the latter coupled to the glyoxylate cycle in yeast. These models are based on the analysis of 13C-NMR spectra of glutamate obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, NCYC strain, fed with 100% enriched [2-13C]acetate. The population of each glutamate isotopomer, the change in intensity of each multiplet component or the enrichment of any glutamate carbon is expressed by a specific analytical equation from which the flux in the citric acid and the glyoxylate cycles can be deduced. The aerobic metabolism of 100% [2-13C]acetate in acetate-grown S. cerevisiae cells was studied as a function of time using 13C-NMR. 1H-NMR and biochemical techniques. The C1 and C6 doublet and singlet of labeled trehalose increase continuously with time indicating that there is no isotopic transformation between trehalose isotopomers even though the corresponding formation rates are different. By contrast, the glutamate C4 singlet increases then decreases with time. The C4 doublet, which is lower than the singlet for t 90 min. A similar observation was made for the C2 resonance singlet and doublet. In addition, the glutamate C2 multiplet consists of only seven instead of nine peaks as in random labeling. These results agree well with our models and demonstrate that, in the presence of acetate, anaplerotic carbon sources involved in the synthesis of acetyl-CoA are negligible in yeast. The flux in the citric acid cycle was deduced from a plot of the C4 area versus incubation time, while the flux within the glyoxylate cycle was determined from the relative intensity of the glutamate C4 doublet and singlet. The fluxes in the citric acid and the glyoxylate cycles were found to be comparable

  3. The Nox/Ferric reductase/Ferric reductase-like families of Eumycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissa, Ibtissem; Bidard, Frédérique; Grognet, Pierre; Grossetete, Sandrine; Silar, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are involved in plant biomass degradation by fungi and development of fungal structures. While the ROS-generating NADPH oxidases from filamentous fungi are under strong scrutiny, much less is known about the related integral Membrane (or Ferric) Reductases (IMRs). Here, we present a survey of these enzymes in 29 fungal genomes covering the entire available range of fungal diversity. IMRs are present in all fungal genomes. They can be classified into at least 24 families, underscoring the high diversity of these enzymes. Some are differentially regulated during colony or fruiting body development, as well as by the nature of the carbon source of the growth medium. Importantly, functional characterization of IMRs has been made on proteins belonging to only two families, while nothing or very little is known about the proteins of the other 22 families.

  4. Cloning of the Soybean Chalcone Reductase Gene GmCHR and Construction of Its Plant Expression Vector%大豆查尔酮还原酶基因GmCHR的克隆与植物表达载体构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘江; 陈沛; 邢光南; 赵团结; 李艳; 盖钧镒

    2013-01-01

    黄酮类化合物在植物中参与过滤紫外线、固氮和花色形成等过程,异黄酮对人体有抗氧化、预防乳腺癌等保健作用.查尔酮还原酶(chalcone reductase,CHR)是植物中参与黄酮类化合物代谢的重要酶.克隆大豆查尔酮还原酶基因并构建植物表达载体,有助于进一步研究其功能和异黄酮的代谢过程.采用RT-PCR方法,从栽培大豆(Gly-cine mx)南农1138-2中,克隆得到了第14号染色体上的一个编码大豆查尔酮还原酶(chalcone reductase,CHR)的基因,命名为GmCHR.该基因含有948 bp长的编码区序列(Coding DNA Sequence,CDS),编码315个氨基酸.预测其蛋白质分子量为35.5 kDa,等电点为6.32.与其他豆科植物中的查尔酮还原酶相比,GmCHR蛋白序列与葛藤(Puerariae montana)CHR的相似性最高,达94%.组织表达分析表明,在自然生长条件下GmCHR在叶中的表达量最大;其次是种子;在花和茎中相同;在根中的表达量最小.利用Gateway方法获得植物过表达载体pMDC83-GmCHR,经检测表明过表达载体已成功转化农杆菌EHA105,为今后进一步了解GmCHR在大豆异黄酮代谢过程中的功能提供材料基础.%Flavonoids are involved in UV filtration,symbiotic nitrogen fixation and floral pigmentation in plants. Isoflavones have potential effects on human health,such as antioxirlant activity,preventing breast cancer and other cancers. Chalcone reductase ( CHR) is an important enzyme involved in flavonoid biosynthesis. Cloning of soybean chalcone reductase and construction of its plant expression vector would help study its function and the phenylpropanoid pathway. A gene encoding CHR on chromosome 14 was cloned from the cultivated soybean( Giycine max)cultivar Nannong 1138-2 using RT-PCR,and was designated as GmCHR. This gene contains a coding DNA sequence(CDS)of 948 bp,and the corresponding protein consists of 315 a-mino acids. The protein is estimated to have a molecular weight of 35.5 kDa and

  5. Diet and the frequency of the alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase Pro11Leu polymorphism in different human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Elizabeth F; Mayor, Lianne R; Thomas, Mark G; Danpure, Christopher J

    2004-11-01

    The intermediary metabolic enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) contains a Pro11Leu polymorphism that decreases its catalytic activity by a factor of three and causes a small proportion to be mistargeted from its normal intracellular location in the peroxisomes to the mitochondria. These changes are predicted to have significant effects on the synthesis and excretion of the metabolic end-product oxalate and the deposition of insoluble calcium oxalate in the kidney and urinary tract. Based on the evolution of AGT targeting in mammals, we have previously hypothesised that this polymorphism would be advantageous for individuals who have a meat-rich diet, but disadvantageous for those who do not. If true, the frequency distribution of Pro11Leu in different extant human populations should have been shaped by their dietary history so that it should be more common in populations with predominantly meat-eating ancestral diets than it is in populations in which the ancestral diets were predominantly vegetarian. In the present study, we have determined frequency of Pro11Leu in 11 different human populations with divergent ancestral dietary lifestyles. We show that the Pro11Leu allelic frequency varies widely from 27.9% in the Saami, a population with a very meat-rich ancestral diet, to 2.3% in Chinese, who are likely to have had a more mixed ancestral diet. FST analysis shows that the differences in Pro11Leu frequency between some populations (particularly Saami vs Chinese) was very high when compared with neutral loci, suggesting that its frequency might have been shaped by dietary selection pressure.

  6. Terpenoids from Diplophyllum taxifolium with quinone reductase-inducing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Shen, Tao; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Two new ent-prenylaromadendrane-type diterpenoids, diplotaxifols A (1) and B (2), a new ent-eudesmol, ent-eudesma-4(15),11(13)-dien-6α,12-diol (3), eight new eudesmanolides enantiomers (4-11) of the corresponding compounds from higher plants along with four known ent-eudesmanolides (12-15) were isolated from the 95% EtOH extract of Chinese liverwort Diplophyllum taxifolium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, NMR and IR spectral data, and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The quinone reductase-inducing activity of the compounds was evaluated.

  7. Overexpression of Soybean Isoflavone Reductase (GmIFR) Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qun; Li, Ninghui; Dong, Lidong; Zhang, Dayong; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wang, Xin; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatments, GmIFR was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethephon (ET), abscisic acid (placeCityABA), salicylic acid (SA). It is located in the cytoplasm when transiently expressed in soybean protoplasts. The daidzein levels reduced greatly for the seeds of transgenic plants, while the relative content of glyceollins in transgenic plants was significantly higher than that of non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, we found that the relative expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of transgenic soybean plants were significantly lower than those of non-transgenic plants after incubation with P. sojae, suggesting an important role of GmIFR might function as an antioxidant to reduce ROS in soybean. The enzyme activity assay suggested that GmIFR has isoflavone reductase activity.

  8. Proanthocyanidin synthesis in Theobroma cacao: genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase, anthocyanidin reductase, and leucoanthocyanidin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Shi, Zi; Maximova, Siela; Payne, Mark J; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2013-12-05

    The proanthocyanidins (PAs), a subgroup of flavonoids, accumulate to levels of approximately 10% total dry weight of cacao seeds. PAs have been associated with human health benefits and also play important roles in pest and disease defense throughout the plant. To dissect the genetic basis of PA biosynthetic pathway in cacao (Theobroma cacao), we have isolated three genes encoding key PA synthesis enzymes, anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR). We measured the expression levels of TcANR, TcANS and TcLAR and PA content in cacao leaves, flowers, pod exocarp and seeds. In all tissues examined, all three genes were abundantly expressed and well correlated with PA accumulation levels, suggesting their active roles in PA synthesis. Overexpression of TcANR in an Arabidopsis ban mutant complemented the PA deficient phenotype in seeds and resulted in reduced anthocyanidin levels in hypocotyls. Overexpression of TcANS in tobacco resulted in increased content of both anthocyanidins and PAs in flower petals. Overexpression of TcANS in an Arabidopsis ldox mutant complemented its PA deficient phenotype in seeds. Recombinant TcLAR protein converted leucoanthocyanidin to catechin in vitro. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing TcLAR had decreased amounts of anthocyanidins and increased PAs. Overexpressing TcLAR in Arabidopsis ldox mutant also resulted in elevated synthesis of not only catechin but also epicatechin. Our results confirm the in vivo function of cacao ANS and ANR predicted based on sequence homology to previously characterized enzymes from other species. In addition, our results provide a clear functional analysis of a LAR gene in vivo.

  9. Glyoxylate as a reducing agent for manganese(III) in salen scaffold: A kinetics and mechanistic study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akshaya K Kar; Achyutananda Acharya; Guru C Pradhan; Anadi C Dash

    2014-05-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of glyoxylic acid (HGl) by MnIII(salen)(OH2)$^{+}_{2}$ ((H2salen = N,N'- bis(salicylidene)ethane-1,2-diamine) is investigated at 30.0-45.0°C, 1.83 ≤ pH ≤ 6.10, I = 0.3 mol dm-3(NaClO4). The products are identified as formic acid, CO2 and MnII with the reaction stoichiometry, |[MnIII]/[HGl]| = 2. The overall reaction involves fast equilibrium pre-association of MnIII(salen)(OH2)$^{+}_{2}$ with HGl and its conjugate base Gl− forming the corresponding inner sphere complexes (both HGl and Gl− being the monohydrate gem-diol forms) followed by the slow electron transfer steps. In addition, the second order electron transfer reactions involving the inner-sphere complexes and HGl/Gl− are also observed. The rate, equilibrium constants and activation parameters for various steps are presented. MnIII(salen)(OH2)(Gl) is virtually inert to intra molecular electron transfer while the process is facile for MnIII(salen)(OH2)(HGl)+ (105ket} = 2.8 ± 0.3 s-1 at 35.0°C) reflecting the involvement of proton coupled electron transfer mechanism in the latter case. A computational study of the structure optimization of the complexes, trans-MnIII(salen)(OH2)$^{+}_{2}$, trans-MnIII(salen)(OH2)(Gl), and trans- MnIII(salen)(OH2)(HGl)+ (all high spin MnIII(d4) systems), reveals strongest axial distortion for the (aqua)(Gl) complex ; HGl bound to MnIII centre by the C=O function of the carboxyl group in the (aqua)(HGl) complex facilitates the formation of a hydrogen bond between the proton of the carboxyl group and the coordinated phenoxide moiety ((O-H…O hydrogen bond distance 1.745 Å) and the gem-diols are not involved in H-bonding in either case. A rate comparison for the second order paths: MnIII(salen)(OH2)(HGl)/Gl)+/0 + HGl/Gl− → products, shows that HGl for the (aqua)(HGl) complex is a better reducing agent than Gl− for the (aqua)(Gl) complex (HG ∼ 5 Gl). The high values of activation enthalpy (H≠ = 93-119 kJ mol-1) are indicative of

  10. Structure of Hordeum vulgare NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase 2. Unwinding the reaction mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkensgaard, Kristine Groth; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are protein disulfide reductases that regulate the intracellular redox environment and are important for seed germination in plants. Trxs are in turn regulated by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs), which provide reducing equivalents to Trx using NADPH to recycle Trxs...... relative to the FAD domain in comparison with AtNTR-B. The structure may represent an intermediate between the two conformations described previously: the flavin-oxidizing (FO) and the flavin-reducing (FR) conformations. Here, analysis of interdomain contacts as well as phylogenetic studies lead...

  11. A soluble 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, A; Camacho, A

    1997-01-01

    of the genes described from eukaryotic organisms and the deduced amino acid sequence could be aligned with the C-terminal half of animal and plant reductases exhibiting pronounced similarity to other eukaryotic counterparts. Further examination of the 5' flanking region by cDNA analysis and establishment...... cellular distribution of enzymic activity was investigated after differential centrifugation of Trypanosoma cell extracts. Reductase activity was primarily associated with the cellular soluble fraction because 95% of the total cellular activity was recovered in the supernatant and was particularly...

  12. Overexpression of AtFRO6 in transgenic tobacco enhances ferric chelate reductase activity in leaves and increases tolerance to iron-deficiency chlorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Ya; Cai, Qiu-Yi; Yu, Dian-Si; Guo, Chang-Hong

    2011-08-01

    The Arabidopsis gene FRO6(AtFRO6) encodes ferric chelate reductase and highly expressed in green tissues of plants. We have expressed the gene AtFRO6 under the control of a 35S promoter in transgenic tobacco plants. High-level expression of AtFRO6 in transgenic plants was confirmed by northern blot analysis. Ferric reductase activity in leaves of transgenic plants grown under iron-sufficient or iron-deficient conditions is 2.13 and 1.26 fold higher than in control plants respectively. The enhanced ferric reductase activity led to increased concentrations of ferrous iron and chlorophyll, and reduced the iron deficiency chlorosis in the transgenic plants, compared to the control plants. In roots, the concentration of ferrous iron and ferric reductase activity were not significantly different in the transgenic plants compared to the control plants. These results suggest that FRO6 functions as a ferric chelate reductase for iron uptake by leaf cells, and overexpression of AtFRO6 in transgenic plants can reduce iron deficiency chlorosis.

  13. 茶树花青素还原酶的酶学特性研究%Research on Enzymatic Characteristics of Anthocyanin Reductase of Tea Plant [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨琴; 赵磊; 刘亚军; 刘莉; 王云生; 高丽萍; 夏涛

    2013-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) is a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of proanthocyanidins(PAs), which catalyzes anthocyanidins into the corresponding 2, 3-cis-flavan-3-ols. For researching enzymatic characteristics of the enzyme, this study was carried out to express and purify the protein by prokaryotic expression and Cobalt ion affinity column purification. The optimal conditions of CsANR1 were observed at 40℃ and pH 6.5. The more substrate preference of CsANR1 was showed on cyanidin over delphinidin. Moreover, Cu2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Mn2+, Zn2+ and Hg2+inhibited the enzyme activity and the enzyme activity decreased 50% after storing 15 days.%  茶树花青素还原酶(CsANR)作为原花青素生物合成途径中的关键酶,催化花青素为相应的2,3-顺式-黄烷-3-醇。为了研究该酶的酶学特性,本文采用原核表达及钴离子亲和柱纯化技术,表达并纯化出目的蛋白;重点对 CsANR1酶学特性进行研究分析。结果表明,CsANR1的最适反应温度为40℃,最适 pH 值为6.5;对底物矢车菊色素的亲和力高于飞燕草色素。Cu2+、Co2+、Fe2+、Mn2+、Zn2+和 Hg2+等金属离子对酶有抑制作用,存放15 d 后酶活下降50%。

  14. Recombinant pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases from western red cedar (Thuja plicata) catalyze opposite enantiospecific conversions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, M; Gang, D R; Davin, L B; Lewis, N G

    1999-01-01

    Although the heartwood of woody plants represents the main source of fiber and solid wood products, essentially nothing is known about how the biological processes leading to its formation are initiated and regulated. Accordingly, a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-guided cloning strategy was employed to obtain genes encoding pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases from western red cedar (Thuja plicata) as a means to initiate the study of its heartwood formation. (+)-Pinoresinol-(+)-lariciresinol reductase from Forsythia intermedia was used as a template for primer construction for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplifications, which, when followed by homologous hybridization cloning, resulted in the isolation of two distinct classes of putative pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase cDNA clones from western red cedar. A representative of each class was expressed as a fusion protein with beta-galactosidase and assayed for enzymatic activity. Using both deuterated and radiolabeled (+/-)-pinoresinols as substrates, it was established that each class of cDNA encoded a pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase of different (opposite) enantiospecificity. Significantly, the protein from one class converted (+)-pinoresinol into (-)-secoisolariciresinol, whereas the other utilized the opposite (-)-enantiomer to give the corresponding (+)-form. This differential substrate specificity raises important questions about the role of each of these individual reductases in heartwood formation, such as whether they are expressed in different cells/tissues or at different stages during heartwood development.

  15. Comparative modelling and molecular docking of nitrate reductase from Bacillus weihenstephanensis (DS45

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Seenivasagan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate reductase catalyses the oxidation of NAD(PH and the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. NR serves as a central point for the integration of metabolic pathways by governing the flux of reduced nitrogen through several regulatory mechanisms in plants, algae and fungi. Bacteria express nitrate reductases that convert nitrate to nitrite, but mammals lack these specific enzymes. The microbial nitrate reductase reduces toxic compounds to nontoxic compounds with the help of NAD(PH. In the present study, our results revealed that Bacillus weihenstephanensis expresses a nitrate reductase enzyme, which was made to generate the 3D structure of the enzyme. Six different modelling servers, namely Phyre2, RaptorX, M4T Server, HHpred, SWISS MODEL and Mod Web, were used for comparative modelling of the structure. The model was validated with standard parameters (PROCHECK and Verify 3D. This study will be useful in the functional characterization of the nitrate reductase enzyme and its docking with nitrate molecules, as well as for use with autodocking.

  16. Peach MYB7 activates transcription of the proanthocyanidin pathway gene encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase, but not anthocyanidin reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eZhou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs are a group of natural phenolic compounds that have a great effect on both flavour and nutritious value of fruit. It has been shown that PA synthesis is regulated by R2R3-MYB transcription factors (TFs via activation of PA-specific pathway genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a MYB gene designated PpMYB7 in peach. The peach PpMYB7 represents a new group of R2R3-MYB genes regulating PA synthesis in plants. It is able to activate transcription of PpLAR1 but not PpANR, and has a broader selection of potential bHLH partners compared with PpMYBPA1. Transcription of PpMYB7 can be activated by the peach basic leucine-zipper 5 TF (PpbZIP5 via response to ABA. Our study suggests a transcriptional network regulating PA synthesis in peach, with the results aiding the understanding of the functional divergence between R2R3-MYB TFs in plants.

  17. Dynamic Changes of Nitrate Reductase Activity within 24 Hours

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The research aimed to study the circadian rhythm of nitrate re- ductase activity (NRA) in plant. [Method] The wheat plants at heading stage were used as the materials for the measurement of dynamic changes of nitrate reductase activity (NRA) within 24 h under the conditions of constant high temperature. [Resulti The fluctuation of NRA in wheat changed greatly from 20:00 pm to 11:00 am. The enzyme activity remained constant, but at 14:00 the enzyme activity was the high- est, higher than all the other time points except the enzyme activity measured at11:00. The enzyme activity was the lowest of 17:00, which was lower than all the other time points except the enzyme activity measured at 2:00. [Conclusion] There were autonomous rhythm changes of NRA in wheat in a certain degree.

  18. The aldo-keto reductase superfamily homepage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, David; Bauman, David R; Heredia, Vladi V; Penning, Trevor M

    2003-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are one of the three enzyme superfamilies that perform oxidoreduction on a wide variety of natural and foreign substrates. A systematic nomenclature for the AKR superfamily was adopted in 1996 and was updated in September 2000 (visit www.med.upenn.edu/akr). Investigators have been diligent in submitting sequences of functional proteins to the Web site. With the new additions, the superfamily contains 114 proteins expressed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that are distributed over 14 families (AKR1-AKR14). The AKR1 family contains the aldose reductases, the aldehyde reductases, the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and steroid 5beta-reductases, and is the largest. Other families of interest include AKR6, which includes potassium channel beta-subunits, and AKR7 the aflatoxin aldehyde reductases. Two new families include AKR13 (yeast aldose reductase) and AKR14 (Escherichia coli aldehyde reductase). Crystal structures of many AKRs and their complexes with ligands are available in the PDB and accessible through the Web site. Each structure has the characteristic (alpha/beta)(8)-barrel motif of the superfamily, a conserved cofactor binding site and a catalytic tetrad, and variable loop structures that define substrate specificity. Although the majority of AKRs are monomeric proteins of about 320 amino acids in length, the AKR2, AKR6 and AKR7 family may form multimers. To expand the nomenclature to accommodate multimers, we recommend that the composition and stoichiometry be listed. For example, AKR7A1:AKR7A4 (1:3) would designate a tetramer of the composition indicated. The current nomenclature is recognized by the Human Genome Project (HUGO) and the Web site provides a link to genomic information including chromosomal localization, gene boundaries, human ESTs and SNPs and much more.

  19. A Rh(ii)-catalyzed three-component reaction of 3-diazooxindoles with N,N-disubstituted anilines and glyoxylates for the synthesis of 3-aryl-3-substituted oxindoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shi-Kun; Song, Long-Long; Lei, Yu-Bing; Gopi Krishna Reddy, A; Xing, Dong; Hu, Wen-Hao

    2016-11-02

    A simple and effective method for the synthesis of 3-aryl-3-substituted oxindole derivatives via a [Rh]-catalyzed three-component reaction of 3-diazooxindoles with N,N-disubstituted anilines and glyoxylates is developed. This transformation is proposed to proceed through an intermolecular aldol-type trapping of zwitterionic intermediates.

  20. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  1. Differential molecular response of monodehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase by nitration and S-nitrosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Valderrama, Raquel; Padilla, María N; López-Jaramillo, Javier; Luque, Francisco; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2015-09-01

    The ascorbate-glutathione cycle is a metabolic pathway that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide and involves enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Proteomic studies have shown that some enzymes in this cycle such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), and glutathione reductase (GR) are potential targets for post-translational modifications (PMTs) mediated by nitric oxide-derived molecules. Using purified recombinant pea peroxisomal MDAR and cytosolic and chloroplastic GR enzymes produced in Escherichia coli, the effects of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) which are known to mediate protein nitration and S-nitrosylation processes, respectively, were analysed. Although ONOO(-) and GSNO inhibit peroxisomal MDAR activity, chloroplastic and cytosolic GR were not affected by these molecules. Mass spectrometric analysis of the nitrated MDAR revealed that Tyr213, Try292, and Tyr345 were exclusively nitrated to 3-nitrotyrosine by ONOO(-). The location of these residues in the structure of pea peroxisomal MDAR reveals that Tyr345 is found at 3.3 Å of His313 which is involved in the NADP-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed Tyr345 as the primary site of nitration responsible for the inhibition of MDAR activity by ONOO(-). These results provide new insights into the molecular regulation of MDAR which is deactivated by nitration and S-nitrosylation. However, GR was not affected by ONOO(-) or GSNO, suggesting the existence of a mechanism to conserve redox status by maintaining the level of reduced GSH. Under a nitro-oxidative stress induced by salinity (150mM NaCl), MDAR expression (mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels) was increased, probably to compensate the inhibitory effects of S-nitrosylation and nitration on the enzyme. The present data show the modulation of the antioxidative response of key enzymes in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle by nitric oxide (NO)-PTMs, thus indicating the close involvement of

  2. Structural and docking studies of Leucaena leucocephala Cinnamoyl CoA reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Kumar, Vikash; Kabra, Ashish; Phogat, Navneet; Kumar, Manoj

    2011-03-01

    Lignin, a major constituent of plant call wall, is a phenolic heteropolymer. It plays a major role in the development of plants and their defense mechanism against pathogens. Therefore Lignin biosynthesis is one of the critical metabolic pathways. In lignin biosynthesis, the Cinnamoyl CoA reductase is a key enzyme which catalyzes the first step in the pathway. Cinnamoyl CoA reductase provides the substrates which represent the main transitional molecules of lignin biosynthesis pathway, exhibits a high in vitro kinetic preference for feruloyl CoA. In present study, the three-dimensional model of cinnamoyl CoA reductase was constructed based on the crystal structure of Grape Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase. Furthermore, the docking studies were performed to understand the substrate interactions to the active site of CCR. It showed that residues ARG51, ASN52, ASP54 and ASN58 were involved in substrate binding. We also suggest that residue ARG51 in CCR is the determinant residue in competitive inhibition of other substrates. This structural and docking information have prospective implications to understand the mechanism of CCR enzymatic reaction with feruloyl CoA, however the approach will be applicable in prediction of substrates and engineering 3D structures of other enzymes as well.

  3. Asymmetric Ketone Reduction by Imine Reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Maike; Meisner, Jan; Quertinmont, Leann; Lutz, Stefan; Kästner, Johannes; Nestl, Bettina M

    2017-02-01

    The rapidly growing area of asymmetric imine reduction by imine reductases (IREDs) has provided alternative routes to chiral amines. Here we report the expansion of the reaction scope of IREDs by showing the stereoselective reduction of 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone. Assisted by an in silico analysis of energy barriers, we evaluated asymmetric hydrogenations of carbonyls and imines while considering the influence of substrate reactivity on the chemoselectivity of this novel class of reductases. We report the asymmetric reduction of C=N as well as C=O bonds catalysed by members of the IRED enzyme family. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Stereospecificity of (+)-pinoresinol and (+)-lariciresinol reductases from Forsythia intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, A; Dinkova, A; Davin, L B; Bedgar, D L; Lewis, N G

    1993-12-25

    Pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase catalyzes the first known example of a highly unusual benzylic ether reduction in plants; its mechanism of hydride transfer is described. The enzyme was found in Forsythia intermedia and catalyzes the presumed regulatory branch-points in the pathway leading to benzylaryltetrahydrofuran, dibenzylbutane, dibenzylbutyrolactone, and aryltetrahydronaphthalene lignans. Using [7,7'-2H2]-pinoresinol and [7,7'-2H3]lariciresinol as substrates, the hydride transfers of the highly unusual reductase were demonstrated to be completely stereospecific (> 99%). The incoming hydrides were found to take up the pro-R position at C-7' (and/or C-7) in lariciresinol and secoisolariciresinol, thereby eliminating the possibility of random hydride delivery to a planar quinone methide intermediate. As might be expected, the mode of hydride abstraction from NADPH was also stereospecific: using [4R-3H] and [4S-3H]NADPH, it was found that only the 4 pro-R hydrogen was abstracted for enzymatic hydride transfer.

  5. Nodule and Leaf Nitrate Reductases and Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago sativa L. under Water Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio-Tejo, P; Sánchez-Díaz, M

    1982-02-01

    The effect of water stress on patterns of nitrate reductase activity in the leaves and nodules and on nitrogen fixation were investigated in Medicago sativa L. plants watered 1 week before drought with or without NO(3) (-). Nitrogen fixation was decreased by water stress and also inhibited strongly by the presence of NO(3) (-). During drought, leaf nitrate reductase activity (NRA) decreased significantly particularly in plants watered with NO(3) (-), while with rewatering, leaf NRA recovery was quite important especially in the NO(3) (-)-watered plants. As water stress progressed, the nodular NRA increased both in plants watered with NO(3) (-) and in those without NO(3) (-) contrary to the behavior of the leaves. Beyond -15.10(5) pascal, nodular NRA began to decrease in plants watered with NO(3) (-). This phenomenon was not observed in nodules of plants given water only.Upon rewatering, it was observed that in plants watered with NO(3) (-) the nodular NRA increased again, while in plants watered but not given NO(3) (-), such activity began to decrease. Nitrogen fixation increased only in plants without NO(3) (-).

  6. Non-traditional antibacterial screening approaches for the identification of novel inhibitors of the glyoxylate shunt in gram-negative pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly C Fahnoe

    Full Text Available Antibacterial compounds that affect bacterial viability have traditionally been identified, confirmed, and characterized in standard laboratory media. The historical success of identifying new antibiotics via this route has justifiably established a traditional means of screening for new antimicrobials. The emergence of multi-drug-resistant (MDR bacterial pathogens has expedited the need for new antibiotics, though many in the industry have questioned the source(s of these new compounds. As many pharmaceutical companies' chemical libraries have been exhaustively screened via the traditional route, we have concluded that all compounds with any antibacterial potential have been identified. While new compound libraries and platforms are being pursued, it also seems prudent to screen the libraries we currently have in hand using alternative screening approaches. One strategy involves screening under conditions that better reflect the environment pathogens experience during an infection, and identifying in vivo essential targets and pathways that are dispensable for growth in standard laboratory media in vitro. Here we describe a novel screening strategy for identifying compounds that inhibit the glyoxylate shunt in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a pathway that is required for bacterial survival in the pulmonary environment. We demonstrate that these compounds, which were not previously identified using traditional screening approaches, have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity when they are tested under in vivo-relevant conditions. We also show that these compounds have potent activity on both enzymes that comprise the glyoxylate shunt, a feature that was supported by computational homology modeling. By dual-targeting both enzymes in this pathway, we would expect to see a reduced propensity for resistance development to these compounds. Taken together, these data suggest that understanding the in vivo environment that bacterial pathogens must tolerate

  7. Inhibition of Krebs cycle and activation of glyoxylate cycle in the course of chronological aging of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Compensatory role of succinate oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, V; Ignatov, V; Kondrashova, M

    2004-01-01

    We investigated oxidative processes in mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on ethanol in the course of chronological aging. We elaborated a model of chronological aging that avoids the influence of exhaustion of medium, as well as the accumulation of toxic metabolites during aging. A decrease in total respiration of cells and, even more, of the contribution of respiration coupled with ATP-synthesis was observed during aging. Aging is also related with the decrease of the contribution of malonate-insensitive respiration. Activities of citrate-synthase (CS), alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were threefold decreased. The activity of NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH) decreased more significantly, while the activity of NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-ICDH) fell even greater, being completely inactivated on the third week of aging. In contrast, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), enzymes of glyoxylate cycle (GCL) (isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MLS)), and enzymes of ethanol oxidation (alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ACDH)), were activated by 50% or more. The behavior of oxidative enzymes and metabolic pathways are apparently inherent to a more viable, long-lived cells in population, selected in the course of chronological aging. This selection allows cells to reveal the mechanism of their higher viability as caused by shunting of complete Krebs cycle by glyoxylate cycle, with a concomitant increased rate of the most efficient energy source, namely succinate formation and oxidation. Thiobarbituric-reactive species (TAR species) increased during aging. We supposed that to be the immediate cause of damage of a part of yeast population. These data show that a greater succinate contribution to respiration in more active cells is a general property of yeast and animal tissues.

  8. Characterisation of a desmosterol reductase involved in phytosterol dealkylation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonora F Ciufo

    Full Text Available Most species of invertebrate animals cannot synthesise sterols de novo and many that feed on plants dealkylate phytosterols (mostly C(29 and C(28 yielding cholesterol (C(27. The final step of this dealkylation pathway involves desmosterol reductase (DHCR24-catalysed reduction of desmosterol to cholesterol. We now report the molecular characterisation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, of such a desmosterol reductase involved in production of cholesterol from phytosterol, rather than in de novo synthesis of cholesterol. Phylogenomic analysis of putative desmosterol reductases revealed the occurrence of various clades that allowed for the identification of a strong reductase candidate gene in Bombyx mori (BGIBMGA 005735. Following PCR-based cloning of the cDNA (1.6 kb and its heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisae, the recombinant protein catalysed reduction of desmosterol to cholesterol in an NADH- and FAD-dependent reaction.Conceptual translation of the cDNA, that encodes a 58.9 kDa protein, and database searching, revealed that the enzyme belongs to an FAD-dependent oxidoreductase family. Western blotting revealed reductase protein expression exclusively in the microsomal subcellular fraction and primarily in the gut. The protein is peripherally associated with microsomal membranes. 2D-native gel and PAGE analysis revealed that the reductase is part of a large complex with molecular weight approximately 250 kDa. The protein occurs in midgut microsomes at a fairly constant level throughout development in the last two instars, but is drastically reduced during the wandering stage in preparation for metamorphosis. Putative Broad Complex transcription factor-binding sites detectable upstream of the DHCR24 gene may play a role in this down-regulation.

  9. Evaluation of constitutive iron reductase (AtFRO2 expression on mineral accumulation and distribution in soybean (Glycine max. L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Wilton Vasconcelos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an important micronutrient in human and plant nutrition. Adequate iron nutrition during crop production is central for assuring appropriate iron concentrations in the harvestable organs, for human food or animal feed. The whole-plant movement of iron involves several processes, including the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron at several locations throughout the plant, prior to transmembrane trafficking of ferrous iron. In this study, soybean plants that constitutively expressed the AtFRO2 iron reductase gene were analyzed for leaf iron reductase activity, as well as the effect of this transgene's expression on root, leaf, pod wall, and seed mineral concentrations. High Fe supply, in combination with the constitutive expression of AtFRO2, resulted in significantly higher concentrations of different minerals in roots (K, P, Zn, Ca, Ni, Mg and Mo, pod walls (Fe, K, P, Cu and Ni, leaves (Fe, P, Cu, Ca, Ni and Mg and seeds (Fe, Zn, Cu and Ni. Leaf and pod wall iron concentrations increased as much as 500% in transgenic plants, while seed iron concentrations only increased by 10%, suggesting that factors other than leaf and pod wall reductase activity were limiting the translocation of iron to seeds. Protoplasts isolated from transgenic leaves had three-fold higher reductase activity than controls. Expression levels of the iron storage protein, ferritin, were higher in the transgenic leaves than in wild-type, suggesting that the excess iron may be stored as ferritin in the leaves and therefore unavailable for phloem loading and delivery to the seeds. Also, citrate and malate levels in the roots and leaves of transgenic plants were significantly higher than in wild-type, suggesting that organic acid production could be related to the increased accumulation of minerals in roots, leaves and pod walls, but not in the seeds. All together, these results suggest a more ubiquitous role for the iron reductase in whole-plant mineral accumulation and

  10. Evaluation of constitutive iron reductase (AtFRO2) expression on mineral accumulation and distribution in soybean (Glycine max. L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Marta W; Clemente, Thomas E; Grusak, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient in human and plant nutrition. Adequate iron nutrition during crop production is central for assuring appropriate iron concentrations in the harvestable organs, for human food or animal feed. The whole-plant movement of iron involves several processes, including the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron at several locations throughout the plant, prior to transmembrane trafficking of ferrous iron. In this study, soybean plants that constitutively expressed the AtFRO2 iron reductase gene were analyzed for leaf iron reductase activity, as well as the effect of this transgene's expression on root, leaf, pod wall, and seed mineral concentrations. High Fe supply, in combination with the constitutive expression of AtFRO2, resulted in significantly higher concentrations of different minerals in roots (K, P, Zn, Ca, Ni, Mg, and Mo), pod walls (Fe, K, P, Cu, and Ni), leaves (Fe, P, Cu, Ca, Ni, and Mg) and seeds (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Ni). Leaf and pod wall iron concentrations increased as much as 500% in transgenic plants, while seed iron concentrations only increased by 10%, suggesting that factors other than leaf and pod wall reductase activity were limiting the translocation of iron to seeds. Protoplasts isolated from transgenic leaves had three-fold higher reductase activity than controls. Expression levels of the iron storage protein, ferritin, were higher in the transgenic leaves than in wild-type, suggesting that the excess iron may be stored as ferritin in the leaves and therefore unavailable for phloem loading and delivery to the seeds. Also, citrate and malate levels in the roots and leaves of transgenic plants were significantly higher than in wild-type, suggesting that organic acid production could be related to the increased accumulation of minerals in roots, leaves, and pod walls, but not in the seeds. All together, these results suggest a more ubiquitous role for the iron reductase in whole-plant mineral accumulation and distribution.

  11. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins.

  12. Sequence diversity and enzyme activity of ferric-chelate reductase LeFRO1 in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Danyu; Chen, Chunlin; Wu, Huilan; Li, Ye; Li, Junming; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2013-11-20

    Ferric-chelate reductase which functions in the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron on root surface is a critical protein for iron homeostasis in strategy I plants. LeFRO1 is a major ferric-chelate reductase involved in iron uptake in tomato. To identify the natural variations of LeFRO1 and to assess their effect on the ferric-chelate reductase activity, we cloned the coding sequences of LeFRO1 from 16 tomato varieties collected from different regions, and detected three types of LeFRO1 (LeFRO1(MM), LeFRO1(Ailsa) and LeFRO1(Monita)) with five amino acid variations at the positions 21, 24, 112, 195 and 582. Enzyme activity assay revealed that the three types of LeFRO1 possessed different ferric-chelate reductase activity (LeFRO1(Ailsa) > LeFRO1(MM) > LeFRO1(Monita)). The 112th amino acid residue Ala of LeFRO1 is critical for maintaining the high activity of ferric-chelate reductase, because modification of this amino acid resulted in a significant reduction of enzyme activity. Further, we showed that the combination of the amino acid residue Ile at the site 24 with Lys at the site 582 played a positive role in the enzyme activity of LeFRO1. In conclusion, the findings are helpful to understand the natural adaptation mechanisms of plants to iron-limiting stress, and may provide new knowledge to select and manipulate LeFRO1 for improving the iron deficiency tolerance in tomato.

  13. Expression Analysis of Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase Genes Involved in Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Purple Grains of Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao-Sen LIU; Fang WANG; Yu-Xiu DONG; Xian-Sheng ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    The grain color of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important characteristic in crop production.Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes (DFR) encode the key enzyme dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, which is involved in the pigmentation of plant tissues. To investigate the molecular mechanism of anthocyanin deposition in grains of wheat, we determined the expression of the wheat DFR gene in purple grains of cultivar Heimai 76. The results showed that DFR transcripts were localized in the seed coat of purple grains rather than in the pericarp, whereas anthocyanins were accumulated in both tissues of purple grains,suggesting that anthocyanin deposition was mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. Overexpression of the TaDFR-A gene in Arabidopsis showed that TaDFR-A was responsible for the pigmentation of Arabidopsis plant tissues, indicating TaDFR-A gene has the same role in Arabidopsis.

  14. Overexpression of soybean isoflavone reductase (GmIFR enhances resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun eCheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Isoflavone reductase (IFR is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. The cDNA of GmIFR was 1199 bp containing a 939 bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 312 amino acids. Sequence analysis suggested that GmIFR contained a NAD(P domain of 107 amino acids. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatments, GmIFR was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethephon (ET, abscisic acid (ABA, salicylic acid (SA. It is located in the cytoplasmic when transiently expressed in Arabidopsis protoplasts. The daidzein levels reduced greatly for the seeds of transgenic plants, while levels of genistein and glycitein had little change compared to that of control plants. Furthermore, we also found that the reactive oxygen species (ROS content of transgenic soybean plants was significantly lower than that of control plants, suggesting an important role of GmIFR might function as an antioxidant to reduce ROS in soybean.

  15. Molecular cloning and catalytic characterization of a recombinant tropine biosynthetic tropinone reductase from Withania coagulans leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Amit K; Sangwan, Neelam S; Tripathi, Sandhya; Sangwan, Rajender S

    2013-03-10

    Tropinone reductases (TRs) are small proteins belonging to the SDR (short chain dehydrogenase/reductase) family of enzymes. TR-I and TR-II catalyze the conversion of tropinone into tropane alcohols (tropine and pseudotropine, respectively). The steps are intermediary enroute to biosynthesis of tropane esters of medicinal importance, hyoscyamine/scopolamine, and calystegins, respectively. Biosynthesis of tropane alkaloids has been proposed to occur in roots. However, in the present report, a tropine forming tropinone reductase (TR-I) cDNA was isolated from the aerial tissue (leaf) of a medicinal plant, Withania coagulans. The ORF was deduced to encode a polypeptide of 29.34 kDa. The complete cDNA (WcTRI) was expressed in E. coli and the recombinant His-tagged protein was purified for functional characterization. The enzyme had a narrow pH range of substantial activity with maxima at 6.6. Relatively superior thermostability of the enzyme (30% retention of activity at 60 °C) was catalytic novelty in consonance with the desert area restricted habitat of the plant. The in vitro reaction kinetics predominantly favoured the forward reaction. The enzyme had wide substrate specificity but did not cover the substrates of other well-known plant SDR related to menthol metabolism. To our knowledge, this pertains to be the first report on any gene and enzyme of secondary metabolism from the commercially and medicinally important vegetable rennet species.

  16. Molecular Characterization of a Dehydroascorbate Reductase from Pinus bungeana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Ling Yang; Ying-Ru Zhao; Cai-Ling Wang; Zhi-Ling Yang; Qing-Yin Zeng; Hai Lu

    2009-01-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) plays a critical role in the ascorbate-glutathione recycling reaction for most higher plants. To date, studies on DHAR in higher plants have focused largely on Arabidopsis and agricultural plants, and there is virtually no information on the molecular characteristics of DHAR in gymnosperms. The present study reports the cloning and characteristics of a DHAR (PbDHAR) from a pine, Pinus bungeana Zucc. ex Endl. The PbDHAR gene encodes a protein of 215 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 24.26 kDa. The predicted 3-D structure of PbDHAR showed a typical glutathione S-transferase fold. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the PbDHAR was a constitutive expression gene in P. bungeana. The expression level of PbDHAR mRNA in P. bungeana seedlings did not show significant change under high temperature stress. The recombinant PbDHAR was overexpressed in Escherichia coll following purification with affinity chromatography. The recombinant PbDHAR exhibited enzymatic activity (19.84μmol/min per mg) and high affinity (a K_m of 0.08 mM) towards the substrates dehydroascorbate (DHA). Moreover, the recombinant PbDHAR was a thermostable enzyme, and retained 77% of its initial activity at 55 ℃. The present study is the first to provide a detailed molecular characterization of the DHAR in P. bungeana.

  17. Characterization of human platelet glutathione reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroff, G; Kosow, D P

    1978-12-08

    Glutathione reductase (NAD(P)h:oxidized glutathione oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.4.2) has been purified 1000-fold from the cytoplasmic fraction of human platelets. Salts, including the heretofore unreported effect of sodium citrate, activate the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxidized glutathione. Sodium citrate and monovalent salt activation appears to involve multiple sites having different binding affinities. At sub-saturating sodium phosphate, non-linear double reciprocal plots indicative of substrate activation by oxidized glutathione were observed. Initial velocity double reciprocal plots at sub-saturating and saturating concentrations of phosphate generate a family of converging lines. NADP+ is a partial inhibitor, indicating that the reduction of oxidized glutathione can proceed by more than one pathway. FMN, FAD, and riboflavin inhibit platelet glutathione reductase by influencing only the V while nitrofurantoin inhibition is associated with an increase Koxidized glutathione and a decreased V.

  18. Study on the By-product Produced During the Scale-up of Drug Intermediate L-Menthol Glyoxylate%二羟乙酸薄荷酯的制备过程中副产物的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙中柱; 徐轶; 王春梅; 吴彦; 蔡水洪; 苏克曼

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the impurity in the preparation of L-menthol glyoxylate was identified by various spectroscopies. Furthermore, the cause and mechanism of the production of the impurity was discussed and the method for controlling the impurity lovel was suggested, providing the basis for the scale up of L-menthol glyoxylate.%利用波谱分析技术鉴定了二羟乙酸薄荷酯制备过程中的杂质结构,并由此推测该杂质产生的原因、机理,提出抑制形成该杂质的副反应的方法,为工业化大生产奠定了基础.

  19. Glyoxylate carboligase: a unique thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzyme that can cycle between the 4'-aminopyrimidinium and 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomeric forms in the absence of the conserved glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeria, Natalia; Binshtein, Elad; Patel, Hetalben; Balakrishnan, Anand; Vered, Ilan; Shaanan, Boaz; Barak, Ze'ev; Chipman, David; Jordan, Frank

    2012-10-01

    Glyoxylate carboligase (GCL) is a thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme, which catalyzes the decarboxylation of glyoxylate and ligation to a second molecule of glyoxylate to form tartronate semialdehyde (TSA). This enzyme is unique among ThDP enzymes in that it lacks a conserved glutamate near the N1' atom of ThDP (replaced by Val51) or any other potential acid-base side chains near ThDP. The V51D substitution shifts the pH optimum to 6.0-6.2 (pK(a) of 6.2) for TSA formation from pH 7.0-7.7 in wild-type GCL. This pK(a) is similar to the pK(a) of 6.1 for the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine (IP)-4'-aminopyrimidinium (APH(+)) protonic equilibrium, suggesting that the same groups control both ThDP protonation and TSA formation. The key covalent ThDP-bound intermediates were identified on V51D GCL by a combination of steady-state and stopped-flow circular dichroism methods, yielding rate constants for their formation and decomposition. It was demonstrated that active center variants with substitution at I393 could synthesize (S)-acetolactate from pyruvate solely, and acetylglycolate derived from pyruvate as the acetyl donor and glyoxylate as the acceptor, implying that this substitutent favored pyruvate as the donor in carboligase reactions. Consistent with these observations, the I393A GLC variants could stabilize the predecarboxylation intermediate analogues derived from acetylphosphinate, propionylphosphinate, and methyl acetylphosphonate in their IP tautomeric forms notwithstanding the absence of the conserved glutamate. The role of the residue at the position occupied typically by the conserved Glu controls the pH dependence of kinetic parameters, while the entire reaction sequence could be catalyzed by ThDP itself, once the APH(+) form is accessible.

  20. Inhibition of aldose reductase and anti-cataract action of trans-anethole isolated from Foeniculum vulgare Mill. fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongare, Vandana; Kulkarni, Chaitanya; Kondawar, Manish; Magdum, Chandrakant; Haldavnekar, Vivek; Arvindekar, Akalpita

    2012-05-01

    Foeniculum vulgare fruits are routinely consumed for their carminative and mouth freshening effect. The plant was evaluated for aldose reductase inhibition and anti-diabetic action. Bioguided fractionation using silica gel column chromatography, HPLC, and GC-MS analysis revealed trans-anethole as the bioactive constituent possessing potent aldose reductase inhibitory action, with an IC50 value of 3.8μg/ml. Prolonged treatment with the pet ether fraction of the F. vulgare distillate demonstrated improvement in blood glucose, lipid profile, glycated haemoglobin and other parameters in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Trans-anethole could effectively show anti-cataract activity through the increase in soluble lens protein, reduced glutathione, catalase and SOD activity on in vitro incubation of the eye lens with 55mM glucose. Trans-anethole demonstrated noncompetitive to mixed type of inhibition of lens aldose reductase using Lineweaver Burk plot.

  1. Genome-Wide Survey of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 Reveals a Role for the Glyoxylate Pathway and Extracellular Proteases in the Utilization of Mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jeffrey M; Phan, Chi; Hunter, Ryan C

    2017-08-01

    Chronic airway infections by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Although this bacterium has been extensively studied for its virulence determinants, biofilm growth, and immune evasion mechanisms, comparatively little is known about the nutrient sources that sustain its growth in vivo Respiratory mucins represent a potentially abundant bioavailable nutrient source, although we have recently shown that canonical pathogens inefficiently use these host glycoproteins as a growth substrate. However, given that P. aeruginosa, particularly in its biofilm mode of growth, is thought to grow slowly in vivo, the inefficient use of mucin glycoproteins may be relevant to its persistence within the CF airways. To this end, we used whole-genome fitness analysis, combining transposon mutagenesis with high-throughput sequencing, to identify genetic determinants required for P. aeruginosa growth using intact purified mucins as a sole carbon source. Our analysis reveals a biphasic growth phenotype, during which the glyoxylate pathway and amino acid biosynthetic machinery are required for mucin utilization. Secondary analyses confirmed the simultaneous liberation and consumption of acetate during mucin degradation and revealed a central role for the extracellular proteases LasB and AprA. Together, these studies describe a molecular basis for mucin-based nutrient acquisition by P. aeruginosa and reveal a host-pathogen dynamic that may contribute to its persistence within the CF airways. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Up-regulation of carbon metabolism-related glyoxylate cycle and toxin production in Beauveria bassiana JEF-007 during infection of bean bug, Riptortus pedestris (Hemiptera: Alydidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Ting; Lee, Se Jin; Nai, Yu-Shin; Kim, Sihyeon; Kim, Jae Su

    2016-10-01

    Beauveria bassiana (Bb) is used as an environment-friendly biopesticide. However, the molecular mechanisms of Bb-host interactions are not well understood. Herein, RNA isolated from B. bassiana (Bb JEF-007) and Riptortus pedestris (Hemiptera: Alydidae) infected with this strain were firstly subjected to high-throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze and compare transcriptomes. Due to lack of fungal and host genome information, fungal transcriptome was processed to partially exclude non-infection specific genes and host-flora. Differentially Expressed Gene (DEG) analysis showed that 2381 genes were up-regulated and 2303 genes were down-regulated upon infection. Most DEGs were classified into the categories of single-organism, cellular and metabolism processes by Gene Ontology analysis. Most DEGs were involved in metabolic pathways based on Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway mapping. Carbon metabolism-related enzymes in the glyoxylate cycle were significantly up-regulated, suggesting a possible role for them in Bb growth in the host. Additionally, transcript levels of several fungal genes were dramatically increased after infection, such as cytotoxic lectin-like protein, bacterial-like toxin, proteins related to cell wall formation, hyphal growth, nutrient uptake, and halogenated compound synthesis. This work provides insight into how entomopathogenic B. bassiana grows in agriculturally harmful bean bug at 6 d post infection.

  3. New roles of flavoproteins in molecular cell biology: an unexpected role for quinone reductases as regulators of proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollner, Sonja; Macheroux, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Quinone reductases are ubiquitous soluble enzymes found in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. These enzymes utilize a reduced nicotinamide such as NADH or NADPH to reduce the flavin cofactor (either FMN or FAD), which then affords two-electron reduction of cellular quinones. Although the chemical nature of the quinone substrate is still a matter of debate, the reaction appears to play a pivotal role in quinone detoxification by preventing the generation of potentially harmful semiquinones. In recent years, an additional role of quinone reductases as regulators of proteasomal degradation of transcription factors and possibly intrinsically unstructured protein has emerged. To fulfil this role, quinone reductase binds to the core particle of the proteasome and recruits certain transcription factors such as p53 and p73alpha to the complex. The latter process appears to be governed by the redox state of the flavin cofactor of the quinone reductase, thus linking the stability of transcription factors to cellular events such as oxidative stress. Here, we review the current evidence for protein complex formation between quinone reductase and the 20S proteasome in eukaryotic cells and describe the regulatory role of this complex in stabilizing transcription factors by acting as inhibitors of their proteasomal degradation.

  4. Hanford waste vitrification plant hydrogen generation study: Preliminary evaluation of alternatives to formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Kumar, V.

    1996-02-01

    Oxalic, glyoxylic, glycolic, malonic, pyruvic, lactic, levulinic, and citric acids as well as glycine have been evaluated as possible substitutes for formic acid in the preparation of feed for the Hanford waste vitrification plant using a non-radioactive feed stimulant UGA-12M1 containing substantial amounts of aluminum and iron oxides as well as nitrate and nitrite at 90C in the presence of hydrated rhodium trichloride. Unlike formic acid none of these carboxylic acids liberate hydrogen under these conditions and only malonic and citric acids form ammonia. Glyoxylic, glycolic, malonic, pyruvic, lactic, levulinic, and citric acids all appear to have significant reducing properties under the reaction conditions of interest as indicated by the observation of appreciable amounts of N{sub 2}O as a reduction product of,nitrite or, less likely, nitrate at 90C. Glyoxylic, pyruvic, and malonic acids all appear to be unstable towards decarboxylation at 90C in the presence of Al(OH){sub 3}. Among the carboxylic acids investigated in this study the {alpha}-hydroxycarboxylic acids glycolic and lactic acids appear to be the most interesting potential substitutes for formic acid in the feed preparation for the vitrification plant because of their failure to produce hydrogen or ammonia or to undergo decarboxylation under the reaction conditions although they exhibit some reducing properties in feed stimulant experiments.

  5. Nitrate reductase activity in cabbage (Brassica oleracae var. capitata seedlings affected by the different nitrogen fertilizer forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Turan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different nitrogen fertilizer (potassium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulphate, urea and farmyard manure on nitrate reductase activity in cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata seedlings were studied. pH of the plant growth niedia was higher in the nitrate fertilizer treatment than the ammonium and other fertilizer forms. NO3--N application increased NRA in plant, but NH4+-N decreased NRA in plant. Harvesting date and different fertilizer doses increased NRA while NH4+-N decreased plant nitrate uptake. There was a significant relationship between NRA and fertilizer types.

  6. Two mutations of dihydropteridine reductase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzone, A; Guardamagna, O; Ferraris, S; Bracco, G; Niederwieser, A; Cotton, R G

    1988-02-01

    Two patients with dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR) deficiency, in one case due to the absence of any enzyme protein (DHPR- cross reactive material (CRM)-) and in the other case due to the production of a mutant type devoid of catalytic activity (DHPR- CRM+) were examined. This latter form of malignant phenylketonuria, whose relative frequency seems to be higher in the Italian population, possibly has a worse prognosis. The earlier onset and the greater severity of clinical symptoms are associated with a more pronounced hydroxylation defect, as shown by higher degree of neonatal hyperphenylalaninaemia, unresponsiveness to an oral tetrahydrobiopterin load, lower concentrations of neurotransmitter metabolites, and reduced tyrosine production after an oral phenylalanine load.

  7. Enzyme toolbox: novel enantiocomplementary imine reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Philipp N; Fademrecht, Silvia; Hofelzer, Sebastian; Pleiss, Jürgen; Leipold, Friedemann; Turner, Nicholas J; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard

    2014-10-13

    Reducing reactions are among the most useful transformations for the generation of chiral compounds in the fine-chemical industry. Because of their exquisite selectivities, enzymatic approaches have emerged as the method of choice for the reduction of C=O and activated C=C bonds. However, stereoselective enzymatic reduction of C=N bonds is still in its infancy-it was only recently described after the discovery of enzymes capable of imine reduction. In our work, we increased the spectrum of imine-reducing enzymes by database analysis. By combining the currently available knowledge about the function of imine reductases with the experimentally uncharacterized diversity stored in protein sequence databases, three novel imine reductases with complementary enantiopreference were identified along with amino acids important for catalysis. Furthermore, their reducing capability was demonstrated by the reduction of the pharmaceutically relevant prochiral imine 2-methylpyrroline. These novel enzymes exhibited comparable to higher catalytic efficiencies than previously described enzymes, and their biosynthetic potential is highlighted by the full conversion of 2-methylpyrroline in whole cells with excellent selectivities. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Iron-mediated effects on nitrate reductase in marine phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, K.R.; Stolte, W.; Baar, H.J.W. de

    1994-01-01

    The potential activity of nitrate reductase was determined in uni-algal cultures in the laboratory and in natural marine phytoplankton assemblages. In the laboratory bioassays, distinct differences in nitrate reductase activity were observed in iron replete versus depleted cultures for Emiliania hux

  9. Misfolding caused by the pathogenic mutation G47R on the minor allele of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase and chaperoning activity of pyridoxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montioli, Riccardo; Oppici, Elisa; Dindo, Mirco; Roncador, Alessandro; Gotte, Giovanni; Cellini, Barbara; Borri Voltattorni, Carla

    2015-10-01

    Liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) enzyme, exists as two polymorphic forms, the major (AGT-Ma) and the minor (AGT-Mi) haplotype. Deficit of AGT causes Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1 (PH1), an autosomal recessive rare disease. Although ~one-third of the 79 disease-causing missense mutations segregates on AGT-Mi, only few of them are well characterized. Here for the first time the molecular and cellular defects of G47R-Mi are reported. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant purified G47R-Mi variant exhibits only a 2.5-fold reduction of its kcat, and its apo form displays a remarkably decreased PLP binding affinity, increased dimer-monomer equilibrium dissociation constant value, susceptibility to thermal denaturation and to N-terminal region proteolytic cleavage, and aggregation propensity. When stably expressed in a mammalian cell line, we found ~95% of the intact form of the variant in the insoluble fraction, and proteolyzed (within the N-terminal region) and aggregated forms both in the soluble and insoluble fractions. Moreover, the intact and nicked forms have a peroxisomal and a mitochondrial localization, respectively. Unlike what already seen for G41R-Mi, exposure of G47R-Mi expressing cells to pyridoxine (PN) remarkably increases the expression level and the specific activity in a dose-dependent manner, reroutes all the protein to peroxisomes, and rescues its functionality. Although the mechanism of the different effect of PN on the variants G47R-Mi and G41R-Mi remains elusive, the chaperoning activity of PN may be of value in the therapy of patients bearing the G47R mutation.

  10. Crystal structure of the S187F variant of human liver alanine: glyoxylate [corrected] aminotransferase associated with primary hyperoxaluria type I and its functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppici, Elisa; Fodor, Krisztian; Paiardini, Alessandro; Williams, Chris; Voltattorni, Carla Borri; Wilmanns, Matthias; Cellini, Barbara

    2013-08-01

    The substitution of Ser187, a residue located far from the active site of human liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), by Phe gives rise to a variant associated with primary hyperoxaluria type I. Unexpectedly, previous studies revealed that the recombinant form of S187F exhibits a remarkable loss of catalytic activity, an increased pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) binding affinity and a different coenzyme binding mode compared with normal AGT. To shed light on the structural elements responsible for these defects, we solved the crystal structure of the variant to a resolution of 2.9 Å. Although the overall conformation of the variant is similar to that of normal AGT, we noticed: (i) a displacement of the PLP-binding Lys209 and Val185, located on the re and si side of PLP, respectively, and (ii) slight conformational changes of other active site residues, in particular Trp108, the base stacking residue with the pyridine cofactor moiety. This active site perturbation results in a mispositioning of the AGT-pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP) complex and of the external aldimine, as predicted by molecular modeling studies. Taken together, both predicted and observed movements caused by the S187F mutation are consistent with the following functional properties of the variant: (i) a 300- to 500-fold decrease in both the rate constant of L-alanine half-transamination and the kcat of the overall transamination, (ii) a different PMP binding mode and affinity, and (iii) a different microenvironment of the external aldimine. Proposals for the treatment of patients bearing S187F mutation are discussed on the basis of these results.

  11. Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2) polymorphisms have considerable impact on methylarginine and β-aminoisobutyrate metabolism in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Anja; Müller, Fabian; König, Jörg; Mieth, Maren; Sticht, Heinrich; Zolk, Oliver; Kralj, Ana; Heinrich, Markus R; Fromm, Martin F; Maas, Renke

    2014-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of asymmetric (ADMA) and symmetric (SDMA) dimethylarginine have repeatedly been linked to adverse clinical outcomes. Both methylarginines are substrates of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2). It was the aim of the present study to simultaneously investigate the functional relevance and relative contributions of common AGXT2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to plasma and urinary concentrations of methylarginines as well as β-aminoisobutyrate (BAIB), a prototypic substrate of AGXT2. In a cohort of 400 healthy volunteers ADMA, SDMA and BAIB concentrations were determined in plasma and urine using HPLC-MS/MS and were related to the coding AGXT2 SNPs rs37369 (p.Val140Ile) and rs16899974 (p.Val498Leu). Volunteers heterozygous or homozygous for the AGXT2 SNP rs37369 had higher SDMA plasma concentrations by 5% and 20% (p = 0.002) as well as higher BAIB concentrations by 54% and 146%, respectively, in plasma and 237% and 1661%, respectively, in urine (both pimpact of the amino acid exchange p.Val140Ile, we established human embryonic kidney cell lines stably overexpressing wild-type or mutant (p.Val140Ile) AGXT2 protein and assessed enzyme activity using BAIB and stable-isotope labeled [²H₆]-SDMA as substrate. In vitro, the amino acid exchange of the mutant protein resulted in a significantly lower enzyme activity compared to wild-type AGXT2 (p<0.05). In silico modeling of the SNPs indicated reduced enzyme stability and substrate binding. In conclusion, SNPs of AGXT2 affect plasma as well as urinary BAIB and SDMA concentrations linking methylarginine metabolism to the common genetic trait of hyper-β-aminoisobutyric aciduria.

  12. Peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase in CAM plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, M F; Segovia, J L; Alejandre, M J; García-Peregrín, E

    1981-12-01

    Citrate synthase wa studied for the first time in peroxisomes and mitochondria of crassulacean acid metabolism plants. Cellular organelles were isolated from Agave americana leaves by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and characterized by the use of catalase and cytochrome oxidase as marker enzymes, respectively. 48,000 X g centrifugation caused the breakdown of the cellular organelles. The presence of a glyoxylate cycle enzyme (citrate synthase) and a glycollate pathway enzyme (catalase) in the same organelles, besides the absence of another glyoxalate cycle enzyme (malate synthase) is reported for the first time, suggesting that peroxisomal and glyoxysomal proteins are synthesized at the same time and housed in he same organelle.

  13. Nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase expression and activity in response to different nitrogen sources in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balotf, Sadegh; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.7.1.1), nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.2.2), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in response to potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and ammonium nitrate in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings. Plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 17 days and then subjected to nitrogen starvation for 7 days. The starved plants were supplied with potassium nitrate ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride (50 mM) for 4 days and the leaves were harvested. The relative expression of NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT as well as the enzyme activities were investigated. Nitrogen starvation caused a significant decrease both in transcript levels and in NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities. Potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate treatments restored NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT expressions and activities. Ammonium chloride increased only the expressions and activities of GS and GOGAT in a dose-dependent manner. The results of our study highlight the differential effects between the type and the amount of nitrogen salts on NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities in wheat seedlings while potassium nitrate being more effective.

  14. Transgenic Tobacco Overexpressing Tea cDNA Encoding Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase and Anthocyanidin Reductase Induces Early Flowering and Provides Biotic Stress Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar

    Full Text Available Flavan-3-ols contribute significantly to flavonoid content of tea (Camellia sinensis L.. Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR are known to be key regulatory enzymes of flavan-3-ols biosynthesis. In this study, we have generated the transgenic tobacco overexpressing individually tea cDNA CsDFR and CsANR encoding for DFR and ANR to evaluate their influence on developmental and protective abilities of plant against biotic stress. The transgenic lines of CsDFR and CsANR produced early flowering and better seed yield. Both types of transgenic tobacco showed higher content of flavonoids than control. Flavan-3-ols such as catechin, epicatechin and epicatechingallate were found to be increased in transgenic lines. The free radical scavenging activity of CsDFR and CsANR transgenic lines was improved. Oxidative stress was observed to induce lesser cell death in transgenic lines compared to control tobacco plants. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing CsDFR and CsANR also showed resistance against infestation by a tobacco leaf cutworm Spodoptera litura. Results suggested that the overexpression of CsDFR and CsANR cDNA in tobacco has improved flavonoids content and antioxidant potential. These attributes in transgenic tobacco have ultimately improved their growth and development, and biotic stress tolerance.

  15. Atomic Structure of Salutaridine Reductase from the Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashi, Yasuhiro; Kutchan, Toni M.; Smith, Thomas J. (Danforth)

    2011-11-18

    The opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) is one of the oldest known medicinal plants. In the biosynthetic pathway for morphine and codeine, salutaridine is reduced to salutaridinol by salutaridine reductase (SalR; EC 1.1.1.248) using NADPH as coenzyme. Here, we report the atomic structure of SalR to a resolution of {approx}1.9 {angstrom} in the presence of NADPH. The core structure is highly homologous to other members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. The major difference is that the nicotinamide moiety and the substrate-binding pocket are covered by a loop (residues 265-279), on top of which lies a large 'flap'-like domain (residues 105-140). This configuration appears to be a combination of the two common structural themes found in other members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. Previous modeling studies suggested that substrate inhibition is due to mutually exclusive productive and nonproductive modes of substrate binding in the active site. This model was tested via site-directed mutagenesis, and a number of these mutations abrogated substrate inhibition. However, the atomic structure of SalR shows that these mutated residues are instead distributed over a wide area of the enzyme, and many are not in the active site. To explain how residues distal to the active site might affect catalysis, a model is presented whereby SalR may undergo significant conformational changes during catalytic turnover.

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana dehydroascorbate reductase 2: Conformational flexibility during catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodra, Nandita; Young, David; Astolfi Rosado, Leonardo; Pallo, Anna; Wahni, Khadija; de Proft, Frank; Huang, Jingjing; van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2017-02-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) catalyzes the glutathione (GSH)-dependent reduction of dehydroascorbate and plays a direct role in regenerating ascorbic acid, an essential plant antioxidant vital for defense against oxidative stress. DHAR enzymes bear close structural homology to the glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily of enzymes and contain the same active site motif, but most GSTs do not exhibit DHAR activity. The presence of a cysteine at the active site is essential for the catalytic functioning of DHAR, as mutation of this cysteine abolishes the activity. Here we present the crystal structure of DHAR2 from Arabidopsis thaliana with GSH bound to the catalytic cysteine. This structure reveals localized conformational differences around the active site which distinguishes the GSH-bound DHAR2 structure from that of DHAR1. We also unraveled the enzymatic step in which DHAR releases oxidized glutathione (GSSG). To consolidate our structural and kinetic findings, we investigated potential conformational flexibility in DHAR2 by normal mode analysis and found that subdomain mobility could be linked to GSH binding or GSSG release.

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana dehydroascorbate reductase 2: Conformational flexibility during catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodra, Nandita; Young, David; Astolfi Rosado, Leonardo; Pallo, Anna; Wahni, Khadija; De Proft, Frank; Huang, Jingjing; Van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2017-01-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) catalyzes the glutathione (GSH)-dependent reduction of dehydroascorbate and plays a direct role in regenerating ascorbic acid, an essential plant antioxidant vital for defense against oxidative stress. DHAR enzymes bear close structural homology to the glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily of enzymes and contain the same active site motif, but most GSTs do not exhibit DHAR activity. The presence of a cysteine at the active site is essential for the catalytic functioning of DHAR, as mutation of this cysteine abolishes the activity. Here we present the crystal structure of DHAR2 from Arabidopsis thaliana with GSH bound to the catalytic cysteine. This structure reveals localized conformational differences around the active site which distinguishes the GSH-bound DHAR2 structure from that of DHAR1. We also unraveled the enzymatic step in which DHAR releases oxidized glutathione (GSSG). To consolidate our structural and kinetic findings, we investigated potential conformational flexibility in DHAR2 by normal mode analysis and found that subdomain mobility could be linked to GSH binding or GSSG release. PMID:28195196

  18. A Modified Method for Measuring Root Iron Reductase Activity Under Normal Laboratory Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shao-Jian; HE Yun-Feng; TANG Cai-Xian; Y. MASAOKA

    2005-01-01

    Based on the strong chelating property of bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid (BPDS) with Fe(Ⅱ), root Fe(Ⅲ) chelate reductase activity is usually measured with a spectrophotometer using MES (2-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid) or HEPES (2-(4-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinyl) ethanesulfonic acid) buffer in the dark because of high autoreduction rate of Fe(Ⅲ)in the presence of light. However, the exclusion of light is inconvenient, especially when analyzing a large number of samples. The objective of this study was to develop a new method for determination of root reductase activity under normal laboratory conditions using a suitable buffer composition and Fe(Ⅲ) concentration to eliminate the autoreduction of Fe(Ⅲ). A modified method using a Tris (2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol) buffer at pH 7.5 instead of MES or HEPES buffer and a decreased FeEDTA (Fe ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid) concentration of 50 μmol L-1 was developed. The autoreduction of Fe(Ⅲ) using the Tris buffer was undetectable for temperatures at 4 and 28 ℃ and was also much lower than that using the other buffers even with sunlight during measurement of Fe(Ⅲ) reduction.Furthermore, the differences in Fe(Ⅲ) reductase activity among 5 plant species and 14 red clover cultivars (Trifolium pratense L.) could be easily detected with the modified method. The method developed in this study to measure root Fe chelate reductase activity was not only effective and reliable but also easily managed under normal laboratory light conditions.

  19. Functional Characterization of Four Putative δ1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductases from Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Forlani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In most living organisms, the amino acid proline is synthesized starting from both glutamate and ornithine. In prokaryotes, in the absence of an ornithine cyclodeaminase that has been identified to date only in a small number of soil and plant bacteria, these pathways share the last step, the reduction of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C catalyzed by P5C reductase (EC 1.5.1.2. In several species, multiple forms of P5C reductase have been reported, possibly reflecting the dual function of proline. Aside from its common role as a building block of proteins, proline is indeed also involved in the cellular response to osmotic and oxidative stress conditions. Genome analysis of Bacillus subtilis identifies the presence of four genes (ProH, ProI, ProG, and ComER that, based on bioinformatic and phylogenic studies, were defined as respectively coding a putative P5C reductase. Here we describe the cloning, heterologous expression, functional analysis and small-angle X-ray scattering studies of the four affinity-purified proteins. Results showed that two of them, namely ProI and ComER, lost their catalytic efficiency or underwent subfunctionalization. In the case of ComER, this could be likely explained by the loss of the ability to form a dimer, which has been previously shown to be an essential structural feature of the catalytically active P5C reductase. The properties of the two active enzymes are consistent with a constitutive role for ProG, and suggest that ProH expression may be beneficial to satisfy an increased need for proline.

  20. Functional Characterization of Four Putative d1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductases from Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Nocek, Boguslaw; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2017-08-02

    In most living organisms, the amino acid proline is synthesized starting from both glutamate and ornithine. In prokaryotes, in the absence of an ornithine cyclodeaminase that has been identified to date only in a small number of soil and plant bacteria, these pathways share the last step, the reduction of delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) catalyzed by P5C reductase (EC 1.5.1.2). In several species, multiple forms of P5C reductase have been reported, possibly reflecting the dual function of proline. Aside from its common role as a building block of proteins, proline is indeed also involved in the cellular response to osmotic and oxidative stress conditions. Genome analysis of Bacillus subtilis identifies the presence of four genes (ProH, ProI, ProG, and ComER) that, based on bioinformatic and phylogenic studies, were defined as respectively coding a putative P5C reductase. Here we describe the cloning, heterologous expression, functional analysis and small-angle X-ray scattering studies of the four affinity-purified proteins. Results showed that two of them, namely ProI and ComER, lost their catalytic efficiency or underwent subfunctionalization. In the case of ComER, this could be likely explained by the loss of the ability to form a dimer, which has been previously shown to be an essential structural feature of the catalytically active P5C reductase. The properties of the two active enzymes are consistent with a constitutive role for ProG, and suggest that ProH expression may be beneficial to satisfy an increased need for proline.

  1. Glyphosate effect on shikimate, nitrate reductase activity, yield, and seed composition in corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishna N; Bellaloui, Nacer; Zablotowicz, Robert M

    2010-03-24

    When glyphosate is applied to glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, drift to nonglyphosate-resistant (non-GR) crops may cause significant injury and reduce yields. Tools are needed to quantify injury and predict crop losses. In this study, glyphosate drift was simulated by direct application at 12.5% of the recommended label rate to non-GR corn (Zea mays L.) at 3 or 6 weeks after planting (WAP) during two field seasons in the Mississippi delta region of the southeastern USA. Visual plant injury, shikimate accumulation, nitrate reductase activity, leaf nitrogen, yield, and seed composition were evaluated. Effects were also evaluated in GR corn and GR corn with stacked glufosinate-resistant gene at the recommended label rate at 3 and 6 WAP. Glyphosate at 105 g ae/ha was applied once at 3 or 6 weeks after planting to non-GR corn. Glyphosate at 840 (lower label limit) or 1260 (upper label limit) g ae/ha was applied twice at 3 and 6 WAP to transgenic corn. Glyphosate caused injury (45-55%) and increased shikimate levels (24-86%) in non-GR compared to nontreated corn. In non-GR corn, glyphosate drift did not affect starch content but increased seed protein 8-21% while reducing leaf nitrogen reductase activity 46-64%, leaf nitrogen 7-16%, grain yield 49-54%, and seed oil 18-23%. In GR and GR stacked with glufosinate-resistant corn, glyphosate applied at label rates did not affect corn yield, leaf and seed nitrogen, or seed composition (protein, oil, and starch content). Yet, nitrate reductase activity was reduced 5-19% with glyphosate at 840 + 840 g/ha rate and 8-42% with glyphosate at 1260 + 1260 g/ha rate in both GR and GR stacked corn. These results demonstrate the potential for severe yield loss in non-GR corn exposed to glyphosate drift.

  2. Decreased glutathione reductase2 leads to early leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shunhua; Wang, Liang; Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione reductase (GR) catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) and participates in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, which scavenges H2 O2 . Here, we report that chloroplastic/mitochondrial GR2 is an important regulator of leaf senescence. Seed development of the homozygous gr2 knockout mutant was blocked at the globular stage. Therefore, to investigate the function of GR2 in leaf senescence, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants with decreased GR2 using RNAi. The GR2 RNAi plants displayed early onset of age-dependent and dark- and H2 O2 -induced leaf senescence, which was accompanied by the induction of the senescence-related marker genes SAG12 and SAG13. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis revealed that genes related to leaf senescence, oxidative stress, and phytohormone pathways were upregulated directly before senescence in RNAi plants. In addition, H2 O2 accumulated to higher levels in RNAi plants than in wild-type plants and the levels of H2 O2 peaked in RNAi plants directly before the early onset of leaf senescence. RNAi plants showed a greater decrease in GSH/GSSG levels than wild-type plants during leaf development. Our results suggest that GR2 plays an important role in leaf senescence by modulating H2 O2 and glutathione signaling in Arabidopsis.

  3. Metal resistant plants and phytoremediation of environmental contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard B.; Li, Yujing; Dhankher, Om P.

    2010-04-20

    The present disclosure provides a method of producing transgenic plants which are resistant to at least one metal ion by transforming the plant with a recombinant DNA comprising a nucleic acid encoding a bacterial arsenic reductase under the control of a plant expressible promoter, and a nucleic acid encoding a nucleotide sequence encoding a phytochelatin biosynthetic enzyme under the control of a plant expressible promoter. The invention also relates a method of phytoremediation of a contaminated site by growing in the site a transgenic plant expressing a nucleic acid encoding a bacterial arsenate reductase and a nucleic acid encoding a phytochelatin biosynthetic enzyme.

  4. Adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate reductase is regulated differently in Allium cepa L. and Brassica oleracea L. upon exposure to H2S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durenkamp, Mark; De Kok, Lult J.; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2007-01-01

    The reduction of adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate (APS) by APS reductase (APR) is considered to be one of the rate-limiting steps in the assimilation of sulphur in plants. In order to identify the mechanisms of regulation of this enzyme, the impact of atmospheric H2S exposure on mRNA expression, protein

  5. Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2 polymorphisms have considerable impact on methylarginine and β-aminoisobutyrate metabolism in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kittel

    Full Text Available Elevated plasma concentrations of asymmetric (ADMA and symmetric (SDMA dimethylarginine have repeatedly been linked to adverse clinical outcomes. Both methylarginines are substrates of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2. It was the aim of the present study to simultaneously investigate the functional relevance and relative contributions of common AGXT2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to plasma and urinary concentrations of methylarginines as well as β-aminoisobutyrate (BAIB, a prototypic substrate of AGXT2. In a cohort of 400 healthy volunteers ADMA, SDMA and BAIB concentrations were determined in plasma and urine using HPLC-MS/MS and were related to the coding AGXT2 SNPs rs37369 (p.Val140Ile and rs16899974 (p.Val498Leu. Volunteers heterozygous or homozygous for the AGXT2 SNP rs37369 had higher SDMA plasma concentrations by 5% and 20% (p = 0.002 as well as higher BAIB concentrations by 54% and 146%, respectively, in plasma and 237% and 1661%, respectively, in urine (both p<0.001. ADMA concentrations were not affected by both SNPs. A haplotype analysis revealed that the second investigated AGXT2 SNP rs16899974, which was not significantly linked to the other AGXT2 SNP, further aggravates the effect of rs37369 with respect to BAIB concentrations in plasma and urine. To investigate the impact of the amino acid exchange p.Val140Ile, we established human embryonic kidney cell lines stably overexpressing wild-type or mutant (p.Val140Ile AGXT2 protein and assessed enzyme activity using BAIB and stable-isotope labeled [²H₆]-SDMA as substrate. In vitro, the amino acid exchange of the mutant protein resulted in a significantly lower enzyme activity compared to wild-type AGXT2 (p<0.05. In silico modeling of the SNPs indicated reduced enzyme stability and substrate binding. In conclusion, SNPs of AGXT2 affect plasma as well as urinary BAIB and SDMA concentrations linking methylarginine metabolism to the common genetic trait of hyper

  6. Regulation of ribonucleotide reductase by Spd1 involves multiple mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestoras, Konstantinos; Mohammed, Asma Hadi; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie

    2010-01-01

    The correct levels of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and their relative abundance are important to maintain genomic integrity. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) regulation is complex and multifaceted. RNR is regulated allosterically by two nucleotide-binding sites, by transcriptional control, and...

  7. Cyclic Voltammetric Responses of Nitrate Reductase on Chemical Modified Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YaRuSONG; HuiBoSHAO; 等

    2002-01-01

    Electrochemistry of nitrate reductases (NR) incorporated into 2-aminoethanethiol self-assembled on the gold electrode and polyacrylamide cast on the pyrolytic graphite electrode was examined. NR on chemical modified electrode showed electrochemical cyclic voltammetric responses in phosphate buffers.

  8. Enantioselective imine reduction catalyzed by imine reductases and artificial metalloenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamenara, Daniela; Domínguez de María, Pablo

    2014-05-21

    Adding value to organic synthesis. Novel imine reductases enable the enantioselective reduction of imines to afford optically active amines. Likewise, novel bioinspired artificial metalloenzymes can perform the same reaction as well. Emerging proof-of-concepts are herein discussed.

  9. Variation and inheritance of iron reductase activity in the roots of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and association with seed iron accumulation QTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Andrea C

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron deficiency anemia is a global problem which often affects women and children of developing countries. Strategy I plants, such as common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. take up iron through a process that involves an iron reduction mechanism in their roots; this reduction is required to convert ferric iron to ferrous iron. Root absorbed iron is critical for the iron nutrition of the plant, and for the delivery of iron to the shoot and ultimately the seeds. The objectives of this study were to determine the variability and inheritance for iron reductase activity in a range of genotypes and in a low × high seed iron cross (DOR364 × G19833, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL for this trait, and to assess possible associations with seed iron levels. Results The experiments were carried out with hydroponically grown plants provided different amounts of iron varying between 0 and 20 μM Fe(III-EDDHA. The parents, DOR364 and G19833, plus 13 other cultivated or wild beans, were found to differ in iron reductase activity. Based on these initial experiments, two growth conditions (iron limited and iron sufficient were selected as treatments for evaluating the DOR364 × G19833 recombinant inbred lines. A single major QTL was found for iron reductase activity under iron-limited conditions (1 μM Fe on linkage group b02 and another major QTL was found under iron sufficient conditions (15 μM Fe on linkage group b11. Associations between the b11 QTL were found with several QTL for seed iron. Conclusions Genes conditioning iron reductase activity in iron sufficient bean plants appear to be associated with genes contributing to seed iron accumulation. Markers for bean iron reductase (FRO homologues were found with in silico mapping based on common bean synteny with soybean and Medicago truncatula on b06 and b07; however, neither locus aligned with the QTL for iron reductase activity. In summary, the QTL for iron reductase activity

  10. Gene expression of monodehydroascorbate reductase and dehydroascorbate reductase during fruit ripening and in response to environmental stresses in acerola (Malpighia glabra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltelib, Hani A; Badejo, Adebanjo A; Fujikawa, Yukichi; Esaka, Muneharu

    2011-04-15

    Acerola (Malpighia glabra) is an exotic fruit cultivated primarily for its abundant ascorbic acid (AsA) content. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the metabolism of AsA in acerola have yet to be defined. Monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) are key enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle that maintain reduced pools of ascorbic acid and serve as important antioxidants. cDNAs encoding MDHAR and DHAR were isolated from acerola using RT-PCR and RACE. Phylogenetic trees associated acerola MDHAR and DHAR with other plant cytosolic MDHARs and DHARs. Expressions of the two genes correlated with their enzymatic activities and were differentially regulated during fruit ripening. Interestingly, MDHAR expression was only detected in overripe fruits, whereas the transcript level of DHAR was highest at the intermediate stage of fruit ripening. Under dark conditions, there was a sharp and significant decline in the total and reduced ascorbate contents, accompanied by a decrease in the level of transcripts and enzyme activities of the two genes in acerola leaves. MDHAR and DHAR transcripts and enzyme activities were significantly up-regulated in the leaves of acerola under cold and salt stress conditions, indicating that expression of both genes are transcriptionally regulated under these stresses.

  11. Aldose reductase, oxidative stress and diabetic mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waiho eTang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance 1. DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR [ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21], a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes NADPH-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis and myocardium (heart failure leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in 2. In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications.

  12. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy.

  13. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J. Mark, E-mail: mark.petrash@ucdenver.edu

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1{sup GFP} mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR{sup WT} background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. - Highlights: • AR inhibition prevents retinal microglial activation. • Endotoxin-induced ocular cytokine production is reduced in AR null mice. • Overexpression of AR spontaneously induces retinal microglial activation.

  14. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Activity and Folate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursen Keser

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Folate is a vital B vitamin which is easily water-soluble. It is a natural source which is found in the herbal and animal foods. Folate has important duties in the human metabolism, one of them is the adjustment of the level of plasma homocysteine. Reduction in MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase,which is in charge of the metabolism of homocysteine activity affects the level of homocysteine. Therefore MTHFR is an important enzyme in folate metabolism. Some of the mutations occurring in the MTHFR gene is a risk factor for various diseases and may be caused the hyperhomocysteinemia or the homocystinuria, and they also may lead to metabolic problems. MTHFR is effective in the important pathways such as DNA synthesis, methylation reactions and synthesis of RNA. C677T and A1298C are the most commonly occurring polymorphisms in the gene of MTHFR. The frequency of these polymorphisms show differences in the populations. MTHFR, folate distribution, metabolism of homocysteine and S-adenosylmethionine, by the MTHFR methylation the genetic defects have the potential of affecting the risk of disease in the negative or positive way.

  15. Successful expression of a novel bacterial gene for pinoresinol reductase and its effect on lignan biosynthesis in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Masayuki; Tsuji, Yukiko; Kusunose, Tatsuya; Okazawa, Atsushi; Kamimura, Naofumi; Mori, Tetsuya; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Fukuhara, Yuki; Hara, Hirofumi; Sato-Izawa, Kanna; Muranaka, Toshiya; Saito, Kazuki; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao; Masai, Eiji; Kajita, Shinya

    2014-10-01

    Pinoresinol reductase and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase play important roles in an early step of lignan biosynthesis in plants. The activities of both enzymes have also been detected in bacteria. In this study, pinZ, which was first isolated as a gene for bacterial pinoresinol reductase, was constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Higher reductive activity toward pinoresinol was detected in the resultant transgenic plants but not in wild-type plant. Principal component analysis of data from untargeted metabolome analyses of stem, root, and leaf extracts of the wild-type and two independent transgenic lines indicate that pinZ expression caused dynamic metabolic changes in stems, but not in roots and leaves. The metabolome data also suggest that expression of pinZ influenced the metabolisms of lignan and glucosinolates but not so much of neolignans such as guaiacylglycerol-8-O-4'-feruloyl ethers. In-depth quantitative analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) indicated that amounts of pinoresinol and its glucoside form were markedly reduced in the transgenic plant, whereas the amounts of glucoside form of secoisolariciresinol in transgenic roots, leaves, and stems increased. The detected levels of lariciresinol in the transgenic plant following β-glucosidase treatment also tended to be higher than those in the wild-type plant. Our findings indicate that overexpression of pinZ induces change in lignan compositions and has a major effect not only on lignan biosynthesis but also on biosynthesis of other primary and secondary metabolites.

  16. Phytochemical analysis with the antioxidant and aldose reductase inhibitory capacities of Tephrosia humilis aerial parts' extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plioukas, Michael; Gabrieli, Chrysi; Lazari, Diamanto; Kokkalou, Eugene

    2016-06-01

    The aerial parts of Tephrosia humilis were tested about their antioxidant potential, their ability to inhibit the aldose/aldehyde reductase enzymes and their phenolic content. The plant material was exhaustively extracted with petroleum ether, dichloromethane and methanol, consecutively. The concentrated methanol extract was re-extracted, successively, with diethyl ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol. All extracts showed significant antioxidant capacity, but the most effective was the ethyl acetate extract. As about the aldose reductase inhibition, all fractions, except the aqueous, were strong inhibitors of the enzyme, with the n-butanolic and ethyl acetate fractions to inhibit the enzyme above 75%. These findings provide support to the ethnopharmacological usage of the plant as antioxidant and validate its potential to act against the long-term diabetic complications. The phytochemical analysis showed the presence of 1,4-dihydroxy-3,4-(epoxyethano)-5-cyclohexene(1), cleroindicin E(2), lupeol(3), methyl p-coumarate(4), methyl 4-hydroxybenzoate(5), prunin(6), 5,7,2',5'-tetrahydroxyflavanone 7-rutinoside(7), protocatechuic acid(8), luteolin 7-glucoside(9), apigenin(10), naringin(11), rhoifolin(12) and luteolin 7-glucuronate(13).

  17. Expression of Cyanobacterial Acyl-ACP Reductase Elevates the Triacylglycerol Level in the Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiya, Nobuko; Kawase, Yasuko; Hayakawa, Jumpei; Matsuda, Mami; Nakamura, Mami; Era, Atsuko; Tanaka, Kan; Kondo, Akihiko; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Imamura, Sousuke; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen starvation is known to induce the accumulation of triacylglycerol (TAG) in many microalgae, and potential use of microalgae as a source of biofuel has been explored. However, nitrogen starvation also stops cellular growth. The expression of cyanobacterial acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase in the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae chloroplasts resulted in an accumulation of TAG, which led to an increase in the number and size of lipid droplets while maintaining cellular growth. Transcriptome and metabolome analyses showed that the expression of acyl-ACP reductase altered the activities of several metabolic pathways. The activities of enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis in chloroplasts, such as acetyl-CoA carboxylase and pyruvate dehydrogenase, were up-regulated, while pyruvate decarboxylation in mitochondria and the subsequent consumption of acetyl-CoA by the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were down-regulated. Aldehyde dehydrogenase, which oxidizes fatty aldehydes to fatty acids, was also up-regulated in the acyl-ACP reductase expresser. This activation was required for the lipid droplet accumulation and metabolic changes observed in the acyl-ACP reductase expresser. Nitrogen starvation also resulted in lipid droplet accumulation in C. merolae, while cell growth ceased as in the case of other algal species. The metabolic changes that occur upon the expression of acyl-ACP reductase are quite different from those caused by nitrogen starvation. Therefore, there should be a method for further increasing the storage lipid level while still maintaining cell growth that is different from the metabolic response to nitrogen starvation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramm, Anneke; Kisiela, Michael; Schulz, Rüdiger; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) represent a large superfamily of enzymes, most of which are NAD(H)-dependent or NADP(H)-dependent oxidoreductases. They display a wide substrate spectrum, including steroids, alcohols, sugars, aromatic compounds, and xenobiotics. On the basis of characteristic sequence motifs, the SDRs are subdivided into two main (classical and extended) and three smaller (divergent, intermediate, and complex) families. Despite low residue identities in pairwise comparisons, the three-dimensional structure among the SDRs is conserved and shows a typical Rossmann fold. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach to determine whether and which SDRs are present in cyanobacteria, microorganisms that played an important role in our ecosystem as the first oxygen producers. Cyanobacterial SDRs could indeed be identified, and were clustered according to the SDR classification system. Furthermore, because of the early availability of its genome sequence and the easy application of transformation methods, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, one of the most important cyanobacterial strains, was chosen as the model organism for this phylum. Synechocystis sp. SDRs were further analysed with bioinformatics tools, such as hidden Markov models (HMMs). It became evident that several cyanobacterial SDRs show remarkable sequence identities with SDRs in other organisms. These so-called 'homologous' proteins exist in plants, model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis  elegans, and even in humans. As sequence identities of up to 60% were found between Synechocystis and humans, it was concluded that SDRs seemed to have been well conserved during evolution, even after dramatic terrestrial changes such as the conversion of the early reducing atmosphere to an oxidizing one by cyanobacteria.

  19. Prokaryotic arsenate reductase enhances arsenate resistance in Mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Tao, Xuanyu; Wu, Gaofeng; Li, Xiangkai; Liu, Pu

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a well-known heavy metal toxicant in the environment. Bioremediation of heavy metals has been proposed as a low-cost and eco-friendly method. This article described some of recent patents on transgenic plants with enhanced heavy metal resistance. Further, to test whether genetic modification of mammalian cells could render higher arsenic resistance, a prokaryotic arsenic reductase gene arsC was transfected into human liver cancer cell HepG2. In the stably transfected cells, the expression level of arsC gene was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results showed that arsC was expressed in HepG2 cells and the expression was upregulated by 3 folds upon arsenate induction. To further test whether arsC has function in HepG2 cells, the viability of HepG2-pCI-ArsC cells exposed to arsenite or arsenate was compared to that of HepG2-pCI cells without arsC gene. The results indicated that arsC increased the viability of HepG2 cells by 25% in arsenate, but not in arsenite. And the test of reducing ability of stably transfected cells revealed that the concentration of accumulated trivalent arsenic increased by 25% in HepG2-pCI-ArsC cells. To determine the intracellular localization of ArsC, a fusion vector with fluorescent marker pEGFP-N1-ArsC was constructed and transfected into.HepG2. Laser confocal microscopy showed that EGFP-ArsC fusion protein was distributed throughout the cells. Taken together, these results demonstrated that prokaryotic arsenic resistant gene arsC integrated successfully into HepG2 genome and enhanced arsenate resistance of HepG2, which brought new insights of arsenic detoxification in mammalian cells.

  20. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamala Salvamani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, nitric oxide (NO, and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase.

  1. Characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana pinoresinol reductase, a new type of enzyme involved in lignan biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsubo, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Masaharu; Suzuki, Shiro; Hattori, Takefumi; Umezawa, Toshiaki

    2008-06-01

    A lignan, lariciresinol, was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana, the most widely used model plant in plant bioscience sectors, for the first time. In the A. thaliana genome database, there are two genes (At1g32100 and At4g13660) that are annotated as pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase (PLR). The recombinant AtPLRs showed strict substrate preference toward pinoresinol but only weak or no activity toward lariciresinol, which is in sharp contrast to conventional PLRs of other plants that can reduce both pinoresinol and lariciresinol efficiently to lariciresinol and secoisolariciresinol, respectively. Therefore, we renamed AtPLRs as A. thaliana pinoresinol reductases (AtPrRs). The recombinant AtPrR2 encoded by At4g13660 reduced only (-)-pinoresinol to (-)-lariciresinol and not (+)-pinoresinol in the presence of NADPH. This enantiomeric selectivity accords with that of other PLRs of other plants so far reported, which can reduce one of the enantiomers selectively, whatever the preferential enantiomer. In sharp contrast, AtPrR1 encoded by At1g32100 reduced both (+)- and (-)-pinoresinols to (+)- and (-)-lariciresinols efficiently with comparative k(cat)/K(m) values. Analysis of lignans and spatiotemporal expression of AtPrR1 and AtPrR2 in their functionally deficient A. thaliana mutants and wild type indicated that both genes are involved in lariciresinol biosynthesis. In addition, the analysis of the enantiomeric compositions of lariciresinol isolated from the mutants and wild type showed that PrRs together with a dirigent protein(s) are involved in the enantiomeric control in lignan biosynthesis. Furthermore, it was demonstrated conclusively for the first time that differential expression of PrR isoforms that have distinct selectivities of substrate enantiomers can determine enantiomeric compositions of the product, lariciresinol.

  2. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions.

  3. Chlorophyll b degradation by chlorophyll b reductase under high-light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Rei; Ito, Hisashi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2015-12-01

    The light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein complex of photosystem II (LHCII) is the main antenna complex of photosystem II (PSII). Plants change their LHCII content depending on the light environment. Under high-light conditions, the content of LHCII should decrease because over-excitation damages the photosystem. Chlorophyll b is indispensable for accumulating LHCII, and chlorophyll b degradation induces LHCII degradation. Chlorophyll b degradation is initiated by chlorophyll b reductase (CBR). In land plants, NON-YELLOW COLORING 1 (NYC1) and NYC1-Like (NOL) are isozymes of CBR. We analyzed these mutants to determine their functions under high-light conditions. During high-light treatment, the chlorophyll a/b ratio was stable in the wild-type (WT) and nol plants, and the LHCII content decreased in WT plants. The chlorophyll a/b ratio decreased in the nyc1 and nyc1/nol plants, and a substantial degree of LHCII was retained in nyc1/nol plants after the high-light treatment. These results demonstrate that NYC1 degrades the chlorophyll b on LHCII under high-light conditions, thus decreasing the LHCII content. After the high-light treatment, the maximum quantum efficiency of the PSII photochemistry was lower in nyc1 and nyc1/nol plants than in WT and nol plants. A larger light-harvesting system would damage PSII in nyc1 and nyc1/nol plants. The fluorescence spectroscopy of the leaves indicated that photosystem I was also damaged by the excess LHCII in nyc1/nol plants. These observations suggest that chlorophyll b degradation by NYC1 is the initial reaction for the optimization of the light-harvesting capacity under high-light conditions.

  4. IN-VIVO NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN THE MYRICA ESCULENTA BUCH. HAM. D.DON SEEDLINGS UNDER NURSERY CONDITIONS

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    S.P. Chaukiyal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Myrica esculenta locally known as kafal, is a dioecious, moderate sized, evergreen tree species. It is a characteristic associate of Quercus leucotrichophora and Rhododendron species between 1000-2200 m above sea level and valued for its wild edible fruits used in different preparations. An experiment was conducted under pot culture conditions to study the effects of different nitrogen fertilizer doses (i.e. 20; 40; 20 and control without fertilizer on the in-vivo nitrate reductase activity (NRA in different plant parts. Nitrogen doses were applied in two equal split between fifteen days intervals. Monthly nitrate reductase activity was estimated in different plant parts viz., leaf, stem and root for a period of twelve months. It was observed that maximum NRA was recorded in the 80 kg N/ha followed by 40 kg N/ha, 20 kg N/ha and minimum in control treatment in different plant parts as well as in total plant also. On the seasonal NRA a higher NR activity was recorded during rainy followed by summer and lowest in winter season. Seasonal effects were significantly different as compared to seasons x treatments. However, on monthly analysis basis, months and treatment effects in leaf, stem, root and total plant NR activity was significantly different among each other. However, for all the parameters studied months x treatments were found significantly different at 5% level.

  5. Light-regulated expression of the nitrate-reductase and nitrite-reductase genes in tomato and in the phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, T W; Foyer, C; Caboche, M

    1992-08-01

    The phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum (L.) Mill) was used to investigate if phytochrome plays a role in the regulation of nitrate-reductase (NR, EC 1.6.6.1) and nitrite-reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.7.1) gene expression. We show that the expression of the tomato NR and NiR genes is stimulated by light and that this light response is mediated by the photoreceptor phytochrome. The red-light response of the NR and NiR genes was reduced in etiolated aurea seedlings when compared to isogenic wild-type cotyledons. The relative levels of NR mRNA and NiR transcripts and their diurnal fluctuations were identical in mature white-light-grown leaves of the wild-type and of the aurea mutant. The transcript levels for cab and RbcS (genes for the chlorophyll-a/b-binding protein of PSII and the small subunit of the enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, respectively) in aurea leaves grown in white light were indistinguishable from the respective transcript levels in the leaves of the wildtype grown under the same conditions. Despite a severe reduction in the chlorophyll content, the rate of net CO2 uptake by leaves of the aurea mutant was only slightly reduced when compared to the rate of net photosynthesis of wild-type leaves. This difference in the photosynthetic performances of wild-type and aurea mutant plants disappeared during aging of the plants. The increase in zeaxanthin and the concomitant decrease in violaxanthin in leaves of the aurea mutant compared with the same pigment levels in leaves of the wild-type indicate that the activity of the xanthophyll cycle is increased in aurea leaves as a consequence of the reduced CO2-fixation capacity of the mutant leaves.

  6. Evidence that the intra-amoebal Legionella drancourtii acquired a sterol reductase gene from eukaryotes

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    Fournier Pierre-Edouard

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Free-living amoebae serve as a natural reservoir for some bacteria that have evolved into «amoeba-resistant» bacteria. Among these, some are strictly intra-amoebal, such as Candidatus "Protochlamydia amoebophila" (Candidatus "P. amoebophila", whose genomic sequence is available. We sequenced the genome of Legionella drancourtii (L. drancourtii, another recently described intra-amoebal bacterium. By comparing these two genomes with those of their closely related species, we were able to study the genetic characteristics specific to their amoebal lifestyle. Findings We identified a sterol delta-7 reductase-encoding gene common to these two bacteria and absent in their relatives. This gene encodes an enzyme which catalyses the last step of cholesterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes, and is probably functional within L. drancourtii since it is transcribed. The phylogenetic analysis of this protein suggests that it was acquired horizontally by a few bacteria from viridiplantae. This gene was also found in the Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus genome, a virus that grows in amoebae and possesses the largest viral genome known to date. Conclusion L. drancourtii acquired a sterol delta-7 reductase-encoding gene of viridiplantae origin. The most parsimonious hypothesis is that this gene was initially acquired by a Chlamydiales ancestor parasite of plants. Subsequently, its descendents transmitted this gene in amoebae to other intra-amoebal microorganisms, including L. drancourtii and Coxiella burnetii. The role of the sterol delta-7 reductase in prokaryotes is as yet unknown but we speculate that it is involved in host cholesterol parasitism.

  7. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Histidine-Tagged Escherichia coli Dihydrodipicolinate Reductase.

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    Yvonne D Trigoso

    Full Text Available The enzyme dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR is a component of the lysine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria and higher plants. DHDPR catalyzes the NAD(PH dependent reduction of 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate to the cyclic imine L-2,3,4,5,-tetrahydropicolinic acid. The dapB gene that encodes dihydrodipicolinate reductase has previously been cloned, but the expression of the enzyme is low and the purification is time consuming. Therefore the E. coli dapB gene was cloned into the pET16b vector to improve the protein expression and simplify the purification. The dapB gene sequence was utilized to design forward and reverse oligonucleotide primers that were used to PCR the gene from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. The primers were designed with NdeI or BamHI restriction sites on the 5'and 3' terminus respectively. The PCR product was sequenced to confirm the identity of dapB. The gene was cloned into the expression vector pET16b through NdeI and BamHI restriction endonuclease sites. The resulting plasmid containing dapB was transformed into the bacterial strain BL21 (DE3. The transformed cells were utilized to grow and express the histidine-tagged reductase and the protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. SDS/PAGE gel analysis has shown that the protein was 95% pure and has approximate subunit molecular weight of 28 kDa. The protein purification is completed in one day and 3 liters of culture produced approximately 40-50 mgs of protein, an improvement on the previous protein expression and multistep purification.

  8. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Histidine-Tagged Escherichia coli Dihydrodipicolinate Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigoso, Yvonne D; Evans, Russell C; Karsten, William E; Chooback, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR) is a component of the lysine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria and higher plants. DHDPR catalyzes the NAD(P)H dependent reduction of 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate to the cyclic imine L-2,3,4,5,-tetrahydropicolinic acid. The dapB gene that encodes dihydrodipicolinate reductase has previously been cloned, but the expression of the enzyme is low and the purification is time consuming. Therefore the E. coli dapB gene was cloned into the pET16b vector to improve the protein expression and simplify the purification. The dapB gene sequence was utilized to design forward and reverse oligonucleotide primers that were used to PCR the gene from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. The primers were designed with NdeI or BamHI restriction sites on the 5'and 3' terminus respectively. The PCR product was sequenced to confirm the identity of dapB. The gene was cloned into the expression vector pET16b through NdeI and BamHI restriction endonuclease sites. The resulting plasmid containing dapB was transformed into the bacterial strain BL21 (DE3). The transformed cells were utilized to grow and express the histidine-tagged reductase and the protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. SDS/PAGE gel analysis has shown that the protein was 95% pure and has approximate subunit molecular weight of 28 kDa. The protein purification is completed in one day and 3 liters of culture produced approximately 40-50 mgs of protein, an improvement on the previous protein expression and multistep purification.

  9. The uptake and accumulation of phosphorous and nitrates and the activity of nitrate reductase in cucumber seedlings treated with PbCl2 or CdCl2

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    Marek Burzyński

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of 4-day-old cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. seedlings with PbCl2 or CdCl2 caused a significant increase in the accumulation of heavy metals by the plants, especially in the roots. The accumulated Pb initially enhanced the uptake of phosphorous after the plants had been transferred to a nutrient medium (6, 24 hrs, but after only 48 Ins the uptake had dropped to below control level. The plants treated with Cd exhibited a constant decreased phosphorous uptake level. The accumulated lead and cadmium also inhibited nitrate uptake and the activity of nitrate reductase. It is suggested that the reason for the decreased nitrate reductase activity lay rather in the lower nitrate uptake than in a direct effect of the heavy metals on the enzyme.

  10. Selenium in Thioredoxin Reductase: A Mechanistic Perspective†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Brian M.; Eckenroth, Brian E.; Flemer, Stevenson; Hondal, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Most high Mr thioredoxin reductases (TRs) have the unusual feature of utilizing a vicinal disulfide bond (Cys1-Cys2) which form an eight-membered ring during the catalytic cycle. Many eukaryotic TRs have replaced the Cys2 position of the dyad with the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec). Here we demonstrate that Cys- and Sec-containing TRs are distinguished by the importance each class of enzymes places on the 8-membered ring structure in the catalytic cycle. This hypothesis was explored by studying the truncated enzyme missing the C-terminal ring structure in conjunction with oxidized peptide substrates to investigate the reduction and opening of this dyad. The peptide substrates were identical in sequence to the missing part of the enzyme, containing either a disulfide or selenylsulfide linkage, but were differentiated by the presence (cyclic) and absence (acyclic) of the ring structure. The ratio of these turnover rates informs that the ring is only of modest importance for the truncated mouse mitochondrial Sec-TR (ring/no ring = 32), while the ring structure is highly important for the truncated Cys-TRs from D. melanogaster and C. elegans (ring/no ring > 1000). All three enzymes exhibit a similar dependence upon leaving group pKa as shown by the use of the acyclic peptides as substrates. These two factors can be reconciled for Cys-TRs if the ring functions to simultaneously allow for attack by a nearby thiolate while correctly positioning the leaving group sulfur atom to accept a proton from the enzymic general acid. For Sec-TRs the ring is unimportant because the lower pKa of the selenol relative to a thiol obviates its need to be protonated upon S-Se bond scission and permits physical separation of the selenol and the general acid. Further study of the biochemical properties of the truncated Cys and Sec TR enzymes demonstrates that the chemical advantage conferred on the eukaryotic enzyme by a selenol is the ability to function at acidic pH. PMID:18986163

  11. 4-Dimethylaminoazobenzenes: carcinogenicities and reductive cleavage by microsomal azo reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambooy, J P; Koffman, B M

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four 4-dimethylaminoazobenzenes (DABs) in which systematic structural modifications have been made in the prime ring have been studied for substrate specificity for microsomal azo reductase. The DABs were also evaluated for carcinogenicity and it was found that there was no correlation between carcinogenicity and extent of azo bond cleavage by azo reductase. While any substituent in the prime ring reduces the rate of cleavage of the azo bond relative to the unsubstituted dye, there is a correlation between substituent size and susceptibility to the enzyme. Substituent size was also found to be a significant factor in the induction of hepatomas by the dyes. Preliminary studies have shown that there appears to be a positive correlation between microsomal riboflavin content and the activity of the azo reductase.

  12. Ectopic expression of a basic helix-loop-helix gene transactivates parallel pathways of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis. structure, expression analysis, and genetic control of leucoanthocyanidin 4-reductase and anthocyanidin reductase genes in Lotus corniculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolocci, Francesco; Robbins, Mark P; Madeo, Laura; Arcioni, Sergio; Martens, Stefan; Damiani, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are plant secondary metabolites and are composed primarily of catechin and epicatechin units in higher plant species. Due to the ability of PAs to bind reversibly with plant proteins to improve digestion and reduce bloat, engineering this pathway in leaves is a major goal for forage breeders. Here, we report the cloning and expression analysis of anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin 4-reductase (LAR), two genes encoding enzymes committed to epicatechin and catechin biosynthesis, respectively, in Lotus corniculatus. We show the presence of two LAR gene families (LAR1 and LAR2) and that the steady-state levels of ANR and LAR1 genes correlate with the levels of PAs in leaves of wild-type and transgenic plants. Interestingly, ANR and LAR1, but not LAR2, genes produced active proteins following heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and are affected by the same basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that promotes PA accumulation in cells of palisade and spongy mesophyll. This study provides direct evidence that the same subclass of transcription factors can mediate the expression of the structural genes of both branches of PA biosynthesis.

  13. Mitochondrial Thioredoxin-Glutathione Reductase from Larval Taenia crassiceps (Cysticerci

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    Alberto Guevara-Flores

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial thioredoxin-glutathione reductase was purified from larval Taenia crassiceps (cysticerci. The preparation showed NADPH-dependent reductase activity with either thioredoxin or GSSG, and was able to perform thiol/disulfide exchange reactions. At 25∘C specific activities were 437  ±  27 mU mg-1 and 840  ±  49 mU mg-1 with thioredoxin and GSSG, respectively. Apparent Km values were 0.87  ±  0.04  μM, 41  ±  6  μM and 19  ±  10  μM for thioredoxin, GSSG and NADPH, respectively. Thioredoxin from eukaryotic sources was accepted as substrate. The enzyme reduced H2O2 in a NADPH-dependent manner, although with low catalytic efficiency. In the presence of thioredoxin, mitochondrial TGR showed a thioredoxin peroxidase-like activity. All disulfide reductase activities were inhibited by auranofin, suggesting mTGR is dependent on selenocysteine. The reductase activity with GSSG showed a higher dependence on temperature as compared with the DTNB reductase activity. The variation of the GSSG- and DTNB reductase activities on pH was dependent on the disulfide substrate. Like the cytosolic isoform, mTGR showed a hysteretic kinetic behavior at moderate or high GSSG concentrations, but it was less sensitive to calcium. The enzyme was able to protect glutamine synthetase from oxidative inactivation, suggesting that mTGR is competent to contend with oxidative stress.

  14. Characterization of the Hyperproduction Process of Citric Acid by Aspergillus niger and the Formation of Glyoxylic Acid%黑曲霉产柠檬酸的发酵过程表征及乙醛酸的形成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓涛; 郭艳梅; 曾祥峰; 满云; 郑平; 王昌禄; 孙际宾

    2011-01-01

    本文对黑曲霉柠檬酸生产过程的菌体形态、总糖、还原糖及有机酸的变化进行了系统地研究.研究结果表明:整个发酵过程中,菌球形态保持紧密稳定,发酵产物中以柠檬酸为主,产量达到155 g/L.并首次发现柠檬酸发酵过程中伴随有乙醛酸的生成,最大浓度可达9.4 g/L.对于菌种和发酵工艺的改进有着重要的指导意义.%China is the major manufacturer for citric acid in the world. The morphology, sugar fluctuation and organic acid formation were systematically and quantitatively measured during the citric acid fermentation process by an industrial strain Aspergillus niger. It was shown that the hyphae was tightly packaged as stable pellets throughout the fermentation process; citric acid up to 155g/L is the major product. Surprisingly, we found that glyoxylic acid, which was thought as an toxic metabolite and less possible to be accumulated during the fermentation process, is the key product coupling with citric acid production. The concentration of glyoxylic acid reached up to 9.4g/L at the end of fermentation. This finding leads to new ideas for the strain improvement and process optimization in the future.

  15. S-glutathionyl-(chloro)hydroquinone reductases: a new class of glutathione transferases functioning as oxidoreductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchik, Sara M; Xun, Luying

    2011-05-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are best known for transferring glutathione (GSH) to hydrophobic organic compounds, making the conjugates more soluble. However, the omega-class GSTs of animals and the lambda-class GSTs and dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs) of plants have little or no activity for GSH transfer. Instead, they catalyze GSH-dependent oxidoreductions. The lambda-class GSTs reduce disulfide bonds, the DHARs reduce the disulfide bonds and dehydroascorbate, and the omega-class GSTs can reduce more substrates, including disulfide bonds, dehydroascorbate, and dimethylarsinate. Glutathionyl-(chloro)hydroquinone reductases (GS-HQRs) are the newest class of GSTs that mainly catalyze oxidoreductions. Besides the activities of the other three classes, GS-HQRs also reduce GS-hydroquinones, including GS-trichloro-p-hydroquinone, GS-dichloro-p-hydroquinone, GS-2-hydroxy-p-hydroquinone, and GS-p-hydroquinone. They are conserved and widely distributed in bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and plants, but not in animals. The four classes are phylogenetically more related to each other than to other GSTs, and they share a Cys-Pro motif at the GSH-binding site. Hydroquinones are metabolic intermediates of certain aromatic compounds. They can be auto-oxidized by O(2) to benzoquinones, which spontaneously react with GSH to form GS-hydroquinones via Michael's addition. GS-HQRs are expected to channel GS-hydroquinones, formed spontaneously or enzymatically, back to hydroquinones. When the released hydroquinones are intermediates of metabolic pathways, GS-HQRs play a maintenance role for the pathways. Further, the common presence of GS-HQRs in plants, green algae, cyanobacteria, and halobacteria suggest a beneficial role in the light-using organisms.

  16. Do cytochromes function as oxygen sensors in the regulation of nitrate reductase biosynthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, C H; Bishop, C W

    1977-01-01

    The observation that oxygen represses nitrate reductase biosynthesis in a hemA mutant grown aerobically with or without delta-aminolevulinic acid indicates that cytochromes are not responsible for nitrate reductase repression in aerobically grown cells. PMID:326768

  17. The Quaternary Structure of NADPH Thioredoxin Reductase C Is Redox-Sensitive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Manuel Pérez-Ruiz; Maricruz González; Maria Cristina Spinola; Luisa Maria Sandali; Francisco Javier Cejudo

    2009-01-01

    NADPH thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a chloroplast enzyme able to conjugate NADPH thioredoxin reduc-tase (NTR) and thioredoxin (TRX) activities for the efficient reduction of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys PRX).Because NADPH can be produced in chloroplasts during darkness,NTRC plays a key role for plant peroxide detoxification during the night.Here,it is shown that the quaternary structure of NTRC is highly dependent on its redox status.In vitro,most of the enzyme adopted an oligomeric state that disaggregated in dimers upon addition of NADPH,NADH,or DTr.Gel filtration and West-ern blot analysis of protein extracts from Arabidopsis chloroplast stroma showed that native NTRC forms aggregates,which are sensitive to NADPH and DTT,suggesting that the aggregation state might be a significant aspect of NTRC activity in vivo.Moreover,the enzyme is localized in clusters in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.NTRC triple and double mutants,A164G-V182E-R183F and A164G-R183F,replacing key residues of NADPH binding site,showed reduced activity but were still able to dimerize though with an increase in intermediary forms.Based on these results,we propose that the catalytically active form of NTRC is the dimer,which formation is induced by NADPH.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of ferredoxin-NAD(P)+ reductase from Chlorobium tepidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Norifumi; Seo, Daisuke; Shiba, Tomoo; Sakurai, Takeshi; Kurisu, Genji

    2008-03-01

    Ferredoxin-NAD(P)(+) reductase (FNR) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the photoreduction of NAD(P)(+) to generate NAD(P)H during the final step of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. FNR from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a homodimeric enzyme with a molecular weight of 90 kDa; it shares a high level of amino-acid sequence identity to thioredoxin reductase rather than to conventional plant-type FNRs. In order to understand the structural basis of the ferredoxin-dependency of this unique photosynthetic FNR, C. tepidum FNR has been heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized in two forms. Form I crystals belong to space group C222(1) and contain one dimer in the asymmetric unit, while form II crystals belong to space group P4(1)22 or P4(3)22. Diffraction data were collected from a form I crystal to 2.4 A resolution on the synchrotron-radiation beamline NW12 at the Photon Factory.

  19. Molecular characterization of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase involved in proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in apple

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    Yuepeng eHan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs are the major component of phenolics in apple, but mechanisms involved in PA biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, the relationship between the PA biosynthesis and the expression of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR was investigated in fruit skin of one apple cultivar and three crabapples. Transcript levels of LAR1 and ANR2 genes were significantly correlated with the contents of catechin and epicatechin, respectively, which suggests their active roles in PA synthesis. Surprisingly, transcript levels for both LAR1 and LAR2 genes were almost undetectable in two crabapples that accumulated both flavan-3-ols and PAs. This contradicts the previous finding that LAR1 gene is a strong candidate regulating the accumulation of metabolites such as epicatechin and PAs in apple. Ectopic expression of apple MdLAR1 gene in tobacco suppresses expression of the late genes in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, resulting in loss of anthocyanin in flowers. Interestingly, a decrease in PA biosynthesis was also observed in flowers of transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the MdLAR1 gene, which could be attributed to decreased expression of both the NtANR1 and NtANR2 genes. Our study not only confirms the in vivo function of apple LAR1 gene, but it is also helpful for understanding the mechanism of PA biosynthesis.

  20. A novel NADPH thioredoxin reductase, localized in the chloroplast, which deficiency causes hypersensitivity to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Antonio Jesús; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Spínola, María Cristina; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2004-10-15

    Plants contain three thioredoxin systems. Chloroplast thioredoxins are reduced by ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase, whereas the cytosolic and mitochondrial thioredoxins are reduced by NADPH thioredoxin reductase (NTR). There is high similarity among NTRs from plants, lower eukaryotes, and bacteria, which are different from mammal NTR. Here we describe the OsNTRC gene from rice encoding a novel NTR with a thioredoxin-like domain at the C terminus, hence, a putative NTR/thioredoxin system in a single polypeptide. Orthologous genes were found in other plants and cyanobacteria, but not in bacteria, yeast, or mammals. Full-length OsNTRC and constructs with truncated NTR and thioredoxin domains were expressed in Escherichia coli as His-tagged polypeptides, and a polyclonal antibody specifically cross-reacting with the OsNTRC enzyme was raised. An in vitro activity assay showed that OsNTRC is a bifunctional enzyme with both NTR and thioredoxin activity but is not an NTR/thioredoxin system. Although the OsNTRC gene was expressed in roots and shoots of rice seedlings, the protein was exclusively found in shoots and mature leaves. Moreover, fractionation experiments showed that OsNTRC is localized to the chloroplast. An Arabidopsis NTRC knock-out mutant showed growth inhibition and hypersensitivity to methyl viologen, drought, and salt stress. These results suggest that the NTRC gene is involved in plant protection against oxidative stress.

  1. Adubação do cafeeiro com nitrato de potássio via solo e folha, no outono-inverno e primavera-verão: efeitos na atividade da redutase do nitrato, no crescimento das plantas e na produção Coffee tree fertilization with potassium nitrate via leaf and soil, in autumn-winter and spring-summer: effects on nitrate reductase activity, on plant growth and production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Barros de Freitas

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se verificar o efeito da adubação de 100 g de N/ano/planta, em três épocas (outono-inverno, primavera-verão e outono-inverno/primavera-verão e três modos de aplicação (folha, solo e folha/solo, no desenvolvimento, na produção e na atividade da redutase do nitrato (RN da cultivar Rubi-MG com quatro anos de idade. A análise conjunta entre o modo e época de aplicação mostra que o padrão de RN não se altera, sendo no frio maior nas raízes e no calor maior nas folhas. O mesmo aconteceu com o padrão de crescimento, rápido na estação quente/chuvosa e lento no período seco/frio. Em função da época de adubação, concluiu-se que, no outono-inverno, deve-se dar preferência pela aplicação na folha ou folha-solo. Esses modos de adubação foram os mais eficientes na retomada do crescimento. Quando as adubações ocorrerem nos dois períodos, qualquer um dos três modos pode ser utilizado. Apesar da inviabilidade de várias pulverizações, eventualmente, uma ou mais pulverizações com KNO3 podem substituir eficientemente a adubação no solo.The objective of this work was to verify the effect of the fertilization of 100g N/year/plant, in three periods (autumn-winter, spring-summer and autumn-winter/spring-summer and three types of application (leaf, soil and leaf/soil on the development, production and nitrate reductase activity (NR on four years old Rubi-MG cultivar. The analysis of type and time of application showed no alteration on NR activity being higher on roots in cold weather and higher on leaves in warmer weather. The same was observed with growth pattern, fast in hot/rain season and slow in dry/cold period. During autumn-winter, applications may be performed on leaf or leaf-soil. These types of fertilization were the most efficient during growth recovering. When the fertilization occurred in both periods, any type may be used. Although, several pulverizations are nonviable, one or more pulverization with

  2. Inhibition of Albendazole and Oxfendazole on the Activity of Fumaric Reductase in Cysticercus cellulosae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xue-jun; LI Qing-zhang; LI Xia

    2004-01-01

    The activity of fumaric reductase in Cysticercus cellulosae tissue homogenate with albendazole and oxfendazole individually was detected. Results showed that the two kinds of drugs both could inhabite the activity of fumaric reductase. The results indicate that the mechanism of action of benzimidazole carbamate drugs is probably inhabiting the complex of fumaric reductase noncompetently, thus lead to the exhaostion of energy and death.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of ferredoxin-NAD(P){sup +} reductase from Chlorobium tepidum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraki, Norifumi [Department of Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Seo, Daisuke [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Shiba, Tomoo [Department of Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeshi [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Kurisu, Genji, E-mail: gkurisu@xtal.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    Ferredoxin-NAD(P){sup +} reductase from C. tepidum has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Ferredoxin-NAD(P){sup +} reductase (FNR) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the photoreduction of NAD(P){sup +} to generate NAD(P)H during the final step of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. FNR from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a homodimeric enzyme with a molecular weight of 90 kDa; it shares a high level of amino-acid sequence identity to thioredoxin reductase rather than to conventional plant-type FNRs. In order to understand the structural basis of the ferredoxin-dependency of this unique photosynthetic FNR, C. tepidum FNR has been heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized in two forms. Form I crystals belong to space group C222{sub 1} and contain one dimer in the asymmetric unit, while form II crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1}22 or P4{sub 3}22. Diffraction data were collected from a form I crystal to 2.4 Å resolution on the synchrotron-radiation beamline NW12 at the Photon Factory.

  4. Isolation and expression of the Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edman, J C; Edman, U; Cao, Mi-Mi;

    1989-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR; 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate: NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) cDNA sequences have been isolated by their ability to confer trimethoprim resistance to Escherichia coli. Consistent with the recent conclusion that P. carinii is a member of the Fungi...

  5. Bidirectional catalysis by copper-containing nitrite reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijma, HJ; Canters, GW; de Vries, S; Verbeet, MP

    2004-01-01

    The copper-containing nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 was found to catalyze the oxidation of nitric oxide to nitrite, the reverse of its physiological reaction. Thermodynamic and kinetic constants with the physiological electron donor pseudoazurin were determined for both directions

  6. Plasmid-encoded diacetyl (acetoin) reductase in Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, Fergal P; Myling-Petersen, Dorte; Larsen, Dianna;

    2003-01-01

    ) reductases reported previously. Downstream of the butA gene of L. pseudomesenteroides, but coding in the opposite orientation, a putative DNA recombinase was identified. A two-step PCR approach was used to construct FPR02, a butA mutant of the wild-type strain, CHCC2114. FPR02 had significantly reduced...

  7. Sepiapterin reductase deficiency : A Treatable Mimic of Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedman, Jennifer; Roze, Emmanuel; Abdenur, Jose E.; Chang, Richard; Gasperini, Serena; Saletti, Veronica; Wali, Gurusidheshwar M.; Eiroa, Hernan; Neville, Brian; Felice, Alex; Parascandalo, Ray; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I.; Arrabal-Fernandez, Luisa; Dill, Patricia; Eichler, Florian S.; Echenne, Bernard; Gutierrez-Solana, Luis G.; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Hyland, Keith; Kusmierska, Katarzyna; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Lutz, Thomas; Mazzuca, Michel; Penzien, Johann; Bwee Tien Poll-The, [No Value; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Szymanska, Krystyna; Thoeny, Beat; Blau, Nenad

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Sepiapterin reductase deficiency (SRD) is an under-recognized levodopa-responsive disorder. We describe clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in a cohort of patients with this treatable condition. We aim to improve awareness of the phenotype and available diagnostic and therapeuti

  8. Direct Electrochemistry With Nitrate Reductase in Chitosan Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Xia CHEN; Jing Bo HU; Hong WU; Hui Bo SHAO

    2004-01-01

    Stable films made from chitosan(CS)on pyrolytic graphite electrode(PGE)gave direct electrochemistry for incorporated enzyme nitrate reductase(NR).Cyclic voltammetry of CS/NR films showed a pair of well-defined and nearly reversible redox peaks at about-0.430 V vs.SCE at pH 7.0 phosphate buffers.

  9. The effect of copper on human erythrocyte glutathione reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flikweert, J.P.; Hoorn, R.K.J.; Staal, Gerard E.J.

    1974-01-01

    1. 1. The influence of copper on purified human erythrocyte glutathione reductase (E.C. 1.6.4.2) was studied. The holoenzyme was inhibited at low oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentrations. At a glutathione concentration of 1 mM and higher no inhibition at all was found. The inhibition was independe

  10. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process...

  11. Genome-wide analysis of glutathione reductase (GR) genes from rice and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Dipesh Kumar; Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Yadav, Sandep; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-02-01

    Plant cells and tissues remain always on risk under abiotic and biotic stresses due to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Plants protect themselves against ROS induced oxidative damage by the upregulation of antioxidant machinery. Out of many components of antioxidant machinery, glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) and glutathione (GSH, γ-Glu-Cys-Gly) play important role in the protection of cell against oxidative damage. In stress condition, the GR helps in maintaining the reduced glutathione pool for strengthening the antioxidative processes in plants. Present study investigates genome wide analysis of GR from rice and Arabidopsis. We were able to identify 3 rice GR genes (LOC_Os02 g56850, LOC_Os03 g06740, LOC_Os10 g28000) and 2 Arabidopsis GR genes (AT3G54660, AT3G24170) from their respective genomes on the basis of their annotation as well as the presence of pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases class-I active site. The evolutionary relationship of the GR genes from rice and Arabidopsis genomes was analyzed using the multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. This revealed evolutionary conserved pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases class-I active site among the GR protein in rice and Arabidopsis. This study should make an important contribution to our better understanding of the GR under normal and stress condition in plants.

  12. The nitric oxide production in the moss Physcomitrella patens is mediated by nitrate reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigoberto Medina-Andrés

    Full Text Available During the last 20 years multiple roles of the nitric oxide gas (•NO have been uncovered in plant growth, development and many physiological processes. In seed plants the enzymatic synthesis of •NO is mediated by a nitric oxide synthase (NOS-like activity performed by a still unknown enzyme(s and nitrate reductase (NR. In green algae the •NO production has been linked only to NR activity, although a NOS gene was reported for Ostreococcus tauri and O. lucimarinus, no other Viridiplantae species has such gene. As there is no information about •NO synthesis neither for non-vascular plants nor for non-seed vascular plants, the interesting question regarding the evolution of the enzymatic •NO production systems during land plant natural history remains open. To address this issue the endogenous •NO production by protonema was demonstrated using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR. The •NO signal was almost eliminated in plants treated with sodium tungstate, which also reduced the NR activity, demonstrating that in P. patens NR activity is the main source for •NO production. The analysis with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM confirmed endogenous NO production and showed that •NO signal is accumulated in the cytoplasm of protonema cells. The results presented here show for the first time the •NO production in a non-vascular plant and demonstrate that the NR-dependent enzymatic synthesis of •NO is common for embryophytes and green algae.

  13. Isolation and characterization of thioredoxin and NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Changbo; Wang, Myeong-Hyeon

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the pathways of oxidoreductases in plants, 2 key components in thioredox systems i.e. thioredoxin h (Trx h) and NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTR) genes were first isolated from tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum). Subsequently, the coding sequences of Trx h and NTR were inserted into pET expression vectors, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In the UV-Visible spectra of the purified proteins, tomato Trx h was shown to have a characteristic 'shoulder' at -290 nm, while the NTR protein had the 3 typical peaks unique to flavoenzymes. The activities of both proteins were demonstrated by following insulin reduction, as well as DTNB reduction. Moreover, both NADPH and NADH could serve as substrates in the NTR reduction system, but the catalytic efficiency of NTR with NADPH was 2500-fold higher than with NADH. Additionally, our results reveal that the tomato Trx system might be involved in oxidative stress, but not in cold damage.

  14. Lignases and aldo-keto reductases for conversion of lignin-containing materials to fermentable products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, Michael; Sethi, Amit

    2016-09-13

    Termites have specialized digestive systems that overcome the lignin barrier in wood to release fermentable simple sugars. Using the termite Reticulitermes flavipes and its gut symbionts, high-throughput titanium pyrosequencing and proteomics approaches experimentally compared the effects of lignin-containing diets on host-symbiont digestome composition. Proteomic investigations and functional digestive studies with recombinant lignocellulases conducted in parallel provided strong evidence of congruence at the transcription and translational levels and provide enzymatic strategies for overcoming recalcitrant lignin barriers in biofuel feedstocks. Briefly described, therefore, the disclosure provides a system for generating a fermentable product from a lignified plant material, the system comprising a cooperating series of at least two catalytically active polypeptides, where said catalytically active polypeptides are selected from the group consisting of: cellulase Cell-1, .beta.-glu cellulase, an aldo-keto-reductase, a catalase, a laccase, and an endo-xylanase.

  15. 3-Oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase from oilseed rape (Brassica napus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, P S; Kekwick, R G; Smith, C G; Sidebottom, C; Slabas, A R

    1992-04-01

    3-Oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase (E.C. 1.1.1.100, alternatively known as beta-ketoacyl-[ACP] reductase), a component of fatty acid synthetase has been purified from seeds of rape by ammonium sulphate fractionation, Procion Red H-E3B chromatography, FPLC gel filtration and high performance hydroxyapatite chromatography. The purified enzyme appears on SDS-PAGE as a number of 20-30 kDa components and has a strong tendency to exist in a dimeric form, particularly when dithiothreitol is not present to reduce disulphide bonds. Cleveland mapping and cross-reactivity with antiserum raised against avocado 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase both indicate that the multiple components have similar primary structures. On gel filtration the enzyme appears to have a molecular mass of 120 kDa suggesting that the native structure is tetrameric. The enzyme has a strong preference for the acetoacetyl ester of acyl carrier protein (Km = 3 microM) over the corresponding esters of the model substrates N-acetyl cysteamine (Km = 35 mM) and CoA (Km = 261 microM). It is inactivated by dilution but this can be partly prevented by the inclusion of NADPH. Using an antiserum prepared against avocado 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase, the enzyme has been visualised inside the plastids of rape embryo and leaf tissues by immunoelectron microscopy. Amino acid sequencing of two peptides prepared by digestion of the purified enzyme with trypsin showed strong similarities with 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase from avocado pear and the Nod G gene product from Rhizobium meliloti.

  16. Role of respiratory nitrate reductase in ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens YT101 to colonize the rhizosphere of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiglione, J F; Gourbiere, F; Potier, P; Philippot, L; Lensi, R

    2000-09-01

    Selection of the denitrifying community by plant roots (i.e., increase in the denitrifier/total heterotroph ratio in the rhizosphere) has been reported by several authors. However, very few studies to evaluate the role of the denitrifying function itself in the selection of microorganisms in the rhizosphere have been performed. In the present study, we compared the rhizosphere survival of the denitrifying Pseudomonas fluorescens YT101 strain with that of its isogenic mutant deficient in the ability to synthesize the respiratory nitrate reductase, coinoculated in nonplanted or planted soil. We demonstrated that under nonlimiting nitrate conditions, the denitrifying wild-type strain had an advantage in the ability to colonize the rhizosphere of maize. Investigations of the effect of the inoculum characteristics (density of the total inoculum and relative proportions of mutant and wild-type strains) on the outcome of the selection demonstrated that the selective effect of the plant was expressed only during the phase of bacterial multiplication and that the intensity of selection was dependent on the magnitude of this phase. Moreover, application of the de Wit replacement series technique to our results suggests that the advantage of the wild-type strain was maximal when the ratio between the two strains in the inoculum was close to 1:1. This work constitutes the first direct demonstration that the presence of a functional structural gene encoding the respiratory nitrate reductase confers higher rhizosphere competence to a microorganism.

  17. Recominant Pinoresino-Lariciresinol Reductase, Recombinant Dirigent Protein And Methods Of Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Norman G. (Pullman, WA); Davin, Laurence B. (Pullman, WA); Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T. (Baltimore, MD); Fujita, Masayuki (Kita-gun, JP), Gang; David R. (Ann Arbor, MI), Sarkanen; Simo (Minneapolis, MN), Ford; Joshua D. (Pullman, WA)

    2003-10-21

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided from source species Forsythia intermedia, Thuja plicata, Tsuga heterophylla, Eucommia ulmoides, Linum usitatissimum, and Schisandra chinensis, which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  18. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Norman G. (Pullman, WA); Davin, Laurence B. (Pullman, WA); Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T. (Baltimore, MD); Fujita, Masayuki (Kagawa, JP); Gang, David R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Sarkanen, Simo (S. Minneapolis, MN); Ford, Joshua D. (Pullman, WA)

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  19. Development of radiation indicator plants by molecular breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jang-Ryol; Min, Sung-Ran; Jeong, Won-Joong; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwon, Seok-Yoon; Pai, Hyun-Sook; Cho, Hye-Sun; In, Dong-Su; Oh, Seung-Chol; Park, Sang- Gyu; Woo, Je-Wook; Kin, Tae-Hwan; Park, Ju-Hyun; Kim, Chang-Sook [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    To develop the transgenic plants with low level of antioxidant enzyme, transgenic tobacco plants (157 plants) using 8 different plant expression vectors which have APX genes in sense or antisense orientation under the control of CaMV 35S promoter or stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter were developed. The insertion of transgene in transgenic plants was confirmed by PCR analysis. The total APX activities of transgenic plants were enhanced or reduced by introduction of APX gene in plants. To clone the radiation-responsive genes and their promoter from plants, the NeIF2Bb, one of radiation-responsive genes from tobacco plant was characterized using molecular and cell biological tools. Promoter of GST6, a radiation-responsive gene, was cloned using RT-PCR. The GST6 promoter sequence was analyzed, and known sequence motif was searched. To develop the remediation technology of radioactively contaminated soil using transgenic plants uranium reductase and radiation resistance genes have been introduced in tobacco and indian mustard plans. The uranium reductase and radiation resistance (RecA) genes were confirmed in transgenic tobacco and indian mustard plants by PCR analysis. Also, Gene expression of uranium reductase and radiation resistance were confirmed in transgenic indian mustard plants by northern blot analysis. 42 refs., 12 figs. (Author)

  20. NADPH Thioredoxin Reductase C Controls the Redox Status of Chloroplast 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kerstin Kirchsteiger; Pablo Pulido; Maricruz Gonzalez; Francisco Javier Cejudo

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs) are efficiently reduced by NADPH Thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). To investigate the effect of light/darkness on NTRC function, the content of abundant plastidial enzymes, Rubisco, glutamine synthetase (GS), and 2-Cys Prxs was analyzed during two consecutive days in Arabidopsis wild-type and ntrc mutant plants. No significant difference of the content of these proteins was observed during the day or the night in wild-type and mutant plants. NTRC deficiency caused a lower content of fully reduced 2-Cys Prxs, which was undetectable in darkness, suggesting that NTRC is the most important pathway for 2-Cys Prx reduction, probably the only one during the night. Arabidopsis contains two plastidial 2-Cys Prxs, A and B, for which T-DNA insertion lines were characterized showing the same phenotype as wild-type plants. Two-dimensional gel analysis of leaf extracts from these mutants allowed the identification of basic and acidic isoforms of 2-Cys Prx A and B. In-vitro assays and mass spectrometry analysis showed that the acidic isoform of both proteins is produced by overoxidation of the peroxidatic Cys residue to sulfinic acid. 2-Cys Prx overoxidation was lower in the NTRC mutant. These results show the important function of NTRC to maintain the redox equilibrium of chloroplast 2-Cys Prxs.

  1. Biomass accumulation, photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, nutrient contents and nitrate reductase activity in young rosewood plants (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke submitted to different NO3-:NH4+ ratios Acúmulo de biomassa, eficiência fotoquímica do fotossistema II, conteúdo de nutrientes e atividade da redutase do nitrato em plantas jovens de pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke submetidas a diferentes relações NO3-:NH4+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denize Caranhas de Sousa Barreto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke is a native tree species of Amazon rainforest growing naturally in acidic forest soils with reduced redox potential. However, this species can also been found growing in forest gaps containing oxide soils. Variations in the forms of mineral nitrogen (NO3- or NH4+ may be predicted in these different edaphic conditions. Considering that possibility, an experiment was carried out to analyze the effects of different NO3-:NH4+ ratios on the growth performance, mineral composition, chloroplastid pigment contents, photochemical efficiency photosystem II (PSII, and nitrate redutase activity (RN, E.C.1.6.6.1 on A. rosaeodora seedlings. Nine-month-old seedlings were grown in pots with a washed sand capacity of 7.5 kg and submitted to different NO3-:NH4+ ratios (T1 = 0:100%, T2 = 25:75%, T3 = 50:50%, T4 = 75:25%, and T5 = 100:0%. The lowest relative growth rate was observed when the NO3-:NH4+ ratio was equal to 0:100%. In general, high concentrations of NO3- rather than NH4+ favored a greater nutrient accumulation in different parts of the plant. For the chloroplastid pigment, the highest Chl a, Chl b, Chl tot, Chl a/b and Chl tot/Cx+c contents were found in the treatment with 75:25% of NO3-:NH4+, and for Chl b and Cx+c it was observed no difference. In addition, there was a higher photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm when high NO3- concentrations were used. A linear and positive response for the nitrate reductase activity was recorded when the nitrate content increased on the culture substrate. Our results suggest that A. rosaeodora seedlings have a better growth performance when the NO3- concentrations in the culture substrate were higher than the NH4+ concentrations.O pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke habita, naturalmente, solos florestais ácidos com potencial redox reduzido. No entanto, estas espécies têm sido encontradas também em clareiras que, teoricamente, apresentam solos mais oxidados. Nestas diferentes

  2. The respiratory arsenate reductase from Bacillus selenitireducens strain MLS10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkar, E.; Lisak, J.; Saltikov, C.; Basu, P.; Oremland, R.S.; Stolz, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    The respiratory arsenate reductase from the Gram-positive, haloalkaliphile, Bacillus selenitireducens strain MLS10 was purified and characterized. It is a membrane bound heterodimer (150 kDa) composed of two subunits ArrA (110 kDa) and ArrB (34 kDa), with an apparent Km for arsenate of 34 ??M and Vmax of 2.5 ??mol min-1 mg-1. Optimal activity occurred at pH 9.5 and 150 g l-1 of NaCl. Metal analysis (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) of the holoenzyme and sequence analysis of the catalytic subunit (ArrA; the gene for which was cloned and sequenced) indicate it is a member of the DMSO reductase family of molybdoproteins. ?? 2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Thioredoxin and glutaredoxin-mediated redox regulation of ribonucleotide reductase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajib; Sengupta; Arne; Holmgren

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase(RNR), the rate-limitingenzyme in DNA synthesis, catalyzes reduction of thedifferent ribonucleotides to their corresponding deoxyri-bonucleotides. The crucial role of RNR in DNA synthesishas made it an important target for the development ofantiviral and anticancer drugs. Taking account of the re-cent developments in this field of research, this reviewfocuses on the role of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin sys-tems in the redox reactions of the RNR catalysis.

  4. Differential expression of disulfide reductase enzymes in a free-living platyhelminth (Dugesia dorotocephala)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Juárez, Álvaro Miguel; Martínez-González, José de Jesús; del Arenal Mena, Irene Patricia; Flores-Herrera, Óscar

    2017-01-01

    A search of the disulfide reductase activities expressed in the adult stage of the free-living platyhelminth Dugesia dorotocephala was carried out. Using GSSG or DTNB as substrates, it was possible to obtain a purified fraction containing both GSSG and DTNB reductase activities. Through the purification procedure, both disulfide reductase activities were obtained in the same chromatographic peak. By mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments obtained after tryptic digestion of the purified fraction, the presence of glutathione reductase (GR), thioredoxin-glutathione reductase (TGR), and a putative thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) was detected. Using the gold compound auranofin to selectively inhibit the GSSG reductase activity of TGR, it was found that barely 5% of the total GR activity in the D. dorotocephala extract can be assigned to GR. Such strategy did allow us to determine the kinetic parameters for both GR and TGR. Although It was not possible to discriminate DTNB reductase activity due to TrxR from that of TGR, a chromatofocusing experiment with a D. dorotocephala extract resulted in the obtention of a minor protein fraction enriched in TrxR, strongly suggesting its presence as a functional protein. Thus, unlike its parasitic counterparts, in the free-living platyhelminth lineage the three disulfide reductases are present as functional proteins, albeit TGR is still the major disulfide reductase involved in the reduction of both Trx and GSSG. This fact suggests the development of TGR in parasitic flatworms was not linked to a parasitic mode of life. PMID:28787021

  5. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  6. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Adrenal Cortex Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, A Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AKR1B) proteins are monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates, such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. Due to the involvement of human aldose reductases in pathologies, such as diabetic complications and cancer, AKR1B subgroup enzymatic properties have been extensively characterized. However, the issue of AKR1B function in non-pathologic conditions remains poorly resolved. Adrenal activities generated large amount of harmful aldehydes from lipid peroxidation and steroidogenesis, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal), which can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) activity, suggesting that, in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, the adrenal gland is one of the major sites for human and murine AKR1B expression, suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover, chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms. This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal-specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions.

  7. The Effect of Nitrate Levels and Harvest Times on Fe, Zn, Cu, and K, Concentrations and Nitrate Reductase Activity in Lettuce and Spinach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Gheshlaghi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Leafy vegetables are considered as the main sources of nitrate in the human diet. In order to investigate the effect of nitrate levels and harvest times on nitrate accumulation, nitrate reductase activity, concentrations of Fe, Zn, Cu and K in Lettuce and Spinach and their relation to nitrate accumulation in these leafy vegetables, two harvest times (29 and 46 days after transplanting, two vegetable species of lettuce and spinach and two concentrations of nitrate (10 and 20 mM were used in a hydroponics greenhouse experiment with a completely randomized design and 3 replications. Modified Hoagland and Arnon nutrient solutions were used for the experiment. The results indicated that by increasing nitrate concentration of solution, nitrate accumulation in roots and shoots of lettuce and spinach increased significantly (P ≤ 0.05, and the same trend was observed for the nitrate reductase activity in the shoots of the two species. Increasing the nitrate concentrations of solution, reduced the shoot dry weight and the concentration of Fe and Cu in both species, where as it increased the K and Zn concentrations in the shoots of the two species in each both harvest times, the nitrate accumulation increased, but the nitrate reductase activity decreased in the shoots of the two species over the course of the growth. The Concentration of Fe, Cu and K decreased in the shoots of lettuce and the spinach with the time, despite the increase in Zn concentration in the shoots. The results also indicated that increasing nitrate concentrations of solution to the levels greater than the plant capacity for reduction and net uptake of nitrate, leads to the nitrate accumulation in the plants. Nitrate accumulation in plant tissue led to decreases in fresh shoot yield and Fe and Cu concentrations and nitrate reductase activities in both lettuce and spinach.

  8. Chemical Constituents of Smilax china L. Stems and Their Inhibitory Activities against Glycation, Aldose Reductase, α-Glucosidase, and Lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Eun Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for natural inhibitors with anti-diabetes properties has gained increasing attention. Among four selected Smilacaceae family plants, Smilax china L. stems (SCS showed significant in vitro anti-glycation and rat lens aldose reductase inhibitory activities. Bioactivity-guided isolation was performed with SCS and four solvent fractions were obtained, which in turn yielded 10 compounds, including one phenolic acid, three chlorogenic acids, four flavonoids, one stilbene, and one phenylpropanoid glycoside; their structures were elucidated using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. All solvent fractions, isolated compounds, and stem extracts from plants sourced from six different provinces of South Korea were next tested for their inhibitory effects against advanced glycation end products, as well as aldose reductase. α-Glucosidase, and lipase assays were also performed on the fractions and compounds. Since compounds 3, 4, 6, and 8 appeared to be the superior inhibitors among the tested compounds, a comparative study was performed via high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection using a self-developed analysis method to confirm the relationship between the quantity and bioactivity of the compounds in each extract. The findings of this study demonstrate the potent therapeutic efficacy of SCS and its potential use as a cost-effective natural alternative medicine against type 2 diabetes and its complications.

  9. Expressed sequence tags and molecular cloning and characterization of gene encoding pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase from Podophyllum hexandrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankhede, Dhammaprakash Pandhari; Biswas, Dipul Kumar; Rajkumar, Subramani; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2013-12-01

    Podophyllotoxin, an aryltetralin lignan, is the source of important anticancer drugs etoposide, teniposide, and etopophos. Roots/rhizome of Podophyllum hexandrum form one of the most important sources of podophyllotoxin. In order to understand genes involved in podophyllotoxin biosynthesis, two suppression subtractive hybridization libraries were synthesized, one each from root/rhizome and leaves using high and low podophyllotoxin-producing plants of P. hexandrum. Sequencing of clones identified a total of 1,141 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) resulting in 354 unique ESTs. Several unique ESTs showed sequence similarity to the genes involved in metabolism, stress/defense responses, and signalling pathways. A few ESTs also showed high sequence similarity with genes which were shown to be involved in podophyllotoxin biosynthesis in other plant species such as pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. A full length coding sequence of pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase (PLR) has been cloned from P. hexandrum which was found to encode protein with 311 amino acids and show sequence similarity with PLR from Forsythia intermedia and Linum spp. Spatial and stress-inducible expression pattern of PhPLR and other known genes of podophyllotoxin biosynthesis, secoisolariciresinol dehydrogenase (PhSDH), and dirigent protein oxidase (PhDPO) have been studied. All the three genes showed wounding and methyl jasmonate-inducible expression pattern. The present work would form a basis for further studies to understand genomics of podophyllotoxin biosynthesis in P. hexandrum.

  10. Induced fit and equilibrium dynamics for high catalytic efficiency in ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, Darío H; Musumeci, Matías A; Carrillo, Néstor; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A

    2009-06-23

    Ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase (FNR) is a FAD-containing protein that catalyzes the reversible transfer of electrons between NADP(H) and ferredoxin or flavodoxin. This enzyme participates in the redox-based metabolism of plastids, mitochondria, and bacteria. Plastidic plant-type FNRs are very efficient reductases in supporting photosynthesis. They have a strong preference for NADP(H) over NAD(H), consistent with the main physiological role of NADP(+) photoreduction. In contrast, FNRs from organisms with heterotrophic metabolisms or anoxygenic photosynthesis display turnover rates that are up to 100-fold lower than those of their plastidic and cyanobacterial counterparts. With the aim of elucidating the mechanisms by which plastidic enzymes achieve such high catalytic efficiencies and NADP(H) specificity, we investigated the manner in which the NADP(H) nicotinamide enters and properly binds to the catalytic site. Analyzing the interaction of different nucleotides, substrate analogues, and aromatic compounds with the wild type and the mutant Y308S-FNR from pea, we found that the interaction of the 2'-P-AMP moiety from NADP(+) induces a change that favors the interaction of the nicotinamide, thereby facilitating the catalytic process. Furthermore, the main role of the terminal tyrosine, Y308, is to destabilize the interaction of the nicotinamide with the enzyme, inducing product release and favoring discrimination of the nucleotide substrate. We determined that this function can be replaced by the addition of aromatic compounds that freely diffuse in solution and establish a dynamic equilibrium, reversing the effect of the mutation in the Y308S-FNR mutant.

  11. Swapping FAD binding motifs between plastidic and bacterial ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Matías A; Botti, Horacio; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A

    2011-03-29

    Plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are grouped in two classes, plastidic with an extended FAD conformation and high catalytic rates and bacterial with a folded flavin nucleotide and low turnover rates. The 112-123 β-hairpin from a plastidic FNR and the carboxy-terminal tryptophan of a bacterial FNR, suggested to be responsible for the FAD differential conformation, were mutually exchanged. The plastidic FNR lacking the β-hairpin was unable to fold properly. An extra tryptophan at the carboxy terminus, emulating the bacterial FNR, resulted in an enzyme with decreased affinity for FAD and reduced diaphorase and ferredoxin-dependent cytochrome c reductase activities. The insertion of the β-hairpin into the corresponding position of the bacterial FNR increased FAD affinity but did not affect its catalytic properties. The same insertion with simultaneous deletion of the carboxy-terminal tryptophan produced a bacterial chimera emulating the plastidic architecture with an increased k(cat) and an increased catalytic efficiency for the diaphorase activity and a decrease in the enzyme's ability to react with its substrates ferredoxin and flavodoxin. Crystallographic structures of the chimeras showed no significant changes in their overall structure, although alterations in the FAD conformations were observed. Plastidic and bacterial FNRs thus reveal differential effects of key structural elements. While the 112-123 β-hairpin modulates the catalytic efficiency of plastidic FNR, it seems not to affect the bacterial FNR behavior, which instead can be improved by the loss of the C-terminal tryptophan. This report highlights the role of the FAD moiety conformation and the structural determinants involved in stabilizing it, ultimately modulating the functional output of FNRs.

  12. Hepatocyte Hyperproliferation upon Liver-Specific Co-disruption of Thioredoxin-1, Thioredoxin Reductase-1, and Glutathione Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R. Prigge

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Energetic nutrients are oxidized to sustain high intracellular NADPH/NADP+ ratios. NADPH-dependent reduction of thioredoxin-1 (Trx1 disulfide and glutathione disulfide by thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1 and glutathione reductase (Gsr, respectively, fuels antioxidant systems and deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Mouse livers lacking both TrxR1 and Gsr sustain these essential activities using an NADPH-independent methionine-consuming pathway; however, it remains unclear how this reducing power is distributed. Here, we show that liver-specific co-disruption of the genes encoding Trx1, TrxR1, and Gsr (triple-null causes dramatic hepatocyte hyperproliferation. Thus, even in the absence of Trx1, methionine-fueled glutathione production supports hepatocyte S phase deoxyribonucleotide production. Also, Trx1 in the absence of TrxR1 provides a survival advantage to cells under hyperglycemic stress, suggesting that glutathione, likely via glutaredoxins, can reduce Trx1 disulfide in vivo. In triple-null livers like in many cancers, deoxyribonucleotide synthesis places a critical yet relatively low-volume demand on these reductase systems, thereby favoring high hepatocyte turnover over sustained hepatocyte integrity.

  13. Variation of glucosinolates and quinone reductase activity among different varieties of Chinese kale and improvement of glucoraphanin by metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hongmei; Sun, Bo; Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Xu, Chaojiong; Wang, Qiaomei

    2015-02-01

    The variation of glucosinolates and quinone reductase (QR) activity in fourteen varieties of Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey) was investigated in the present study. Results showed that gluconapin (GNA), instead of glucoraphanin (GRA), was the most predominant glucosinolate in all varieties, and QR activity was remarkably positively correlated with the glucoraphanin level. AOP2, a tandem 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, catalyzes the conversion of glucoraphanin to gluconapin in glucosinolate biosynthesis. Here, antisense AOP2 was transformed into Gailan-04, the variety with the highest gluconapin content and ratio of GNA/GRA. The glucoraphanin content and corresponding QR activity were notably increased in transgenic plants, while no significant difference at the level of other main nutritional compounds (total phenolics, vitamin C, carotenoids and chlorophyll) was observed between the transgenic lines and the wide-type plants. Taken together, metabolic engineering is a good practice for improvement of glucoraphanin in Chinese kale.

  14. Immunological comparison of the NADH:nitrate reductase from different cucumber tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Marciniak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble nitrate reductase from cucumber roots (Cucumis sativus L. was isolated and purified with blue-Sepharose 4B. Specific antibodies against the NR protein were raised by immunization of a goat. Using polyclonal antibodies anti-NR properties of the nitrate reductase from various cucumber tissues were examined. Experiments showed difference in immuno-logical properties of nitrate reductase (NR from cotyledon roots and leaves.

  15. Comparative studies on the soluble and plasma membrane associated nitrate reductase from Cucumis sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Kłobus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical comparison between two forms of nitrate reductase from cucumber roots: the soluble enzyme and the plasma membrane-associated one was made. Soluble nitrate reductase was purified on the blue-Sepharose 4B. The nitrate reductase bound with plasma membranes was isolated from cucumber roots by partition of microsomes in the 6.5% dextran-PEG two phase system. The molecular weight of native enzyme estimated with HPLC was 240 kDa and 114 kDa for the soluble and membrane bounded enzyme, respectively. Temperature induced phase separation in Triton X-114 indicated a huge difference in hydrophobicity of the plasma membrane associated nitrate reductase and soluble form of enzyme. Small differences were observed in partial activities of plasma membrane nitrate reductase and soluble nitrate reductase. Also experiments with polyclonal antiserum raised against the native nitrate reductase showed some differences in the immunological properties of both forms of the nitrate reductase. The above results indicated that in cucumber roots two different forms of the nitrate reductase are present.

  16. Histochemical Localization of Glutathione Dependent NBT-Reductase in Mouse Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated. Methods The fresh frozen tissue sections (8m thickness) were prepared and incubated in medium containing NBT, reduced glutathione (GSH) and phosphate buffer. The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange. Results  The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has been found to be localized in the areas rich in glutathione and actively proliferating area of the skin. Conclusion The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutathione contents.

  17. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis.

  18. Isolation and characterization of an enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase gene from microalga Isochrysis galbana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Minggang; LIANG Kepeng; WANG Bo; SUN Xiuqin; YUE Yanyan; WAN Wenwen; ZHENG Li

    2013-01-01

    In most bacteria,plants and algae,fatty acid biosynthesis is catalyzed by a group of freely dissociable proteins known as the type Ⅱ fatty acid synthase (FAS Ⅱ) system.In the FAS Ⅱ system,enoylacyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) acts as a determinant for completing the cycles of fatty acid elongation.In this study,the cDNA sequence of ENR,designated as IgENR,was isolated from the microalga Isochrysis galbana CCMM5001.RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) was used to isolate the full-length cDNA ofIgENR (1 503 bp),which contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1 044 bp and encodes a protein of 347 amino acids.The genomic DNA sequence ofIgENR is interrupted by four introns.The putative amino acid sequence is homologous to the ENRs of seed plants and algae,and they contain common coenzymebinding sites and active site motifs.Under different stress conditions,real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) showed the expression ofIgENR was upregulated by high temperature (35℃),and downregulated by depleted nitrogen (0 mol/L).To clarify the mechanism of lipids accumulating lipids,other genes involved in lipids accumulation should be studied.

  19. Isolation and characterization of an enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase gene from microalga Isochrysis galbana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Minggang; Liang, Kepeng; Wang, Bo; Sun, Xiuqin; Yue, Yanyan; Wan, Wenwen; Zheng, Li

    2013-03-01

    In most bacteria, plants and algae, fatty acid biosynthesis is catalyzed by a group of freely dissociable proteins known as the type II fatty acid synthase (FAS II) system. In the FAS II system, enoylacyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) acts as a determinant for completing the cycles of fatty acid elongation. In this study, the cDNA sequence of ENR, designated as IgENR, was isolated from the microalga Isochrysis galbana CCMM5001. RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) was used to isolate the full-length cDNA of IgENR (1 503 bp), which contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1 044 bp and encodes a protein of 347 amino acids. The genomic DNA sequence of IgENR is interrupted by four introns. The putative amino acid sequence is homologous to the ENRs of seed plants and algae, and they contain common coenzymebinding sites and active site motifs. Under different stress conditions, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) showed the expression of IgENR was upregulated by high temperature (35°C), and downregulated by depleted nitrogen (0 mol/L). To clarify the mechanism of lipids accumulating lipids, other genes involved in lipids accumulation should be studied.

  20. The nitrate reductase inhibitor, tungsten, disrupts actin microfilaments in Zea mays L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P

    2014-05-01

    Tungsten is a widely used inhibitor of nitrate reductase, applied to diminish the nitric oxide levels in plants. It was recently shown that tungsten also has heavy metal attributes. Since information about the toxic effects of tungsten on actin is limited, and considering that actin microfilaments are involved in the entry of tungsten inside plant cells, the effects of tungsten on them were studied in Zea mays seedlings. Treatments with sodium tungstate for 3, 6, 12 or 24 h were performed on intact seedlings and seedlings with truncated roots. Afterwards, actin microfilaments in meristematic root and leaf tissues were stained with fluorescent phalloidin, and the specimens were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. While the actin microfilament network was well organized in untreated seedlings, in tungstate-treated ones it was disrupted in a time-dependent manner. In protodermal root cells, the effects of tungsten were stronger as cortical microfilaments were almost completely depolymerized and the intracellular ones appeared highly bundled. Fluorescence intensity measurements confirmed the above results. In the meristematic leaf tissue of intact seedlings, no depolymerization of actin microfilaments was noticed. However, when root tips were severed prior to tungstate application, both cortical and endoplasmic actin networks of leaf cells were disrupted and bundled after 24 h of treatment. The differential response of root and leaf tissues to tungsten toxicity may be due to differential penetration and absorption, while the effects on actin microfilaments could not be attributed to the nitric oxide depletion by tungsten.

  1. Genes encoding chimeras of Neurospora crassa erg-3 and human TM7SF2 proteins fail to complement Neurospora and yeast sterol C-14 reductase mutants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Prakash; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2002-03-01

    The human gene TM7SF2 encodes a polypeptide (SR-1) with high sequence similarity to sterol C-14 reductase, a key sterol biosynthetic enzyme in fungi, plants and mammals. In Neurospora and yeast this enzyme is encoded by the erg-3 and erg24 genes respectively. In an effort to demonstrate sterol C-14 reductase activity for SR-1 we constructed six recombinant genes coding for chimeras of the Neurospora erg-3 and SR-1 protein sequences and tested them for complementation of the Neurospora erg-3 mutant. To our surprise, all the chimeras failed to complement erg-3. A few of the chimeric proteins were also tested against the yeast erg24 mutant, but again there was no complementation. We discuss some reasons that might account for these unexpected findings.

  2. Redox regulation of ascorbate and glutathione by a chloroplastic dehydroascorbate reductase is required for high-light stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshi, Masahiro; Hatanaka, Risa; Tanabe, Noriaki; Terai, Yusuke; Maruta, Takanori; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2016-05-01

    Chloroplasts are a significant site for reactive oxygen species production under illumination and, thus, possess a well-organized antioxidant system involving ascorbate. Ascorbate recycling occurs in different manners in this system, including a dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) reaction. We herein investigated the physiological significance of DHAR3 in photo-oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. GFP-fused DHAR3 protein was targeted to chloroplasts in Arabidopsis leaves. A DHAR3 knockout mutant exhibited sensitivity to high light (HL). Under HL, the ascorbate redox states were similar in mutant and wild-type plants, while total ascorbate content was significantly lower in the mutant, suggesting that DHAR3 contributes, at least to some extent, to ascorbate recycling. Activation of monodehydroascorbate reductase occurred in dhar3 mutant, which might compensate for the lack of DHAR3. Interestingly, glutathione oxidation was consistently inhibited in dhar3 mutant. These findings indicate that DHAR3 regulates both ascorbate and glutathione redox states to acclimate to HL.

  3. Regulation of AhFRO1, an Fe(III)-chelate reductase of peanut, during iron deficiency stress and intercropping with maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong; Duan, Lihong; Wu, Huilan; Yang, Rongxin; Ling, Hongqing; Li, Wen-Xue; Zhang, Fusuo

    2009-07-01

    Iron deficiency-induced chlorosis in peanut during anthesis was alleviated when peanut was intercropped with maize in field and pot experiments. Iron acquisition of graminaceous plants is characterized by the synthesis and secretion of the iron-chelating phytosiderophores. Compared to the roots of monocropped maize, the roots of maize intercropped with peanut always secreted higher amounts of phytosiderophores during peanut anthesis. For non-graminaceous plants, reduction of ferric to ferrous iron on the root surface is the rate-limiting step for mobilizing iron from soil. The full-length cDNA, AhFRO1, which is encoding an Fe(III)-chelate reductase, was isolated from peanut. AhFRO1 expression in yeast conferred Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity to the cells. Consistent with its function in iron uptake, AhFRO1 was determined to be a membrane protein by transient expression analysis. AhFRO1 mRNA accumulated under iron deficiency conditions. During pre-anthesis, the Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity and the transcript levels of AhFRO1 were similar in monocropped and intercropped peanut. When the iron deficiency-induced chlorosis developed in the monocropped peanuts, both the Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity of peanut and the transcript levels of AhFRO1 were higher in intercropped than in monocropped peanuts, which is consistent with the secretion of phytosiderophores by maize roots. We conclude that AhFRO1 in peanut and phytosiderophores from maize co-operate to improve the iron nutrition of peanut when intercropped with maize.

  4. Nitrate reductase-mediated NO production enhances Cd accumulation in Panax notoginseng roots by affecting root cell wall properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Qi; Wu, Wenwei; Yu, Wenqian; Zhang, Jiarong; Xu, Jin; Rengel, Zed; Chen, Limei; Cui, Xiuming; Chen, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Panax notoginseng (Burk) F. H. Chen is a traditional medicinal herb in China. However, the high capacity of its roots to accumulate cadmium (Cd) poses a potential risk to human health. Although there is some evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in mediating Cd toxicity, the origin of Cd-induced NO and its function in plant responses to Cd remain unknown. In this study, we examined NO synthesis and its role in Cd accumulation in P. notoginseng roots. Cd-induced NO production was significantly decreased by application of the nitrate reductase inhibitor tungstate but not the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (N(G)-methyl-l-arginine acetate), indicating that nitrate reductase is the major contributor to Cd-induced NO production in P. notoginseng roots. Under conditions of Cd stress, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) increased Cd accumulation in root cell walls but decreased Cd translocation to the shoot. In contrast, the NO scavenger cPTIO (2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) and tungstate both significantly decreased NO-increased Cd retention in root cell walls. The amounts of hemicellulose 1 and pectin, together with pectin methylesterase activity, were increased with the addition of SNP but were decreased by cPTIO and tungstate. Furthermore, increases or decreases in hemicellulose 1 and pectin contents as well as pectin methylesterase activity fit well with the increased or decreased retention of Cd in the cell walls of P. notoginseng roots. The results suggest that nitrate reductase-mediated NO production enhances Cd retention in P. notoginseng roots by modulating the properties of the cell wall.

  5. Aldo-keto reductases 1B in adrenal cortex physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie PASTEL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aldose reductase proteins are cytosolic monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. The Aldose reductase subgroup (AKR1B is one of the most characterized because of its involvement in human diseases such as diabetic complications resulting from the ability of its human archetype AKR1B1 to reduce glucose into sorbitol. However the issue of AKR1B function in non pathologic condition remains poorly resolved. Adrenal steroidogenesis is strongly associated with high production of endogenous harmful lipid aldehyde by-products including isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal derived from cholesterol side chain cleavage (the first step of steroid synthesis and 4-hydroxynonenal (4- HNE that can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase activity, suggesting that in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, previous studies have established that the adrenal gland is one of the major site for human and murine AKR1B expression suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms.This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions.

  6. INHIBITION OF RAT LENS ALDOSE REDUCTASE BY QUERCETAGETIN AND PATULETIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the results of inhibition of the Aldose reductase(AR) activity on Wistar rat lens by Quercetagetin extracted from Tagetes erects Linn and by Patuletin extracted from Tagetes patula Linn are reported.Quercetagetin inhibited AR of the rat lens by 93.9% at 10~(-4)M, 76.0% at 10~(-5)M and 13.3% at 10~(-6)M. Patuletin inhibited AR of the rat lens by 100% at 10~(-1)M, 80% at 10~(-5)M and 22.7% at 10~(-6)M respectively. The results show that these two flavones are lens AR Inhibitors, but further ...

  7. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency presenting as a rash.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crushell, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    We report on the case of a 2-year-old girl recently diagnosed with Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency who originally presented in the neonatal period with a distinctive rash. At 11 weeks of age she developed seizures, she had acquired microcephaly and developmental delay. The rash deteriorated dramatically following commencement of phenobarbitone; both rash and seizures abated following empiric introduction of pyridoxine and folinic acid as treatment of possible vitamin responsive seizures. We postulate that phenobarbitone in combination with MTHFR deficiency may have caused her rash to deteriorate and subsequent folinic acid was helpful in treating the rash and preventing further acute neurological decline as commonly associated with this condition.

  8. Applications of Carboxylic Acid Reductases in Oleaginous Microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Linger, Jeffrey; McGeehan, John; Tyo, Keith; Beckham, Gregg

    2016-04-24

    Carboxylic acid reductases (CARs) are recently emerging reductive enzymes for the direct production of aldehydes from biologically-produced carboxylic acids. Recent work has demonstrated that these powerful enzymes are able to reduce a very broad range of volatile- to long-chain fatty acids as well as aromatic acids. Here, we express four CAR enzymes from different fungal origins to test their activity against fatty acids commonly produced in oleaginous microbes. These in vitro results will inform metabolic engineering strategies to conduct mild biological reduction of carboxylic acids in situ, which is conventionally done via hydrotreating catalysis at high temperatures and hydrogen pressures.

  9. Relevance of cytochrome P450s in plants: also one of Ron Estabrook's research interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shet, Manjunath S

    2007-01-01

    I worked with Dr. Ronald Estabrook for nearly 10 years at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. In Ron's lab, when I joined I was initially involved in the isolation, purification, and characterization of cytochrome P450s and NADPH-P450(c) reductase(s) from plants, which was his new exploratory project at the time. We developed methods for the isolation, solubilization, and purification of P450s and NADPH-P450(c) reductase from plant tissue microsomes. We carried out number of in vitro experiments to study the involvement P450s and NADPH-P450(c) reductase in the biosynthesis of number of phytoalexins. We successfully isolated, purified, and cloned NADPH-P450(c) reductase from etiolated mung bean (Vigna radiate) seedlings. In addition, a series of studies were undertaken to show that purified mung bean NADPH-P450(c) reductase was able to catalyze P450-supported reactions for mammalian and bacterial P450s. My stay in Ron's lab was very educational and productive. He provided the necessary support and led the way through the maze in different research projects in the lab, which allowed me to understand the roles of P450s in humans, animals, plants, and microorganisms. He liked to teach and discover new things everyday in the lab. He is a great scientist, as well as loving and caring mentor.

  10. Functions of Flavin Reductase and Quinone Reductase in 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol Degradation by Cupriavidus necator JMP134▿

    OpenAIRE

    Belchik, Sara Mae; Xun, Luying

    2007-01-01

    The tcpRXABCYD operon of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 is involved in the degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), a toxic pollutant. TcpA is a reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2)-dependent monooxygenase that converts 2,4,6-TCP to 6-chlorohydroxyquinone. It has been implied via genetic analysis that TcpX acts as an FAD reductase to supply TcpA with FADH2, whereas the function of TcpB in 2,4,6-TCP degradation is still unclear. In order to provide direct biochemical evidence for t...

  11. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christina; Dietrich, Michael; Herrmann, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Teresa; Albrecht, Philipp; Methner, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR), a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase.

  12. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity......The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa......-controlled bimolecular process, followed by unimolecular electron equilibration between the c and d(1) hemes (k(ET) = 4.3 s(-1) and K = 1.4 at 298 K, pH 7.0). In the case of the mutant, the latter ET rate was faster by almost one order of magnitude. Moreover, the internal ET rate dropped (by approximately 30-fold...

  13. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christina; Dietrich, Michael; Herrmann, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR), a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase. PMID:28116039

  14. Properties of the arsenate reductase of plasmid R773.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladysheva, T B; Oden, K L; Rosen, B P

    1994-06-14

    Resistance to toxic oxyanions in Escherichia coli is conferred by the ars operon carried on plasmid R773. The gene products of this operon catalyze extrusion of antimonials and arsenicals from cells of E. coli, thus providing resistance to those toxic oxyanions. In addition, resistance to arsenate is conferred by the product of the arsC gene. In this report, purified ArsC protein was shown to catalyze reduction of arsenate to arsenite. The enzymatic activity of the ArsC protein required glutaredoxin as a source of reducing equivalents. Other reductants, including glutathione and thioredoxin, were not effective electron donors. A spectrophotometric assay was devised in which arsenate reduction was coupled to NADPH oxidation. The results obtained with the coupled assay corresponded to those found by direct reduction of radioactive arsenate to arsenite. The only substrate of the reaction was arsenate (Km = 8 mM); other oxyanions including phosphate, sulfate, and antimonate were not reduced. Phosphate and sulfate were weak inhibitors, while the product, arsenite, was a stronger inhibitor (Ki = 0.1 mM). Arsenate reductase activity exhibited a pH optimum of 6.3-6.8. These results indicate that the ArsC protein is a novel reductase, and elucidation of its enzymatic mechanism should be of interest.

  15. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Hoffmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2 leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR, a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase.

  16. THE EFFECTS OF AN ALDOSE REDUCTASE INHIBITOR ON THE PROGRESSION OF DIABETIC-RETINOPATHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TROMP, A; HOOYMANS, JMM; BARENDSEN, BC; VONDOORMAAL, JJ

    1991-01-01

    The polyol pathway has long been associated with diabetic retinopathy. Glucose is converted to sorbitol with the aid of the enzyme aldose reductase. Aldose reductase inhibitors can prevent changes induced by diabetes. A total of 30 patients with minimal background retinopathy were randomly divided i

  17. Determination of potential N2O-reductase activity in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, S.P.; Yuan, H.J.; Hu, C.S.; Oenema, O.; Zhang, Y.M.; Li, X.X.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of N2O-reductase activity in soil is important for understanding the microbial regulation of nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations in soil. Unfortunately, there are no easily applicable and accurate methods for determining N2O-reductase activity, which frustrates the understanding of the

  18. Inhibitory Activities of Phenolic Compounds Isolated from Adina rubella Leaves Against 5α-Reductase Associated with Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Heo, Jun Hyeok; Hwang, Yoon Jeong; Le, Thi Tam; Lee, Min Won

    2016-07-07

    Adina rubella Hance (AR), a plant native to Korea, has been used as traditional medicine for dysentery, eczema, intoxication, and external hemorrhages. Previous phytochemical studies of AR have reported several components, including terpenoids, phenolics, and alkaloids. The current study evaluated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities and 5α-reductase inhibition of isolated compounds of AR leaves to find a potential therapeutic agent for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Repeated chromatographic isolation of an 80% acetone extract of AR leaves yielded seven phenolic compounds: caffeic acid (1), chlorogenic acid (2), methyl chlorogenate (3), quercetin-3-rutinoside (4), kaempferol-3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-d-glucopyranoside (5), hyperoside (6), and grandifloroside (7). Compound 7 is a novel compound in AR. Caffeoyl derivatives 1-3 and 7 showed good anti-oxidative activities. In particular, caffeic acid (1) and grandifloroside (7) showed potent anti-inflammatory activities, and 7 also exhibited potent inhibitory activity against TNF-α and 5α-reductase. Our results show that the extract and grandifloroside (7) from leaves of AR might be developed as a source of potent anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agents and therapeutic agent for BPH.

  19. Inhibitory Activities of Phenolic Compounds Isolated from Adina rubella Leaves Against 5α-Reductase Associated with Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adina rubella Hance (AR, a plant native to Korea, has been used as traditional medicine for dysentery, eczema, intoxication, and external hemorrhages. Previous phytochemical studies of AR have reported several components, including terpenoids, phenolics, and alkaloids. The current study evaluated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities and 5α-reductase inhibition of isolated compounds of AR leaves to find a potential therapeutic agent for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH. Repeated chromatographic isolation of an 80% acetone extract of AR leaves yielded seven phenolic compounds: caffeic acid (1, chlorogenic acid (2, methyl chlorogenate (3, quercetin-3-rutinoside (4, kaempferol-3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6-β-d-glucopyranoside (5, hyperoside (6, and grandifloroside (7. Compound 7 is a novel compound in AR. Caffeoyl derivatives 1–3 and 7 showed good anti-oxidative activities. In particular, caffeic acid (1 and grandifloroside (7 showed potent anti-inflammatory activities, and 7 also exhibited potent inhibitory activity against TNF-α and 5α-reductase. Our results show that the extract and grandifloroside (7 from leaves of AR might be developed as a source of potent anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agents and therapeutic agent for BPH.

  20. Separation and distribution of thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme, tetrathionate reductase, and thiosulfate reductase in extracts of marine heterotroph strain 16B.

    OpenAIRE

    Whited, G M; Tuttle, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme (TSO), tetrathionate reductase (TTR), and thiosulfate reductase (TSR) were demonstrated in cell-free extracts of the marine heterotrophic thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium strain 16B. Extracts prepared from cells cultured aerobically in the absence of thiosulfate or tetrathionate exhibited constitutive TSO and TTR activity which resided in the soluble fraction of ultracentrifuged crude extracts. Constitutive TSO and TTR cochromatographed on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, Celle...

  1. Nitric oxide in plants: the roles of ascorbate and hemoglobin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Wang

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid and hemoglobins have been linked to nitric oxide metabolism in plants. It has been hypothesized that ascorbic acid directly reduces plant hemoglobin in support of NO scavenging, producing nitrate and monodehydroascorbate. In this scenario, monodehydroascorbate reductase uses NADH to reduce monodehydroascorbate back to ascorbate to sustain the cycle. To test this hypothesis, rates of rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin reduction by ascorbate were measured directly, in the presence and absence of purified rice monodehydroascorbate reductase and NADH. Solution NO scavenging was also measured methodically in the presence and absence of rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin and monodehydroascorbate reductase, under hypoxic and normoxic conditions, in an effort to gauge the likelihood of these proteins affecting NO metabolism in plant tissues. Our results indicate that ascorbic acid slowly reduces rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin at a rate identical to myoglobin reduction. The product of the reaction is monodehydroascorbate, which can be efficiently reduced back to ascorbate in the presence of monodehydroascorbate reductase and NADH. However, our NO scavenging results suggest that the direct reduction of plant hemoglobin by ascorbic acid is unlikely to serve as a significant factor in NO metabolism, even in the presence of monodehydroascorbate reductase. Finally, the possibility that the direct reaction of nitrite/nitrous acid and ascorbic acid produces NO was measured at various pH values mimicking hypoxic plant cells. Our results suggest that this reaction is a likely source of NO as the plant cell pH drops below 7, and as nitrite concentrations rise to mM levels during hypoxia.

  2. Sulphur deprivation limits Fe-deficiency responses in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchi, Sabrina; Cesco, Stefano; Varanini, Zeno; Pinton, Roberto; Astolfi, Stefania

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this work was to clarify the role of S supply in the development of the response to Fe depletion in Strategy I plants. In S-sufficient plants, Fe-deficiency caused an increase in the Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity, 59Fe uptake rate and ethylene production at root level. This response was associated with increased expression of LeFRO1 [Fe(III)-chelate reductase] and LeIRT1 (Fe2+ transporter) genes. Instead, when S-deficient plants were transferred to a Fe-free solution, no induction of Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity and ethylene production was observed. The same held true for LeFRO1 gene expression, while the increase in 59Fe2+ uptake rate and LeIRT1 gene over-expression were limited. Sulphur deficiency caused a decrease in total sulphur and thiol content; a concomitant increase in 35SO4(2-) uptake rate was observed, this behaviour being particularly evident in Fe-deficient plants. Sulphur deficiency also virtually abolished expression of the nicotianamine synthase gene (LeNAS), independently of the Fe growth conditions. Sulphur deficiency alone also caused a decrease in Fe content in tomato leaves and an increase in root ethylene production; however, these events were not associated with either increased Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity, higher rates of 59Fe uptake or over-expression of either LeFRO1 or LeIRT1 genes. Results show that S deficiency could limit the capacity of tomato plants to cope with Fe-shortage by preventing the induction of the Fe(III)-chelate reductase and limiting the activity and expression of the Fe2+ transporter. Furthermore, the results support the idea that ethylene alone cannot trigger specific Fe-deficiency physiological responses in a Strategy I plant, such as tomato.

  3. Purification of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase from swine testis microsomes by chromatofocusing and characterization of the purified reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwada, M; Ohsawa, Y; Horie, S

    1985-07-18

    A purified NADPH-cytochrome c reductase (NADPH: ferricytochrome oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.2.4) was prepared from swine testis microsomes by detergent solubilization followed by a procedure including chromatofocusing. The reductase was eluted at an isoelectric point of 4.8 from the chromatofocusing column. 730-fold purification was achieved with an overall yield of 1.2%. The preparation was found to be homogeneous upon polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Upon SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, however, the purified preparation resolved into one major band (Mr 78 000) and two minor bands (Mr 60 000 and 15 000). The enzyme contained about 1 mol each of FMN and FAD, which were both extractable with trichloroacetic acid and also boiling water. The oxidized form of the enzyme showed the absorption spectrum of a typical flavoprotein. Aerobic reduction with NADPH resulted in conversion of the spectrum into one of an air-stable semiquinone form. The activity of the purified preparation was 26 mumol cytochrome c reduced/min per mg protein under the standard assay conditions at 22 degrees C. The enzyme catalyzed the reaction through a ping-pong mechanism.

  4. Naegleria fowleri: a free-living highly pathogenic amoeba contains trypanothione/trypanothione reductase and glutathione/glutathione reductase systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondarza, Raúl N; Hurtado, Gerardo; Tamayo, Elsa; Iturbe, Angélica; Hernández, Eva

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents definitive data showing that the thiol-bimane compound isolated and purified by HPLC from Naegleria fowleri trophozoites unequivocally corresponds by matrix assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS, to the characteristic monoprotonated ion of trypanothione-(bimane)(2) [M(+)H(+)] of m/z 1104.57 and to the trypanothione-(bimane) of m/z 914.46. The trypanothione disulfide T(S)(2) was also found to have a molecular ion of m/z 723.37. Additionally HPLC demonstrated that thiol-bimane compounds corresponding to cysteine and glutathione were present in Naegleria. The ion patterns of the thiol-bimane compounds prepared from commercial trypanothione standard, Entamoeba histolytica and Crithidia luciliae are identical to the Naegleria thiol-bimane compound. Partially purified extracts from N. fowleri showed the coexistence of glutathione and trypanothione reductases activities. There is not doubt that the thiol compound trypanothione, which was previously thought to occur only in Kinetoplastida, is also present in the human pathogens E. histolytica and N. fowleri, as well as in the non-pathogenic euglenozoan E. gracilis. The presence of the trypanothione/trypanothione reductase system in N. fowleri creates the possibility of using this enzyme as a new "drug target" for rationally designed drugs to eliminate the parasite, without affecting the human host.

  5. Proximal FAD histidine residue influences interflavin electron transfer in cytochrome P450 reductase and methionine synthase reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meints, Carla E; Parke, Sarah M; Wolthers, Kirsten R

    2014-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and methionine synthase reductase (MSR) transfer reducing equivalents from NADPH to FAD to FMN. In CPR, hydride transfer and interflavin electron transfer are kinetically coupled steps, but in MSR the two catalytic steps are represented by two distinct kinetic phases leading to transient formation of the FAD hydroquinone. In human CPR, His(322) forms a hydrogen-bond with the highly conserved Asp(677), a member of the catalytic triad. The catalytic triad is present in MSR, but Ala(312) replaces the histidine residue. To examine if this structural variation accounts for differences in their kinetic behavior, reciprocal substitutions were created. Substitution of His(322) for Ala in CPR does not affect the rate of NADPH hydride transfer or the FAD redox potentials, but does impede interflavin electron transfer. For MSR, swapping Ala(312) for a histidine residue resulted in the kinetic coupling of hydride and interflavin electron transfer, and eliminated the formation of the FAD hydroquinone intermediate. For both enzymes, placement of the His residue in the active site weakens coenzyme binding affinity. The data suggest that the proximal FAD histidine residue accelerates proton-coupled electron transfer from FADH2 to the higher potential FMN; a mechanism for this catalytic role is discussed.

  6. Extraction and identification of three major aldose reductase inhibitors from Artemisia montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyun Ah; Islam, M D Nurul; Kwon, Yong Soo; Jin, Seong Eun; Son, You Kyung; Park, Jin Ju; Sohn, Hee Sook; Choi, Jae Sue

    2011-02-01

    Aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) provide an important therapeutic and preventive opportunity against hyperglycemia associated diabetic complications. The methanolic extracts of 12 species from the genus Artemisia exhibited significant in vitro rat lens AR (RLAR) inhibitory activities with IC(50) values ranging from 0.51 to 13.45 μg/mL (quercetin, 0.64 μg/mL). Since the whole plant of Artemisia montana showed the highest RLAR inhibitory activity, bioassay-guided fractionation was performed to obtain ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions. Repeated column chromatography of two active fractions, yielded fifteen compounds, including four chlorogenic acids (3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, chlorogenic acid, neochlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid), six flavonoids (apigenin, luteolin, quercetin, isoquercitrin, hyperoside, luteolin 7-rutinoside), and five coumarins (umbelliferone, scoparone, scopoletin, esculetin, and scopolin); their structures were confirmed by spectroscopic methods. 3,5-Di-O-caffeoylquinic acid and chlorogenic acid, as well as test flavonoids, displayed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activities with IC(50) values ranging from 0.19 to 5.37 μM. Furthermore, the HPLC profiles of the ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions indicated that 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, chlorogenic acid, and hyperoside, as major compounds, might play crucial roles in RLAR inhibition. The results suggest that A. montana and three key AR inhibitors therein would clearly be potential candidates as therapeutic or preventive agents for diabetic complications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pinoresinol reductase 1 impacts lignin distribution during secondary cell wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiao; Zeng, Yining; Yin, Yanbin; Pu, Yunqiao; Jackson, Lisa A; Engle, Nancy L; Martin, Madhavi Z; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Dixon, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Pinoresinol reductase (PrR) catalyzes the conversion of the lignan (-)-pinoresinol to (-)-lariciresinol in Arabidopsis thaliana, where it is encoded by two genes, PrR1 and PrR2, that appear to act redundantly. PrR1 is highly expressed in lignified inflorescence stem tissue, whereas PrR2 expression is barely detectable in stems. Co-expression analysis has indicated that PrR1 is co-expressed with many characterized genes involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis, whereas PrR2 expression clusters with a different set of genes. The promoter of the PrR1 gene is regulated by the secondary cell wall related transcription factors SND1 and MYB46. The loss-of-function mutant of PrR1 shows, in addition to elevated levels of pinoresinol, significantly decreased lignin content and a slightly altered lignin structure with lower abundance of cinnamyl alcohol end groups. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy analysis indicated that the lignin content of the prr1-1 loss-of-function mutant is similar to that of wild-type plants in xylem cells, which exhibit a normal phenotype, but is reduced in the fiber cells. Together, these data suggest an association of the lignan biosynthetic enzyme encoded by PrR1 with secondary cell wall biosynthesis in fiber cells.

  8. Pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases with different stereospecificity from Linum album and Linum usitatissimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Heimendahl, Cosima B I; Schäfer, Katrin M; Eklund, Patrik; Sjöholm, Rainer; Schmidt, Thomas J; Fuss, Elisabeth

    2005-06-01

    Recently it was found that cell cultures and plants of Linum species contain lignans of various chemical structures. The stereochemistry of these compounds differ among species. Cell cultures of L. album accumulate (-)-podophyllotoxin together with pure (-)-secoisolariciresinol. The presence of both enantiomers of the precursor pinoresinol indicates that in L. album cell cultures the reactions from pinoresinol to secoisolariciresinol are the first steps determining enantiospecificity in biosynthesis of podophyllotoxin. Seeds of L. usitatissimum contain almost enantiomerically pure (+)-secoisolariciresinoldiglucosid derived from (+)-secoisolariciresinol. A cell culture of this species contains a mixture of both enantiomers of pinoresinol and pure (+)-secoisolariciresinol. In order to get more insight into the mechanism of (-)- and (+)-secoisolariciresinol biosynthesis, respectively, we isolated a cDNA encoding pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR) from L. album. The heterologously expressed PLR-La1 converts only (+)-pinoresinol into (-)-secoisolariciresinol. In contrast, the heterologously expressed PLR from L. usitatissimum converts only (-)-pinoresinol to (+)-secoisolariciresinol confirming the results from others. Comparison of all available PLR protein sequences resulted in a few amino acids which may be responsible for the action of the PLRs with respect to the different enantioselectivity. A mutagenesis approach could not confirm this hypothesis. Aspects about the evolution of PLRs are discussed.

  9. Nitrate reductase activity and its diurnal variation rhythm for Camptotheca acuminata seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNShi-qin; YANXiu-feng

    2004-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity (NRA) in different plant organs and leaves in different positions of Camptotheca acuminata seedlings was determined by an In vivo assay, the diurnal variation rhythm of NRA in leaves of different positions was observed,and the correlations between leaf NRA, leaf area and lamina mass per unit area (LMA) were also examined. The results showed that NRA in the leaf was significantly highest, compared with that in other organs such as roots, stems and leaves. In this experiment, the 10 leaves were selected from the apex to the base of the seedlings in order. The different NRA occurred obviously in leaves of different positions of C. acuminata seedlings from the apex to the base, and NRA was higher in the 4th-6th leaves.The diurnal change rhythm of leaf NRA showed a one peak curve, and maximum NRA value appeared at about midday (at 12:30 or so). No obvious correlations between NRA and leaf area or lamina mass per unit area were observed. This study offered scientific foundation for the further research on nitrogen metabolism of C. acuminata.

  10. Functional validation of Phragmites communis glutathione reductase (PhaGR) as an essential enzyme in salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Quan, Geng; Wang, Jing; Han, Huiling; Chen, ShiHua; Guo, ShanLi; Yin, HaiBo

    2015-04-01

    Reed plants (Phragmites communis (Linn.) Trin) are hydrophilic perennial grasses growing in fresh and brackish waters. These plants readily adapt to arid and high salinity conditions; however, their resistance mechanism against abiotic stresses, especially high salinity, is largely unknown. In the present study, we cloned a glutathione reductase gene from P. communis and investigated its role in conferring salt tolerance in reed plants. The expression of PhaGR at the transcriptional level was affected by multiple abiotic stresses including NaCl, Cd(2+), heat, cold, PEG 6000, and abscisic acid (ABA). Furthermore, NaCl and Cd(2+) could increase its expressions at the translational level. NaCl and Cd(2+) also increased the biosynthesis of soluble protein and reduced glutathione (GSH). Reed seedlings that were challenged with NaCl showed higher levels of GR activities, which corroborated our gene expression data. The increase in GR possibly increased the salt tolerance of reed plants through GSH production. Thus, PhaGR is a potential target gene in improving the salt tolerance of crops through genetic manipulation.

  11. The bacterial superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase are crucial for endophytic colonization of rice roots by Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquéres, Sylvia; Meneses, Carlos; Rouws, Luc; Rothballer, Michael; Baldani, Ivo; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton

    2013-08-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is an aerobic diazotrophic plant-growth-promoting bacterium isolated from different gramineous plants. We showed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were produced at early stages of rice root colonization, a typical plant defense response against pathogens. The transcription of the pathogen-related-10 gene of the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway but not of the PR-1 gene of the salicylic acid pathway was activated by the endophytic colonization of rice roots by G. diazotrophicus strain PAL5. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that, at early stages of colonization, the bacteria upregulated the transcript levels of ROS-detoxifying genes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR). To proof the role of ROS-scavenging enzymes in the colonization and interaction process, transposon insertion mutants of the SOD and GR genes of strain PAL5 were constructed. The SOD and GR mutants were unable to efficiently colonize the roots, indicated by the decrease of tightly root-associated bacterial cell counts and endophytic colonization and by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. Interestingly, the mutants did not induce the PR-10 of the JA-pathway, probably due to the inability of endophytic colonization. Thus, ROS-scavenging enzymes of G. diazotrophicus strain PAL5 play an important role in the endophytic colonization of rice plants.

  12. Overexpression of a GmCnx1 gene enhanced activity of nitrate reductase and aldehyde oxidase, and boosted mosaic virus resistance in soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhou

    Full Text Available Molybdenum cofactor (Moco is required for the activities of Moco-dependant enzymes. Cofactor for nitrate reductase and xanthine dehydrogenase (Cnx1 is known to be involved in the biosynthesis of Moco in plants. In this work, a soybean (Glycine max L. Cnx1 gene (GmCnx1 was transferred into soybean using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. Twenty seven positive transgenic soybean plants were identified by coating leaves with phosphinothricin, bar protein quick dip stick and PCR analysis. Moreover, Southern blot analysis was carried out to confirm the insertion of GmCnx1 gene. Furthermore, expression of GmCnx1 gene in leaf and root of all transgenic lines increased 1.04-2.12 and 1.55-3.89 folds, respectively, as compared to wild type with GmCnx1 gene and in line 10 , 22 showing the highest expression. The activities of Moco-related enzymes viz nitrate reductase (NR and aldehydeoxidase (AO of T1 generation plants revealed that the best line among the GmCnx1 transgenic plants accumulated 4.25 μg g(-1 h(-1 and 30 pmol L(-1, respectively (approximately 2.6-fold and 3.9-fold higher than non-transgenic control plants.In addition, overexpression ofGmCnx1boosted the resistance to various strains of soybean mosaic virus (SMV. DAS-ELISA analysis further revealed that infection rate of GmCnx1 transgenic plants were generally lower than those of non-transgenic plants among two different virus strains tested. Taken together, this study showed that overexpression of a GmCnx1 gene enhanced NR and AO activities and SMV resistance, suggesting its important role in soybean genetic improvement.

  13. Peroxisomal Monodehydroascorbate Reductase. Genomic Clone Characterization and Functional Analysis under Environmental Stress Conditions1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterrier, Marina; Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.; Sandalio, Luisa M.; del Río, Luis A.

    2005-01-01

    In plant cells, ascorbate is a major antioxidant that is involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. Monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR) is the enzymatic component of this cycle involved in the regeneration of reduced ascorbate. The identification of the intron-exon organization and the promoter region of the pea (Pisum sativum) MDAR 1 gene was achieved in pea leaves using the method of walking polymerase chain reaction on genomic DNA. The nuclear gene of MDAR 1 comprises nine exons and eight introns, giving a total length of 3,770 bp. The sequence of 544 bp upstream of the initiation codon, which contains the promoter and 5′ untranslated region, and 190 bp downstream of the stop codon were also determined. The presence of different regulatory motifs in the promoter region of the gene might indicate distinct responses to various conditions. The expression analysis in different plant organs by northern blots showed that fruits had the highest level of MDAR. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of pea leaves transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens having the binary vectors pGD, which contain the autofluorescent proteins enhanced green fluorescent protein and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein with the full-length cDNA for MDAR 1 and catalase, indicated that the MDAR 1 encoded the peroxisomal isoform. The functional analysis of MDAR by activity and protein expression was studied in pea plants grown under eight stress conditions, including continuous light, high light intensity, continuous dark, mechanical wounding, low and high temperature, cadmium, and the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. This functional analysis is representative of all the MDAR isoforms present in the different cell compartments. Results obtained showed a significant induction by high light intensity and cadmium. On the other hand, expression studies, performed by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated differential expression patterns

  14. Expression of an isoflavone reductase-like gene enhanced by pollen tube growth in pistils of Solanum tuberosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eldik, G J; Ruiter, R K; Colla, P H; van Herpen, M M; Schrauwen, J A; Wullems, G J

    1997-03-01

    Successful sexual reproduction relies on gene products delivered by the pistil to create an environment suitable for pollen tube growth. These compounds are either produced before pollination or formed during the interactions between pistil and pollen tubes. Here we describe the pollination-enhanced expression of the cp100 gene in pistils of Solanum tuberosum. Temporal analysis of gene expression revealed an enhanced expression already one hour after pollination and lasts more than 72 h. Increase in expression also occurred after touching the stigma and was not restricted to the site of touch but spread into the style. The predicted CP100 protein shows similarity to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but belongs to a family of IFR-like NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases present in various plant species.

  15. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria;

    2008-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism...... disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences...

  16. Go Green: The Antiinflammatory Effects of Biliverdin Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eWegiel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biliverdin (BV has emerged as a cytoprotective and important anti-inflammatory molecule. Conversion of BV to bilirubin (BR is catalyzed by biliverdin reductase (BVR and is required for the downstream signaling and nuclear localization of BVR. Recent data by others and us make clear that BVR is a critical regulator of innate immune responses resulting from acute insult and injury and moreover, that a lack of BVR results in an enhanced pro-inflammatory phenotype. In macrophages, BVR is regulated by its substrate BV which leads to activation of the PI3K-Akt-IL10 axis and inhibition of TLR4 expression via direct binding of BVR to the TLR4 promoter. In this review, we will summarize recent findings on the role of BVR and the bile pigments in inflammation in context with its activity as an enzyme, receptor and transcriptional regulator.

  17. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria

    2008-01-01

    disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism......Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...

  18. Aspects of ribonucleotide reductase regulation and genome stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena Berner Nedergaard

    yeast, and Sml1, Hug1, and Dif1 in budding yeast. An elevated, as well as a reduced dNTP pool is shown to lead to an increase in spontaneous mutation rates, hence regulation of RNR is very important in order to maintain genomic stability. No human inhibitory proteins have yet been identified to regulate......In all living cells, synthesis of the DNA building blocks, deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs), is tightly regulated to ensure a precise DNA replication to maintain genomic stability. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is the enzyme responsible for reducing ribonucleotides to their deoxy forms...... the human RNR enzyme. In this study regulation of human RNR was investigated using a fission yeast strain that depended solely on the human genes of R1 and R2 for dNTP synthesis. Even though this strain could grow like wild-type fission yeast it was hypersensitive to hydroxyurea (HU) and depended...

  19. Structure of a bacterial homologue of vitamin K epoxide reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weikai; Schulman, Sol; Dutton, Rachel J.; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon; Rapoport, Tom A. (Harvard-Med); (HHMI)

    2010-03-19

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) generates vitamin K hydroquinone to sustain {gamma}-carboxylation of many blood coagulation factors. Here, we report the 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of VKOR from Synechococcus sp. The structure shows VKOR in complex with its naturally fused redox partner, a thioredoxin-like domain, and corresponds to an arrested state of electron transfer. The catalytic core of VKOR is a four transmembrane helix bundle that surrounds a quinone, connected through an additional transmembrane segment with the periplasmic thioredoxin-like domain. We propose a pathway for how VKOR uses electrons from cysteines of newly synthesized proteins to reduce a quinone, a mechanism confirmed by in vitro reconstitution of vitamin K-dependent disulphide bridge formation. Our results have implications for the mechanism of the mammalian VKOR and explain how mutations can cause resistance to the VKOR inhibitor warfarin, the most commonly used oral anticoagulant.

  20. Pulse radiolysis studies on superoxide reductase from Treponema pallidum

    CERN Document Server

    Nivière, V; Fontecave, M; Houée-Levin, C

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are small metalloenzymes, which catalyze reduction of O2*- to H2O2. The reaction of the enzyme from Treponema pallidum with superoxide was studied by pulse radiolysis methods. The first step is an extremely fast bi-molecular reaction of the ferrous center with O2, with a rate constant of 6 x 10 (8) M(-1) s(-1). A first intermediate is formed which is converted to a second one with a slower rate constant of 4800 s(-1). This latter value is 10 times higher than the corresponding one previously reported in the case of SOR from Desulfoarculus baarsii. The reconstituted spectra for the two intermediates are consistent with formation of transient iron-peroxide species.

  1. Identification of imine reductase-specific sequence motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fademrecht, Silvia; Scheller, Philipp N; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Chiral amines are valuable building blocks for the production of a variety of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and other specialty chemicals. Only recently, imine reductases (IREDs) were discovered which catalyze the stereoselective reduction of imines to chiral amines. Although several IREDs were biochemically characterized in the last few years, knowledge of the reaction mechanism and the molecular basis of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity is limited. To gain further insights into the sequence-function relationships, the Imine Reductase Engineering Database (www.IRED.BioCatNet.de) was established and a systematic analysis of 530 putative IREDs was performed. A standard numbering scheme based on R-IRED-Sk was introduced to facilitate the identification and communication of structurally equivalent positions in different proteins. A conservation analysis revealed a highly conserved cofactor binding region and a predominantly hydrophobic substrate binding cleft. Two IRED-specific motifs were identified, the cofactor binding motif GLGxMGx(5 )[ATS]x(4) Gx(4) [VIL]WNR[TS]x(2) [KR] and the active site motif Gx[DE]x[GDA]x[APS]x(3){K}x[ASL]x[LMVIAG]. Our results indicate a preference toward NADPH for all IREDs and explain why, despite their sequence similarity to β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases (β-HADs), no conversion of β-hydroxyacids has been observed. Superfamily-specific conservations were investigated to explore the molecular basis of their stereopreference. Based on our analysis and previous experimental results on IRED mutants, an exclusive role of standard position 187 for stereoselectivity is excluded. Alternatively, two standard positions 139 and 194 were identified which are superfamily-specifically conserved and differ in R- and S-selective enzymes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellenbrand Janine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. Results cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba, domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. Conclusion The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis.

  3. Identification and Quantification of Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Flavonoids in Herbal Formulation and Extract of Gymnema sylvestre Using HPLC-PDA and LC-MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjappan Satheeshkumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adulteration of herbal supplements is a major issue for many countries. A simple and reliable HPLC-PDA method was developed for quantification of aldose reductase inhibitory flavonoids rutin, quercetin, and kaempferol. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Fortis C18 column in gradient mode with detection at 267 nm. The presence of these markers was confirmed through the accurate m/z values and MS/MS data obtained using quadruple time of flight mass spectrometry (QTOF-MS. The proposed method was successfully applied to examine the amount of these active constituents in antiobese polyherbal formulation and plant extract of Gymnema sylvestre.

  4. Staying green postharvest: how three mutations in the Arabidopsis chlorophyll b reductase gene NYC1 delay degreening by distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibran, Rubina; Sullivan, Kerry L; Crowhurst, Ross; Erridge, Zoe A; Chagné, David; McLachlan, Andrew R G; Brummell, David A; Dijkwel, Paul P; Hunter, Donald A

    2015-11-01

    Stresses such as energy deprivation, wounding and water-supply disruption often contribute to rapid deterioration of harvested tissues. To uncover the genetic regulation behind such stresses, a simple assessment system was used to detect senescence mutants in conjunction with two rapid mapping techniques to identify the causal mutations. To demonstrate the power of this approach, immature inflorescences of Arabidopsis plants that contained ethyl methanesulfonate-induced lesions were detached and screened for altered timing of dark-induced senescence. Numerous mutant lines displaying accelerated or delayed timing of senescence relative to wild type were discovered. The underlying mutations in three of these were identified using High Resolution Melting analysis to map to a chromosomal arm followed by a whole-genome sequencing-based mapping method, termed 'Needle in the K-Stack', to identify the causal lesions. All three mutations were single base pair changes and occurred in the same gene, NON-YELLOW COLORING1 (NYC1), a chlorophyll b reductase of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. This was consistent with the mutants preferentially retaining chlorophyll b, although substantial amounts of chlorophyll b were still lost. The single base pair mutations disrupted NYC1 function by three distinct mechanisms, one by producing a termination codon, the second by interfering with correct intron splicing and the third by replacing a highly conserved proline with a non-equivalent serine residue. This non-synonymous amino acid change, which occurred in the NADPH binding domain of NYC1, is the first example of such a mutation in an SDR protein inhibiting a physiological response in plants.

  5. Exogenous methyl jasmonate treatment increases glucosinolate biosynthesis and quinone reductase activity in kale leaf tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Juvik, John A

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) spray treatments were applied to the kale varieties 'Dwarf Blue Curled Vates' and 'Red Winter' in replicated field plantings in 2010 and 2011 to investigate alteration of glucosinolate (GS) composition in harvested leaf tissue. Aqueous solutions of 250 µM MeJA were sprayed to saturation on aerial plant tissues four days prior to harvest at commercial maturity. The MeJA treatment significantly increased gluconasturtiin (56%), glucobrassicin (98%), and neoglucobrassicin (150%) concentrations in the apical leaf tissue of these genotypes over two seasons. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) activity, a biomarker for anti-carcinogenesis, was significantly increased by the extracts from the leaf tissue of these two cultivars. Extracts of apical leaf tissues had greater MeJA mediated increases in phenolics, glucosinolate concentrations, GS hydrolysis products, and QR activity than extracts from basal leaf tissue samples. The concentration of the hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin, sulforphane was significantly increased in apical leaf tissue of the cultivar 'Red Winter' in both 2010 and 2011. There was interaction between exogenous MeJA treatment and environmental conditions to induce endogenous JA. Correlation analysis revealed that indole-3-carbanol (I3C) generated from the hydrolysis of glucobrassicin significantly correlated with QR activity (r = 0.800, Pkale leaf tissues of both cultivars in 2011. Correlation analysis of these results indicated that sulforaphane, NI3C, neoascorbigen, I3C, and diindolylmethane were all significantly correlated with QR activity. Thus, increased QR activity may be due to combined increases in phenolics (quercetin and kaempferol) and GS hydrolysis product concentrations rather than by individual products alone.

  6. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A protects hepatocytes against acetaminophen-induced toxicity via regulation of thioredoxin reductase 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahendra Pratap; Kwak, Geun-Hee; Kim, Ki Young; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2017-06-03

    Thioredoxin reductase 1 (TXNRD1) is associated with susceptibility to acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver damage. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) is an antioxidant and protein repair enzyme that specifically catalyzes the reduction of methionine S-sulfoxide residues. We have previously shown that MsrA deficiency exacerbates acute liver injury induced by APAP. In this study, we used primary hepatocytes to investigate the underlying mechanism of the protective effect of MsrA against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. MsrA gene-deleted (MsrA(-/-)) hepatocytes showed higher susceptibility to APAP-induced cytotoxicity than wild-type (MsrA(+/+)) cells, consistent with our previous in vivo results. MsrA deficiency increased APAP-induced glutathione depletion and reactive oxygen species production. APAP treatment increased Nrf2 activation more profoundly in MsrA(-/-) than in MsrA(+/+) hepatocytes. Basal TXNRD1 levels were significantly higher in MsrA(-/-) than in MsrA(+/+) hepatocytes, while TXNRD1 depletion in both MsrA(-/-) and MsrA(+/+) cells resulted in increased resistance to APAP-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, APAP treatment significantly increased TXNRD1 expression in MsrA(-/-) hepatocytes, while no significant change was observed in MsrA(+/+) cells. Overexpression of MsrA reduced APAP-induced cytotoxicity and TXNRD1 expression levels in APAP-treated MsrA(-/-) hepatocytes. Collectively, our results suggest that MsrA protects hepatocytes from APAP-induced cytotoxicity through the modulation of TXNRD1 expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. meta-Tyrosine induces modification of reactive nitrogen species level, protein nitration and nitrosoglutathione reductase in tomato roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Borucki, Wojciech; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2017-08-01

    A non-protein amino acid (NPAA) - meta-Tyrosine (m-Tyr), is a harmful compound produced by fescue roots. Young (3-4 days old) tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings were supplemented for 24-72 h with m-Tyr (50 or 250 μM) inhibiting root growth by 50 or 100%, without lethal effect. Fluorescence of DAF-FM and APF derivatives was determined to show reactive nitrogen species (RNS) localization and level in roots of tomato plants. m-Tyr-induced restriction of root elongation growth was related to formation of nitrated proteins described as content of 3-nitrotyrosine. Supplementation with m-Tyr enhanced superoxide radicals generation in extracts of tomato roots and stimulated protein nitration. It correlated well to increase of fluorescence of DAF-FM derivatives, and transiently stimulated fluorescence of APF derivatives corresponding respectively to NO and ONOO(-) formation. Alterations in RNS formation induced by m-Tyr were linked to metabolism of nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Activity of nitrosoglutatione reductase (GSNOR), catalyzing degradation of GSNO was enhanced by long term plant supplementation with m-Tyr, similarly as protein abundance, while transcripts level were only slightly altered by tested NPAA. We conclude, that although in animal cells m-Tyr is considered as a marker of oxidative stress, its secondary mode of action in tomato plants involves perturbation in RNS formation, alteration in GSNO metabolism and modification of protein nitration level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cloning and expressional analyses of a cinnamoyl CoA reductase cDNA from rice seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yong; GONG Wei; LIU Tianyun; ZHU Yuxian

    2003-01-01

    Cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR: EC 1.2.1.44), the entry-point enzyme of the lignin specific biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes the conversion of cinnamoyl CoA esters to their corresponding cinnamaldehydes. Multiple sequence alignment showed that the deduced polypeptide shared 70% similarity and 30% sequence identity at the amino acid level with defined CCR genes from other plant species and they all contain the common signature sequences thought to be the catalytic site as well as the putative NADP binding domain. Using a conserved OsCCR cDNA fragment as the probe for library screening, we isolated the genomic DNA that covered the whole coding region of OsCCR with total length of 3045 bp including 4 introns and 5 exons. The open reading frame for our OsCCR gene contains 337 amino acids. Northern blot indicated that OsCCR was expressed in different organs with the highest level found in stems. In situ hybridization results showed that OsCCR mRNA was localized mainly along the vascular bundles in stems and leaves, and also in lateral roots that was differentiating from the tillering node. We conclude that the vascular-localized expression of OsCCR gene may suggest its possible involvement in lignin biosynthesis. Cloning and characterization of OsCCR will help to clarify how lignifications in plants are regulated and will provide a physical basis for creating genetically engineered rice plants with optimal lignin contents.

  9. Histochemical Localization of Glutathione Dependent NBT—Reductase in Mouse Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOESHWERSHUKLA

    2001-01-01

    Objective:Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium(NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated.Methods:The fresh frozen tissue sections(8m thickness)were prepared and incuated in medium containing NBT,reduced glutathione(GSH) and Phosphate uffer,The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange.Results:The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has een found to be localized in the areas rich in glutatione and actively proliferating area of the skin.Conclusion:The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutatione contents.

  10. Survival and psychomotor development with early betaine treatment in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, E.F.; Koning, T.J. de; Verhoeven-Duif, N.M.; Rovers, M.M.; Hasselt, P.M. van

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES MEDLI

  11. Survival and Psychomotor Development With Early Betaine Treatment in Patients With Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, Eugene F.; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; van Hasselt, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES MEDLI

  12. Molecular Evolution and Expression Divergence of Aconitase (ACO Gene Family in Land Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-ming Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aconitase (ACO is a key enzyme that catalyzes the isomerization of citrate to isocitrate in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA and glyoxylate cycles. The function of ACOs has been well studied in model plants, such as Arabidopsis. In contrast, the evolutionary patterns of the ACO family in land plants are poorly understood. In this study, we systematically examined the molecular evolution and expression divergence of the ACO gene family in 12 land plant species. Thirty-six ACO genes were identified from the 12 land plant species representing the four major land plant lineages: bryophytes, lycophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. All of these ACOs belong to the cytosolic isoform. Three gene duplication events contributed to the expansion of the ACO family in angiosperms. The ancestor of angiosperms may have contained only one ACO gene. One gene duplication event split angiosperm ACOs into two distinct clades. Two clades showed a divergence in selective pressure and gene expression patterns. The cis-acting elements that function in light responsiveness were most abundant in the promoter region of the ACO genes, indicating that plant ACO genes might participate in light regulatory pathways. Our findings provide comprehensive insights into the ACO gene family in land plants.

  13. Isobutyraldehyde production from Escherichia coli by removing aldehyde reductase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez Gabriel M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing global demand and reliance on petroleum-derived chemicals will necessitate alternative sources for chemical feedstocks. Currently, 99% of chemical feedstocks are derived from petroleum and natural gas. Renewable methods for producing important chemical feedstocks largely remain unaddressed. Synthetic biology enables the renewable production of various chemicals from microorganisms by constructing unique metabolic pathways. Here, we engineer Escherichia coli for the production of isobutyraldehyde, which can be readily converted to various hydrocarbons currently derived from petroleum such as isobutyric acid, acetal, oxime and imine using existing chemical catalysis. Isobutyraldehyde can be readily stripped from cultures during production, which reduces toxic effects of isobutyraldehyde. Results We adopted the isobutanol pathway previously constructed in E. coli, neglecting the last step in the pathway where isobutyraldehyde is converted to isobutanol. However, this strain still overwhelmingly produced isobutanol (1.5 g/L/OD600 (isobutanol vs 0.14 g/L/OD600 (isobutyraldehyde. Next, we deleted yqhD which encodes a broad-substrate range aldehyde reductase known to be active toward isobutyraldehyde. This strain produced isobutanol and isobutyraldehyde at a near 1:1 ratio, indicating further native isobutyraldehyde reductase (IBR activity in E. coli. To further eliminate isobutanol formation, we set out to identify and remove the remaining IBRs from the E. coli genome. We identified 7 annotated genes coding for IBRs that could be active toward isobutyraldehyde: adhP, eutG, yiaY, yjgB, betA, fucO, eutE. Individual deletions of the genes yielded only marginal improvements. Therefore, we sequentially deleted all seven of the genes and assessed production. The combined deletions greatly increased isobutyraldehyde production (1.5 g/L/OD600 and decreased isobutanol production (0.4 g/L/OD600. By assessing production by

  14. Localization and Solubilization of the Iron(III) Reductase of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The iron(III) reductase activity of Geobacter sulfurreducens was determined with the electron donor NADH and the artificial electron donor horse heart cytochrome c. The highest reduction rates were obtained with Fe(III) complexed by nitrilotriacetic acid as an electron acceptor. Fractionation experiments indicated that no iron(III) reductase activity was present in the cytoplasm, that approximately one-third was found in the periplasmic fraction, and that two-thirds were associated with the m...

  15. Positive pleiotropic effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor on vitiligo

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are commonly used in medicine to control blood lipid disorder. Large clinical trials have demonstrated that statins greatly reduces cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in patients with and without coronary artery disease. Also, the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors has been reported to have immunosuppressive effects. Case presentation We describe an unusual case of regression of vitiligo in a patient treated with high dos...

  16. Organic Acids: The Pools of Fixed Carbon Involved in Redox Regulation and Energy Balance in Higher Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir U Igamberdiev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic acids are synthesized in plants as a result of the incomplete oxidation of photosynthetic products and represent the stored pools of fixed carbon accumulated due to different transient times of conversion of carbon compounds in metabolic pathways. When redox level in the cell increases, e.g., in conditions of active photosynthesis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle in mitochondria is transformed to a partial cycle supplying citrate for the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate (citrate valve, while malate is accumulated and participates in the redox balance in different cell compartments (via malate valve. This results in malate and citrate frequently being the most accumulated acids in plants. However, the intensity of reactions linked to the conversion of these compounds can cause preferential accumulation of other organic acids, e.g., fumarate or isocitrate, in higher concentrations than malate and citrate. The secondary reactions, associated with the central metabolic pathways, in particularly with the TCA cycle, result in accumulation of other organic acids that are derived from the intermediates of the cycle. They form the additional pools of fixed carbon and stabilize the TCA cycle. Trans-aconitate is formed from citrate or cis-aconitate, accumulation of hydroxycitrate can be linked to metabolism of 2-oxoglutarate, while 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate can be formed from pyruvate and glyoxylate. Glyoxylate, a product of either glycolate oxidase or isocitrate lyase, can be converted to oxalate. Malonate is accumulated at high concentrations in legume plants. Organic acids play a role in plants in providing redox equilibrium, supporting ionic gradients on membranes, and acidification of the extracellular medium.

  17. X-ray structure of trypanothione reductase from Crithidia fasciculata at 2. 4- angstrom resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyan, J.; Xiangpeng Kong; Krishna, T.S.R.; Murgolo, N.J.; Field, H.; Cerami, A.; Henderson, G.B. (Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Sweet, R.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    Trypanosomes and related protozoan parasites lack glutathione reductase and possess instead a closely related enzyme that serves as the reductant of a bis(glutathione)-spermidien conjugate, trypanothione. The human and parasite enzymes have mutually exclusive substrate specificities, providing a route for the design of therapeutic agents by specific inhibition of the parasite enzyme. The authors report here the three-dimensional structure of trypanothione reductase from Crithidia fasciculata and show that it closely resembles the structure of human glutathione reductase. In particular, the core structure surrounding the catalytic machinery is almost identical in the two enzymes. However, significant differences are found at the substrate binding sites. A cluster of basic residues in glutathione reductase is replaced by neutral, hydrophobic, or acidic residues in trypanothione reductase, consistent with the nature of the spermidine linkage and the change in overall charge of the substrate from {minus}2 to +1, respectively. The binding site is more open in trypanothione reductase due to rotations of about 4{degree} in the domains that form in site, with relative shifts of as much as 2-3 {angstrom} in residues that can interact with potential inhibitors and complement previous modeling and mutagenesis studies on the two enzymes.

  18. Characterization of two alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C homologs alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C_H1 and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C_H2 in Bacillus subtilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mee-Kyung; Cha; Yoo-Jeen; Bae; Kyu-Jeong; Kim; Byung-Joon; Park; Il-Han; Kim

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C(AhpC) homologs in Bacillus subtilis(B. subtilis) and to characterize their structural and biochemical properties. AhpC is responsible for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species in bacteria.METHODS: Two AhpC homologs(AhpC_H1 and AhpC_H2) were identified by searching the B. subtilis database; these were then cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. AhpC mutants carrying substitutions of catalytically important Cys residues(C37S, C47 S, C166 S, C37/47 S, C37/166 S, C47/166 S, and C37/47/166 S for AhpC_H1; C52 S, C169 S, and C52/169 S for AhpC_H2) were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis and purified, and their structure-function relationship was analyzed. The B. subtilis ahp C genes were disrupted by the short flanking homology method, and the phenotypes of the resulting AhpC-deficient bacteria were examined.RESULTS: Comparative characterization of AhpC homologs indicates that AhpC_H1 contains an extra C37, which forms a disulfide bond with the peroxidatic C47, and behaves like an atypical 2-Cys AhpC, while AhpC_H2 functions like a typical 2-Cys AhpC. Tryptic digestion analysis demonstrated the presence of intramolecular Cys37-Cys47 linkage, which could be reduced by thioredoxin, resulting in the association of the dimer into higher-molecular-mass complexes. Peroxidase activity analysis of Cys→Ser mutants indicated that three Cys residues were involved in the catalysis. AhpC_H1 was resistant to inactivation by peroxide substrates, but had lower activity at physiological H2O2 concentrations compared to AhpC_H2, suggesting that in B. subtilis, the enzymes may be physiologically functional at different substrate concentrations. The exposure to organic peroxides induced AhpC_H1 expression, while AhpC_H1-deficient mutants exhibited growth retardation in the stationary phase, suggesting the role of AhpC_H1 as an antioxidant scavenger of lipid hydroperoxides and a stress-response factor in B. subtilis

  19. Inhibition of Aldose Reductase by Gentiana lutea Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar Akileshwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of intracellular sorbitol due to increased aldose reductase (ALR2 activity has been implicated in the development of various secondary complications of diabetes. Thus, ALR2 inhibition could be an effective strategy in the prevention or delay of certain diabetic complications. Gentiana lutea grows naturally in the central and southern areas of Europe. Its roots are commonly consumed as a beverage in some European countries and are also known to have medicinal properties. The water, ethanol, methanol, and ether extracts of the roots of G. lutea were subjected to in vitro bioassay to evaluate their inhibitory activity on the ALR2. While the ether and methanol extracts showed greater inhibitory activities against both rat lens and human ALR2, the water and ethanol extracts showed moderate inhibitory activities. Moreover, the ether and methanol extracts of G. lutea roots significantly and dose-dependently inhibited sorbitol accumulation in human erythrocytes under high glucose conditions. Molecular docking studies with the constituents commonly present in the roots of G. lutea indicate that a secoiridoid glycoside, amarogentin, may be a potential inhibitor of ALR2. This is the first paper that shows G. lutea extracts exhibit inhibitory activity towards ALR2 and these results suggest that Gentiana or its constituents might be useful to prevent or treat diabetic complications.

  20. Solvent effects on catalysis by Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveridge, E Joel; Tey, Lai-Hock; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2010-01-27

    Hydride transfer catalyzed by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) has been described previously within an environmentally coupled model of hydrogen tunneling, where protein motions control binding of substrate and cofactor to generate a tunneling ready conformation and modulate the width of the activation barrier and hence the reaction rate. Changes to the composition of the reaction medium are known to perturb protein motions. We have measured kinetic parameters of the reaction catalyzed by DHFR from Escherichia coli in the presence of various cosolvents and cosolutes and show that the dielectric constant, but not the viscosity, of the reaction medium affects the rate of reaction. Neither the primary kinetic isotope effect on the reaction nor its temperature dependence were affected by changes to the bulk solvent properties. These results are in agreement with our previous report on the effect of solvent composition on catalysis by DHFR from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima. However, the effect of solvent on the temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on hydride transfer catalyzed by E. coli DHFR is difficult to explain within a model, in which long-range motions couple to the chemical step of the reaction, but may indicate the existence of a short-range promoting vibration or the presence of multiple nearly isoenergetic conformational substates of enzymes with similar but distinct catalytic properties.

  1. A second target of benzamide riboside: dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Breton; Johnson-Farley, Nadine; Kerrigan, John E; Scotto, Kathleen W; Banerjee, Debabrata; Felczak, Krzysztof; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W; Gounder, Murugesan; Lin, HongXia; Abali, Emine Ercikan; Bertino, Joseph R

    2012-11-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is an essential enzyme involved in de novo purine and thymidine biosynthesis. For several decades, selective inhibition of DHFR has proven to be a potent therapeutic approach in the treatment of various cancers including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, osteogenic sarcoma, carcinoma of the breast, and head and neck cancer. Therapeutic success with DHFR inhibitor methotrexate (MTX) has been compromised in the clinic, which limits the success of MTX treatment by both acquired and intrinsic resistance mechanisms. We report that benzamide riboside (BR), via anabolism to benzamide adenine dinucleotide (BAD) known to potently inhibit inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), also inhibits cell growth through a mechanism involving downregulation of DHFR protein. Evidence to support this second site of action of BR includes the finding that CCRF-CEM/R human T-cell lymphoblasic leukemia cells, resistant to MTX as a consequence of gene amplification and overexpression of DHFR, are more resistant to BR than are parental cells. Studies of the mechanism by which BR lowers DHFR showed that BR, through its metabolite BAD, reduced NADP and NADPH cellular levels by inhibiting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide kinase (NADK). As consequence of the lack of NADPH, DHFR was shown to be destabilized. We suggest that, inhibition of NADK is a new approach to downregulate DHFR and to inhibit cell growth.

  2. Structural Basis for the Thermostability of Sulfur Oxygenase Reductases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤晓颜; 孟珍; 陈栋炜; 郭旭; Josef Zeyer; 刘双江; 姜成英

    2012-01-01

    The thermostability of three sulfur oxygenase reductases (SORs) was investigated from thermoacidophilic achaea Acidianus tengchongensis (SORAT) and Sulfolobus tokodaii (SORsT) as well as the moderately thermophilic bacterium Acidithiobacillus sp. SM-1 (SORsB). The optimal temperatures for catalyzing sulfur oxidation were 80 ℃ (SORAT), 85 ℃ (SORsT), and 70 ℃ (SORsB), respectively. The half-lives of the three SORs at their optimal catalytic conditions were 100 min (SORAT), 58 min (SORsT), and 37 min (SORsB). In order to reveal the structural basis of the thermostability of these SORs, three-dimensional structural models of them were generated by homology modeling using the previously reported high-resolution X-ray structure of SORAA (from Acidianus ambivalens) as a template. The results suggest that thermostability was dependent on: (a) high number of the charged amino acid glutamic acid and the flexible amino acid proline, (b) low number of the therraolabile amino acid glutamine, (c) increased number of ion pairs, (d) decreased ratio of hydrophobie accessible solvent surface area (ASA) to charged ASA, and (e) increased volumes of the cavity. The number of cavities and the number of hydrogen bonds did not signifieantly affect the thermostability of SORs, whereas the cavity volumes increased as the thermal stability increased.

  3. Binding of Natural and Synthetic Polyphenols to Human Dihydrofolate Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Neptuno Rodríguez-López

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR is the subject of intensive investigation since it appears to be the primary target enzyme for antifolate drugs. Fluorescence quenching experiments show that the ester bond-containing tea polyphenols (--epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG and (--epicatechin gallate (ECG are potent inhibitors of DHFR with dissociation constants (KD of 0.9 and 1.8 μM, respectively, while polyphenols lacking the ester bound gallate moiety [e.g., (--epigallocatechin (EGC and (--epicatechin (EC] did not bind to this enzyme. To avoid stability and bioavailability problems associated with tea catechins we synthesized a methylated derivative of ECG (3-O-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl-(--epicatechin; TMECG, which effectively binds to DHFR (KD = 2.1 μM. In alkaline solution, TMECG generates a stable quinone methide product that strongly binds to the enzyme with a KD of 8.2 nM. Quercetin glucuronides also bind to DHFR but its effective binding was highly dependent of the sugar residue, with quercetin-3-xyloside being the stronger inhibitor of the enzyme with a KD of 0.6 μM. The finding that natural polyphenols are good inhibitors of human DHFR could explain the epidemiological data on their prophylactic effects for certain forms of cancer and open a possibility for the use of natural and synthetic polyphenols in cancer chemotherapy.

  4. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Genotypes, Dietary Habits and Susceptibility to Stomach Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChangmingGao; TakezakiToshiro; JianzhongWu; JianhuoDing; YantingLiu; SupingLi; PingSu; XuHu; TianliongXu; HamajimaNobuyuki; TajimaKazuo

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the relation among methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T genotypes, dietary habits and the risk of stomach cancer (SC).METHODS A case-control study was conducted with 107 cases of SC and 200 population-based controls in Chuzhou district, Huaian, Jiangsu province, China. The epidemiological data were collected, and DNA of peripheral blood leukocytes was obtained from all of the subjects..MTHFR genotypes were detected by PCR-RFLP. RESULTS (1) The prevalence of the MTHFR C/T or T/T genotypes was found to be significantly different between controls (68.5%) and SC cases (79.4%,P=0.0416), the increased risk had an adjusted OR of 1.79 (95%C1:1.01-3.19). (2) Among subjects who had a low intake of garlic or Chinese onion, MTHFR C/T or T/T genotypes significantly increased the risk of developing SC. Among non-tea drinkers or among subjects who had a frequent intakeof meat, the carriers of the MTHFR C/T or T/T genotypes had a higher risk of SC than individuals with the C/C type MTHFR. CONCLUSION The polymorphism of MTHFR C677T was associated with increased risk of developing SC, and that individuals with differing genotypes may have different susceptibilities to SC, based on their exposure level to environmental factors.

  5. Functional characterization of methionine sulfoxide reductase A from Trypanosoma spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Diego G; Cabeza, Matías S; Erben, Esteban D; Carranza, Pedro G; Lujan, Hugo D; Téllez Iñón, María T; Iglesias, Alberto A; Guerrero, Sergio A

    2011-01-01

    Methionine is an amino acid susceptible to being oxidized to methionine sulfoxide (MetSO). The reduction of MetSO to methionine is catalyzed by methionine sulfoxide reductase (MSR), an enzyme present in almost all organisms. In trypanosomatids, the study of antioxidant systems has been mainly focused on the involvement of trypanothione, a specific redox component in these organisms. However, no information is available concerning their mechanisms for repairing oxidized proteins, which would be relevant for the survival of these pathogens in the various stages of their life cycle. We report the molecular cloning of three genes encoding a putative A-type MSR in trypanosomatids. The genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the corresponding recombinant proteins were purified and functionally characterized. The enzymes were specific for L-Met(S)SO reduction, using Trypanosoma cruzi tryparedoxin I as the reducing substrate. Each enzyme migrated in electrophoresis with a particular profile reflecting the differences they exhibit in superficial charge. The in vivo presence of the enzymes was evidenced by immunological detection in replicative stages of T. cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei. The results support the occurrence of a metabolic pathway in Trypanosoma spp. involved in the critical function of repairing oxidized macromolecules.

  6. The Sorghum Gene for Leaf Color Changes upon Wounding (P Encodes a Flavanone 4-Reductase in the 3-Deoxyanthocyanidin Biosynthesis Pathway

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    Hiroyuki Kawahigashi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Upon wounding or pathogen invasion, leaves of sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench] plants with the P gene turn purple, whereas leaves with the recessive allele turn brown or tan. This purple phenotype is determined by the production of two 3-deoxyanthocyanidins, apigeninidin and luteolinidin, which are not produced by the tan-phenotype plants. Using map-based cloning in progeny from a cross between purple Nakei-MS3B (PP and tan Greenleaf (pp cultivars, we isolated this gene, which was located in a 27-kb genomic region around the 58.1 Mb position on chromosome 6. Four candidate genes identified in this region were similar to the maize leucoanthocyanidin reductase gene. None of them was expressed before wounding, and only the Sb06g029550 gene was induced in both cultivars after wounding. The Sb06g029550 protein was detected in Nakei-MS3B, but only slightly in Greenleaf, in which it may be unstable because of a Cys252Tyr substitution. A recombinant Sb06g029550 protein had a specific flavanone 4-reductase activity, and converted flavanones (naringenin or eriodictyol to flavan-4-ols (apiforol or luteoforol in vitro. Our data indicate that the Sb06g029550 gene is involved in the 3-deoxyanthocyanidin synthesis pathway.

  7. Reduction of the pea ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase catalytic efficiency by the structuring of a carboxyl-terminal artificial metal binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L; Orecchia, Martín; Rial, Daniela V; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A

    2006-11-21

    Ferredoxin (flavodoxin)-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are ubiquitous flavoenzymes that deliver NADPH or low-potential one-electron donors (ferredoxin, flavodoxin, and adrenodoxin) to redox-based metabolisms in plastids, mitochondria, and bacteria. The FNRs from plants and most eubacteria constitute a unique family, the plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases. Plastidic FNRs are quite efficient at sustaining the demands of the photosynthetic process. At variance, FNRs from organisms with heterotrophic metabolisms or anoxygenic photosynthesis display turnover numbers that are 20-100-fold lower than those of their plastidic and cyanobacterial counterparts. To gain insight into the FNR structural features that modulate enzyme catalytic efficiency, we constructed a recombinant FNR in which the carboxyl-terminal amino acid (Tyr308) is followed by an artificial metal binding site of nine amino acids, including four histidine residues. This added structure binds Zn2+ or Co2+ and, as a consequence, significantly reduces the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme by decreasing its kcat. The Km for NADPH and the Kd for NADP+ were increased 2 and 3 times, respectively, by the addition of the amino acid extension in the absence of Zn2+. Nevertheless, the structuring of the metal binding site did not change the Km for NADPH or the Kd for NADP+ of the FNR-tail enzyme. Our results provide experimental evidence which indicates that mobility of the carboxyl-terminal backbone region of the FNR, mainly Tyr308, is essential for obtaining an FNR enzyme with high catalytic efficiency.

  8. Structural functionality, catalytic mechanism modeling and molecular allergenicity of phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase, an olive pollen (Ole e 12) allergen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C.; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Gachomo, Emma W.; Alché, Juan D.

    2013-10-01

    Isoflavone reductase-like proteins (IRLs) are enzymes with key roles in the metabolism of diverse flavonoids. Last identified olive pollen allergen (Ole e 12) is an IRL relevant for allergy amelioration, since it exhibits high prevalence among atopic patients. The goals of this study are the characterization of (A) the structural-functionality of Ole e 12 with a focus in its catalytic mechanism, and (B) its molecular allergenicity by extensive analysis using different molecular computer-aided approaches covering (1) physicochemical properties and functional-regulatory motifs, (2) sequence analysis, 2-D and 3D structural homology modeling comparative study and molecular docking, (3) conservational and evolutionary analysis, (4) catalytic mechanism modeling, and (5) sequence, structure-docking based B-cell epitopes prediction, while T-cell epitopes were predicted by inhibitory concentration and binding score methods. Structural-based detailed features, phylogenetic and sequences analysis have identified Ole e 12 as phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase. A catalytic mechanism has been proposed for Ole e 12 which display Lys133 as one of the conserved residues of the IRLs catalytic tetrad (Asn-Ser-Tyr-Lys). Structure characterization revealed a conserved protein folding among plants IRLs. However, sequence polymorphism significantly affected residues involved in the catalytic pocket structure and environment (cofactor and substrate interaction-recognition). It might also be responsible for IRLs isoforms functionality and regulation, since micro-heterogeneities affected physicochemical and posttranslational motifs. This polymorphism might have large implications for molecular differences in B- and T-cells epitopes of Ole e 12, and its identification may help designing strategies to improve the component-resolving diagnosis and immunotherapy of pollen and food allergy through development of molecular tools.

  9. NADPH-Thioredoxin Reductase C Mediates the Response to Oxidative Stress and Thermotolerance in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Riego, Ana M; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Galmozzi, Carla V; Florencio, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thiioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx) as well as through other functions related to redox enzyme regulation. In cyanobacteria, the Anabaena NTRC has been characterized in vitro, however, nothing was known about its in vivo function. In order to study that, we have generated the first knockout mutant strain (ΔntrC), apart from the previously described in Arabidopsis. Detailed characterization of this strain reveals a differential sensitivity to oxidative stress treatments with respect to the wild-type Anabaena strain, including a higher level of ROS (reactive oxygen species) in normal growth conditions. In the mutant strain, different oxidative stress treatments such as hydrogen peroxide, methyl-viologen or high light irradiance provoke an increase in the expression of genes related to ROS detoxification, including AnNTRC and peroxiredoxin genes, with a concomitant increase in the amount of AnNTRC and 2-Cys Prx. Moreover, the role of AnNTRC in the antioxidant response is confirmed by the observation of a pronounced overoxidation of the 2-Cys Prx and a time-delay recovery of the reduced form of this protein upon oxidative stress treatments. Our results suggest the participation of this enzyme in the peroxide detoxification in Anabaena. In addition, we describe the role of Anabaena NTRC in thermotolerance, by the appearance of high molecular mass AnNTRC complexes, showing that the mutant strain is more sensitive to high temperature treatments.

  10. NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C mediates the response to oxidative stress and thermotolerance in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARÍA SÁNCHEZ-RIEGO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available NTRC (NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx as well as through other functions related to redox enzyme regulation. In cyanobacteria, the Anabaena NTRC has been characterized in vitro, however nothing was known about its in vivo function. In order to study that, we have generated the first knockout mutant strain (∆ntrC, apart from the previously described in Arabidopsis. Detailed characterization of this strain reveals a differential sensitivity to oxidative stress treatments with respect to the wild-type Anabaena strain, including a higher level of ROS (reactive oxygen species in normal growth conditions. In the mutant strain, different oxidative stress treatments such as hydrogen peroxide, methyl-viologen or high light irradiance provoke an increase in the expression of genes related to ROS detoxification, including AnNTRC and peroxiredoxin genes, with a concomitant increase in the amount of AnNTRC and 2-Cys Prx. Moreover, the role of AnNTRC in the antioxidant response is confirmed by the observation of a pronounced overoxidation of the 2-Cys Prx and a time-delay recovery of the reduced form of this protein upon oxidative stress treatments. Our results suggest the participation of this enzyme in the peroxide detoxification in Anabaena. In addition, we describe the role of Anabaena NTRC in thermotolerance, by the appearance of high molecular mass AnNTRC complexes, showing that the mutant strain is more sensitive to high temperature treatments.

  11. Aldose reductase inhibitory potential of different fractions ofHouttuynia cordata Thunb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manish Kumar; Damiki Laloo; Satyendra K. Prasad; Siva Hemalatha

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the aldose reductase(AR) inhibitory activity of different fractions from Houttuynia cordata(H. cordata) which used as a medicinal salad for lowering of blood sugar level. Methods:AR inhibitory activity along with protein content was evaluatedin vitro in rat lens. Total phenol and flavonoid contents were also determined in all the fractions.Results:All the four fractions were found to inhibit lensAR activity, but to differentextent.From dose response curve(DRC), aqueous fraction(AQ) was found to be the most effectiveAR inhibitor followed by ethyl acetate(EA), chloroform(CL) and hexane fraction(HEX).TheIC50 values ofAQ,EA,CL and HEX were calculated to be(64.62±3.90),(90.69±7.50),(134.59±4.90) and(151.58±3.30) μg/mL respectively.Quercetin was taken as positive control which exhibitedAR inhibition withanIC50 value of(3.21±0.60) μg/mL in a non-competitive manner.Conclusion:These findings indicated that,AQ fraction ofH. cordata exhibited significant inhibitory effect onAR in a non-competitive manner, which may be attributed to the presence of high phenolic and flavonoid contents.Thus, the plantH. cordata may act as a promising source in the treatment of secondary complications like cataract associated with diabetes.

  12. Arabidopsis dehydroascorbate reductase 1 and 2 modulate redox states of ascorbate-glutathione cycle in the cytosol in response to photooxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshi, Masahiro; Yamada, Hiroki; Hatanaka, Risa; Tanabe, Noriaki; Tamoi, Masahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    Ascorbate and glutathione are indispensable cellular redox buffers and allow plants to acclimate stressful conditions. Arabidopsis contains three functional dehydroascorbate reductases (DHAR1-3), which catalyzes the conversion of dehydroascorbate into its reduced form using glutathione as a reductant. We herein attempted to elucidate the physiological role in DHAR1 and DHAR2 in stress responses. The total DHAR activities in DHAR knockout Arabidopsis plants, dhar1 and dhar2, were 22 and 92%, respectively, that in wild-type leaves. Under high light (HL), the levels of total ascorbate and dehydroascorbate were only reduced and increased, respectively, in dhar1. The oxidation of glutathione under HL was significantly inhibited in both dhar1 and dhar2, while glutathione contents were only enhanced in dhar1. The dhar1 showed stronger visible symptoms than the dhar2 under photooxidative stress conditions. Our results demonstrated a pivotal role of DHAR1 in the modulation of cellular redox states under photooxidative stress.

  13. Biosynthesis of Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloid Ajmaline Catalyzed by Novel Reductases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction One of the major root alkaloids of the Indian medicinal plant Rauvolfia serpenlina Benth. Ex Kurz is named ajmaline. The enzymatic biosynthesisof this alkaloid has been studied for a long time by our group[1].

  14. Increased 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in idiopathic hirsutism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafini, P.; Lobo, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro, genital skin 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity (5..cap alpha..-RA) was measured in ten hirsute women with normal androgen levels (idiopathic hirsutism (IH)) and in ten hirsute women with elevated androgen levels (polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO)) in order to determine the influence of secreted androgens on 5..cap alpha..-RA. In vitro 5..cap alpha..-RA was assessed by incubations of skin with /sup 14/C-testosterone (T) for 2 hours, after which steroids were separated and the radioactivity of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5..cap alpha..-androstane 3..cap alpha..-17..beta..-estradiol (3..cap alpha..-diol) in specific eluates were determined. All androgens were normal in IH with the exception of higher levels of 3..cap alpha..-diol glucuronide which were similar to the levels of PCO. The conversion ratio (CR) of T to DHT in IH and PCO were similar, yet significantly greater than the CR of control subjects. The CR of T to 3..cap alpha..-diol in IH and PCO were similar, yet higher than in control subjects. Serum androgens showed no correlation with 5..cap alpha..-RA, while the CR of T to DHT showed a significant positive correlation with the Ferriman and Gallwey score. The increased 5..cap alpha..-RA in IH appears to be independent of serum androgen levels and is, therefore, an inherent abnormality. The term idiopathic is a misnomer, because hirsutism in these patients may be explained on the basis of increased skin 5..cap alpha..-RA.

  15. Metabolism of bupropion by carbonyl reductases in liver and intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connarn, Jamie N; Zhang, Xinyuan; Babiskin, Andrew; Sun, Duxin

    2015-07-01

    Bupropion's metabolism and the formation of hydroxybupropion in the liver by cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) has been extensively studied; however, the metabolism and formation of erythro/threohydrobupropion in the liver and intestine by carbonyl reductases (CR) has not been well characterized. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the relative contribution of the two metabolism pathways of bupropion (by CYP2B6 and CR) in the subcellular fractions of liver and intestine and to identify the CRs responsible for erythro/threohydrobupropion formation in the liver and the intestine. The results showed that the liver microsome generated the highest amount of hydroxybupropion (Vmax = 131 pmol/min per milligram, Km = 87 μM). In addition, liver microsome and S9 fractions formed similar levels of threohydrobupropion by CR (Vmax = 98-99 pmol/min per milligram and Km = 186-265 μM). Interestingly, the liver has similar capability to form hydroxybupropion (by CYP2B6) and threohydrobupropion (by CR). In contrast, none of the intestinal fractions generate hydroxybupropion, suggesting that the intestine does not have CYP2B6 available for metabolism of bupropion. However, intestinal S9 fraction formed threohydrobupropion to the extent of 25% of the amount of threohydrobupropion formed by liver S9 fraction. Enzyme inhibition and Western blots identified that 11β-dehydrogenase isozyme 1 in the liver microsome fraction is mainly responsible for the formation of threohydrobupropion, and in the intestine AKR7 may be responsible for the same metabolite formation. These quantitative comparisons of bupropion metabolism by CR in the liver and intestine may provide new insight into its efficacy and side effects with respect to these metabolites.

  16. Differing views of the role of selenium in thioredoxin reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Erik L.

    2010-01-01

    This review covers three different chemical explanations that could account for the requirement of selenium in the form of selenocysteine in the active site of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. These views are the following: (1) the traditional view of selenocysteine as a superior nucleophile relative to cysteine, (2) the superior leaving group ability of a selenol relative to a thiol due to its significantly lower pKa and, (3) the superior ability of selenium to accept electrons (electrophilicity) relative to sulfur. We term these chemical explanations as the “chemico-enzymatic” function of selenium in an enzyme. We formally define the chemico-enzymatic function of selenium as its specific chemical property that allows a selenoenzyme to catalyze its individual reaction. However we, and others, question whether selenocysteine is chemically necessary to catalyze an enzymatic reaction since cysteine-homologs of selenocysteine-containing enzymes catalyze their specific enzymatic reactions with high catalytic efficiency. There must be a unique chemical reason for the presence of selenocysteine in enzymes that explains the biological pressure on the genome to maintain the complex selenocysteine-insertion machinery. We term this biological pressure the “chemico-biological” function of selenocysteine. We discuss evidence that this chemico-biological function is the ability of selenoenzymes to resist inactivation by irreversible oxidation. The way in which selenocysteine confers resistance to oxidation could be due to the superior ability of the oxidized form of selenocysteine (Sec-SeO2−, seleninic acid) to be recycled back to its parent form (Sec-SeH, selenocysteine) in comparison to the same cycling of cysteine-sulfinic acid to cysteine (Cys-SO2− to Cys-SH). PMID:20397034

  17. Inhibition of peroxisomal hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR1) by tyrosine nitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpas, Francisco J; Leterrier, Marina; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Valderrama, Raquel; Chaki, Mounira; López-Jaramillo, Javier; Luque, Francisco; Palma, José M; Padilla, María N; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Barroso, Juan B

    2013-11-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification (PTM) mediated by nitric oxide-derived molecules. Peroxisomes are oxidative organelles in which the presence of nitric oxide (NO) has been reported. We studied peroxisomal nitroproteome of pea leaves by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and proteomic approaches. Proteomic analysis of peroxisomes from pea leaves detected a total of four nitro-tyrosine immunopositive proteins by using an antibody against nitrotyrosine. One of these proteins was found to be the NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR). The in vitro nitration of peroxisomal samples caused a 65% inhibition of HPR activity. Analysis of recombinant peroxisomal NADH-dependent HPR1 activity from Arabidopsis in the presence of H2O2, NO, GSH and peroxynitrite showed that the ONOO(-) molecule caused the highest inhibition of activity (51% at 5mM SIN-1), with 5mM H2O2 having no inhibitory effect. Mass spectrometric analysis of the nitrated recombinant HPR1 enabled us to determine that, among the eleven tyrosine present in this enzyme, only Tyr-97, Tyr-108 and Tyr-198 were exclusively nitrated to 3-nitrotyrosine by peroxynitrite. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed Tyr198 as the primary site of nitration responsible for the inhibition on the enzymatic activity by peroxynitrite. These findings suggest that peroxisomal HPR is a target of peroxynitrite which provokes a loss of function. This is the first report demonstrating the peroxisomal NADH-dependent HPR activity involved in the photorespiration pathway is regulated by tyrosine nitration, indicating that peroxisomal NO metabolism may contribute to the regulation of physiological processes under no-stress conditions. © 2013.

  18. Pyranopterin Coordination Controls Molybdenum Electrochemistry in Escherichia coli Nitrate Reductase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Yi; Rothery, Richard A.; Weiner, Joel H.

    2015-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that pyranopterin (PPT) coordination plays a critical role in defining molybdenum active site redox chemistry and reactivity in the mononuclear molybdoenzymes. The molybdenum atom of Escherichia coli nitrate reductase A (NarGHI) is coordinated by two PPT-dithiolene chelates that are defined as proximal and distal based on their proximity to a [4Fe-4S] cluster known as FS0. We examined variants of two sets of residues involved in PPT coordination: (i) those interacting directly or indirectly with the pyran oxygen of the bicyclic distal PPT (NarG-Ser719, NarG-His1163, and NarG-His1184); and (ii) those involved in bridging the two PPTs and stabilizing the oxidation state of the proximal PPT (NarG-His1092 and NarG-His1098). A S719A variant has essentially no effect on the overall Mo(VI/IV) reduction potential, whereas the H1163A and H1184A variants elicit large effects (ΔEm values of −88 and −36 mV, respectively). Ala variants of His1092 and His1098 also elicit large ΔEm values of −143 and −101 mV, respectively. An Arg variant of His1092 elicits a small ΔEm of +18 mV on the Mo(VI/IV) reduction potential. There is a linear correlation between the molybdenum Em value and both enzyme activity and the ability to support anaerobic respiratory growth on nitrate. These data support a non-innocent role for the PPT moieties in controlling active site metal redox chemistry and catalysis. PMID:26297003

  19. Rational Design of a Structural and Functional Nitric Oxide Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeung, N.; Lin, Y; Gao, Y; Zhao, X; Russell, B; Lei, L; Miner, L; Robinson, H; Lu, Y

    2009-01-01

    Protein design provides a rigorous test of our knowledge about proteins and allows the creation of novel enzymes for biotechnological applications. Whereas progress has been made in designing proteins that mimic native proteins structurally, it is more difficult to design functional proteins. In comparison to recent successes in designing non-metalloproteins, it is even more challenging to rationally design metalloproteins that reproduce both the structure and function of native metalloenzymes. This is because protein metal-binding sites are much more varied than non-metal-containing sites, in terms of different metal ion oxidation states, preferred geometry and metal ion ligand donor sets. Because of their variability, it has been difficult to predict metal-binding site properties in silico, as many of the parameters, such as force fields, are ill-defined. Therefore, the successful design of a structural and functional metalloprotein would greatly advance the field of protein design and our understanding of enzymes. Here we report a successful, rational design of a structural and functional model of a metalloprotein, nitric oxide reductase (NOR), by introducing three histidines and one glutamate, predicted as ligands in the active site of NOR, into the distal pocket of myoglobin. A crystal structure of the designed protein confirms that the minimized computer model contains a haem/non-haem FeB centre that is remarkably similar to that in the crystal structure. This designed protein also exhibits NO reduction activity, and so models both the structure and function of NOR, offering insight that the active site glutamate is required for both iron binding and activity. These results show that structural and functional metalloproteins can be rationally designed in silico.

  20. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Endocrinology and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Volat, Fanny; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    The aldose reductase (AR; human AKR1B1/mouse Akr1b3) has been the focus of many research because of its role in diabetic complications. The starting point of these alterations is the massive entry of glucose in polyol pathway where it is converted into sorbitol by this enzyme. However, the issue of AR function in non-diabetic condition remains unresolved. AR-like enzymes (AKR1B10, Akr1b7, and Akr1b8) are highly related isoforms often co-expressed with bona fide AR, making functional analysis of one or the other isoform a challenging task. AKR1B/Akr1b members share at least 65% protein identity and the general ability to reduce many redundant substrates such as aldehydes provided from lipid peroxidation, steroids and their by-products, and xenobiotics in vitro. Based on these properties, AKR1B/Akr1b are generally considered as detoxifying enzymes. Considering that divergences should be more informative than similarities to help understanding their physiological functions, we chose to review specific hallmarks of each human/mouse isoforms by focusing on tissue distribution and specific mechanisms of gene regulation. Indeed, although the AR shows ubiquitous expression, AR-like proteins exhibit tissue-specific patterns of expression. We focused on three organs where certain isoforms are enriched, the adrenal gland, enterohepatic, and adipose tissues and tried to connect recent enzymatic and regulation data with endocrine and metabolic functions of these organs. We presented recent mouse models showing unsuspected physiological functions in the regulation of glucido-lipidic metabolism and adipose tissue homeostasis. Beyond the widely accepted idea that AKR1B/Akr1b are detoxification enzymes, these recent reports provide growing evidences that they are able to modify or generate signal molecules. This conceptually shifts this class of enzymes from unenviable status of scavenger to upper class of messengers.

  1. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism in Indian stroke patients

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    Kalita J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: In view of the prevailing controversy about the role of Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutation in stroke and paucity of studies from India, this study has been undertaken to evaluate MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism in consecutive ischemic stroke patients and correlate these with folic acid, homocysteine (Hcy and conventional risk factors. Settings and Design: Ischemic stroke patients prospectively evaluated in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Computerized tomography proven ischemic stroke patients were prospectively evaluated including clinical, family history of stroke, dietary habits and addictions. Their fasting and postprandial blood sugar, lipid profile, vitamin B12, folic acid and MTHFR gene analysis were done. Statistical Analysis: MTHFR gene polymorphism was correlated with serum folic acid, Vitamin B12 and Hcy levels; family history of stroke in first-degree relatives; and dietary habits; employing Chi-square test. Results: There were 58 patients with ischemic stroke, whose mean age was 50 (4-79 years; among them, 10 were females. MTHFR gene polymorphism was present in 19 (32.8% patients, 3 were homozygous and 16 were heterozygous. Both serum folate and B12 levels were low in 29 (50% patients and Hcy in 48 (83%. Hypertension was present in 28 (48% patients, diabetes in 12 (21%, hyperlipidemia in 52 (90%, smoking in 17 (29%, obesity in 1 (1.7% and family history of stroke in first-degree relatives in 13 (22.4%. There was no significant relationship of MTHFR gene polymorphism with folic acid, B12, Hcy levels, dietary habits and number of risk factors. Vitamin B12 level was low in vegetarians ( P Conclusion: MTHFR gene polymorphism was found in one-third of patients with ischemic stroke and was insignificantly associated with higher frequency of elevated Hcy.

  2. The Characteristics and Regulatory Mechanisms of Superoxide Generation from eNOS Reductase Domain.

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    Hu Peng

    Full Text Available In addition to superoxide (O2.- generation from nitric oxide synthase (NOS oxygenase domain, a new O2.- generation site has been identified in the reductase domain of inducible NOS (iNOS and neuronal NOS (nNOS. Cysteine S-glutathionylation in eNOS reductase domain also induces O2.- generation from eNOS reductase domain. However, the characteristics and regulatory mechanism of the O2.- generation from NOS reductase domain remain unclear. We cloned and purified the wild type bovine eNOS (WT eNOS, a mutant of Serine 1179 replaced with aspartic acid eNOS (S1179D eNOS, which mimics the negative charge caused by phosphorylationand truncated eNOS reductase domain (eNOS RD. Both WT eNOS and S1179D eNOS generated significant amount of O2.- in the absence of BH4 and L-arginine. The capacity of O2.- generation from S1179D eNOS was significantly higher than that of WT eNOS (1.74:1. O2.- generation from both WT eNOS and S1179D eNOS were not completely inhibited by 100nM tetrahydrobiopterin(BH4. This BH4 un-inhibited O2.- generation from eNOS was blocked by 10mM flavoprotein inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI. Purified eNOS reductase domain protein confirmed that this BH4 un-inhibited O2.- generation originates at the FMN or FAD/NADPH binding site of eNOS reductase domain. DEPMPO-OOH adduct EPR signals and NADPH consumptions analyses showed that O2.- generation from eNOS reductase domain was regulated by Serine 1179 phosphorylation and DPI, but not by L-arginine, BH4 or calmodulin (CaM. In addition to the heme center of eNOS oxygenase domain, we confirmed another O2.- generation site in the eNOS reductase domain and characterized its regulatory properties.

  3. Mitochondrial glycolate oxidation contributes to photorespiration in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Markus; Thiruveedhi, Krishnaveni; Rosenkranz, Ruben; Kebeish, Rashad; Hirsch, Heinz-Josef; Kreuzaler, Fritz; Peterhänsel, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    The oxidation of glycolate to glyoxylate is an important reaction step in photorespiration. Land plants and charophycean green algae oxidize glycolate in the peroxisome using oxygen as a co-factor, whereas chlorophycean green algae use a mitochondrial glycolate dehydrogenase (GDH) with organic co-factors. Previous analyses revealed the existence of a GDH in the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtGDH). In this study, the contribution of AtGDH to photorespiration was characterized. Both RNA abundance and mitochondrial GDH activity were up-regulated under photorespiratory growth conditions. Labelling experiments indicated that glycolate oxidation in mitochondrial extracts is coupled to CO(2) release. This effect could be enhanced by adding co-factors for aminotransferases, but is inhibited by the addition of glycine. T-DNA insertion lines for AtGDH show a drastic reduction in mitochondrial GDH activity and CO(2) release from glycolate. Furthermore, photorespiration is reduced in these mutant lines compared with the wild type, as revealed by determination of the post-illumination CO(2) burst and the glycine/serine ratio under photorespiratory growth conditions. The data show that mitochondrial glycolate oxidation contributes to photorespiration in higher plants. This indicates the conservation of chlorophycean photorespiration in streptophytes despite the evolution of leaf-type peroxisomes.

  4. Expression of 5α-Reductase Type 2 Gene in Human Testis, Epididymis and Vas Deferens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘德瑜; 吴燕婉; 罗宏志; 张桂元

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To study the expression pattern of 5α-reductase type 2 gene in human malereproductive organsMethods The expression level of 5α-reductase type 2 gene inhuman testis, epididymisand vas deferens tissues was determined by in situ hybridization using Digoxin labeled5α-reductase type 2 cRNA probe.Results The brown granules of hybridizing signals distributed in the cytoplasm ofSertoli and Leydig cells of the testis, the principle cells of epididymis and the epithe-lial cells of vas deferens, but there was no positive signal in the nuclei of above-men-tioned cells. No positive signal was observed in germ cells, basement of the testis,interstium of epididymis and basement, as well as smooth muscle of vas deferens.Conclusion This study confirmed that the 5α-reductase type 2 gene expressed in Ser-toli, Leydig cells of the testis, and the principle cells of epididymis. The expressionpattern of the gene in these cells in human was similar to that of rat and monkey. Thepresence of 5a-reductase type 2 gene in epithelial cells of the vas deferens suggested itmight possess an important physiological role in human reproduction.

  5. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvetti, A; Peña-Díaz, J; Hurtado, R; Ruiz-Pérez, L M; González-Pacanowska, D

    2000-07-01

    In eukaryotes the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase catalyses the synthesis of mevalonic acid, a common precursor to all isoprenoid compounds. Here we report the isolation and overexpression of the gene coding for HMG-CoA reductase from Leishmania major. The protein from Leishmania lacks the membrane domain characteristic of eukaryotic cells but exhibits sequence similarity with eukaryotic reductases. Highly purified protein was achieved by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on hydroxyapatite. Kinetic parameters were determined for the protozoan reductase, obtaining K(m) values for the overall reaction of 40.3+/-5.8 microM for (R,S)-HMG-CoA and 81.4+/-5.3 microM for NADPH; V(max) was 33.55+/-1.8 units x mg(-1). Gel-filtration experiments suggested an apparent molecular mass of 184 kDa with subunits of 46 kDa. Finally, in order to achieve a better understanding of the role of this enzyme in trypanosomatids, the effect of possible regulators of isoprenoid biosynthesis in cultured promastigote cells was studied. Neither mevalonic acid nor serum sterols appear to modulate enzyme activity whereas incubation with lovastatin results in significant increases in the amount of reductase protein. Western- and Northern-blot analyses indicate that this activation is apparently performed via post-transcriptional control.

  6. Plant Sterols: Diversity, Biosynthesis, and Physiological Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valitova, J N; Sulkarnayeva, A G; Minibayeva, F V

    2016-08-01

    Sterols, which are isoprenoid derivatives, are structural components of biological membranes. Special attention is now being given not only to their structure and function, but also to their regulatory roles in plants. Plant sterols have diverse composition; they exist as free sterols, sterol esters with higher fatty acids, sterol glycosides, and acylsterol glycosides, which are absent in animal cells. This diversity of types of phytosterols determines a wide spectrum of functions they play in plant life. Sterols are precursors of a group of plant hormones, the brassinosteroids, which regulate plant growth and development. Furthermore, sterols participate in transmembrane signal transduction by forming lipid microdomains. The predominant sterols in plants are β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. These sterols differ in the presence of a methyl or an ethyl group in the side chain at the 24th carbon atom and are named methylsterols or ethylsterols, respectively. The balance between 24-methylsterols and 24-ethylsterols is specific for individual plant species. The present review focuses on the key stages of plant sterol biosynthesis that determine the ratios between the different types of sterols, and the crosstalk between the sterol and sphingolipid pathways. The main enzymes involved in plant sterol biosynthesis are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, C24-sterol methyltransferase, and C22-sterol desaturase. These enzymes are responsible for maintaining the optimal balance between sterols. Regulation of the ratios between the different types of sterols and sterols/sphingolipids can be of crucial importance in the responses of plants to stresses.

  7. Clustered Genes Encoding 2-Keto-l-Gulonate Reductase and l-Idonate 5-Dehydrogenase in the Novel Fungal d-Glucuronic Acid Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivanen, Joosu; Arvas, Mikko; Richard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    D-Glucuronic acid is a biomass component that occurs in plant cell wall polysaccharides and is catabolized by saprotrophic microorganisms including fungi. A pathway for D-glucuronic acid catabolism in fungal microorganisms is only partly known. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger, the enzymes that are known to be part of the pathway are the NADPH requiring D-glucuronic acid reductase forming L-gulonate and the NADH requiring 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase that forms L-idonate. With the aid of RNA sequencing we identified two more enzymes of the pathway. The first is a NADPH requiring 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase that forms L-idonate, GluD. The second is a NAD+ requiring L-idonate 5-dehydrogenase forming 5-keto-gluconate, GluE. The genes coding for these two enzymes are clustered and share the same bidirectional promoter. The GluD is an enzyme with a strict requirement for NADP+/NADPH as cofactors. The kcat for 2-keto-L-gulonate and L-idonate is 21.4 and 1.1 s-1, and the Km 25.3 and 12.6 mM, respectively, when using the purified protein. In contrast, the GluE has a strict requirement for NAD+/NADH. The kcat for L-idonate and 5-keto-D-gluconate is 5.5 and 7.2 s-1, and the Km 30.9 and 8.4 mM, respectively. These values also refer to the purified protein. The gluD deletion resulted in accumulation of 2-keto-L-gulonate in the liquid cultivation while the gluE deletion resulted in reduced growth and cessation of the D-glucuronic acid catabolism. PMID:28261181

  8. The Effects of Dose Rhizoctonia Binucleat (BNR and Phosphorus to Nitrate Reductase Activity (NRA and Chlorophyll of Vanilla Seedling (Vanilla planifolia Andrews

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    Haryuni Haryuni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews is one of the important exported commodities in Indonesia. Indonesia is one of top five major vanilla exporters in the world, that produce the high quality of Indonesian vanilla with high vanillin content (2.75%. The aims of this research were to determine the effects of dose binukleat Rhizoctonia (BNR and phosphorus as well as the interaction of the nitrate reductase activity (NRA and chlorophyll of the vanilla seedling (Vanilla planifolia Andrew. Method in this research used completely randomized factorial design, by involving two factors (dose of BNR inoculation and Phosphor. The first factor is without inoculation and inoculation BNR (M0, M1, M2, M3 wich consists of (0,5, 10, 15 g/polybag, the second factor is the dose of phosphorus fertilizer (P0, P1, P2, P3 which consists of (0, 3, 6, 9 g/polibag. The results showed that the inoculation dose of BNR and doses of phosphorus not significant and lower levels of NRA and chlorophyll while the interaction dose of BNR and phosphorus significantly and increase levels of NRA and chlorophyll of vanilla seedling. Nitrate Reductase Activity and chlorophyll has important role in metabolism process as a plant growth indicator.How to CiteHaryuni, H., & Dewi, T. S. K. (2016. The Effects of Dose Rhizoctonia Binucleat (BNR and Phosphorus to Nitrate Reductase Activity (NRA and Chlorophyll of Vanilla Seedling (Vanilla planifolia Andrews. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(2, 141-147.

  9. Clustered Genes Encoding 2-Keto-l-Gulonate Reductase and l-Idonate 5-Dehydrogenase in the Novel Fungal d-Glucuronic Acid Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivanen, Joosu; Arvas, Mikko; Richard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    D-Glucuronic acid is a biomass component that occurs in plant cell wall polysaccharides and is catabolized by saprotrophic microorganisms including fungi. A pathway for D-glucuronic acid catabolism in fungal microorganisms is only partly known. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger, the enzymes that are known to be part of the pathway are the NADPH requiring D-glucuronic acid reductase forming L-gulonate and the NADH requiring 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase that forms L-idonate. With the aid of RNA sequencing we identified two more enzymes of the pathway. The first is a NADPH requiring 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase that forms L-idonate, GluD. The second is a NAD(+) requiring L-idonate 5-dehydrogenase forming 5-keto-gluconate, GluE. The genes coding for these two enzymes are clustered and share the same bidirectional promoter. The GluD is an enzyme with a strict requirement for NADP(+)/NADPH as cofactors. The kcat for 2-keto-L-gulonate and L-idonate is 21.4 and 1.1 s(-1), and the Km 25.3 and 12.6 mM, respectively, when using the purified protein. In contrast, the GluE has a strict requirement for NAD(+)/NADH. The kcat for L-idonate and 5-keto-D-gluconate is 5.5 and 7.2 s(-1), and the Km 30.9 and 8.4 mM, respectively. These values also refer to the purified protein. The gluD deletion resulted in accumulation of 2-keto-L-gulonate in the liquid cultivation while the gluE deletion resulted in reduced growth and cessation of the D-glucuronic acid catabolism.

  10. Cloning of thioredoxin h reductase and characterization of the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin h system from wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Antonio J; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2002-10-15

    Thioredoxins h are ubiquitous proteins reduced by NADPH- thioredoxin reductase (NTR). They are able to reduce disulphides in target proteins. In monocots, thioredoxins h accumulate at high level in seeds and show a predominant localization in the nucleus of seed cells. These results suggest that the NTR-thioredoxin h system probably plays an important role in seed physiology. To date, the study of this system in monocots is limited by the lack of information about NTR. In the present study, we describe the cloning of a full-length cDNA encoding NTR from wheat ( Triticum aestivum ). The polypeptide deduced from this cDNA shows close similarity to NTRs from Arabidopsis, contains FAD- and NADPH-binding domains and a disulphide probably interacting with the disulphide at the active site of thioredoxin h. Wheat NTR was expressed in Escherichia coli as a His-tagged protein. The absorption spectrum of the purified recombinant protein is typical of flavoenzymes. Furthermore, it showed NADPH-dependent thioredoxin h reduction activity, thus confirming that the cDNA clone reported in the present study encodes wheat NTR. Using the His-tagged NTR and TRXhA (wheat thioredoxin h ), we successfully reconstituted the wheat NTR-thioredoxin h system in vitro, as shown by the insulin reduction assay. A polyclonal antibody was raised against wheat NTR after immunization of rabbits with the purified His-tagged protein. This antibody efficiently detected a single polypeptide of the corresponding molecular mass in seed extracts and it allowed the analysis of the pattern of accumulation of NTR in different wheat organs and developmental stages. NTR shows a wide distribution in wheat, but, surprisingly, its accumulation in seeds is low, in contrast with the level of thioredoxins h.

  11. Side chain conformational averaging in human dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Lisa M; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2014-02-25

    The three-dimensional structures of the dihydrofolate reductase enzymes from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR or ecE) and Homo sapiens (hDHFR or hE) are very similar, despite a rather low level of sequence identity. Whereas the active site loops of ecDHFR undergo major conformational rearrangements during progression through the reaction cycle, hDHFR remains fixed in a closed loop conformation in all of its catalytic intermediates. To elucidate the structural and dynamic differences between the human and E. coli enzymes, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of side chain flexibility and dynamics in complexes of hDHFR that represent intermediates in the major catalytic cycle. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation dispersion experiments show that, in marked contrast to the functionally important motions that feature prominently in the catalytic intermediates of ecDHFR, millisecond time scale fluctuations cannot be detected for hDHFR side chains. Ligand flux in hDHFR is thought to be mediated by conformational changes between a hinge-open state when the substrate/product-binding pocket is vacant and a hinge-closed state when this pocket is occupied. Comparison of X-ray structures of hinge-open and hinge-closed states shows that helix αF changes position by sliding between the two states. Analysis of χ1 rotamer populations derived from measurements of (3)JCγCO and (3)JCγN couplings indicates that many of the side chains that contact helix αF exhibit rotamer averaging that may facilitate the conformational change. The χ1 rotamer adopted by the Phe31 side chain depends upon whether the active site contains the substrate or product. In the holoenzyme (the binary complex of hDHFR with reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate), a combination of hinge opening and a change in the Phe31 χ1 rotamer opens the active site to facilitate entry of the substrate. Overall, the data suggest that, unlike ecDHFR, hDHFR requires minimal backbone conformational rearrangement as

  12. RESISTANCE LEVEL OF Pseudomonas stutzeri AGAINST MERCURY AND ITS ABILITY IN PRODUCTION OF MERCURY REDUCTASE ENZYME

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    Purkan Purkan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mercury reductase is an enzyme that is able to reduce Hg2+ to Hg0 non toxic. This enzyme is usually produced by mercury resistant bacteria. The research wanted to determine the resistance of indigenous Pseudomonas stutzeri isolate toward mercury and to explore the mercury reductase activity which is produced by the bacteria. The results of resistance assay of the Pseudomonas stutzeri toward mercury ion showed that the isolate could survive in media containing HgCl2 up to a concentration of 80 µM. The bacteria could produce mercury reductase optimally at the 24th of fermentation time. The enzyme showed optimum activity at pH 7 and temperature of 45 oC

  13. A substrate-bound structure of cyanobacterial biliverdin reductase identifies stacked substrates as critical for activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Haruna; Hirabayashi, Kei; Nishigaya, Yuki; Kouriki, Haruna; Nakaniwa, Tetsuko; Hagiwara, Yoshinori; Harada, Jiro; Sato, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Asada, Yujiro; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Ken; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Sugishima, Masakazu; Wada, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Biliverdin reductase catalyses the last step in haem degradation and produces the major lipophilic antioxidant bilirubin via reduction of biliverdin, using NAD(P)H as a cofactor. Despite the importance of biliverdin reductase in maintaining the redox balance, the molecular details of the reaction it catalyses remain unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of biliverdin reductase in complex with biliverdin and NADP+. Unexpectedly, two biliverdin molecules, which we designated the proximal and distal biliverdins, bind with stacked geometry in the active site. The nicotinamide ring of the NADP+ is located close to the reaction site on the proximal biliverdin, supporting that the hydride directly attacks this position of the proximal biliverdin. The results of mutagenesis studies suggest that a conserved Arg185 is essential for the catalysis. The distal biliverdin probably acts as a conduit to deliver the proton from Arg185 to the proximal biliverdin, thus yielding bilirubin. PMID:28169272

  14. [Progress in research of aldose reductase inhibitors in traditional medicinal herbs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chang-Gen; Zhang, Lin-Xia; Liu, Xia

    2005-10-01

    The traditional medicinal herbs are natural product, and have no obviously toxic action and side effect, and their resources are extensive. The adverse effects produced by aldose reductase inhibitors in traditional medicinal herbs are less than those from chemical synthesis and micro-organism, they can effectively prevent and delay diabetic complication, such as diabetic nephropathy, vasculopathy, retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and so on. They will have a wonderful respect. Flavonoid compounds and their derivates from traditional medicinal herbs are active inhibitors to aldose reductase, such as quercetin, silymarin, puerarin, baicalim, berberine and so on. In addition, some compound preparations show more strongly activity in inhibiting aldose reductase and degrading sorbitol contents, such as Shendan in traditional medicinal herbs being active inhibitors and Jianyi capsule, Jinmaitong composita, Liuwei Di-huang pill, et al. The progresses definite functions of treating diabetes complications have been reviewed.

  15. Directed Molecular Evolution of Nitrite Oxido-reductase by DNA-shuffling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUN-WEN LI; JIN-LAI ZHENG; XIN-WEI WANG; MIN JIN; FU-HUAN CHAO

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develtop directly molecular evolution of nitrite oxido-reductase using DNA-shuffling technique because nitrobacteria grow extremely slow and are unable to nitrify effectively inorganic nitrogen in wastewater treatment. Methods The norB gene coding the nitrite oxido-reductase in nitrobacteria was cloned and sequenced. Then, directed molecular evolution of nitrite oxido-reductase was developed by DNA-shuffling of 15 norB genes from different nitrobacteria. Results After DNA-shuffling with sexual PCR and staggered extension process PCR, the sequence was different from its parental DNA fragments and the homology ranged from 98% to 99%. The maximum nitrification rate of the modified bacterium of X16 by modified bacterium had the same characteristics of its parental bacteria of E. coli and could grow rapidly in normal cultures.Conclusion DNA-shuffling was successfully used to engineer E. coli, which had norB gene and could degrade inorganic nitrogen effectively.

  16. Structure of Physarum polycephalum cytochrome b5 reductase at 1.56 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwoo; Suga, Michihiro; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Ikegami, Terumi; Minami, Yoshiko; Yubisui, Toshitsugu; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2007-04-01

    Physarum polycephalum cytochrome b(5) reductase catalyzes the reduction of cytochrome b(5) by NADH. The structure of P. polycephalum cytochrome b(5) reductase was determined at a resolution of 1.56 A. The molecular structure was compared with that of human cytochrome b(5) reductase, which had previously been determined at 1.75 A resolution [Bando et al. (2004), Acta Cryst. D60, 1929-1934]. The high-resolution structure revealed conformational differences between the two enzymes in the adenosine moiety of the FAD, the lid region and the linker region. The structural properties of both proteins were inspected in terms of hydrogen bonding, ion pairs, accessible surface area and cavity volume. The differences in these structural properties between the two proteins were consistent with estimates of their thermostabilities obtained from differential scanning calorimetry data.

  17. Cuminaldehyde: Aldose Reductase and alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitor Derived from Cuminum cyminum L. Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2005-04-06

    The inhibitory activity of Cuminum cyminum seed-isolated component was evaluated against lens aldose reductase and alpha-glucosidase isolated from Sprague-Dawley male rats and compared to that of 11 commercially available components derived from C. cyminum seed oil, as well as quercitrin as an aldose reductase inhibitor and acarbose as an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. The biologically active constituent of C. cyminum seed oil was characterized as cuminaldehyde by various spectral analyses. The IC(50) value of cuminaldehyde is 0.00085 mg/mL against aldose reductase and 0.5 mg/mL against alpha-glucosidase, respectively. Cuminaldehyde was about 1.8 and 1.6 times less in inhibitory activity than acarbose and quercitin, respectively. Nonetheless, cuminaldehyde may be useful as a lead compound and a new agent for antidiabetic therapeutics.

  18. Circadian variation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in swine liver and ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, D H; Kim, D N; Lee, K T; Reiner, J M; Thomas, W A

    1981-07-01

    The temporal variation of HMG-CoA reductase activity in the liver and intestine of swine was investigated. The thin-layer chromatographic method widely used in the assay of the reductase was successfully applied to the porcine enzymes. Parallel circadian rhythms were demonstrated in both hepatic and ileal reductases from mash-fed animals. Peak activity occurred approximately 6 hr after feeding, 2.7-fold over the basal level in the liver, and 1.6-fold in the ileum. A milk-cholesterol diet caused a marked depression of both rhythms (90% in liver, 50% in ileum); however, the hourly variation in activity persisted in both organs. Cholestyramine was found to elevate hepatic activity (2.7-fold throughout the rhythm) without affecting that of the intestine. Clofibrate had no effect on either enzyme at any time during the cycle despite a 34% reduction in serum cholesterol concentrations.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyota, Eduardo [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Sousa, Sylvia Morais de [Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Costa Lima, Aline da [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Menossi, Marcelo [Departamento de Genética e Evolução, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Yunes, José Andrés [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Centro Infantil Boldrini, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Aparicio, Ricardo, E-mail: aparicio@iqm.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2007-11-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR.

  20. A DFT-based QSAR study on inhibition of human dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, Sedat; Sizochenko, Natalia; Orhan, Adnan; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Diaminopyrimidine derivatives are frequently used as inhibitors of human dihydrofolate reductase, for example in treatment of patients whose immune system are affected by human immunodeficiency virus. Forty-seven dicyclic and tricyclic potential inhibitors of human dihydrofolate reductase were analyzed using the quantitative structure-activity analysis supported by DFT-based and DRAGON-based descriptors. The developed model yielded an RMSE deviation of 1.1 a correlation coefficient of 0.81. The prediction set was characterized by R(2)=0.60 and RMSE=3.59. Factors responsible for inhibition process were identified and discussed. The resulting model was validated via cross validation and Y-scrambling procedure. From the best model, we found several mass-related descriptors and Sanderson electronegativity-related descriptors that have the best correlations with the investigated inhibitory concentration. These descriptors reflect results from QSAR studies based on characteristics of human dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors.

  1. NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase: molecular cloning and functional characterization of two paralogs from Withania somnifera (L. dunal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satiander Rana

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (L. Dunal, a highly reputed medicinal plant, synthesizes a large array of steroidal lactone triterpenoids called withanolides. Although its chemical profile and pharmacological activities have been studied extensively during the last two decades, limited attempts have been made to decipher the biosynthetic route and identification of key regulatory genes involved in withanolide biosynthesis. Cytochrome P450 reductase is the most imperative redox partner of multiple P450s involved in primary and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. We describe here the cloning and characterization of two paralogs of cytochrome P450 reductase from W. somnifera. The full length paralogs of WsCPR1 and WsCPR2 have open reading frames of 2058 and 2142 bp encoding 685 and 713 amino acid residues, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that grouping of dual CPRs was in accordance with class I and class II of eudicotyledon CPRs. The corresponding coding sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins, purified and characterized. Recombinant proteins of both the paralogs were purified with their intact membrane anchor regions and it is hitherto unreported for other CPRs which have been purified from microsomal fraction. Southern blot analysis suggested that two divergent isoforms of CPR exist independently in Withania genome. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that both genes were widely expressed in leaves, stalks, roots, flowers and berries with higher expression level of WsCPR2 in comparison to WsCPR1. Similar to CPRs of other plant species, WsCPR1 was un-inducible while WsCPR2 transcript level increased in a time-dependent manner after elicitor treatments. High performance liquid chromatography of withanolides extracted from elicitor-treated samples showed a significant increase in two of the key withanolides, withanolide A and withaferin A, possibly indicating the role of WsCPR2 in

  2. Putative Role of the Aldo-Keto Reductase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Benznidazole Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, Patricia Andrea; Laverrière, Marc; Cannata, Joaquín J B; García, Gabriela Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Benznidazole (Bz), the drug used for treatment of Chagas' disease (caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi), is activated by a parasitic NADH-dependent type I nitroreductase (NTR I). However, several studies have shown that other enzymes are involved. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the aldo-keto reductase from T. cruzi (TcAKR), a NADPH-dependent oxido-reductase previously described by our group, uses Bz as the substrate. We demonstrated that both recombinant and native TcAKR enzymes reduce Bz by using NADPH, but not NADH, as a cofactor. TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes showed higher NADPH-dependent Bz reductase activity and a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for Bz 1.8-fold higher than that of the controls, suggesting that TcAKR is involved in Bz detoxification instead of activation. To understand the role of TcAKR in Bz metabolism, we studied TcAKR expression and NADPH/NADH-dependent Bz reductase activities in two T. cruzi strains with differential susceptibility to Bz: CL Brener and Nicaragua. Taking into account the results obtained with TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes, we expected the more resistant strain, Nicaragua, to have higher TcAKR levels than CL Brener. However, the results were the opposite. CL Brener showed 2-fold higher TcAKR expression and 5.7-fold higher NADPH-Bz reduction than the Nicaragua strain. In addition, NADH-dependent Bz reductase activity, characteristic of NTR I, was also higher in CL Brener than in Nicaragua. We conclude that although TcAKR uses Bz as the substrate, TcAKR activity is not a determinant of Bz resistance in wild-type strains and may be overcome by other enzymes involved in Bz activation, such as NADPH- and NADH-dependent reductases.

  3. 5{alpha}-reductase expression by prostate cancer cell lines and benign prostatic hyperplasia in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.M.; Masters, J.R.W. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom)]|[Pfizer Central Research, Kent (United Kingdom); Ballard, S.A.; Worman, N. [Pfizer Central Research, Sandwich (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    5{alpha}-Reductase (5{alpha}R) activity in two human prostate cancer cell lines was compared to that in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue and COS cells transfected with and expressing the human genes for 5{alpha}-reductase type 1 (5{alpha}R1) and type 2 (5{alpha}R2). Comparisons were based on pH profiles and sensitivities to selective inhibitors of 5{alpha}-reductase. In the cancer lines, activity was greatest over the pH range 7-8, compared to a sharp peak of activity between pH 5-5.5 in BPH tissue and COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R2. Finasteride and SKF105,657 were potent inhibitors of 5{alpha}-reductase activity in BPH tissue and COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R2, but weak inhibitors in the cancer lines and in COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R1. In contrast, LTK1 17,026 was a more potent inhibitor of 5{alpha}-reductase activity in the prostate cancer cell lines and in COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R1. These data indicate that human prostate cancer cell lines express 5{alpha}-reductase activity similar to that in COS cells transfected with 5{alpha}R1, but different from that in BPH tissue. This may be a consequence of in vitro culture. Alternatively, it may reflect a change occurring as a result of neoplastic transformation, in which case it will be important to select appropriate inhibitors in the clinic. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Adverse Effects and Safety of 5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors (Finasteride, Dutasteride): A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshburg, Jason M.; Kelsey, Petra A.; Therrien, Chelsea A.; Gavino, A. Carlo; Reichenberg, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Finasteride and dutasteride, both 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, are considered first-line treatment for androgenetic hair loss in men and used increasingly in women. In each case, patients are expected to take the medications indefinitely despite the lack of research regarding long-term adverse effects. Concerns regarding the adverse effects of these medications has led the United States National Institutes of Health to add a link for post-finasteride syndrome to its Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center. Herein, the authors report the results of a literature search reviewing adverse events of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors as they relate to prostate cancer, psychological effects, sexual health, and use in women. Several large studies found no increase in incidence of prostate cancer, a possible increase of high-grade cancer when detected, and no change in survival rate with 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use. Currently, there is no direct link between 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use and depression; however, several small studies have led to depression being listed as a side effect on the medication packaging. Sexual effects including erectile dysfunction and decreased libido and ejaculate were reported in as many as 3.4 to 15.8 percent of men. To date, there are very few studies evaluating 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use in women. Risks include birth defects in male fetuses if used in pregnancy, decreased libido, headache, gastrointestinal discomfort, and isolated reports of changes in menstruation, acne, and dizziness. Overall, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors were well-tolerated in both men and women, but not without risk, highlighting the importance of patient education prior to treatment. PMID:27672412

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil); Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A. [Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Molecular Biology Division, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Suipacha 531, S2002LRK Rosario (Argentina); Polikarpov, Igor, E-mail: ipolikarpov@if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source.

  6. Subcellular localization of the five members of the human steroid 5α-reductase family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Scaglione

    2017-06-01

    We report the cloning and transient expression in HeLa cells of the five members of the human steroid 5α-reductase family as both N- and C-terminus green fluorescent protein tagged protein constructs. Following the intrinsic fluorescence of the tag, we have determined that the subcellular localization of these enzymes is in the endoplasmic reticulum, upon expression in HeLa cells. The presence of the tag at either end of the polypeptide chain can affect protein expression and, in the case of trans enoyl-CoA reductase, it induces the formation of protein aggregates.

  7. Purification and kinetic analysis of cytosolic and mitochondrial thioredoxin glutathione reductase extracted from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancarte, Agustin; Nava, Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Thioredoxin glutathione reductases (TGRs) (EC 1.8.1.9) were purified to homogeneity from the cytosolic (cTsTGR) and mitochondrial (mTsTGR) fractions of Taenia solium, the agent responsible for neurocysticercosis, one of the major central nervous system parasitic diseases in humans. TsTGRs had a relative molecular weight of 132,000, while the corresponding value per subunit obtained under denaturing conditions, was of 62,000. Specific activities for thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase substrates for both TGRs explored were in the range or lower than values obtained for other platyhelminths and mammalian TGRs. cTsTGR and mTsTGR also showed hydroperoxide reductase activity using hydroperoxide as substrate. Km(DTNB) and Kcat(DTNB) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (88 µM and 1.9 s(-1); 45 µM and 12.6 s(-1), respectively) and Km(GSSG) and Kcat(GSSG) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (6.3 µM and 0.96 s(-1); 4 µM and 1.62 s(-1), respectively) were similar to or lower than those reported for mammalian TGRs. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that 12 peptides from cTsTGR and seven from mTsTGR were a match for gi|29825896 thioredoxin glutathione reductase [Echinococcus granulosus], confirming that both enzymes are TGRs. Both T. solium TGRs were inhibited by the gold compound auranofin, a selective inhibitor of thiol-dependent flavoreductases (I₅₀ = 3.25, 2.29 nM for DTNB and GSSG substrates, respectively for cTsTGR; I₅₀ = 5.6, 25.4 nM for mTsTGR toward the same substrates in the described order). Glutathione reductase activity of cTsTGR and mTsTGR exhibited hysteretic behavior with moderate to high concentrations of GSSG; this result was not observed either with thioredoxin, DTNB or NADPH. However, the observed hysteretic kinetics was suppressed with increasing amounts of both parasitic TGRs. These data suggest the existence of an effective substitute which may account for the lack of the detoxification enzymes glutathione reductase

  8. Characterization of a periplasmic nitrate reductase in complex with its biosynthetic chaperone

    OpenAIRE

    Dow, J. M.; Grahl, S.; Ward, R; Evans, R.; Byron, O; Norman, D. G.; Palmer, T; Sargent, F

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a Gram‐negative bacterium that can use nitrate during anaerobic respiration. The catalytic subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapA contains two types of redox cofactor and is exported across the cytoplasmic membrane by the twin‐arginine protein transport pathway. NapD is a small cytoplasmic protein that is essential for the activity of the periplasmic nitrate reductase and binds tightly to the twin‐arginine signal peptide of NapA. Here we show, using spin labelli...

  9. Alpha 1-blockers vs 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors in benign prostatic hyperplasia. A comparative review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J T

    1995-01-01

    During recent years, pharmacological treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has become the primary treatment choice for an increasing number of patients. The 2 principal drug classes employed are alpha 1-blockers and 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Current information from...... of patients who will respond well to alpha 1-blockers have yet to be identified, and data concerning the long term effects of these drugs are not yet available. 5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors have a slow onset of effect, but treatment leads to improvement in symptoms, reduction of the size of the prostate gland...... or unwilling to undergo surgical resection of the prostate will benefit from such therapy....

  10. Studies on some characteristics of nitrate reductase from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWenhua; YanGuiping; 等

    1994-01-01

    Some characteristics of nitrate reductase from sugar beet leaves shown in this paper were as follows:The nitrate reductase from sugar beet leaves required NADH as an electron donor.Accordingly,the nitrate reductase was classified as NADH-dependent(E.C.1.6.61).The Km value of the nitrate reductase for NADH and NO3- were 0.86m mol and 0.18μ mol respectively.The optimum pH in reaction mixture solution for nitrate reduction activity was 7.5.The effect of variable concentrations of inorganic phosphorus in the reaction buffer on nitrate reductase activity was investigated.When the inorganic phosphorus concentration was below 35m mol,the nitrate reductase activity was increased with increase of inorganic phosphorus concentration.Conversely,when the inorganic phosphorus concentration was over 35m mol,the nitrate reductase activity was inhibited.The nitrate reductase activity assayed in vitro was 3.2 and 5.6times of that assayed in vivo under the condition of exogenous and endogenous ground substance respectively.

  11. Feedback regulation of cholesterol synthesis:sterol-accelerated ubiquitination and degradation of HMG CoA reductase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Russell A DeBose-Boyd

    2008-01-01

    3Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase produces mevalonate,an important intermediate in the synthesis of cholesterol and essential nonsterol isoprenoids.The reductase is subject to an exorbitant amount of feedback control through multiple mechanisms that are mediated by sterol and nonsterol end-products of mevalonate metabolism.Here,Ⅰwill discuss recent advances that shed light on one mechanism for control of reductase,which involves rapid degradation of the enzyme.Accumulation of certain sterols triggers binding of reductase to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane proteins called Insig-1 and Insig-2.Reductase-Insig binding results in recruitment of a membrane-associated ubiquitin ligase called gp78,which initiates ubiquitination of reductase.This ubiquitination is an obligatory reaction for recognition and degradation of reductase from ER membranes by cytosolic 26S proteasomes.Thus,sterol-accelerated degradation of reductase represents an example of how a general cellular process (ER-associated degradation) is used to control an important metabolic pathway (cholesterol synthesis).

  12. Rubredoxin Reductase of Pseudomonas oleovorans. Structural Relationship to Other Flavoprotein Oxidoreductases Based on One NAD and Two FAD Fingerprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, Gerrit; Engel, Henk; Vriend, Gert; Terpstra, Peter; Witholt, Bernard

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation of alkanes to alkanols by Pseudomonas oleovorans involves a three-component enzyme system: alkane hydroxylase, rubredoxin and rubredoxin reductase. Alkane hydroxylase and rubredoxin are encoded by the alkBPGHJKL operon, while previous studies indicated that rubredoxin reductase is most

  13. Lens Aldose Reductase Inhibitory and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Fractions of Chromolaena odorata (Siam Weed: Potential for Cataract Remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel O. AJANI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Searching for effective and safe aldose reductase (AR inhibitor agent is a major thrust area in the mainstream of anti-cataractogenic research. This study was set up to investigate the in vitro aldose reductase inhibitory (ARI activity of fractions of methanolic extract of Chromolaena odorata leaves, on partially purified AR from goat lens, for potential use in the development of anticataractogenic agent. The phyto-constituents of the leaves were screened in aqueous and methanolic extracts and the free radical scavenging activities of the fractions were evaluated. The kinetics of the enzyme in the presence of fractions of the leaves was then compared. Phenol, flavonoid, alkaloid, saponin, terpenoid, quinones and phlobatannins were detected in both extracts. All the fractions inhibited AR in an uncompetitive manner, showing a reduced V max and Km when compared with glyceraldehyde. ARI activity was found to be the highest with aqueous fraction (IC50, 0.22 ± 0.01 mg/ml. All other fractions showed mild to moderate AR inhibition capacity, while it was found to be the lowest within hexane fraction (IC50, 1.20 ± 0.10 mg/ml. All the fractions showed free radical scavenging activity and metal chelating activity. The study confirmed the ARI and antioxidant capacity of Chromolaena odorata which may be due to its phenolic constituents, indicating that the plant may serve as a base for the development of anticataract agent.

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of three genes encoding dihydroflavonol-4-reductase from Ginkgo biloba in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Hua

    Full Text Available Dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR, EC1.1.1.219 catalyzes a key step late in the biosynthesis of anthocyanins, condensed tannins (proanthocyanidins, and other flavonoids important to plant survival and human nutrition. Three DFR cDNA clones (designated GbDFRs were isolated from the gymnosperm Ginkgo biloba. The deduced GbDFR proteins showed high identities to other plant DFRs, which form three distinct DFR families. Southern blot analysis showed that the three GbDFRs each belong to a different DFR family. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that the GbDFRs share the same ancestor as other DFRs. The expression of the three recombinant GbDFRs in Escherichia coli showed that their actual protein sizes were in agreement with predictions from the cDNA sequences. The recombinant proteins were purified and their activity was analyzed; both GbDFR1 and GbDFR3 could catalyze dihydroquercetin conversion to leucocyanidin, while GbDFR2 catalyzed dihydrokaempferol conversion to leucopelargonidin. qRT-PCR showed that the GbDFRs were expressed in a tissue-specific manner, and transcript accumulation for the three genes was highest in young leaves and stamens. These transcription patterns were in good agreement with the pattern of anthocyanin accumulation in G.biloba. The expression profiles suggested that GbDFR1 and GbDFR2 are mainly involved in responses to plant hormones, environmental stress and damage. During the annual growth cycle, the GbDFRs were significantly correlated with anthocyanin accumulation in leaves. A fitted linear curve showed the best model for relating GbDFR2 and GbDFR3 with anthocyanin accumulation in leaves. GbDFR1 appears to be involved in environmental stress response, while GbDFR3 likely has primary functions in the synthesis of anthocyanins. These data revealed unexpected properties and differences in three DFR proteins from a single species.

  15. Cytochrome P450s and cytochrome P450 reductase in the olfactory organ of the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, M-A; Bozzolan, F; Chertemps, T; Jacquin-Joly, E; Lalouette, L; Siaussat, D; Maïbèche-Coisne, M

    2012-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s) are involved in many physiological functions in insects, such as the metabolism of signal molecules, adaptation to host plants and insecticide resistance. Several P450s have been reported in the olfactory organs of insects, the antennae, and have been proposed to play a role in odorant processing and/or xenobiotic metabolism. Despite recent transcriptomic analyses in several species, the diversity of antennal P450s in insects has not yet been investigated. Here, we report the identification of 37 putative P450s expressed in the antennae of the pest moth Spodoptera littoralis, as well as the characterization of a redox partner, cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that S. littoralis P450s belong to four clades defined by their conservation with vertebrate P450s and their cellular localization. Interestingly, the CYP3 and CYP4 clans, which have been described to be mainly involved in the metabolism of plant compounds and xenobiotics, were largely predominant. More surprisingly, two P450s related to ecdysteroid metabolism were also identified. Expression patterns in adult and larval tissues were studied. Eight P450s appeared to be specific to the chemosensory organs, ie the antennae and proboscis, suggesting a specific role in odorant and tastant processing. Moreover, exposure of males to a plant odorant down-regulated the transcript level of CPR, revealing for the first time the regulation of this gene by odorants within insect antennae. This work suggests that the antennae of insects are a key site for P450-mediated metabolism of a large range of exogenous and endogenous molecules.

  16. Crystal structures of Leptospira interrogans FAD-containing ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase and its complex with NADP+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Alessandro S; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L; Bernardes, Amanda; Neto, Mario de Oliveira; Santos, Maria Auxiliadora M; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Polikarpov, Igor

    2007-10-24

    Ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are flavoenzymes that catalyze the electron transfer between NADP(H) and the proteins ferredoxin or flavodoxin. A number of structural features distinguish plant and bacterial FNRs, one of which is the mode of the cofactor FAD binding. Leptospira interrogans is a spirochaete parasitic bacterium capable of infecting humans and mammals in general. Leptospira interrogans FNR (LepFNR) displays low sequence identity with plant (34% with Zea mays) and bacterial (31% with Escherichia coli) FNRs. However, LepFNR contains all consensus sequences that define the plastidic class FNRs. The crystal structures of the FAD-containing LepFNR and the complex of the enzyme with NADP+, were solved and compared to known FNRs. The comparison reveals significant structural similarities of the enzyme with the plastidic type FNRs and differences with the bacterial enzymes. Our small angle X-ray scattering experiments show that LepFNR is a monomeric enzyme. Moreover, our biochemical data demonstrate that the LepFNR has an enzymatic activity similar to those reported for the plastidic enzymes and that is significantly different from bacterial flavoenzymes, which display lower turnover rates. LepFNR is the first plastidic type FNR found in bacteria and, despite of its low sequence similarity with plastidic FNRs still displays high catalytic turnover rates. The typical structural and biochemical characteristics of plant FNRs unveiled for LepFNR support a notion of a putative lateral gene transfer which presumably offers Leptospira interrogans evolutionary advantages. The wealth of structural information about LepFNR provides a molecular basis for advanced drugs developments against leptospirosis.

  17. Crystal structures of Leptospira interrogans FAD-containing ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase and its complex with NADP+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceccarelli Eduardo A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ferredoxin-NADP(H reductases (FNRs are flavoenzymes that catalyze the electron transfer between NADP(H and the proteins ferredoxin or flavodoxin. A number of structural features distinguish plant and bacterial FNRs, one of which is the mode of the cofactor FAD binding. Leptospira interrogans is a spirochaete parasitic bacterium capable of infecting humans and mammals in general. Leptospira interrogans FNR (LepFNR displays low sequence identity with plant (34% with Zea mays and bacterial (31% with Escherichia coli FNRs. However, LepFNR contains all consensus sequences that define the plastidic class FNRs. Results The crystal structures of the FAD-containing LepFNR and the complex of the enzyme with NADP+, were solved and compared to known FNRs. The comparison reveals significant structural similarities of the enzyme with the plastidic type FNRs and differences with the bacterial enzymes. Our small angle X-ray scattering experiments show that LepFNR is a monomeric enzyme. Moreover, our biochemical data demonstrate that the LepFNR has an enzymatic activity similar to those reported for the plastidic enzymes and that is significantly different from bacterial flavoenzymes, which display lower turnover rates. Conclusion LepFNR is the first plastidic type FNR found in bacteria and, despite of its low sequence similarity with plastidic FNRs still displays high catalytic turnover rates. The typical structural and biochemical characteristics of plant FNRs unveiled for LepFNR support a notion of a putative lateral gene transfer which presumably offers Leptospira interrogans evolutionary advantages. The wealth of structural information about LepFNR provides a molecular basis for advanced drugs developments against leptospirosis.

  18. Physarum polycephalum expresses a dihydropteridine reductase with selectivity for pterin substrates with a 6-(1', 2'-dihydroxypropyl) substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Claudia; Golderer, Georg; Gröbner, Peter; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Werner, Ernst R

    2003-07-01

    Physarum polycephalum is one of few non-animal organisms capable of synthesizing tetrahydrobiopterin from GTP. Here we demonstrate developmentally regulated expression of quinoid dihydropteridine reductase (EC 1.6.99.7), an enzyme required for recycling 6,7-[8H]-dihydrobiopterin. Physarum also expresses phenylalanine-4-hydroxylase activity, an enzyme that depends on dihydropteridine reductase. The 24.4 kDa Physarum dihydropteridine reductase shares 43% amino acid identity with the human protein. A number of residues important for function of the mammalian enzyme are also conserved in the Physarum sequence. In comparison to sheep liver dihydropteridine reductase, purified recombinant Physarum dihydropteridine reductase prefers pterin substrates with a 6-(1', 2'-dihydroxypropyl) group. Our results demonstrate that Physarum synthesizes, utilizes and metabolizes tetrahydrobiopterin in a way hitherto thought to be restricted to the animal kingdom.

  19. Pinpointing a Mechanistic Switch Between Ketoreduction and “Ene” Reduction in Short‐Chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygidakis, Antonios; Karuppiah, Vijaykumar; Hoeven, Robin; Ní Cheallaigh, Aisling; Leys, David; Gardiner, John M.; Toogood, Helen S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Three enzymes of the Mentha essential oil biosynthetic pathway are highly homologous, namely the ketoreductases (−)‐menthone:(−)‐menthol reductase and (−)‐menthone:(+)‐neomenthol reductase, and the “ene” reductase isopiperitenone reductase. We identified a rare catalytic residue substitution in the last two, and performed comparative crystal structure analyses and residue‐swapping mutagenesis to investigate whether this determines the reaction outcome. The result was a complete loss of native activity and a switch between ene reduction and ketoreduction. This suggests the importance of a catalytic glutamate vs. tyrosine residue in determining the outcome of the reduction of α,β‐unsaturated alkenes, due to the substrate occupying different binding conformations, and possibly also to the relative acidities of the two residues. This simple switch in mechanism by a single amino acid substitution could potentially generate a large number of de novo ene reductases. PMID:27411040

  20. Hypothesis on Serenoa repens (Bartram small extract inhibition of prostatic 5α-reductase through an in silico approach on 5β-reductase x-ray structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Governa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a common disease in men aged over 50 years old, with an incidence increasing to more than 80% over the age of 70, that is increasingly going to attract pharmaceutical interest. Within conventional therapies, such as α-adrenoreceptor antagonists and 5α-reductase inhibitor, there is a large requirement for treatments with less adverse events on, e.g., blood pressure and sexual function: phytotherapy may be the right way to fill this need. Serenoa repens standardized extract has been widely studied and its ability to reduce lower urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia is comprehensively described in literature. An innovative investigation on the mechanism of inhibition of 5α-reductase by Serenoa repens extract active principles is proposed in this work through computational methods, performing molecular docking simulations on the crystal structure of human liver 5β-reductase. The results confirm that both sterols and fatty acids can play a role in the inhibition of the enzyme, thus, suggesting a competitive mechanism of inhibition. This work proposes a further confirmation for the rational use of herbal products in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia, and suggests computational methods as an innovative, low cost, and non-invasive process for the study of phytocomplex activity toward proteic targets.

  1. Enhancing Heat Tolerance of the Little Dogwood Cornus canadensis L. f. with Introduction of a Superoxide Reductase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xing-Min; Liu, Xiang; Ji, Mikyoung; Hoffmann, William A; Grunden, Amy; Xiang, Qiu-Yun J

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be accelerated under various biotic and abiotic stresses causing lipid peroxidation, protein degradation, enzyme inactivation, and DNA damage. Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a novel antioxidant enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus and is employed by this anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon for efficient detoxification of ROS. In this study, SOR was introduced into a flowering plant Cornus canadensis to enhance its heat tolerance and reduce heat induced damage. A fusion construct of the SOR gene and Green Fluorescent Protein gene (GFP) was introduced into C. canadensis using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Heat tolerance of the GFP-SOR expressing transgenic plants was investigated by observing morphological symptoms of heat injury and by examining changes in photosynthesis, malondialdehyde (MDA), and proline levels in the plants. Our results indicate that the expression of the P. furiosus SOR gene in the transgenic plants alleviated lipid peroxidation of cell membranes and photoinhibition of PS II, and decreased the accumulation of proline at 40°C. After a series of exposures to increasing temperatures, the SOR transgenic plants remained healthy and green whereas most of the non-transgenic plants dried up and were unable to recover. While it had previously been reported that expression of SOR in Arabidopsis enhanced heat tolerance, this is the first report of the successful demonstration of improved heat tolerance in a non-model plant resulting from the introduction of P. furiosus SOR. The study demonstrates the potential of SOR for crop improvement and that inherent limitations of plant heat tolerance can be ameliorated with P. furiosus SOR.

  2. Enhancing heat tolerance of the little dogwood Cornus canadensis L. f. with introduction of a superoxide reductase gene from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinmin eGeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS can be accelerated under various biotic and abiotic stresses causing lipid peroxidation, protein degradation, enzyme inactivation, and DNA damage. Superoxide reductase (SOR is a novel antioxidant enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus and is employed by this anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon for efficient detoxification of ROS. In this study, SOR was introduced into a flowering plant Cornus canadensis to enhance its heat tolerance and reduce heat induced damage. A fusion construct of the SOR gene and Green Fluorescent Protein gene (GFP was introduced into C. canadensis using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Heat tolerance of the GFP-SOR expressing transgenic plants was investigated by observing morphological symptoms of heat injury and by examining changes in photosynthesis, malondialdehyde (MDA, and proline levels in the plants. Our results indicate that the expression of the P. furiosus SOR gene in the transgenic plants alleviated lipid peroxidation of cell membranes and photoinhibition of PS II, and decreased the accumulation of proline at 40°C. After a series of exposures to increasing temperatures, the SOR transgenic plants remained healthy and green whereas most of the non-transgenic plants dried up and were unable to recover. While it had previously been reported that expression of SOR in Arabidopsis enhanced heat tolerance, this is the first report of the successful demonstration of improved heat tolerance in a non-model plant resulting from the introduction of P. furiosus SOR. The study demonstrates the potential of SOR for crop improvement and that inherent limitations of plant heat tolerance can be ameliorated with P. furiosus SOR.

  3. Origin and evolution of the protein-repairing enzymes methionine sulphoxide reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing-Hai; Weissbach, Herbert

    2008-08-01

    The majority of extant life forms thrive in an O2-rich environment, which unavoidably induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during cellular activities. ROS readily oxidize methionine (Met) residues in proteins/peptides to form methionine sulphoxide [Met(O)] that can lead to impaired protein function. Two methionine sulphoxide reductases, MsrA and MsrB, catalyse the reduction of the S and R epimers, respectively, of Met(O) in proteins to Met. The Msr system has two known functions in protecting cells against oxidative damage. The first is to repair proteins that have lost activity due to Met oxidation and the second is to function as part of a scavenger system to remove ROS through the reversible oxidation/reduction of Met residues in proteins. Bacterial, plant and animal cells lacking MsrA are known to be more sensitive to oxidative stress. The Msr system is considered an important cellular defence mechanism to protect against oxidative stress and may be involved in ageing/senescence. MsrA is present in all known eukaryotes and eubacteria and a majority of archaea, reflecting its essential role in cellular life. MsrB is found in all eukaryotes and the majority of eubacteria and archaea but is absent in some eubacteria and archaea, which may imply a less important role of MsrB compared to MsrA. MsrA and MsrB share no sequence or structure homology, and therefore probably emerged as a result of independent evolutionary events. The fact that some archaea lack msr genes raises the question of how these archaea cope with oxidative damage to proteins and consequently of the significance of msr evolution in oxic eukaryotes dealing with oxidative stress. Our best hypothesis is that the presence of ROS-destroying enzymes such as peroxiredoxins and a lower dissolved O2 concentration in those msr-lacking organisms grown at high temperatures might account for the successful survival of these organisms under oxidative stress.

  4. S-Glutathionyl-(chloro)hydroquinone reductases: a novel class of glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Luying; Belchik, Sara M; Xun, Randy; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Huina; Sanchez, Emiliano; Kang, Chulhee; Board, Philip G

    2010-05-27

    Sphingobium chlorophenolicum completely mineralizes PCP (pentachlorophenol). Two GSTs (glutathione transferases), PcpC and PcpF, are involved in the degradation. PcpC uses GSH to reduce TeCH (tetrachloro-p-hydroquinone) to TriCH (trichloro-p-hydroquinone) and then to DiCH (dichloro-p-hydroquinone) during PCP degradation. However, oxidatively damaged PcpC produces GS-TriCH (S-glutathionyl-TriCH) and GS-DiCH (S-glutathionyl-TriCH) conjugates. PcpF converts the conjugates into TriCH and DiCH, re-entering the degradation pathway. PcpF was further characterized in the present study. It catalysed GSH-dependent reduction of GS-TriCH via a Ping Pong mechanism. First, PcpF reacted with GS-TriCH to release TriCH and formed disulfide bond between its Cys53 residue and the GS moiety. Then, a GSH came in to regenerate PcpF and release GS-SG. A TBLASTN search revealed that PcpF homologues were widely distributed in bacteria, halobacteria (archaea), fungi and plants, and they belonged to ECM4 (extracellular mutant 4) group COG0435 in the conserved domain database. Phylogenetic analysis grouped PcpF and homologues into a distinct group, separated from Omega class GSTs. The two groups shared conserved amino acid residues, for GSH binding, but had different residues for the binding of the second substrate. Several recombinant PcpF homologues and two human Omega class GSTs were produced in Escherichia coli and purified. They had zero or low activities for transferring GSH to standard substrates, but all had reasonable activities for GSH-dependent reduction of disulfide bond (thiol transfer), dehydroascorbate and dimethylarsinate. All the tested PcpF homologues reduced GS-TriCH, but the two Omega class GSTs did not. Thus PcpF homologues were tentatively named S-glutathionyl-(chloro)hydroquinone reductases for catalysing the GSH-dependent reduction of GS-TriCH.

  5. Allosteric control of internal electron transfer in cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase is a bifunctional multiheme enzyme catalyzing the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide and the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the internal electron transfer process in the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme have...

  6. 5 Alpha-reductase inhibitory and antiandrogenic activities of novel steroids in hamster seminal vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Marisa; Bratoeff, Eugene; Flores, Eugenio; Ramírez, Elena; Calleros, Jorge; Montes, Diana; Quiroz, Alexandra; Heuze, Ivonne

    2002-11-01

    The pharmacological activity of several 16-bromosubstituted trienediones 4 and 5, 16-methyl substituted dienediones 6 and 7 and the 16-methyl substituted trienedione 8 was determined on gonadectomized hamster seminal vesicles by measuring the in vitro conversion of testosterone (T) to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as 5alpha-reductase inhibitors and also the ability of these steroids to bind to the androgen receptor. Steroids 6 and 7 when injected together with T decreased the weight of the seminal vesicles thus showing an antiandrogenic effect. Compounds 5 and 6 reduced substantially the conversion of T to DHT and therefore can be considered good inhibitors for the enzyme 5alpha-reductase; however both steroids failed to form a complex with the androgen receptor. On the other hand compound 7 which showed a very small inhibitory activity for the enzyme 5alpha-reductase, exhibited a very high affinity for the androgen receptor and thus can be considered an effective antiandrogen. This compound also reduced substantially the weight of the seminal vesicles. Steroids 4 and 8 did not reduce the weight of the seminal vesicles and exhibited a low affinity for the androgen receptor; 8 showed a weak 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activity, whereas 4 exhibited a weak androgenic effect.

  7. Low activity of superoxide dismutase and high activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes from centenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Jeune, B; Nybo, H

    1998-01-01

    aged between 60 and 79 years. MEASUREMENTS: enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase (GR) in erythrocytes. Functional capacity among the centenarians was evaluated by Katz' index of activities of daily living, the Physical...

  8. pH dependence of copper geometry, reduction potential, and nitrite affinity in nitrite reductase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobson, F.; Pistorius, A.M.A.; Farkas, D.; Grip, W.J. de; Hansson, O.; Sjolin, L.; Neutze, R.

    2007-01-01

    Many properties of copper-containing nitrite reductase are pH-dependent, such as gene expression, enzyme activity, and substrate affinity. Here we use x-ray diffraction to investigate the structural basis for the pH dependence of activity and nitrite affinity by examining the type 2 copper site and

  9. Phellinstatin, a new inhibitor of enoyl-ACP reductase produced by the medicinal fungus Phellinus linteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jun-Young; Kwon, Yun-Ju; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Seok, Soon-Ja; Kim, Won-Gon

    2011-03-15

    A new trimeric hispidin derivative, phellinstatin, was isolated from a culture broth of the medicinal fungus Phellinus linteus and its structure was established by various spectral analysis. Phellinstatin strongly inhibited Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-ACP reductase with an IC(50) of 6 μM and also showed antibacterial activity against S. aureus and MRSA.

  10. Calorimetric and spectroscopic investigations of the thermal denaturation of wild type nitrite reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stirpe, A; Guzzi, R; Wijma, H; Verbeet, MP; Canters, GW; Sportelli, L

    2005-01-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) is a multicopper protein, with a trimeric structure containing two types of copper site: type I is present in each subunit whereas type 2 is localized at the subunits interface. The paper reports on the thermal behaviour of wild type NiR from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6. The

  11. NADPH-dependent D-aldose reductases and xylose fermentation in Fusarium oxysporum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Christakopoulos, P.

    2004-01-01

    Two aldose (xylose) reductases (ARI and ARII) from Fusarium oxysporum were purified and characterized. The native ARI was a monomer with M-r 41000, pI 5.2 and showed a 52-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, while ARII was homodimeric with a subunit of M-r 37000, pI 3.6 and a 60-fold preference...

  12. Proximal hypospadias in a male patient with 5α-reductase deficiency: A case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Basuguy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypospadias is a congenital disorder of male external genital. The newborn showed penoscrotal hypospadias with chordee and microphallus. Endocrine data and a normal male karyotype were suggestive of 5α-reductase deficiency. Penoscrotalhypospadias repair of the patient was made.

  13. Aldose reductase induced by hyperosmotic stress mediates cardiomyocyte apoptosis: differential effects of sorbitol and mannitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Anita S; Ulloa, Juan Alberto; Chiong, Mario; Criollo, Alfredo; Eisner, Verónica; Barros, Luis Felipe; Lavandero, Sergio

    2003-10-03

    Cells adapt to hyperosmotic conditions by several mechanisms, including accumulation of sorbitol via induction of the polyol pathway. Failure to adapt to osmotic stress can result in apoptotic cell death. In the present study, we assessed the role of aldose reductase, the key enzyme of the polyol pathway, in cardiac myocyte apoptosis. Hyperosmotic stress, elicited by exposure of cultured rat cardiac myocytes to the nonpermeant solutes sorbitol and mannitol, caused identical cell shrinkage and adaptive hexose uptake stimulation. In contrast, only sorbitol induced the polyol pathway and triggered stress pathways as well as apoptosis-related signaling events. Sorbitol resulted in activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p54 c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and protein kinase B. Furthermore, sorbitol treatment resulting in induction and activation of aldose reductase, decreased expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL, increased DNA fragmentation, and glutathione depletion. Apoptosis was attenuated by aldose reductase inhibition with zopolrestat and also by glutathione replenishment with N-acetylcysteine. In conclusion, our data show that hypertonic shrinkage of cardiac myocytes alone is not sufficient to induce cardiac myocyte apoptosis. Hyperosmolarity-induced cell death is sensitive to the nature of the osmolyte and requires induction of aldose reductase as well as a decrease in intracellular glutathione levels.

  14. Structure of Physarum polycephalum cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase at 1.56 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sangwoo; Suga, Michihiro; Ogasahara, Kyoko [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Ikegami, Terumi; Minami, Yoshiko; Yubisui, Toshitsugu [Department of Biochemistry, Okayama University of Science, 1-1 Ridai-cho, Okayama 700-0005 (Japan); Tsukihara, Tomitake, E-mail: tsuki@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2007-04-01

    The structure of P. polycephalum cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase, an enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of cytochrome b{sub 5} by NADH, was determined at a resolution of 1.56 Å. Physarum polycephalum cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase catalyzes the reduction of cytochrome b{sub 5} by NADH. The structure of P. polycephalum cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase was determined at a resolution of 1.56 Å. The molecular structure was compared with that of human cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase, which had previously been determined at 1.75 Å resolution [Bando et al. (2004 ▶), Acta Cryst. D60, 1929–1934]. The high-resolution structure revealed conformational differences between the two enzymes in the adenosine moiety of the FAD, the lid region and the linker region. The structural properties of both proteins were inspected in terms of hydrogen bonding, ion pairs, accessible surface area and cavity volume. The differences in these structural properties between the two proteins were consistent with estimates of their thermostabilities obtained from differential scanning calorimetry data.

  15. Spectrophotometric activity microassay for pure and recombinant cytochrome P450-type nitric oxide reductase

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Garny, S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) of the P450 oxidoreductase family accepts electrons directly from its cofactor, NADH, to reduce two nitric oxide (NO) molecules to one nitrous oxide molecule and water. The enzyme plays a key role in removal of radical...

  16. Purification to Homogeneity and Characterization of a Novel Pseudomonas putida Chromate Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C. H.; Keyhan, M.; Wielinga, B.; Fendorf, S.; Matin, A.

    2000-01-01

    Cr(VI) (chromate) is a widespread environmental contaminant. Bacterial chromate reductases can convert soluble and toxic chromate to the insoluble and less toxic Cr(III). Bioremediation can therefore be effective in removing chromate from the environment, especially if the bacterial propensity for such removal is enhanced by genetic and biochemical engineering. To clone the chromate reductase-encoding gene, we purified to homogeneity (>600-fold purification) and characterized a novel soluble chromate reductase from Pseudomonas putida, using ammonium sulfate precipitation (55 to 70%), anion-exchange chromatography (DEAE Sepharose CL-6B), chromatofocusing (Polybuffer exchanger 94), and gel filtration (Superose 12 HR 10/30). The enzyme activity was dependent on NADH or NADPH; the temperature and pH optima for chromate reduction were 80°C and 5, respectively; and the Km was 374 μM, with a Vmax of 1.72 μmol/min/mg of protein. Sulfate inhibited the enzyme activity noncompetitively. The reductase activity remained virtually unaltered after 30 min of exposure to 50°C; even exposure to higher temperatures did not immediately inactivate the enzyme. X-ray absorption near-edge-structure spectra showed quantitative conversion of chromate to Cr(III) during the enzyme reaction. PMID:10788340

  17. Purification to homogeneity and characterization of a novel Pseudomonas putida chromate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.H.; Keyhan, M.; Wielinga, B.; Fendorf, S.; Matin, A.

    2000-05-01

    Cr(VI) (chromate) is a widespread environmental contaminant. Bacterial chromate reductases can convert soluble and toxic chromate to the insoluble and less toxic Cr(III). Bioremediation can therefore be effective in removing chromate from the environment, especially if the bacterial propensity for such removal is enhanced by genetic and biochemical engineering. To clone the chromate reductase-encoding gene, the authors purified to homogeneity and characterized a novel soluble chromate reductase from Pseudomonas putida, using ammonium sulfate precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography, chromatofocusing, and gel filtration. The enzyme activity was dependent on NADH or NADPH; the temperature and pH optima for chromate reduction were 80 C and 5, respectively; and the K{sub m} was 374 {micro}M, with a V{sub max} of 1.72 {micro}mol/min/mg of protein. Sulfate inhibited the enzyme activity noncompetitively. The reductase activity remained virtually unaltered after 30 min of exposure to 50 C; even exposure to higher temperatures did not immediately inactivate the enzyme. X-ray absorption near-edge-structure spectra showed quantitative conversion of chromate to Cr(III) during the enzyme reaction.

  18. Primary △4-3-oxosteroid 5β-reductase deficiency: Two cases in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Zhao; Ling-Juan Fang; Kenneth DR Setchell; Rui Chen; Li-Ting Li; Jian-She Wang

    2012-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) deficiency,a rare but life-threatening form of bile acid deficiency,has not been previously described in China.Here,we describe the first two primary △4-3-oxosteroid 5β-reductase deficiency patients in Mainland China diagnosed by fast atom bombardment-mass spectroscopy of urinary bile acids and confirmed by genetic analysis.A high proportion of atypical 3-oxo-A4-bile acids in the urine indicated a deficiency in A4-3-oxosteroid 5β-reductase.All of the coding exons and adjacent intronic sequence of the AKR1D1 gene were sequenced using peripheral lymphocyte genomic DNA of two patients and one of the patient's parents.One patient exhibited compound heterozygous mutations:c.396C>A and c.722A>T,while the other was heterozygous for the mutation c.797G>A.Based on these mutations,a diagnosis of primary △4-3-oxosteroid 5β-reductase deficiency could be confirmed.With ursodeoxycholic acid treatment and fat-soluble vitamin supplements,liver function tests normalized rapidly,and the degree of hepatomegaly was markedly reduced in both patients.

  19. Purification and characterization of a 15-ketoprostaglandin d-reductase from bovine lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.

    1979-01-01

    15-Ketoprostaglandin d-reductase from bovine lung has been purified using affinity chromatography to apparent homogeneity, as judged from polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with and without sodium dodecyl sulphate. Valine was identified as the N-terminal amino acid, and the isoelectric point...

  20. Cloning, expression and antigenicity of the L. donovani reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A T; Kemp, K; Theander, T G

    2001-01-01

    (K). Only 2 of 22 plasma samples from patients with visceral leishmaniasis were found to have detectable anti-reductase antibodies and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from one of three individuals previously infected with visceral leishmaniasis proliferated in the presence of recombinant...

  1. Identification and characterization of an inborn error of metabolism caused by dihydrofolate reductase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banka, S.; Blom, H.J.; Walter, J.; Aziz, M.; Urquhart, J.; Clouthier, C.M.; Rice, G.I.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Hilton, E.; Vassallo, G.; Will, A.; Smith, D.E.; Smulders, Y.M.; Wevers, R.A.; Steinfeld, R.; Heales, S.; Crow, Y.J.; Pelletier, J.N.; Jones, S.; Newman, W.G.

    2011-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a critical enzyme in folate metabolism and an important target of antineoplastic, antimicrobial, and antiinflammatory drugs. We describe three individuals from two families with a recessive inborn error of metabolism, characterized by megaloblastic anemia and/or

  2. In silico docking studies of aldose reductase inhibitory activity of commercially available flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Madeswaran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to investigate the aldose reductase inhibitory activity of flavonoids using in silico docking studies. In this perspective, flavonoids like biochanin, butein, esculatin, fisetin and herbacetin were selected. Epalrestat, a known aldose reductase inhibitor was used as the standard. In silico docking studies were carried out using AutoDock 4.2, based on the Lamarckian genetic algorithm principle. The results showed that all the selected flavonoids showed binding energy ranging between -9.33 kcal/mol to -7.23 kcal/mol when compared with that of the standard (-8.73 kcal/mol. Inhibition constant (144.13 µM to 4.98 µM and intermolecular energy (-11.42 kcal/mol to -7.83 kcal/mol of the flavonoids also coincide with the binding energy. All the selected flavonoids contributed aldose reductase inhibitory activity because of its structural properties. These molecular docking analyses could lead to the further development of potent aldose reductase inhibitors for the treatment of diabetes.

  3. Part of respiratory nitrate reductase of Klebsiella aerogenes is intimately associated with the peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, P R; Wientjes, F B; Nanninga, N; Van't Riet, J

    1987-02-01

    Lysozyme digestion and sonication of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-purified Klebsiella aerogenes murein sacculi resulted in the quantitative release of both subunits of nitrate reductase, as well as a number of other cytoplasmic membrane polypeptides (5.2%, by weight, of the total membrane proteins). Similar results were obtained after lysozyme digestion of SDS-prepared peptidoglycan fragments, which excluded the phenomenon of simple trapping of the polypeptides by the surrounding peptidoglycan matrix. About 28% of membrane-bound nitrate reductase appears to be tightly associated with the peptidoglycan. Additional evidence for this association was demonstrated by positive immunogold labeling of SDS-murein sacculi and thin sections of plasmolyzed bacteria. Qualitative amino acid analysis of trypsin-treated sacculi, a tryptic product of holo-nitrate reductase, and amino- and carboxypeptidase digests of both nitrate reductase subunits indicated the possible existence of a terminal anchoring peptide containing the following amino acids: (Gly)n, Trp, Ser, Pro, Ile, Leu, Phe, Cys, Tyr, Asp, and Lys.

  4. Sensing nitrite through a pseudoazurin-nitrite reductase electron transfer relay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astier, Y; Canters, GW; Davis, JJ; Hill, HAO; Verbeet, MP; Wijma, HJ

    2005-01-01

    Nitrite is converted to nitric oxide by haem or copper-containing enzymes in denitrifying bacteria during the process of denitrification. In designing an efficient biosensor, this enzymic turnover must be quantitatively assessed. The enzyme nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis contains a redo

  5. The 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism interacts with smoking to increase homocysteine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, K.S.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Young, I.S.; Murray, L.; McMaster, D.; Woodside, J.; Yarnell, J.W.; Boreham, C.A.; McNulty, H.; Strain, J.J.; McPartlin, J.; Scott, J.M.; Mitchell, L.E.; Whitehead, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Elevated homocysteine is a risk marker for several human pathologies. Risk factors for elevated homocysteine include low folate and homozygosity for the T allele of the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism. Because nitric oxide may inhibit folate catabolism and

  6. Functional characterization of a soluble NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase from Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzerodt, Thomas; Wetterhorn, Karl; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Rayment, Ivan

    2017-10-01

    Fusarium head blight is a devastating disease in wheat caused by some fungal pathogens of the Fusarium genus mainly F. graminearum, due to accumulation of toxic trichothecenes. Most of the trichothecene biosynthetic pathway has been mapped, although some proteins of the pathway remain uncharacterized, including an NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. We subcloned a F. graminearum cytochrome P450 reductase that might be involved in the trichothecene biosynthesis. It was expressed heterologously in E. coli as N-terminal truncated form with an octahistidine tag for purification. The construct yielded a soluble apoprotein and its incubation with flavins yielded the corresponding monomeric holoprotein. It was characterized for activity in the pH range 5.5-9.5, using thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) or cytochrome c as substrates. Binding of the small molecule MTT was weaker than for cytochrome c, however, the rate of MTT reduction was faster. Contrary to other studies of cytochrome reductase proteins, MTT reduction proceeded in a cooperative manner in our studies. Optimum kinetic activity was found at pH 7.5-8.5 for bothMTT and cytochrome c. This is the first paper presenting characterization of a cytochrome P450 reductase from F. graminearum which most likely is involved in mycotoxin biosynthesis or some primary metabolic pathway such as sterol biosynthesis in F. graminearum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinetic properties and inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado-Guerrrero, Ramón; Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, Andrea;

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis of the recombinant soluble enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) from Trypanosoma cruzi has been performed. The enzyme catalyzes the normal anabolic reaction and the reductant is NADPH. It also catalyzes the oxidation of mevalonate but at a lower propo...

  8. IMPACT OF SALINITY AND SODICITY ON BIOMASS, TOTAL NITROGEN, NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY, LEAF AREA, AND CHLOROPHYLL CONTENTS IN MAIZE (ZEA MAYS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. GUFRAN KHAN*, SHIMELIS*, G., ALEMU, H.* AND KEBENU, F**

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Salinity and sodicity are major constraint in increasing crop production at global level. Millions of the hectares of the land are too saline to produce economic yield.  In Ethiopia, 11 million ha of land is salt affected, about half of these soils are saline and remaining half are saline - sodic and sodic soil. As most of the arable land and quality water resources have already been exploited, the use of saline or urban/industrial waste water may be a viable alternative for further agro production. In view of such perspectives, an investigation was conducted to examine the effect of salinity (NaCl and sodicity (Na2CO3 on  biomass, total nitrogen, nitrate reductase activity, leaf area, and chlorophyll contents in Maize (Zea mays L. plants. The appropriate amount of NaCl and Na2CO3  was  dissolved in distilled water for appraisal of artificial  salinity and sodicity levels ( 0 , 4, 8,  and 12  and  mScm-1 in soil medium. Plants were also supplied with potassium (0 and 5mM KNO3 as remedial treatment. Maize plants were analyzed for germination, early growth, biomass, total nitrogen, Nitrate reductase activity, Leaf area, and chlorophyll contents as grown under different ECe levels of salinity and sodicity. The extent of salinity and sodicity effects was compared on the basis of different parameters. It was observed that plants showed substantial reduction in all parameters due to imposition of salinity and sodicity in root medium and it was more so due to sodicity. However, the use of additional potassium brought about an enhancement in these parameters.  It is suggested that plants may be raised in saline soil and saline water however; the extent of success depends upon salinity and sodicity levels, remedial treatments and plant species. The outcome of the present work may contribute towards viable utilization of saline soil and water for enhancing agro production of suitable crops, a desired goal to achieve food security.

  9. The Non-canonical Tetratricopeptide Repeat (TPR) Domain of Fluorescent (FLU) Mediates Complex Formation with Glutamyl-tRNA Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Feilong; Fang, Ying; Chen, Xuemin; Chen, Yuhong; Zhang, Wenxia; Dai, Huai-En; Lin, Rongcheng; Liu, Lin

    2015-07-10

    The tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein FLU is a negative regulator of chlorophyll biosynthesis in plants. It directly interacts through its TPR domain with glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR), the rate-limiting enzyme in the formation of δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). Delineation of how FLU binds to GluTR is important for understanding the molecular basis for FLU-mediated repression of synthesis of ALA, the universal tetrapyrrole precursor. Here, we characterize the FLU-GluTR interaction by solving the crystal structures of the uncomplexed TPR domain of FLU (FLU(TPR)) at 1.45-Å resolution and the complex of the dimeric domain of GluTR bound to FLU(TPR) at 2.4-Å resolution. Three non-canonical TPR motifs of each FLU(TPR) form a concave surface and clamp the helix bundle in the C-terminal dimeric domain of GluTR. We demonstrate that a 2:2 FLU(TPR)-GluTR complex is the functional unit for FLU-mediated GluTR regulation and suggest that the formation of the FLU-GluTR complex prevents glutamyl-tRNA, the GluTR substrate, from binding with this enzyme. These results also provide insights into the spatial regulation of ALA synthesis by the membrane-located FLU protein.

  10. An Insight Into Structure, Function, and Expression Analysis of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA Reductase of

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    Kamalakshi Devi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Citronella ( Cymbopogon winterianus is one of the richest sources of high-value isoprenoid aromatic compounds used as flavour, fragrance, and therapeutic elements. These isoprenoid compounds are synthesized by 2 independent pathways: mevalonate pathway and 2-C-methyl- d -erythritol-4-phosphate pathway. Evidence suggests that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR is a rate-controlling enzyme for the synthesis of variety of isoprenoids. This study reports the isolation, characterization, and tissue-specific expression analysis of HMGR from citronella. The modelled HMGR is a class I type of HMGR enzyme with 3-domain architecture. The active site comprises a cofactor (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and the substrate-binding motifs. The real-time and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results revealed equal expression level in both leaf sheath and root tissue. The results from our study shall be a valuable resource for future molecular intervention to alter the metabolic flux towards improvement of key active ingredient in this important medicinal plant.

  11. Iron Deficiency-induced Increase of Root Branching Contributes to the Enhanced Root Ferric Chelate Reductase Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong-Wei Jin; Wei-Wei Chen; Zhi-Bin Meng; Shao-Jian Zheng

    2008-01-01

    In various plant species, Fe deficiency increases lateral root branching. However, whether this morphological alteration contributes to the Fe deficiency-induced physiological responses still remains to be demonstrated. In the present research, we demonstrated that the lateral root development of red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) was significantly enhanced by Fe deficient treatment, and the total lateral root number correlated well with the Fe deficiency-induced ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity. By analyzing the results from Dasgan et al. (2002), we also found that although the two tomato genotypes line227/1 (P1) and Roza (P2) and their reciprocal F1 hybrid lines ("P1 × P2" and "P2 × P1 ") were cultured under two different lower Fe conditions (10-6 and 10-7 M FeEDDHA), their FCR activities are significantly correlated with the lateral root number. More interestingly, the -Fe chlorosis tolerant ability of these four tomato lines displays similar trends with the lateral root density. Taking these results together, it was proposed that the Fe deficiency-induced increases of the lateral root should play an important role in resistance to Fe deficiency, which may act as harnesses of a useful trait for the selection and breeding of more Fe-efficiant crops among the genotypes that have evolved a Fe deficiency-induced Fe uptake system.

  12. The selective antifungal activity of Drosophila melanogaster metchnikowin reflects the species-dependent inhibition of succinate-coenzyme Q reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Mohammad-Reza Bolouri; Gross, Thomas; Becker, Annette; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Rahnamaeian, Mohammad

    2017-08-15

    Insect-derived antifungal peptides have a significant economic potential, particularly for the engineering of pathogen-resistant crops. However, the nonspecific antifungal activity of such peptides could result in detrimental effects against beneficial fungi, whose interactions with plants promote growth or increase resistance against biotic and abiotic stress. The antifungal peptide metchnikowin (Mtk) from Drosophila melanogaster acts selectively against pathogenic Ascomycota, including Fusarium graminearum, without affecting Basidiomycota such as the beneficial symbiont Piriformospora indica. Here we investigated the mechanism responsible for the selective antifungal activity of Mtk by using the peptide to probe a yeast two-hybrid library of F. graminearum cDNAs. We found that Mtk specifically targets the iron-sulfur subunit (SdhB) of succinate-coenzyme Q reductase (SQR). A functional assay based on the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity of mitochondrial complex II clearly demonstrated that Mtk inhibited the SDH activity of F. graminearum mitochondrial SQR by up to 52%, but that the equivalent enzyme in P. indica was unaffected. A phylogenetic analysis of the SdhB family revealed a significant divergence between the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. SQR is one of the key targets of antifungal agents and we therefore propose Mtk as an environmentally sustainable and more selective alternative to chemical fungicides.

  13. Mechanistic insights into ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase catalysis involving the conserved glutamate in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumit, Verónica I; Essigke, Timm; Cortez, Néstor; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2010-04-02

    Plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are flavoenzymes harboring one molecule of noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide that catalyze reversible reactions between obligatory one-electron carriers and obligatory two-electron carriers. A glutamate next to the C-terminus is strictly conserved in FNR and has been proposed to function as proton donor/acceptor during catalysis. However, experimental studies of this proposed function led to contradicting conclusions about the role of this glutamate in the catalytic mechanism. In the present work, we study the titration behavior of the glutamate in the active site of FNR using theoretical methods. Protonation probabilities for maize FNR were computed for the reaction intermediates of the catalytic cycle by Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations and Metropolis Monte Carlo titration. The titration behavior of the highly conserved glutamate was found to vary depending on the bound substrates NADP(H) and ferredoxin and also on the redox states of these substrates and the flavin adenine dinucleotide. Our results support the involvement of the glutamate in the FNR catalytic mechanism not only as a proton donor but also as a key residue for stabilizing and destabilizing reaction intermediates. On the basis of our findings, we propose a model rationalizing the function of the glutamate in the reaction cycle, which allows reinterpretation of previous experimental results. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase catalyzing the final step of noscapine biosynthesis is localized to laticifers in opium poppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The final step in the biosynthesis of the phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid noscapine involves a purported dehydrogenation of the narcotinehemiacetal keto moiety. A short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR), designated noscapine synthase (NOS), that catalyzes dehydrogenation of narcotinehemiacetal to noscapine was identified in opium poppy and functionally characterized. The NOS gene was isolated using an integrated transcript and metabolite profiling strategy and subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli. Noscapine synthase is highly divergent from other characterized members of the NADPH-dependent SDR superfamily involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism, and it exhibits exclusive substrate specificity for narcotinehemiacetal. Kinetic analyses showed that NOS exhibits higher catalytic efficiency with NAD+ as the cofactor compared with NADP+. Suppression of NOS transcript levels in opium poppy plants subjected to virus-induced gene silencing resulted in a corresponding reduction in the accumulation of noscapine and an increase in narcotinehemiacetal levels in the latex. Noscapine and NOS transcripts were detected in all opium poppy organs, but both were most abundant in stems. Unlike other putative biosynthetic genes clustered in the opium poppy genome, and their corresponding proteins, NOS transcripts and the cognate enzyme were abundant in latex, indicating that noscapine metabolism is completed in a distinct cell type compared with the rest of the pathway.

  15. Influence of the temporal and spatial variation of nitrate reductase, glutamine synthetase and soil composition in the N species content in lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Edgar; Fidalgo, Fernanda; Teixeira, Jorge; Aguiar, Ana A; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O

    2014-04-01

    The variation of nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS) and N content in lettuce was evaluated at 5 stages of lettuce growth. Soil physicochemical properties and its N content were also assessed to elucidate the soil-to-plant transfer of inorganic N and potential leaching to groundwater. A decrease of NR activity and an increase of NO3(-) and N-Kjeldahl content in lettuces were observed during plant growth, whereas GS activity and NH4(+) increased during the first few weeks of lettuce growth and then decreased. Although the temporal variation was similar in lettuces grown in different soils, quantitative differences were observed, indicating that high NO3(-) content in soil caused a higher NO3(-) accumulation in lettuce despite the higher NR activity during the initial stage of plant growth. Higher levels of NO3(-) and NH4(+) were correlated with higher levels of N-Kjeldahl in lettuce suggesting a positive effect of these N species in the biosynthesis of organic forms of N. Soil physicochemical properties influenced the mobility of inorganic N within the groundwater-soil-plant system. Sandy soils with low OM content allowed NO3(-) leaching, which was confirmed by higher NO3(-) levels in groundwater. Therefore, lettuces grown in those soils presented lower N content and the inputs of N to the environment were higher. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C plays a role in nonhost disease resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pathogens by regulating chloroplast-generated reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ishiga

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts are cytoplasmic organelles for photosynthesis in eukaryotic cells. In addition, recent studies have shown that chloroplasts have a critical role in plant innate immunity against invading pathogens. Hydrogen peroxide is a toxic by-product from photosynthesis, which also functions as a signaling compound in plant innate immunity. Therefore, it is important to regulate the level of hydrogen peroxide in response to pathogens. Chloroplasts maintain components of the redox detoxification system including enzymes such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs, and NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC. However, the significance of 2-Cys Prxs and NTRC in the molecular basis of nonhost disease resistance is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of Prxs and NTRC using knock-out mutants of Arabidopsis in response to nonhost Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Plants lacking functional NTRC showed localized cell death (LCD accompanied by the elevated accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in response to nonhost pathogens. Interestingly, the Arabidopsis ntrc mutant showed enhanced bacterial growth and disease susceptibility of nonhost pathogens. Furthermore, the expression profiles of the salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA-mediated signaling pathways and phytohormone analyses including SA and JA revealed that the Arabidopsis ntrc mutant shows elevated JA-mediated signaling pathways in response to nonhost pathogen. These results suggest the critical role of NTRC in plant innate immunity against nonhost P. syringae pathogens.

  17. Paraquat Resistance in Leaf Discs of PSAG12-IPT Modified Gerbera Is Related to the Activities of Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase, and Dehydroascorbate Reductase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Qi-xian; BAO Zhi-yi; ZHU Zhu-jun; MAO Bi-zeng; QIAN Qiong-qiu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, using in vitro leaf disc culture system, the changes of contents of chlorophylls, carotenoids, soluble protein, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), and activities of antioxidant enzymes were investigated during the incubation of leaf discs of PSAG12-IPT modified gerbera in 0, 25, 50 μmol L-1 paraquat (PQ) under continuous light intensity of 130 μmol m-2 s-1, compared with the control plant (wild type). The results showed that PQ treatment significantly decreased the contents of chlorophylls, carotenoids, and soluble protein, therefore, promoted leaf senescence. However, the decreases in the leaf discs of modified gerbera were considerably smaller. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) were significantly increased by PQ treatment and with the increasing of PQ concentration, particularly in the modified plants. The activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) could not be detected in the leaf discs of PQ treatments, which suggested that they were labile to the oxidative stress induced by PQ. As a product of lipid peroxidation, TBARS significantly increased in content with the increase of PQ concentration, while its concentration in the modified plants was significantly lower than that of control plants. Therefore, it could be concluded that the chimeric gene PSAG12-IPT transformed gerbera leaves had higher antioxidative potential, thus causing the delay of senescence under oxidative stress induced by PQ.

  18. Nitrogen assimilation by nodulate plants of Phaseolus vulgaris l. and Vigna unguiculata (l. ) walp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, M.C.P.; Fernandes, M.S.; Sa, M.F.M. (Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Solos)

    1982-05-01

    Under field conditions, the processes of nitrogen assimilation via nitrogenase and nitrate-reductase, the transport and the accumulation of nitrogen in nodulated plants of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Rio Tibagi and Vigna unguiculata cv. Vita 34 were compared and contrasted. V. unguiculata showed better nodulation than P. vulgaris and consequently had higher rates of nitrogenase activity. The small nodulation of P. vulgaris resulted in greater dependence on soil mineral nitrogen as indicated by the higher rates of nitrate-reductase acitivty compared with V. unguiculata, especially during reproductive stage of growth. The superiority of V. unguiculata in terms of assimilation and remobilization of stored nitrogen resulted in a seed yield 28% greater than that of P. vulgaris. P. vulgaris showed a negative correlation between the nitrate-reductase activity and the ureide content of the sap indicating that the metabolic pathways leading to ureide production operates alternatively to nitrate assimilation.

  19. Biliverdin Reductase-A correlates with inducible nitric oxide synthasein in atorvastatin treated aged canine brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabio Di Domenico; Marzia Perluigi; Eugenio Barone

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive impairment and neuropathology. Recent preclinical and epidemiological studies proposed statins as a possible therapeutic drug for Alzheimer’s disease, but the exact mechanisms of action are stil unknown. Biliverdin reductase-A is a pleiotropic enzyme involved in cel ular stress responses. It not only transforms biliverdin-IX alpha into the antioxidant bilirubin-IX alpha but its serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase activity is able to modulate cel signaling networks. We previously reported the beneficial effects of atorvastatin treatment on biliverdin reductase-A and heme oxygenase-1 in the brains of a well characterized pre-clinical model of Alzheimer’s disease, aged beagles, together with observed improvement in cognition. Here we extend our knowledge of the effects of atorvastatin on inducible nitric oxide synthase in parietal cortex, cerebel um and liver of the same animals. We demonstrated that atorvastatin treatment (80 mg/day for 14.5 months) to aged beagles selectively increased inducible nitric oxide synthase in the parietal cortex but not in the cerebel um. In contrast, inducible nitric oxide synthase protein levels were significantly decreased in the liver. Significant positive correlations were found between biliverdin reductase-A and inducible nitric oxide synthase as wel as heme oxygenase-1 protein levels in the parietal cortex. The opposite was observed in the liver. Inducible nitric oxide synthase up-regulation in the parietal cortex was positively associated with improved biliverdin reductase-A functions, whereas the oxidative-induced impairment of biliverdin reductase-A in the liver negatively affected inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, thus suggesting a role for biliverdin reductase-A in atorvastatin-dependent inducible nitric oxide synthase changes. Interestingly, increased inducible nitric oxide synthase levels in the parietal cortex were not

  20. Reduced bone mass and muscle strength in male 5α-reductase type 1 inactivated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara H Windahl

    Full Text Available Androgens are important regulators of bone mass but the relative importance of testosterone (T versus dihydrotestosterone (DHT for the activation of the androgen receptor (AR in bone is unknown. 5α-reductase is responsible for the irreversible conversion of T to the more potent AR activator DHT. There are two well established isoenzymes of 5α-reductase (type 1 and type 2, encoded by separate genes (Srd5a1 and Srd5a2. 5α-reductase type 2 is predominantly expressed in male reproductive tissues whereas 5α-reductase type 1 is highly expressed in liver and moderately expressed in several other tissues including bone. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of 5α-reductase type 1 for bone mass using Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice. Four-month-old male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice had reduced trabecular bone mineral density (-36%, p<0.05 and cortical bone mineral content (-15%, p<0.05 but unchanged serum androgen levels compared with wild type (WT mice. The cortical bone dimensions were reduced in the male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice as a result of a reduced cortical periosteal circumference compared with WT mice. T treatment increased the cortical periosteal circumference (p<0.05 in orchidectomized WT mice but not in orchidectomized Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice. Male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice demonstrated a reduced forelimb muscle grip strength compared with WT mice (p<0.05. Female Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice had slightly increased cortical bone mass associated with elevated circulating levels of androgens. In conclusion, 5α-reductase type 1 inactivated male mice have reduced bone mass and forelimb muscle grip strength and we propose that these effects are due to lack of 5α-reductase type 1 expression in bone and muscle. In contrast, the increased cortical bone mass in female Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice, is an indirect effect mediated by elevated circulating androgen levels.

  1. Monoterpene metabolism. Cloning, expression, and characterization of menthone reductases from peppermint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L; McConkey, Marie E; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-03-01

    (-)-Menthone is the predominant monoterpene produced in the essential oil of maturing peppermint (Mentha x piperita) leaves during the filling of epidermal oil glands. This early biosynthetic process is followed by a second, later oil maturation program (approximately coincident with flower initiation) in which the C3-carbonyl of menthone is reduced to yield (-)-(3R)-menthol and (+)-(3S)-neomenthol by two distinct NADPH-dependent ketoreductases. An activity-based in situ screen, by expression in Escherichia coli of 23 putative redox enzymes from an immature peppermint oil gland expressed sequence tag library, was used to isolate a cDNA encoding the latter menthone:(+)-(3S)-neomenthol reductase. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification and RACE were used to acquire the former menthone:(-)-(3R)-menthol reductase directly from mRNA isolated from the oil gland secretory cells of mature leaves. The deduced amino acid sequences of these two reductases share 73% identity, provide no apparent subcellular targeting information, and predict inclusion in the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family of enzymes. The menthone:(+)-(3S)-neomenthol reductase cDNA encodes a 35,722-D protein, and the recombinant enzyme yields 94% (+)-(3S)-neomenthol and 6% (-)-(3R)-menthol from (-)-menthone as substrate, and 86% (+)-(3S)-isomenthol and 14% (+)-(3R)-neoisomenthol from (+)-isomenthone as substrate, has a pH optimum of 9.3, and K(m) values of 674 mum, > 1 mm, and 10 mum for menthone, isomenthone, and NADPH, respectively, with a k(cat) of 0.06 s(-1). The recombinant menthone:(-)-(3R)-menthol reductase has a deduced size of 34,070 D and converts (-)-menthone to 95% (-)-(3R)-menthol and 5% (+)-(3S)-neomenthol, and (+)-isomenthone to 87% (+)-(3R)-neoisomenthol and 13% (+)-(3S)-isomenthol, displays optimum activity at neutral pH, and has K(m) values of 3.0 mum, 41 mum, and 0.12 mum for menthone, isomenthone, and NADPH, respectively, with a k(cat) of 0.6 s(-1). The respective activities of

  2. Peroxisomal hydroxypyruvate reductase is not essential for photorespiration in Arabidopsis but its absence causes an increase in the stoichiometry of photorespiratory CO2 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Asaph B; Walker, Berkley J; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Smith, Steven M; Badger, Murray R

    2011-09-01

    Recycling of carbon by the photorespiratory pathway involves enzymatic steps in the chloroplast, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. Most of these reactions are essential for plants growing under ambient CO(2) concentrations. However, some disruptions of photorespiratory metabolism cause subtle phenotypes in plants grown in air. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana lacking both of the peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase genes (pmdh1pmdh2) or hydroxypyruvate reductase (hpr1) are viable in air and have rates of photosynthesis only slightly lower than wild-type plants. To investigate how disruption of the peroxisomal reduction of hydroxypyruvate to glycerate influences photorespiratory carbon metabolism we analyzed leaf gas exchange in A. thaliana plants lacking peroxisomal HPR1 expression. In addition, because the lack of HPR1 could be compensated for by other reactions within the peroxisomes using reductant supplied by PMDH a triple mutant lacking expression of both peroxisomal PMDH genes and HPR1 (pmdh1pmdh2hpr1) was analyzed. Rates of photosynthesis under photorespiratory conditions (ambient CO(2) and O(2) concentrations) were slightly reduced in the hpr1 and pmdh1pmdh2hpr1 plants indicating other reactions can help bypass this disruption in the photorespiratory pathway. However, the CO(2) compensation points (Γ) increased under photorespiratory conditions in both mutants indicating changes in photorespiratory carbon metabolism in these plants. Measurements of Γ*, the CO(2) compensation point in the absence of mitochondrial respiration, and the CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation reaction demonstrated that the increase in Γ in the hpr1 and pmdh1pmdh2hpr1 plants is not associated with changes in mitochondrial respiration but with an increase in the non-respiratory CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation reaction.

  3. Mitochondrial fumarate reductase as a target of chemotherapy: from parasites to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Chika; Tomitsuka, Eriko; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Recent research on respiratory chain of the parasitic helminth, Ascaris suum has shown that the mitochondrial NADH-fumarate reductase system (fumarate respiration), which is composed of complex I (NADH-rhodoquinone reductase), rhodoquinone and complex II (rhodoquinol-fumarate reductase) plays an important role in the anaerobic energy metabolism of adult parasites inhabiting hosts. The enzymes in these parasite-specific pathways are potential target for chemotherapy. We isolated a novel compound, nafuredin, from Aspergillus niger, which inhibits NADH-fumarate reductase in helminth mitochondria at nM order. It competes for the quinone-binding site in complex I and shows high selective toxicity to the helminth enzyme. Moreover, nafuredin exerts anthelmintic activity against Haemonchus contortus in in vivo trials with sheep indicating that mitochondrial complex I is a promising target for chemotherapy. In addition to complex I, complex II is a good target because its catalytic direction is reverse of succinate-ubiquionone reductase in the host complex II. Furthermore, we found atpenin and flutolanil strongly and specifically inhibit mitochondrial complex II. Interestingly, fumarate respiration was found not only in the parasites but also in some types of human cancer cells. Analysis of the mitochondria from the cancer cells identified an anthelminthic as a specific inhibitor of the fumarate respiration. Role of isoforms of human complex II in the hypoxic condition of cancer cells and fetal tissues is a challenge. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Mitochondria, Life and Intervention 2010. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Protein method for investigating mercuric reductase gene expression in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunseitan, O A

    1998-02-01

    A colorimetric assay for NADPH-dependent, mercuric ion-specific oxidoreductase activity was developed to facilitate the investigation of mercuric reductase gene expression in polluted aquatic ecosystems. Protein molecules extracted directly from unseeded freshwater and samples seeded with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PU21 (Rip64) were quantitatively assayed for mercuric reductase activity in microtiter plates by stoichiometric coupling of mercuric ion reduction to a colorimetric redox chain through NADPH oxidation. Residual NADPH was determined by titration with phenazine methosulfate-catalyzed reduction of methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium to produce visible formazan. Spectrophotometric determination of formazan concentration showed a positive correlation with the amount of NADPH remaining in the reaction mixture (r2 = 0.99). Mercuric reductase activity in the protein extracts was inversely related to the amount of NADPH remaining and to the amount of formazan produced. A qualitative nitrocellulose membrane-based version of the method was also developed, where regions of mercuric reductase activity remained colorless against a stained-membrane background. The assay detected induced mercuric reductase activity from 10(2) CFU, and up to threefold signal intensity was detected in seeded freshwater samples amended with mercury compared to that in mercury-free samples. The efficiency of extraction of bacterial proteins from the freshwater samples was (97 +/- 2)% over the range of population densities investigated (10(2) to 10(8) CFU/ml). The method was validated by detection of enzyme activity in protein extracts of water samples from a polluted site harboring naturally occurring mercury-resistant bacteria. The new method is proposed as a supplement to the repertoire of molecular techniques available for assessing specific gene expression in heterogeneous microbial communities impacted by mercury pollution.

  5. Isolation and characterization of cloned cDNAs as encoding human liver chlordecone reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, C.J.; Molowa, D.T.; Guzelian, P.S. (Medical College of Virginia, Richmond (USA))

    1990-01-30

    Chlordecone (Kepone), a toxic organochlorine pesticide, undergoes bioreduction to chlorodecone alcohol in human liver. This reaction is controlled by a cytosolic enzyme, chlordecone reductase (CDR), which may be of the aldo-keto reductase family of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. To further investigate the primary structure and expression of CDR, the authors screened a library of human liver cDNAs cloned in the expression vector {lambda}gt11 and isolated an 800 bp cDNA that directed synthesis of a fusion protein recognized by polyclonal anti-CDR antibodies. Using this cDNA as a probe, they screened two human liver cDNA libraries and found several 1.2-kb cDNAs which would code for polypeptide with 308 residues (35.8 kDa). However, a similar full-length cDNA, possibly the transcript of a pseudogene, contained an in-frame nonsense codon. The deduced protein sequence of CDR showed 65% similarity to the primary structure of human liver aldehyde reductase and 66% similarity to the inferred protein sequence of rat lens aldose reductase. A search of GenBank revealed significant nucleotide similarity to a cDNA coding for bovine lung prostaglandin f synthase and to a partial cDNA coding for frog lens {rho}-crystallin. RNA from adult but not fetal human liver, and from the human hepatoma cell-line Hep G2, contained major (1.6 kb) and minor (2.8 kb) species hybridizable to a CDR cDNA. The relative amounts of these RNAs varied markedly among nine subjects. From this initial description of the nucleotide sequence for a human carbonyl reductase, they conclude that CDR and several related enzymes are part of a novel multigene family involved in the metabolism of such xenobiotics as chlordecone and possibly endogenous substrates.

  6. Structural-functional characterization and physiological significance of ferredoxin-NADP reductase from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondo, María Laura; Musumeci, Matías A; Delprato, María Laura; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Orellano, Elena G

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a phytopathogen bacterium that causes severe citrus canker disease. Similar to other phytopathogens, after infection by this bacterium, plants trigger a defense mechanism that produces reactive oxygen species. Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases (FNRs) are redox flavoenzymes that participate in several metabolic functions, including the response to reactive oxygen species. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri has a gene (fpr) that encodes for a FNR (Xac-FNR) that belongs to the subclass I bacterial FNRs. The aim of this work was to search for the physiological role of this enzyme and to characterize its structural and functional properties. The functionality of Xac-FNR was tested by cross-complementation of a FNR knockout Escherichia coli strain, which exhibit high susceptibility to agents that produce an abnormal accumulation of (•)O(2)(-). Xac-FNR was able to substitute for the FNR in E. coli in its antioxidant role. The expression of fpr in X. axonopodis pv. citri was assessed using semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. A 2.2-fold induction was observed in the presence of the superoxide-generating agents methyl viologen and 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. Structural and functional studies showed that Xac-FNR displayed different functional features from other subclass I bacterial FNRs. Our analyses suggest that these differences may be due to the unusual carboxy-terminal region. We propose a further classification of subclass I bacterial FNRs, which is useful to determine the nature of their ferredoxin redox partners. Using sequence analysis, we identified a ferredoxin (XAC1762) as a potential substrate of Xac-FNR. The purified ferredoxin protein displayed the typical broad UV-visible spectrum of [4Fe-4S] clusters and was able to function as substrate of Xac-FNR in the cytochrome c reductase activity. Our results suggest that Xac-FNR is involved in the oxidative stress response of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri and

  7. Structural-functional characterization and physiological significance of ferredoxin-NADP reductase from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

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    María Laura Tondo

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a phytopathogen bacterium that causes severe citrus canker disease. Similar to other phytopathogens, after infection by this bacterium, plants trigger a defense mechanism that produces reactive oxygen species. Ferredoxin-NADP(+ reductases (FNRs are redox flavoenzymes that participate in several metabolic functions, including the response to reactive oxygen species. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri has a gene (fpr that encodes for a FNR (Xac-FNR that belongs to the subclass I bacterial FNRs. The aim of this work was to search for the physiological role of this enzyme and to characterize its structural and functional properties. The functionality of Xac-FNR was tested by cross-complementation of a FNR knockout Escherichia coli strain, which exhibit high susceptibility to agents that produce an abnormal accumulation of (•O(2(-. Xac-FNR was able to substitute for the FNR in E. coli in its antioxidant role. The expression of fpr in X. axonopodis pv. citri was assessed using semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. A 2.2-fold induction was observed in the presence of the superoxide-generating agents methyl viologen and 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. Structural and functional studies showed that Xac-FNR displayed different functional features from other subclass I bacterial FNRs. Our analyses suggest that these differences may be due to the unusual carboxy-terminal region. We propose a further classification of subclass I bacterial FNRs, which is useful to determine the nature of their ferredoxin redox partners. Using sequence analysis, we identified a ferredoxin (XAC1762 as a potential substrate of Xac-FNR. The purified ferredoxin protein displayed the typical broad UV-visible spectrum of [4Fe-4S] clusters and was able to function as substrate of Xac-FNR in the cytochrome c reductase activity. Our results suggest that Xac-FNR is involved in the oxidative stress response of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv

  8. Male Sterile2 Encodes a Plastid-Localized Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Required for Pollen Exine Development in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.; Shanklin, J.; Yu, X.-H.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; De Oliveira, S.; Schreiber, L.; Zhang, D.

    2011-10-01

    Male Sterile2 (MS2) is predicted to encode a fatty acid reductase required for pollen wall development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Transient expression of MS2 in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves resulted in the accumulation of significant levels of C16 and C18 fatty alcohols. Expression of MS2 fused with green fluorescent protein revealed that an amino-terminal transit peptide targets the MS2 to plastids. The plastidial localization of MS2 is biologically important because genetic complementation of MS2 in ms2 homozygous plants was dependent on the presence of its amino-terminal transit peptide or that of the Rubisco small subunit protein amino-terminal transit peptide. In addition, two domains, NAD(P)H-binding domain and sterile domain, conserved in MS2 and its homologs were also shown to be essential for MS2 function in pollen exine development by genetic complementation testing. Direct biochemical analysis revealed that purified recombinant MS2 enzyme is able to convert palmitoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein to the corresponding C16:0 alcohol with NAD(P)H as the preferred electron donor. Using optimized reaction conditions (i.e. at pH 6.0 and 30 C), MS2 exhibits a K{sub m} for 16:0-Acyl Carrier Protein of 23.3 {+-} 4.0 {mu}m, a V{sub max} of 38.3 {+-} 4.5 nmol mg{sup -1} min{sup -1}, and a catalytic efficiency/K{sub m} of 1,873 m{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Based on the high homology of MS2 to other characterized fatty acid reductases, it was surprising that MS2 showed no activity against palmitoyl- or other acyl-coenzyme A; however, this is consistent with its plastidial localization. In summary, genetic and biochemical evidence demonstrate an MS2-mediated conserved plastidial pathway for the production of fatty alcohols that are essential for pollen wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

  9. Purification and characterization of an NADPH-cytochrome P450 (cytochrome c) reductase from spearmint (Mentha spicata) glandular trichomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnamperuma, K; Croteau, R

    1996-05-01

    Solubilized NADPH-cytochrome c (P450) reductase was purified to homogeneity from an extract of spearmint (Mentha spicata) glandular trichomes by dye-ligand interaction chromatography on Matrex-Gel Red A and affinity chromatography on 2', 5'-adenosine diphosphate agarose. SDS-PAGE of the purified enzyme preparation revealed the presence of two similar proteins with masses of 82 kDa (major) and 77 kDa (minor) that crossreacted on immunoblot analysis with polyclonal antibodies directed against NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase from Jerusalem artichoke and from mung bean. Complete immunoinhibition of reductase activity was observed with both types of polyclonal antibodies, while only partial inhibition of activity resulted using a family of monoclonal antibodies directed against the Jerusalem artichoke cytochrome P450 reductase. Inhibition of the spearmint oil gland cytochrome c reductase was also observed with the diphenyliodonium ion. The K(m) values for the cosubstrates NADPH and cytochrome c were 6.2 and 3.7 microM, respectively, and the pH optimum for activity was at 8.5. The NADPH-cytochrome c reductase reconstituted NADPH-dependent (-)-4S-limonene-6-hydroxylase activity in the presence of cytochrome P450, purified from the microsomal fraction of spearmint oil gland cells and dilauroyl phosphatidyl choline. These characteristics establish the identity of the purified enzyme as a NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase.

  10. Tropine forming tropinone reductase gene from Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha: biochemical characteristics of the recombinant enzyme and novel physiological overtones of tissue-wide gene expression patterns.

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    Amit Kumar Kushwaha

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera is one of the most reputed medicinal plants of Indian systems of medicine synthesizing diverse types of secondary metabolites such as withanolides, alkaloids, withanamides etc. Present study comprises cloning and E. coli over-expression of a tropinone reductase gene (WsTR-I from W. somnifera, and elucidation of biochemical characteristics and physiological role of tropinone reductase enzyme in tropane alkaloid biosynthesis in aerial tissues of the plant. The recombinant enzyme was demonstrated to catalyze NADPH-dependent tropinone to tropine conversion step in tropane metabolism, through TLC, GC and GC-MS-MS analyses of the reaction product. The functionally active homodimeric ~60 kDa enzyme catalyzed the reaction in reversible manner at optimum pH 6.7. Catalytic kinetics of the enzyme favoured its forward reaction (tropine formation. Comparative 3-D models of landscape of the enzyme active site contours and tropinone binding site were also developed. Tissue-wide and ontogenic stage-wise assessment of WsTR-I transcript levels revealed constitutive expression of the gene with relatively lower abundance in berries and young leaves. The tissue profiles of WsTR-I expression matched those of tropine levels. The data suggest that, in W. somnifera, aerial tissues as well possess tropane alkaloid biosynthetic competence. In vivo feeding of U-[(14C]-sucrose to orphan shoot (twigs and [(14C]-chasing revealed substantial radiolabel incorporation in tropinone and tropine, confirming the de novo synthesizing ability of the aerial tissues. This inherent independent ability heralds a conceptual novelty in the backdrop of classical view that these tissues acquire the alkaloids through transportation from roots rather than synthesis. The TR-I gene expression was found to be up-regulated on exposure to signal molecules (methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid and on mechanical injury. The enzyme's catalytic and structural properties as well as gene

  11. Evaluation of effect of alcoholic extract of heartwood of Pterocarpus marsupium on in vitro antioxidant, anti-glycation, sorbitol accumulation and inhibition of aldose reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pankaj; Jain, Vivek; Pareek, Ashutosh; Kumari, Preeti; Singh, Randhir; Agarwal, Priyanka; Sharma, Veena

    2017-07-01

    Rising popularity of phytomedicines in various diseased conditions have strengthened the significance of plant-research and evaluation of phytoextracts in clinical manifestations. Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb., a medicinal plant, known for its anti-oxidant and anti-diabetic activity is a rich source of phytochemicals with antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic activities. However, its possible role in diabetic complications is not evaluated yet. The present study explores the possible role of alcoholic extract of heartwood of P. marsupium in the treatment of long-term diabetic complications. The alcoholic extract of P. marsupium was evaluated for advanced glycation-end-products formation, erythrocyte sorbitol accumulation and rat kidney aldose reductase enzyme inhibition at the concentration of 25-400 μg/ml using in-vitro bioassays. Also the phytoextract at the concentration of 10-320 μg/ml was evaluated for its antioxidant potential by in-vitro antioxidant assays which includes, determination of total phenol content; reducing power assay; nitric oxide scavenging activity; superoxide radical scavenging activity; total antioxidant capacity; total flavonoid content; DPPH scavenging activity; and hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity. The alcoholic extract of P. marsupium across varying concentrations showed inhibitory effect as evident by IC50 on advanced glycation-end-products formation (55.39 μg/ml), sorbitol accumulation (151.00 μg/ml) and rat kidney aldose reductase (195.88 μg/ml). The phytoextract also exhibited high phenolic and flavonoid contents with promising antioxidant potential against the antioxidant assays evaluated. The present investigation suggests that the phytoextract showed prominent antioxidant, antiglycation property and, inhibited accumulation of sorbitol and ALR enzyme, thus promising a beneficial role in reducing/delaying diabetic complications.

  12. NDH-1 and NDH-2 Plastoquinone Reductases in Oxygenic Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Gilles; Aro, Eva-Mari; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2016-04-29

    Oxygenic photosynthesis converts solar energy into chemical energy in the chloroplasts of plants and microalgae as well as in prokaryotic cyanobacteria using a complex machinery composed of two photosystems and both membrane-bound and soluble electron carriers. In addition to the major photosynthetic complexes photosystem II (PSII), cytochrome b6f, and photosystem I (PSI), chloroplasts also contain minor components, including a well-conserved type I NADH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complex that functions in close relationship with photosynthesis and likewise originated from the endosymbiotic cyanobacterial ancestor. Some plants and many microalgal species have lost plastidial ndh genes and a functional NDH-1 complex during evolution, and studies have suggested that a plastidial type II NADH dehydrogenase (NDH-2) complex substitutes for the electron transport activity of NDH-1. However, although NDH-1 was initially thought to use NAD(P)H as an electron donor, recent research has demonstrated that both chloroplast and cyanobacterial NDH-1s oxidize reduced ferredoxin. We discuss more recent findings related to the biochemical composition and activity of NDH-1 and NDH-2 in relation to the physiology and regulation of photosynthesis, particularly focusing on their roles in cyclic electron flow around PSI, chlororespiration, and acclimation to changing environments.

  13. Studies of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase and implications for the development of antiparasitic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muench, Stephen P. [The Krebs Institute for Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Prigge, Sean T. [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); McLeod, Rima [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Pathology and the Committees on Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Immunology and The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Rafferty, John B. [The Krebs Institute for Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Kirisits, Michael J. [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Pathology and the Committees on Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Immunology and The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Roberts, Craig W. [Department of Immunology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NR, Scotland (United Kingdom); Mui, Ernest J. [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Pathology and the Committees on Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Immunology and The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Rice, David W., E-mail: d.rice@sheffield.ac.uk [The Krebs Institute for Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-01

    The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. Recent studies have demonstrated that submicromolar concentrations of the biocide triclosan arrest the growth of the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii and inhibit the activity of the apicomplexan enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR). The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures of T. gondii ENR have revealed that, as in its bacterial and plant homologues, a loop region which flanks the active site becomes ordered upon inhibitor binding, resulting in the slow tight binding of triclosan. In addition, the T. gondii ENR–triclosan complex reveals the folding of a hydrophilic insert common to the apicomplexan family that flanks the substrate-binding domain and is disordered in all other reported apicomplexan ENR structures. Structural comparison of the apicomplexan ENR structures with their bacterial and plant counterparts has revealed that although the active sites of the parasite enzymes are broadly similar to those of their bacterial counterparts, there are a number of important differences within the drug-binding pocket that reduce the packing interactions formed with several inhibitors in the apicomplexan ENR enzymes. Together with other significant structural differences, this provides a possible explanation of the lower affinity of the parasite ENR enzyme family for aminopyridine-based inhibitors, suggesting that an effective antiparasitic agent may well be distinct from equivalent antimicrobials.

  14. ROS-mediated inhibition of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase contributes to the activation of anti-oxidative mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabella Kovacs

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO has emerged as a signaling molecule in plants being involved in diverse physiological processes like germination, root growth, stomata closing and response to biotic and abiotic stress. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO as a biological NO donor has a very important function in NO signaling since it can transfer its NO moiety to other proteins (trans-nitrosylation. Such trans-nitrosylation reactions are equilibrium reactions and depend on GSNO level. The breakdown of GSNO and thus the level of S-nitrosylated proteins are regulated by GSNO-reductase (GSNOR. In this way, this enzyme controls S-nitrosothiol levels and regulates NO signaling. Here we report that Arabidopsis thaliana GSNOR activity is reversibly inhibited by H2O2 in-vitro and by paraquat-induced oxidative stress in-vivo. Light scattering analyses of reduced and oxidized recombinant GSNOR demonstrated that GSNOR proteins form dimers under both reducing and oxidizing conditions. Moreover, mass spectrometric analyses revealed that H2O2-treatment increased the amount of oxidative modifications on Zn2+-coordinating Cys47 and Cys177. Inhibition of GSNOR results in enhanced levels of S-nitrosothiols followed by accumulation of glutathione. Moreover, transcript levels of redox-regulated genes and activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes are increased in gsnor-ko plants, which may contribute to the enhanced resistance against oxidative stress. In sum, our results demonstrate that ROS-dependent inhibition of GSNOR is playing an important role in activation of anti-oxidative mechanisms to damping oxidative damage and imply a direct crosstalk between ROS- and NO-signaling.

  15. A single tyrosine hydroxyl group almost entirely controls the NADPH specificity of Plasmodium falciparum ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Sara; Pandini, Vittorio; Vanoni, Maria Antonietta; Aliverti, Alessandro

    2012-05-08

    Plasmodium falciparum ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) is a FAD-containing enzyme that, in addition to be a promising target of novel antimalarial drugs, represents an excellent model of plant-type FNRs. The cofactor specificity of FNRs depends on differences in both k(cat) and K(m) values for NADPH and NADH. Here, we report that deletion of the hydroxyl group of the conserved Y258 of P. falciparum FNR, which interacts with the 2'-phosphate group of NADPH, selectively decreased the k(cat) of the NADPH-dependent reaction by a factor of 2 to match that of the NADH-dependent one. Rapid-reaction kinetics, active-site titrations with NADP(+), and anaerobic photoreduction experiments indicated that this effect may be the consequence of destabilization of the catalytically competent conformation of bound NADPH. Moreover, because the Y258F replacement increased the K(m) for NADPH 4-fold and decreased that for NADH 3-fold, it led to a drop in the ability of the enzyme to discriminate between the coenzymes from 70- to just 1.5-fold. The impact of the Y258F change was not affected by the presence of the H286Q mutation, which is known to enhance the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Our data highlight the major role played by the Y258 hydroxyl group in determining the coenzyme specificity of P. falciparum FNR. From the general standpoint of engineering the kinetic properties of plant-type FNRs, although P. falciparum FNR is less strictly NADPH-dependent than its homologues, the almost complete abolishment of coenzyme selectivity reported here has never been accomplished before through a single mutation.

  16. Ultraviolet-B-induced flavonoid accumulation in Betula pendula leaves is dependent upon nitrate reductase-mediated nitric oxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Dong, Ju-Fang; Jin, Hai-Hong; Sun, Li-Na; Xu, Mao-Jun

    2011-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule involved in many physiological processes in plants. Nitric oxide generation and flavonoid accumulation are two early reactions of plants to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation. However, the source of UV-B-triggered NO generation and the role of NO in UV-B-induced flavonoid accumulation are not fully understood. In order to evaluate the origin of UV-B-triggered NO generation, we examined the responses of nitrate reductase (NR) activity and the expression levels of NIA1 and NIA2 genes in leaves of Betula pendula Roth (silver birch) seedlings to UV-B irradiation. The data show that UV-B irradiation stimulates NR activity and induces up-regulation of NIA1 but does not affect NIA2 expression during UV-B-triggered NO generation. Pretreatment of the leaves with NR inhibitors tungstate (TUN) and glutamine (Gln) abolishes not only UV-B-triggered NR activities but also UV-B-induced NO generation. Furthermore, application of TUN and Gln suppresses UV-B-induced flavonoid production in the leaves and the suppression of NR inhibitors on UV-B-induced flavonoid production can be reversed by NO via its donor sodium nitroprusside. Together, the data indicate that NIA1 in the leaves of silver birch seedlings is sensitive to UV-B and the UV-B-induced up-regulation of NIA1 may lead to enhancement of NR activity. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that NR is involved in UV-B-triggered NO generation and NR-mediated NO generation is essential for UV-B-induced flavonoid accumulation in silver birch leaves.

  17. The isolation and characterization of β-glucogallin as a novel aldose reductase inhibitor from Emblica officinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthenna Puppala

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is recognized as a leading cause of new cases of blindness. The prevalence of diabetic eye disease is expected to continue to increase worldwide as a result of the dramatic increase in the number of people with diabetes. At present, there is no medical treatment to delay or prevent the onset and progression of cataract or retinopathy, the most common causes of vision loss in diabetics. The plant Emblica officinalis (gooseberry has been used for thousands of years as a traditional Indian Ayurvedic preparation for the treatment of diabetes in humans. Extracts from this plant have been shown to be efficacious against the progression of cataract in a diabetic rat model. Aldose reductase (ALR2 is implicated in the development of secondary complications of diabetes including cataract and, therefore, has been a major drug target for the development of therapies to treat diabetic disease. Herein, we present the bioassay-guided isolation and structure elucidation of 1-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (β-glucogallin, a major component from the fruit of the gooseberry that displays selective as well as relatively potent inhibition (IC(50 = 17 µM of AKR1B1 in vitro. Molecular modeling demonstrates that this inhibitor is able to favorably bind in the active site. Further, we show that β-glucogallin effectively inhibits sorbitol accumulation by 73% at 30 µM under hyperglycemic conditions in an ex-vivo organ culture model of lenses excised from transgenic mice overexpressing human ALR2 in the lens. This study supports the continued development of natural products such as β-glucogallin as therapeutic leads in the development of novel therapies to treat diabetic complications such as cataract.

  18. Engineering a catabolic pathway in plants for the degradation of 1,2-dichloroethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Benitez, Gilda L; Gandia-Herrero, Fernando; Graham, Stuart; Larson, Tony R; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; French, Christopher E; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Bruce, Neil C

    2008-07-01

    Plants are increasingly being employed to clean up environmental pollutants such as heavy metals; however, a major limitation of phytoremediation is the inability of plants to mineralize most organic pollutants. A key component of organic pollutants is halogenated aliphatic compounds that include 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA). Although plants lack the enzymatic activity required to metabolize this compound, two bacterial enzymes, haloalkane dehalogenase (DhlA) and haloacid dehalogenase (DhlB) from the bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10, have the ability to dehalogenate a range of halogenated aliphatics, including 1,2-DCA. We have engineered the dhlA and dhlB genes into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'Xanthi') plants and used 1,2-DCA as a model substrate to demonstrate the ability of the transgenic tobacco to remediate a range of halogenated, aliphatic hydrocarbons. DhlA converts 1,2-DCA to 2-chloroethanol, which is then metabolized to the phytotoxic 2-chloroacetaldehyde, then chloroacetic acid, by endogenous plant alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities, respectively. Chloroacetic acid is dehalogenated by DhlB to produce the glyoxylate cycle intermediate glycolate. Plants expressing only DhlA produced phytotoxic levels of chlorinated intermediates and died, while plants expressing DhlA together with DhlB thrived at levels of 1,2-DCA that were toxic to DhlA-expressing plants. This represents a significant advance in the development of a low-cost phytoremediation approach toward the clean-up of halogenated organic pollutants from contaminated soil and groundwater.

  19. The plant short-chain dehydrogenase (SDR) superfamily: genome-wide inventory and diversification patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moummou, Hanane; Kallberg, Yvonne; Tonfack, Libert Brice; Persson, Bengt; van der Rest, Benoît

    2012-11-20

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) form one of the largest and oldest NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductase families. Despite a conserved 'Rossmann-fold' structure, members of the SDR superfamily exhibit low sequence similarities, which constituted a bottleneck in terms of identification. Recent classification methods, relying on hidden-Markov models (HMMs), improved identification and enabled the construction of a nomenclature. However, functional annotations of plant SDRs remain scarce. Wide-scale analyses were performed on ten plant genomes. The combination of hidden Markov model (HMM) based analyses and similarity searches led to the construction of an exhaustive inventory of plant SDR. With 68 to 315 members found in each analysed genome, the inventory confirmed the over-representation of SDRs in plants compared to animals, fungi and prokaryotes. The plant SDRs were first classified into three major types - 'classical', 'extended' and 'divergent' - but a minority (10% of the predicted SDRs) could not be classified into these general types ('unknown' or 'atypical' types). In a second step, we could categorize the vast majority of land plant SDRs into a set of 49 families. Out of these 49 families, 35 appeared early during evolution since they are commonly found through all the Green Lineage. Yet, some SDR families - tropinone reductase-like proteins (SDR65C), 'ABA2-like'-NAD dehydrogenase (SDR110C), 'salutaridine/menthone-reductase-like' proteins (SDR114C), 'dihydroflavonol 4-reductase'-like proteins (SDR108E) and 'isoflavone-reductase-like' (SDR460A) proteins - have undergone significant functional diversification within vascular plants since they diverged from Bryophytes. Interestingly, these diversified families are either involved in the secondary metabolism routes (terpenoids, alkaloids, phenolics) or participate in developmental processes (hormone biosynthesis or catabolism, flower development), in opposition to SDR families involved in primary

  20. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard B.; Balish, Rebecca S.; Tehryung, Kim; McKinney, Elizabeth C.

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  1. Volatile compounds of healthy and insect-damaged Hippophae rhamnoides sinensis in natural and planted forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Shixiang; Luo, Youqing; Zhou, Jiao; Liu, Shujing

    2012-01-01

    Volatile compounds of healthy and insect-damaged stems of Hippophae rhamnoides sinensis were analysed using dynamic headspace and thermal-desorption cold-trap injector gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (TCT-GC/MS). Sixteen compounds, belonging to alkanes, alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ketones, and ethers, were identified in the stems of healthy H. rhamnoides sinensis; the compounds in H. rhamnoides sinensis occurring naturally or cultivated in plantations were similar, but the relative contents were significantly different. In plants damaged by Holcocerus hippophaecolus, the nature and content of the volatile compounds were greatly changed. Butanedione and butyl glyoxylate were newly generated after damage by the pest, and the relative levels of pentanal, heptanal, eucalyptol, terpineol, and camphor were sharply increased in both naturally occurring and plantation-grown plants. n-Decane, trans-2-nonen-1-ol, and n-hexadecane levels increased in plants cultivated in the plantation and decreased in natural forests, whereas the levels of other types were reduced. Thus, both the nature and the content of volatile compounds of H. rhamnoides sinensis are affected by H. hippophaecolus damage, providing a theoretical basis to identify the mechanism of pest destruction.

  2. Molecular cloning and characterization of a birch pollen minor allergen, Bet v 5, belonging to a family of isoflavone reductase-related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamloo, F; Schmitz, N; Scheurer, S; Foetisch, K; Hoffmann, A; Haustein, D; Vieths, S

    1999-11-01

    Birch pollen is a major cause of pollinosis and is responsible for cross-reactive oral allergies to fruits, nuts, and vegetables. The major allergen, Bet v 1, has been extensively characterized, and 3 minor allergens, Bet v 2, Bet v 3, and Bet v 4, have been cloned and sequenced. Recently, another birch pollen protein with an apparent mass of 35 kd was described as a new IgE-binding protein in birch pollen with cross-reacting homologues in plant foods. The aim of this study was to determine the primary structure of the 35-kd birch pollen allergen and to investigate its immunologic properties. On the basis of a known complementary DNA fragment, a PCR strategy was applied to obtain the full-length nucleotide sequence of the coding region. The protein was expressed as His-Tag fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified by Ni-chelate affinity chromatography. Nonfusion protein was obtained by cyanogen bromide treatment of the fusion protein. IgE-binding characteristics and potential allergenicity were investigated by immunoblot, immunoblot inhibition analysis, rat basophil leukemia-cell mediator release assay, and basophil histamine release and compared with those of natural (n) Bet v 5, recombinant (r)Bet v 1, and rBet v 2. Recombinant Bet v 5 has a mass of 33 kd, an isoelectric point of 9.0, and sequence identity of 60% to 80% to isoflavone reductase homologue proteins from various plants. On immunoblots the recombinant Bet v 5 bound IgE from 9 (32%) of 28 sera from patients allergic to birch pollen with a CAP class of at least 3; Bet v 1 was detected by 89% of these patients. IgE immunoblot and inhibition experiments showed that nBet v 5 and rBet v 5 shared identical epitopes. A rabbit antiserum raised against pea isoflavone reductase and patients' IgE reacted with Bet v 5 and proteins of similar size in several vegetable foods, including exotic fruits. A similar reaction pattern was obtained with 2 Bet v 5-specific mAbs. Furthermore, Bet v 5 triggered a dose

  3. Functional characterization of Dihydroflavonol-4-reductase in anthocyanin biosynthesis of purple sweet potato underlies the direct evidence of anthocyanins function against abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxia; Fan, Weijuan; Li, Hong; Yang, Jun; Huang, Jirong; Zhang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) is a key enzyme in the catalysis of the stereospecific reduction of dihydroflavonols to leucoanthocyanidins in anthocyanin biosynthesis. In the purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) cv. Ayamurasaki, expression of the IbDFR gene was strongly associated with anthocyanin accumulation in leaves, stems and roots. Overexpression of the IbDFR in Arabidopsis tt3 mutants fully complemented the pigmentation phenotype of the seed coat, cotyledon and hypocotyl. Downregulation of IbDFR expression in transgenic sweet potato (DFRi) using an RNAi approach dramatically reduced anthocyanin accumulation in young leaves, stems and storage roots. In contrast, the increase of flavonols quercetin-3-O-hexose-hexoside and quercetin-3-O-glucoside in the leaves and roots of DFRi plants is significant. Therefore, the metabolic pathway channeled greater flavonol influx in the DFRi plants when their anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin accumulation were decreased. These plants also displayed reduced antioxidant capacity compared to the wild type. After 24 h of cold treatment and 2 h recovery, the wild-type plants were almost fully restored to the initial phenotype compared to the slower recovery of DFRi plants, in which the levels of electrolyte leakage and hydrogen peroxide accumulation were dramatically increased. These results provide direct evidence of anthocyanins function in the protection against oxidative stress in the sweet potato. The molecular characterization of the IbDFR gene in the sweet potato not only confirms its important roles in flavonoid metabolism but also supports the protective function of anthocyanins of enhanced scavenging of reactive oxygen radicals in plants under stressful conditions.

  4. Fingerprinting antioxidative activities in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Livia; Plieth, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Background A plethora of concurrent cellular activities is mobilised in the adaptation of plants to adverse environmental conditions. This response can be quantified by physiological experiments or metabolic profiling. The intention of this work is to reduce the number of metabolic processes studied to a minimum of relevant parameters with a maximum yield of information. Therefore, we inspected 'summary parameters' characteristic for whole classes of antioxidative metabolites and key enzymes. Results Three bioluminescence assays are presented. A horseradish peroxidase-based total antioxidative capacity (TAC) assay is used to probe low molecular weight antioxidants. Peroxidases are quantified by their luminol converting activity (LUPO). Finally, we quantify high molecular weight superoxide anion scavenging activity (SOSA) using coelenterazine. Experiments with Lepidium sativum L. show how salt, drought, cold, and heat influence the antioxidative system represented here by TAC, LUPO, SOSA, catalase, and glutathione reductase (GR). LUPO and SOSA run anti-parallel under all investigated stress conditions suggesting shifts in antioxidative functions rather than formation of antioxidative power. TAC runs in parallel with GR. This indicates that a majority of low molecular weight antioxidants in plants is represented by glutathione. Conclusion The set of assays presented here is capable of characterising antioxidative activities in plants. It is inexpensive, quick and reproducible and delivers quantitative data. 'Summary parameters' like TAC, LUPO, and SOSA are quantitative traits which may be promising for implementation in high-throughput screening for robustness of novel mutants, transgenics, or breeds. PMID:19171044

  5. Nitrogen nutrition of Canna indica: Effects of ammonium versus nitrate on growth, biomass allocation, photosynthesis, nitrate reductase activity and N uptake rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Dennis; Brix, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The effects of inorganic nitrogen (N) source (NH4+, NO3- or both) on growth, biomass allocation, photosynthesis, N uptake rate, nitrate reductase activity and mineral composition of Canna indica were studied in hydroponic culture. The relative growth rates (0.05-0.06 g g-1 d-1), biomass allocatio...... as well as on terrestrial soils. Furthermore, it is concluded that C. indica is suitable for use in different types of constructed wetlands....... and plant morphology of C. indica were indifferent to N nutrition. However, NH4+ fed plants had higher concentrations of N in the tissues, lower concentrations of mineral cations and higher contents of chlorophylls in the leaves compared to NO3- fed plants suggesting a slight advantage of NH4+ nutrition...... had intermediate NRA suggesting that C. indica takes up and assimilate NO3- in the presence of NH4+. Our results show that C. indica is relatively indifferent to inorganic N source, which together with its high growth rate contributes to explain the occurrence of this species in flooded wetland soils...

  6. Inhibitory Activities of Phenolic Compounds Isolated from Adina rubella Leaves Against 5α-Reductase Associated with Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yin, Jun; Heo, Jun Hyeok; Hwang, Yoon Jeong; Le, Thi Tam; Lee, Min Won

    2016-01-01

    .... The current study evaluated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities and 5α-reductase inhibition of isolated compounds of AR leaves to find a potential therapeutic agent for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH...

  7. Inhibitory Activities of Phenolic Compounds Isolated from Adina rubella Leaves Against 5[alpha]-Reductase Associated with Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jun Yin; Jun Hyeok Heo; Yoon Jeong Hwang; Thi Tam Le; Min Won Lee

    2016-01-01

    .... The current study evaluated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities and 5[alpha]-reductase inhibition of isolated compounds of AR leaves to find a potential therapeutic agent for benign prostatic hypertrophy...

  8. Plant breeding by using radiation mutation - Development of radiation indicator plants by molecular breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jang Ryol; Kwak, Sang Soo; Kwon, Seok Yoon [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    - tSOD1, cytosolic CuZnSOD cDNA was cloned from tobacco cDNA library by PCR. To develop the under-producing the transgenic plants, the vectors were constructed using by antisense and co-supressing technology. The transgenic tobacco plants were confirmed that over 60% of kanamycin-resistant plants were introduced the foreign gene by PCR and transformed one copy through Southern blot analysis. - In an attempt to identify marker genes for gamma irradiation of plants, expression patterns of diverse genes upon gamma irradiation of young tobacco plants were investigated. With the knowledge of distinctive expression patterns of diverse genes, irradiation-indicating marker plants could be developed by engineering and monitoring multiple radiation-responsive genes. Additionally, a gamma irradiation-responsive NtTMK1 receptor-like kinase gene was molecular biologically characterized. -Uranium reductase gene (Cytochrome C3) and radiation resistance gene (recA) have been cloned from Desulfovibrio and Deinococcus radiodurans. -Two plant transformation vectors (pCYC3 and pDrecA) have been constructed. - Tobacco transgenic plants of have been obtained. 52 refs., 5 figs. (Author)

  9. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) by withanolides isolated from Physalis pubescens L. (Solanaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Long; Yuan, Yonglei; Ma, Zhongjun; Chen, Zhe; Gan, Lishe; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Huang, Dongsheng

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, it was demonstrated that the dichloromethane extract of Physalis pubescens L. (DEPP) had weak potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity, but an UPLC-ESI-MS method with glutathione (GSH) as the substrate revealed that the DEPP had electrophiles (with an α,β-unsaturated ketone moiety). These electrophiles could induce quinone reductase (QR) activity, which might be attributed to the modification of the highly reactive cysteine residues in Keap1. Herein, four withanolides, including three new compounds physapubescin B (2), physapubescin C (3), physapubescin D (4), together with one known steroidal compound physapubescin (1) were isolated. Structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic analysis and that of physapubescin C (3) was confirmed by a combination of molecular modeling and quantum chemical DFT-GIAO calculations. Evaluation of the QR inducing activities of all withanolides indicated potent activities of compounds 1 and 2, which had a common α,β-unsaturated ketone moiety.

  10. Positive pleiotropic effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor on vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jobin Jean

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins are commonly used in medicine to control blood lipid disorder. Large clinical trials have demonstrated that statins greatly reduces cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in patients with and without coronary artery disease. Also, the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors has been reported to have immunosuppressive effects. Case presentation We describe an unusual case of regression of vitiligo in a patient treated with high dose simvastatin. The relation between simvastatin and regression of vitiligo in this case report may be related to the autoimmune pathophysiology of the disease. Conclusion This unexpected beneficial impact provides another scientific credence to the hypothesis that immune mechanisms play a role in the development of vitiligo and that the use of statins as immuno-modulator could be of use not only for treatment relative to organ transplant but in other pathologies such as vitiligo.

  11. Synthesis of 3-[(N-Carboalkoxy)ethylamino]-indazole-dione Derivatives and Their Biological Activities on Human Liver Carbonyl Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Berhe, Solomon; Slupe, Andrew; Luster, Choice; Charlier, Henry A.; Warner, Don L.; Zalkow, Leon H.; Burgess, Edward M.; Enwerem, Nkechi M.; Bakare, Oladapo

    2009-01-01

    A series of indazole-dione derivatives were synthesized by the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of appropriate substituted benzoquinones or naphthoquinones and N-carboalkoxyamino diazopropane derivatives. These compounds were evaluated for their effects on human carbonyl reductase. Several of the analogs were found to serve as substrates for carbonyl reductase with a wide range of catalytic efficiencies, while four analogs display inhibitory activities with IC50 values ranging from 3 – 5 μM...

  12. High dose androgen therapy in male pseudohermaphroditism due to 5 alpha-reductase deficiency and disorders of the androgen receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Price, P; Wass, J. A.; Griffin, J E; Leshin, M; Savage, M O; Large, D. M.; Bu'Lock, D E; Anderson, D. C.; Wilson, J. D.; Besser, G M

    1984-01-01

    We describe the clinical and biochemical features of six men with male pseudohermaphroditism due to androgen resistance. Each of the subjects had male-gender behavior but incomplete virilization. The underlying defects in androgen metabolism were defined by studies of the 5 alpha-reductase enzyme and the androgen receptor in fibroblasts cultured from biopsies of genital skin. Four of the six have 5 alpha-reductase deficiency, and two have defects of the androgen receptor (the Reifenstein synd...

  13. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (mera) as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Martins, Adriana; de Jesus, Michele Silva; Lacerda, Michele; Moreira, Josino Costa; Filgueiras, Ana Luzia Lauria; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens Guimarães

    2008-01-01

    The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA) activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA) gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains. PMID:24031221

  14. Aldose reductases influence prostaglandin F2α levels and adipocyte differentiation in male mouse and human species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Loubeau, Gaëlle; Dani, Christian; Slim, Karem; Martin, Gwenaëlle; Volat, Fanny; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie

    2015-05-01

    Aldose reductases (AKR1B) are widely expressed oxidoreductases whose physiological function remains elusive. Some isoforms are genuine prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) synthases, suggesting they might influence adipose homeostasis because PGF2α inhibits adipogenesis. This was shown by Akr1b7 gene ablation in the mouse, which resulted in increased adiposity related to a lower PGF2α content in fat. Yet humans have no ortholog gene for Akr1b7, so the role of aldose reductases in human adipose homeostasis remains to be explored. We analyzed expression of genes encoding human and mouse aldose reductase isoforms in adipose tissues and differentiating adipocytes to assess conserved mechanisms regulating PGF2α synthesis and adipogenesis. The Akr1b3 gene encoded the most abundant isoform in mouse adipose tissue, whereas Akr1b7 encoded the only isoform enriched in the stromal vascular fraction. Most mouse aldose reductase gene expression peaked in early adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells and diminished with differentiation. In contrast with its mouse ortholog Akr1b3, AKR1B1 expression increased throughout differentiation of human multipotent adipose-derived stem cells, paralleling PGF2α release, whereas PGF2α receptor (FP) levels collapsed in early differentiation. Pharmacological inhibition of aldose reductase using Statil altered PGF2α production and enhanced human multipotent adipose-derived stem adipocyte differentiation. As expected, the adipogenic effects of Statil were counteracted by an FP agonist (cloprostenol). Thus, in both species aldose reductase-dependent PGF2α production could be important in early differentiation to restrict adipogenesis. PGF2α antiadipogenic signaling could then be toned down through the FP receptor or aldose reductases down-regulation in human and mouse cells, respectively. Our data suggest that aldose reductase inhibitors could have obesogenic potential.

  15. Substrate Specificity, Inhibitor Selectivity and Structure-Function Relationships of Aldo-Keto Reductase 1B15: A Novel Human Retinaldehyde Reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Giménez-Dejoz

    Full Text Available Human aldo-keto reductase 1B15 (AKR1B15 is a newly discovered enzyme which shares 92% amino acid sequence identity with AKR1B10. While AKR1B10 is a well characterized enzyme with high retinaldehyde reductase activity, involved in the development of several cancer types, the enzymatic activity and physiological role of AKR1B15 are still poorly known. Here, the purified recombinant enzyme has been subjected to substrate specificity characterization, kinetic analysis and inhibitor screening, combined with structural modeling. AKR1B15 is active towards a variety of carbonyl substrates, including retinoids, with lower kcat and Km values than AKR1B10. In contrast to AKR1B10, which strongly prefers all-trans-retinaldehyde, AKR1B15 exhibits superior catalytic efficiency with 9-cis-retinaldehyde, the best substrate found for this enzyme. With ketone and dicarbonyl substrates, AKR1B15 also shows higher catalytic activity than AKR1B10. Several typical AKR inhibitors do not significantly affect AKR1B15 activity. Amino acid substitutions clustered in loops A and C result in a smaller, more hydrophobic and more rigid active site in AKR1B15 compared with the AKR1B10 pocket, consistent with distinct substrate specificity and narrower inhibitor selectivity for AKR1B15.

  16. Separation and distribution of thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme, tetrathionate reductase, and thiosulfate reductase in extracts of marine heterotroph strain 16B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, G M; Tuttle, J H

    1983-11-01

    Thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme (TSO), tetrathionate reductase (TTR), and thiosulfate reductase (TSR) were demonstrated in cell-free extracts of the marine heterotrophic thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium strain 16B. Extracts prepared from cells cultured aerobically in the absence of thiosulfate or tetrathionate exhibited constitutive TSO and TTR activity which resided in the soluble fraction of ultracentrifuged crude extracts. Constitutive TSO and TTR cochromatographed on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, Cellex D, Sephadex G-150, and orange A dye-ligand affinity gels. Extracts prepared from cells cultured anaerobically with tetrathionate or aerobically with thiosulfate followed by oxygen deprivation showed an 11- to 30-fold increase in TTR activity, with no increase in TSO activity. The inducible TTR resided in both the ultracentrifuge pellet and supernatant fractions and was readily separated from constitutive TSO and TTR in the latter by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography. Inducible TTR exhibited TSR activity, which was also located in both membrane and soluble extract fractions and which cochromatographed with inducible TTR. The results indicate that constitutive TSO and TTR in marine heterotroph 16B represent reverse activities of the same enzyme whose major physiological function is thiosulfate oxidation. Evidence is also presented which suggests a possible association of inducible TTR and TSR in strain 16B.

  17. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  18. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montalvetti, A; Pena Diaz, Javier; Hurtado, R

    2000-01-01

    understanding of the role of this enzyme in trypanosomatids, the effect of possible regulators of isoprenoid biosynthesis in cultured promastigote cells was studied. Neither mevalonic acid nor serum sterols appear to modulate enzyme activity whereas incubation with lovastatin results in significant increases...... Leishmania lacks the membrane domain characteristic of eukaryotic cells but exhibits sequence similarity with eukaryotic reductases. Highly purified protein was achieved by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on hydroxyapatite. Kinetic parameters were determined for the protozoan...

  19. Herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase null mutants induce lesions in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, S R; Kik, N A; Birch, G M; Chiego, D J; Shipman, C

    1989-12-01

    Two herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase null mutants, hrR3 and ICP6 delta, produced cutaneous lesions in guinea pigs as severe as those of wild-type strains. The lesions induced by hrR3 resulted from in vivo replication of the mutant virus, suggesting that this virus-encoded enzyme is nonessential for virus replication in guinea pigs.

  20. Molecular modeling toward selective inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase from the biological warfare agent Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoppo, Juliana O S; Mancini, Daiana T; Guimarães, Ana P; Gonçalves, Arlan S; da Cunha, Elaine F F; França, Tanos C C; Ramalho, Teodorico C

    2015-02-16

    In the present work, we applied docking and molecular dynamics techniques to study 11 compounds inside the enzymes dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from the biological warfare agent Bacillus anthracis (BaDHFR) and Homo sapiens sapiens (HssDHFR). Six of these compounds were selected for a study with the mutant BaF96IDHFR. Our results corroborated with experimental data and allowed the proposition of a new molecule with potential activity and better selectivity for BaDHFR.

  1. Aminoglycoside-Resistant Mutation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Defective in Cytochrome c552 and Nitrate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, L E; Nicas, Thalia; Holloway, B W; Crowther, Carol

    1980-01-01

    A gentamicin-resistant mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO503 was selected after ethyl methane sulfonate mutagenesis. The strain, P. aeruginosa PAO2401 had increased resistance to all aminoglycosides tested but exhibited no change for other antibiotics. The mutation designated aglA (aminoglycoside resistance) was 50% cotransducible with the 8-min ilvB,C marker on the P. aeruginosa chromosome. It showed a marked reduction in cytochrome c552 and nitrate reductase (Nar) and a change in terminal...

  2. Purification of the Cytochrome c Reductase/Cytochrome c Oxidase Super Complex of Yeast Mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Hans-Peter; Sunderhaus, Stephanie; Boekema, Egbert J.; Kouřil, Roman

    2009-01-01

    The protein complexes of the respiratory chain interact by forming large protein particles called respiratory supercomplexes or ‘‘respirasomes’’. Biochemical characterization of these particles proved to be difficult because of their instability. Here we describe a strategy to isolate and characterize the cytochrome c reductase/cytochrome c oxidase supercomplex of yeast, also termed the III + IV supercomplex, which is based on lactate cultivation of yeast, gentle isolation of mitochondria, me...

  3. How native-state topology affects the folding of dihydrofolate reductase and interleukin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Cecilia; Jennings, Patricia A.; Onuchic, José N.

    2000-05-01

    The overall structure of the transition-state and intermediate ensembles observed experimentally for dihydrofolate reductase and interleukin-1 can be obtained by using simplified models that have almost no energetic frustration. The predictive power of these models suggests that, even for these very large proteins with completely different folding mechanisms and functions, real protein sequences are sufficiently well designed, and much of the structural heterogeneity observed in the intermediates and the transition-state ensembles is determined by topological effects.

  4. Identification of ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase hinge (UQCRH) as a potential diagnostic biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Feng; Liu, Qicai; Li, Guoping; Dong, Feng; Qiu, Minglian; Lv, Xiaoting; Zhang, Sheng; Guo, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase hinge (UQCRH) is a novel protein that localizes in the mitochondrial membrane and induces mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. It had a high expression rate of 87.10% (108/124) in lung adenocarcinoma. Moreover, serum UQCRH level in patients with lung adenocarcinoma was significantly increased compared with that of pneumonia patients (p < 0.0001) and normal control subjects (p < 0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis using ...

  5. Lemierre's syndrome with double heterozygote status in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa Behpour-Oskooee; Abdollah Karimi; Shirin Sayyahfar

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are some risk factors being more vulnerable to Lemierre's syndrome such as a hypercoagulable state. Methods: We report a rare case of Lemierre's syndrome with ethmoid and maxillary sinusitis, bilateral mastoiditis, and sigmoid sinus thrombosis. Results: Genetic study revealed a double heterozygote status in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene including C677T and A1298C. Conclusion: It is suggested to screen patients with Lemierre's syndrome for a hypercoagulable state to consider anticoagulant therapy.

  6. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF 5αα-REDUCTASE AND ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Loran

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of prostate cancer is inseparably linked with the effect of androgens on the fundamental prostatic intracellular processes,such as proliferation, apoptosis, which is realized through a number of second messengers. Major of them are the AR gene encoding androgenreceptors and the SRD5A2 gene encoding 5α-reductase enzyme. This paper deals with the study of the role of these genes in prostate cancer.  

  7. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF 5αα-REDUCTASE AND ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Loran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of prostate cancer is inseparably linked with the effect of androgens on the fundamental prostatic intracellular processes,such as proliferation, apoptosis, which is realized through a number of second messengers. Major of them are the AR gene encoding androgenreceptors and the SRD5A2 gene encoding 5α-reductase enzyme. This paper deals with the study of the role of these genes in prostate cancer.  

  8. Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome is caused by mutations in the 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Waterham, H. R.; Wijburg, F.A.; Hennekam, R. C.; Vreken, P; Poll-The, B T; Dorland, L.; Duran, M.; Jira, P.E.; Smeitink, J. A.; Wevers, R. A.; Wanders, R J

    1998-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome is a frequently occurring autosomal recessive developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, mental retardation, and multiple congenital anomalies. Biochemically, the disorder is caused by deficient activity of 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase, which catalyzes the final step in the cholesterol-biosynthesis pathway-that is, the reduction of the Delta7 double bond of 7-dehydrocholesterol to produce cholesterol. We identified a partial transcript coding for...

  9. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors from Monascus-Fermented Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven compounds were isolated from Monascus-fermented rice by column chromatography with silica gel and semiprep HPLC. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods. All compounds displayed HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory potential, among them compound 7 exhibited strong inhibition with IC50 value comparable with lovastatin. In this study, two compounds (1 and 2 were obtained from natural source for the first time.

  10. Tetrahydrobiopterin non-responsiveness in dihydropteridine reductase deficiency is associated with the presence of mutant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, R G; Jennings, I; Bracco, G; Ponzone, A; Guardamagna, O

    1986-01-01

    Correlation of the response to a load of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) in dihydropterin reductase (DHPR) deficient patients to the type of mutation in these patients has led to the conclusion that 4 patients without mutant DHPR molecules in their cells respond to the BH4 load, whereas 3 patients with mutant DHPR in their cells do not respond. Intravenous injection of BH4 in 1 of the cases not responding to BH4 again showed no response.

  11. Expression of steroid 5α-reductase isozymes in prostate of adult rats after environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Pilar; Torres, Jesús M; Castro, Beatriz; Olmo, Asunción; del Moral, Raimundo G; Ortega, Esperanza

    2013-01-01

    The elevated incidence of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy is a cause of increasing public health concern in the Western world. The normal and pathological growth of the prostate are both dependent on stimulation by dihydrotestosterone, which is synthesized from circulating testosterone by two 5α-reductase (5α-R) isozymes, 5α-reductase type 1 (5α-R1) and 5α-reductase type 2 (5α-R2). Both isozymes have been implicated in prostate disease. We used quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively, to quantify mRNA and protein levels of 5α-R isozymes in the ventral prostate of adult rats under environmental stress conditions analogous to those found in some common workplace situations, i.e. artificial light, excessive heat, and the sensation of immobility in a small space. Transcription and expression levels of both 5α-R isozymes were significantly higher in environmentally stressed rats than in unstressed rats. Increased 5α-R isozyme levels may play a role in the development or maintenance of prostate disease. Further research is warranted to explore these effects of environmental stress on human health and their implications for environmental and occupational health policies. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  12. Molecular dissection of a putative iron reductase from Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Kim, David D; Nelson, Ornella D; Otwell, Anne E; Richardson, Ruth E; Callister, Stephen J; Lin, Hening

    2015-11-20

    Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 is a Firmicute strain capable of reducing a variety of heavy metal ions and has a great potential in heavy metal bioremediation. We recently identified Dred_2421 as a potential iron reductase through proteomic study of D. reducens. The current study examines its iron-reduction mechanism. Dred_2421, like its close homolog from Escherichia coli (2, 4-dienoyl-CoA reductase), has an FMN-binding N-terminal domain (NTD), an FAD-binding C-terminal domain (CTD), and a 4Fe-4S cluster between the two domains. To understand the mechanism of the iron-reduction activity and the role of each domain, we generated a series of variants for each domain and investigated their iron-reduction activity. Our results suggest that CTD is the main contributor of the iron-reduction activity, and that NTD and the 4Fe-4S cluster are not directly involved in such activity. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the iron-reductase activity of Dred_2421 and may also help to elucidate other physiological activities this enzyme may have.

  13. A genetic screen reveals a periplasmic copper chaperone required for nitrite reductase activity in pathogenic Neisseria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Freda E-C; Djoko, Karrera Y; Bent, Stephen J; Day, Christopher J; McEwan, Alastair G; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-09-01

    Under conditions of low oxygen availability, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are able to respire via a partial denitrification pathway in which nitrite is converted to nitrous oxide. In this process, nitrite reductase (AniA), a copper (Cu)-containing protein converts nitrite to NO, and this product is converted to nitrous oxide by nitric oxide reductase (NorB). NorB also confers protection against toxic NO, and so we devised a conditional lethal screen, using a norB mutant, to identify mutants that were resistant to nitrite-dependent killing. After random-deletion mutagenesis of N. meningitidis, this genetic screen identified a gene encoding a Cu chaperone that is essential for AniA function, AccA. Purified AccA binds one Cu (I) ion and also possesses a second binding site for Cu (II). This novel periplasmic Cu chaperone (AccA) appears to be essential for provision of Cu ions to AniA of pathogenic Neisseria to generate an active nitrite reductase. Apart from the Neisseria genus, AccA is distributed across a wide range of environmental Proteobacteria species. © FASEB.

  14. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Aparecida Manólio Soares

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC, and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect.

  15. Stereospecific micellar electrokinetic chromatography assay of methionine sulfoxide reductase activity employing a multiple layer coated capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingfu; El-Mergawy, Rabab G; Heinemann, Stefan H; Schönherr, Roland; Jáč, Pavel; Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2013-09-01

    A micellar electrokinetic chromatography method for the analysis of the l-methionine sulfoxide diastereomers employing a successive multiple ionic-polymer layer coated fused-silica capillary was developed and validated in order to investigate the stereospecificity of methionine sulfoxide reductases. The capillary coating consisted of a first layer of hexadimethrine and a second layer of dextran sulfate providing a stable strong cathodic EOF and consequently highly repeatable analyte migration times. The methionine sulfoxide diastereomers, methionine as product as well as β-alanine as internal standard were derivatized by dabsyl chloride and separated using a 35 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 8.0, containing 25 mM SDS as BGE and a separation voltage of 25 kV. The method was validated in the range of 0.15-2.0 mM with respect to linearity and precision. The LODs of the analytes ranged between 0.04 and 0.10 mM. The assay was subsequently applied to determine the stereospecificity of methionine sulfoxide reductases as well as the enzyme kinetics of human methionine sulfoxide reductase A. Monitoring the decrease of the l-methionine-(S)-sulfoxide Km = 411.8 ± 33.8 μM and Vmax = 307.5 ± 10.8 μM/min were determined.

  16. Comparative azo reductase activity of red azo dyes through caecal and hepatic microsomal fraction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Das, M; Khanna, S K

    1997-09-01

    In order to study the rate of formation of toxic aromatic amines, anaerobic reduction of four red azo dyes viz. amaranth, carmoisine, fast Red E and ponceau 4R was investigated by incubating caecal content and hepatic microsomal fraction of rats with 37.5 microM concentration of dyes in sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.4 using NADPH generating system, glucose oxidase system and nitrogen as the gaseous phase. Caecal suspension exhibited higher azo reductase activity than that of hepatic microsomal fraction using any of the 4 azo dyes. Caecal microbes showed maximal azo reductase activity when ponceau 4R was used as a substrate followed by fast Red E and carmoisine, while with amaranth the activity was minimum. Similarly ponceau 4 R exhibited maximum hepatic microsomal azo reductase activity followed by fast Red E and carmoisine whereas, amaranth had minimum activity. Caecal flora possessed almost 17 fold higher degradative capability of ponceau 4 R and fast Red E colourants than the hepatic microsomal fraction. The higher reductive ability through caecal flora for ponceau 4R and fast Red E signifies the formation of more aromatic amines which may be re-absorbed through the intestine to be either eliminated through urine as conjugates or retained in the target tissues to elicit toxic effects.

  17. Nitrosative Stress Response in Vibrio cholerae: Role of S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Sourav Kumar; Bag, Prasanta Kumar; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2017-07-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, poses serious threats to humans worldwide. V. cholerae faces host inflammatory response and encounters nitrosative stress before establishing successful colonization. It is not clear how V. cholerae combats nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species. In the present study, we used three clinical strains of V. cholerae and tested their nitrosative stress response pattern towards sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Among them, V. cholerae, belonging to both O1 and O139 serotypes, showed moderate resistance to SNP and GSNO. However, a V. cholerae strain belonging to non O1 and non O139 showed sensitivity to SNP but resistance towards GSNO. Reduced glutathione and glutathione reductase play a significant role to combat nitrosative stress in V. cholerae. This is the first report where we show the presence of GSNO reductase activity in V. cholerae and that it plays an important role to detoxify S-Nitrosoglutathione. GSNO reductase activity of V. cholerae was regulated by posttranslational modification through S-nitrosylation under in vitro conditions which could be reversed by dithiothreitol (DTT). In addition, we show that biofilm formation remained unaffected under nitrosative stress in V. cholerae.

  18. A preliminary study on estimating extra-cellular nitrate reductase activities in estuarine systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pant H. K.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes catalyzing ammonium (NH4+/nitrate (NO3– into nitrous oxide (N2O/molecular nitrogen (N2, play critical roles in water quality management. The objective of this paper was to investigate the role of extra-cellular enzymes in cycling of nitrogen (N in aquatic systems. It appears that N in estuaries, salt marshes, etc., does not stay long enough to be available for uptake, thus, creating N limited conditions. This study showed that indigenous extra-cellular nitrate reductase along with others involved in N transformations in the waters/sediments of estuarine systems can cause complete removal of NH4+ and NO3– from the waters and available NH4+ and NO3– from the sediments. These results indicate that due to high extra-cellular nitrate reductase and other enzymes associated with N transformations in sediments/waters, substantial amounts of NH4+ and NO3– can be quickly lost from the systems as N2O and/or nitric oxide (NO, in turn, creating N limited conditions in estuarine systems. Such high activities of indigenous nitrate reductase and others are useful in removing readily bioavailable N from the systems, thereby avoidance of eutrophic conditions. However, they might contribute in increasing the N2O, a potent greenhouse gas with global warming potential (GWP of 296, in the atmosphere.

  19. Purification and characterization of a novel carbonyl reductase with high stereo-selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ming; XU Yan; MU Xiaoqing; XIAO Rong

    2007-01-01

    A novel NADPH-dependent carbonyl reductase was separated from Candida parapsilosis CCTCC 203011.The enzyme gave a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE),which was purified through ammonium sulfate,Diethylamino Ethanol (DEAE) sepharose Fast flow (FF),phenyl-sepharose FF and blue sepharose FF chromatography from cell-free extract.The molecular mass of the enzyme was about 30 kDa.The optimum pH and temperature for reduction were 4.5℃ and 35℃,respectively.The Cu2+ had strong restrictive effect on enzyme activity.In addition,the carbonyl reductase was an enzyme with high substrate specificity and stereo-selectivity,and showed high asymmetric reduction activity towards α-hydroxyacetophenone and ethyl 4-chloro acetoacetate.For the asymmetric reduction of α-hydroxyacetophenone and ethyl 4-chloro acetoacetate,(S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol and (R)-ethyl 4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate were produced by the purified enzyme,with the 100% and 94.3% e.e.value,respectively.Therefore,the enzyme could be one of the effective biocatalysts for asymmetric synthesis of chiral alcohols.The amino acid sequences of one peptide from the purified enzyme were analyzed by LC-MASS-MASS,and the carbonyl reductase showed some identity to the hypothetical protein CaO 19.10414 reported.

  20. Inhibitory effects of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott constituents on aldose reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong Mei; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kang, Beom Goo; Hong, Jae Seung; Lim, Soon Sung

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the rat lens aldose reductase-inhibitory effects of 95% ethanol extracts from the leaves of C. esculenta and, its organic solvent soluble fractions, including the dichloromethane (CH2Cl2), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol (BuOH) and water (H2O) layers, using dl-glyceraldehyde as a substrate. Ten compounds, namely tryptophan (1), orientin (2), isoorientin (3), vitexin (4), isovitexin (5), luteolin-7-O-glucoside (6), luteolin-7-O-rutinoside (7), rosmarinic acid (8), 1-O-feruloyl-d-glucoside (9) and 1-O-caffeoyl-d-glucoside (10) were isolated from the EtOAc and BuOH fractions of C. esculenta. The structures of compounds 1-10 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and comparison with previous reports. All the isolates were subjected to an in vitro bioassay to evaluate their inhibitory activity against rat lens aldose reductase. Among tested compounds, compounds 2 and 3 significantly inhibited rat lens aldose reductase, with IC50 values of 1.65 and 1.92 μM, respectively. Notably, the inhibitory activity of orientin was 3.9 times greater than that of the positive control, quercetin (4.12 μM). However, the isolated compounds showed only moderate ABTS+ [2,29-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] activity. These results suggest that flavonoid derivatives from Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott represent potential compounds for the prevention and/or treatment of diabetic complications.

  1. Molecular dissection of a putative iron reductase from Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Kim, David D.; Nelson, Ornella D.; Otwell, Anne E.; Richardson, Ruth E.; Callister, Stephen J.; Lin, Hening

    2015-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 is a Firmicute strain capable of reducing a variety of heavy metal ions and has a great potential in heavy metal bioremediation. We recently identified Dred_2421 as a potential iron reductase through proteomic study of D. reducens. The current study examines its iron-reduction mechanism. Dred_2421, like its close homolog from Escherichia coli (2, 4-dienoyl-CoA reductase), has an FMN-binding N-terminal domain (NTD), an FAD-binding C-terminal domain (CTD), and a 4Fe-4S cluster between the two domains. To understand the mechanism of the iron-reduction activity and the role of each domain, we generated a series of variants for each domain and investigated their iron-reduction activity. Our results suggest that CTD is the main contributor of the iron-reduction activity, and that NTD and the 4Fe-4S cluster are not directly involved in such activity. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the iron-reductase activity of Dred_2421 and may also help to elucidate other physiological activities this enzyme may have. PMID:26454174

  2. Evolution of the ferric reductase domain (FRD) superfamily: modularity, functional diversification, and signature motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Xenarios, Ioannis; Soldati, Thierry; Boeckmann, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    A heme-containing transmembrane ferric reductase domain (FRD) is found in bacterial and eukaryotic protein families, including ferric reductases (FRE), and NADPH oxidases (NOX). The aim of this study was to understand the phylogeny of the FRD superfamily. Bacteria contain FRD proteins consisting only of the ferric reductase domain, such as YedZ and short bFRE proteins. Full length FRE and NOX enzymes are mostly found in eukaryotic cells and all possess a dehydrogenase domain, allowing them to catalyze electron transfer from cytosolic NADPH to extracellular metal ions (FRE) or oxygen (NOX). Metazoa possess YedZ-related STEAP proteins, possibly derived from bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. Phylogenetic analyses suggests that FRE enzymes appeared early in evolution, followed by a transition towards EF-hand containing NOX enzymes (NOX5- and DUOX-like). An ancestral gene of the NOX(1-4) family probably lost the EF-hands and new regulatory mechanisms of increasing complexity evolved in this clade. Two signature motifs were identified: NOX enzymes are distinguished from FRE enzymes through a four amino acid motif spanning from transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) to TM4, and YedZ/STEAP proteins are identified by the replacement of the first canonical heme-spanning histidine by a highly conserved arginine. The FRD superfamily most likely originated in bacteria.

  3. Screening for inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase using pulsed ultrafiltration mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, D; van Breemen, R B

    1998-04-01

    A method of screening combinatorial libraries for inhibitors of eukaryotic dihydrofolate reductase has been developed using pulsed ultra-filtration electrospray mass spectrometry, which is a continuous-flow affinity separation system for extracting and identifying high affinity ligands in combinatorial libraries. In this application, pulsed ultrafiltration conditions were optimized for the isolation and identification of inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase from a 22 compound library containing six known inhibitors of the enzyme including trimethoprim, aminopterin, methotrexate, pyrimethamine, folic acid, and folinic acid, and 16 compounds without known affinity. In order to optimize the screening method, sources of non-specific binding were identified and minimized. A significant source of non-specific binding for this set of library compounds was hydrophobic interaction with the surfaces of the ultrafiltration chamber. After affinity separation of bound (high affinity) versus free (low affinity) library compounds during pulsed ultrafiltration, receptor-bound ligands were released and eluted using either organic solvent or acidified mobile phase. Although 80% methanol easily disrupted the receptor-ligand complexes, organic solvent had the undesirable effect of releasing non-specifically bound compounds from the chamber and thereby increasing the background noise. Interference from non-specific binding was minimized by releasing bound ligands using a low pH mobile phase eluent instead of organic solvent. Under the conditions used, pulsed ultrafiltration mass spectrometry selectively identified the two library compounds with the hi