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Sample records for plant disposal rooms

  1. Waste isolation pilot plant disposal room model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, B.M.

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes development of the conceptual and mathematical models for the part of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository performance assessment that is concerned with what happens to the waste over long times after the repository is decommissioned. These models, collectively referred to as the {open_quotes}Disposal Room Model,{close_quotes} describe the repository closure process during which deformation of the surrounding salt consolidates the waste. First, the relationship of repository closure to demonstration of compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard (40 CFR 191 Appendix C) and how sensitive performance results are to it are examined. Next, a detailed description is provided of the elements of the disposal region, and properties selected for the salt, waste, and other potential disposal features such as backfill. Included in the discussion is an explanation of how the various models were developed over time. Other aspects of closure analysis, such as the waste flow model and method of analysis, are also described. Finally, the closure predictions used in the final performance assessment analysis for the WIPP Compliance Certification Application are summarized.

  2. Waste isolation pilot plant disposal room model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, B.M.

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes development of the conceptual and mathematical models for the part of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository performance assessment that is concerned with what happens to the waste over long times after the repository is decommissioned. These models, collectively referred to as the open-quotes Disposal Room Model,close quotes describe the repository closure process during which deformation of the surrounding salt consolidates the waste. First, the relationship of repository closure to demonstration of compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard (40 CFR 191 Appendix C) and how sensitive performance results are to it are examined. Next, a detailed description is provided of the elements of the disposal region, and properties selected for the salt, waste, and other potential disposal features such as backfill. Included in the discussion is an explanation of how the various models were developed over time. Other aspects of closure analysis, such as the waste flow model and method of analysis, are also described. Finally, the closure predictions used in the final performance assessment analysis for the WIPP Compliance Certification Application are summarized

  3. The advantages of a salt/bentonite backfill for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, B.M.; Novak, C.F.; Jercinovic, M.

    1991-04-01

    A 70/30 wt% salt/bentonite mixture is shown to be preferable to pure crushed salt as backfill for disposal rooms in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report discusses several selection criteria used to arrive at this conclusion: the need for low permeability and porosity after closure, chemical stability with the surroundings, adequate strength to avoid shear erosion from human intrusion, ease of emplacement, and sorption potential for brine and radionuclides. Both salt and salt/bentonite are expected to consolidate to a final state of impermeability (i.e., ≤ 10 -18 m 2 ) adequate for satisfying federal nuclear regulations. Any advantage of the salt/bentonite mixture is dependent upon bentonite's potential for sorbing brine and radionuclides. Estimates suggest that bentonite's sorption potential for water in brine is much less than for pure water. While no credit is presently taken for brine sorption in salt/bentonite backfill, the possibility that some amount of inflowing brine would be chemically bound is considered likely. Bentonite may also sorb much of the plutonium, americium, and neptunium within the disposal room inventory. Sorption would be effective only if a major portion of the backfill is in contact with radioactive brine. Brine flow from the waste out through highly localized channels in the backfill would negate sorption effectiveness. Although the sorption potentials of bentonite for both brine and radionuclides are not ideal, they are distinctly beneficial. Furthermore, no detrimental aspects of adding bentonite to the salt as a backfill have been identified. These two observations are the major reasons for selecting salt/bentonite as a backfill within the WIPP. 39 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Stability of disposal rooms during waste retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandshaug, T.

    1989-03-01

    This report presents the results of a numerical analysis to determine the stability of waste disposal rooms for vertical and horizontal emplacement during the period of waste retrieval. It is assumed that waste retrieval starts 50 years after the initial emplacement of the waste, and that access to and retrieval of the waste containers take place through the disposal rooms. It is further assumed that the disposal rooms are not back-filled. Convective cooling of the disposal rooms in preparation for waste retrieval is included in the analysis. Conditions and parameters used were taken from the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report (MacDougall et al., 1987). Thermal results are presented which illustrate the heat transfer response of the rock adjacent to the disposal rooms. Mechanical results are presented which illustrate the predicted distribution of stress, joint slip, and room deformations for the period of time investigated. Under the assumption that the host rock can be classified as ''fair to good'' using the Geomechanics Classification System (Bieniawski, 1974), only light ground support would appear to be necessary for the disposal rooms to remain stable. 23 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Final disposal room structural response calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-08-01

    Finite element calculations have been performed to determine the structural response of waste-filled disposal rooms at the WIPP for a period of 10,000 years after emplacement of the waste. The calculations were performed to generate the porosity surface data for the final set of compliance calculations. The most recent reference data for the stratigraphy, waste characterization, gas generation potential, and nonlinear material response have been brought together for this final set of calculations

  6. A summary of the models used for the mechanical response of disposal rooms in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant with regard to compliance with 40 CFR 191, Subpart B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, B.M.; Mendenhall, F.T.

    1993-08-01

    A summary is presented of the results of a number of studies conducted prior to March 1992 that have led to a conceptual model describing how the porosity (and therefore the permeability) of waste and backfill in a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal room changes with time and also describes how results from calculations involving mathematical models of these processes are used to provide input into performance assessment of the repository. Included in the report are descriptions of essential material response or constitutive models that include the influence of gas generation and the response of simple gas-pressurized cracks and fractures in salt, marker beds, and clay seams. Two-dimensional versus three-dimensional disposal room configurations and descriptions of the differences between numerical codes are also discussed. Calculational results using the mathematical models for disposal room response are described, beginning with closure of empty rooms and becoming progressively more complex. More recent results address some of the effects of gas generation in a room containing waste and backfill and intersected by a gas permeable marker bed. Developments currently in progress to improve the evaluation of the disposal room performance are addressing the coupling between brine flow and closure and the two-dimensional capability for analyzing a complete panel of rooms. Next, a method is described for including disposal room closure results into performance assessment analyses that determine if the repository is in compliance with regulatory standards. The coupling is accomplished using closure surfaces that describe the relationship among porosity, total amount of gas in the repository, and time. A number of conclusions about room response and recommendations for further work are included throughout the report

  7. Engineering for a disposal facility using the in-room emplacement method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, P; Bilinsky, D M; Ates, Y; Read, R S; Crosthwaite, J L; Dixon, D A

    1996-06-01

    This report describes three nuclear fuel waste disposal vaults using the in-room emplacement method. First, a generic disposal vault design is provided which is suitable for a depth range of 500 m to 1000 m in highly stressed, sparsely fractured rock. The design process is described for all components of the system. The generic design is then applied to two different disposal vaults, one at a depth of 750 m in a low hydraulically conductive, sparsely fractured rock mass and another at a depth of 500 m in a higher conductivity, moderately fractured rock mass. In the in-room emplacement method, the disposal containers with used-fuel bundles are emplaced within the confines of the excavated rooms of a disposal vault. The discussion of the disposal-facility design process begins with a detailed description of a copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal container and the factors that influenced its design. The disposal-room generic design is presented including the detailed specifications, the scoping and numerical thermal and thermal mechanical analyses, the backfilling and sealing materials, and the operational processes. One room design is provided that meets all the requirements for a vault depth range of 500 to 1000 m. A disposal-vault layout and the factors that influenced its design are also presented, including materials handling, general logistics, and separation of radiological and nonradiological operations. Modifications to the used-fuel packaging plant for the filling and sealing of the copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal containers and a brief description of the common surface facilities needed by the disposal vault and the packaging plant are provided. The implementation of the disposal facility is outlined, describing the project stages and activities and itemizing a specific plan for each of the project stages: siting, construction, operation; decommissioning; and closure. (author). 72 refs., 15 tabs., 63 figs.

  8. Engineering for a disposal facility using the in-room emplacement method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, P.; Bilinsky, D.M.; Ates, Y.; Read, R.S.; Crosthwaite, J.L.; Dixon, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes three nuclear fuel waste disposal vaults using the in-room emplacement method. First, a generic disposal vault design is provided which is suitable for a depth range of 500 m to 1000 m in highly stressed, sparsely fractured rock. The design process is described for all components of the system. The generic design is then applied to two different disposal vaults, one at a depth of 750 m in a low hydraulically conductive, sparsely fractured rock mass and another at a depth of 500 m in a higher conductivity, moderately fractured rock mass. In the in-room emplacement method, the disposal containers with used-fuel bundles are emplaced within the confines of the excavated rooms of a disposal vault. The discussion of the disposal-facility design process begins with a detailed description of a copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal container and the factors that influenced its design. The disposal-room generic design is presented including the detailed specifications, the scoping and numerical thermal and thermal mechanical analyses, the backfilling and sealing materials, and the operational processes. One room design is provided that meets all the requirements for a vault depth range of 500 to 1000 m. A disposal-vault layout and the factors that influenced its design are also presented, including materials handling, general logistics, and separation of radiological and nonradiological operations. Modifications to the used-fuel packaging plant for the filling and sealing of the copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal containers and a brief description of the common surface facilities needed by the disposal vault and the packaging plant are provided. The implementation of the disposal facility is outlined, describing the project stages and activities and itemizing a specific plan for each of the project stages: siting, construction, operation; decommissioning; and closure. (author)

  9. Computer simulation of an internally pressurized radioactive waste disposal room in a bedded salt formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.T.; Weatherby, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico was created by the U.S. Department of Energy as an underground research and development facility to demonstrate the safe storage of transuranic waste generated from defense activities. This facility consists of storage rooms mined from a bedded salt formation at a depth of about 650 meters. Each room will accommodate about 6800 55-gallon drums filled with waste. After waste containers are emplaced, the storage rooms are to be backfilled with mined salt or other backfill materials. As time passes, reconsolidation of this backfill will reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the room. However, gases produced by decomposition and corrosion of waste and waste containers may cause a slow build-up of pressure which can retard consolidation of the waste and backfilled salt. The authors have developed a finite-element model of an idealized disposal room which is assumed to be perfectly sealed. The assumption that no gas escapes from the disposal room is a highly idealized and extreme condition which does not account for leakage paths, such as interbeds, that exist in the surrounding salt formation. This model has been used in a parametric study to determine how reconsolidation is influenced by various assumed gas generation rates and total amounts of gas generated. Results show that reductions in the gas generation, relative to the baseline case, can increase the degree of consolidation and reduce the peak gas pressure in disposal rooms. Even higher degrees of reconsolidation can be achieved by reducing both amounts and rates of gas generation. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Structural evaluation of WIPP disposal room raised to Clay Seam G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Holland, John F.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes a series of structural calculations that examine effects of raising the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository horizon from the original design level upward 2.43 meters. These calculations allow evaluation of various features incorporated in conceptual models used for performance assessment. Material presented in this report supports the regulatory compliance re-certification, and therefore begins by replicating the calculations used in the initial compliance certification application. Calculations are then repeated for grid changes appropriate for the new horizon raised to Clay Seam G. Results are presented in three main areas: 1. Disposal room porosity, 2. Disturbed rock zone characteristics, and 3. Anhydrite marker bed failure. No change to the porosity surface for the compliance re-certification application is necessary to account for raising the repository horizon, because the new porosity surface is essentially identical. The disturbed rock zone evolution and devolution are charted in terms of a stress invariant criterion over the regulatory period. This model shows that the damage zone does not extend upward to MB 138, but does reach MB 139 below the repository. Damaged salt would be expected to heal in nominally 100 years. The anhydrite marker beds sustain states of stress that promote failure and substantial marker bed deformation into the room assures fractured anhydrite will sustain in the proximity of the disposal rooms

  11. Structural evaluation of WIPP disposal room raised to clay seam G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Holland, John F.

    2007-01-01

    An error was discovered in the ALGEBBRA script used to calculate the disturbed rock zone around the disposal room and the shear failure zone in the anhydrite layers in the original version. To correct the error, a memorandum of correction was submitted according to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Quality Assurance program. The recommended course of action was to correct the error, to repeat the post-process, and to rewrite Section 7.4, 7.5, 8, and Appendix B in the original report. The sections and appendix revised by the post-process using the corrected ALGEBRA scripts are provided in this revision. The original report summarizes a series of structural calculations that examine effects of raising the WIPP repository horizon from the original design level upward 2.43 meters. Calculations were then repeated for grid changes appropriate for the new horizon raised to Clay Seam G. Results are presented in three main areas: (1) Disposal room porosity, (2) Disturbed rock zone characteristics, and (3) Anhydrite marker bed failure. No change to the porosity surface for the compliance re-certification application is necessary to account for raising the repository horizon, because the new porosity surface is essentially identical. The disturbed rock zone evolution and devolution are charted in terms of a stress invariant criterion over the regulatory period. This model shows that the propagation of the DRZ into the surrounding rock salt does not penetrate through MB 139 in the case of both the original horizon and the raised room. Damaged salt would be expected to heal in nominally 150 years. The shear failure does not occur in either the upper or lower anhydrite layers at the moment of excavation, but appears above and below the middle of the pillar one day after the excavation. The damaged anhydrite is not expected to heal as the salt in the DRZ is expected to

  12. Disposable Bioreactors for Plant Micropropagation and Mass Plant Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducos, Jean-Paul; Terrier, Bénédicte; Courtois, Didier

    Different types of bioreactors are used at Nestlé R&D Centre - Tours for mass propagation of selected plant varieties by somatic embryogenesis and for large scale culture of plants cells to produce metabolites or recombinant proteins. Recent studies have been directed to cut down the production costs of these two processes by developing disposable cell culture systems. Vegetative propagation of elite plant varieties is achieved through somatic embryogenesis in liquid medium. A pilot scale process has recently been set up for the industrial propagation of Coffea canephora (Robusta coffee). The current production capacity is 3.0 million embryos per year. The pre-germination of the embryos was previously conducted by temporary immersion in liquid medium in 10-L glass bioreactors. An improved process has been developed using a 10-L disposable bioreactor consisting of a bag containing a rigid plastic box ('Box-in-Bag' bioreactor), insuring, amongst other advantages, a higher light transmittance to the biomass due to its horizontal design. For large scale cell culture, two novel flexible plastic-based disposable bioreactors have been developed from 10 to 100 L working volumes, validated with several plant species ('Wave and Undertow' and 'Slug Bubble' bioreactors). The advantages and the limits of these new types of bioreactor are discussed, based mainly on our own experience on coffee somatic embryogenesis and mass cell culture of soya and tobacco.

  13. Disposal of Savannah River Plant waste salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukes, M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 26-million gallons of soluble low-level waste salts will be produced during solidification of 6-million gallons of high-level defense waste in the proposed Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Soluble wastes (primarily NaNO 3 , NaNO 2 , and NaOH) stored in the waste tanks will be decontaminated by ion exchange and solidified in concrete. The resulting salt-concrete mixture, saltcrete, will be placed in a landfill on the plantsite such that all applicable federal and state disposal criteria are met. Proposed NRC guidelines for the disposal of waste with the radionuclide content of SRP salt would permit shallow land burial. Federal and state rules require that potentially hazardous chemical wastes (mainly nitrate-nitrate salts in the saltcrete) be contained to the degree necessary to meet drinking water standards in the ground water beneath the landfill boundary. This paper describes the proposed saltcrete landfill and tests under way to ensure that the landfill will meet these criteria. The work includes laboratory and field tests of the saltcrete itself, a field test of a one-tenth linear scale model of the entire landfill system, and a numerical model of the system

  14. Defense waste salt disposal at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.; Dukes, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    A cement-based waste form, saltstone, has been designed for disposal of Savannah River Plant low-level radioactive salt waste. The disposal process includes emplacing the saltstone in engineered trenches above the water table but below grade at SRP. Design of the waste form and disposal system limits the concentration of salts and radionuclides in the groundwater so that EPA drinking water standards will not be exceeded at the perimeter of the disposal site. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  15. A summary of methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in numerical models of multiphase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Davies, P.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Eight alternative methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in a multiphase flow model of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were implemented and evaluated: Three fixed-room geometries three porosity functions and two fluid-phase-salt methods. The pressure-time-porosity line interpolation method is the method used in current WIPP Performance Assessment calculations. The room closure approximation methods were calibrated against a series of room closure simulations performed using a creep closure code, SANCHO. The fixed-room geometries did not incorporate a direct coupling between room void volume and room pressure. The two porosity function methods that utilized moles of gas as an independent parameter for closure coupling. The capillary backstress method was unable to accurately simulate conditions of re-closure of the room. Two methods were found to be accurate enough to approximate the effects of room closure; the boundary backstress method and pressure-time-porosity line interpolation. The boundary backstress method is a more reliable indicator of system behavior due to a theoretical basis for modeling salt deformation as a viscous process. It is a complex method and a detailed calibration process is required. The pressure lines method is thought to be less reliable because the results were skewed towards SANCHO results in simulations where the sequence of gas generation was significantly different from the SANCHO gas-generation rate histories used for closure calibration. This limitation in the pressure lines method is most pronounced at higher gas-generation rates and is relatively insignificant at lower gas-generation rates. Due to its relative simplicity, the pressure lines method is easier to implement in multiphase flow codes and simulations have a shorter execution time.

  16. A summary of methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in numerical models of multiphase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W.; Davies, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    Eight alternative methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in a multiphase flow model of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were implemented and evaluated: Three fixed-room geometries three porosity functions and two fluid-phase-salt methods. The pressure-time-porosity line interpolation method is the method used in current WIPP Performance Assessment calculations. The room closure approximation methods were calibrated against a series of room closure simulations performed using a creep closure code, SANCHO. The fixed-room geometries did not incorporate a direct coupling between room void volume and room pressure. The two porosity function methods that utilized moles of gas as an independent parameter for closure coupling. The capillary backstress method was unable to accurately simulate conditions of re-closure of the room. Two methods were found to be accurate enough to approximate the effects of room closure; the boundary backstress method and pressure-time-porosity line interpolation. The boundary backstress method is a more reliable indicator of system behavior due to a theoretical basis for modeling salt deformation as a viscous process. It is a complex method and a detailed calibration process is required. The pressure lines method is thought to be less reliable because the results were skewed towards SANCHO results in simulations where the sequence of gas generation was significantly different from the SANCHO gas-generation rate histories used for closure calibration. This limitation in the pressure lines method is most pronounced at higher gas-generation rates and is relatively insignificant at lower gas-generation rates. Due to its relative simplicity, the pressure lines method is easier to implement in multiphase flow codes and simulations have a shorter execution time

  17. A sensitivity analysis of the WIPP disposal room model: Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labreche, D.A.; Beikmann, M.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Osnes, J.D. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Butcher, B.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The WIPP Disposal Room Model (DRM) is a numerical model with three major components constitutive models of TRU waste, crushed salt backfill, and intact halite -- and several secondary components, including air gap elements, slidelines, and assumptions on symmetry and geometry. A sensitivity analysis of the Disposal Room Model was initiated on two of the three major components (waste and backfill models) and on several secondary components as a group. The immediate goal of this component sensitivity analysis (Phase I) was to sort (rank) model parameters in terms of their relative importance to model response so that a Monte Carlo analysis on a reduced set of DRM parameters could be performed under Phase II. The goal of the Phase II analysis will be to develop a probabilistic definition of a disposal room porosity surface (porosity, gas volume, time) that could be used in WIPP Performance Assessment analyses. This report documents a literature survey which quantifies the relative importance of the secondary room components to room closure, a differential analysis of the creep consolidation model and definition of a follow-up Monte Carlo analysis of the model, and an analysis and refitting of the waste component data on which a volumetric plasticity model of TRU drum waste is based. A summary, evaluation of progress, and recommendations for future work conclude the report.

  18. Disposal of slightly contaminated radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    With regard to the disposal of solid wastes, nuclear power plants basically have two options, disposal in a Part 61 licensed low-level waste site, or receive approval pursuant to 20.2002 for disposal in a manner not otherwise authorized by the NRC. Since 1981, the staff has reviewed and approved 30 requests for disposal of slightly contaminated radioactive materials pursuant to Section 20.2002 (formerly 20.302) for nuclear power plants located in non-Agreement States. NRC Agreement States have been delegated the authority for reviewing and approving such disposals (whether onsite or offsite) for nuclear power plants within their borders. This paper describes the characteristics of the waste disposed of, the review process, and the staff`s guidelines.

  19. Information presentation in power plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kautto, A.

    1984-11-01

    The objective of this study is to support operators' work especially in the control rooms of power plant. The exemplified process is a pressurized water (nuclear) reactor (PWR). The man-process interface is an information system that covers information refining, information presentation, information system handling, and process control. THe emphasis in this study is on the organization and presentation of information and on the alert function that is part of the information system. Another goal is to design the alert function so as to radically reduce the number of alarms during plant shutdown, e.g. during the refuelling or maintenance period and during a disturbance. Further, the experimental validation of CFMS (Critical Function Monitoring System), developed by Combustion Engineering, Inc. in the U.S.A. is described briefly. The validation was made at the Loviisa training simulator in the autumn of 1982. CFMS is a safety-related functional alarm system. The functional decomposition of information has turned out to be successful and it is helpful in designing displays. Preliminary criteria for designing displays, the structure of the information presentation system and the illustration of main interactions are presented. General practical ideas on designing the alert function seem very promising. Preliminary results of the CFMS validation are presented. Further, some ideas are presented on how to carry out the analysis and how to make such validations in the future. A new idea for the evaluation of core safety is presented, based on control theory concepts

  20. Alternative disposal technologies for new low-level radioactive waste disposal/storage facilities at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Waste Management Activities for groundwater protection has been prepared for the Savannah River Plant. Support documentation for the DEIS included an Environmental Information Document on new radioactive waste disposal and storage facilities in which possible alternative disposal technologies were examined in depth. Six technologies that would meet the needs of the Savannah River Plant that selected for description and analysis include near surface disposal, near surface disposal with exceptions, engineered storage, engineered disposal, vault disposal of untreated waste, and a combination of near surface disposal, engineered disposal, and engineered storage. 2 refs

  1. Disposal of solid radioactive waste of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YU Shichen.

    1986-01-01

    The contaminations of marine enviroment by the disposal of radwastes should not been expected, then ocean disposal has been stoped in some countries, and land disposal of solid radwastes should been a better method for mankind and environment protection. Ground burial near the surface is currently considered to be feasible. Storage in spent pit or in plant area also should been adapted in several countries

  2. Control rooms in German nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.

    1999-01-01

    The paper explains and illustrates the dissimilarity in design and equipment of control rooms in German NPPs, as well as a historical survey of the general principles and approaches applied in the evolution of control room technology, including backfitting activities. Experience obtained from daily operation as well training at the simulators is taken as a basis to formulate fundamental requirements for modification or novel design approaches. (orig./CB) [de

  3. Considerations concerning the ergonomics of power plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, L.; Hinz, W.

    1981-01-01

    Modern control rooms for the monitoring and control of large power plants have a high degree of automation. However, it is the responsibility of the control room personnel to ensure optimum process control during all operational states. The proper ergonomic design of a control room is one of the prerequisites to ensure that the operators are able to perceive the often large flow of current information and, after processing, to respond properly. (orig.) [de

  4. Facility Description 2012. Summary report of the encapsulation plant and disposal facility designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomaeki, J.; Ristimaeki, L.

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the facility description is to be a specific summary report of the scope of Posiva's nuclear facilities (encapsulation plant and disposal facility) in Olkiluoto. This facility description is based on the 2012 designs and completing Posiva working reports. The facility description depicts the nuclear facilities and their operation as the disposal of spent nuclear fuel starts in Olkiluoto in about 2020. According to the decisions-in-principle of the government, the spent nuclear fuel from Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants in operation and in future cumulative spent nuclear fuel from Loviisa 1 and 2, Olkiluoto 1, 2, 3 and 4 nuclear power plants, is permitted to be disposed of in Olkiluoto bedrock. The design of the disposal facility is based on the KBS-3V concept (vertical disposal). Long-term safety concept is based on the multi-barrier principle i.e. several release barriers, which ensure one another so that insufficiency in the performance of one barrier doesn't jeopardize long-term safety of the disposal. The release barriers are the following: canister, bentonite buffer and deposition tunnel backfill, and the host rock around the repository. The canisters are installed into the deposition holes, which are bored to the floor of the deposition tunnels. The canisters are enveloped with compacted bentonite blocks, which swell after absorbing water. The surrounding bedrock and the central and access tunnel backfill provide additional retardation, retention, and dilution. The nuclear facilities consist of an encapsulation plant and of underground final disposal facility including other aboveground buildings and surface structures serving the facility. The access tunnel and ventilation shafts to the underground disposal facility and some auxiliary rooms are constructed as a part of ONKALO underground rock characterization facility during years 2004-2014. The construction works needed for the repository start after obtaining the construction

  5. Establishment of new disposal capacity for the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albenesius, E.L.; Wilhite, E.L.

    1987-01-01

    Two new low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites for decontaminated salt solidified with cement and fly ash (saltstone) and for conventional solid LLW are planned for SRP in the next several years. An above-ground vault disposal system for saltstone was designed to minimize impact on the environment by controlling permeability and diffusivity of the waste form and concrete liner. The experimental program leading to the engineered disposal system included formulation studies, multiple approaches to measurement of permeability and diffusivity, extensive mathematical modeling, and large-scale lysimeter tests to validate model projections. The overall study is an example of the systems approach to disposal site design to achieve a predetermined performance objective. The same systems approach is being used to develop alternative designs for disposal of conventional LLW at the Savannah River Plant. 14 figures

  6. Supply, operation and radioactive waste disposal of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohrhauer, H.; Krey, M.; Haag, G.; Wolters, J.; Merz, E.; Sauermann, P.F.

    1981-07-01

    The subject of 'Nuclear Fuel Cycle' is treated in 5 reports: 1. Uranium supply; 2. Fabrication and characteristics of fuel elements; 3. Design, operation and safety of nuclear power plants after Harrisburg; 4. Radioactive waste disposal of nuclear power plants - changed political scenery after 1979; 5. Shutdown and dismantling of LWR-KKW - state of knowledge and feasibility. (HP) [de

  7. Method of disposing of shut-down nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaiser, H.

    1984-01-01

    A shut-down atomic power plant or a section thereof, particularly the nuclear reactor, is disposed of by sinking it to below ground level by constructing a caisson with cutting edges from the foundations of said plant or section or by excavating a pit therebelow

  8. Control room habitability in Spanish Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mediavilla, F.; Sierra, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    Since the NRC published in 2003 the Generic Letter 2003-01 Control room Habitability and the Regulatory guide 1.197 Demonstrating Control Room Envelope Integrity at Nuclear Power Reactors, where it is emphasized the importance of verifying the control room habitability by means of alternative methods, Spanish Nuclear Power Plants are undertaking the different necessary activities to fulfill the requirements of the regulatory commission. This paper describes the main mechanisms included in NEI 99-03 Nuclear Energy Institute publication Control room Habitability Assessment guidance, to demonstrate and maintain Control room Habitability. In addition, in this article it Ds shown the theoretical principle of the test used to quantify air in-leakage in a control room envelope by using tracer gas techniques. The necessary activities to perform the initial in leakage testing are also put forward. Since 2006 Tecnatom, S. A. has performed the baseline testing in four Spanish Units, all of them with successful results. The rest of the Plants are scheduled to perform the tests during the second half of this year. Finally, this document summarises the more important aspects to be taken into account in the development of control room Habitability Programs, which are expected to ensure the integral maintenance of the Control room Envelope during the life a plant. (Author)

  9. Improvement on main control room for Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumiya, Masayuki

    1996-01-01

    The main control room which is the information center of nuclear power plant has been continuously improved utilizing the state of the art ergonomics, a high performance computer, computer graphic technologies, etc. For the latest Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant, the CRT monitoring system is applied as the major information source for facilitating operators' plant monitoring tasks. For an operating plant, enhancement of monitoring and logging functions has been made adopting a high performance computer

  10. 9+ years of disposal experience at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, Norbert T.; Nelson, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    With almost a decade of operating experience, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has established an enviable record by clearly demonstrating that a deep geologic repository for unconditioned radioactive waste in rock salt can be operated safely and in compliance with very complex regulations. WIPP has disposed of contact-handled transuranic (TRU) waste since 1999 and remote-handled TRU waste since 2007. Emplacement methods range from directly stacking unshielded 0.21-4.5 m 3 containers inside disposal rooms to remotely inserting highly radioactive 0.89 m 3 canisters into horizontally drilled holes (shield plugs placed in front of canisters protect workers inside active disposal rooms). More than 100 000 waste containers have been emplaced, and one-third of WIPP's authorized repository capacity of 175,000 m 3 has already been consumed. Principal surface operations are conducted in the waste handling building, which is divided into CH and RH waste handling areas. Four vertical shafts extend from the surface to the disposal horizon, 655 m below the surface in a 1000 m thick sequence of Permian bedded salt. The waste disposal area of about 0.5 km 2 is divided into ten panels, each consisting of seven rooms. Vertical closure (creep) rates in disposal rooms range up to 10 cm per year. While one panel is being filled with waste, the next one is being mined. Mined salt is raised to the surface in the salt shaft, and waste is lowered down the waste shaft. Both of these shafts also serve as principal access for personnel and materials. Underground ventilation is divided into separate flow paths, allowing simultaneous mining and disposal. A filter building near the exhaust shaft provides the capability to filter the exhaust air (in reduced ventilation mode) through HEPA filters before release to the atmosphere. WIPP operations have not exposed employees or the public to radiation doses beyond natural background variability. They consistently meet or exceed regulatory

  11. Greater confinement disposal program at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.; Towler, O.A.; Peterson, D.L.; Johnson, G.M.; Helton, B.D.

    1984-01-01

    The first facility to demonstrate Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) in a humid environment in the United States has been built and is operating at the Savannah River Plant. GCD practices of waste segregation, packaging, emplacement below the root zone, and waste stabilization are being used in the demonstration. Activity concentrations to select wastes for GCD are based on a study of SRP burial records, and are equal to or less than those for Class B waste in 10CFR61. The first disposal units to be constructed are 9-foot diameter, thirty-foot deep boreholes which will be used to dispose of wastes from production reactors, tritiated wastes, and selected wastes from off-site. In 1984 an engineered GCD trench will be constructed for disposal of boxed wastes and large bulky items. 2 figures, 1 table

  12. Disposal of radioactive wastes from Czechoslovak nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, L.

    In gaseous radioactive waste disposal, aerosol particles are filtered and gaseous wastes are discharged in the environment. The filters and filter materials used are stored on solid radioactive waste storage sites in the individual power plants. Liquid radioactive wastes are concentrated and the concentrates are stored. Distillates and low-level radioactive waste water are discharged into the hydrosphere. Solid radioactive wastes are stored without treatment in power plant bunkers. Bituminization and cementation of liquid radioactive wastes are discussed. (H.S.)

  13. Perception of tomorrow's nuclear power plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, O.R.

    1986-01-01

    Major development programs are upgrading today's light water reactor nuclear power plant (NPP) control rooms. These programs involve displays, control panel architecture, procedures, staffing, and training, and are supported by analytical efforts to refine the definitions of the dynamics and the functional requirements of NPP operation. These programs demonstrate that the NPP control room is the visible command/control/communications center of the complex man/machine system that operates the plant. These development programs are primarily plant specific, although the owners' groups and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) do provide some standardization. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory recently completed a project to categorize control room changes and estimate the degree of change. That project, plus related studies, provides the basis for this image of the next generation of NPP control rooms. The next generation of NPP control rooms is envisioned as being dominated by three current trends: (1) application of state-of-the-art computer hardware and software; (2) use of NPP dynamic analyses to provide the basis for the control room man/machine system design; and (3) application of empirical principles of human performance

  14. Control room systems design for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This publication provides a resource for those who are involved in researching, managing, conceptualizing, designing, manufacturing or backfitting power plant control room systems. It will also be useful to those responsible for performing reviews or evaluations of the design and facilities associated with existing power plant control room systems. The ultimate worth of the publication, however, will depend upon how well it can support its users. Readers are invited to provide comments and observations to the IAEA, Division of Nuclear Power. If appropriate, the report will subsequently be re-issued, taking such feedback into account. Refs, figs and tabs.

  15. Control room systems design for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This publication provides a resource for those who are involved in researching, managing, conceptualizing, designing, manufacturing or backfitting power plant control room systems. It will also be useful to those responsible for performing reviews or evaluations of the design and facilities associated with existing power plant control room systems. The ultimate worth of the publication, however, will depend upon how well it can support its users. Readers are invited to provide comments and observations to the IAEA, Division of Nuclear Power. If appropriate, the report will subsequently be re-issued, taking such feedback into account. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Advanced control room design for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarola, K.

    1987-01-01

    The power industry has seen a continuous growth of size and complexity of nuclear power plants. Accompanying these changes have been extensive regulatory requirements resulting in significant construction, operation and maintenance costs. In response to related concerns raised by industry members, Combustion Engineering developed the NUPLEX 80 Advanced Control Room. The goal of NUPLEX 80 TM is to: reduce design and construction costs; increase plant safety and availability through improvements in the man-machine interface; and reduce maintenance costs. This paper provides an overview of the NUPLEX 80 Advanced Control Room and explains how the stated goals are achieved. (author)

  17. The principles of disposal provisions for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, K.

    1990-01-01

    The question which requirements concerning disposal are to be put to nuclear power plants, is dependent on the fact whether the disposal principles arranged between Federal Government and Laender are legally binding. The question whether the Federal Government/Laender arrangements are legally binding agreements or merely political declarations of no legally binding character, is determined by a number of criteria. On the basis of these criteria, the decisions of the heads of the Federal Government and the Laender relating to disposal principles are mere political declarations without a legally binding effect. The publication also investigates the question - and answers in the negative sense - whether the BMI's request addressed to the Laender concerning the application of the disposal principles is an obligatory directive pursuant to section 85 subsection 3 Basic Law. The investigation is of interest beyond the topical question of the validity of disposal principles. It is also of interest for assessing the legal character and binding effect of numerous Government/Laender agreements on other subjects. (orig./HSCH) [de

  18. Nuclear power plant control room operator control and monitoring tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovell, C.R.; Beck, M.G.; Carter, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a research project the purpose of which is to develop the technical bases for regulatory review criteria for use in evaluating the safety implications of human factors associated with the use of artificial intelligence and expert systems, and with advanced instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants (NPP). This report documents the results from Task 8 of that project. The primary objectives of the task was to identify the scope and type of control and monitoring tasks now performed by control-room operators. Another purpose was to address the types of controls and safety systems needed to operate the nuclear plant. The final objective of Task 8 was to identify and categorize the type of information and displays/indicators required to monitor the performance of the control and safety systems. This report also discusses state-of-the-art controls and advanced display devices which will be available for use in control-room retrofits and in control room of future plants. The fundamental types of control and monitoring tasks currently conducted by operators can be divided into four classifications: function monitoring tasks, control manipulation tasks, fault diagnostic tasks, and administrative tasks. There are three general types of controls used in today's NPPs, switches, pushbuttons, and analog controllers. Plant I and C systems include components to achieve a number of safety-related functions: measuring critical plant parameters, controlling critical plant parameters within safety limits, and automatically actuating protective devices if safe limits are exceeded. The types of information monitored by the control-room operators consist of the following parameters: pressure, fluid flow and level, neutron flux, temperature, component status, water chemistry, electrical, and process and area radiation. The basic types of monitoring devices common to nearly all NPP control rooms include: analog meters

  19. Control room design and human engineering in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, L.; Hinz, W.

    1982-01-01

    The concept for modern plant control rooms is primary influenced by: The automation of protection, binary control and closed loop control functions; organization employing functional areas; computer based information processing; human engineered design. Automation reduces the human work load. Employment of functional areas permits optimization of operational sequences. Computer based information processing makes it possible to output information in accordance with operating requirements. Design based on human engineering principles assures the quality of the interaction between the operator and the equipment. The degree to which these conceptional features play a role in design of power plant control rooms depends on the unit rating, the mode of operation and on the requirements respecting safety and availability of the plant. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of control rooms of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norros, L.; Ranta, J.; Wahlstroem, B.

    1983-05-01

    To identify and correct the lacks in control rooms of operating power plants and plants under construction an extensive program has been started in the USA. In Finland as in other countries using nuclear power, the development in the USA particularly with regard to the requirements imposed on nuclear power plants is carefully followed. The changes in these requirements are sooner or later also reflected in the guidelines given by the Finnish authorities. It is therefore important to be able to form a notion of how the new requirements apply to Finnish conditions. Especially it is important to review the latest assessment guidelines for control room implementation (NUREG-0700). Thus we can avoid possible over hasty conclusions. The aim of the analysis of the method and experiments presented in NUREG 0700 report was to create a basis for assessment of the suitability of the method for Finnish control room implementation. The task group has made a general methodical analysis of the method, and partly tried it in assessment of the TVO2 control room. It is obvious that direct conclusions from the American situation are misleading. It can be considered unfeasible to follow the American requirements as such, because they can lead to unwanted results. If the review is limited to control room details, the NRC program (checklist) can be considered successful. It can also be used during planning to observation of small discrepancies. However, we can question the applicability of some requirements. It is, though, more essential that the control room entity has neither in this nor in several other programs been reached or standardized. In spite of the difficulties we should try to reach this most important goal. (author)

  1. 7 CFR 330.205 - Disposal of plant pests when permits are canceled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disposal of plant pests when permits are canceled. 330... PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Plant Pests § 330.205 Disposal of...

  2. Greater confinement disposal program at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towler, O.A.; Cook, J.R.; Peterson, D.L.; Reddick, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A facility to demonstrate Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) of low-level solid radioactive waste in a humid environment has been built and is operating at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). GCD practices of waste segregation into high and low activity concentrations, emplacement of waste below the root zone, waste stabilization, and capping are being used in the demonstration. Activity concentrations to select wastes for GCD are based on the volume/activity distribution of low-level solid wastes as obtained from SRP burial records, and are equal to or less than those for Class B waste in 10 CFR 61. The first disposal units constructed are twenty 9-ft-diam, 30-ft-deep boreholes. These holes will be used to dispose of wastes from the production reactors, tritiated wastes, and selected wastes from offsite. In 1984, construction will begin on an engineered GCD trench for disposal of boxed waste and large bulky items that meet the activity concentration criteria. 4 references, 5 figures, 2 tables

  3. Conflicts concerning sites for waste treatment and waste disposal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werbeck, N.

    1993-01-01

    The erection of waste treatment and waste disposal flants increasingly meets with the disapproval of local residents. This is due to three factors: Firstly, the erection and operation of waste treatment plants is assumed to necessarily entail harmful effects and risks, which may be true or may not. Secondly, these disadvantages are in part considered to be non-compensable. Thirdly, waste treatment plants have a large catchment area, which means that more people enjoy their benefits than have to suffer their disadvantages. If residents in the vicinity of such plants are not compensated for damage sustained or harmed in ways that cannot be compensated for it becomes a rational stance for them, while not objecting to waste treatment and waste disposal plants in principle to object to their being in their own neighbourhood. The book comprehensively describes the subject area from an economic angle. The causes are analysed in detail and an action strategy is pointed, out, which can help to reduce acceptance problems. The individual chapters deal with emissions, risk potentials, optimization calculus considering individual firms or persons and groups of two or more firms or persons, private-economy approaches for the solving of site selection conflicts, collective decision-making. (orig./HSCH) [de

  4. Greater Confinement Disposal Program at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towler, O.A.; Cook, J.R.; Peterson, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Plans for improved LLW disposal at the Savannah River Plant include Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) for the higher activity fractions of this waste. GCD practices will include waste segregation, packaging, emplacement below the root zone, and stabilizing the emplacement with cement. Statistical review of SRP burial records showed that about 95% of the radioactivity is associated with only 5% of the waste volume. Trigger values determined in this study were compared with actual burials in 1982 to determine what GCD facilities would be needed for a demonstration to begin in Fall 1983. Facilities selected include 8-feet-diameter x 30-feet-deep boreholes to contain reactor scrap, tritiated waste, and selected wastes from offsite

  5. Control room design and human engineering in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, L.; Hinz, W.

    1981-01-01

    Automation reduces the human work load. Employment of functional areas permits optimization of operational sequences. Computer based information processing makes it possible to output information in accordance with operating requirements. Design based on human engineering principles assures the quality of the interaction between the operator and the equipment. The degree to which these conceptional features play a role in design of power plant control rooms depends on the unit rating, the mode of operation and on the requirements respecting safety and availability of the plant. (orig./RW)

  6. Design of control rooms and ergonomics in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, L.; Hinz, W.

    1981-01-01

    Modern power plant control rooms are characterized by automation of protection and control functions, subdivision according to functions, computer-aided information processing, and ergonomic design. Automation relieves the personnel of stress. Subdivision according to functions permits optimized procedures. Computer-aided information processing results in variable information output tailored to the actual needs. Ergonomic design assures qualified man-machine interaction. Of course, these characteristics will vary between power plants in dependence of unit power, mode of operation, and safety and availability requirements. (orig.) [de

  7. Nuclear power plant control room operators' performance research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.H.; Haas, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    A research program is being conducted to provide information on the performance of nuclear power plant control room operators when responding to abnormal/emergency events in the plants and in full-scope training simulators. The initial impetus for this program was the need for data to assess proposed design criteria for the choice of manual versus automatic action for accomplishing safety-related functions during design basis accidents. The program also included studies of training simulator capabilities, of procedures and data for specifying and verifying simulator performance, and of methods and applications of task analysis

  8. Communications involving the control room of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGregor, J.; Cunningham, B.; Safayeni, F.; Duimering, R.

    1992-04-01

    This study investigated communications within the operations component of a nuclear power plant, with a primary emphasis on control room communications. A structured interview technique was developed following preliminary interviews at the plant, and pretested at AECB headquarters. Patterns were identified from questions asked on communications links, work relationships, miscommunications, procedures, instrumentation and responses to problems. The study was an exploratory one, conducted under a limited budget, to provide background information and to identify areas for further investigation. The report offers recommendations about areas for further research

  9. Costs of disposable material in the operating room do not show high correlation with surgical time: Implications for hospital payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delo, Caroline; Leclercq, Pol; Martins, Dimitri; Pirson, Magali

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyze the variation of the surgical time and of disposable costs per surgical procedure and to analyze the association between disposable costs and the surgical time. The registration of data was done in an operating room of a 419 bed general hospital, over a period of three months (n = 1556 surgical procedures). Disposable material per procedure used was recorded through a barcode scanning method. The average cost (standard deviation) of disposable material is €183.66 (€183.44). The mean surgical time (standard deviation) is 96 min (63). Results have shown that the homogeneity of operating time and DM costs was quite good per surgical procedure. The correlation between the surgical time and DM costs is not high (r = 0.65). In a context of Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) based hospital payment, it is important that costs information systems are able to precisely calculate costs per case. Our results show that the correlation between surgical time and costs of disposable materials is not good. Therefore, empirical data or itemized lists should be used instead of surgical time as a cost driver for the allocation of costs of disposable materials to patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in control room at Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kecklund, Lena

    2005-09-01

    The Swedish nuclear power plants were commissioned during a period between 1972 and 1985 and the instrumentation and control equipment are basically from that period. For several years there have been plans made for changes in all the nuclear power plants and to a certain extent the changes in control equipment and monitoring rooms have also been implemented. The object of this project was to make a comprehensive review of the changes in control room design implemented in the Swedish nuclear power plants and to describe how the MTO- (Man-Technology-Organisation) and (Man-Machine-Interface) -issues have been integrated in the process. The survey is intended to give an overall picture of the changes in control room design and man-machine-interface made in the Swedish control rooms, in order to get a deeper knowledge of the change management process and its results as well as of the management of MTO-issues in these projects. The units included in this survey are: Oskarhamn reactor 2 and 3; Ringhals reactor 2, 3 and 4; Forsmark reactor 1, 2 and 3. The Oskarshamn 1 unit has not been included in this report as it has recently undergone an extensive modernisation program as well as a detailed inspection by the SKI (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate). At Ringhals 2 the modernisation work is carried out at present and the unit is also subjected to extensive inspection activities carried out by SKI and is therefore not part of this survey. This report also includes a short description of relevant standards and requirements. Then follows a presentation of the results of the plant survey, presented as case studies for three companies OKG, Ringhals and FKA. Control room changes are summarized as well as the results on specific MTO issues which has been surveyed. In all the power companies there is a joint way of working with projects concerning plant modifications. This process is described for each company separately. In the concluding of the report the strengths and

  11. Power plant waste disposals in open-cast mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herstus, J.; Stastny, J. [AGE s.r.o. - Aplikovana Geotechnika a Ekologie, Thamova (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    High population density in Czech Republic has led, as well as in other countries, to strong NIMBY syndrome influencing the waste disposal location. The largest thermal power plants are situated in neighborhood of extensive open-cast brown coal mines with huge area covered by tipped clayey spoil. Such spoil areas, technically almost useless, are potential space for power giant waste disposal position. There are several limitations, based on specific structural features of tipped clayey spoil, influencing decision to use such area as site for waste disposal. Low shear strength and extremely high compressibility belong to the geotechnical limitations. High permeability of upper ten or more meters of tipped spoil and its changes with applied stress level belongs to transitional features between geotechnical and environmental limitations. The problems of ash and FGD products stabilized interaction with such subgrade represent environmental limitation. The paper reports about the testing procedure developed for thickness and permeability estimation of upper soil layer and gives brief review of laboratory and site investigation results on potential sites from point of view of above mentioned limitations. Also gives an outline how to eliminate the influence of unfavorable conditions.

  12. Information Foraging in Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boring, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    nformation foraging theory articulates the role of the human as an 'informavore' that seeks information and follows optimal foraging strategies (i.e., the 'information scent') to find meaningful information. This paper briefly reviews the findings from information foraging theory outside the nuclear domain and then discusses the types of information foraging strategies operators employ for normal and off-normal operations in the control room. For example, operators may employ a predatory 'wolf' strategy of hunting for information in the face of a plant upset. However, during routine operations, the operators may employ a trapping 'spider' strategy of waiting for relevant indicators to appear. This delineation corresponds to information pull and push strategies, respectively. No studies have been conducted to determine explicitly the characteristics of a control room interface that is optimized for both push and pull information foraging strategies, nor has there been empirical work to validate operator performance when transitioning between push and pull strategies. This paper explores examples of control room operators as wolves vs. spiders and con- cludes by proposing a set of research questions to investigate information foraging in control room settings.

  13. Information Foraging in Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Boring

    2011-09-01

    nformation foraging theory articulates the role of the human as an 'informavore' that seeks information and follows optimal foraging strategies (i.e., the 'information scent') to find meaningful information. This paper briefly reviews the findings from information foraging theory outside the nuclear domain and then discusses the types of information foraging strategies operators employ for normal and off-normal operations in the control room. For example, operators may employ a predatory 'wolf' strategy of hunting for information in the face of a plant upset. However, during routine operations, the operators may employ a trapping 'spider' strategy of waiting for relevant indicators to appear. This delineation corresponds to information pull and push strategies, respectively. No studies have been conducted to determine explicitly the characteristics of a control room interface that is optimized for both push and pull information foraging strategies, nor has there been empirical work to validate operator performance when transitioning between push and pull strategies. This paper explores examples of control room operators as wolves vs. spiders and con- cludes by proposing a set of research questions to investigate information foraging in control room settings.

  14. Game-based training environment for nuclear plant control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung Tamin; Sun Tienlung; Yang Chihwei; Yang Lichen; Cheng Tsungchieh; Wang Jyhgang

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power plant's safety is very important problem. In this very conscientious environment if operator has a little mistake, they may threaten with many people influence their safety. Therefore, operating training of control room is very important. However, the operator training is in limited space and time. Each operator must go to simulative control room do some training. If we can let each trainee having more time to do training and does not go to simulative control room. It may have some advantages for trainee. Moreover, in the traditional training ways, each operator may through the video, teaching manual or through the experienced instructor to learn the knowledge. This training way may let operator feel bored and stressful. So, in this paper aims, we hope utilizing virtual reality technology developing a game-based virtual training environment of control room. Finally, we will use presence questionnaire evaluating realism and feasibility of our virtual training environment. Expecting this initial concept of game-based virtual training environment can attract trainees having more learning motivation to do training in off-hour. (author)

  15. An expert display system and nuclear power plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltracchi, L.

    1988-01-01

    An expert display system controls automatically the display of segments on a cathode ray tube's screen to form an image of plant operations. The image consists of an icon of: 1) the process (heat engine cycle), 2) plant control systems, and 3) safety systems. A set of data-driven, forward-chaining computer stored rules control the display of segments. As plant operation changes, measured plant data are processed through the rules, and the results control the deletion and addition of segments to the display format. The icon contains information needed by control rooms operators to monitor plant operations. One example of an expert display is illustrated for the operator's task of monitoring leakage from a safety valve in a steam line of a boiling water reactor (BWR). In another example, the use of an expert display to monitor plant operations during pre-trip, trip, and post-trip operations is discussed as a universal display. The viewpoints and opinions expressed herein are the author's personal ones, and they are not to be interpreted as Nuclear Regulatory Commission criteria, requirements, or guidelines

  16. A Business Case for Nuclear Plant Control Room Modernization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Ken; Lawrie, Sean; Niedermuller, Josef M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a generic business case for implementation of technology that supports Control Room Modernization (CRM). The analysis presented in two forms; 1) a standalone technology upgrade, and 2) a technology upgrade that is built upon and incremental to a prior business case created for Mobile Work Packages (MWP). The business case contends that advanced communication and networking and analytical technologies will allow NPP to conduct control room operations with improved focus by reducing human factors and redundant manpower, and therefore operate with fewer errors. While some labor savings can be harvested in terms of overtime, the majority of savings are demonstrated as reduced time to take the plant off line and bring back on line in support of outages. The benefits are quantified to a rough order of magnitude that provides directional guidance to NPPs that are interested in developing a similar business case. This business case focuses on modernization of the operator control room and does not consider a complete overhaul and modernization of a plants instrument and control systems. While operators may be considering such an investment at their plants, the sizable capital investment required is not likely supported by a cost/benefit analysis alone. More likely, it is driven by obsolescence and reliability issues, and requires consideration of mechanical condition of plant systems, capital depreciation, financing, relicensing and overall viability of the plant asset over a 20-year horizon in a competitive market. Prior studies [REF] have indicated that such a modernization of plant I&C systems, alone or as part of a larger modernization effort, can yield very significant reductions in O&M costs. However, the depth of research and analysis required to develop a meaningful business case for a plant modernization effort is well beyond the scope of this study. While CRM as considered in this study can be easily integrated as part of grander plant

  17. A Business Case for Nuclear Plant Control Room Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lawrie, Sean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Niedermuller, Josef M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a generic business case for implementation of technology that supports Control Room Modernization (CRM). The analysis presented in two forms; 1) a standalone technology upgrade, and 2) a technology upgrade that is built upon and incremental to a prior business case created for Mobile Work Packages (MWP). The business case contends that advanced communication and networking and analytical technologies will allow NPP to conduct control room operations with improved focus by reducing human factors and redundant manpower, and therefore operate with fewer errors. While some labor savings can be harvested in terms of overtime, the majority of savings are demonstrated as reduced time to take the plant off line and bring back on line in support of outages. The benefits are quantified to a rough order of magnitude that provides directional guidance to NPPs that are interested in developing a similar business case. This business case focuses on modernization of the operator control room and does not consider a complete overhaul and modernization of a plants instrument and control systems. While operators may be considering such an investment at their plants, the sizable capital investment required is not likely supported by a cost/benefit analysis alone. More likely, it is driven by obsolescence and reliability issues, and requires consideration of mechanical condition of plant systems, capital depreciation, financing, relicensing and overall viability of the plant asset over a 20-year horizon in a competitive market. Prior studies [REF] have indicated that such a modernization of plant I&C systems, alone or as part of a larger modernization effort, can yield very significant reductions in O&M costs. However, the depth of research and analysis required to develop a meaningful business case for a plant modernization effort is well beyond the scope of this study. While CRM as considered in this study can be easily integrated as part of grander plant

  18. B Plant treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units inspection plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam, T.G.

    1996-01-01

    This inspection plan is written to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303 for operations of a TSD facility. Owners/operators of TSD facilities are required to inspection their facility and active waste management units to prevent and/or detect malfunctions, discharges and other conditions potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. A written plan detailing these inspection efforts must be maintained at the facility in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC), Chapter 173-303, ''Dangerous Waste Regulations'' (WAC 173-303), a written inspection plan is required for the operation of a treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facility and individual TSD units. B Plant is a permitted TSD facility currently operating under interim status with an approved Part A Permit. Various operational systems and locations within or under the control of B Plant have been permitted for waste management activities. Included are the following TSD units: Cell 4 Container Storage Area; B Plant Containment Building; Low Level Waste Tank System; Organic Waste Tank System; Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) Tank System; Low Level Waste Concentrator Tank System. This inspection plan complies with the requirements of WAC 173-303. It addresses both general TSD facility and TSD unit-specific inspection requirements. Sections on each of the TSD units provide a brief description of the system configuration and the permitted waste management activity, a summary of the inspection requirements, and details on the activities B Plant uses to maintain compliance with those requirements

  19. The Design and Research of the Operation Status Detector for Marine Engine Room Power Plant Based on Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Designed in this paper, based on the noise of ship engine room power plant running status of detector, is mainly used in the operation of the power plant of acoustic shell size to determine when the machine running state, this device is composed of signal disposal and alarm display adjustment part of two parts. Detector that can show the size of the voice, if exceed the set limit alarm value, the detector can sound an alarm, to remind staff equipment fails, it shall timely inspection maintenance, improve the safety of the operation of the ship.

  20. Long-term disposal of enrichment plant tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-08-01

    Approximately 97% of the uranium fed to the isotope separation plants is recovered as tails containing nominally 0.2 wt percent U-235. Essentially all this tails material produced in the past, as well as that currently being generated, is stored as solidified UF 6 in steel cylinders. This report describes a stand-alone, 10 tU/day facility for converting the UF 6 to a stable uranium oxide powder amenable to long-term storage in steel drums. The conversion is accomplished in a two-step process in which the UF 6 is first reduced to UF 4 with hydrogen in a tower reactor and then the UF 4 is pyrohydrolyzed to UO 2 with steam in a three-stage screw reactor. One reduction reactor supplies the feed for three pyrohydrolysis reactor lines. Included in the process flow sheets and reactor design details are descriptions of the major auxiliary components for vaporizing and feeding the UF 6 , a dissociator for ammonia used as a hydrogen source, a system for recovering anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, and a reactor system for the disposal of hydrous hydrogen fluoride. Two of the nominal 10 tU/day plants would be required to handle the tails produced in isotope separation plants supplying enriched uranium to a nuclear power industry with a generation capacity of 50 GWe per year

  1. Unresolved issues for the disposal of remote-handled transuranic waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.K.; Neill, R.H.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to dispose of 176,000 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by the defense activities of the US Government. The envisioned inventory contains approximately 6 million cubic feet of contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste and 250,000 cubic feet of remote handled transuranic (RH TRU) waste. CH TRU emits less than 0.2 rem/hr at the container surface. Of the 250,000 cubic feet of RH TRU waste, 5% by volume can emit up to 1,000 rem/hr at the container surface. The remainder of RH TRU waste must emit less than 100 rem/hr. These are major unresolved problems with the intended disposal of RH TRU waste in the WIPP. (1) The WIPP design requires the canisters of RH TRU waste to be emplaced in the walls (ribs) of each repository room. Each room will then be filled with drums of CH TRU waste. However, the RH TRU waste will not be available for shipment and disposal until after several rooms have already been filled with drums of CH TRU waste. RH TRU disposal capacity will be loss for each room that is first filled with CH TRU waste. (2) Complete RH TRU waste characterization data will not be available for performance assessment because the facilities needed for waste handling, waste treatment, waste packaging, and waste characterization do not yet exist. (3) The DOE does not have a transportation cask for RH TRU waste certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These issues are discussed along with possible solutions and consequences from these solutions. 46 refs

  2. 3D visualization based customer experiences of nuclear plant control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Tienlung; Chou Chinmei; Hung Tamin; Cheng Tsungchieh; Yang Chihwei; Yang Lichen

    2011-01-01

    This paper employs virtual reality (VR) technology to develop an interactive virtual nuclear plant control room in which the general public could easily walk into the 'red zone' and play with the control buttons. The VR-based approach allows deeper and richer customer experiences that the real nuclear plant control room could not offer. When people know more about the serious process control procedures enforced in the nuclear plant control room, they will appropriate more about the safety efforts imposed by the nuclear plant and become more comfortable about the nuclear plant. The virtual nuclear plant control room is built using a 3D game development tool called Unity3D. The 3D scene is connected to a nuclear plant simulation system through Windows API programs. To evaluate the usability of the virtual control room, an experiment will be conducted to see how much 'immersion' the users could feel when they played with the virtual control room. (author)

  3. Shield requirement estimation for pin storage room in fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanthi, M.M.; Keshavamurthy, R.S.; Sivashankaran, G.

    2012-01-01

    Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle Facility (FRFCF) is an upcoming project in Kalpakkam. It has the facility to recycle the fuel from PFBR. It is an integrated facility, consists of fuel reprocessing plant, fuel fabrication plant (FFP), core subassembly plant, Reprocessed Uranium plant (RUP) and waste management plant. The spent fuel from PFBR would be reprocessed in fuel reprocessing plant. The reprocessed fuel material would be sent to fuel fabrication plant. The main activity of fuel fabrication plant is the production of MOX fuel pins. The fuel fabrication plant has a fuel pin storage room. The shield requirement for the pin storage room has been estimated by Monte Carlo method. (author)

  4. Waste salt disposal at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.; Oblath, S.B.; Pepper, D.W.; Wilhite, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    Waste salt solution, produced during processing of high-level nuclear waste, will be incorporated in a cement matrix for emplacement in an engineered disposal facility. Wasteform characteristics and disposal facility details will be presented along with results of a field test of wasteform contaminant release and of modeling studies to predict releases. 5 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  5. FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION FOR MODELING CONTROL ROOM CREW PERFORMANCE AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman; Tuan Q Tran; Brian F Gore

    2008-09-01

    This paper summarizes an emerging project regarding the utilization of high-fidelity MIDAS simulations for visualizing and modeling control room crew performance at nuclear power plants. The key envisioned uses for MIDAS-based control room simulations are: (i) the estimation of human error associated with advanced control room equipment and configurations, (ii) the investigative determination of contributory cognitive factors for risk significant scenarios involving control room operating crews, and (iii) the certification of reduced staffing levels in advanced control rooms. It is proposed that MIDAS serves as a key component for the effective modeling of cognition, elements of situation awareness, and risk associated with human performance in next generation control rooms.

  6. FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION FOR MODELING CONTROL ROOM CREW PERFORMANCE AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman; Tuan Q Tran; Brian F Gore

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes an emerging project regarding the utilization of high-fidelity MIDAS simulations for visualizing and modeling control room crew performance at nuclear power plants. The key envisioned uses for MIDAS-based control room simulations are: (1) the estimation of human error associated with advanced control room equipment and configurations, (2) the investigative determination of contributory cognitive factors for risk significant scenarios involving control room operating crews, and (3) the certification of reduced staffing levels in advanced control rooms. It is proposed that MIDAS serves as a key component for the effective modeling of cognition, elements of situation awareness, and risk associated with human performance in next generation control rooms

  7. Disposal of spent fuel from German nuclear power plants - 16028

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, Reinhold; Brammer, Klaus-Juergen; Filbert, Wolfgang; Bollingerfehr, Wilhelm

    2009-01-01

    The 'direct disposal of spent fuel' as a part of the current German reference concept was developed as an alternative to spent fuel reprocessing and vitrified HLW disposal. The technical facilities necessary for the implementation of this part of the reference concept, the so called POLLUX R concept, i.e. interim storage buildings for casks containing spent fuel, a pilot conditioning facility, and a special cask 'POLLUX' for final disposal have been built. With view to a geological salt formation all handling procedures for the direct disposal of spent fuel were tested aboveground in full-scale test facilities. To optimise the reference concept, all operational steps have been reviewed for possible improvements. The two additional concepts for the direct disposal of SF are the BSK 3 concept and the DIREGT concept. Both concepts rely on borehole emplacement technology, vertical boreholes for the BSK 3 concept und horizontal boreholes for the DIREGT concept. Supported by the EU and the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi), DBE TECHNOLOGY built an aboveground full-scale test facility to simulate all relevant handling procedures for the BSK 3 disposal concept. GNS (Company for Nuclear Service), representing the German utilities, provided the main components and its know-how concerning cask design and manufacturing. The test program was concluded recently after more than 1.000 emplacement operations had been performed successfully. The BSK 3 emplacement system in total comprises an emplacement device, a borehole lock, a transport cart, a transfer cask which will shuttle between the aboveground conditioning facility and the underground repository, and the BSK 3 canister itself, designed to contain the fuel rods of three PWR-fuel assemblies with a total of about 1.6 tHM. The BSK 3 concept simplifies the operation of the repository because the handling procedures and techniques can also be applied for the disposal of reprocessing residues. In addition

  8. Analysis on nuclear power plant control room system design and improvement based on human factor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Feng; Liu Yanzi; Sun Yongbin

    2014-01-01

    The design of nuclear power plant control room system is a process of improvement with the implementation of human factor engineering theory and guidance. The method of implementation human factor engineering principles into the nuclear power plant control room system design and improvement was discussed in this paper. It is recommended that comprehensive address should be done from control room system function, human machine interface, digital procedure, control room layout and environment design based on the human factor engineering theory and experience. The main issues which should be paid more attention during the control room system design and improvement also were addressed in this paper, and then advices and notices for the design and improvement of the nuclear power plant control room system were afforded. (authors)

  9. Gaining control room habitability margin at the Palisades Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harden, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    The bounding design-basis accident for control room habitability is the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). At Palisades, very little margin existed between the calculated control room operator thyroid dose and the 0.3-Sv (30-rem) limit of Standard Review Plan (SRP) 6.4. Also, a low rate of unfiltered air leakage into the control room during the emergency mode of operation, 5.5 x 10 -3 m 3 /s (11.6 ft 3 /min), was accounted for in the control room habitability analysis. The control room heating, ventilating and air-conditioning system at Palisades has louvered isolation dampers for the normal air intake that are exposed to a negative pressure. Considering the small margin to the thyroid dose limits and the leakage characteristics of louvered dampers, a low allowable rate of unfiltered air in-leakage raised some concern. A significant effort has been initiated to alleviate control room habitability concerns at Palisades. The first step in this effort was to evaluate the calculational models for control room habitability and gain margin through updated analytical methods. To accomplish this, a new radiological consequence analysis for the LOCA was completed

  10. Sharps injury reduction: a six-year, three-phase study comparing use of a small patient-room sharps disposal container with a larger engineered container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmond, T; Naisoro, W

    2014-09-01

    A 350-bed Sydney hospital noted excessive container-associated sharps injuries (CASI) using small sharps containers and compared the effect from 2004 to 2010 of using a larger container engineered to reduce CASI. In Phase 1 (Ph1), disposable 1.4L containers (BD Australia) were carried to/from patients' rooms. In Phase 2 (Ph2), this stopped and a safety-engineered 32L reusable container (the Device; Sharpsmart, SteriHealth) was mounted in medication stations only and sharps were carried to and from patient rooms using kidney dishes. In Phase 3 (Ph3), the Device was wall-mounted in patient rooms. Sharps injuries were categorised as 'during-procedure', 'after-procedure but before disposal', 'CASI', and 'improper disposal SI'. Disposal-related SI comprised CASI plus improper-disposal SI. Injuries per 100 full-time-equivalent staff were analysed using Chi 2 ; p ≤ 0.05; and relative risk and 95% confidence limits were calculated. In Ph1 (small containers) 19.4% of SI were CASI and transport injuries were zero. In Ph2 (Device in medication station) CASI fell 94.9% ( p <0.001); Disposal-related SI fell 71.1% ( p =0.002) but transport injuries rose significantly. In Ph3 (Device in patient room) zero CASI occurred ( p <0.001); Disposal-related SI fell 83.1% ( p =0.001). Recapping SI fell 85.1% ( p =0.01) with the Device. The Device's volume, large aperture, passive overfill-protection and close-at-hand siting are postulated as SI reduction factors.

  11. Reasonable management plan of sludge in sewage disposal plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yum, Kyu Jin; Koo, Hyun Jung [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    The compost method, which is widely used as a sewage disposal recycling in Korea, is now basically impossible to recycle sludge to compost by the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry announcement. Therefore, the disposal of sludge will be much harder with reducing the amount of sludge used as compost. The amount of sludge other than using as compost is very small, so the development of various sludge recycling and use will be needed with regulations. This study was implemented to help the establishment of sewage sludge recycling policy in Korea. 30 refs., 17 figs., 58 tabs.

  12. Virtual reality applied in the ergonomic evaluation of nuclear power plant control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatto, Leandro Barbosa da Silveira

    2012-01-01

    A nuclear power plant control room is a complex system that controls a nuclear and thermodynamic process used to produce electrical energy. The operators interact with the control room through interfaces that have significant implications to nuclear power plant safety and influence the operator activity. The operator activity presents complexity features and shows a series of mechanisms absents from the human factors guidelines, important to the evaluation and update of control rooms. The ergonomics approach considers the operation strategies, the interaction between the operators, the operator-system interaction, and interaction between operators and support groups. The main objective of this paper is propose the modeling of a nuclear control room, with the support of a game engine core. This tool will be used in the ergonomic evaluation of nuclear control room, generating information and data that will make possible the adequacy of control rooms features to the legal requirements of the regulating agency, assisting the nuclear licensing. (author)

  13. OVERVIEW OF A RECONFIGURABLE SIMULATOR FOR MAIN CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring

    2012-10-01

    This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plant modernization in the U.S. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

  14. Optimization of the main control room habitability system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Guanghui; Zhao Xinyan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the optimization of main control room habitability system in nuclear power plant. It also describes the design shortage in terms of habitability in the main control room. Through modification and optimization, habitable conditions are met for personnel staying in the emergency area of the main control room for a period of time, with an aim to take accident intervention measures smoothly and reduce the accident loss and radioactive contamination as low as possible. (authors)

  15. How does a change in the control room design affect diagnostic strategies in nuclear power plants?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Jonghyun

    2014-01-01

    Recently, main control rooms have been considerably changed by modern computer techniques. Some of the features that distinguish digital control rooms from conventional, analog rooms in nuclear power plants include advanced alarm systems, graphic information display systems, computerized procedure systems, and soft control. These features can bring changes in operator tasks, changing the characteristics of tasks or creating new tasks for operators. It is especially expected that these features may bring out changes in the operator's diagnostic tasks and strategies in a digital control room as compared with an analog control room. This study investigates the differences in the operator's diagnostic tasks and strategies in analog and digital control rooms. This study also attempts to evaluate how new systems in a digital control room affect diagnostic strategies. Three different approaches, which are complementary, are used to identify diagnostic strategies in the digital control room and in the analog control room: (1) observation in the simulator, (2) interview with operators, and (3) a literature review. The results show that the digital control room introduces new diagnosis strategies compared with the analog control room while also changing the characteristics of the strategies, mostly by gaining more support from the computerized system. (author)

  16. Polonium-210 in the environment around a radioactive waste disposal area and phosphate ore processing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, III, W J; Markham, O D

    1984-04-01

    Polonium-210 concentrations were determined for soil, vegetation and small mammal tissues collected at a solid radioactive waste disposal area, near a phosphate ore processing plant and at two rural areas in southeastern Idaho. Polonium concentrations in media sampled near the radioactive waste disposal facility were equal to or less than values from rural area samples, indicating that disposal of solid radioactive waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site has not resulted in increased environmental levels of polonium. Concentrations of /sup 210/Po in soils, deer mice hide and carcass samples collected near the phosphate processing plant were statistically greater than the other sampling locations; however, the mean /sup 210/Po concentration in soils and small mammal tissues from sampling areas near the phosphate plant were only four and three times greater, respectively, than control values. No statistical difference was observed for /sup 210/Po concentrations in vegetation among any of the sampling locations.

  17. Nuclear power plant control room task analysis. Pilot study for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barks, D.B.; Kozinsky, E.J.; Eckel, S.

    1982-05-01

    The purposes of this nuclear plant task analysis pilot study: to demonstrate the use of task analysis techniques on selected abnormal or emergency operation events in a nuclear power plant; to evaluate the use of simulator data obtained from an automated Performance Measurement System to supplement and validate data obtained by traditional task analysis methods; and to demonstrate sample applications of task analysis data to address questions pertinent to nuclear power plant operational safety: control room layout, staffing and training requirements, operating procedures, interpersonal communications, and job performance aids. Five data sources were investigated to provide information for a task analysis. These sources were (1) written operating procedures (event-based); (2) interviews with subject matter experts (the control room operators); (3) videotapes of the control room operators (senior reactor operators and reactor operators) while responding to each event in a simulator; (4) walk-/talk-throughs conducted by control room operators for each event; and (5) simulator data from the PMS

  18. Consequences of modern information display technologies in power plant control rooms. What has changed in control rooms?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruip, Jochen

    2007-01-01

    Control rooms of power plants have undergone major developments and changes, some of them considerable, over the past few years. The most visible change has been the display of information on a variety of video screens and projectors. The question examined in the article is whether the visible or invisible changes in power plant control rooms have any influence on the training of operators. In a contribution coming from the Simulator Center, this question naturally focuses on simulator training, which is to be discussed in the light of the basic objectives of this type of training. The main duty of the Essen Simulator Center is to offer first training and in-career training to the licensed operators of nuclear power plants. The experience accumulated in nearly thirty years of simulator training has been laid down in the 'Kompendium der Simulatorschulung' (Handbook of Simulator Training). Simulator training, as referred to above, is a major component of all training programs. The two main objectives of simulator training are 'reliability in operation' and 'experience' in handling the new information systems and digital I and C systems. In the future, simulators can also be used for advanced developments and for advance testing and training. (orig.)

  19. Nuclear power and heating plant control rooms. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaniuk, B.

    1983-01-01

    The questions are discussed of memory capacity, vigilance, speed of data processing, decision-making quality and other demands placed on operators of nuclear power and heating plants. On the example of the accident at the Three Mile Island-2 nuclear power plant, the instants are shown when failure of the human factor owing to a stress situation resulted in the accident not being coped with in time. It is therefore necessary to place high demands on the choice of operators and to devote equal attention to the human factor as to the safety of the technical equipment of the power plant. (J.B.)

  20. Environmental issues of disposal of wastes from thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, R.; Sinha, T.K.; Saxena, N.C.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to find out means to use the fly ash ponds as useful fertile land which will result in an environment friendly fly ash disposal system. The results showed: (i) fly-ash mixed with 50% or even 25% soil can support on it vegetables like tomato, brinjal, kholrabi, chilly and ladies finger, food crops like wheat, bazra and paddy and pulses like arhar, (ii) fly ash ponds without any amendment can support growth of lemon-grass, (iii) another set of experiments have shown that normal leaching of fly ash by rain water or tap water does not draw any pollutant from it, (iv) long term leaching through months can draw negligible amounts of Cu, Zn, Mn, Fe, etc. which may not result in any effective ground water pollution. (author)

  1. Reinvestigation into Closure Predictions of Room D at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedlunn, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Room D was an in-situ, isothermal, underground experiment conducted at theWaste Isolation Pilot Plant between 1984 and 1991. The room was carefully instrumented to measure the horizontal and vertical closure immediately upon excavation and for several years thereafter. Early finite element simulations of salt creep around Room D under predicted the vertical closure by 4.5×, causing investigators to explore a series of changes to the way Room D was modeled. Discrepancies between simulations and measurements were resolved through a series of adjustments to model parameters, which were openly acknowledged in published reports. Interest in Room D has been rekindled recently by the U.S./German Joint Project III and Project WEIMOS, which seek to improve the predictions of rock salt constitutive models. Joint Project participants calibrate their models solely against laboratory tests, and benchmark the models against underground experiments, such as room D. This report describes updating legacy Room D simulations to today’s computational standards by rectifying several numerical issues. Subsequently, the constitutive model used in previous modeling is recalibrated two different ways against a suite of new laboratory creep experiments on salt extracted from the repository horizon of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Simulations with the new, laboratory-based, calibrations under predict Room D vertical closure by 3.1×. A list of potential improvements is discussed.

  2. Reinvestigation into Closure Predictions of Room D at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedlunn, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-27

    Room D was an in-situ, isothermal, underground experiment conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant between 1984 and 1991. The room was carefully instrumented to measure the horizontal and vertical closure immediately upon excavation and for several years thereafter. Early finite element simulations of salt creep around Room D under-predicted the vertical closure by 4.5×, causing investigators to explore a series of changes to the way Room D was modeled. Discrepancies between simulations and measurements were resolved through a series of adjustments to model parameters, which were openly acknowledged in published reports. Interest in Room D has been rekindled recently by the U.S./German Joint Project III and Project WEIMOS, which seek to improve the predictions of rock salt constitutive models. Joint Project participants calibrate their models solely against laboratory tests, and benchmark the models against underground experiments, such as room D. This report describes updating legacy Room D simulations to today’s computational standards by rectifying several numerical issues. Subsequently, the constitutive model used in previous modeling is recalibrated two different ways against a suite of new laboratory creep experiments on salt extracted from the repository horizon of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Simulations with the new, laboratory-based, calibrations under-predict Room D vertical closure by 3.1×. A list of potential improvements is discussed.

  3. Large screen mimic display design research for advanced main control room in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Mingguang; Yang Yanhua; Xu Jijun; Zhang Qinshun; Ning Zhonghe

    2002-01-01

    Firstly the evolution of mimic diagrams or displays used in the main control room of nuclear power plant was introduced. The active functions of mimic diagrams were analyzed on the release of operator psychological burden and pressure, the assistance of operator for the information searching, status understanding, manual actuation, correct decision making as well as the safe and reliable operation of the nuclear power plant. The importance and necessity to use the (large screen) mimic diagrams in advanced main control room of nuclear power plant, the design principle, design details and verification measures of large screen mimic display are also described

  4. Near-term improvements for nuclear power plant control room annunciator systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.L.; Duvernoy, E.G.; Ames, K.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Eckenrode, R.J.

    1983-04-01

    This report sets forth a basic design philosophy with its associated functional criteria and design principles for present-day, hard-wired annunciator systems in the control rooms of nuclear power plants. It also presents a variety of annunciator design features that are either necessary for or useful to the implementation of the design philosophy. The information contained in this report is synthesized from an extensive literature review, from inspection and analysis of control room annunciator systems in the nuclear industry and in related industries, and from discussions with a variety of individuals who are knowledgeable about annunciator systems, nuclear plant control rooms, or both. This information should help licensees and license applicants in improving their hard-wired, control room annunciator systems as outlined by NUREG-0700

  5. New low-level radioactive waste disposal/storage facilities for the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Within the next few years the Savannah River Plant will require new facilities for the disposal and/or storage of solid low-level radioactive waste. Six options have been developed which would meet the regulatory and site-specific requirements for such facilities

  6. Application of process computers and colour CRT displays in the plant control room of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, M.; Hayakawa, H.; Kawahara, H.; Neda, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The recent application of a CRT display system in an 1100-MW(e) BWR plant control room and the design features of a new control room whose installation is planned for the next generation are discussed. As reactor unit capacity and the need for plant safety and reliability continue to increase, instrumentation and control equipment is growing in number and complexity. In consequence, control and supervision of plant operations require improvement. Thus, because of recent progress in the field of process computers and display equipment (colour CRTs), efficient improvements of the control room are under way in the Japanese BWR plant. In the recently constructed BWR plant (1100 MW(e)), five CRTs on the bench board and two process computers were additionally installed in the control room during the construction stage to improve plant control and supervisory functions by implementing the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident. The major functions of the new computers and display systems are to show integrated graphic displays of the plant status, to monitor the standby condition of the safety system, to show the condition of the integrated alarm system, etc. In practice, in the actual plant, this newly installed system performs well. On the basis of the experience gained in these activities, a new computerized control and monitoring system is now being designed for subsequent domestic BWR plants. This advanced system will incorporate not only the functions already mentioned, but also a surveillance guide system and plant automation. For future plants, a diagnostic system and an instructional system that can analyse a disturbance and give operational guidance to the plant operator are being developed in a government-sponsored programme. (author)

  7. New Low-Level Radioactive Waste Storage/Disposal Facilities at the Savannah River Plant: Environmental information document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.; Grant, M.W.; Towler, O.O.

    1987-04-01

    Site selection, alternative facilities, and alternative operations are described for a new low-level solid radioactive waste storage/disposal operation at the Savannah River Plant. Performance assessments and cost estimates for the alternatives are presented. Appendix G contains an intensive archaeological survey of alternative waste disposal areas in the Savannah River Plant area. 117 refs., 99 figs., 128 tabs

  8. 32 CFR 644.486 - Disposal of buildings and improvements constructed under emergency plant facilities (EPF) or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Disposal of buildings and improvements constructed under emergency plant facilities (EPF) or similar contracts. 644.486 Section 644.486 National... Disposal of buildings and improvements constructed under emergency plant facilities (EPF) or similar...

  9. Study on comprehensive evaluation model for nuclear power plant control room layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yiming; Liu Yuan; Fan Huixian

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation model for layout of the main control room of nuclear power plants was proposed. Firstly the design scope and principle for the layout of the main control room were defined based on the standards, and then the index system for the comprehensive evaluation was established. Finally, comprehensive evaluation was carried out for the layout design by applying the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method in the index system. (authors)

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase final supplemental environmental impact statement. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II) is to provide information on environmental impacts regarding the Department of Energy''s (DOE) proposed disposal operations at WIPP. The Proposed Action describes the treatment and disposal of the Basic inventory of TRU waste over a 35-year period. The Action Alternatives proposed the treatment of the Basic Inventory and an Additional Inventory as well as the transportation of the treated waste to WIPP for disposal over a 150- to 190-year period. The three Action Alternatives include the treatment of TRU waste at consolidation sites to meet WIPP planning-basic Waste Acceptance Criteria, the thermal treatment of TRU waste to meet Land Disposal Restrictions, and the treatment of TRU waste by a shred and grout process. SEIS-II evaluates environmental impacts resulting from the various treatment options; the transportation of TRU waste to WIPP using truck, a combination of truck and regular rail service, and a combination of truck and dedicated rail service; and the disposal of this waste in the repository. Evaluated impacts include those to the general environment and to human health. Additional issues associated with the implementation of the alternatives are discussed to provide further understanding of the decisions to be reached and to provide the opportunity for public input on improving DOE''s Environmental Management Program

  11. Measuring Human Performance in Simulated Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms Using Eye Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovesdi, Casey Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Brandon Charles [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bower, Gordon Ross [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spielman, Zachary Alexander [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hill, Rachael Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); LeBlanc, Katya Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Control room modernization will be an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. As part of modernization efforts, personnel will need to gain a full understanding of how control room technologies affect performance of human operators. Recent advances in technology enables the use of eye tracking technology to continuously measure an operator’s eye movement, which correlates with a variety of human performance constructs such as situation awareness and workload. This report describes eye tracking metrics in the context of how they will be used in nuclear power plant control room simulator studies.

  12. Measuring Human Performance in Simulated Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms Using Eye Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovesdi, Casey Robert; Rice, Brandon Charles; Bower, Gordon Ross; Spielman, Zachary Alexander; Hill, Rachael Ann; LeBlanc, Katya Lee

    2015-01-01

    Control room modernization will be an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. As part of modernization efforts, personnel will need to gain a full understanding of how control room technologies affect performance of human operators. Recent advances in technology enables the use of eye tracking technology to continuously measure an operator's eye movement, which correlates with a variety of human performance constructs such as situation awareness and workload. This report describes eye tracking metrics in the context of how they will be used in nuclear power plant control room simulator studies.

  13. Open of chat rooms for discussing geological disposal issues and review of adequate approaches for offering the information using the internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Masayuki; Ito, Toshikazu; Yabuta, Naohiro; Yoshizawa, Nobuaki; Tsunoda, Hirokazu

    2001-03-01

    JNC is doing publicity work to let the technical reliability for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) comprehended widely. But the information about geological disposal of HLW itself and its technology has not been spread and recognized. It has been required to offer the opportunity to discuss the geological disposal and its technology as our own issue. Recently the internet, which has such characteristics as two-way, instant and open communication means, has become used on business and for pleasure commonly. So the opportunity for discussing the topics related to geological disposal of HLW has been offered on the internet web site so-called 'Internet Forum' by JNC since fiscal year 1999. 'Internet Forum' or an assembly of chat rooms is being run on the web server which is not operated by JNC in order to provide the place where discussion on the issue can be done as fairly and objectively as possible. In this report, the results of Internet Forum in fiscal year 2000 comparing with that in fiscal year 1999 were shown and the adequate approaches of operating 'Internet Forum' and offering the information about geological disposal of HLW were reviewed. (author)

  14. Control rooms and man-machine interface in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    The importance of man-machine interface for ensuring safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants has always been recognized. Since the early 1970's, the concepts of operator support and human factors have been increasingly used to better define the role of control rooms. In the late 1970's, the lessons learned from experience considerably accelerated the development of recommendations and regulatory requirements governing the resources and data available to operators in nuclear power plant control rooms, and specified the expertise required to assist them in case of need. This document summarizes the steps which have been taken and are being planned around the world to improve the man-machine interface for safe and economic power generation. It intends to present to the reader useful examples on some selected control room design and man-machine interface practices for operation and surveillance of nuclear power plants. 53 refs, 94 figs, 27 tabs

  15. Man-machine considerations in nuclear power plant control room design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennant, D.V.

    1987-01-01

    Although human factors is a subject that has been around for a number of years, this area of design has only recently become known to the power industry. As power plants have grown in size and complexity, the instrumentation required to control and monitor plant processes has increased tremendously. This has been especially true in nuclear power facilities. Although operators are better trained and qualified, very little consideration has been devoted to man-machine interface and the limitations of human operators. This paper explores the historic aspects and design philosophy associated with nuclear plant control rooms. Current problems and solutions are explored along with the components of a control room review. Finally, a survey of future advances in control room design are offered. This paper is concerned with instrumentation, controls, and displays

  16. Evaluation of disposal, recycling and clearance scenarios for managing ARIES radwaste after plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, L.

    2007-01-01

    The wealth of experience accumulated over the past 30-40 years of fusion power plant studies must be forged into a new strategy to reshape all aspects of handling the continual stream of radioactive materials during operation and after power plant decommissioning. With tighter environmental controls and the political difficulty of building new repositories worldwide, the disposal option could be replaced with more environmentally attractive scenarios, such as recycling and clearance. We applied the three scenarios to the most recent ARIES compact stellarator power plant. All ARIES-CS components qualify as Class A or C low-level waste, according to the US guidelines, and can potentially be recycled using conventional and advanced remote handling equipment. Approximately 80% of the total waste can be cleared for reuse within the nuclear industry or, preferably, released to the commercial market. This paper documents the recent developments in radwaste management of nuclear facilities and highlights the benefits and challenges of disposal, recycling and clearance

  17. Safety analysis of disposal of decommissioning waste from the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant - PURKU-93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieno, T.; Meszaros, F.; Nordman, H.; Taivassalo, V.

    1993-12-01

    Decommissioning waste from the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant will be disposed of at the depth between 60 and 100 meters in the bedrock at the power plant site. The existing VLJ repository for low and medium level operating waste will be extended with three new silos for the decommissioning waste of the TVO I and II reactors and the spent fuel interim store at the Olkiluoto site. Besides dismantling waste also used fuel boxes, control rods and other activated metal components accumulated during the operation of the reactors will be disposed of in the repository. The safety analysis is based on the detailed decommissioning plan of the Olkiluoto power plants and the comprehensive safety analysis carried out for the Final Safety Analysis Report of the VLJ repository. (58 refs., 31 figs., 38 tabs.)

  18. Results of technical and economical examinations for substantiation of special plant design for reprocessing and radioactive wastes disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, A.V.; Baldov, A.N.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the results of technical and economical examinations for substantiation of special plant design for reprocessing and radioactive wastes disposal are presented. Ground for the examination conducting was Health of Nation Programme ratified by the President and a number of Governmental decisions. The special plant is planned in the Mangystau Region. In the framework of feasibility study the data base by the worldwide known technologies was implemented, on reprocessing and experience of radioactive waste disposal. The technical requirements for the special plant construction are determined. The alternative options by structure content and site location of the special plant and radioactive waste disposal are cited

  19. The Swedish concept for disposal of waste arising from the operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Swedish nuclear power programme consists of 12 reactors producing 50% of the electricity in Sweden. It is stated by law that a waste producer has to make sure a safe handling and disposal of his radioactive waste. SKB is performing necessary activities on behalf of the waste producers. A system is in operation today that will manage all the radioactive waste produced in the country. The system consists of a transportation system, a final repository for operational waste and an interim storage facility for spent fuel. What remains to be built is an encapsulation plant for the spent fuel and a deep repository for final disposal of spent fuel and other long lived waste. All costs for managing and disposal of radioactive waste is paid by the owners of the nuclear power utilities. (author) 9 figs

  20. WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT (WIPP): THE NATIONS' SOLUTION TO NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE AND DISPOSAL ISSUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Tammy Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-17

    In the southeastern portion of my home state of New Mexico lies the Chihuahauan desert, where a transuranic (TRU), underground disposal site known as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) occupies 16 square miles. Full operation status began in March 1999, the year I graduated from Los Alamos High School, in Los Alamos, NM, the birthplace of the atomic bomb and one of the nation’s main TRU waste generator sites. During the time of its development and until recently, I did not have a full grasp on the role Los Alamos was playing in regards to WIPP. WIPP is used to store and dispose of TRU waste that has been generated since the 1940s because of nuclear weapons research and testing operations that have occurred in Los Alamos, NM and at other sites throughout the United States (U.S.). TRU waste consists of items that are contaminated with artificial, man-made radioactive elements that have atomic numbers greater than uranium, or are trans-uranic, on the periodic table of elements and it has longevity characteristics that may be hazardous to human health and the environment. Therefore, WIPP has underground rooms that have been carved out of 2,000 square foot thick salt formations approximately 2,150 feet underground so that the TRU waste can be isolated and disposed of. WIPP has operated safely and successfully until this year, when two unrelated events occurred in February 2014. With these events, the safety precautions and measures that have been operating at WIPP for the last 15 years are being revised and improved to ensure that other such events do not occur again.

  1. Review of Methods Related to Assessing Human Performance in Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katya L Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman

    2001-11-01

    With the increased use of digital systems in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms comes a need to thoroughly understand the human performance issues associated with digital systems. A common way to evaluate human performance is to test operators and crews in NPP control room simulators. However, it is often challenging to characterize human performance in meaningful ways when measuring performance in NPP control room simulations. A review of the literature in NPP simulator studies reveals a variety of ways to measure human performance in NPP control room simulations including direct observation, automated computer logging, recordings from physiological equipment, self-report techniques, protocol analysis and structured debriefs, and application of model-based evaluation. These methods and the particular measures used are summarized and evaluated.

  2. Review of international standards related to the design for control rooms on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Masashi; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Fujita, Yushi

    2005-01-01

    The improvement of Human-Machine Interface (HMI) design for control rooms on nuclear power plants (NPP) has been accomplished world wide, especially after the TMI-2 accident. The design process and guidelines are standardized in IEC60964 and supplemental standards as international standard. However, technological update is required due to the increased use of computerized control and monitoring equipment and systems in control rooms on NPP in recent years. Standards are becoming more important for computerized control rooms because there is more freedom to design than conventional hardware based system. For computerized control rooms, standards for hardware and software of HMI systems should be also considered. Standards and guidelines for computerized control rooms on NPP have been developed recently in each body such as IEC, ISO, and IEEE etc. Therefore, reviewing these standards and guidelines related to control rooms design of NPP can be useful not only for revision of the international standards such as IEC60964, but also for users of the standards and guidelines. In this paper, we reviewed the international standards related to the design for control rooms, in the two aspects of HMI design and hardware and software design, considering the undergoing revision work and their application. (author)

  3. Radioactive Waste Disposal Pilot Plant concept for a New Mexico site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weart, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    Twenty years of investigation have shown that disposal of nuclear wastes in deep salt formations is the surest means of isolating these wastes from the biosphere for the extremely long period of time required. A large scale demonstration of this capability will soon be provided by a Radioactive Waste Disposal Pilot Plant (RWDPP) to be developed in southeastern New Mexico. Initially, the pilot plant will accept only ERDA generated waste; high level waste from the commercial power reactor fuel cycle will eventually be accommodated in the pilot plant and the initial RWDPP design will be compatible with this waste form. Selection of a specific site and salt horizon will be completed in June 1976. Conceptual design of the RWDPP and assessment of its environmental impact will be completed by June 1977. Construction is expected to start in 1978 with first waste accepted in 1982. The present concept develops disposal areas for all nuclear waste types in a single salt horizon about 800 meters deep. This single level can accommodate all low level and high level waste generated in the United States through the year 2010. A major constraint on the RWDPP design is the ERDA requirement that all waste be ''readily'' retrievable during the duration of pilot plant operation

  4. Plant Leaf Imaging using Time of Flight Camera under Sunlight, Shadow and Room Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazmi, Wajahat; Foix, Sergi; Alenya, Guillem

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the effects of ambient light on Time of Flight (ToF) depth imaging for a plant's leaf in sunlight, shadow and room conditions. ToF imaging is sensitive to ambient light and we try to find the best possible integration times (IT) for each condition. This is important in...

  5. The role of the operator of nuclear power plants in disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussade, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Public opinion polls show that the French have largely understood the importance of our nuclear programme in maintaining French independence with regard to power supply and its security and that they have confidence in the technicians for the proper construction and operation of these power plants, but that they retain many questions concerning the disposal of nuclear waste. They have the impression that solutions remain to be found, and especially that the Electricite de France (EDF) devised the nuclear power programme without concern for the disposal of waste. This lack of information is fortunately far from reality, EDF, under the supervision of the security authorities, manages the waste produced in the nuclear power plants. Final stocking of waste is handled by a body that is independent of the waste producer, the ''Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs'' (Andra) (National Agency for the Management of Radioactive Waste). (author). 7 refs., 1 tab

  6. GUIDANCE FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM AND HUMAN-SYSTEM INTERFACE MODERNIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, J.; Morris, G.

    2004-01-01

    Several nuclear power plants in the United States are starting instrumentation and control (I and C) modernization programs using digital equipment to address obsolescence issues and the need to improve plant performance while maintaining high levels of safety. As an integral part of the I and C modernization program at a nuclear power plant, the control room and other human-system interfaces (HSIs) are also being modernized. To support safe and effective operation, it is critical to plan, design, implement, train for, operate, and maintain the control room and HSI changes to take advantage of human cognitive processing abilities. A project, jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) Program, is developing guidance for specifying and designing control rooms, remote shut-down panels, HSIs etc. The guidance is intended for application by utilities and suppliers of control room and HSI modernization. The guidance will facilitate specification, design, implementation, operations, maintenance, training, and licensing activities. This guidance will be used to reduce the likelihood of human errors and licensing risk, to gain maximum benefit of implemented technology, and to increase performance. The guidance is of five types. The first is planning guidance to help a utility develop its plant-specific control room operating concepts, its plant-specific endpoint vision for the control room, its migration path to achieve that endpoint vision, and its regulatory, licensing, and human factors program plans. The second is process guidance for general HSI design and integration, human factors engineering analyses, verification and validation, in-service monitoring processes, etc. The third is detailed human factors engineering guidance for control room and HSI technical areas. The fourth is guidance for licensing. The fifth is guidance for special topics

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase final supplemental environmental impact statement. Volume 3: Comment response document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II) is to provide information on environmental impacts regarding the Department of Energy''s (DOE) proposed disposal operations at WIPP. The Proposed Action describes the treatment and disposal of the Basic inventory of TRU waste over a 35-year period. The Action Alternatives proposed the treatment of the Basic Inventory and an Additional Inventory as well as the transportation of the treated waste to WIPP for disposal over a 150- to 190-year period. The three Action Alternatives include the treatment of TRU waste at consolidation sites to meet WIPP planning-basic Waste Acceptance Criteria, the thermal treatment of TRU waste to meet Land Disposal Restrictions, and the treatment of TRU waste by a shred and grout process. SEIS-II evaluates environmental impacts resulting from the various treatment options; the transportation of TRU waste to WIPP using truck, a combination of truck and regular rail service, and a combination of truck and dedicated rail service; and the disposal of this waste in the repository. Evaluated impacts include those to the general environment and to human health. Additional issues associated with the implementation of the alternatives are discussed to provide further understanding of the decisions to be reached and to provide the opportunity for public input on improving DOE''s Environmental Management Program. This volume provides responses to public comments on the Draft SEIS-II. Comments are related to: Alternatives; TRU waste; DOE credibility; Editorial; Endorsement/opposition; Environmental justice; Facility accidents; Generator site operations; Health and safety; Legal and policy issues; NEPA process; WIPP facilities; WIPP waste isolation performance; Purpose and need; WIPP operations; Site characterization; Site selection; Socioeconomics; and Transportation

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase final supplemental environmental impact statement. Volume 2: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II) is to provide information on environmental impacts regarding the Department of Energy's (DOE) proposed disposal operations at WIPP. The Proposed Action describes the treatment and disposal of the Basic inventory of TRU waste over a 35-year period. The Action Alternatives proposed the treatment of the Basic Inventory and an Additional Inventory as well as the transportation of the treated waste to WIPP for disposal over a 150- to 190-year period. The three Action Alternatives include the treatment of TRU waste at consolidation sites to meet WIPP planning-basic Waste Acceptance Criteria, the thermal treatment of TRU waste to meet Land Disposal Restrictions, and the treatment of TRU waste by a shred and grout process. SEIS-II evaluates environmental impacts resulting from the various treatment options; the transportation of TRU waste to WIPP using truck, a combination of truck and regular rail service, and a combination of truck and dedicated rail service; and the disposal of this waste in the repository. Evaluated impacts include those to the general environment and to human health. Additional issues associated with the implementation of the alternatives are discussed to provide further understanding of the decisions to be reached and to provide the opportunity for public input on improving DOE's Environmental Management Program. This volume contains the following appendices: Waste inventory; Summary of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement and its use in determining human health impacts at treatment sites; Air quality; Life-cycle costs and economic impacts; Transportation; Human health; Facility accidents; Long-term consequence analysis for proposed action and action alternatives; Long-term consequence analysis for no action alternative 2; and Updated estimates of the DOE's transuranic waste volumes

  9. Concept and design of a fully computerized control room for future nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinz, W.; Kollmannsberger, J.

    1991-01-01

    The development of digital process control equipment and of safety engineering equipment together with the CRT - based information visualization systems is advanced to a state allowing process control of nuclear power plant to be done by these equipments. The systems have been tested in the control room of the fossil-fuel Staudinger reactor station, unit 5, and the computer-assisted PRISCA process information system has been tested in the Konvoi-type nuclear reactor series. These tests serve as a basis for further process control system development by Siemens KWU, to be used in their future nuclear power plants. The advantages of digital process control and CRT-based information display are intended to be used for further optimization of the man-machine interface in nuclear power plant. One important aspect is to give the control room personnel complete insight into the operational processes of the entire plant, and to establish for detail recognition for process monitoring a very close mental link between operators and the system processes. In addition, the control room operator has to be given appropriate means and tools for process monitoring and control, fulfilling the requirements of guaranteeing the plant's availability and safety. These requirements put very high demands on the process monitoring and control equipment. (orig.) [de

  10. Optimizing the human engineering design of control panels in nuclear power plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrendt, V.; Krehbiehl, T.; Hartfiel, H.D.; Mannhaupt, H.R.

    1986-12-01

    The study contains two parts. In the first part an analytical procedure is developed to logically and reproducibly subdivide the control room personnel tasks resulting in a list of the elements (operations) and the structure (operations scheme) of a task. The second part lists together all knowledge of and influences on human engineering which are known at this time and which should be taken into account in designing control rooms. The content of this catalogue can best be used and presented by using a personal computer. Two fundamental different ways are possible to use the catalogue. Designing new control rooms or new parts of control rooms the results of the task analysis which should be done first, should guide the search in the catalogue to find the right human engineering factors. For assessing existing control room panels the performance shaping factors which are establishing the table of content, permit a quick access to the catalogue. Both the specific procedure of the task analysis and the different ways of access to the catalogue of human engineering knowledge for designing nuclear power plant control rooms have been proven by experienced system engineers and safety experts. The results are presented. They have been considered in this version of the study. (orig.) [de

  11. Test program for closure activities at a mixed waste disposal site at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.; Harley, J.P. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A 58-acre site at the Savannah River Plant which was used for disposal of low-level radioactive waste and quantities of the hazardous materials lead, cadmium, scintillation fluid, and oil will be the first large waste site at the Savannah River Plant to be permanently closed. The actions leading to closure of the facility will include surface stabilization and capping of the site. Test programs have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of dynamic compaction as a stabilization technique and the feasibility of using locally derived clay as a capping material

  12. Use of control room simulators for training of nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    Safety analysis and operational experience consistently indicate that human error is the greatest contributor to the risk of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant. Subsequent to the Three Mile Island accident, major changes were made internationally in reducing the potential for human error through improved procedures, information presentation, and training of operators. The use of full scope simulators in the training of operators is an essential element of these efforts to reduce human error. The operators today spend a large fraction of their time training and retraining on the simulator. As indicated in the IAEA Safety Guide on Recruitment, Qualification and Training of Personnel for Nuclear Power Plants, NS-G-2.8, 2002, representative simulator facilities should be used for training of control room operators and shift supervisors. Simulator training should incorporate normal, abnormal and accident conditions. The ability of the simulator to closely represent the actual conditions and environment that would be experienced in a real situation is critical to the value of the training received. The objective of this report is to provide nuclear power plant (NPP) managers, training centre managers and personnel involved with control room simulator training with practical information they can use to improve the performance of their personnel. While the emphasis in this publication is on simulator training of control room personnel using full scope simulators, information is also provided on how organizations have effectively used control room simulators for training of other NPP personnel, including simulators other than full-scope simulators

  13. Safety review for human factors engineering and control rooms of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Mengzhuo

    1998-01-01

    Safety review for human factors engineering and control rooms of nuclear power plants (NPP) is in a forward position of science and technology, which began at American TMI severe accident and had been implemented in China. The importance and the significance of the safety review are expounded, the requirements of its scope and profundity are explained in detail. In addition, the situation of the technical document system for nuclear safety regulation on human factors engineering and control rooms of NPP in China is introduced briefly, on which the safety review is based

  14. Control room modernization at Finnish nuclear power plants - Two projects compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laarni, J.; Norros, L.

    2006-01-01

    The modernization of automation systems and human-machine interfaces is a current issue at both of the two nuclear power plants (i.e., Fortum's Loviisa plant and TVO's Olkiluoto plant) in Finland. Since the plants have been launched in the 1970's or 1980's, technology is in part old-fashioned and needs to be renewed. At Olkiluoto upgrades of the turbine operator systems have already been conducted; at Loviisa the first phase of the modernization project has just started. Basically, there is a question of the complete digitalization of the information streams at the two plants, and transition from a conventional hard-wired or hybrid control room to a screen-based one. The new human-machine interfaces will comprise new technology, such as PC workstations, soft control, touch screens and large-screen overall displays. The modernization of human-system interfaces is carried out in a stepwise manner at both plants. At both plants the main driver has not been the need to renew the user interfaces of the control room, but the need to upgrade the automation systems. In part because of this, there is a lack of a systematic top-down approach in which different aspects of human factors (HF) engineering are considered in relationship to higher level goals. Our aim here is to give an overview description of the control room modernization projects at the two plants and provide a preliminary evaluation of their progress to date. The projects are also compared, for example, in terms of duration, scope and phasing, and who is responsible for the realization of the project. In addition, we also compare experiences from the Finnish projects to experiences from similar projects abroad. The main part of the data used in this study is based on designers' and project members' interviews. (authors)

  15. Disposal options for polluted plants grown on heavy metal contaminated brownfield lands - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Helga; Szemmelveisz, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    Reducing or preventing damage caused by environmental pollution is a significant goal nowadays. Phytoextraction, as remediation technique is widely used, but during the process, the heavy metal content of the biomass grown on these sites special treatment and disposal techniques are required, for example liquid extraction, direct disposal, composting, and combustion. These processes are discussed in this review in economical and environmental aspects. The following main properties are analyzed: form and harmful element content of remains, utilization of the main and byproducts, affect to the environment during the treatment and disposal. The thermal treatment (combustion, gasification) of contaminated biomass provides a promising alternative disposal option, because the energy production affects the rate of return, and the harmful elements are riched in a small amount of solid remains depending on the ash content of the plant (1-2%). The biomass combustion technology is a wildely used energy production process in residential and industrial scale, but the ordinary biomass firing systems are not suited to burn this type of fuel without environmental risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Disposal of defense spent fuel and HLW from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermold, L.F.; Loo, H.H.; Klingler, R.D.; Herzog, J.D.; Knecht, D.A.

    1992-12-01

    Acid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage ate the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, with an emphasis on the description of HLW and spent fuels requiring repository disposal

  17. Interface control document between PUREX/UO3 Plant Transition and Solid Waste Disposal Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    This interface control document (ICD) between PUREX/UO 3 Plant Transition (PPT) and Solid Waste Disposal Division (SWD) establishes at a top level the functional responsibilities of each division where interfaces exist between the two divisions. Since the PUREX Transition and Solid Waste Disposal divisions operate autonomously, it is important that each division has a clear understanding of the other division's expectations regarding these interfaces. This ICD primarily deals with solid wastes generated by the PPT. In addition to delineating functional responsibilities, the ICD includes a baseline description of those wastes that will require management as part of the interface between the divisions. The baseline description of wastes includes waste volumes and timing for use in planning the proper waste management capabilities: the primary purpose of this ICD is to ensure defensibility of expected waste stream volumes and Characteristics for future waste management facilities. Waste descriptions must be as complete as-possible to ensure adequate treatment, storage, and disposal capability will exist. The ICD also facilitates integration of existing or planned waste management capabilities of the PUREX. Transition and Solid Waste Disposal divisions. The ICD does not impact or affect the existing processes or procedures for shipping, packaging, or approval for shipping wastes by generators to the Solid Waste Division

  18. Environmental information document: New hazardous and mixed waste storage/disposal facilities at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.; Grant, M.W.; Towler, O.O.

    1987-04-01

    Site selection, alternative facilities and alternative operations are described for new hazardous and mixed waste storage/disposal facilities at the Savannah River Plant. Performance assessments and cost estimates for the alternatives are presented

  19. Post-closure permit application for the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin at the Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, J.K. Jr.; Kimbrough, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains information related to the closure and post closure of the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin of the Y-12 plant. Information concerning the background of the basin, geology, hydrology, and analysis of the sediments is included

  20. Native Plant Uptake Model for Radioactive Waste Disposal Areas at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Theresa J.; Wirth, Sharon

    1999-01-01

    This report defines and defends the basic framework, methodology, and associated input parameters for modeling plant uptake of radionuclides for use in Performance Assessment (PA) activities of Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). PAs are used to help determine whether waste disposal configurations meet applicable regulatory standards for the protection of human health, the environment, or both. Plants adapted to the arid climate of the NTS are able to rapidly capture infiltrating moisture. In addition to capturing soil moisture, plant roots absorb nutrients, minerals, and heavy metals, transporting them within the plant to the above-ground biomass. In this fashion, plant uptake affects the movement of radionuclides. The plant uptake model presented reflects rooting characteristics important to plant uptake, biomass turnover rates, and the ability of plants to uptake radionuclides from the soil. Parameters are provided for modeling plant uptake and estimating surface contaminant flux due to plant uptake under both current and potential future climate conditions with increased effective soil moisture. The term ''effective moisture'' is used throughout this report to indicate the soil moisture that is available to plants and is intended to be inclusive of all the variables that control soil moisture at a site (e.g., precipitation, temperature, soil texture, and soil chemistry). Effective moisture is a concept used to simplify a number of complex, interrelated soil processes for which there are too little data to model actual plant available moisture. The PA simulates both the flux of radionuclides across the land surface and the potential dose to humans from that flux. Surface flux is modeled here as the amount of soil contamination that is transferred from the soil by roots and incorporated into aboveground biomass. Movement of contaminants to the surface is the only transport mechanism evaluated with the model presented here

  1. Native Plant Uptake Model for Radioactive Waste Disposal Areas at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,THERESA J.; WIRTH,SHARON

    1999-09-01

    This report defines and defends the basic framework, methodology, and associated input parameters for modeling plant uptake of radionuclides for use in Performance Assessment (PA) activities of Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). PAs are used to help determine whether waste disposal configurations meet applicable regulatory standards for the protection of human health, the environment, or both. Plants adapted to the arid climate of the NTS are able to rapidly capture infiltrating moisture. In addition to capturing soil moisture, plant roots absorb nutrients, minerals, and heavy metals, transporting them within the plant to the above-ground biomass. In this fashion, plant uptake affects the movement of radionuclides. The plant uptake model presented reflects rooting characteristics important to plant uptake, biomass turnover rates, and the ability of plants to uptake radionuclides from the soil. Parameters are provided for modeling plant uptake and estimating surface contaminant flux due to plant uptake under both current and potential future climate conditions with increased effective soil moisture. The term ''effective moisture'' is used throughout this report to indicate the soil moisture that is available to plants and is intended to be inclusive of all the variables that control soil moisture at a site (e.g., precipitation, temperature, soil texture, and soil chemistry). Effective moisture is a concept used to simplify a number of complex, interrelated soil processes for which there are too little data to model actual plant available moisture. The PA simulates both the flux of radionuclides across the land surface and the potential dose to humans from that flux. Surface flux is modeled here as the amount of soil contamination that is transferred from the soil by roots and incorporated into aboveground biomass. Movement of contaminants to the surface is the only transport mechanism evaluated with the model

  2. A computerized diagnostic system for nuclear plant control rooms based on statistical quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, C.D.; Grenzebach, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    In engineering science, statistical quality control techniques have traditionally been applied to control manufacturing processes. An application to commercial nuclear power plant maintenance and control is presented that can greatly improve safety. As a demonstration of such an approach to plant maintenance and control, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps of the St. Lucie Unit 2 nuclear power plant located in Florida. A 30-day history of the four pumps prior to a plant shutdown caused by pump failure and a related fire within the containment was analyzed. Statistical quality control charts of recorded variables were constructed for each pump, which were shown to go out of statistical control many days before the plant trip. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators

  3. Control Room Tasks During Refueling in Ringhals 1 Nuclear Power Plant - Operator performance during refuelling outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroebeck, Einar; Olausson, Jesper; Van Gemst, Paul

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the performance and tasks of the operators in the control room during refuelling outages. Analyses of such events have, during the last years, shown that the risk for nuclear accidents is not negligible compared with the risk at higher reactor power levels. Some experts have the opinion that, due to mistakes during an outage, the risk for such accidents during the outage and other accidents later on during power operation is higher than in other plant situations. The high risk level is mainly a result of errors at maintenance actions and supervision of lining up of safety systems. Most of the control rooms in existing NPPs were designed more than 10 years ago. At that time the activities and the tasks for the operators were not very well understood. Procedures for refuelling and other activities during the outages were not described very well. Often the utility organisation for refuelling outages was not established at the start of the control room design. Experience from operation during many years has shown that the performance of operators can be improved in existing plant, and thus risks be reduced, by upgrading the control room. These issues have been studied as a part of the modernisation project for Ringhals 1, an ABB Atom BWR owned by Vattenfall AB in Sweden. The paper will describe the working model for upgrading the control room and important issues to take care of with respect to refuelling outages. The identified issues will be used as the input for improving control room philosophy and the individual technical systems. (authors)

  4. Research on control function switch of nuclear power plant control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Shibo; Mao Ting; Cheng Bo; Zhang Gang

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear power plant provides main control room (MCR) to the unit operators for the plant monitoring and control, and provides the remote shutdown station (RSS) as the back-up control room, which is used only when MCR is unavailable. The RSS could be used to monitor and control the plant, bring the plant into shutdown state and remove the residual heat. The command from MCR and RSS is blocked by each other and can not be executed at the same time. The operation mode switch function between MCR and RSS is carried out by MCR/RSS mode switches. The operation mode switch scheme of CPR1000, ERP and AP1000 were compared and researched, and some design bases for new nuclear power plant were submitted in this paper. These design bases could be referred during the design of control function switch for the new nuclear power plants, in order to put forward a more practical, simple, safe and convenient scheme. (authors)

  5. Ergonomic principles of control rooms in nuclear power plants. Vol. 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.; Bohr, E.; Thau, G.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes the findings of a study on the present status and possible improvements in the design of nuclear power plant control rooms according to ergonomic principles and criteria. The findings have been acquired by observing the performance of control room operators, by interviewing operators and management personnel, and by analyzing major characteristics of the man-machine interface. The methods currently used for developing and designing control rooms have also been examined, and the pertinent scientific and technical literature has been reviewed. The results of the study indicate that there is a growing awareness and consideration of physical factors affecting operator performance and reliability whereas less attention is paid to the essential cognitive characteristics of work in the control room. The tasks of operators thus may contain avoidable hindrances and error possibilities that may adversely affect their contribution to reliable plant operation. Major areas of possible ergonomic advancements are set out in the study, and most of them are discussed in depth. Ergonomic requirements are identified for further improving the situation, and approaches, ways and means for solving of mitigating individual problems are indicated wherever possible. A more deliberate consideration of factors affecting operator performance and reliability is suggested, based on a systems ergonomics approach. Design objectives and criteria as well as specific design recommendations for individual areas are given separately. In conclusion, gaps in our existing knowledge are identified which require further research. (orig.) [de

  6. Radioactive waste disposal by nuclear power plants in the light of operational economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhard, H.; Schmidt, D.

    1984-01-01

    The expansion of power generation on the basis of nuclear energy in the Federal Republic of Germany calls for answers also to the questions arising at the level of operating efficiency from the radioactive waste disposal requirements necessarily associated with the operation of nuclear power plants. As these are measures of very long-term consequences and which are, for the greater part, only-coming up in future, not only the effects to be expected on the balance of trade and taxbalance, but also the influence on price calculation will be of paramount importance for public utilities. Moreover, because of the continually increasing financial reserves for radioactive waste disposal the financing aspects are gaining added weight; reliance on foreign capital, anyhow specific to that sector of industry, is much aggravated. (orig.) [de

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase supplemental environmental impact statement. Implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Implementation Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II) has two primary purposes: (1) To report on the results of the scoping process (2) To provide guidance for preparing SEIS-II SEIS-II will be the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review for WIPP`s disposal phase. Chapter 1 of this plan provides background on WIPP and this NEPA review. Chapter 2 describes the purpose and need for action by the Department of Energy (hereafter DOE or the Department), as well as a description of the Proposed Action and alternatives being considered. Chapter 3 describes the work plan, including the schedule, responsibilities, and planned consultations with other agencies and organizations. Chapter 4 describes the scoping process, presents major issues identified during the scoping process, and briefly indicates how issues will be addressed in SEIS-II.

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase supplemental environmental impact statement. Implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The Implementation Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II) has two primary purposes: (1) To report on the results of the scoping process (2) To provide guidance for preparing SEIS-II SEIS-II will be the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review for WIPP's disposal phase. Chapter 1 of this plan provides background on WIPP and this NEPA review. Chapter 2 describes the purpose and need for action by the Department of Energy (hereafter DOE or the Department), as well as a description of the Proposed Action and alternatives being considered. Chapter 3 describes the work plan, including the schedule, responsibilities, and planned consultations with other agencies and organizations. Chapter 4 describes the scoping process, presents major issues identified during the scoping process, and briefly indicates how issues will be addressed in SEIS-II

  9. Performance-based evaluation of graphic displays for nuclear-power-plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, R.J.; Banks, W.W.; Gertman, D.I.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports several methodologies for evaluating the perceptual and perceptual/decision making aspects of displays used in the control rooms of nuclear power plants. This NRC funded study focuses upon the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) and relates the utility of the display to objective performance and preference measures obtained in experimental conditions. The first condition is a traditional laboratory setting where classical experimental methodologies can be employed. The second condition is an interactive control room simulation where the operator's performance is assessed while he/she operates the simulator. The third condition is a rating scale designed to assess operator preferences and opinions regarding a variety of display formats. The goal of this study is the development of a cost-efficient display evaluation methodology which correlates highly with the operator's ability to control a plant

  10. Digitized operator evaluation system for main control room of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yu; Yan Shengyuan; Chen Wenlong

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the human-machine system matching relation of main control room in nuclear power plant accurately and efficiently, the expression and parameters of operator human body model were analyzed, and the evaluation required function of digital operator was determined. Based on the secondary development technology, the digital operator evaluation body model was developed. It could choose generation, gender, operation posture, single/eyes horizon, and left/right hand up to the domain according to the needs of specific evaluation, it was used to evaluate whether display information can be visible and equipment can be touch, and it also has key evaluation functions such as workspace and character visibility at the same time. The examples show that this method can complete the evaluation work of human-machine matching relation for main control room of nuclear power plant accurately, efficiently and quickly, and achieve the most optimal human-machine coordination relationship. (authors)

  11. Room at the Mountain: Estimated Maximum Amounts of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Capable of Disposal in a Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, John H.; Kemeny, John; King, Fraser; Ross, Alan M.; Ross, Benjamen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an initial analysis of the maximum amount of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) that could be emplaced into a geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis identifies and uses programmatic, material, and geological constraints and factors that affect this estimation of maximum amount of CSNF for disposal. The conclusion of this initial analysis is that the current legislative limit on Yucca Mountain disposal capacity, 63,000 MTHM of CSNF, is a small fraction of the available physical capacity of the Yucca Mountain system assuming the current high-temperature operating mode (HTOM) design. EPRI is confident that at least four times the legislative limit for CSNF (∼260,000 MTHM) can be emplaced in the Yucca Mountain system. It is possible that with additional site characterization, upwards of nine times the legislative limit (∼570,000 MTHM) could be emplaced. (authors)

  12. Work Analysis of the nuclear power plant control room operators (II): The classes of situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alengry, P.

    1989-03-01

    This report presents a work analysis of nuclear power plant control room operators focused on the classes of situation they can meet during their job. Each class of situation is first described in terms of the process variables states. We then describe the goals of the operators and the variables they process in each class of situation. We report some of the most representative difficulties encountered by the operators in each class of situation. Finally, we conclude on different topics: the nature of the mental representations, the temporal dimension, the monitoring activity, and the role of the context in the work of controlling a nuclear power plant [fr

  13. Research on cognitive reliability model for main control room considering human factors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jianjun; Zhang Li; Wang Yiqun; Zhang Kun; Peng Yuyuan; Zhou Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Facing the shortcomings of the traditional cognitive factors and cognitive model, this paper presents a Bayesian networks cognitive reliability model by taking the main control room as a reference background and human factors as the key points. The model mainly analyzes the cognitive reliability affected by the human factors, and for the cognitive node and influence factors corresponding to cognitive node, a series of methods and function formulas to compute the node cognitive reliability is proposed. The model and corresponding methods can be applied to the evaluation of cognitive process for the nuclear power plant operators and have a certain significance for the prevention of safety accidents in nuclear power plants. (authors)

  14. Disposal of Steam Generators from Decommissioning of PWR Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walberg, Mirko; Viermann, Joerg; Beverungen, Martin; Kemp, Lutz; Lindstroem, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Amongst other materials remarkable amounts of radioactively contaminated or activated scrap are generated from the dismantling of Nuclear Power Plants. These scrap materials include contaminated pipework, fittings, pumps, the reactor pressure vessel and other large components, most of them are heat exchangers. Taking into account all commercial and technical aspects an external processing and subsequent recycling of the material might be an advantageous option for many of these components. The disposal of steam generators makes up an especially challenging task because of their measures, their weight and compared to other heat exchangers high radioactive inventory. Based on its experiences from many years of disposal of smaller components of NPP still in operation or under decommissioning GNS and Studsvik Nuclear developed a concept for disposal of steam generators, also involving experiences made in Sweden. The concept comprises transport preparations and necessary supporting documents, the complete logistics chain, steam generator treatment and the processing of arising residues and materials not suitable for recycling. The first components to be prepared, shipped and treated according to this concept were four steam generators from the decommissioning of the German NPP Stade which were removed from the plant and shipped to the processing facility during the third quarter of 2007. Although the plant had undergone a full system decontamination, due to the remaining contamination in a number of plugged tubes the steam generators had to be qualified as industrial packages, type 2 (IP-2 packages), and according to a special requirement of the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection a license for a shipment under special arrangement had to be applied for. The presentation gives an overview of the calculations and evidences required within the course of the IP-2 qualification, additional requirements of the competent authorities during the licensing procedure as

  15. Changes in control room at Swedish nuclear power plants; Kontrollrumsfoeraendringar vid svenska kaernkraftverk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kecklund, Lena [MTO Psykologi, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2005-09-15

    The Swedish nuclear power plants were commissioned during a period between 1972 and 1985 and the instrumentation and control equipment are basically from that period. For several years there have been plans made for changes in all the nuclear power plants and to a certain extent the changes in control equipment and monitoring rooms have also been implemented. The object of this project was to make a comprehensive review of the changes in control room design implemented in the Swedish nuclear power plants and to describe how the MTO- (Man-Technology-Organisation) and (Man-Machine-Interface) -issues have been integrated in the process. The survey is intended to give an overall picture of the changes in control room design and man-machine-interface made in the Swedish control rooms, in order to get a deeper knowledge of the change management process and its results as well as of the management of MTO-issues in these projects. The units included in this survey are: Oskarhamn reactor 2 and 3; Ringhals reactor 2, 3 and 4; Forsmark reactor 1, 2 and 3. The Oskarshamn 1 unit has not been included in this report as it has recently undergone an extensive modernisation program as well as a detailed inspection by the SKI (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate). At Ringhals 2 the modernisation work is carried out at present and the unit is also subjected to extensive inspection activities carried out by SKI and is therefore not part of this survey. This report also includes a short description of relevant standards and requirements. Then follows a presentation of the results of the plant survey, presented as case studies for three companies OKG, Ringhals and FKA. Control room changes are summarized as well as the results on specific MTO issues which has been surveyed. In all the power companies there is a joint way of working with projects concerning plant modifications. This process is described for each company separately. In the concluding of the report the strengths and

  16. Advanced techniques for storage and disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weh, R.; Sowa, W.

    1999-01-01

    Electricity generation using fossil fuel at comparatively low costs forces nuclear energy to explore all economic potentials. The cost advantage of direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel compared to reprocessing gives reason enough to follow that path more and more. The present paper describes components and facilities for long-term storage as well as packaging strategies, developed and implemented under the responsibility of the German utilities operating nuclear power plants. A proposal is made to complement or even to replace the POLLUX cask concept by a system using BSK 3 fuel rod containers together with LB 21 storage casks. (author)

  17. Disposal of decontaminated salts at the Savannah River Plant by solidification and burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukes, M.D.; Wolf, H.C.; Langton, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current plan for disposal of waste salt at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) is to immobilize the decontaminated salt solution by mixing with cement and SRP soil, and bury the resulting grout (saltstone) in a landfill. The grout which contains 37.8 wt % salt solution, 22.8 wt % Portland I-P cement, and 39.2 wt % SRP soil, was specially formulated to have a low permeability ( -10 cm/sec). This material will be mixed and placed in trenches. After setting, the saltstone will be covered with a clay cap, and an overburden of compacted native soil will be replaced. 6 references

  18. Human factors design of nuclear power plant control rooms including computer-based operator aids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastl, W.; Felkel, L.; Becker, G.; Bohr, E.

    1983-01-01

    The scientific handling of human factors problems in control rooms began around 1970 on the basis of safety considerations. Some recent research work deals with the development of computerized systems like plant balance calculation, safety parameter display, alarm reduction and disturbance analysis. For disturbance analysis purposes it is necessary to homogenize the information presented to the operator according to the actual plant situation in order to supply the operator with the information he most urgently needs at the time. Different approaches for solving this problem are discussed, and an overview is given on what is being done. Other research projects concentrate on the detailed analysis of operators' diagnosis strategies in unexpected situations, in order to obtain a better understanding of their mental processes and the influences upon them when such situations occur. This project involves the use of a simulator and sophisticated recording and analysis methods. Control rooms are currently designed with the aid of mock-ups. They enable operators to contribute their experience to the optimization of the arrangement of displays and controls. Modern control rooms are characterized by increasing use of process computers and CRT (Cathode Ray Tube) displays. A general concept for the integration of the new computerized system and the conventional control panels is needed. The technical changes modify operators' tasks, and future ergonomic work in nuclear plants will need to consider the re-allocation of function between man and machine, the incorporation of task changes in training programmes, and the optimal design of information presentation using CRTs. Aspects of developments in control room design are detailed, typical research results are dealt with, and a brief forecast of the ergonomic contribution to be made in the Federal Republic of Germany is given

  19. Deep geologic disposal of mixed waste in bedded salt: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, N.T.

    1993-01-01

    Mixed waste (i.e., waste that contains both chemically hazardous and radioactive components) poses a moral, political, and technical challenge to present and future generations. But an international consensus is emerging that harmful byproducts and residues can be permanently isolated from the biosphere in a safe and environmentally responsible manner by deep geologic disposal. To investigate and demonstrate such disposal for transuranic mixed waste, derived from defense-related activities, the US Department of Energy has prepared the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. This research and development facility was excavated approximately at the center of a 600 m thick sequence of salt (halite) beds, 655 m below the surface. Proof of the long-term tectonic and hydrological stability of the region is supplied by the fact that these salt beds have remained essentially undisturbed since they were deposited during the Late Permian age, approximately 225 million years ago. Plutonium-239, the main radioactive component of transuranic mixed waste, has a half-life of 24,500 years. Even ten half-lives of this isotope - amounting to about a quarter million years, the time during which its activity will decline to background level represent only 0.11 percent of the history of the repository medium. Therefore, deep geologic disposal of transuranic mixed waste in Permian bedded salt appears eminently feasible

  20. Baseline Evaluations to Support Control Room Modernization at Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald L.; Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2015-02-01

    For any major control room modernization activity at a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) in the U.S., a utility should carefully follow the four phases prescribed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in NUREG-0711, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model. These four phases include Planning and Analysis, Design, Verification and Validation, and Implementation and Operation. While NUREG-0711 is a useful guideline, it is written primarily from the perspective of regulatory review, and it therefore does not provide a nuanced account of many of the steps the utility might undertake as part of control room modernization. The guideline is largely summative—intended to catalog final products—rather than formative—intended to guide the overall modernization process. In this paper, we highlight two crucial formative sub-elements of the Planning and Analysis phase specific to control room modernization that are not covered in NUREG-0711. These two sub-elements are the usability and ergonomics baseline evaluations. A baseline evaluation entails evaluating the system as-built and currently in use. The usability baseline evaluation provides key insights into operator performance using the control system currently in place. The ergonomics baseline evaluation identifies possible deficiencies in the physical configuration of the control system. Both baseline evaluations feed into the design of the replacement system and subsequent summative benchmarking activities that help ensure that control room modernization represents a successful evolution of the control system.

  1. Psychological factors of professional success of nuclear power plant main control room operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosenkov A.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to conduct a comparative analysis of the psychological characteristics of the most and least successful main control room operators. Material and Methods. Two NPP staff groups: the most and least successful main control room operators, who worked in routine operating conditions, were surveyed. Expert evaluation method has been applied to identify the groups. The subjects were administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI, Cattell's Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF form A and Raven's Progressive Matrices test. Results. Numerous significant psychological differences between the groups of most and least successful control room operators were obtained: the best operators were significantly more introverted and correctly solved more logical tasks with smaller percentage of mistakes under time pressure than worst ones. Conclusions: 1. The psychodiagnostic methods used in the study were adequate to meet research objective 2. Tendency to introversion, as well as developed the ability to solve logic problems undertime pressure, apparently, are important professional qualities for control room operators. These indicators should be considered in the process of psychological selection and professional guidance of nuclear power plant operators.

  2. Design of nuclear power plant control rooms: some findings and possible improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohr, E.

    1984-01-01

    Major findings are described of a study on the present status and possible improvements in the design of nuclear power plant control rooms according to ergonomic principles and criteria. The findings have been acquired by observing the performance of control room operators, by interviewing operators and management personnel, and by analysing major characteristics of the man-machine interface. The methods currently used for developing and designing control rooms have also been examined. The results of the study indicate that there is a growing awareness and consideration of physical factors affecting performance. More attention should be paid to the essential cognitive characteristics of work in the control room with the aim of avoiding unnecessary hindrances and possible errors. Examples are given of some of these problems, and approaches, ways and means for solving or mitigating them are indicated. A more deliberate consideration of factors affecting operator performance and reliability is suggested, based on a systems ergonomics approach. Analyses of critical tasks would be a major feature of this approach. Its main objective is to ensure that operators are able to carry out their tasks reliably. (author)

  3. Baseline Evaluations to Support Control Room Modernization at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boring, Ronald L.; Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    For any major control room modernization activity at a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) in the U.S., a utility should carefully follow the four phases prescribed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in NUREG-0711, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model. These four phases include Planning and Analysis, Design, Verification and Validation, and Implementation and Operation. While NUREG-0711 is a useful guideline, it is written primarily from the perspective of regulatory review, and it therefore does not provide a nuanced account of many of the steps the utility might undertake as part of control room modernization. The guideline is largely summative–intended to catalog final products–rather than formative–intended to guide the overall modernization process. In this paper, we highlight two crucial formative sub-elements of the Planning and Analysis phase specific to control room modernization that are not covered in NUREG-0711. These two sub-elements are the usability and ergonomics baseline evaluations. A baseline evaluation entails evaluating the system as-built and currently in use. The usability baseline evaluation provides key insights into operator performance using the control system currently in place. The ergonomics baseline evaluation identifies possible deficiencies in the physical configuration of the control system. Both baseline evaluations feed into the design of the replacement system and subsequent summative benchmarking activities that help ensure that control room modernization represents a successful evolution of the control system.

  4. A study of the operational logistics in the disposal plant for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylvaenne, O.; Kaskinen, T.; Kuussaari, P.

    2003-02-01

    The final disposal plant for spent nuclear fuel comprises an encapsulation facility that will be built on the surface, other support activities above ground, and a repository that will be constructed deep in the bedrock. This report analyses the final repository operational logistics. The desktop research report is compiled of data taken from several existing planning reports covering the planning periods 1997-2002. The logistics specialised description of the final repository considers most areas in the daily operation of the facility. Among these are: Disposal tunnel excavation; construction and transports; Tunnel preparation for canisters; Reception of spent nuclear fuel transport casks; Encapsulation process; Preparation of bentonite blocks for canister holes, block laying; Final disposal of canisters; and Preparation of backfilling material and backfilling. The transport and handling volumes have certain cycles. Rock will be excavated during one contiguous period in 3 years, backfilling takes two weeks in a month and the deposition of canisters also two weeks. Thus the material flows vary greatly due to their cyclical nature. The transport and handling volumes are considerable, by far largest single item being excavated rock with about 5000 annual truck loads during the active excavation period, backfilling is about 1300 loads yearly at a steady pace. The report covers and summarises material flows, handling methods and equipment, buffering, storage and transports. It suggests some changes to operational procedures. Proposals have been made as to the location of the encapsulation facility and the methods of material transport. The logistical 'hot' issues, entry of the main transport ramp, rock field, rock crushing process, bentonite storage, bentonite brick production and backfiller production are all proposed to be located close to each other to minimise driving distance. It has also been proposed that the bentonite block buffer should rather be located at

  5. Preliminary investigation of the structural influence of entry-entry intersections and inhomogeneous initial-stress fields on repository disposal rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loken, M.C.

    1983-07-01

    The structural influence of entry-entry intersections and inhomogeneous initial stress fields on a repository configuration has been investigated. The out-of-plane stress increases rapidly into the pillar from the rib of the connecting corridor to the plane strain value within one pillar width of the intersection, indicating that a two-dimensional analysis is valid over a major portion of the disposal room and pillar. Inhomogeneous initial stress fields do not significantly alter the trends of the resulting post-excavation stress fields. However, the magnitude of the vertical stress and the effective stress is slightly greater near the corner at the intersection. Further nonlinear analyses are required to assess the stability of the pillar at the intersection because of the high deviatoric stresses occurring in that region. 6 references

  6. Cognitive models and computer aids for nuclear plant control room operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, T.B.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews what is usually meant by a cognitive model of a control room operator in a nuclear power plant. It emphasizes the idea of internal (that is, mental) representation of external events and the use of such representation for the cognitive steps of attending, recognizing or learning, assessing and deciding. As computers play an increasingly important role in nuclear power plants, especially as cognitive aids to human supervisors of highly automated control systems, it is important that the software and computer interface characteristics be compatible with the operator's internal model. Specific examples discussed in this paper are in the monitoring and prediction of the plant state and in the detection and diagnosis of failures. Current trends in SPDS (safety parameter display system) and failure detection/location systems will be discussed in this regard

  7. Characterization and remediation of a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murarka, I.P.; Neuhauser, E.F.; Sherman, M.W.; Taylor, B.B.; Mauro, D.M.; Ripp, J.A.; Taylor, T.D.

    1993-01-01

    From the early 1800s through the late 1940s, the production of gas using coal, coke or oil resulted in generation of large volumes of residues including coal tar, lamp black and wood chips containing cyanides at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. Often, these tarry residues were disposed of by burial at or near these plants. In recent years, old MGP sites have come under increased scrutiny from environmental regulators. To address the issues of groundwater contamination and need for clean-up, it is necessary to accurately determine where the tarry materials are now located and how different chemicals released from tars have migrated away from their sources. EPRI research at a coal-tar disposal site in New York has focused on examining and evaluating conventional and innovative methods for sampling and analysis to delineate the nature and extent of subsurface contamination, and to assess the efficacy of remedial actions. This paper presents some of the results of this research and offers recommendations on conducting size investigations as well as selecting appropriate remediation measures

  8. Analysis results for the stereotypes regarding colors applied to the nuclear power plant control room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Hyun Chul [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dhong Ha [Suwon Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-01-01

    The general public not engaged in the nuclear power plant industry have no idea of the color usage in the nuclear control room. So we converted the specific color usage situation into similar but general situations. In questionnaire, we gave subjects the general situation where color coding is applied and alternative colors which were applied to the HF010 guidelines. And we asked the subjects to choose the colors proper to the situation and to rank the colors according to the degree of suitability. Two hundred fifty college students participated in the experiment. The results suggest that we can use any color coding system in the conventional control room and the CRT in the control deck because most people have no special previous color-meaning association but red-emergency relation.

  9. Team interaction skills evaluation criteria for nuclear power plant control room operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, J.; Gaddy, C.; Toquam, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on previous research which has shown the value of good team interaction skills to group performance, yet little progress has been made in measuring such skills. Dimensions of team interaction skills developed in an earlier study were extensively revised and cast into a Behaviorally anchored Rating scales (BARS) and a Behavioral Frequency scale format. Rating data were collected using training instructors at a nuclear plant, who rated videotape scenarios of control room performance and later rated control room crews during requalification training. High levels of interrater agreement on both rating scales was, although the hypothesized factor structure did not emerge. Analysis of ratings of the videotapes using Cronbach's components of accuracy indicted that BARS ratings generally exhibited less error than did the Behavioral Frequency ratings. This paper discusses results in terms of both field and research implications

  10. Analysis results for the stereotypes regarding colors applied to the nuclear power plant control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Dhong Ha

    2003-01-01

    The general public not engaged in the nuclear power plant industry have no idea of the color usage in the nuclear control room. So we converted the specific color usage situation into similar but general situations. In questionnaire, we gave subjects the general situation where color coding is applied and alternative colors which were applied to the HF010 guidelines. And we asked the subjects to choose the colors proper to the situation and to rank the colors according to the degree of suitability. Two hundred fifty college students participated in the experiment. The results suggest that we can use any color coding system in the conventional control room and the CRT in the control deck because most people have no special previous color-meaning association but red-emergency relation

  11. Integrated application of human factors to a power plant control room information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, H.C. Jr.; Gutierrez, R.

    1988-01-01

    The human factors plan was developed as a methodology to apply human factors from the conceptual design of the EPIC system to the functional verification conducted at the plant. An integral part of the Human Factors Plan was the Functional Verification Plan. Developed in parallel, this second plan and its resultant programs verified functional appropriateness of the SPDS display, NSSS displays, EOP displays, man-machine interfaces (MMI), and workstation designs. The functional verification process was performed at the hardware/software developer's factory and at the JAFNPP, following installation of the EPIC system. Because the EPIC system replaces existing control room equipment, it is important that human factors be applied in a systematic manner consistent with other control room displays and controls. To ensure that this goal was met, a human factors plan was developed

  12. Interim results of the study of control room crew staffing for advanced passive reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallbert, B.P.; Sebok, A.; Haugset, K.

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the ways in which vendors expect the operations staff to interact with advanced passive plants by vendors have led to a need for reconsideration of the minimum shift staffing requirements of licensed Reactor Operators and Senior Reactor Operators contained in current federal regulations (i.e., 10 CFR 50.54(m)). A research project is being carried out to evaluate the impact(s) of advanced passive plant design and staffing of control room crews on operator and team performance. The purpose of the project is to contribute to the understanding of potential safety issues and provide data to support the development of design review guidance. Two factors are being evaluated across a range of plant operating conditions: control room crew staffing; and characteristics of the operating facility itself, whether it employs conventional or advanced, passive features. This paper presents the results of the first phase of the study conducted at the Loviisa nuclear power station earlier this year. Loviisa served as the conventional plant in this study. Data collection from four crews were collected from a series of design basis scenarios, each crew serving in either a normal or minimum staffing configuration. Results of data analyses show that crews participating in the minimum shift staffing configuration experienced significantly higher workload, had lower situation awareness, demonstrated significantly less effective team performance, and performed more poorly as a crew than the crews participating in the normal shift staffing configuration. The baseline data on crew configurations from the conventional plant setting will be compared with similar data to be collected from the advanced plant setting, and a report prepared providing the results of the entire study

  13. An assessment of plant biointrusion at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project rock-covered disposal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    This study is one of a number of special studies that have been conducted regarding various aspects of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This special study was proposed following routine surveillance and maintenance surveys and observations reported in a special study of vegetative covers (DOE, 1988), in which plants were observed growing up through the rock erosion layer at recently completed disposal cells. Some of the plants observed were deep-rooted woody species, and questions concerning root intrusion into disposal cells and the need to control plant growth were raised. The special study discussed in this report was designed to address some of the ramifications of plant growth on disposal cells that have rock covers. The NRC has chosen rock covers over vegetative covers in the arid western United States because licenses cannot substantiate that the vegetative covers ''will be significantly greater than 30 percent and preferably 70 percent,'' which is the amount of ''vegetation required to reduce flow to a point of stability.'' The potential impacts of vegetation growing in rock covers are not addressed by the NRC (1990). The objectives, then, of this study were to determine the species of plants growing on two rock-covered disposal cells, study the rooting pattern of plants on these cells, and identify possible impacts of plant root penetration on these and other UMTRA Project rock-covered cells

  14. Limitation for performance of jobs in power unit control room of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janas, D.

    1988-01-01

    The procedure is described for an analysis of the somatic and mental health condition of operating personnel in the unit control room of a nuclear power plant. It was divided into three stages, viz.: (1) determination of adverse and favorable effects of work; (2) the recording of social, psychological, physiological and biochemical changes in the personnel; (3) determination of possibilities of controlling the limit for performance of a job. The analysis showed that the problem is complex and should permanently remain in the centre of attention. (J.B.). 3 refs

  15. Human factors review of nuclear power plant control room design. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminara, J.L.; Gonzalez, W.R.; Parsons, S.O.

    1976-11-01

    The human factors aspects of five representative nuclear power plant control rooms were evaluated using such methods as a checklist guided observation system, structured interviews with operators and trainers, direct observations of operator behavior, task analyses and procedure evaluation, and historical error analyses. The human factors aspects of design practices are illustrated, and many improvements in current practices are suggested. The study recommends that a detailed set of applicable human factors standards be developed to stimulate a uniform and systematic concern for human factors in design considerations

  16. Digital Full-Scope Simulation of a Conventional Nuclear Power Plant Control Room, Phase 2: Installation of a Reconfigurable Simulator to Support Nuclear Plant Sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Kirk Fitzgerald; Jacques Hugo; Bruce Hallbert

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program has developed a control room simulator in support of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. This report highlights the recent completion of this reconfigurable, full-scale, full-scope control room simulator buildout at the Idaho National Laboratory. The simulator is fully reconfigurable, meaning it supports multiple plant models developed by different simulator vendors. The simulator is full-scale, using glasstop virtual panels to display the analog control boards found at current plants. The present installation features 15 glasstop panels, uniquely achieving a complete control room representation. The simulator is also full-scope, meaning it uses the same plant models used for training simulators at actual plants. Unlike in the plant training simulators, the deployment on glasstop panels allows a high degree of customization of the panels, allowing the simulator to be used for research on the design of new digital control systems for control room modernization. This report includes separate sections discussing the glasstop panels, their layout to mimic control rooms at actual plants, technical details on creating a multi-plant and multi-vendor reconfigurable simulator, and current efforts to support control room modernization at U.S. utilities. The glasstop simulator provides an ideal testbed for prototyping and validating new control room concepts. Equally importantly, it is helping create a standardized and vetted human factors engineering process that can be used across the nuclear industry to ensure control room upgrades maintain and even improve current reliability and safety.

  17. A HUMAN FACTORS META MODEL FOR U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2017-03-01

    Over the last several years, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored human factors research and development (R&D) and human factors engineering (HFE) activities through its Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to modernize the main control rooms (MCR) of commercial nuclear power plants (NPP). Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in partnership with numerous commercial nuclear utilities, has conducted some of this R&D to enable the life extension of NPPs (i.e., provide the technical basis for the long-term reliability, productivity, safety, and security of U.S. NPPs). From these activities performed to date, a human factors meta model for U.S. NPP control room modernization can now be formulated. This paper discusses this emergent HFE meta model for NPP control room modernization, with the goal of providing an integrated high level roadmap and guidance on how to perform human factors R&D and HFE for those in the U.S. nuclear industry that are engaging in the process of upgrading their MCRs.

  18. A Pilot Study Investigating the Effects of Advanced Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Technologies: Methods and Qualitative Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLanc, Katya Le [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Powers, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spielman, Zachary [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Brandon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fitzgerald, Kirk [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Control room modernization is an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. None of the 99 currently operating commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. has completed a full-scale control room modernization to date. Nuclear power plant main control rooms for the existing commercial reactor fleet remain significantly analog, with only limited digital modernizations. Upgrades in the U.S. do not achieve the full potential of newer technologies that might otherwise enhance plant and operator performance. The goal of the control room upgrade benefits research is to identify previously overlooked benefits of modernization, identify candidate technologies that may facilitate such benefits, and demonstrate these technologies through human factors research. This report describes a pilot study to test upgrades to the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at INL.

  19. Potential for long-term isolation by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram-Howery, S.G. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Swift, P.N. (Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) must comply with EPA regulation 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B, which sets environmental standards for radioactive waste disposal. The regulation, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (hereafter referred to as the Standard), was vacated in 1987 by a Federal Court of Appeals and is underground revision. By agreement with the Sate of New Mexico, the WIPP project is evaluating compliance with the Standard as promulgated, in 1985 until a new regulation is available. This report summarizes the early-1990 status of Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL) understanding of the Project's ability to achieve compliance. The report reviews the qualitative and quantitative requirements for compliance, and identifies unknowns complicating performance assessment. It discusses in relatively nontechnical terms the approaches to resolving those unknowns, and concludes that SNL has reasonable confidence that compliance is achievable with the Standard as first promulgated. 46 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Planning for closures of hazardous waste land disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, S.H.; Kelly, B.A.; DeLozier, M.F.P.; Manrod, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Eight hazardous waste land disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are being closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) under an integrated multi-year program. The units, some of which date back to the early 1950s and include five surface impoundments, two landfills and a land treatment unit, have been used for the management of a variety of types of hazardous wastes. Closure plans for the units have been submitted and are in various stages of revision and regulatory review. The units will be closed by various combinations of methods, including liquid removal and treatment, sludge stabilization, contaminated sludge and/or soil removal, and capping. Closure of all eight units must be initiated by November 8, 1988. Funding for the eight closures is being provided by a new Department of Energy budget category, the environmental Restoration Budget Category (ERBC), which is intended to allow for a more rapid response to environmental problems and regulatory requirements. A major project, Closure and Post-Closure Activities (CAPCA) has been identified for ERBC funding to close the land disposal units in accordance with RCRA requirements. Establishing the project scope has required the development of a detailed set of assumptions and a confirmation program for each assumption. Other significant activities in the CAPCA project include risk assessments and the preparation of an integrated project schedule

  1. Nuclear power plant control room crew task analysis database: SEEK system. Users manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgy, D.; Schroeder, L.

    1984-05-01

    The Crew Task Analysis SEEK Users Manual was prepared for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. It is designed for use with the existing computerized Control Room Crew Task Analysis Database. The SEEK system consists of a PR1ME computer with its associated peripherals and software augmented by General Physics Corporation SEEK database management software. The SEEK software programs provide the Crew Task Database user with rapid access to any number of records desired. The software uses English-like sentences to allow the user to construct logical sorts and outputs of the task data. Given the multiple-associative nature of the database, users can directly access the data at the plant, operating sequence, task or element level - or any combination of these levels. A complete description of the crew task data contained in the database is presented in NUREG/CR-3371, Task Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Crews (Volumes 1 and 2)

  2. Technical and regulatory challenges for digital instrumentation and control and control room systems in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, R.; Naser, J.; Harris, T.; Keithline, K.

    2006-01-01

    There are several unsettled technical and licensing issues in the areas of instrumentation and control (I and C), human factors, and updated control room designs that need coordinated, proactive industry attention. Some of these issues are already causing protracted regulatory reviews for existing plants, and left untreated, may cause substantial delays and increased costs for new plant combined construction and operating license approvals. Both industry and the NRC will have roles in resolving the key issues and addressing them in future design efforts and regulatory reviews. Where action is needed, the industry will want to minimize costs and risks by defining industry consensus solutions with corresponding technical bases. NEI has formed a working group to coordinate industry efforts and communications with NRC staff. The working group will also help determine priorities and coordinate both new and existing plant resources. EPRI will provide technical input and guidance for the working group. In order to be able to conduct reviews in a timely fashion, the NRC will likely need to enhance and expand staff resources as existing plants are upgraded and new plant reviews become more active. The industry initiative began with a workshop sponsored by EPRI and NEI on March 28-29, 2006, which led to the creation of the NEI working group. The working group has now identified and prioritized important generic issues, established resolution paths and schedules, and identified the roles of various stakeholders including utility companies, EPRI, NEI, vendors and the NRC. Through the course of this initiative I and C issues for both existing and new plants are being addressed. This paper describes the key I and C related technical and regulatory issues and their implications for new and operating plants, and provides a status report on the efforts to resolve them. (authors)

  3. Program for closure of an inactive radioactive waste disposal site at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The 643-G Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility was operated at the Savannah River Plant from 1952 through 1974, and has been inactive since that time. The actions leading to closure of 643-G will involve a combination of activities consisting of limited waste removal, stabilization, capping, and monitoring. The overall effect of these closure actions will be to place the 643-G site in a physically and chemically stable state which will remain stable over a long period of time. During a one-hundred year institutional control period surveillance and monitoring of the site will be carried out to verify that the performance of the system is acceptable, and access of the general public to the site will be restricted. The program described in this paper is a recommendation; the actual closure plan will be negotiated with regulatory authorities. 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. Geochemical and Geophysical Study in a Degraded Area Used for Disposal of Sludge from a Water Treatment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, R.C.A.; Nunes, S.A.; Da Silva, D.R.; Lira, C.P.; Boaventura, G.R.; Do Nascimento, C.T.C.; Moreira, R.C.A.; Pinheiro, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of disposal of sludge from water treatment plant (WTS) in area damaged by laterite extraction and its consequences to soil and groundwater were investigated. Therefore, the presence and concentration of anthropogenic elements and chemical compounds were determinated. WTS disposal's influence was characterized by electroresistivity method. The WTS's geochemical dispersion was noticed in the first meters of the non saturated zone from the lending area. Lateritic profiles were characterized due to the large variation in chemical composition between the horizons. Infiltration and percolation of rainwater through the WTS have caused migration of total dissolved solids to the groundwater. WTS's disposing area has more similarities to local preserved vegetation than to gravel bed area. WTS can be considered a noninert residue if disposed in degraded areas located in regions with similar geological and hydrochemical characteristics.

  5. Preliminary plan for disposal-system characterization and long-term performance evaluation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram-Howery, S.G.; Hunter, R.L.

    1989-04-01

    The US Department of Energy is planning to dispose of transuranic wastes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Sandia National Laboratories is responsible for evaluating the compliance of the WIPP with the Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). This plan has been developed to present the issues that will be addressed before compliance can be evaluated. These issues examine the procedural nature of the Standard, and the technical requirements for further characterizing the behavior of the disposal system, including uncertainties, to support the compliance assessment. The plan briefly describes the activities that will be conducted prior to 1993 by Sandia to characterize the WIPP disposal system's behavior and predict its performance. 41 refs., 35 figs., 21 tabs

  6. Improvements and standardization of communication means for control room personnel in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preuss, W.; Eggerdinger, C.; Sieber, R.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the findings of an investigation into selected communication means for control room personnel in nuclear power stations. The study can be seen as a contribution to the systematic analysis of major problem areas which were identified in the general study 'Human factors in the nuclear power plant'. The subjects under investigation were the 'Shift book', 'Simulation book', and 'Technical and organisational changes and their records'. It was intended to analyse both the communication, processes and the associated written documentation in order to determine areas for potential improvement and possibilities for standardization. Information was obtained by interviewing shift members and their supervisors, by general observation, and by compilation and evaluation of the extensive dokumentation. Assessment criteria were developed on a scientific basis and in the course of the investigation, in particular from ergonomic findings, as well as from standards and regulations and comparison between the plants. General practical suggestions were developed for the improvement of the communication forms and the formal design of the documents and their contents. The transfer of the recommendations to practical use in the plants presupposes the consideration of plant-specific frames of reference. The report includes a compilation and listing of suggestions for improvement in topical subdivisions. (orig.) [de

  7. Tensile Properties and Integrity of Clean Room and Low-Modulus Disposable Nitrile Gloves: A Comparison of Two Dissimilar Glove Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalen, Robert N.; Wong, Weng kee

    2012-01-01

    Background: The selection of disposable nitrile exam gloves is complicated by (i) the availability of several types or formulations, (ii) product variability, and (iii) an inability of common quality control tests to detect small holes in the fingers. Differences in polymer formulation (e.g. filler and plasticizer/oil content) and tensile properties are expected to account for much of the observed variability in performance. Objectives: This study evaluated the tensile properties and integrity (leak failure rates) of two glove choices assumed to contain different amounts of plasticizers/oils. The primary aims were to determine if the tensile properties and integrity differed and if associations existed among these factors. Additional physical and chemical properties were evaluated. Methods: Six clean room and five low-modulus products were evaluated using the American Society for Testing and Materials Method D412 and a modified water-leak test to detect holes capable of passing a virus or chemical agent. Results: Significant differences in the leak failure rates and tensile properties existed between the two glove types (P ≤ 0.05). The clean room gloves were about three times more likely to have leak failures (chi-square; P = 0.001). No correlation was observed between leak failures and tensile properties. Solvent extract, an indication of added plasticizer/oil, was not associated with leak failures. However, gloves with a maximum modulus gloves were a better choice for protection against aqueous chemical or biological penetration. The observed variability between glove products indicated that glove selection cannot rely solely on glove type or manufacturer labeling. Measures of modulus and AD may aid in the selection process, in contrast with common measures of tensile strength and elongation at break. PMID:22201179

  8. Control room conceptual design of nuclear power plant with multiple modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Qianqian; Qu Ronghong; Zhang Liangju

    2014-01-01

    A conceptual design of the control room layout for the nuclear power plant with multiple modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors has been developed. The modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors may need to be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands to realize the economic efficiency. There are many differences between the multi-modular plant and the current NPPs in the control room. These differences may include the staffing level, the human-machine interface design, the operation mode, etc. The potential challenges of the human factor engineering (HFE) in the control room of the multi-modular plant are analyzed, including the operation workload of the multi-modular tasks, how to help the crew to keep situation awareness of all modules, and how to support team work, the control of shared system between modules, etc. A concept design of control room for the multi-modular plant is presented based on the design aspect of HTR-PM (High temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble bed module). HFE issues are considered in the conceptual design of control room for the multi-modular plant and some design strategies are presented. As a novel conceptual design, verifications and validations are needed, and focus of further work is sketch out. (author)

  9. Operational safety analysis of the Olkiluoto encapsulation plant and disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, J.; Suolanen, V.

    2012-11-01

    Radiation doses for workers of the facility, for inhabitants in the environment and for terrestrial ecosystem possibly caused by the encapsulation and disposal facilities to be built at Olkiluoto during its operation were considered in the study. The study covers both the normal operation of the plant and some hypothetical incidents and accidents. Release through the ventilation stack is assumed to be filtered both in normal operation and in hypothetical abnormal fault and accident cases. In addition the results for unfiltered releases are also presented. This research is limited to the deterministic analysis. During about 30 operation years of our four nuclear power plant units there have been found 58 broken fuel pins. Roughly estimating there has been one fuel leakage per year in a facility (includes two units). Based on this and adopting a conservative approach, it is estimated that one fuel pin per year could leak in normal operation during encapsulation process. The release magnitude in incidents and accidents is based on the event chains, which lead to loss of fuel pin tightness followed by a discharge of radionuclides into the handling space and to some degree to the atmosphere through the ventilation stack equipped with redundant filters. The most exposed group of inhabitants is conservatively assumed to live at the distance of 200 meters from the encapsulation and disposal plant and it will receive the largest doses in most dispersion conditions. The dose value to a member of the most exposed group was calculated on the basis of the weather data in such a way that greater dose than obtained here is caused only in 0.5 percent of dispersion conditions. The results obtained indicate that during normal operation the doses to workers remain small and the dose to the member of the most exposed group is less than 0.001 mSv per year. In the case of hypothetical fault and accident releases the offsite doses do not exceed either the limit values set by the safety

  10. Operational safety analysis of the Olkiluoto encapsulation plant and disposal facility; Olkiluodon kapselointi- ja loppusijoituslaitoksen kaeyttoeturvallisuusanalyysi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, J.; Suolanen, V. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-11-15

    Radiation doses for workers of the facility, for inhabitants in the environment and for terrestrial ecosystem possibly caused by the encapsulation and disposal facilities to be built at Olkiluoto during its operation were considered in the study. The study covers both the normal operation of the plant and some hypothetical incidents and accidents. Release through the ventilation stack is assumed to be filtered both in normal operation and in hypothetical abnormal fault and accident cases. In addition the results for unfiltered releases are also presented. This research is limited to the deterministic analysis. During about 30 operation years of our four nuclear power plant units there have been found 58 broken fuel pins. Roughly estimating there has been one fuel leakage per year in a facility (includes two units). Based on this and adopting a conservative approach, it is estimated that one fuel pin per year could leak in normal operation during encapsulation process. The release magnitude in incidents and accidents is based on the event chains, which lead to loss of fuel pin tightness followed by a discharge of radionuclides into the handling space and to some degree to the atmosphere through the ventilation stack equipped with redundant filters. The most exposed group of inhabitants is conservatively assumed to live at the distance of 200 meters from the encapsulation and disposal plant and it will receive the largest doses in most dispersion conditions. The dose value to a member of the most exposed group was calculated on the basis of the weather data in such a way that greater dose than obtained here is caused only in 0.5 percent of dispersion conditions. The results obtained indicate that during normal operation the doses to workers remain small and the dose to the member of the most exposed group is less than 0.001 mSv per year. In the case of hypothetical fault and accident releases the offsite doses do not exceed either the limit values set by the safety

  11. Air temperature determination inside residual heat removal pump room of Angra-1 nuclear power plant after a design basic accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siniscalchi, Marcio Rezende

    2005-01-01

    This work develops heat transfer theoretical models for determination of air temperature inside the Residual Heat Removal Pump Room of Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant after a Design Basis Accident without forced ventilation. Two models had been developed. The differential equations are solved by analytical methods. A software in FORTRAN language are developed for simulations of temperature inside rooms for different geometries and materials. (author)

  12. Multilevel interfaces for power plant control rooms I: An integrative review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    Events that are unfamiliar to operators and that have not been anticipated by designers pose the greatest threat to system safety in nuclear power plants. The abstraction hierarchy has been proposed as a representation framework that can be adopted to design interfaces that support operators in dealing with these unanticipated events. This multilevel representation format represents a plant in terms of both physical and functional constraints. This article reviews, for the first time, the work that has been done in academia, industry, and research laboratories on multilevel interfaces based on the abstraction hierarchy. The review indicates that there are many degrees of freedom in designing an interface based on the abstraction hierarchy but that very little systematic work has been done in evaluating how best to deal with those degrees of freedom. As a result, there is very little defensible guidance to provide designers. As a first step in overcoming this barrier, a companion paper uses the results of the review presented here to develop a preliminary design space for multilevel interfaces based on the abstraction hierarchy. This space serves several worthwhile purposes relevant not only to research but also to design and regulation as well. Consequently this complementary set of papers should be of interest to researchers, designers, and regulators concerned with nuclear power-plant control rooms. 53 refs., 8 figs

  13. Multilivel interfaces for power plant control rooms II: A preliminary design space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    Events that are unfamiliar to operators and that have not been anticipated by designers pose the greatest threat to system safely in nuclear power plants. The abstraction hierarchy has been proposed as a representation frame-work that can be adopted to design interfaces that support operators in dealing with these unanticipated events. It consists of a multilevel representation format that represents a plant in terms of both physical and functional constraints. In a companion article, the work that has been done on this topic in academia, industry, and research laboratories was reviewed. On the basis of the results of that review, this article proposes a preliminary design space for multilevel interfaces based on the abstraction hierarchy. This space serves several worthwhile purposes: providing a unified framework within which to compare and contrast previous and future work in this area, providing a coherent research agenda by identifying some of the dimensions that can be meaningfully manipulated and evaluated in future experiments, and finally, serving as an input design by outlining the various decisions that need to be made in developing multilevel interfaces and the different options that are currently available for each of those decisions. Consequently this article should be of interest to researchers, designers, and regulators concerned with nuclear power-plant control rooms

  14. Team interaction skills evaluation criteria for nuclear power plant control room operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, J.C.; Hauth, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Team interaction skills are an essential aspect of safe nuclear power plant control room operations. Previous research has shown that, when a group works together, rather than as individuals, more effective operations are possible. However, little research has addressed how such team interaction skills can be measured. In this study rating scales were developed specifically for such a measurement purpose. Dimensions of team skill performance were identified from previous research and experience in the area, incorporating the input of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) contract operator licensing examiners. Rating scales were developed on the basis of these dimensions, incorporating a modified Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (BARS) as well as Behavioral Frequency formats. After a pilot-testing/revision process, rating data were collected using 11 control room crews responding to simulator scenarios at a boiling water and a pressurized water reactor. Statistical analyses of the resulting data revealed moderate inter-rater reliability using the Behavioral Frequency scales, relatively low inter-rater reliability using the BARS, and moderate support for convergent and discriminant validity of the scales. It was concluded that the scales show promise psychometrically and in terms of user acceptability, but that additional scale revision is needed before field implementation. Recommendations for scale revision and directions for future research were presented

  15. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase final supplemental environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Chapters 1--6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II) is to provide information on environmental impacts regarding the Department of Energy's (DOE) proposed disposal operations at WIPP. The Proposed Action describes the treatment and disposal of the Basic inventory of TRU waste over a 35-year period. The Action Alternatives proposed the treatment of the Basic Inventory and an Additional Inventory as well as the transportation of the treated waste to WIPP for disposal over a 150- to 190-year period. The three Action Alternatives include the treatment of TRU waste at consolidation sites to meet WIPP planning-basic Waste Acceptance Criteria, the thermal treatment of TRU waste to meet Land Disposal Restrictions, and the treatment of TRU waste by a shred and grout process. SEIS-II evaluates environmental impacts resulting from the various treatment options; the transportation of TRU waste to WIPP using truck, a combination of truck and regular rail service, and a combination of truck and dedicated rail service; and the disposal of this waste in the repository. Evaluated impacts include those to the general environment and to human health. Additional issues associated with the implementation of the alternatives are discussed to provide further understanding of the decisions to be reached and to provide the opportunity for public input on improving DOE's Environmental Management Program. Chapters 1--6 include an introduction, background information, description of the proposed action and alternatives, description of the affected environments, environmental impacts, and consultations and permits

  16. Feasibility study for the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    In July 1990, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) directed the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations to comply with Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements for the remediation of the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Disposal Site located at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. EPA, Waste Management Branch, had approved a closure plan in December 1989 for the UNC Disposal Site. This feasibility study (FS) is a fully satisfy the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Contingency Plan (NCP) requirements for support of the selection of a remedial response for closure of the UNC Disposal Site. For two years the UNC Disposal Site accepted and disposed of waste from the decommissioning of a UNC uranium recovery facility in Wood River Junction, Rhode Island. Between June 1982 and November 1984, the UNC Disposal Site received 11,000 55-gal drums of sludge fixed in cement, 18,000 drums of contaminated soil, and 288 wooden boxes of contaminated building and process demolition materials. The FS assembles a wide range of remedial technologies so the most appropriate actions could be selected to remediate potential contamination to below MCLs and/or to below the maximum level of acceptable risk. Technologies were evaluated based on technical effectiveness, ease of implementation, and costs. Applicable technologies were then selected for alternative development. 33 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs

  17. Disposal of Kr-85 separated from the dissolver off-gas of a reprocessing plant for LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nommensen, O.

    1981-08-01

    The principle of the radiation protection to keep the radiation load of the population as low as possible requires the development of methods for retaining the radionuclide Krypton 85 seperated off the dissolver waste gas of future reprocessing plants for LWR-nuclear fuel elements. In a recommendation of the RSK the long-termed storage of the Kr-85 in a pressure gas bottle and the marine disposal we considered to be disposal methods low in risk. The present work develops a concept for both of the disposal methods and demonstrates their technical feasibility. The comparison of the cost estimations effected for both of the disposal methods shows that the costs related with the marine disposal of the pressure gas bottles amounting to 1.90 DM/kg of reprocessed U fall by the factor 10 below the costs that result from the surface storage of the bottles. In both cases was referred to a reprocessing capacity of 1400 t U/a corresponding to 50 GW installed nuclear power, thereby accumulating approximately 629 PBq (17 MCi) Kr-85 per year. Both concepts project the seperated radioactive inert gas to be filled in pressure gas bottles in a low temperature rectification plant. Each of the 85 bottles to be filled per year contains 7.4 PBq (200 kCi) Kr-85. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Applied means to increase stimulation in the control room work at the Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, P.E.; Akerhielm, F.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are generally designed and built with a quality which implies that the units seldom require intervention from the operating staff under normal operating conditions. This leaves the operators with the dominating task of only passively supervising the process. A number of measures have been taken to counteract the problem of under-stimulated individuals in the control rooms and to maintain active and purposeful working conditions. Basically these measures derive from the belief that augmented competence, increased responsibilities and a enhanced sense of indispensability functions as an inspiration even in a monotonous working situation. For this purpose a number of activities and tasks, parallel to the normal duties as member of the operating staff, have been implemented

  19. Team interaction skills evaluation criteria for nuclear power plant control room operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, J.C.; Toquam, J.; Gaddy, C.

    1991-09-01

    Previous research has shown the value of good team interaction skills to group performance, yet little progress has been made on in terms of how such skills can be measured. In this study rating scales developed previously (Montgomery, et al., 1990) were extensively revised and cast into a Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (BARS) and a Behavioral Frequency format. Rating data were collected using 13 training instructors at the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Plant, who rated three videotapes of simulator scenario performance during a day-long training session and later evaluated control room crews during requalification training. High levels of interrater agreement on both rating scales were found. However, the factor structure of the ratings was generally inconsistent with that hypothesized. Analysis of training ratings using Cronbach's components of accuracy (Cronbach, 1955) indicated that BARS ratings generally exhibited less error than did the Behavioral Frequency ratings. The results are discussed in terms of both field and research implications

  20. Intelligent software system for the advanced control room of a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Soon Heung; Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Jin Kyun; Heo, Gyung Young [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Han Gon [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The intelligent software system for nuclear power plants (NPPs) has been conceptually designed in this study. Its design goals are to operate NPPs in an improved manner and to support operators` cognitive takes. It consists of six major modules such as {sup I}nformation Processing,{sup {sup A}}larm Processing,{sup {sup P}}rocedure Tracking,{sup {sup P}}erformance Diagnosis,{sup a}nd {sup E}vent Diagnosis{sup m}odules for operators and {sup M}alfunction Diagnosis{sup m}odule for maintenance personnel. Most of the modules have been developed for several years and the others are under development. After the completion of development, they will be combined into one system that would be main parts of advanced control rooms in NPPs. 5 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  1. Human factors review of nuclear power plant control room design. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminara, J.L.; Gonzalez, W.R.; Parsons, S.O.

    1976-11-01

    Human factors engineering is an interdisciplinary specialty concerned with influencing the design of equipment systems, facilities, and operational environments to promote safe, efficient, and reliable operator performance. The human factors aspects of five representative nuclear power plant control rooms were evaluated using such methods as a checklist-guided observation system, structured interviews with operators and trainers, direct observations of operator behavior, task analyses and procedure evaluation, and historical error analyses. The human factors aspects of design practices are illustrated, and many improvements in current practices are suggested. The study recommends that a detailed set of applicable human factors standards be developed to stimulate a uniform and systematic concern for human factors in design considerations

  2. Intelligent software system for the advanced control room of a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Soon Heung; Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Jin Kyun; Heo, Gyung Young [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Han Gon [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The intelligent software system for nuclear power plants (NPPs) has been conceptually designed in this study. Its design goals are to operate NPPs in an improved manner and to support operators` cognitive takes. It consists of six major modules such as {sup I}nformation Processing,{sup {sup A}}larm Processing,{sup {sup P}}rocedure Tracking,{sup {sup P}}erformance Diagnosis,{sup a}nd {sup E}vent Diagnosis{sup m}odules for operators and {sup M}alfunction Diagnosis{sup m}odule for maintenance personnel. Most of the modules have been developed for several years and the others are under development. After the completion of development, they will be combined into one system that would be main parts of advanced control rooms in NPPs. 5 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  3. Commentary on nuclear power plant control room habitability - including a review of related LERs (1981-1983)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, D.W.; Kotra, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    A review of Licensee Event Reports filed by the operator of commercial nuclear power plants from 1981 through 1983 has revealed that approximately 3% pertain to systems that maintain or monitor control room habitability. Dominant contributors were deficiencies in normal and emergency trains of heating, ventilation, air conditioning and air cleaning systems (45%), deficiencies in atmospheric monitors for toxic and radioactive substances (27%) and deficiencies in fire protection systems (13%). To correct the situation revealed by these analyses and by information provided from other sources, it is recommended that the NRC incorporate into its program plan the development of information that anticipates the conditions within a control room during emergencies, and that criteria for habitability within the control room be better defined. In addition, it is suggested than an improved protocol for testing control room air-related systems be developed, that the required thickness and number of layers of charcoal adsorption beds for control room air cleaning systems be re-evaluated, and that steps be taken to improve the quality of heating, ventilating, air conditioning and air cleaning components. It is also recommended that greater emphasis be placed on maintaining nuclear power plant control rooms in a habitable condition during emergencies so that the operators can remain there and safely shut down the plant, in contrast to placing reliance on the use of remote shutdown panels or auxiliary control facilities

  4. Early-1990 status of performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram-Howery, S G [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swift, P N [Tech Reps Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-07-15

    This paper summarizes the early-1990 status of the performance-assessment work being done to evaluate compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B. This regulation sets environmental standards for radioactive waste disposal (Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes). As required by Subpart B, evaluations of compliance will include probabilistic numerical simulations of repository performance and qualitative judgments. Compliance appears uncertain only in the event of human intrusion into the repository after decommissioning. Issues affecting compliance following intrusion include properties of the plugs used to seal the intruding borehole, permeability and porosity of the waste, and possible pressurization of the repository by gas generated from the organic decomposition and corrosion of the waste and containers. Research is in progress to determine the probability of intrusion and to quantify parameter uncertainties needed to include these factors in simulations of repository performance. The Department of Energy (DOE) is following two strategies to assure compliance. First, passive marker systems will be designed and implemented to reduce the likelihood of intrusion and increase the likelihood that intruders will properly reseal the repository. Second, modifications to the form of the waste and the design of the repository to achieve acceptable performance if the intruding borehole is not adequately sealed will be designed. Goals include reductions in gas generation and waste permeability and porosity. Numerous modifications are technically possible. Work in progress will evaluate proposed modifications and recommend the most promising for further testing. The DOE is confident that compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR 191 can be established using a combination of the two strategies

  5. Early-1990 status of performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram-Howery, S.G.; Swift, P.N.

    1991-07-01

    This paper summarizes the early-1990 status of the performance-assessment work being done to evaluate compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B. This regulation sets environmental standards for radioactive waste disposal (Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes). As required by Subpart B, evaluations of compliance will include probabilistic numerical simulations of repository performance and qualitative judgments. Compliance appears uncertain only in the event of human intrusion into the repository after decommissioning. Issues affecting compliance following intrusion include properties of the plugs used to seal the intruding borehole, permeability and porosity of the waste, and possible pressurization of the repository by gas generated from the organic decomposition and corrosion of the waste and containers. Research is in progress to determine the probability of intrusion and to quantify parameter uncertainties needed to include these factors in simulations of repository performance. The Department of Energy (DOE) is following two strategies to assure compliance. First, passive marker systems will be designed and implemented to reduce the likelihood of intrusion and increase the likelihood that intruders will properly reseal the repository. Second, modifications to the form of the waste and the design of the repository to achieve acceptable performance if the intruding borehole is not adequately sealed will be designed. Goals include reductions in gas generation and waste permeability and porosity. Numerous modifications are technically possible. Work in progress will evaluate proposed modifications and recommend the most promising for further testing. The DOE is confident that compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR 191 can be established using a combination of the two strategies

  6. Automation inflicted differences on operator performance in nuclear power plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Jonas; Osvalder, A.L.

    2007-03-01

    Today it is possible to automate almost any function in a human-machine system. Therefore it is important to find a balance between automation level and the prerequisites for the operator to maintain safe operation. Different human factors evaluation methods can be used to find differences between automatic and manual operations that have an effect on operator performance; e.g. Predictive Human Error Analysis (PHEA), NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX), Halden Questionnaire, and Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART). Results from an empirical study concerning automation levels, made at Ringhals power plant, showed that factors as time pressure and criticality of the work situation influenced the operator's performance and mental workload more than differences in level of automation. The results indicate that the operator's attention strategies differ between the manual and automatic sequences. Independently of level of automation, it is essential that the operator retains control and situational understanding. When performing a manual task, the operator is 'closer' to the process and in control with sufficient situational understanding. When the level of automation increases, the demands on information presentation increase to ensure safe plant operation. The need for control can be met by introducing 'control gates' where the operator has to accept that the automatic procedures are continuing as expected. Situational understanding can be established by clear information about process status and by continuous feedback. A conclusion of the study was that a collaborative control room environment is important. Rather than allocating functions to either the operator or the system, a complementary strategy should be used. Key parameters to consider when planning the work in the control room are time constraints and task criticality and how they affect the performance of the joint cognitive system.However, the examined working situations were too different

  7. To stay or to go? Balancing the risk of reprocessing plant control room evacuation following a criticality alarm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, Suzanne; McCrindle, David; Harris, Neil; Haworth, Justin

    2003-01-01

    Following a criticality alarm within the Magnox Separation Plant at Sellafield, there is a conflict of interest between the risks associated with complete evacuation versus continued manning of the control room. The historic emergency response policy would be to completely evacuate the control room upon a criticality alarm. If, however, the alarm was found to be false, the inevitable loss in control over the plant could have environmental, operational and radiological release consequences. Maintaining control room manning following a genuine alarm might, however, result in an avoidable high dose to an operator. Based upon the estimated dose equivalent to a control room operator for a range of criticality incident morphologies a risk analysis was undertaken. The results indicate that the differential risk between an operator who evacuates immediately and an operator who remains for a short time to complete diagnostic checks is very small. As a consequence a new emergency policy was therefore developed on plant which results in a relatively low risk to control room operators, but still allows control over the plant to be retained following a false criticality alarm. (author)

  8. Proposed plan for the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with Section 117(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986, is releasing the proposed plan for remedial action at the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Disposal Site located at the DOE Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of this document is to present and solicit for comment to the public and all interested parties the ''preferred plan'' to remediate the UNC Disposal Site. However, comments on all alternatives are invited

  9. Site selection experience for a new low-level radioactive waste storage/disposal facility at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towler, O.A.; Cook, J.R.; Helton, B.D.

    1985-10-01

    Preliminary performance criteria and site selection guides specific to the Savannah River Plant, were developed for a new low-level radioactive waste storage/disposal facility. These site selection guides were applied to seventeen potential sites identified at SRP. The potential site were ranked based on how well they met a set of characteristics considered important in site selection for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. The characteristics were given a weighting factor representing its relative importance in meeting site performance criteria. A candidate site was selected and will be the subject of a site characterization program

  10. Plant species potentially suitable for cover on low-level solid nuclear waste disposal sites: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenkert, A.L.; Parr, P.D.; Taylor, F.G.

    1984-09-01

    This report reviews available literature on soil conditions, hydrology, and climatological data and suggests plant species suitable for covering the low-level nuclear waste disposal areas in the White Oak Creek Watershed within the Oak Ridge Reservation. Literature on naturally invading species and secondary succession, on plant species used for reclamation of coal spoils and roadsides, and on horticultural species is reviewed. The potential of plant species to take up, or mine, the waste through deep rooting is assessed. The effects of vegetation cover on the water balance in a watershed are reviewed. Several conclusions are presented concerning the management of vegetation cover on low-level solid waste disposal areas. 163 references, 2 figures, 9 tables

  11. Plant species potentially suitable for cover on low-level solid nuclear waste disposal sites: a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenkert, A.L.; Parr, P.D.; Taylor, F.G.

    1984-09-01

    This report reviews available literature on soil conditions, hydrology, and climatological data and suggests plant species suitable for covering the low-level nuclear waste disposal areas in the White Oak Creek Watershed within the Oak Ridge Reservation. Literature on naturally invading species and secondary succession, on plant species used for reclamation of coal spoils and roadsides, and on horticultural species is reviewed. The potential of plant species to take up, or mine, the waste through deep rooting is assessed. The effects of vegetation cover on the water balance in a watershed are reviewed. Several conclusions are presented concerning the management of vegetation cover on low-level solid waste disposal areas. 163 references, 2 figures, 9 tables.

  12. REVIEW Of COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURE GUIDELINES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David I Gertman; Katya Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring

    2011-09-01

    Computerized procedures (CPs) are recognized as an emerging alternative to paper-based procedures for supporting control room operators in nuclear power plants undergoing life extension and in the concept of operations for advanced reactor designs. CPs potentially reduce operator workload, yield increases in efficiency, and provide for greater resilience. Yet, CPs may also adversely impact human and plant performance if not designed and implemented properly. Therefore, it is important to ensure that existing guidance is sufficient to provide for proper implementation and monitoring of CPs. In this paper, human performance issues were identified based on a review of the behavioral science literature, research on computerized procedures in nuclear and other industries, and a review of industry experience with CPs. The review of human performance issues led to the identification of a number of technical gaps in available guidance sources. To address some of the gaps, we developed 13 supplemental guidelines to support design and safety. This paper presents these guidelines and the case for further research.

  13. Human factors verification and validation of the advanced nuclear plant control room design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Richard; Zizzo, David; Yu, Kim

    2005-01-01

    The GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) design has implemented the applicable human factors engineering (HFE) principles in the design of human-system interfaces (HSI). The ABWR uses unique features such as large mimic and touch-screen technology to present plant overviews and system operating details to the control room operating staff. The HSI designs, both in the console panels and the software generated graphical user interfaces, have been developed and evaluated using HFE guidelines. In addition to HFE guidelines reviews performed during design and implementation, broader reviews have been performed under the HFE Verification and Validation Implementation Plan (HFE V and VIP). Based upon the NUREG-0711, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) (Reference 1), the HFE V and VIP, hereafter also referred to as V and V, has provided feedback during the various phases of design, implementation, and integration of the HSI. As one of the ten elements of the HFE PRM, the V and V activities reaffirm that the design of the HSI conforms to the HFE design principles and that the plant operating staff in the control room can perform their assigned tasks. This rigorous HFE V and V process is now being applied in the implementation of the ABWR design for Taiwan Power Company's Lungmen Power Station. Two 1350 MWe ABWR units are currently under construction at Lungmen. The HFE V and V ensures that the process for the design is compliant with the HFE principles. An important aspect of the Lungmen HFE program has been the direct involvement of the end user, Taiwan Power Company (TPC), throughout the design development and implementation. These HFE V and V activities, performed in three phases, ensures that the necessary displays, control, and alarms are provided to support the identified personnel tasks. The HFE V and V also checks to determine that the design of each identified component is compliant with the HFE principles. The V and V ensures

  14. Evolution of coal ash solidification properties with disposal site depth and age, 'Gacko' Thermal power plant case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Dinko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ash with high calcium content is produced by coal combusting in 'Gacko' thermal power plant (Bosnia and Herzegovina. Result of controlled mixture of water and ash is spontaneous ash solidification on disposal site. Speed and solidification efficiency depends on content of calcium-oxide in ash and water: ash mass ratio, which was determined by previous research. Mass ratio that was chosen as the most suitable ratio for industrial usage (roughly was 1:1. Samples of ash of different age were taken after 6.5 years of exploitation and their chemical, physical, mineralogical and geotechnical characteristics were analyzed. Disposed ash was stratified and very heterogeneous. It was shown that great impact on solidification process in practice have climate conditions, proper handling slurry processing, work continuity and disposal site preparation. Great impact of water is noticed which is, because of its water permeability filtrated into lower layers and significantly alters it characteristic.

  15. Saltstone: cement-based waste form for disposal of Savannah River Plant low-level radioactive salt waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Defense waste processing at the Savannah River Plant will include decontamination and disposal of approximately 400 million liters of waste containing NaNO 3 , NaOH, Na 2 SO 4 , and NaNO 2 . After decontamination, the salt solution is classified as low-level waste. A cement-based waste form, saltstone, has been designed for disposal of Savannah River Plant low-level radioactive salt waste. Bulk properties of this material have been tailored with respect to salt leach rate, permeability, and compressive strength. Microstructure and mineralogy of leached and unleached specimens were characterized by SEM and x-ray diffraction analyses. The disposal system for the DWPF salt waste includes reconstitution of the crystallized salt as a solution containing 32 wt % solids. This solution will be decontaminated to remove 137 Cs and 90 Sr and then stabilized in a cement-based waste form. Laboratory and field tests indicate that this stabilization process greatly reduces the mobility of all of the waste constitutents in the surface and near-surface environment. Engineered trenches for subsurface burial of the saltstone have been designed to ensure compatibility between the waste form and the environment. The total disposal sytem, saltstone-trench-surrounding soil, has been designed to contain radionuclides, Cr, and Hg by both physical encapsulation and chemical fixation mechanisms. Physical encapsulation of the salts is the mechanism employed for controlling N and OH releases. In this way, final disposal of the SRP low-level waste can be achieved and the quality of the groundwater at the perimeter of the disposal site meets EPA drinking water standards

  16. Consideration of nuclear criticality when disposing of transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RECHARD,ROBERT P.; SANCHEZ,LAWRENCE C.; STOCKMAN,CHRISTINE T.; TRELLUE,HOLLY R.

    2000-04-01

    Based on general arguments presented in this report, nuclear criticality was eliminated from performance assessment calculations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a repository for waste contaminated with transuranic (TRU) radioisotopes, located in southeastern New Mexico. At the WIPP, the probability of criticality within the repository is low because mechanisms to concentrate the fissile radioisotopes dispersed throughout the waste are absent. In addition, following an inadvertent human intrusion into the repository (an event that must be considered because of safety regulations), the probability of nuclear criticality away from the repository is low because (1) the amount of fissile mass transported over 10,000 yr is predicted to be small, (2) often there are insufficient spaces in the advective pore space (e.g., macroscopic fractures) to provide sufficient thickness for precipitation of fissile material, and (3) there is no credible mechanism to counteract the natural tendency of the material to disperse during transport and instead concentrate fissile material in a small enough volume for it to form a critical concentration. Furthermore, before a criticality would have the potential to affect human health after closure of the repository--assuming that a criticality could occur--it would have to either (1) degrade the ability of the disposal system to contain nuclear waste or (2) produce significantly more radioisotopes than originally present. Neither of these situations can occur at the WIPP; thus, the consequences of a criticality are also low.

  17. Consideration of nuclear criticality when disposing of transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, Robert P.; Sanchez, Lawrence C.; Stockman, Christine T.; Trellue, Holly R.

    2000-01-01

    Based on general arguments presented in this report, nuclear criticality was eliminated from performance assessment calculations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a repository for waste contaminated with transuranic (TRU) radioisotopes, located in southeastern New Mexico. At the WIPP, the probability of criticality within the repository is low because mechanisms to concentrate the fissile radioisotopes dispersed throughout the waste are absent. In addition, following an inadvertent human intrusion into the repository (an event that must be considered because of safety regulations), the probability of nuclear criticality away from the repository is low because (1) the amount of fissile mass transported over 10,000 yr is predicted to be small, (2) often there are insufficient spaces in the advective pore space (e.g., macroscopic fractures) to provide sufficient thickness for precipitation of fissile material, and (3) there is no credible mechanism to counteract the natural tendency of the material to disperse during transport and instead concentrate fissile material in a small enough volume for it to form a critical concentration. Furthermore, before a criticality would have the potential to affect human health after closure of the repository--assuming that a criticality could occur--it would have to either (1) degrade the ability of the disposal system to contain nuclear waste or (2) produce significantly more radioisotopes than originally present. Neither of these situations can occur at the WIPP; thus, the consequences of a criticality are also low

  18. Baseline Study Methodology for Future Phases of Research on Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, Katya Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bower, Gordon Ross [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hill, Rachael Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spielman, Zachary Alexander [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Brandon Charles [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-01

    In order to provide a basis for industry adoption of advanced technologies, the Control Room Upgrades Benefits Research Project will investigate the benefits of including advanced technologies as part of control room modernization This report describes the background, methodology, and research plan for the first in a series of full-scale studies to test the effects of advanced technology in NPP control rooms. This study will test the effect of Advanced Overview Displays in the partner Utility’s control room simulator

  19. Migration of Older to New Digital Control Systems in Nuclear Power Plant Main Control Rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovesdi, Casey Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey Clark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has the primary mission to advance nuclear power by resolving socio-technical issues through research and development (R&D). One DOE-NE activity supporting this mission is the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. LWRS has the overall objective to sustain the operation of existing commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) through conducting R&D across multiple “pathways,” or R&D focus areas. The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies pathway conducts targeted R&D to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control (I&C) and related information systems in operating U.S. NPPs. This work involves (1) ensuring that legacy analog II&C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet, and (2) implementing digital II&C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the NPP operating model. Under the LWRS Advanced II&C pathway, Human Factors experts at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have been conducting R&D in support of NPP main control room (MCR) modernization activities. Work in prior years has focused on migrating analog I&C systems to new digital I&C systems (). In fiscal year 2016 (FY16), one new focus area for this research is migrating older digital I&C systems to new and advanced digital I&C systems. This report summarizes a plan for conducting a digital-to-digital migration of a legacy digital I&C system to a new digital I&C system in support of control room modernization activities.

  20. Migration of Older to New Digital Control Systems in Nuclear Power Plant Main Control Rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovesdi, Casey Robert; Joe, Jeffrey Clark

    2016-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has the primary mission to advance nuclear power by resolving socio-technical issues through research and development (R&D). One DOE-NE activity supporting this mission is the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. LWRS has the overall objective to sustain the operation of existing commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) through conducting R&D across multiple ''pathways,'' or R&D focus areas. The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies pathway conducts targeted R&D to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control (I&C) and related information systems in operating U.S. NPPs. This work involves (1) ensuring that legacy analog II&C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet, and (2) implementing digital II&C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the NPP operating model. Under the LWRS Advanced II&C pathway, Human Factors experts at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have been conducting R&D in support of NPP main control room (MCR) modernization activities. Work in prior years has focused on migrating analog I&C systems to new digital I&C systems (). In fiscal year 2016 (FY16), one new focus area for this research is migrating older digital I&C systems to new and advanced digital I&C systems. This report summarizes a plan for conducting a digital-to-digital migration of a legacy digital I&C system to a new digital I&C system in support of control room modernization activities.

  1. Avoiding 100 New Power Plants by Increasing Efficiency of Room Air Conditioners in India: Opportunities and Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Amol; Abhyankar, Nikit; Shah, Nihar

    2014-06-19

    Electricity demand for room ACs is growing very rapidly in emerging economies such as India. We estimate the electricity demand from room ACs in 2030 in India considering factors such as weather and income growth using market data on penetration of ACs in different income classes and climatic regions. We discuss the status of the current standards, labels, and incentive programs to improve the efficiency of room ACs in these markets and assess the potential for further large improvements in efficiency and find that efficiency can be improved by over 40percent cost effectively. The total potential energy savings from Room AC efficiency improvement in India using the best available technology will reach over 118 TWh in 2030; potential peak demand saving is found to be 60 GW by 2030. This is equivalent to avoiding 120 new coal fired power plants of 500 MW each. We discuss policy options to complement, expand and improve the ongoing programs to capture this large potential.

  2. Avoiding 100 new power plants by increasing efficiency of room air conditioners in India: opportunities and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Amol; Abhyankar, Nikit; Shah, Nihar; [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Division

    2013-10-15

    Electricity demand for room ACs is growing very rapidly in emerging economies such as India. We estimate the electricity demand from room ACs in 2030 in India considering factors such as weather and income growth using market data on penetration of ACs in different income classes and climatic regions. We discuss the status of the current standards, labels, and incentive programs to improve the efficiency of room ACs in these markets and assess the potential for further large improvements in efficiency and find that efficiency can be improved by over 40% cost effectively. The total potential energy savings from Room AC efficiency improvement in India using the best available technology will reach over 118 TWh in 2030; potential peak demand saving is found to be 60 GW by 2030. This is equivalent to avoiding 120 new coal fired power plants of 500 MW each. We discuss policy options to complement, expand and improve the ongoing programs to capture this large potential.

  3. Control room unfiltered in-leakage limit analysis of design-basis LOCA for Lungmen ABWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai Chihming; Chang Chinjang; Yuann Yngruey

    2014-01-01

    In USNRC's Generic Letter 2003-01, 'Control Room Habitability,' it requests utilities provide information to demonstrate that the control room at each of their respective facilities complies with the current licensing and design bases, and applicable regulatory requirements, and that suitable design, maintenance and testing control measures are in place for maintaining this compliance. In particular, each utility is required to perform the control room in-leakage test to demonstrate that the unfiltered in-leakage rate is within that assumed in the licensing analyses. It must be ensured that the control room envelope habitability, in terms of radiation dose, is maintained during normal operations as well as design basis accidents. In view of this, a dose analysis has been performed to establish the control room unfiltered in-leakage limit which can be used as an acceptance criterion for the in-leakage test. The analysis in this study is for Lungmen ABWR plant. The plant has twin units, with each unit having its own control room. The TID-4844 source terms and associated methodology are used. The USNRC RADTRAD v3.03 code is employed for the transport calculation of radioactive materials in different paths, including control room in-leakage path. The radiological criterion on protection of the operators specified in 10 CFR 50, Appendix A, General Design Criterion 19 is followed. It's demonstrated that the performance of Lungmen control room with 500 cfm unfiltered in-leakage air could meet the radiological habitability acceptance criteria in case of radiation hazards. (author)

  4. Human-machine interface aspects and use of computer-based operator support systems in control room upgrades and new control room designs for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, O.

    1997-01-01

    At the Halden Project efforts are made to explore the possibilities through design, development and validation of Computer-based Operator Support Systems (COSSes) which can assist the operators in different operational situations, ranging from normal operation to disturbance and accident conditions. The programme comprises four main activities: 1) verification and validation of safety critical software systems; 2) man-machine interaction research emphasizing improvements in man-machine interfaces on the basis of human factors studies; 3) computerized operator support systems assisting the operator in fault detection/diagnosis and planning of control actions; and 4) control room development providing a basis for retrofitting of existing control rooms and for the design of advanced concepts. The paper presents the status of this development programme, including descriptions of specific operator support functions implemented in the simulator-based, experimental control room at Halden (HAMMLAB, HAlden Man-Machine LABoratory). These operator aids comprise advanced alarms systems, diagnostic support functions, electronic procedures, critical safety functions surveillance and accident management support systems. The different operator support systems development at the Halden Project are tested and evaluated in HAMMLAB with operators from the Halden Reactor, and occasionally from commercial NPPs, as test subjects. These evaluations provide data on the merits of different operator support systems in an advanced control room setting, as well as on how such systems should be integrated to enhance operator performance. The paper discusses these aspects and the role of computerized operator support systems in plant operation based on the experience from this work at the Halden Project. 15 refs, 5 figs

  5. Human-machine interface aspects and use of computer-based operator support systems in control room upgrades and new control room designs for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, O [Institutt for Energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    At the Halden Project efforts are made to explore the possibilities through design, development and validation of Computer-based Operator Support Systems (COSSes) which can assist the operators in different operational situations, ranging from normal operation to disturbance and accident conditions. The programme comprises four main activities: 1) verification and validation of safety critical software systems; 2) man-machine interaction research emphasizing improvements in man-machine interfaces on the basis of human factors studies; 3) computerized operator support systems assisting the operator in fault detection/diagnosis and planning of control actions; and 4) control room development providing a basis for retrofitting of existing control rooms and for the design of advanced concepts. The paper presents the status of this development programme, including descriptions of specific operator support functions implemented in the simulator-based, experimental control room at Halden (HAMMLAB, HAlden Man-Machine LABoratory). These operator aids comprise advanced alarms systems, diagnostic support functions, electronic procedures, critical safety functions surveillance and accident management support systems. The different operator support systems development at the Halden Project are tested and evaluated in HAMMLAB with operators from the Halden Reactor, and occasionally from commercial NPPs, as test subjects. These evaluations provide data on the merits of different operator support systems in an advanced control room setting, as well as on how such systems should be integrated to enhance operator performance. The paper discusses these aspects and the role of computerized operator support systems in plant operation based on the experience from this work at the Halden Project. 15 refs, 5 figs.

  6. Physical environment design criteria for the new control room in the ENEA TRIGA-RC1 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberti, M.; Di Giulio, A.

    1986-01-01

    Parallelly to the plant modifications, many changes of the instrumentation in the Control Room (CR) were necessary in order to deal with the various aged components and the completion and integration needs turning out from the experience in reactor running. In the room, besides the control activity of the RC1 plant, continuous training and updating activities are currently performed which are intended for the operators working in the control rooms of nuclear power plants. The design of the physical environment of the new CR - carried out in a more general research project between ENEA and Politecnico di Milano - was based on the following fundamental criteria: - to ensure conditions fit for the performance of the suspervision, diagnosis and control tasks the operators are entrusted with; - to set up a model of control room for the more complex power plants. First of all a detailed analysis of the environmental conditions relating to microclimate, lighting and noise was accomplished. Afterwards, the goals to be attained were defined as well as the technical means necessary for providing the operators with comfortable working conditions

  7. Automation inflicted differences on operator performance in nuclear power plant control rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jonas; Osvalder, A.L. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Product and Producton Development (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    Today it is possible to automate almost any function in a human-machine system. Therefore it is important to find a balance between automation level and the prerequisites for the operator to maintain safe operation. Different human factors evaluation methods can be used to find differences between automatic and manual operations that have an effect on operator performance; e.g. Predictive Human Error Analysis (PHEA), NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX), Halden Questionnaire, and Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART). Results from an empirical study concerning automation levels, made at Ringhals power plant, showed that factors as time pressure and criticality of the work situation influenced the operator's performance and mental workload more than differences in level of automation. The results indicate that the operator's attention strategies differ between the manual and automatic sequences. Independently of level of automation, it is essential that the operator retains control and situational understanding. When performing a manual task, the operator is 'closer' to the process and in control with sufficient situational understanding. When the level of automation increases, the demands on information presentation increase to ensure safe plant operation. The need for control can be met by introducing 'control gates' where the operator has to accept that the automatic procedures are continuing as expected. Situational understanding can be established by clear information about process status and by continuous feedback. A conclusion of the study was that a collaborative control room environment is important. Rather than allocating functions to either the operator or the system, a complementary strategy should be used. Key parameters to consider when planning the work in the control room are time constraints and task criticality and how they affect the performance of the joint cognitive system.However, the examined working

  8. Treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants. Research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The report presents programs for research, development and demonstration concerning radioactive waste disposal in underground facilities. The main topics are: Radioactive waste management, radioactive waste storage, capsules, environmental impacts, risk assessment, radionuclide migration, radioactive waste disposal, decommissioning, cost, and international cooperation. (129 refs.)

  9. Investigation on the advanced control room design for next generation nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seong Soo

    1998-02-01

    establishing operational goals, forming strategies, and specifying operational means and constraints. The reference set points of the controlled parameters are adaptively adjusted through fuzzy reasoning for optimal cooldown and depressurization. Regarding operator aid, a real-time diagnostic methodology using wavelet transform and pattern matching is developed in this investigation. In this method, plant transient signals are transformed through wavelet transform with upsampling during an interested event. Then, the calculated wavelet coefficients are binarized using least squares fitting, which results in a binarized time-signal pattern. Some time-signal patterns are then superposed in case there are some variations on the same event according to core life and reactor power. The superposed pattern is treated as the diagnostic pattern of the event. Pattern matching is adopted, where both the similarity test between a diagnostic pattern and an arbitrary unknown time-signal pattern and the vigilance test between the winner pattern and the unknown pattern superposed on the winner one are performed in order to identify the causal event of the unknown pattern. The proposed HMI has been evaluated through static and dynamic evaluation. From the evaluation results, it can be concluded that the HMI enables the operator to terminate or mitigate plant disturbances early. After sufficient validation, the concept and the design features of the proposed HMI will be reflected in the design of the main control room of the Korean Next Generation Reactor. The validation of the automating strategies was carried out using the micro-simulator for the Kori nuclear unit 2 with steam generator tube rupture events. The results indicated that the automated emergency operation successfully drove the plant at full power to a cold shutdown state with all the operational constraints satisfied. In addition, the diagnostic methodology developed was validated with some representative events in NPPs using the

  10. Safety analysis of disposal of decommissioning wastes from Loviisa nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieno, T.; Nordman, H.; Rasilainen, K.; Suolanen, V.

    1987-12-01

    The repository for decommissioning wastes from the Loviisa nuclear power plant consisting of two 445 MWe PWR units is planned to be excavated at the depth of 90-130 meters in the bedrock of the power plant site. The reactor vessels weighing each about 215 tons will be transferred each in one piece into the repository. They are emplaced in an upright position in big holes excavated in the bottom of repository caverns. The reactor vessel internals are then emplaced inside the vessels. Finally, the vessels will be filled with concrete and the lids will be emplaced and sealed. Steam generators and pressurizers will also be disposed of uncutted. Other decommissioning wastes will be cut into smaller pieces and emplaced in concrete or wooden containers. The repository will be situated on the small island on which the power plant is located. The groundwater on the island contains two zones of different salinity: an upper zone of fresh, flowing groundwater and a lower zone of saline, stagnant groundwater where the repository will be situated. Three groundwater scenarios have been considered in the safety analysis: a scenario based on the present site conditions, an altered scenario where the repository is assumed to be situated in a zone of fresh, flowing groundwater and a distruptive event scenario with an intensive groundwater flow through the repository. The obtained results of the analysis show clear safety margins. In the basic scenario the maximum annul dose rate is 6x10 -14 Sv/a via the local sea pathways, 6x10 -11 Sv/a via the lake pathways and 4x10 -8 Sv/a via a well bored in the vicinity of the repository. In the altered groundwater scenario the maximum annual dose rate is 4x10 -10 Sv/a via the sea pathways, 3x10 -7 Sv/a via the lake pathways and 1x10 -5 Sv/a via the well pathway. In the unlikely disruptive event scenario the corresponding dose rates are 8x10 -10 Sv/a (sea), 7x10 -7 Sv/a (lake) and 2x10 -4 Sv/a (well)

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant remote-handled transuranic waste disposal strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste disposal strategy described in this report identifies the process for ensuring that cost-effective initial disposal of RH-TRU waste will begin in Fiscal Year 2002. The strategy also provides a long-term approach for ensuring the efficient and sustained disposal of RH-TRU waste during the operating life of WIPP. Because Oak Ridge National Laboratory stores about 85 percent of the current inventory, the strategy is to assess the effectiveness of modifying their facilities to package waste, rather than constructing new facilities. In addition, the strategy involves identification of ways to prepare waste at other sites to supplement waste from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. DOE will also evaluate alternative packagings, modes of transportation, and waste emplacement configurations, and will select preferred alternatives to ensure initial disposal as scheduled. The long-term strategy provides a systemwide planning approach that will allow sustained disposal of RH-TRU waste during the operating life of WIPP. The DOE's approach is to consider the three relevant systems -- the waste management system at the generator/storage sites, the transportation system, and the WIPP disposal system -- and to evaluate the system components individually and in aggregate against criteria for improving system performance. To ensure full implementation, in Fiscal Years 1996 and 1997 DOE will: (1) decide whether existing facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or new facilities to package and certify waste are necessary; (2) select the optimal packaging and mode of transportation for initial disposal; and (3) select an optimal disposal configuration to ensure that the allowable limits of RH-TRU waste can be disposed. These decisions will be used to identify funding requirements for the three relevant systems and schedules for implementation to ensure that the goal of initial disposal is met

  12. Room temperature zeolitization of boiler slag from a Bulgarian thermal power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascova Radost D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and cost-effective method was applied for the synthesis of zeolite composites utilising wet bottom boiler slag from the Bulgarian coal-fired thermal power plant “Sviloza”, near the town of Svishtov. The method consisted of a prolonged alkali treatment at room temperature of this waste. Experimental techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction analyses, are employed to characterize the initial slag and the final products with respect to their morphology, and elemental and mineral compositions. The composites synthesized in this way contained two Na-type zeolite phases: zeolite X (type FAU and zeolite Linde F (type EDI. The zeolited products and the starting slag were tested as adsorbents for a textile dye (Malachite Green from aqueous solutions. In comparison with the initial slag, the zeolite composite possessed substantially better adsorption properties: it almost completely adsorbs the dye in much shorter times. The results of this investigations revealed a new, easy and low cost route for recycling boiler slag into a material with good adsorption characteristics, which could find different applications, e.g., for purifying polluted waters, including those from the textile industry.

  13. Measuring Situation Awareness of Operating Team in Different Main Control Room Environments of Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Woo Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Environments in nuclear power plants (NPPs are changing as the design of instrumentation and control systems for NPPs is rapidly moving toward fully digital instrumentation and control, and modern computer techniques are gradually introduced into main control rooms (MCRs. Within the context of these environmental changes, the level of performance of operators in a digital MCR is a major concern. Situation awareness (SA, which is used within human factors research to explain to what extent operators of safety-critical systems know what is transpiring in the system and the environment, is considered a prerequisite factor to guarantee the safe operation of NPPs. However, the safe operation of NPPs can be guaranteed through a team effort. In this regard, the operating team's SA in a conventional and digital MCR should be measured in order to assess whether the new design features implemented in a digital MCR affect this parameter. This paper explains the team SA measurement method used in this study and the results of applying this measurement method to operating teams in different MCR environments. The paper also discusses several empirical lessons learned from the results.

  14. The design, construction, commissioning and operation of a plant at Dounreay to dispose of sodium from KNKII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowser, R.; Farquhar, J.; Currie, R.

    1997-01-01

    In a competitive bidding exercise, AEA Technology at Dounreay won a contract to dispose of 88 tonnes of fast reactor sodium from the KNKII reactor at KarIsruhe, Germany. This sodium comprises of 36 tonnes of 'primary' sodium containing traces of caesium-137 and sodium-22 and 52 tonnes of lightly tritiated 'secondary' sodium. The sodium has been transported solid to Dounreay in 200 litre drums. To fulfil this contract a sodium disposal plant has been designed, constructed, commissioned and put into operation. Following an option study, an aqueous reaction plant design was selected. In this process, sodium is reacted with aqueous caustic soda, producing hydrogen gas and more caustic soda. The hydrogen is diluted with air and vented to atmosphere, and the caustic is neutralised with hydrochloric acid before discharge to the site low-active drain. All effluents - gaseous or liquid - are filtered and treated to remove as much radioactivity as possible before discharge. The main reasons for choosing this design option were that the process was well proven, the reaction is easily controlled by controlling the supply of sodium into the reaction vessel, reaction temperatures are relatively low and the effluent can be easily prepared for discharge. It was also felt that an aqueous reaction plant could be designed to be operated remotely by one operator. The sodium in the drums is melted in a sodium melting station and then drained to a sodium buffer tank, prior to being injected into the reaction vessel. By collecting sodium in the buffer tank, sodium melting can proceed in parallel with sodium disposal allowing a high throughput to be achieved. This plant has been designed to dispose of 100 kg of sodium per hour, requiring a small operating team, suitably shielded from the radiological hazard. The design also ensures that the rate of reaction is controlled and that the effluent discharged to the low-active drain has been properly neutralised. The construction was performed

  15. Expediting the commercial disposal option: Low-level radioactive waste shipments from the Mound Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, S.; Rothman, R.

    1995-12-31

    In April, Envirocare of Utah, Inc., successfully commenced operation of its mixed waste treatment operation. A mixed waste which was (a) radioactive, (b) listed as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and (c) prohibited from land disposal was treated using Envirocare`s full-scale Mixed Waste Treatment Facility. The treatment system involved application of chemical fixation/stabilization technologies to reduce the leachability of the waste to meet applicable concentration-based RCRA treatment standards. In 1988, Envirocare became the first licensed facility for the disposal of naturally occurring radioactive material. In 1990, Envirocare received a RCRA Part B permit for commercial mixed waste storage and disposal. In 1994, Envirocare was awarded a contract for the disposal of DOE mixed wastes. Envirocare`s RCRA Part B permit allows for the receipt, storage, treatment, and disposal of mixed wastes that do not meet the land-disposal treatment standards of 40 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) 268. Envirocare has successfully received, managed, and disposed of naturally occurring radioactive material, low-activity radioactive waste, and mixed waste from government and private generators.

  16. Review of safety related control room function research based on experience from nuclear power plants in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juslin, K.; Wahlstroem, B.; Rinttilae, E.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive human engineering research programme was established in the second half of the 1970's at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The research is performed in cooperation with the utility companies Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) and includes topics such as Handling of alarm information, Disturbance analysis systems, Assessment of control rooms and Validation of safety parameter display systems. Reference is also made to the Finnish contribution to the OECD Halden Reactor Project (Halden) and the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy (NKA) research projects. In this paper feasible realization alternatives of safety related control room functions are discussed on the basis of experience from the nuclear power plants in Finland, which at present are equipped with extensive process computer systems. A proposal for future power plant information systems is described. It is intended that this proposal will serve as the basis for future computer systems at nuclear power plants in Finland. (author)

  17. Human factors design, verification, and validation for two types of control room upgrades at a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Laurids Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the NUREG-0711 based human factors engineering (HFE) phases and associated elements required to support design, verification and validation (V&V), and implementation of a new plant process computer (PPC) and turbine control system (TCS) at a representative nuclear power plant. This paper reviews ways to take a human-system interface (HSI) specification and use it when migrating legacy PPC displays or designing displays with new functionality. These displays undergo iterative usability testing during the design phase and then undergo an integrated system validation (ISV) in a full scope control room training simulator. Following the successful demonstration of operator performance with the systems during the ISV, the new system is implemented at the plant, first in the training simulator and then in the main control room.

  18. Human factors design, verification, and validation for two types of control room upgrades at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boring, Laurids Ronald

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the NUREG-0711 based human factors engineering (HFE) phases and associated elements required to support design, verification and validation (V&V), and implementation of a new plant process computer (PPC) and turbine control system (TCS) at a representative nuclear power plant. This paper reviews ways to take a human-system interface (HSI) specification and use it when migrating legacy PPC displays or designing displays with new functionality. These displays undergo iterative usability testing during the design phase and then undergo an integrated system validation (ISV) in a full scope control room training simulator. Following the successful demonstration of operator performance with the systems during the ISV, the new system is implemented at the plant, first in the training simulator and then in the main control room.

  19. Pseudoclavibacter caeni sp. nov., isolated from sludge of a sewage disposal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Kim, Hyun Sook; Kim, Myung Kyum; Lee, Myungjin

    2012-04-01

    A Gram-positive, strictly aerobic, rod-shaped, non-motile bacterial strain, designated MJ28T, was isolated from a sludge sample from the Daejeon sewage disposal plant in South Korea. A polyphasic approach was applied to study the taxonomic position of strain MJ28T. Strain MJ28T showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Pseudoclavibacter soli KP02T (95.2 %). Levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strains of other Pseudoclavibacter species were less than 94.0 %. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain MJ28T belonged to the clade formed by members of the genus Pseudoclavibacter in the family Microbacteriaceae. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain MJ28T was 65.8 mol%. The chemotaxonomic characteristics of strain MJ28T showed features typical of the genus Pseudoclavibacter, with MK-9 as the predominant respiratory quinone, 2,4-diaminobutryic acid as the diamino acid in the peptidoglycan, and anteiso-C17:0 (44.6 %), anteiso-C15:0 (35.7 %) and C16:0 (9.5 %) as the major fatty acids. On the basis of phylogenetic inference, fatty acid profile and other phenotypic properties, strain MJ28T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Pseudoclavibacter, for which the name Pseudoclavibacter caeni sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MJ28T (=KCTC 19773T=JCM 16921T).

  20. Nocardioides daejeonensis sp. nov., a denitrifying bacterium isolated from sludge in a sewage-disposal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sung-Geun; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Yang, Jihoon; Jung, Yong-An; Kim, Myung Kyum; Lee, Myungjin

    2012-05-01

    Strain MJ31(T), a gram-reaction-positive, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-motile bacterium, was isolated from a sludge sample collected at the Daejeon sewage-disposal plant, in South Korea, and characterized in order to determine its taxonomic position. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain MJ31(T) belonged to the genus Nocardioides, appearing most closely related to Nocardioides dubius KSL-104(T) (98.6 % sequence similarity), Nocardioides jensenii DSM 20641(T) (97.6 %), Nocardioides daedukensis MDN22(T) (97.2 %) and Nocardioides mesophilus MSL-22(T) (97.0 %). The chemotaxonomic properties of strain MJ31(T) were consistent with those of the genus Nocardioides: MK-8(H(4)) was the predominant menaquinone, iso-C(16 : 0), iso-C(17 : 0) and C(18 : 1)ω9c were the predominant cellular fatty acids, and the cell-wall peptidoglycan was based on LL-2,6-diaminopimelic acid. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain MJ31(T) was 71.2 mol%. Some differential phenotypic properties and low DNA-DNA relatedness values (<28 %) with the type strains of closely related species indicated that strain MJ31(T) represents a novel species, for which the name Nocardioides daejeonensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MJ31(T) ( = KCTC 19772(T) = JCM 16922(T)).

  1. Rhodanobacter caeni sp. nov., isolated from sludge from a sewage disposal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sung-Geun; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Kim, Myung Kyum; Lee, Myungjin

    2012-12-01

    Two Gram-reaction-negative, motile bacteria, designated strains MJ01(T) and MJ14, were isolated from sludge collected from the Daejeon sewage disposal plant in South Korea. The taxonomic positions of both strains were determined using a polyphasic approach. In phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strains MJ01(T) and MJ14 appeared indistinguishable and to be most closely related to members of the genus Rhodanobacter in the family Xanthomonadaceae of the Gammaproteobacteria (96.4-98.8% sequence similarity). Strain MJ01(T) exhibited a relatively high level of DNA-DNA relatedness with strain MJ14 (89.3 %) but relatively low DNA-DNA relatedness values with established species in the genus Rhodanobacter (<60 %). The genomic DNA G+C contents of strains MJ01(T) and MJ14 were 65.3 and 64.8 mol%, respectively. The major respiratory quinone of both novel strains was the ubiquinone Q-8. The major fatty acids of both strains were iso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(16 : 0), iso-C(17:0) and iso-C(17 : 1)ω9c, and the polar lipid profiles of the two strains contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and minor amounts of unidentified aminophospholipids and phospholipids. Based on the phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic evidence, strains MJ01(T) and MJ14 represent a single novel species in the genus Rhodanobacter, for which the name Rhodanobacter caeni sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MJ01(T) ( = KCTC 22449(T) = JCM 16242(T)), with MJ14 ( = KCTC 22460 = JCM 16243) as a reference strain.

  2. Gordonia caeni sp. nov., isolated from sludge of a sewage disposal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Park, Giho; Yang, Hyejin; Hwang, Supyong; Bae, Yoonjung; Jung, Yong-An; Kim, Myung Kyum; Lee, Myungjin

    2012-11-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, short-rod-shaped, non-motile strain (designated MJ32(T)) was isolated from a sludge sample of the Daejeon sewage disposal plant in South Korea. A polyphasic approach was applied to study the taxonomic position of strain MJ32(T). Strain MJ32(T) showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Gordonia hirsuta DSM 44140(T) (98.1%) and Gordonia hydrophobica DSM 44015(T) (97.0%); levels of sequence similarity to the type strains of other recognized Gordonia species were less than 97.0%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain MJ32(T) belonged to the clade formed by members of the genus Gordonia in the family Gordoniaceae. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain MJ32(T) was 69.2 mol%. Chemotaxonomically, strain MJ32(T) showed features typical of the genus Gordonia. The predominant respiratory quinone was MK-9(H(2)), the mycolic acids present had C(56)-C(60) carbon atoms, and the major fatty acids were C(16:0) (34.6%), tuberculostearic acid (21.8%), C(16:1)ω7c (19.5%) and C(18:1)ω9c (12.7%). The peptidoglycan type was based on meso-2,6-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid with glycolated sugars. On the basis of phylogenetic inference, fatty acid profile and other phenotypic properties, strain MJ32(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Gordonia, for which the name Gordonia caeni sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MJ32(T) (=KCTC 19771(T)=JCM 16923(T)).

  3. Fuel from waste solvents; Thermal disposal of spent, non-halogenated solvents in cogeneration plants. Kraftstoff aus Loesemittelabfaellen; Thermische Verwertung von verbrauchten, nicht halogenierten Loesemitteln in Blockheizkraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, E

    1993-10-01

    Organic solvents are used in many sectors. When their specific properties are exhausted, they must be disposed of. One way to dispose of solvents would be to use them as a fuel. Such fuel can be used in cogeneration plants, which deliver power and heat with a high degree of efficiency. (orig./BBR)

  4. Development of control room design in French PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guesnier, G.

    1996-01-01

    The layouts of the control rooms of the French nuclear power stations have undergone great development in the period 1970-1990. The control rooms, with an architecture similar to that of the oil fired power stations, were similar to those of the 1300 MW blocks in which the human factor was emphasised. For the selection of a computerised control room for the N4 series, comprehensive functional and ergonomical validation on a full simulator was required. (author) 3 figs., 7 refs

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase: Draft supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    Purpose of this SEIS-II is to provide information on environmental impacts regarding DOE's proposed disposal operations at WIPP. To that end, SEIS-II was prepared to assess the potential impacts of continuing the phased development of WIPP as a geologic repository for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. SEIS-II evaluates a Proposed Action, three Action Alternatives, and two No Action Alternatives. The Proposed Action describes the treatment and disposal of the Basic Inventory of TRU waste over a 35-year period. SEIS-II evaluates environmental impacts resulting from the various treatment options; transportation of TRU waste to WIPP using truck, a combination of truck and regular rail service, and a combination of truck and dedicated rail service; and the disposal of this waste in the repository. Evaluated impacts include those to the general environment and to human health. Additional issues associated with implementation of the alternatives are discussed

  6. {sup 137}Cs sorption into bentonite from Cidadap-Tasikmalaya as buffer material for disposal demonstration plant facility at Serpong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setiawan, B., E-mail: bravo@batan.go.id; Sriwahyuni, H., E-mail: bravo@batan.go.id; Ekaningrum, NE., E-mail: bravo@batan.go.id; Sumantry, T., E-mail: bravo@batan.go.id [Radwaste Technology Center-National Nuclear Energy Agency, PUSPIPTEK, Serpong-Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    According to co-location principle, near surface disposal type the disposal demonstration plant facility will be build at Serpong nuclear area. The facility also for anticipation of future needs to provide national facility for the servicing of radwaste management of non-nuclear power plant activity in Serpong Nuclear Area. It is needs to study the material of buffer and backfill for the safety of demonstration plant facility. A local bentonite rock from Cidadap-Tasikmalaya was used as the buffer materials. Objective of experiment is to find out the specific data of sorption characteristic of Cidadap bentonite as buffer material in a radwaste disposal system. Experiments were performed in batch method, where bentonite samples were contacted with CsCl solution labeled with Cs-137 in 100 ml/g liquid:solid ratio. Initial Cs concentration was 10{sup −8} M and to study the effects of ionic strength and Cs concentration in solution, 0.1 and 1.0 M NaCl also CsCl concentration ranging 10{sup −8} - 10{sup −4} M were added in solution. As the indicator of Cs saturated in bentonite samples, Kd value was applied. Affected parameters in the experiment were contact time, effects of ionic strength and concentration of CsCl. Results showed that sorption of Cs by bentonite reached constantly after 16 days contacted, and Kd value was 10.600 ml/g. Effect of CsCl concentration on Kd value may decreased in increased in CsCl concentration. Effect of ionic strength increased according to increased in concentration of background and would effect to Kd value due to competition of Na ions and Cs in solution interacts with bentonite. By obtaining the bentonite character data as buffer material, the results could be used as the basis for making of design and the basic of performance assessment the near surface disposal facility in terms of isolation capacity of radwaste later.

  7. The disposal of Canada`s nuclear fuel waste: a study of postclosure safety of in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock volume 1: summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikjord, A G; Baumgartner, P; Johnson, L H; Stanchell, F W; Zach, R; Goodwin, B W

    1996-06-01

    The concept for disposal of Canada`s nuclear fuel waste involves isolating the waste in corrosion-resistant containers emplaced and sealed within a vault at a depth of 500 to 1000 m in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The case for the acceptability of the concept as a means of safely disposing of Canada`s nuclear fuel waste is presented in an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) The disposal concept permits a choice of methods, materials, site locations and designs. The EIS presents a case study of the long-term (i.e., postclosure) performance of a hypothetical implementation of the concept, referred to in this report as the reference disposal system. The reference disposal system is based on borehole emplacement of used CANDU fuel in Grade-2 titanium alloy containers in low-permeability, sparsely fractured plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. We evaluate the long-term performance of another hypothetical implementation of the concept based on in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock. The geological characteristics of the geosphere assumed for this study result in short groundwater travel times from the disposal vault to the surface. In the present study, the principal barrier to the movement of contaminants is the long-lasting copper container. We show that the long-lasting container can effectively compensate for a permeable host rock which results in an unfavourable groundwater flow condition. These studies illustrate the flexibility of AECL`s disposal concept to take advantage of the retention, delay, dispersion, dilution and radioactive decay of contaminants in a system of natural barriers provided by the geosphere and hydrosphere and of engineered barriers provided by the waste form, container, buffer, backfills, other vault seals and grouts. In an actual implementation, the engineered system would be designed for the geological conditions encountered at the host site. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs.

  8. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: a study of postclosure safety of in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock volume 1: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikjord, A.G.; Baumgartner, P.; Johnson, L.H.; Stanchell, F.W.; Zach, R.; Goodwin, B.W.

    1996-06-01

    The concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste involves isolating the waste in corrosion-resistant containers emplaced and sealed within a vault at a depth of 500 to 1000 m in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The case for the acceptability of the concept as a means of safely disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste is presented in an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) The disposal concept permits a choice of methods, materials, site locations and designs. The EIS presents a case study of the long-term (i.e., postclosure) performance of a hypothetical implementation of the concept, referred to in this report as the reference disposal system. The reference disposal system is based on borehole emplacement of used CANDU fuel in Grade-2 titanium alloy containers in low-permeability, sparsely fractured plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. We evaluate the long-term performance of another hypothetical implementation of the concept based on in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock. The geological characteristics of the geosphere assumed for this study result in short groundwater travel times from the disposal vault to the surface. In the present study, the principal barrier to the movement of contaminants is the long-lasting copper container. We show that the long-lasting container can effectively compensate for a permeable host rock which results in an unfavourable groundwater flow condition. These studies illustrate the flexibility of AECL's disposal concept to take advantage of the retention, delay, dispersion, dilution and radioactive decay of contaminants in a system of natural barriers provided by the geosphere and hydrosphere and of engineered barriers provided by the waste form, container, buffer, backfills, other vault seals and grouts. In an actual implementation, the engineered system would be designed for the geological conditions encountered at the host site. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs

  9. Control room - ergonomic factors and their influence on the quality of exploitation process conduction in the coal fueled power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutuzovska, Snezhana

    1997-01-01

    In the Control Room in which control and regulation is performed upon the overall process of electric energy production, the operator plays essential role as an ultimate decision factor, particularly in the states of emergency. From the Control Room the operator performs a real-time supervision and management of the production process thus introducing exquisite quality into the operating fitness maintenance, creating optimal conditions for uninterrupted and safe production. The engagements of the operator in the Control Room require mutual accordance of the anthropology-technical and bio mechanical characteristics with the psychophysiological attributes of the operator. Any command and signaling equipment mishandling may cause numerous unwanted consequences, leading to a production control system breakdown for the power plant. In order to achieve a balanced optimization in the system operation, such as appropriate working conveniences, protection, certain economic effects, etc. an ergonomic organization and arrangement of the Control Room working environment is required. Re existing working environment solutions of the kind in our milieu show outstanding deviations towards the anthropology-physiological and psychophysiological capabilities of the operator on duties of the kind, as well as towards the collocation of signaling and command facilities and other equipment units at the Control Room site - the reason being a lack of appropriate investigation before setup of the systems. Solution to this kind of problems is aimed to provide maximum functional capability, efficiency and safety to the Control Room operator's domain of activities, which will essentially improve the reliability of the entire energy production control system of a thermoelectric power plant. (Author)

  10. Deinococcus daejeonensis sp. nov., isolated from sludge in a sewage disposal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Kim, Myung Kyum; Lim, Sangyong; Joe, Minho; Lee, Myungjin

    2012-06-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, spherical, non-motile red-pigmented bacterial strain, designated MJ27(T), was isolated from a sludge sample of the Daejeon sewage disposal plant in South Korea. A polyphasic approach was used to study the taxonomic position of strain MJ27(T). Strain MJ27(T) shared highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Deinococcus grandis DSM 3963(T) (98.8 %), Deinococcus caeni Ho-08(T) (97.5 %) and Deinococcus aquaticus PB314(T) (96.6 %.); levels of sequence similarity with the type strains of other Deinococcus species were less than 96.0 %. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain MJ27(T) belonged to the clade formed by members of the genus Deinococcus in the family Deinococcaceae. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain MJ27(T) was 67.6 mol%. The chemotaxonomic characteristics of strain MJ27(T) were typical of members of the genus Deinococcus, with MK-8 as the predominant respiratory quinone, C(16:1)ω7c, C(15:1)ω6c, C(16:0) and C(15:0) as major fatty acids (>12 %), ornithine as the diamino acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan and resistance to gamma radiation [D(10) (dose required to reduce the bacterial population by tenfold) >9 kGy]. The low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness reported here (5.3±1.5-29.2±2.3 %) indicate that strain MJ27(T) represents a species that is separate from its closest relatives in the genus Deinococcus. On the basis of phylogenetic inference, fatty acid profile and other phenotypic properties, strain MJ27(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus daejeonensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MJ27(T) ( = KCTC 13751(T) = JCM 16918(T)).

  11. Disposal of spent fuel from German nuclear power plants - paper work or technology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, R.; Filbert, W.

    2006-01-01

    The reference concept 'direct disposal of spent fuel' was developed as an alternative to spent fuel reprocessing and vitrified HLW disposal. The technical facilities necessary for the implementation of this reference concept - the so called POLLUX-concept, e.g. interim storages for casks containing spent fuel, a pilot conditioning facility, and a special cask 'POLLUX' for final disposal have been built. With view to a geological salt formation all handling procedures for the repository were tested aboveground in a test facility at a 1:1 scale. To optimise the concept all operational steps are reviewed for possible improvement. Most promising are a concept using canisters (BSK 3) instead of POLLUX casks, and the direct disposal of transport and storage casks (DIREGT-concept) which is the most recent one and has been designed for the direct disposal of large transport and storage casks. The final exploration of the pre-selected repository site is still pending, from the industries point of view due to political reasons only. The present paper describes the main concepts and their status as of today. (author)

  12. Nuclear power plant control room ventilation system design for meeting general criterion 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, K.G.; Campe, K.M.

    1975-01-01

    The requirement for protection of control room personnel against radiation is specified in General Design Criterion 19 of Appendix A, 10 CFR Part 50. The evaluation of a control room design, especially its emergency ventilation system, with respect to radiation protection primarily consists of determining the radiation doses to control room personnel under accident conditions. The accident dose assessment involves modeling and evaluation of radiological source terms, atmospheric transport of airborne activity, and protection features of the control room ventilation system. Some of the assumptions and conservatisms used in the dose analyses are based on the technical review experience of existing or proposed control room designs. A review of over 50 control room designs has revealed a great variety of design concepts, not all of which seem to have been based on radiation protection criteria. A summary of the basic control room protection requirements, design features, dose acceptance criteria, and an outline of the methods used by the Regulatory staff for accident dose evaluation are presented. (U.S.)

  13. Strategies of modeling the cognitive tasks of human operators for accident scenarios in nuclear power plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, Se Woo; Sur, Sang Moon; Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Jeong Wun

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the development strategies of cognitive task network modeling for accident scenarios in nuclear power plant control rooms. Task network modeling is used to provide useful predictions of operator's performance times and error rates, based upon plant procedures and/or control room changes. Two accident scenarios, small-break loss of coolant accident (LOCA) and steam generator tube rupture (SGTR), are selected for task simulation. To obtain the input data for the model, task elements are extracted by the task analysis of emergency operating procedures. The input data include task performance time, communication ink, panel location, component operating mode, and data for performance shaping factors (PSFs). Operator's verbs are categorized according to the elements of cognitive behavior. The simulation of the task network for the small-break LOCA scenario is presented in this paper. (Author)

  14. Impact of Advanced Alarm Systems and Information Displays on Human Reliability in the Digital Control Room of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Dang, Vinh N

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential impacts of two advanced features of digital control rooms, alarm systems and information display systems, on the Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) in nuclear power plants. Although the features of digital control rooms have already been implemented in new or upgraded nuclear power plants, HRAs have so far not taken much credit for these features. In this circumstance, this paper aims at examining the potential effects of these features on human performance and discussing how these effects can be addressed with existing HRA methods. A conclusion derivable from past experimental studies is that those features are supportive in the severe conditions such as complex scenarios and knowledge-based works. However, in the less complex scenarios and rule-based work, they may have no difference with or sometimes negative impacts on operator performance. The discussion about the impact on the HRA is provided on the basis on the THERP method

  15. Full scope simulator of a nuclear power plant control room using 3D stereo virtual reality techniques for operators training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Almeida, Adino Americo A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Varela, Thiago F.B.

    2007-01-01

    Practical training of nuclear power plants operators are partially performed by means of simulators. Usually these simulators are physical copies of the original control roam, needing a large space on a facility being also very expensive. In this way, the proposal of this paper is to implement the use of Virtual Reality techniques to design a full scope control room simulator, in a manner to reduce costs and physical space usage. (author)

  16. Reliability analysis of operator's monitoring behavior in digital main control room of nuclear power plants and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Hu Hong; Li Pengcheng; Jiang Jianjun; Yi Cannan; Chen Qingqing

    2015-01-01

    In order to build a quantitative model to analyze operators' monitoring behavior reliability of digital main control room of nuclear power plants, based on the analysis of the design characteristics of digital main control room of a nuclear power plant and operator's monitoring behavior, and combining with operators' monitoring behavior process, monitoring behavior reliability was divided into three parts including information transfer reliability among screens, inside-screen information sampling reliability and information detection reliability. Quantitative calculation model of information transfer reliability among screens was established based on Senders's monitoring theory; the inside screen information sampling reliability model was established based on the allocation theory of attention resources; and considering the performance shaping factor causality, a fuzzy Bayesian method was presented to quantify information detection reliability and an example of application was given. The results show that the established model of monitoring behavior reliability gives an objective description for monitoring process, which can quantify the monitoring reliability and overcome the shortcomings of traditional methods. Therefore, it provides theoretical support for operator's monitoring behavior reliability analysis in digital main control room of nuclear power plants and improves the precision of human reliability analysis. (authors)

  17. Authorization of nuclear power plant control room personnel: Methods and practices with emphasis on the use of simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    In 2002 the IAEA published a revision to Safety Guide NS-G-2.8, Recruitment, Qualification and Training of Personnel for Nuclear Power Plants. This Safety Guide provides recommendations on the authorization of designated personnel who have a direct impact on nuclear safety. The IAEA Technical Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel recommended that an additional report be prepared that provided information on the practices in Member States on the use of simulators in the authorization of control room staff. This publication has been prepared in response to that recommendation. In gathering information for the report, Member States were asked to: respond to a survey on the use of simulators and the involvement of regulatory body in operator authorization; and to complete a questionnaire on their practices in authorizing control room staff. Safety analysis and operating experience consistently indicate that human error is a major contributor to nuclear power plant (NPP) accident risk. With the recent world wide emphasis and implementation of full scope simulators for nuclear power plant personnel training, operators spend a large portion of their training time on simulators. As described in the foreword to IAEA-TECDOC-1411, Use of Control Room Simulators for Training of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel, simulators provide operators an opportunity to learn and practice the abilities that are required in accident and infrequently used plant evolutions. Because of their fidelity, full scope simulators are now used by most Member States in the authorization examinations of control room personnel. This situation is becoming more common as more plants acquire modern full scope plant referenced simulators. This publication provides information and examples based upon experience in a variety of Member States. The body of the report provides general information that represents the practices of the Member States that contributed to the

  18. Three alternatives to a full scope control room simulator for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, C.P.

    1988-01-01

    Many utilities are purchasing full scope control room simulators for training purposes. But, depending upon training requirements and finances, an alternative to a full scope control room simulator may be a viable option. Westinghouse has recently built and delivered two styles of alternative simulators. This paper discusses the design and operation of both of these simulators, including advantages and limitations of each design. In addition, the design of a hybrid system which combines features from both of these designs is presented

  19. Deployment of Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility with the Introduction of Nuclear Power Plants in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadrack, Antoony; Kim, Changlak [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Uljin (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear power program will inevitably generate radioactive wastes including low-and intermediate radioactive waste and spent fuel. These wastes are hazardous to human health and the environment and therefore, a reliable radioactive waste disposal facility becomes a necessity. This paper describes Kenya's basic plans for the disposal of radioactive wastes expected from the nuclear program. This plan is important as an initial implementation of a national Low to intermediate level wastes storage facility in Kenya. In Kenya, radioactive waste is generated from the use of radioactive materials in medicine, industry, education and research and development. Future radioactive waste is expected to arise from nuclear reactors, oil exploration, radioisotope and fuel production, and research reactors as shown in table 1. The best strategy is to store the LILW and spent fuel temporarily within reactor sites pending construction of a centralized interim storage facility or final disposal facility. The best philosophy is to introduce both repository and nuclear power programs concurrently. Research and development on volume reduction technology and conceptual design of disposal facility of LILW should be pursued. Safe management of radioactive waste is a national responsibility for sustainable generation of nuclear power. The republic of Kenya is set to become the second African nuclear power generation country after South Africa.

  20. The influence and evaluation of different virtual reality presentations for the main control room of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rouwen; Lin Chiuhsiang Joe; Lin Shiaufeng; Yang Chihwei; Cheng Tsungchieh; Yang Lichen

    2011-01-01

    Certainly, a nuclear power plant (NPP) is a complex system and requires high reliability. Engineering technology plays an important role in NPP that requires complex technical equipment and interfaces in order to achieve public security and working safety. Through training, operators can understand the nuclear power system and further establish the fit between human operators and the system, in order to reduce human errors and to ensure the working safety of the control room of NPP. However, the operator trainings for the control room of NPP are difficult and time-consuming. Virtual control room is thus developed using the virtual reality (VR) technology to help the training process. Presently several researches have developed virtual system for NPP for the purpose of training. However, whether the virtual training system for the control room of NPP can give users realistic immersive context as in the real environment is unknown. Whether these virtual systems are helpful in training performance are yet to be confirmed. For this reason, the control room of Lung-Men NPP of Taiwan was constructed with VR technology in this study in order to compare the performances of two VR representation methods (Desktop VR and Project VR). A searching task was planned in which the operators have to find out the objects appointed by the experimenter in the virtual interface of the main control room. The time to complete the task was collected as dependent variables in this experiment. The subjects have to complete the questionnaire that was developed for evaluating the usability of the virtual interface of MRC after finishing the experiment. The result showed that the performance of the virtual interface of NPP presented by the VR projector was better than the desktop. (author)

  1. Safety evaluation report of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant safety analysis report: Contact-handled transuranic waste disposal operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    DOE 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, requires that the US Department of Energy conduct an independent, defensible, review in order to approve a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). That review and the SAR approval basis is documented in this formal Safety Evaluation Report (SER). This SER documents the DOE's review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant SAR and provides the Carlsbad Area Office Manager, the WIPP SAR approval authority, with the basis for approving the safety document. It concludes that the safety basis documented in the WIPP SAR is comprehensive, correct, and commensurate with hazards associated with planned waste disposal operations

  2. Specification and qualification of fire detectors used in very high radiation rooms at the Angra-2 nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sá, Luís Gustavo S.; Oliveira, Alisson S. de; Donorato, Fernando da S.; Oliveira, Marcos Vinicius M. de, E-mail: luisg@eletronuclear.gov.br, E-mail: alison@eletronuclear.gov.br, E-mail: donora@eletronuclear.gov.br, E-mail: marcoso@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobrás Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil). Departamento GDD.O

    2017-07-01

    During the Operation cycle 11 of the Angra-2 Nuclear Power Plant, faults were observed in the optical and ionic fire detectors models installed in very high radiation rooms (pump reactor rooms and sump containment). It was observed that these models were already obsolete and no available for purchase. In addition, as during the operation cycle these rooms are not accessible for maintenance because of the high dose rates, corrective measures only were taken at Outage 2P11 where all detectors were replaced by the new neural fire detector model. This high-tech model was not sufficiently resistant to the high dose rates of the environment rooms and starts to fail in the beginning of the cycle 11. Thereafter, a specific engineering work was developed in partnership with IPEN - Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research to specify and qualify a new model compatible with the electronic Central of the Fire Detection System and Alarm and at the same time resistant to radiation. The fire detectors were subjected to a known gamma radiation rate at the laboratory facilities of IPEN through the gamma irradiation equipment with cobalt radiation source. In this way, it was possible to determine its useful life comparing the total dose absorbed for detector failure and the environmental dose where it was installed in Angra-2. The current approved model was installed during Outage 2P13, and until now, no spurious alarms or failure were observed during the current cycle. (author)

  3. Dose assessment method for control room habitability in accident condition in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Dong; Tang Shaohua; Wang Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Based on the NRC. technical requirements on NPP control room habitability assessment, and considering the characteristics of the improved second generation NPPs in China, this paper developed a complete dose assessment model for control room habitability. Contrasting to the existing model in China, this model is applicable for DBA and sever accident, and the short term atmospheric diffusion factor can be calculated using the combined wake mode. By considering the zoning of habitable area and the design characteristics of the ventilation system, the effects of un-filtrated air leakage from the building and the ventilation system on the assessment calculation can be considered. (authors)

  4. Environmental impact statement for initiation of transuranic waste disposal at the waste isolation pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, H.E.; Whatley, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    WIPP's long-standing mission is to demonstrate the safe disposal of TRU waste from US defense activities. In 1980, to comply with NEPA, US DOE completed its first environmental impact statement (EIS) which compared impacts of alternatives for TRU waste disposal. Based on this 1980 analysis, DOE decided to construct WIPP in 1981. In a 1990 decision based on examination of alternatives in a 1990 Supplemental EIS, DOE decided to continue WIPP development by proceeding with a testing program to examine WIPP's suitability as a TRU waste repository. Now, as DOE's Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) attempts to complete its regulatory obligations to begin WIPP disposal operations, CAO is developing WIPP's second supplemental EIS (SEIS-II). To complete the SEIS-II, CAO will have to meet a number of challenges. This paper explores both the past and present EISs prepared to evaluate the suitability of WIPP. The challenges in completing an objective comparison of alternatives, while also finalizing other critical-path compliance documents, controlling costs, and keeping stakeholders involved during the decision-making process are addressed

  5. Assessment of odor activity value coefficient and odor contribution based on binary interaction effects in waste disposal plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuandong; Liu, Jiemin; Yan, Luchun; Chen, Haiying; Shao, Huiqi; Meng, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Odor activity value (OAV) has been widely used for the assessment of odor pollution from various sources. However, little attention has been paid to the extreme OAV variation and potential inaccuracies of odor contribution assessment caused by odor interaction effects. The objective of this study is to assess the odor interaction effect for precise assessment of odor contribution. In this paper, samples were collected from a food waste disposal plant, and analyzed by instrumental and olfactory method to conclude odorants' occurrence and OAV. Then odor activity value coefficient (γ) was first proposed to evaluate the type and the level of binary interaction effects based on determination of OAV variation. By multiplying OAV and γ, odor activity factor (OAF) was used to reflect the real OAV. Correlation between the sum of OAF and odor concentration reached 80.0 ± 5.7%, which was 10 times higher than the sum of OAV used before. Results showed that hydrogen sulfide contributed most (annual average 66.4 ± 15.8%) to odor pollution in the waste disposal plant. However, as odor intensity of samples in summer rising, odor contribution of trimethylamine increased to 48.3 ± 3.7% by the strong synergistic interaction effect, while odor contribution of phenol decreased to 0.1 ± 0.02% for the increasing antagonistic interaction effect.

  6. Considerations affecting deep-well disposal of tritium-bearing low-level aqueous waste from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Warner, D.L.; Steindler, M.J.

    1977-03-01

    Present concepts of disposal of low-level aqueous wastes (LLAW) that contain much of the fission-product tritium from light water reactors involve dispersal to the atmosphere or to surface streams at fuel reprocessing plants. These concepts have been challenged in recent years. Deep-well injection of low-level aqueous wastes, an alternative to biospheric dispersal, is the subject of this presentation. Many factors must be considered in assessing its feasibility, including technology, costs, environmental impact, legal and regulatory constraints, and siting. Examination of these factors indicates that the technology of deep-well injection, extensively developed for other industrial wastes, would require little innovation before application to low-level aqueous wastes. Costs would be low, of the order of magnitude of 10 -4 mill/kWh. The environmental impact of normal deep-well disposal would be small, compared with dispersal to the atmosphere or to surface streams; abnormal operation would not be expected to produce catastrophic results. Geologically suitable sites are abundant in the U.S., but a well would best be co-located with the fuel-reprocessing plant where the LLAW is produced. Legal and regulatory constraints now being developed will be the most important determinants of the feasibility of applying the method

  7. Anthropometric Considerations in the Modernized Main Control Room: Application to a Virtual Nuclear Power Plant Control Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chih Wei; Cheng, Tsung Chieh; Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the anthropometric considerations in the main control room (MCR) application to a virtual nuclear power plant (NPP) control panel. Influences of working postures and physical demands on the operational performance are also discussed. Finally, the present research provides a case example to illustrate the influences of anthropometric considerations on the control panel design for MCR operators by applying virtual reality (VR) technology. The MCR design primarily evolved in different countries. The datasets available is usually insufficient or inconsistent for the end users. To solve the upper mentioned problem, this study put emphasis on applying VR technology to anthropometric considerations support control panel design in the modernized MCR. Although the concept of applying VR technology on anthropometric considerations in this paper is related to the MCR in NPPs, it could be easily applied for the purposes of any type of control room in a similar manner

  8. Anthropometric Considerations in the Modernized Main Control Room: Application to a Virtual Nuclear Power Plant Control Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chih Wei; Cheng, Tsung Chieh [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan (China); Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe [Chung-Yuan Christian University, Chung Li (China)

    2011-08-15

    This study investigates the anthropometric considerations in the main control room (MCR) application to a virtual nuclear power plant (NPP) control panel. Influences of working postures and physical demands on the operational performance are also discussed. Finally, the present research provides a case example to illustrate the influences of anthropometric considerations on the control panel design for MCR operators by applying virtual reality (VR) technology. The MCR design primarily evolved in different countries. The datasets available is usually insufficient or inconsistent for the end users. To solve the upper mentioned problem, this study put emphasis on applying VR technology to anthropometric considerations support control panel design in the modernized MCR. Although the concept of applying VR technology on anthropometric considerations in this paper is related to the MCR in NPPs, it could be easily applied for the purposes of any type of control room in a similar manner.

  9. An artificial solar spectrum substantially alters plant development compared with usual climate room irradiance spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewoning, S.W.; Douwstra, P.; Trouwborst, G.; Ieperen, van W.; Harbinson, J.

    2010-01-01

    Plant responses to the light spectrum under which plants are grown affect their developmental characteristics in a complicated manner. Lamps widely used to provide growth irradiance emit spectra which are very different from natural daylight spectra. Whereas specific responses of plants to a

  10. Decontamination and decommissioning of the EBR-I complex. Topical report No. 3. NAK disposal pilot plant test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commander, J.C.; Lewis, L.; Hammer, R.

    1975-06-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 (EBR-I) requires processing of the primary coolant, an eutectic solution of sodium and potassium (NaK), remaining in the EBR-I primary and secondary coolant systems. While developing design criteria for the NaK processing system, reasonable justification was provided for the development of a pilot test plant for field testing some of the process concepts and proposed hardware. The objective of this activity was to prove the process concept on a low-cost, small-scale test bed. The pilot test plant criteria provided a general description of the test including: the purpose, location, description of test equipment available, waste disposal requirements, and a flow diagram and conceptual equipment layout. The pilot plant test operations procedure provided a detailed step-by-step procedure for operation of the pilot plant to obtain the desired test data and operational experience. It also spelled out the safety precautions to be used by operating personnel, including the requirement for alkali metals training certification, use of protective clothing, availability of fire protection equipment, and caustic handling procedures. The pilot plant test was performed on May 16, 1974. During the test, 32.5 gallons or 240 lb of NaK was successfully converted to caustic by reaction with water in a caustic solution. (auth)

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant supplementary roof support system underground storage area, Panel 1, Room 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    WIPP is designed to provide a full-scale facility to demonstrate the technical and operational principles for permanent isolation of defense-generated transuranic waste. It is also designed to provide a facility in which studies and experiments can be conducted. Bin Scale Tests are being planned as part of the WIPP Test Phase Performance Assessment Program described in the WIPP Test Phase Plan: Performance Assessment (DOE 1990 b). These Tests are anticipated to be conducted over a period of up to seven years. Room 1 of Panel 1 of the Underground Storage Area is to be used as the location of the Bin-Scale Tests to investigate the generation of gas from the waste that is proposed to be stored at the WIPP in the near future. The original design for the waste storage rooms in Panel 1 provided for a limited period of time during which to mine the openings and to emplace waste. Room 1 was initially mined to rough dimensions in 1986. Information obtained from the Site and Preliminary Design Validation (SPDV) program showed that the rooms would remain stable without ground support and that creep closure would not adversely affect equipment clearances during at least five years following excavation

  12. Microbiological air pollution of production room of the meat processing plant as a potential threat to the workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Breza-Boruta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Production rooms of the meat plants are the specific environment that require constant monitoring of microbiological air purity. Bioaerosols pose a threat to the safety of produced food and a considerable risk to health of exposed workers. The aim of this study was to estimate the air microbiological pollution in production rooms of the meat processing plant and exposure of the workers to biological aerosol. Material and methods. Air samples were collected at 3 stands in production rooms during winter, with the compaction method using the impactor MAS-100. The total number of bacteria and moulds, Staphylococci and bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae were determined in the studied bioaerosol. The concentration of microorganisms was presented in the form of colony forming units in 1m3 of air. Results. The highest concentration of mesophylic bacteria was found at stand 1 – at the freezing tunnel; whereas the highest contamination with staphylococci and fungal aerosol was found in the room where several workers were employed at packing frozen food. Among determined fungi predominated moulds of the genera: Penicillium, Alternaria and Cladosporium. Also species of potentially pathogenic fungi which produce toxins and have allergizing properties were detected in the studied bioaerosol. Bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae, which also may cause many infavourable health effects in exposed people, occurred at all stands. Conclusion. The concentration level and microbial composition in the inhaled air make valuable information for determination of occupational risk and a potential threat to workers of their workstations. Potentially pathogenic microorganisms present in the studied air (staphylococci, bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae and some moulds according to the Directive 2000/54/EC l belong to the 2nd group of risk and threat of harmful biological agents. Identification of biological threats makes it easier for the

  13. U.S. Department of Energy Implementation of Chemical Evaluation Requirements for Transuranic Waste Disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Alison [USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Washington, DC (United States); Barkley, Michelle [USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Washington, DC (United States); Poppiti, James [USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report summarizes new controls designed to ensure that transuranic waste disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) does not contain incompatible chemicals. These new controls include a Chemical Compatibility Evaluation, an evaluation of oxidizing chemicals, and a waste container assessment to ensure that waste is safe for disposal. These controls are included in the Chapter 18 of the Documented Safety Analysis for WIPP (1).

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Implementation of Chemical Evaluation Requirements for Transuranic Waste Disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Alison; Barkley, Michelle; Poppiti, James

    2017-01-01

    This report summarizes new controls designed to ensure that transuranic waste disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) does not contain incompatible chemicals. These new controls include a Chemical Compatibility Evaluation, an evaluation of oxidizing chemicals, and a waste container assessment to ensure that waste is safe for disposal. These controls are included in the Chapter 18 of the Documented Safety Analysis for WIPP (1).

  15. Detailed analysis of a RCRA landfill for the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this detailed analysis is to provide a preliminary compilation of data, information, and estimated costs associated with a RCRA landfill alternative for UNC Disposal Site. This is in response to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) comment No. 6 from their review of a open-quotes Feasibility Study for the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.close quotes

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Initial Report for PCB Disposal Authorization (40 CFR (section) 761.75[c])

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions

    2002-01-01

    This initial report is being submitted pursuant to Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) (section) 761.75(c) to request authorization to allow the disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) which are duly regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Approval of this initial report will not affect the disposal of TRU or TRU mixed wastes that do not contain PCBs. This initial report also demonstrates how the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) meets or exceeds the technical standards for a Chemical Waste Landfill. Approval of this request will allow the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to dispose of approximately 88,000 cubic feet (ft3) (2,500 cubic meters [m3]) of TRU wastes containing PCBs subject to regulation under the TSCA. This approval will include only those PCB/TRU wastes, which the TSCA regulations allow for disposal of the PCB component in municipal solid waste facilities or chemical waste landfills (e.g., PCB remediation waste, PC B articles, and bulk PCB product waste). Disposal of TRU waste by the DOE is congressionally mandated in Public Law 102-579 (as amended by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997, Pub. L. 104-201, referred to as the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act [LWA]). Portions of the TRU waste inventory contain hazardous waste constituents regulated under 40 CFR Parts 260 through 279, and/or PCBs and PCB Items regulated under 40 CFR Part 761. Therefore, the DOE TRU waste program must address the disposal requirements for these hazardous waste constituents and PCBs. To facilitate the disposal of TRU wastes containing hazardous waste constituents, the owner/operators received a Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) on October 27, 1999. The permit allows the disposal of TRU wastes subject to hazardous waste disposal requirements (TRU mixed waste). Informational copies of this permit and other referenced documents are available

  17. Comparison of environmental impact of waste disposal from fusion, fission and coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Bruno [Fichtner GmbH und Co. KG, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    The radiotoxic hazard of waste from fusion power plants has been compared with that of fission power and radioactive trace elements in coal ash within some research programs such as SEAFP and SEIF. Within another program, in 2005 a Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) has been finalized investigating 4 fusion power plant models A to D. In this paper, the radiotoxicity of model B is compared with a fission power plant, concentrating on the production of wastes. The hazard of the respective masses of enriched uranium before use in a fission power plant and coal ash of a power plant generating the same amount of electricity are used as benchmarks. It is evident that the development of ingestion and inhalation hazard of the PPCS model B is different from the results of earlier studies because of different assumptions on material impurities and other constraints. An important aspect is the presence of actinides in fusion power plant waste. (orig.)

  18. Design of the disposal facility 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saanio, T.; Ikonen, A.; Keto, P.; Kirkkomaeki, T.; Kukkola, T.; Nieminen, J.; Raiko, H.

    2013-11-01

    The spent nuclear fuel accumulated from the nuclear power plants in Olkiluoto in Eurajoki and in Haestholmen in Loviisa will be disposed of in Olkiluoto. A facility complex will be constructed at Olkiluoto, and it will include two nuclear waste facilities according to Government Degree 736/2008. The nuclear waste facilities are an encapsulation plant, constructed to encapsulate spent nuclear fuel and a disposal facility consisting of an underground repository and other underground rooms and above ground service spaces. The repository is planned to be excavated to a depth of 400 - 450 meters. Access routes to the disposal facility are an inclined access tunnel and vertical shafts. The encapsulated fuel is transferred to the disposal facility in the canister lift. The canisters are transferred from the technical rooms to the disposal area via central tunnel and deposited in the deposition holes which are bored in the floors of the deposition tunnels and are lined beforehand with compacted bentonite blocks. Two parallel central tunnels connect all the deposition tunnels and these central tunnels are inter-connected at regular intervals. The solution improves the fire safety of the underground rooms and allows flexible backfilling and closing of the deposition tunnels in stages during the operational phase of the repository. An underground rock characterization facility, ONKALO, is excavated at the disposal level. ONKALO is designed and constructed so that it can later serve as part of the repository. The goal is that the first part of the disposal facility will be constructed under the building permit phase in the 2010's and operations will start in the 2020's. The fuel from 4 operating reactors as well the fuel from the fifth nuclear power plant under construction, has been taken into account in designing the disposal facility. According to the information from TVO and Fortum, the amount of the spent nuclear fuel is 5,440 tU. The disposal facility is being excavated

  19. An artificial solar spectrum substantially alters plant development compared with usual climate room irradiance spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogewoning, Sander W; Douwstra, Peter; Trouwborst, Govert; van Ieperen, Wim; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2010-03-01

    Plant responses to the light spectrum under which plants are grown affect their developmental characteristics in a complicated manner. Lamps widely used to provide growth irradiance emit spectra which are very different from natural daylight spectra. Whereas specific responses of plants to a spectrum differing from natural daylight may sometimes be predictable, the overall plant response is generally difficult to predict due to the complicated interaction of the many different responses. So far studies on plant responses to spectra either use no daylight control or, if a natural daylight control is used, it will fluctuate in intensity and spectrum. An artificial solar (AS) spectrum which closely resembles a sunlight spectrum has been engineered, and growth, morphogenesis, and photosynthetic characteristics of cucumber plants grown for 13 d under this spectrum have been compared with their performance under fluorescent tubes (FTs) and a high pressure sodium lamp (HPS). The total dry weight of the AS-grown plants was 2.3 and 1.6 times greater than that of the FT and HPS plants, respectively, and the height of the AS plants was 4-5 times greater. This striking difference appeared to be related to a more efficient light interception by the AS plants, characterized by longer petioles, a greater leaf unfolding rate, and a lower investment in leaf mass relative to leaf area. Photosynthesis per leaf area was not greater for the AS plants. The extreme differences in plant response to the AS spectrum compared with the widely used protected cultivation light sources tested highlights the importance of a more natural spectrum, such as the AS spectrum, if the aim is to produce plants representative of field conditions.

  20. Description of the tasks of control room operators in German nuclear power plants and support possibilities by advanced computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buettner, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    In course of the development of nuclear power plants the instrumentation and control systems and the information in the control room have been increasing substantially. With this background it is described which operator tasks might be supported by advanced computer aid systems with main emphasis to safety related information and diagnose facilities. Nevertheless, some of this systems under development may be helpful for normal operation modes too. As far as possible recommendations for the realization and test of such systems are made. (orig.) [de

  1. Research on transfer rule of the monitoring of operator in digital main control room of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Li Linfeng; Li Pengcheng; Lu Changshen; Huang Weigang; Dai Zhonghua; Huang Yuanzheng; Chen Qingqing

    2013-01-01

    In the digital main control room of nuclear power plants, monitoring the operating status of the system of reactor is not only one of the most important tasks of the operators, but also the basis and premise of controlling the system of reactor running correctly. After analyzing, inducing, summarizing the data obtained, we found the operators' monitor behavior could be classified as procedure transfer, abnormal transfer, and exchange transfer. The times of exchange transfer is 29% of the total transfer times, abnormal transfer is 14%, regulation transfer is 36%, and others are 21%. (authors)

  2. Virtual reality verification of workplace design guidelines for the process plant control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droeivoldsmo, Asgeir; Nystad, Espen; Helgar, Stein

    2001-02-01

    Early identification of potential human factors guideline-violations and corrective input into the design process is desired for efficient and cost-effective control room design. Virtual reality (VR) technology makes it possible to perform evaluation of the design of the control room at an early stage of the design process, but can we trust the results from such evaluations? This paper describes an experimental validation of a VR model against the real world in five different guideline verification tasks. Results indicate that guideline verification in the VR model can be done with satisfactory accuracy for a number of evaluations. However, some guideline categories require further development of measurement tools and use of a model with higher resolution than the model used in this study. (Author). 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: a study of postclosure safety of in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock. Volume 2: vault model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.H.; LeNeveu, D.M.; King, F.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Kolar, M.; Oscarson, D.W.; Sunder, S.; Onofrei, C.; Crosthwaite, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    A study has been undertaken to evaluate the design and long-term performance of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault based on a concept of in-room emplacement of copper containers at a depth of 500 m in plutonic rock in the Canadian Shield. The containers, each with 72 used CANDU fuel bundles, would be surrounded by clay-based buffer and backfill materials in an array of parallel rooms, with the excavation boundary assumed to have an excavation-disturbed zone (EDZ) with a higher permeability than the surrounding rock. In the anoxic conditions of deep rock of the Canadian Shield, the copper containers are expected to survive for >10 6 a. Thus container manufacturing defects, which are assumed to affect approximately 1 in 5000 containers, would be the only potential source of radionuclide release in the vault. The vault model is a computer code that simulates the release of radionuclides that would occur upon contact of the used fuel with groundwater, the diffusive transport of these radionuclides through the defect in the container shell and the surrounding buffer, and their dispersive and convective transport through the backfill and EDZ into the surrounding rock. The vault model uses a computationally efficient boundary integral model (BIM) that simulates radionuclide mass transport in the engineered barrier system as a point source (representing the defective container) that releases radionuclides into concentric cylinders, that represent the buffer, backfill and EDZ. A 3-dimensional finite-element model is used to verify the accuracy of the BIM. The results obtained in the present study indicates the effectiveness of a design using in-room emplacement of long-lived containers in providing a safe disposal system even under permeable geosphere conditions. (author). refs., tabs., figs

  4. Performance assessment requirements for the identification and tracking of transuranic waste intended for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snider, C.A. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Weston, W.W. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    To demonstrate compliance with environmental radiation protection standards for management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes, a performance assessment (PA) of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was made of waste-waste and waste-repository interactions and impacts on disposal system performance. An estimate of waste components and accumulated quantities was derived from a roll-up of the generator/storage sites` TRU waste inventories. Waste components of significance, and some of negligible effect, were fixed input parameters in the model. The results identified several waste components that require identification and tracking of quantities to ensure that repository limits are not exceeded. The rationale used to establish waste component limits based on input estimates is discussed. The distinction between repository limits and waste container limits is explained. Controls used to ensure that no limits are exceeded are identified. For waste components with no explicit repository based limits, other applicable limits are contained in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The 10 radionuclides targeted for identification and tracking on either a waste container or a waste stream basis include Am-241, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-242, U-233, U-234, U-238, Sr-90, and Cs-137. The accumulative activities of these radionuclides are to be inventoried at the time of emplacement in the WIPP. Changes in inventory curie content as a function of radionuclide decay and ingrowth over time will be calculated and tracked. Due to the large margin of compliance demonstrated by PA with the 10,000 year release limits specified, the quality assurance objective for radioassay of the 10 radionuclides need to be no more restrictive than those already identified for addressing the requirements imposed by transportation and WIPP disposal operations in Section 9 of the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan. 6 refs.

  5. Investigation of the impact of main control room digitalization on operators cognitive reliability in nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Mu, Haiying; Jiang, Jianjun; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is a trend in nuclear power plants (NPPs) toward introducing digital and computer technologies into main control rooms (MCRs). Safe generation of electric power in NPPs requires reliable performance of cognitive tasks such as fault detection, diagnosis, and response planning. The digitalization of MCRs has dramatically changed the whole operating environment, and the ways operators interact with the plant systems. If the design and implementation of the digital technology is incompatible with operators' cognitive characteristics, it may have negative effects on operators' cognitive reliability. Firstly, on the basis of three essential prerequisites for successful cognitive tasks, a causal model is constructed to reveal the typical human performance issues arising from digitalization. The cognitive mechanisms which they impact cognitive reliability are analyzed in detail. Then, Bayesian inference is used to quantify and prioritize the influences of these factors. It suggests that interface management and unbalanced workload distribution have more significant impacts on operators' cognitive reliability.

  6. Deployment of a Full-Scope Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulator at the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boring, Ronald; Persensky, Julius; Thomas, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The INL operates the HSSL to conduct research in the design and evaluation of advanced reactor control rooms, integration of intelligent support systems to assist operators, development and assessment of advanced human performance models, and visualizations to assess advanced operational concepts across various infrastructures. This advanced facility consists of a reconfigurable simulator and a virtual reality capability (known as the Computer-Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE)) (Figure 2). It supports human factors research, including human-in-the-loop performance, HSI, and analog and digital hybrid control displays. It can be applied to the development and evaluation of control systems and displays for complex systems such as existing and advanced NPP control rooms, command and control systems, and advance emergency operations centers. The HSSL incorporates a reconfigurable control room simulator, which is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a joint venture of the DOE and the Idaho University System. The simulator is a platform- and plant-neutral environment intended for full-scope and part-task testing of operator performance in various control room configurations. The simulator is not limited to a particular plant or even simulator architecture. It can support engineering simulator platforms from multiple vendors using digital interfaces. Due to its ability to be reconfigured, it is possible to switch the HSI - not just to digital panels but also to different control modalities such as those using greater plant automation or intelligent alarm filtering. The simulator currently includes three operator workstations, each capable of driving up to eight 30-inch monitors. The size and number of monitors varies depending on the particular front-end simulator deployed for a simulator study. These operator workstations would typically be used for the shift supervisor or senior reactor operator, reactor operator, and assistant reactor

  7. Deployment of a Full-Scope Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulator at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Boring; Julius Persensky; Kenneth Thomas

    2011-09-01

    The INL operates the HSSL to conduct research in the design and evaluation of advanced reactor control rooms, integration of intelligent support systems to assist operators, development and assessment of advanced human performance models, and visualizations to assess advanced operational concepts across various infrastructures. This advanced facility consists of a reconfigurable simulator and a virtual reality capability (known as the Computer-Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE)) (Figure 2). It supports human factors research, including human-in-the-loop performance, HSI, and analog and digital hybrid control displays. It can be applied to the development and evaluation of control systems and displays for complex systems such as existing and advanced NPP control rooms, command and control systems, and advance emergency operations centers. The HSSL incorporates a reconfigurable control room simulator, which is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a joint venture of the DOE and the Idaho University System. The simulator is a platform- and plant-neutral environment intended for full-scope and part-task testing of operator performance in various control room configurations. The simulator is not limited to a particular plant or even simulator architecture. It can support engineering simulator platforms from multiple vendors using digital interfaces. Due to its ability to be reconfigured, it is possible to switch the HSI - not just to digital panels but also to different control modalities such as those using greater plant automation or intelligent alarm filtering. The simulator currently includes three operator workstations, each capable of driving up to eight 30-inch monitors. The size and number of monitors varies depending on the particular front-end simulator deployed for a simulator study. These operator workstations would typically be used for the shift supervisor or senior reactor operator, reactor operator, and assistant reactor

  8. Recent ORNL experience in site performance prediction: the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Landfill and the Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Central Waste Disposal Facility for disposal of low-level radioactive waste was evaluated using pathways analyses. For these evaluations, a conservative approach was selected; that is, conservatism was built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events had to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics existed. Data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations were used in developing the conceptual and numerical models that served as the basis for the numerical simulations of the long-term transport of contamination to man. However, the analyses relied on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Maximum potential doses to man were calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. Even under this conservative framework, the sites were found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations and conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability were drawn. Our experience through these studies has shown that in reaching conclusions in such studies, some consideration must be given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and to quantitatively determine the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed

  9. A study on associations of Korean sample group for colors applied to the nuclear power plant control room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, In Seok; Lee, Jung Woon; Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Hyun Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea); Lee, Dhong Ha [Suwon University, Whasung (Korea)

    2002-05-01

    Colors are widely used to warn risk levels and to attract attention of the public. Korea Standard Nuclear Reactor Control Room (KSNRCR) also uses several colors to differentiate warnings, priorities, status, borders, and messages based on the HF010 guideline. However the previous studies showed that the general public not engaged in a specific job domain had different associations of colors as regulated in the standards or the guidelines. It is also expected that the general public not engaged in nuclear power plant industry will have different color association system from the color coding system applied to the KSNRCR. So, this study was performed to show whether there is any difference between color association of a sample Korean group and the color meanings specified in the HF010 guideline. The general public not engaged in the nuclear power plant industry have no idea of the color usage in the nuclear control room. So we converted the specific color usage situation into similar but general situations. In questionnaire, we gave subjects the general situation where color coding is appled and alternative colors which were applied to the HF010 guidelines. And we asked the subjects to choose the colors proper to the situation and to rank the colors according to the degree of suitability. A hundred college students participated in the experiment. 10 refs., 7 tabs. (Author)

  10. Ergonomic design of an overview display in a nuclear power plant control room. Integrated process status overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouwmeester, R.

    1996-03-01

    A major modification of the Borssele Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), scheduled in 1997, includes the installation of a new Integrated Process Status Overview (IPSO) display in the extensively modified control room. The IPSO display is to promote effective communications among all individuals present in the control room with a clear overview of the main process systems. The flexible LCD rear-projection technique is selected for the replacement of the existing IPSO display with engraved process symbols and hard-wired LEDs. The relation between the IPSO display and the CRT based Process Presentation System (PPS) is described after an elaborate introduction to the nuclear technology and the modification project. The followed IPSO design methodology includes interviews with all IPSO user groups to acquire their experience and comment on the current IPSO in order to enhance the functionality and the acceptance of the new IPSO graphics. The ergonomic design requirements for the new IPSO display concern both generic aspects of information presentation on human-machine interfaces, as well as specific issues related to the selected LCD rear-projection technique. Intermediate stages in the design of the IPSO graphics are outlined as well as the results of the concept evaluation by the user groups. For special interest the functionality of a three dimensional (3-D) display was explored. The design study concludes with a 'final' IPSO graphics design to be used for evaluations on the control room simulator. The presentation of one graphic was found to be most appropriate with adjustment of colour (grey) of components and systems which do not need to operate during the current process conditions or plant mode. (orig.)

  11. California and the consequences of ''linkage'' between power plant licensing and radioactive waste disposal - an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The California's nuclear moratorium was the result of the State Legislature's decision in 1976 to create a ''linkage'' between nuclear powerplant licensing and federal progress toward permanent disposal of nuclear wastes. In author's opinion California's energy policy blocks the construction of nuclear powerplants, impedes the construction of all large central-station base-load facilities, and assures that California's electric utilities will have to burn far more oil and natural gas than would have otherwise been the case. The consequences for the ratepayers will be billions of dollars in unnecessary expense. The consequences for the nation include an undermining of the national goal to reduce oil imports and continued vulnerability to supply disruptions

  12. Method for improving accident sequence recognition in nuclear power plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, C.D.; Dinsmore, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    This work adapts fault trees from plant-specific probabilistic risk analyses (PRAs) to construct and quantitatively evaluate an alarm analysis system for the engineered safety features (ESFs). The purpose is to help improve reactor operator recognition and identification of potential accident sequences. The PRA system fault trees provide system failure mode information which can be used to construct alarm trees. These alarm trees provide a framework for assessing the plant indicators so that the plant conditions are made more readily apparent to plant personnel. In the alarm tree, possible states of each instrumented alarem are identified as true or false. In addition, a warning status is defined and integrated into an alarm analysis routine. The impact of this additional status conditioned on the Boolean laws used to evaluate the alarm trees is examined. An application is described for BWR high pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) that would be utilized during many severe reactor accidents

  13. Milestones for disposal of radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, R.P.

    1998-04-01

    Since its identification as a potential deep geologic repository in about 1973, the regulatory assessment process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico has developed over the past 25 years. National policy issues, negotiated agreements, and court settlements over the first half of the project had a strong influence on the amount and type of scientific data collected. Assessments and studies before the mid 1980s were undertaken primarily (1) to satisfy needs for environmental impact statements, (2) to develop general understanding of selected natural phenomena associated with nuclear waste disposal, or (3) to satisfy negotiated agreements with the State of New Mexico. In the last third of the project, federal compliance policy and actual regulations were sketched out, but continued to evolve until 1996. During this eight-year period, four preliminary performance assessments, one compliance performance assessment, and one verification performance assessment were performed

  14. Milestones for disposal of radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P.

    1998-04-01

    Since its identification as a potential deep geologic repository in about 1973, the regulatory assessment process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico has developed over the past 25 years. National policy issues, negotiated agreements, and court settlements over the first half of the project had a strong influence on the amount and type of scientific data collected. Assessments and studies before the mid 1980s were undertaken primarily (1) to satisfy needs for environmental impact statements, (2) to develop general understanding of selected natural phenomena associated with nuclear waste disposal, or (3) to satisfy negotiated agreements with the State of New Mexico. In the last third of the project, federal compliance policy and actual regulations were sketched out, but continued to evolve until 1996. During this eight-year period, four preliminary performance assessments, one compliance performance assessment, and one verification performance assessment were performed.

  15. Milestones for disposal of radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RECHARD, ROBERT P.

    2000-01-01

    The opening of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on March 26, 1999, was the culmination of a regulatory assessment process that had taken 25 years. National policy issues, negotiated agreements, and court settlements during the first 15 years of the project had a strong influence on the amount and type of scientific data collected up to this point. Assessment activities before the mid 1980s were undertaken primarily (1) to satisfy needs for environmental impact statements, (2) to satisfy negotiated agreements with the State of New Mexico, or (3) to develop general understanding of selected natural phenomena associated with nuclear waste disposal. In the last 10 years, federal compliance policy and actual regulations were sketched out, and continued to evolve until 1996. During this period, stochastic simulations were introduced as a tool for the assessment of the WIPP's performance, and four preliminary performance assessments, one compliance performance assessment, and one verification performance assessment were performed

  16. Human Factors methods concerning integrated validation of nuclear power plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oskarsson, Per-Anders; Johansson, Bjoern J.E.; Gonzalez, Natalia

    2010-02-01

    The frame of reference for this work was existing recommendations and instructions from the NPP area, experiences from the review of the Turbic Validation and experiences from system validations performed at the Swedish Armed Forces, e.g. concerning military control rooms and fighter pilots. These enterprises are characterized by complex systems in extreme environments, often with high risks, where human error can lead to serious consequences. A focus group has been performed with representatives responsible for Human Factors issues from all Swedish NPP:s. The questions that were discussed were, among other things, for whom an integrated validation (IV) is performed and its purpose, what should be included in an IV, the comparison with baseline measures, the design process, the role of SSM, which methods of measurement should be used, and how the methods are affected of changes in the control room. The report brings different questions to discussion concerning the validation process. Supplementary methods of measurement for integrated validation are discussed, e.g. dynamic, psychophysiological, and qualitative methods for identification of problems. Supplementary methods for statistical analysis are presented. The study points out a number of deficiencies in the validation process, e.g. the need of common guidelines for validation and design, criteria for different types of measurements, clarification of the role of SSM, and recommendations for the responsibility of external participants in the validation process. The authors propose 12 measures for taking care of the identified problems

  17. Human Factors methods concerning integrated validation of nuclear power plant control rooms; Metodutveckling foer integrerad validering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskarsson, Per-Anders; Johansson, Bjoern J.E.; Gonzalez, Natalia (Swedish Defence Research Agency, Information Systems, Linkoeping (Sweden))

    2010-02-15

    The frame of reference for this work was existing recommendations and instructions from the NPP area, experiences from the review of the Turbic Validation and experiences from system validations performed at the Swedish Armed Forces, e.g. concerning military control rooms and fighter pilots. These enterprises are characterized by complex systems in extreme environments, often with high risks, where human error can lead to serious consequences. A focus group has been performed with representatives responsible for Human Factors issues from all Swedish NPP:s. The questions that were discussed were, among other things, for whom an integrated validation (IV) is performed and its purpose, what should be included in an IV, the comparison with baseline measures, the design process, the role of SSM, which methods of measurement should be used, and how the methods are affected of changes in the control room. The report brings different questions to discussion concerning the validation process. Supplementary methods of measurement for integrated validation are discussed, e.g. dynamic, psychophysiological, and qualitative methods for identification of problems. Supplementary methods for statistical analysis are presented. The study points out a number of deficiencies in the validation process, e.g. the need of common guidelines for validation and design, criteria for different types of measurements, clarification of the role of SSM, and recommendations for the responsibility of external participants in the validation process. The authors propose 12 measures for taking care of the identified problems

  18. Control-room operator alertness and performance in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, T.l.; Campbell, S.C.; Linder, K.D.; Moore-Ede, M.C

    1990-02-01

    All industries requiring round-the-clock operation must deal with the potential problem of impaired alertness, especially among those who work night shifts. In the nuclear power industry, maintaining optimal alertness and performance of control room operators at all times of day is critical. Many of the toot causes of reduced alertness are straightforward and can be easily remedied with tangible solutions; this manual both discusses the reasons for the problem and suggests solutions. The manual surveys factors that influence operator alertness and performance, including shift schedules, caffeine and alcohol use, diet and family lifestyle factors, the control room enviornment, staffing and overtime practices, and work task design. Specific recommendations are made in each of these areas. The project team, consisting of experts on managing round-the-clock operations and scientists who study human alertness and performance, prepared this manual using the latest scientific research and direct input from shift supervisors and operators via interviews, on-site observation, and questionnaires distributed to every nuclear power station. The material contained within is relevant to shiftwork managers, shift supervisors, and operators, each of whom plays a vital role in maintaining optimal alertness and performance on the job. 90 refs., 35 figs

  19. Approach to team skills training of nuclear power plant control room crews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, L.T.; Gaddy, C.D.; Turney, J.R.

    1985-07-01

    An investigation of current team skills training practices and research was conducted by General Physics Corporation for the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The methodology used included a review of relevant team skills training literature and a workshop to collect inputs from team training practitioners and researchers from the public and private sectors. The workshop was attended by representatives from nuclear utility training organizations, the commercial airline industry, federal agencies, and defense training and research commands. The literature reviews and workshop results provided the input for a suggested approach to team skills training that can be integrated into existing training programs for control room operating crews. The approach includes five phases: (1) team skills objectives development, (2) basic team skills training, (3) team task training, (4) team skills evaluation, and (5) team training program evaluation. Supporting background information and a user-oriented description of the approach to team skills training are provided. 47 refs

  20. Using micro saint to predict performance in a nuclear power plant control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawless, M.T.; Laughery, K.R.; Persenky, J.J.

    1995-09-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires a technical basis for regulatory actions. In the area of human factors, one possible technical basis is human performance modeling technology including task network modeling. This study assessed the feasibility and validity of task network modeling to predict the performance of control room crews. Task network models were built that matched the experimental conditions of a study on computerized procedures that was conducted at North Carolina State University. The data from the open-quotes paper proceduresclose quotes conditions were used to calibrate the task network models. Then, the models were manipulated to reflect expected changes when computerized procedures were used. These models' predictions were then compared to the experimental data from the open-quotes computerized conditionsclose quotes of the North Carolina State University study. Analyses indicated that the models predicted some subsets of the data well, but not all. Implications for the use of task network modeling are discussed

  1. Radiation sensitivity of the microflora in the plant producing radiosterilized disposable medical supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foeldesi, Maria; Gazso, Lajos; Molnar, Andor

    1983-01-01

    480 microbal strains were isolated from the plant's atmosphere and surfaces, the workers' hands and clothes. Sampling was continued for one year to determine seasonal variations. After a survival selection dose of 1 kGy, D 10 values for 53 strains were determined. No outstandingly high radioresistive microorganisms were isolated, the highest D 10 value was 1.83 kGy. The most essential sources of contamination were the surfaces of the production area and the workers' clothes. Regarding seasonal variability, spring and winter were considered as prominent seasons for careful attention to control the plant's microflora. (author)

  2. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: a potential solution for the disposal of transuranic waste

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff; Commission on Geosciences, Environment and Resources; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council; National Academy of Sciences

    ... Isolation Pilot Plant Board on Radioactive Waste Management Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1996 i Copyrighttrue Please breaks inserted. are Page files. accidentally typesetting been have may original from the errors not typographic original retained, and from the c...

  3. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: a study of postclosure safety of in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock. Volume 5: radiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, B.W.; Andres, T.H.; Hajas, W.C.

    1996-06-01

    The concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste involves isolating the waste in long-lived containers placed in a sealed vault at a depth of 500 to 1000 m in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The concept permits a choice of methods, materials, sites and designs. The engineered system would be designed for the geological conditions of the disposal site. The technical feasibility of the disposal concept, and its impact on the environment and human health, have been presented in an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (AECL 1994a,b), supported by nine primary references (Davis et al. 1993; Davison et al. 1994a,b; Goodwin et al. 1994; Greber et al. 1994; Grondin et al. 1994; Johnson et al. 1994a,b; Simmons and Baumgartner 1994). In this report, we evaluate the long-term safety of a second hypothetical implementation of the concept that has several notable differences in site and design features compared to the EIS case study. We assume that the containers are constructed from copper, that they are placed within the disposal rooms, and that the vault is located in a more permeable rock domain. In this study, we consider the groundwater transport scenario and the radionuclides expected to be the most important contributors to dose and radiological risk. We use a prototype systems assessment code, comprising the SYVAC3 executive (the third generation of the SYstems Variability Analysis Code) and models representing the vault, geosphere and biosphere. We have not dealt with other, less likely scenarios, other radionuclides, chemically toxic elements, and some aspects of software quality assurance. The present study provides evidence that the second hypothetical implementation of the disposal concept would meet the radiological risk criterion established by the Atomic Energy Control Board by about an order of magnitude. The study illustrates the flexibility for designing engineered barriers to accommodate a permeable host-rock condition in which advection is the

  4. A State-of-the-Art Report on Technologies of Volume Reduction and Self-Disposal for Large Metal Wastes including the Steam Generator of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kune Woo; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. Y.

    2009-06-01

    This report focuses on technologies of volume reduction and self-disposal for large metal wastes including the steam generator of nuclear power plants. This report consists of the cases of treatments and foreign and domestic technologies for steam generator replacement

  5. Minimizing the Environmental Impact of Sea Brine Disposal by Coupling Desalination Plants with Solar Saltworks: A Case Study for Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Gialis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The explosive increase in world population, along with the fast socio-economic development, have led to an increased water demand, making water shortage one of the greatest problems of modern society. Countries such as Greece, Saudi Arabia and Tunisia face serious water shortage issues and have resorted to solutions such as transporting water by ships from the mainland to islands, a practice that is expensive, energy-intensive and unsustainable. Desalination of sea-water is suitable for supplying arid regions with potable water, but extensive brine discharge may affect marine biota. To avoid this impact, we explore the option of directing the desalination effluent to a solar saltworks for brine concentration and salt production, in order to achieve a zero discharge desalination plant. In this context, we conducted a survey in order to evaluate the potential of transferring desalination brine to solar saltworks, so that its disposal to the sea is avoided. Our analysis showed that brine transfer by trucks is prohibitively expensive. In order to make the zero discharge desalination plant economically feasible, efforts should be directed into developing a more efficient technology that will result in the production of only a fraction of the brine that is produced from our systems today.

  6. Disposal of high-level waste from nuclear power plants in Denmark. v.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The present report deals with material testing as part of the investigations regarding a repository for high-level waste in a salt dome. It is volume 3 of five volumes that together constitute the final report of the Danish utilities' salt dome investigations. The material testing programme chiefly comprised laboratory investigations and analyses of material samples, partly obtained from the salt dome in question and partly from the overlying geological formation. The test programme was fully completed for Eslev salt dome on Mors. Chemical analyses and mineralogical investigations were carried out in order to determine the type and extent of the impurities confined in the rock salt. Moreover, a programme was carried out to investigate the water content of the salt. Temperature conditions around a repository, the strenght and creep properties of the salt were investigated in order to determine whether drill holes, shafts and mine galleries could be constructed and maintained intact within the period of time required to complete the disposal of high-level waste. Chemical analysis were carried out in order to determine which substances are found dissolved in the water contained by the geological formation overlying the salt dome, as well as chemical/physical investigations regarding the water content, porosity, velocity of a possible leak of radioactive waste products, etc. Materials that would be introduced into a repository were studied with regard to their corrosion resistance in the salt environment. Concrete materials were investigated and characterized for their use in the final sealing of the access routes to the repository through the geological formation. (BP)

  7. Integration of error tolerance into the design of control rooms of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepanloo, Kamran

    1998-08-01

    Many complex technological systems' failures have been attributed to human errors. Today, based on extensive research on the role of human element in technological systems it is known that human error can not totally be eliminated in modern, flexible, or changing work environments by conventional style design strategies(e.g. defence in depth), or better instructions nor should they be. Instead, the operators' ability to explore degrees of freedom should be supported and means for recovering from the effects of errors should be included. This calls for innovative error tolerant design of technological systems. Integration of error tolerant concept into the design, construction, startup, and operation of nuclear power plants provides an effective means of reducing human error occurrence during all stages of life of it and therefore leads to considerable enhancement of plant's safety

  8. Development of task analysis method for operator tasks in main control room of an advanced nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chiuhsiangloe; Hsieh Tsungling

    2016-01-01

    Task analysis methods provide an insight for quantitative and qualitative predictions of how people will use a proposed system, though the different versions have different emphases. Most of the methods can attest to the coverage of the functionality of a system and all provide estimates of task performance time. However, most of the tasks that operators deal with in a digital work environment in the main control room of an advanced nuclear power plant require high mental activity. Such mental tasks overlap and must be dealt with at the same time; most of them can be assumed to be highly parallel in nature. Therefore, the primary aim to be addressed in this paper was to develop a method that adopts CPM-GOMS (cognitive perceptual motor-goals operators methods selection rules) as the basic pattern of mental task analysis for the advanced main control room. A within-subjects experiment design was used to examine the validity of the modified CPM-GOMS. Thirty participants participated in two task types, which included high- and low-compatibility types. The results indicated that the performance was significantly higher on the high-compatibility task type than on the low-compatibility task type; that is, the modified CPM-GOMS could distinguish the difference between high- and low-compatibility mental tasks. (author)

  9. An Investigation for Arranging the Video Display Unit Information in a Main Control Room of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Chong Cheng; Yang, Chih Wei [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan (China)

    2014-08-15

    Current digital instrumentation and control and main control room (MCR) technology has extended the capability of integrating information from numerous plant systems and transmitting needed information to operations personnel in a timely manner that could not be envisioned when previous generation plants were designed and built. A MCR operator can complete all necessary operating actions on the video display unit (VDU). It is extremely flexible and convenient for operators to select and to control the system display on the screen. However, a high degree of digitalization has some risks. For example, in nuclear power plants, failures in the instrumentation and control devices could stop the operation of the plant. Human factors engineering (HFE) approaches would be a manner to solve this problem. Under HFE considerations, there exists 'population stereotype' for operation. That is, the operator is used to operating a specific display on the specific VDU for operation. Under emergency conditions, there is possibility that the operator will response with this habit population stereotype, and not be aware that the current situation has already changed. Accordingly, the advanced nuclear power plant should establish the MCR VDU configuration plan to meet the consistent teamwork goal under normal operation, transient and accident conditions. On the other hand, the advanced nuclear power plant should establish the human factors verification and validation plan of the MCR VDU configuration to verify and validate the configuration of the MCR VDUs, and to ensure that the MCR VDU configuration allows the operator shift to meet the HFE consideration and the consistent teamwork goal under normal operation, transient and accident conditions. This paper is one of the HF V V plans of the MCR VDU configuration of the advanced nuclear power plant. The purpose of this study is to confirm whether the VDU configuration meets the human factors principles and the consistent

  10. An Investigation for Arranging the Video Display Unit Information in a Main Control Room of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Chong Cheng; Yang, Chih Wei

    2014-01-01

    Current digital instrumentation and control and main control room (MCR) technology has extended the capability of integrating information from numerous plant systems and transmitting needed information to operations personnel in a timely manner that could not be envisioned when previous generation plants were designed and built. A MCR operator can complete all necessary operating actions on the video display unit (VDU). It is extremely flexible and convenient for operators to select and to control the system display on the screen. However, a high degree of digitalization has some risks. For example, in nuclear power plants, failures in the instrumentation and control devices could stop the operation of the plant. Human factors engineering (HFE) approaches would be a manner to solve this problem. Under HFE considerations, there exists 'population stereotype' for operation. That is, the operator is used to operating a specific display on the specific VDU for operation. Under emergency conditions, there is possibility that the operator will response with this habit population stereotype, and not be aware that the current situation has already changed. Accordingly, the advanced nuclear power plant should establish the MCR VDU configuration plan to meet the consistent teamwork goal under normal operation, transient and accident conditions. On the other hand, the advanced nuclear power plant should establish the human factors verification and validation plan of the MCR VDU configuration to verify and validate the configuration of the MCR VDUs, and to ensure that the MCR VDU configuration allows the operator shift to meet the HFE consideration and the consistent teamwork goal under normal operation, transient and accident conditions. This paper is one of the HF V V plans of the MCR VDU configuration of the advanced nuclear power plant. The purpose of this study is to confirm whether the VDU configuration meets the human factors principles and the consistent

  11. Exposition index calculation from different points in a gamma sterilization plant radiation room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation fields produced by a JS-6500 rectangular irradiator source were evaluated. Knowledge of the values of these fields is necessary in irradiation and health physics processes. Techniques for evaluating the dose rates from puntual, linear and plane sources were applied and computer programs for the three sources designed. Fricke, cupric-ferrous and red acrilic dosimetric systems were used, to verify the eight points located along the interior walls of the irradiation room, around the source with 936, 987 Ci of Co-60 (1st-March 1980). When considering the distance between the source and each point of interest the calculated exposition indexes obtained were practically the same for the three source types and were up to 35% greater than the experimental values; in contrast when absorption and buildup of the source were taken in to account, the experimental values were higher than the calculated ones by up to 16%, this in estimating the produced exposition index for a rectangular source at least there two parameters should be included. (author)

  12. An overview on applied methods in the FRG to investigate human factors in control rooms of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    In the first half of 1984 a feasibility study was carried out with respect to the CSNI of the OECD/NEA inventory of methods for the analysis and evaluation of human factors in the control room of nuclear power plants. In order to enable an analysis of the methods to be made, an elementary categorization of the methods under field studies, laboratory studies and theoretical studies was performed. A further differentiation of these categories was used as the basis for a critical analysis and interpretation of the methods employed in the research plan. In the following sections, an explanation is given of the method categories used and the plans included in the investigation. A short representation is given of the breakdown of the applied methods into categories and an analysis is made of the results. Implications for research programs are discussed. (orig./GL) [de

  13. Scaled-up manufacturing of recombinant antibodies produced by plant cells in a 200-L orbitally-shaken disposable bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Nicole; Rasche, Stefan; Kuehn, Christoph; Anderlei, Tibor; Klöckner, Wolf; Schuster, Flora; Henquet, Maurice; Bosch, Dirk; Büchs, Jochen; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Tobacco BY-2 cells have emerged as a promising platform for the manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins, offering efficient protein secretion, favourable growth characteristics and cultivation in containment under a controlled environment. The cultivation of BY-2 cells in disposable bioreactors is a useful alternative to conventional stainless steel stirred-tank reactors, and orbitally-shaken bioreactors could provide further advantages such as simple bag geometry, scalability and predictable process settings. We carried out a scale-up study, using a 200-L orbitally-shaken bioreactor holding disposable bags, and BY-2 cells producing the human monoclonal antibody M12. We found that cell growth and recombinant protein accumulation were comparable to standard shake flask cultivation, despite a 200-fold difference in cultivation volume. Final cell fresh weights of 300-387 g/L and M12 yields of ∼20 mg/L were achieved with both cultivation methods. Furthermore, we established an efficient downstream process for the recovery of M12 from the culture broth. The viscous spent medium prevented clarification using filtration devices, but we used expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography with SP Sepharose as an alternative for the efficient capture of the M12 antibody. EBA was introduced as an initial purification step prior to protein A affinity chromatography, resulting in an overall M12 recovery of 75-85% and a purity of >95%. Our results demonstrate the suitability of orbitally-shaken bioreactors for the scaled-up cultivation of plant cell suspension cultures and provide a strategy for the efficient purification of antibodies from the BY-2 culture medium. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mill tailings disposal and environmental monitoring at the Ningyo-Toge uranium processing pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, I.; Kitahara, Y.; Takenaka, S.; Kurokawa, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The tailings from the uranium processing pilot plant with a maximum ore processing capacity of 50 t/d are transferred to a tailings dam. The overflow from the dam is chemically treated and through settling ponds, sand filters to be discharged into a river. The concentrations of U, 226 Ra, pH, S.S., COD, Fe, Mn, Cl and F were monitored periodically and they were all below the control values. The results of monitoring on the river bed and rice paddy soil showed no signs of accumulation of U and 226 Ra in it

  15. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor

  16. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin [University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor.

  17. Radiological dose assessment of Department of Energy Pinellas Plant waste proposed for disposal at Laidlaw Environmental Services of South Carolina, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Socolof, M.L.; Lee, D.W.

    1996-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pinellas Plant in Largo, FL is proposing to ship and dispose of hazardous sludge, listed as F006 waste, to the Laidlaw Environmental Services of South Carolina, Inc. (Laidlaw) treatment, storage, and disposal facility in Pinewood, South Carolina. This sludge contains radioactive tritium in concentrations of about 28 pCi/g. The objective of this study is to assess the possible radiological impact to workers at the Laidlaw facility and members of the public due to the handling, processing, and burial of the DOE waste containing tritium

  18. Radiological dose assessment of Department of Energy Pinellas Plant waste proposed for disposal at Laidlaw Environmental Services of South Carolina, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socolof, M.L.; Lee, D.W.

    1996-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pinellas Plant in Largo, FL is proposing to ship and dispose of hazardous sludge, listed as F006 waste, to the Laidlaw Environmental Services of South Carolina, Inc. (Laidlaw) treatment, storage, and disposal facility in Pinewood, South Carolina. This sludge contains radioactive tritium in concentrations of about 28 pCi/g. The objective of this study is to assess the possible radiological impact to workers at the Laidlaw facility and members of the public due to the handling, processing, and burial of the DOE waste containing tritium.

  19. Effect of communication on the reliability of nuclear power plant control room operations - pre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettunen, Jari; Pyy, Pekka

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the study presented in this paper is to investigate communication practices and their impact on human reliability and plant safety in a nuclear power plant environment. The study aims at developing a general systems approach towards the issue. The ultimate goal of the study is to contribute to the development of probabilistic safety assessment methodologies in the area of communications and crew co-operation. This paper outlines the results of the pre-study. The study is based on the use and further development of different modelling techniques and the application of generic systems engineering as well as crew resource management (CRM) principles. The results so far include a concise literature review on communication and crew performance, a presentation of some potential theoretical concepts and approaches for studying communication in relation to organisational reliability, causal failure sequences and human failures mechanisms, and an introduction of a General Communications Model (GCM) that is presented as a promising approach for studying the reliability and adequacy of communication transactions. Finally, some observations and recommendation concerning next phases of the study are made (author) (ml)

  20. Developing a taxonomy of coordination behaviours in nuclear power plant control rooms during emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dunxing; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhizhong; Song, Fei; Ma, Liang

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to develop a taxonomy of coordination behaviours during emergencies in nuclear power plants (NPPs). We summarised basic coordination behaviours from literature in aviation, health care and nuclear field and identified coordination behaviours specific to the nuclear domain by interviewing and surveying control crew operators. The established taxonomy includes 7 workflow stages and 24 basic coordination behaviours. To evaluate the reliability and feasibility of the taxonomy, we analysed 12 videos of operators' training sessions by coding coordination behaviours with the taxonomy and the inter-rater reliability was acceptable. Further analysis of the frequency, the duration and the direction of the coordination behaviours revealed four coordination problems. This taxonomy provides a foundation of systematic observation of coordination behaviours among NPP crews, advances researchers' understanding of the coordination mechanism during emergencies in NPPs and facilitate the possibility to deepen the understanding of the relationships between coordination behaviours and team performance. Practitioner Summary: A taxonomy of coordination behaviours during emergencies in nuclear power plants was developed. Reliability and feasibility of the taxonomy was verified through the analysis of 12 training sessions. The taxonomy can serve as an observation system for analysis of coordination behaviours and help to identify coordination problems of control crews.

  1. Local public document room directory. Revision 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This directory (NUREG/BR-0088, Revision 7) lists local public document rooms (LPDRs) for commercial nuclear power plants with operating or possession-only licenses or under construction, plus the LPDRs for potential high-level radioactive waste repository sites, gaseous diffusion plants, certain fuel cycle facilities, certain low-level waste disposal facilities, and any temporary LPDRs established for the duration of licensing proceedings. In some instances, the LPDR libraries maintain document collections for more than one licensed facility. The library staff members listed are the persons most familiar with the LPDR collections. Reference librarians in the NRC Headquarters Public Document Room (PDR) are also available to assist the public in locating NRC documents

  2. Waste-heat disposal from US geothermal power plants: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, R. C.

    1982-05-01

    Some of the more interesting and significant methods that are currently being studied in the US for reducing waste heat dissipation system costs and water consumption are: (1) allowing plant power output to vary with ambient conditions; (2) use of ammonia to transport waste heat from the turbine condenser to air-cooled coils; (3) development of a plastic-membrane type wet/dry tower; (4) marketing of steam turbines that can tolerate a wider range of back pressure; (5) use of circulating water storage to delay heat dissipation until more favorable conditions exist; (6) development of tubes with enhanced heat transfer surfaces to reduce condenser capital costs; and (7) use of evaporative condensers to reduce costs in binary cycles. Many of these projects involve large scale tests that are now fully installed and producing some preliminary data.

  3. Progress in long-lived radioactive waste management and disposal at the waste isolation pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triay, I R; Matthews, M L [U.S. Dept. of Energy Carlsbad Field Office, New Mexico (United States); Eriksson, L G [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The Salado Formation is buried more than 350 m beneath the sands and cacti of the Chihuahuan Desert and hosts the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) deep geological repository at a depth of approximately 650 m. Since the WIPP repository is at least 10 years ahead of any other repository development for long-lived radioactive waste, other radioactive waste management organizations and institutions could benefit both scientifically and politically from sharing the lessons learned at WIPP. Benefits would include using existing expertise and facilities to cost-effectively address and solve program-specific issues and to train staff. The characteristics of the WIPP repository and infrastructure are described in this paper. (author)

  4. Progress in long-lived radioactive waste management and disposal at the waste isolation pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Matthews, M.L.; Eriksson, L.G.

    2001-01-01

    The Salado Formation is buried more than 350 m beneath the sands and cacti of the Chihuahuan Desert and hosts the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) deep geological repository at a depth of approximately 650 m. Since the WIPP repository is at least 10 years ahead of any other repository development for long-lived radioactive waste, other radioactive waste management organizations and institutions could benefit both scientifically and politically from sharing the lessons learned at WIPP. Benefits would include using existing expertise and facilities to cost-effectively address and solve program-specific issues and to train staff. The characteristics of the WIPP repository and infrastructure are described in this paper. (author)

  5. A research needs assessment for the capture, utilization and disposal of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Volume 2, Topical reports: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This study, identifies and assesses system approaches in order to prioritize research needs for the capture and non-atmospheric sequestering of a significant portion of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emitted from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants (US power plants presently produce about 7% of the world`s CO{sub 2} emissions). The study considers capture technologies applicable either to existing plants or to those that optimistically might be demonstrated on a commercial scale over the next twenty years. The research needs that have high priority in establishing the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of large-scale capture and disposal of CO{sub 2} from electric power plants are:(1) survey and assess the capacity, cost, and location of potential depleted gas and oil wells that are suitable CO{sub 2} repositories (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (2) conduct research on the feasibility of ocean disposal, with objectives of determining the cost, residence time, and environmental effects for different methods of CO{sub 2} injection; (3) perform an in-depth survey of knowledge concerning the feasibility of using deep, confined aquifers for disposal and, if feasible, identify potential disposal locations (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (4) evaluate, on a common basis, system and design alternatives for integration of CO{sub 2} capture systems with emerging and advanced technologies for power generation; and prepare a conceptual design, an analysis of barrier issues, and a preliminary cost estimate for pipeline networks necessary to transport a significant portion of the CO{sub 2} to potentially feasible disposal locations.

  6. Qualification of control room operators for nuclear power plants. A review of practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitalnik, J.; Hurley, F.I.

    1983-01-01

    The increasing complexity of nuclear power plants has increased the demands on operators and several countries have made a break with their traditional practice and made professional engineers available on operating shifts. Engineers are incorporated in differing organizational arrangements which require differing competence of all the members of the shift team. Analysis of the elements of competence shows that all the organizational arrangements can be made to work satisfactorily, provided attention is given to ensuring certain requirements. Analysis also enables some general requirements for the shift operating team to be defined. However, these requirements are ideal, since conditions in some countries prevent their attainment in the short term; the main difficulties stem from the attitudes of professional engineers to shift work and career development. (author)

  7. Control room, emergency control system and local control panels in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The requirements on planning and construction of control boards including ergonomic-technical designing are specified in this rule. The specifications put the requirements on the design of place, process and environment of work, which are mentioned in the sections 90 and 91 of the labor-management relations act, into more concrete terms for the safety-relevant control panels as work places in a nuclear power station. The work places at control panels are not considered as video workstations in the sense of the 'Safety Rules for Video Workstations in the Office Sector' published by the General Association of the Industrial Trade Associations. The requirements are based on the operation and information technology realized at present in control panels of stationary nuclear power plants. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Rooting depths of plants on low-level waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxx, T.S.; Tierney, G.D.; Williams, J.M.

    1984-11-01

    In 1981-1982 an extensive bibliographic study was done to reference rooting depths of native plants in the United States. The data base presently contains 1034 different rooting citations with approximately 12,000 data elements. For this report, data were analyzed for rooting depths related to species found on low-level waste (LLW) sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Average rooting depth and rooting frequencies were determined and related to present LLW maintenance. The data base was searched for information on rooting depths of 53 species found on LLW sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The study indicates 12 out of 13 grasses found on LLW sites root below 91 cm. June grass [Koeleria cristata (L.) Pers.] (76 cm) was the shallowest rooting grass and side-oats grama [Bouteloua curtipendula (Michx.) Torr.] was the deepest rooting grass (396 cm). Forbs were more variable in rooting depths. Indian paintbrush (Castelleja spp.) (30 cm) was the shallowest rooting forb and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was the deepest (>3900 cm). Trees and shrubs commonly rooted below 457 cm. The shallowest rooting tree was elm (Ulmus pumila L.) (127 cm) and the deepest was one-seed juniper [Juniperus monosperma (Engelm) Sarg.] (>6000 cm). Apache plume [Fallugia paradoxa (D. Don) Endl.] rooted to 140 cm, whereas fourwing saltbush [Atriplex canecens (Pursh) Nutt.] rooted to 762 cm

  9. Estrogenic compounds in Tunisian urban sewage treatment plant: occurrence, removal and ecotoxicological impact of sewage discharge and sludge disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhaj, Dalel; Athmouni, Khaled; Jerbi, Bouthaina; Kallel, Monem; Ayadi, Habib; Zhou, John L

    2016-12-01

    The occurrence, fate and ecotoxicological assessment of selected estrogenic compounds were investigated at Tunisian urban sewage treatment plant. The influents, effluents, as well as primary, secondary and dehydrated sludge, were sampled and analyzed for the target estrogens to evaluate their fate. All target compounds were detected in both sewage and sludge with mean concentrations from 0.062 to 0.993 μg L -1 and from 11.8 to 792.9 μg kg -1 dry weight, respectively. A wide range of removal efficiencies during the treatment processes were observed, from 6.3 % for estrone to 76.8 % for estriol. Ecotoxicological risk assessment revealed that the highest ecotoxicological risk in sewage effluent and dehydrated sludge was due to 17β-estradiol with a risk quotient (RQ) of 4.6 and 181.9, respectively, and 17α-ethinylestradiol with RQ of 9.8 and 14.85, respectively. Ecotoxicological risk after sewage discharge and sludge disposal was limited to the presence of 17β-estradiol in dehydrated-sludge amended soil with RQ of 1.38. Further control of estrogenic hormones in sewage effluent and sludge is essential before their discharge and application in order to prevent their introduction into the natural environment.

  10. Disposal of high-level waste from nuclear power plants in Denmark. Salt dome investigations. v.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The present report deals with construction, operation and sealing of disposal facilities for high-level waste in a salt dome. It is volume 4 of five volumes that together constitute the final report on the Danish utilities' salt dome investigations. The safety investigations were carried out for a deep-hole disposal facility located in the salt dome on Mors. In principle the results of the investigations also apply to a shaft/mine disposal facility. The facility is designed for the disposal of vitrified high-level waste in the shape of glass canisters. There is a low concentration of waste in each canister, approx. 10%. Furthermore, it was selected to place the waste in an intermediate storage for about 40 years prior to its final disposal. Consequently, heat generation in the waste at the time of final disposal will be modest, resulting in low temperature increase in the salt. As an example, the highest temperature increase will be approx. 40 deg. C. and it will occur at the edge of the hole five years after disposal has taken place. Prior to disposal, the glass canisters are encased in steel casks with 15 cm thick walls. Three canisters are placed in each cask, and 215 casks are stacked on top on one another in each deep-hole from a depth of 1200 m to 2500 m underground. The additional encasing is designed to protect the glass from dissolution should any brine reach the disposal facility. Furthermore, the steel cask protects the glass canisters against pressure from the wall of the hole. The technical design of the disposal facility gives it a considerable safety margin against unexpected events. The investigations proved Cretaceous strata to constitute an effective secondary barrier that would prevent radioactive matter from travelling from the underlying disposal facility to the biosphere. (BP)

  11. A user-friendly, digital console for the control room parameters supervision in old-generation nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memmi, Fabrizio; Falconi, Luca; Cappelli, Mauro; Palomba, Mario; Sepielli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a user-friendly monitoring system for reactor supervision. • Statistics from data analysis can be used to optimize reactor management. • The tool has been designed in order to include a simulation tool for prediction. • The proposed system could help operators in training and continuous learning. - Abstract: In this work a user-friendly, digital monitoring system for supervision of process variables coming from a fission nuclear reactor of TRIGA type (1-MW TRIGA reactor RC-1) is presented. The system, developed on the basis of COTS tools, can easily interface the control room instrumentation and display the typical monitoring parameters (e.g. nuclear power, temperatures, flow rates, radiological variables) in an intuitive, user-adjustable way for plant operators. A front panel of a virtual instrument allows for a direct measure while the acquisition system, for signals coming from the reactor, can process the data and generate a detailed representation of the results, whose statistics can be interpreted to optimize the reactor management parameters. This system has been also designed so as to include a simulation tool able to predict specific performances and investigate critical phenomena, and to optimize overall plant performances. In particular, it allows to have a feedback control and to perform several predictive statistical surveys of all main process parameters. The proposed system could help operators in training and continuous learning activities, and serve as a basis for an advanced decision support system and for a remote training tool for students and trainees not authorized to work in a radiation environment.

  12. A user-friendly, digital console for the control room parameters supervision in old-generation nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memmi, Fabrizio; Falconi, Luca; Cappelli, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.cappelli@enea.it; Palomba, Mario; Sepielli, Massimo

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • We propose a user-friendly monitoring system for reactor supervision. • Statistics from data analysis can be used to optimize reactor management. • The tool has been designed in order to include a simulation tool for prediction. • The proposed system could help operators in training and continuous learning. - Abstract: In this work a user-friendly, digital monitoring system for supervision of process variables coming from a fission nuclear reactor of TRIGA type (1-MW TRIGA reactor RC-1) is presented. The system, developed on the basis of COTS tools, can easily interface the control room instrumentation and display the typical monitoring parameters (e.g. nuclear power, temperatures, flow rates, radiological variables) in an intuitive, user-adjustable way for plant operators. A front panel of a virtual instrument allows for a direct measure while the acquisition system, for signals coming from the reactor, can process the data and generate a detailed representation of the results, whose statistics can be interpreted to optimize the reactor management parameters. This system has been also designed so as to include a simulation tool able to predict specific performances and investigate critical phenomena, and to optimize overall plant performances. In particular, it allows to have a feedback control and to perform several predictive statistical surveys of all main process parameters. The proposed system could help operators in training and continuous learning activities, and serve as a basis for an advanced decision support system and for a remote training tool for students and trainees not authorized to work in a radiation environment.

  13. Application control chart concepts of designing a pre-alarm system in the nuclear power plant control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, S.-L.; Lin, J.-T.; Liang, G.-F.; Yau, Y.-J.; Yenn, T.-C.; Hsu, C.-C.

    2008-01-01

    This study applied the concepts of the Shewhart control chart to design a pre-alarm system for the nuclear power plant control room. As a support in detecting faults, the pre-alarm system reminded the operators of a change in the system state in its early stages. Two pre-alarm types were designed to compare with the original system, and all participants were requested to monitor each simulated system under both normal and abnormal states. The tasks for the participants included shutting down the reactor, searching for procedures, monitoring system parameters and executing secondary tasks. In each trial, the task performance, mental workload and situation awareness (SA) of the participants were measured. Results indicated that participants had lower mental workload, but equal SA, when monitoring the system with either type of pre-alarm designs, and lower alarm frequency and higher secondary task performance were obtained with the pre-alarm design. Therefore, the pre-alarm system effectively assisted the operators in monitoring tasks

  14. Waste Water Disposal Design And Management I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Sang Hyeon; Lee, Jung Su

    2004-04-01

    This book gives descriptions of waste water disposal, design and management, which includes design of waterworks and sewerage facility such as preparatory work and building plan, used waste water disposal facilities, waste water disposal plant and industrial waste water disposal facilities, water use of waste water disposal plant and design of pump and pump facilities such as type and characteristic, selection and plan, screening and grit.

  15. Shipment and Disposal of Solidified Organic Waste (Waste Type IV) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, E. L; Edmiston, D. R.; O'Leary, G. A.; Rivera, M. A.; Steward, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    In April of 2005, the last shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site to the WIPP was completed. With the completion of this shipment, all transuranic waste generated and stored at Rocky Flats was successfully removed from the site and shipped to and disposed of at the WIPP. Some of the last waste to be shipped and disposed of at the WIPP was waste consisting of solidified organic liquids that is identified as Waste Type IV in the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC) document. Waste Type IV waste typically has a composition, and associated characteristics, that make it significantly more difficult to ship and dispose of than other Waste Types, especially with respect to gas generation. This paper provides an overview of the experience gained at Rocky Flats for management, transportation and disposal of Type IV waste at WIPP, particularly with respect to gas generation testing. (authors)

  16. Draft postclosure permit application for Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oil Landform Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The Oil Landfarm Hazardous-Waste Disposal Unit (HWDU) is located approximately one and one-half miles west of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Oil Landfarm HWDU consists of three disposal plots and along with the Bear Creek Burial Grounds and the S-3 Site comprise the Bear Creek Valley Waste Disposal Area (BCVWDA). The facility was used for the biological degradation of waste oil and machine coolants via landfarming, a process involving the application of waste oils and coolants to nutrient-adjusted soil during the dry months of the year (April to October). The Oil Landfarm HWDU has been closed as a hazardous-waste disposal unit and therefore will be subject to post-closure care. The closure plan for the Oil Landfarm HWDU is provided in Appendix A.1. A post-closure plan for the Oil Landfarm HWDU is presented in Appendix A.2. The purpose of this plan is to identify and describe the activities that will be performed during the post-closure care period. This plan will be implemented and will continue throughout the post-closure care period

  17. Redesigning a control room from an ergonomic point of view : a case study of user participation in a chemical plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, van der T.W.; Kragt, H.; Kragt, H.

    1992-01-01

    A field study in a chemical industry was conducted to redesign a control room with panel instrumentation into one with visual display units (VDUs). The authors had been asked to advise the project team and to participate in the application. First, a general evaluation of the central control room

  18. Anlagen- und Kraftwerksrohrleitungsbau Greifswald GmbH plan and build wet decontamination plant for disposal of components of Russian nuclear submarines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Jan; Konitzer, Arnold; Luedeke, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Anlagen- und Kraftwerksrohrleitungsbau Greifswald, on behalf of Energiewerke Nord GmbH, Lubmin, plan and build a wet decontamination facility for the waste management center at Saida Bay, Russia (EZS). The plant is part of a large project with a total volume on the order of 3-digit millions funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economics and Technology. This project involves construction at Saida Bay near the port city of Murmansk of a complete waste management center and a long-term interim store for radioactively contaminated components. These components are mainly parts of decommissioned nuclear vessels and submarines whose metals, after decontamination, can be returned to economic use. The basis of the wet decontamination plant is a former AKB project for disposal and re-use of contaminated metal components of Energiewerke Nord GmbH at Lubmin, which is being adapted and developed further. The plant is to allow unrestricted re-use of the metals after surface cleaning and surface abrasion, respectively. For this purpose, the contaminated layer is removed far enough for the clearance limits under the Radiation Protection Ordinance to be met. A large fraction of the metals can be re-used after cleaning and do not have to be stored in a financially and logistically expensive process. The contract gives AKB an excellent opportunity to demonstrate its capabilities in plant construction, especially in the very sensitive area of disposal of radioactively contaminated objects. (orig.)

  19. Uptake of radiocarbon from plant rhizosphere based on geological disposal of TRU waste. Root-uptake of radiocarbon carbon derived from acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogiyama, Shinichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shigeo; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Inubushi, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted to examine root-uptake of 14 C in the form of acetic acid by 3 kinds of plants (marigold, tall fescue, and paddy rice) based on buried transuranic (TRU) waste disposal. Also, chamber experiment was conducted to examine loss of 14 C as vaporized carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the experimental tessera (spatially heterogeneous environment). The distribution of radioactivity in the plant, mediums, and carbon dioxide ( 14 CO 2 ) in the chamber were determined, and the distribution of 14 C in the plant was visualized by the autoradiography. The plants absorbed and assimilated 14 C through the roots. The amount of 14 C in marigold and tall fescue were higher than that of paddy rice. However, the amounts of 14 C-acetic acid absorbed by all the plants through their roots were considered to be very small. More so, 14 CO 2 gas was released from the culture solution to the atmosphere; however, it was not enough for the plant to perform photosynthesis. Assimilation of 14 C in the plant shoots would be because of 14 C movement of inorganic forms such as CO 2 and HCO 3 - via the roots. Thus, the results indicated that the plants absorbed 14 C through the roots and assimilated it into the shoots or edible parts not because of uptake of 14 C-acetic acid but because of uptake of 14 C in inorganic forms. (author)

  20. Disposal of high-level waste from nuclear power plants in Denmark. Salt dome investigations. v.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A summary is presented of a report in five volumes on possible disposal of radioactive waste in Denmark. The investigation was made by the Danish electric utilities ELKRAFT and ELSAM at the request of the Danish Government. The investigation proved it possible to consider two alternative designs for a disposal facility, one based on the deposition of waste in individual, deep holes, the other on placing the waste in mine galleries. A safety analysis was completed with the Mors dome as example. The purpose of the analysis was to prove whether safe disposal of high-level waste in Denmark was feasible. The utilities concluded that the results of the analysis were satisfactory and the report is now being assessed by the authorities. (BP)

  1. Definition and means of maintaining the room continuous air monitors portion of the plutonium finishing plant (PFP) safety envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WHITE, W.F.

    1999-01-01

    Room Continuous Air Monitors (CAMs) are used in areas where there is potential for dispersible radioactive material. These CAMs provide audible and visual alarms to warn personnel of an increase in airborne radioactivity

  2. Development of a basic questionnaire for human-factors applications in nuclear-power-plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, D.E.; Fowler, D.R.; Brown, W.R.

    1982-11-01

    This paper analyzes the efforts of a study team in developing an assessment instrument. Principles are outlined for development of any questionnaire or control room survey and some of the actual processes used in the FFTF project are described

  3. Uptake of strontium by chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus) shrub plants growing over a former liquid waste disposal site at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Foxx, T.S.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A major concern of managers at low-level waste burial site facilities is that plant roots may translocate contaminants up to the soil surface. This study investigates the uptake of strontium ( 90 Sr), a biologically mobile element, by chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus), a deep-rooted shrub plant, growing in a former liquid waste disposal site (Solid Waste Management Unit [SWMU] 10-003[c]) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Surface soil samples were also collected from below (understory) and between (interspace) shrub canopies. Both chamisa plants growing over SWMU 10-003(c) contained significantly higher concentrations of 90 Sr than a control plant--one plant, in particular, contained 3.35 x 10 6 Bq kg -1 ash (9.05 x 10 4 pCi g -1 ash) in top-growth material. Similarly, soil surface samples collected underneath and between plants contained 90 Sr concentrations above background and LANL screening action levels (> 218 Bq kg -1 dry [5.90 pCi g -1 dry]); this probably occurred as a result of chamisa plant leaf fall contaminating the soil understory area followed by water and/or winds moving 90 Sr to the soil interspace areas. Although some soil surface migration of 90 Sr from SWMU 10-003(c) has occurred, the level of 90 Sr in sediments collected downstream of SWMU 10-003(c) at the LANL boundary was still within regional (background) concentrations

  4. Sewage sludge disposal at the city of Duesseldorf - Conception of co-combustion in a coal power plant; Klaerschlammentsorgung der Stadt Duesseldorf - Konzeption der Mitverbrennung im Kraftwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindert, M. [Umweltamt der Landeshauptstadt Duesseldorf (Germany); Hansmann, G. [Stadtwerke Duesseldorf AG (Germany); Mittmann, H. [Kanal- und Wasserbauamt der Landeshauptstadt Duesseldorf (Germany); Goertz, W. [Umweltamt der Landeshauptstadt Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1995-11-01

    Simultaneously to the enlargement of the biological wastewater treatment plants in Germany the amount of sludges increased. For the reuse or disposal of these sludges different methods - from agricultural use to incineration - are applied. For the city of Duesseldorf it became necessary to outline a new conception for the sludge disposal. A number of methods has been considered, showing that co-incineration in a coal-power-plant appears to be practicable under the circumstances found in Duesseldorf. Hence the effects of such a co-incineration on the emissions and the composition of solid waste materials of the power plant have been investigated in the course of an experimental operation. These experiments show that coincineration of the sludge also has advantages from the ecological point of view. (orig.) [Deutsch] Mit dem Ausbau der biologischen Klaeranlagen in Deutschland stieg in den letzten Jahren auch die Menge des anfallenden Klaerschlamms. Zur Verwertung bzw. Entsorgung dieses Schlammes werden unterschiedliche Verfahren - von der landwirtschaftlichen Verwertung bis zur Verbrennung - herangezogen. Fuer die Stadt Duesseldorf ergab sich die Notwendigkeit, die Klaerschlammentsorgung neu zu konzipieren. Verschiedene Varianten wurden geprueft, wobei die Mitverbrennung in der Schmelzkammerfeuerung eines Steinkohlekraftwerkes unter den in Duesseldorf herrschenden Randbedingungen praktikabel erschien. Daher wurden die Auswirkungen einer solchen Mitverbrennung auf das Emissionsverhalten und die Zusammensetzung der festen Reststoffe des Kraftwerks waehrend eines Probebetriebes untersucht. Die Versuche zeigen, dass die Mitverbrennung auch aus oekologischer Sicht Vorteile aufweist. (orig.)

  5. Scaled-up manufacturing of recombinant antibodies produced by plant cells in a 200-L orbitally-shaken disposable bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raven, N.; Rasche, F.; Kuehn, C.; Anderlei, T.; Klöckner, W.; Schuster, F.; Henquet, M.G.L.; Bosch, H.J.; Büchs, J.; Fischer, R.; Schillberg, S.

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco BY-2 cells have emerged as a promising platform for the manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins, offering efficient protein secretion, favourable growth characteristics and cultivation in containment under a controlled environment. The cultivation of BY-2 cells in disposable bioreactors is

  6. Disposal safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, J.W.

    International consensus does not seem to be necessary or appropriate for many of the issues concerned with the safety of nuclear waste disposal. International interaction on the technical aspects of disposal has been extensive, and this interaction has contributed greatly to development of a consensus technical infrastructure for disposal. This infrastructure provides a common and firm base for regulatory, political, and social actions in each nation

  7. Waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neerdael, B.; Marivoet, J.; Put, M.; Verstricht, J.; Van Iseghem, P.; Buyens, M.

    1998-01-01

    The primary mission of the Waste Disposal programme at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is to propose, develop, and assess solutions for the safe disposal of radioactive waste. In Belgium, deep geological burial in clay is the primary option for the disposal of High-Level Waste and spent nuclear fuel. The main achievements during 1997 in the following domains are described: performance assessment, characterization of the geosphere, characterization of the waste, migration processes, underground infrastructure

  8. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  9. Disposal of high-level waste from nuclear power plants in Denmark. Salt dome investigations. v.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The present report deals with safety evaluation as part of the investigations regarding a repository for high-level waste in a salt dome. It is volume 5 of five volumes that together constitute the final report on the Danish utilities' salt dome investigations. Two characteristics of the waste are of special importance for the safety evaluation: the encasing of the waste in steel casks with 15 cm thick walls affording protection against corrosion, protecting the surroundings against radiation, and protecting the glass cylinders from mechanical damage resulting from the pressure at the bottom of the disposal hole, and the modest generation of heat in the waste at the time of disposal resulting in a maximum temperature increase in the salt close to the waste of approx. 40 deg. C. These characteristics proved to considerably improve the safety margin with respect to unforeseen circumstances. The character of the salt dome and of the salt in the proposed disposal area offers in itself good protection against contact with the ground water outside the dome. The relatively large depth of 1200 and 2500 m of the salt surface also means that neither dome nor disposal facility will be appreciably influenced by glaciations or earthquakes. The chalk above the proposed disposal area is very tight and to retain radioactive matter effectively even in the precence of high concentrations of NaCL. The safety investigations included a number of natural processes and probable events such as the segregation of crystal water from overlooked salt minerals, faulty sealings of disposal holes, permeable fault zones in the chalk overlying the dome, the risk in connection with human penetration into the dome. These conditions will neither lead to the destruction of the waste casks or to the release of waste from the dome. Leaching of a cavern is the only situation which proved to result in a release of radioactive material to the biosphere, but the resulting doses was found to be small

  10. SIROCCO project: 15 advanced instructor desk and 4 simulated control room for 900MW and 1300MW EDF power plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alphonse, J.; Roth, P.; Sicard, Y.; Rudelli, P.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation describes the fifteen advanced instructors station and four simulated control delivered to EDF in the frame of the SIROCCO project by the Consortium formed by ATOS Origin, CORYS Tess, for the Electricite de France (EDF). These instructor stations are installed on fifteen replica training simulators located on different sites throughout France for the purposes of improving the job-related training of the EDF PWR nuclear power plant operating teams. This covers all 900 MW and 1300MW nuclear power plant of EDF. The simulated control rooms are installed on maintenance platform located at EDF and the consortium facilities. The consortium uses it to maintain and upgrade the simulators. EDF uses it to validate the upgrade delivered by the consortium before on site installation and to perform engineering analysis. This presentation sets out successively: - The major advantages of the generic and configurable connected module concept for flexible and quick adaptation to different simulators; - The innovative functionalities of the advanced Instructor Desk (IS) which make the instructor's tasks of preparation, monitoring and postanalysis of a training session easier and more homogeneous; - The use of the Simulated Control Room (SCR) for training purposes but also for those of maintenance and design studies for upgrades of existing control rooms

  11. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) general contingency plan for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.E.

    1993-11-01

    The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be continually reviewed and revised if any of the following occur: the facility permit is revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures herein can be improved, the operations of the facility change in a way that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent's Office and the Emergency Management Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal units. The 90-day accumulation areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement

  12. Disposal of sewage sludge. Rotary kiln plants and energetic utilization of sewage sludge; Klaerschlammentsorgung. Drehrohranlagen in der Trocknung und energetischen Nutzung von Klaerschlamm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hormes, Franz [Visser und Smit Hanab GmbH, Kaarst (Germany). Rotary Kilns

    2013-03-01

    The author of the contribution under consideration reports on rotary kiln plants in the disposal of sewage sludge. The examples give an insight into the systems engineering for the thermal treatment of sewage sludge, for the minimization or full thermal utilization. The examples show that there exists any specific solution. The process selection depends on the legal requirements and the framework conditions in dependence from the site and infrastructure. Generally, the following statements are valid: (a) The co-combustion is cheaper than every mono-combustion; (b) The costs for the transport of wet sludge often are more favourable than the costs of drying; (c) Plants for low capacities are specifically expensive. The following criteria become more important: (a) energy costs, recycling of energy; (b) recycling of phosphorus from sewage sludge; (c) Reduction of the input of heavy metals in order to comply with the fertilizer ordinance.

  13. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) contingency plan for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be continually reviewed and revised if any of the following occur: the facility permit is revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures can be improved, the operations of the facility change in a way that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent's Office and the Emergency Management Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal units. The 90-day accumulation areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement

  14. Engineering geology study of demo plant radioactive waste final disposal site of medium depth NSD type at Puspiptek, Serpong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heri Syaeful; Sucipta; Imam Achmad Sadisun

    2014-01-01

    Final disposal of radioactive waste intended to keep radioactive substances does not released to the environment until the substance activity decreased to the safe level. Storage concept of radioactive waste (RAW) final disposal that will be developed at the area of Puspiptek, Serpong is near surface disposal (NSD). Based on depth, NSD divided on two type, near surface NSD and medium depth NSD. Concept NSD in this research is medium depth NSD, which is between 30 – 300 meters. During NSD construction in medium-depth required the works of sub-surface excavation or tunneling. Analysis of in-situ stresses and sub-surface deformation performed to recognize the stress magnitude and its distribution that developed in soil/rock as well as the deformation occurred when sub-surface excavation takes place. Based on the analysis, acknowledged the magnitude of tensional and compression stress and its distribution that range from -441 kPa to 4,028 kPa with values of natural deformation or without reinforcement between 4.4 to 13.5 cm. A rather high deformation value which is achieved 13.5 cm leads to necessity of engineering reinforcement during excavation. The designs of engineering reinforcement on every excavation stage refer to the result of modeling analysis of stress and deformation distribution pattern. (author)

  15. Co-combustion of household waste in small-scale energy supply and waste disposal plants; Co-Verbrennung von Siedlungsabfaellen in Kleinanlagen zur dezentralen Energieversorgung und Abfallentsorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeer, Ramona

    2012-07-01

    The studies described in this book demonstrate that the co-combustion of household waste in small-scale combustion plants constitutes an alternative disposal concept which facilitates the operation of decentralised waste disposal and heat supply systems. The basic idea of the concept is the co-combustion of different waste fractions in common household logwood heating systems. The experiments performed have shown that this is technically feasible using currently available technology without further modification and that these plants are capable of combusting various waste fractions at low emission levels. Several co-combustion systems were compared with basic oil, pellet and logwood heating systems in both economic and ecological respects. For this purpose cost-effectiveness calculations and a life cycle assessment were performed and brought together in an eco-efficiency analysis. The results show that the most cost-effective and eco-efficient solution is achieved when the co-combustion system is operated for high energy yield and simultaneous reduction of incombustible fractions.

  16. Control room design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinke, H.

    1980-01-01

    To control a 1300 megawatt nuclear power plant, about 15000 plant parameters must be collected together to control and operate the plant. The control room design therefore is of particular importance. The main design criteria are: Required functions of the power plant process - Level of Automation - Ergonomics - Available Technology. Extensive analysis has resulted in a control room design method. This ensures that an objective solution will be reached. Resulting from this methodical approach are: 1. Scope, position and appearance of the instrumentation. 2. Scope, position and appearance of the operator controls. Process analysis dictates what instrumentation and operator controls are needed. The priority and importance of the control and instrumentation (this we define as the utilisation areas), dictates the rough layout of the control room. (orig./RW)

  17. Approach to first principles model prediction of measured WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] in situ room closure in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, D.E.; Fossum, A.F.; Senseny, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    The discrepancies between predicted and measured WIPP in situ Room D closures are markedly reduced through the use of a Tresca flow potential, an improved small strain constitutive model, an improved set of material parameters, and a modified stratigraphy. 17 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  18. IAEA technical meeting on integrating analog and digital instrumentation and control systems in hybrid main control rooms at nuclear power plants. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    that digital technology offers are needed to increase cost-effective electricity production. As an integral part of the I and C modernization program at a nuclear power plant, the control room and other human-system interfaces (HSIs) will also be modernized. To support safe and effective operation, it is critical to specify, design, implement, operate, and maintain, as well as train for, the control room and HSI changes to take advantage of human cognitive processing abilities. This consideration of human factors is essential to increase performance and to reduce the likelihood of human errors. The plant I and C and HSI modifications can affect personnel in various ways. They can impact the role of personnel, the tasks to be performed, the way tasks are performed, and the knowledge, skills and training required of personnel. As part of modernization, HSIs are becoming more computer-based, incorporating features such as soft controls and computerized procedures, touch-screen interfaces, sit-down workstations, and large-screen overview displays. As computer-based technologies are integrated into control rooms that were largely based on conventional technology, hybrid control rooms are created. The potential benefits of implementing digital technology include more efficient operations and maintenance, leading to improved power plant availability and safety through the avoidance of transients, forced outages, and unnecessary shutdowns. The potential benefits also include increased efficiency and power output as well as reduced operating costs. New digital systems provide the opportunity to give personnel information they did not have with conventional systems. The importance of these issues has led the IAEA to organize (in conjunction with AECL) an international forum for presentations and discussions on the potential benefits and challenges related to the integration of Analog and Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems in Hybrid Main Control Rooms. Many of these

  19. Modern control room for AHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verghese, Clement C.; Joseph, Jose; Biswas, B.B.; Patil, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a next generation nuclear power plant being developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. A modern control room has been conceived for operation and monitoring of the plant in tune with the advanced features of the reactor. A state of the art C and I architecture based on extensive use of computers and networking has been conceived for this plant. This architecture enables the implementation of a fully computerised operator friendly control room with soft HMIs. Features of the modern control room and control room and concept of soft HMI based operator interfaces have been described in the paper. (author)

  20. Cost effective disposal of whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zall, R R

    1980-01-01

    Means of reducing the problem of whey disposal are dealt with, covering inter alia the pre-treatment of cheese milk e.g., by ultrafiltration to lower the whey output, utilization of whey constituents, use of liquid whey for feeding, fermenting whey to produce methane and alcohol, and disposal of whey by irrigation of land or by purification in sewage treatment plants.

  1. Melter Disposal Strategic Planning Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURBANK, D.A.

    2000-09-25

    This document describes the proposed strategy for disposal of spent and failed melters from the tank waste treatment plant to be built by the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site in Washington. It describes program management activities, disposal and transportation systems, leachate management, permitting, and safety authorization basis approvals needed to execute the strategy.

  2. Radwaste treatment and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehn, L.; Breza, M.; Pekar, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this lecture is given the basic information, that is concerning on the RAW treatment and long term disposal of the treated RAW in repository at Mochovce. Then here is given the basic technical and technological information, that is concerning bituminization, plant, the vitrification unit, center for the RAW-treatment (BSC) and repository at Mochovce. (authors)

  3. Waste management, final waste disposal, fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rengeling, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    Out of the legal poblems that are currently at issue, individual questions from four areas are dealt with: privatization of ultimate waste disposal; distribution of responsibilities for tasks in the field of waste disposal; harmonization and systematization of regulations; waste disposal - principles for making provisions for waste disposal - proof of having made provisions for waste disposal; financing and fees. A distinction has to be made between that which is legally and in particular constitutionally imperative or, as the case may be, permissible, and issues where there is room for political decision-making. Ultimately, the deliberations on the amendment are completely confined to the sphere of politics. (orig./HSCH) [de

  4. Methodology of site selection for solid municipal waste disposal plants; Metodologia per la localizzazione sul territorio di aree ambientalmente compatibili con impianti di smaltimento rifiuti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassoni, E; Cautilli, F; Polizzano, C; Andriola, L [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1997-09-01

    The selection of suitable areas for solid municipal waste disposal plants has a notable importance in relation to the problems linked to the solid municipal waste management. The knowledge of the territory constitutes the fundamental base for the selection of compatible areas, from an environmental point of view. The method developed by ENEA (1995) and applied to the Latina territory (Central Italy) preliminary considers an accurate bibliographic and cartographic search, relative to the geological, presently, hydrogeological characteristics and the use constraints of the territory. The selection of suitable areas has been carried out on the ground of the following criteria: - selection of potentially suitable large areas, carried out overlaying thematic maps (geological, geomorphological, etc.) elaborated for all the examined territory; - selection of ``exclusion`` areas on the ground of use constraints, such as residential areas, water protection zones and so on. At the end of the proceeding phases other main points with territorial and socioeconomic significance have been examined and represented on thematic maps. Because the selected areas have resulted too numerous, it has been necessary to utilize methods to get environmental comparative evaluations of the areas in relation to the solid municipal waste disposal plants. A method, developed by ENEA (1994) and based on the calculus of the ``impacts matrix`` has been used. The application of the described method has allowed to find out the areas with the best degree of compatibility, which could be defined ``first priority`` areas for the final choice of the plants site. The aforesaid classification allows the Local Administrators to select the site in a scientifically correct way, on the ground of the evaluation of environmental characteristics above indicated and of a cost-benefit balance; this latter is presently not included among the objectives of the methodology.

  5. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  6. Postconstruction report of the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oakley, L.B.; Siberell, J.K.; Voskuil, T.L.

    1993-06-01

    Remedial actions conducted under the auspices of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) were completed at the Y-12 United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Disposal Site in August 1992. The purpose of this Postconstruction Report is to summarize numerous technical reports and provide CERCLA documentation for completion of the remedial actions. Other CERCLA reports, such as the Feasibility Study for the UNC Disposal Site, provide documentation leading up to the remedial action decision. The remedial action chosen, placement of a modified RCRA cap, was completed successfully, and performance standards were either met or exceeded. This remedial action provided solutions to two environmentally contaminated areas and achieved the goal of minimizing the potential for contamination of the shallow groundwater downgradient of the site, thereby providing protection of human health and the environment. Surveillance and maintenance of the cap will be accomplished to ensure cap integrity, and groundwater monitoring downgradient of the site will continue to confirm the acceptability of the remedial action chosen

  7. Simulation and experimental studies of operators' decision styles and crew composition while using an ecological and traditional user interface for the control room of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkati, N.; Buller, B.J.; Azadeh, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research is threefold: (1) use of the Skill-, Rule-, and Knowledge-based levels of cognitive control -- the SRK framework -- to develop an integrated information processing conceptual framework (for integration of workstation, job, and team design); (2) to evaluate the user interface component of this framework -- the Ecological display; and (3) to analyze the effect of operators' individual information processing behavior and decision styles on handling plant disturbances plus their performance on, and preference for, Traditional and Ecological user interfaces. A series of studies were conducted. In Part I, a computer simulation model and a mathematical model were developed. In Part II, an experiment was designed and conducted at the EBR-II plant of the Argonne National Laboratory-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho. It is concluded that: the integrated SRK-based information processing model for control room operations is superior to the conventional rule-based model; operators' individual decision styles and the combination of their styles play a significant role in effective handling of nuclear power plant disturbances; use of the Ecological interface results in significantly more accurate event diagnosis and recall of various plant parameters, faster response to plant transients, and higher ratings of subject preference; and operators' decision styles affect on both their performance and preference for the Ecological interface

  8. Simulation and experimental studies of operators` decision styles and crew composition while using an ecological and traditional user interface for the control room of a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkati, N.; Buller, B.J.; Azadeh, M.A. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The goal of this research is threefold: (1) use of the Skill-, Rule-, and Knowledge-based levels of cognitive control -- the SRK framework -- to develop an integrated information processing conceptual framework (for integration of workstation, job, and team design); (2) to evaluate the user interface component of this framework -- the Ecological display; and (3) to analyze the effect of operators` individual information processing behavior and decision styles on handling plant disturbances plus their performance on, and preference for, Traditional and Ecological user interfaces. A series of studies were conducted. In Part I, a computer simulation model and a mathematical model were developed. In Part II, an experiment was designed and conducted at the EBR-II plant of the Argonne National Laboratory-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho. It is concluded that: the integrated SRK-based information processing model for control room operations is superior to the conventional rule-based model; operators` individual decision styles and the combination of their styles play a significant role in effective handling of nuclear power plant disturbances; use of the Ecological interface results in significantly more accurate event diagnosis and recall of various plant parameters, faster response to plant transients, and higher ratings of subject preference; and operators` decision styles affect on both their performance and preference for the Ecological interface.

  9. Annual report of 1995 groundwater monitoring data for the Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) and the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) are inactive waste management sites located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The KHQ and CRSDB are regulated as treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The facilities were granted interim status in calendar year (CY) 1986 under Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Hazardous Waste Management Rule 1200-1-11-.05. Historical environmental monitoring data and baseline characterization under interim status indicated that releases of contaminants to groundwater had not occurred; thus, the detection monitoring was implemented at the sites until either clean closure was completed or post-closure permits were issued. The CRSDB was closed in Cy 1989 under a TDEC-approved RCRA closure plan. A revised RCRA PCPA for the CRSDB was submitted by DOE personnel to TDEC staff in September 1994. A final post-closure permit was issued by the TDEC on September 18, 1995. Closure activities at KHQ under RCRA were completed in October 1993. The Record of Decision will also incorporate requirements of the RCRA post-closure permit once it is issued by the TDEC

  10. Landfill disposal risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mininni, G.; Passino, R.; Spinosa, L.

    1993-01-01

    Landfill disposal is the most used waste disposal system in Italy, due to its low costs and also to the great opposition of populations towards new incineration plants and the adjustment of the existing ones. Nevertheless, landfills may present many environmental problems as far as leachate and biogas are concerned directly influencing water, air and soil. This paper shows the most important aspects to be considered for a correct evaluation of environmental impacts caused by a landfill of urban wastes. Moreover, detection systems for on site control of pollution phenomena are presented and some measures for an optimal operation of a landfill are suggested

  11. Radioactive waste disposal: Waste isolation pilot plants (WIPP). (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a geologic repository located in New Mexico for transuranic wastes generated by the U.S. Government. Articles follow the development of the program from initial site selection and characterization through construction and testing, and examine research programs on environmental impacts, structural design, and radionuclide landfill gases. Existing plants and facilities, pilot plants, migration, rock mechanics, economics, regulations, and transport of wastes to the site are also included. The Salt Repository Project and the Crystalline Repository Project are referenced in separate bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 228 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Research on characteristics of communication content of operation crew in digital main control room of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Ye Haifeng; Qing Tao; Li Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Communication content, communication mode and timeliness of communication are the main three factors that influence the effectiveness of the communication between team members. Based on the work domain analysis to execution of state-oriented procedures (SOP), the assumptions for operation crews' characteristics of the communication content in executing SOP were proposed, which supposed that the power plant status and parameters, power plant system functions and equipment, and SOP as well were the main communication contents. On a full-scope simulator of nuclear power plant, three operation crews performed experiments simulating accident scenarios. The results show that the assumptions of characteristics of the communication content are valid. (authors)

  13. Draft audit report, human factors engineering control room design review: Saint Lucie Nuclear Power Plant, Unit No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, L.R.; Lappa, D.A.; Moore, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    A human factors engineering preliminary design review of the Saint Lucie Unit 2 control room was performed at the site on August 3 through August 7, 1981. This design review was carried out by a team from the Human Factors Engineering Branch, Division of Human Factors Safety. This report was prepared on the basis of the HFEB's review of the applicant's Preliminary Design Assessment and the human factors engineering design review/audit performed at the site. The review team included human factors consultants from BioTechnology, Inc., Falls Church, Virginia, and from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (University of California), Livermore, California

  14. Combustion plans. Nordrhein-Westfalen opts for environment-friendly disposal of sewage sludge; Aktion Ofen. NRW plant umweltvertraegliche Klaerschlammverwertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehrenbach, H.; Giegrich, J.; Knappe, F. [ifeu-Institut fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    According to the plans of the Nordrhein-Westfalen minister of the environment, sewage sludge will be banned as a fertiliser. Instead, it is to be disposed in accordance with the specifications of the Act on Recycling and Waste Management and the requirements of the recycling industry. This is the result of a study carried out on behalf of the Ministry which is summarised here. Combustion capacities will be required. [German] Auf die Verbrennungskapazitaeten in NRW rollt eine Klaerschlammlawine zu. Nach den Plaenen des Duesseldorfer Umweltministeriums soll die sogenannte landwirtschaftliche Verwertung kuenftig eingeschraenkt werden. Die Verwertung soll den gesetzlichen Vorgaben des Kreislaufwirtschaftsgesetzes und den Anforderungen der Kreislaufwirtschaft entsprechen. Dies ergibt sich aus einer Studie des Ministeriums, die hier zusammengefasst ist. (orig.)

  15. Annual report of 1991 groundwater monitoring data for the Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin at the Y-12 Plant: Ground water surface elevations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevenell, L.; Switek, J.

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a summary and interpretation of hydraulic head measurements obtained from wells surrounding the Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin sites at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Periodic water level observations are presented using hydrographs and water table contour maps based on data obtained from quarterly sampling during calendar year 1991. Generalized, preliminary interpretation of results are presented. The two sites covered by this report have interim status under the provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). A subset of the wells at each rate are used for groundwater monitoring purposes under the requirements of RCRA. A discussion of the up-gradient and down-gradient directions for each of the sites is included

  16. Heavy metal contamination in sand and sediments near to disposal site of reject brine from desalination plant, Arabian Gulf: Assessment of environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahri, Fatimh

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of heavy metals in environment may cause series potential risk in the living system. This study was carried out to investigate heavy metal contamination in sand samples and sediments along the beach near to disposal site of reject brine from Alkhobar desalination plant, which is one of the oldest and largest reverse osmosis desalination plants in eastern Saudi Arabia, Arabian Gulf. Fourteen heavy metals (U, Ca, Fe, Al, Ti, Sr, Rb, Ni, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, As, and Zr) were measured using gamma-ray spectrometry, atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS) and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (EDX). The obtained data revealed that the concentrations of these metals were higher than the values in sediment and soil for other studies in Arabian Gulf. Furthermore, the mean values of Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, As, Sr, and Zr concentrations in sand and sediments were higher than the geochemical background values in shale. The contamination factor (CF), modified degree of contamination (mC d ) and pollution load index (PLI) were assessed. According to contamination factors (CF > 1), the results showed elevated levels of Cu, Cr, Mn, Zr, and As in all samples. The highest value of contamination factor was found for As. Based on PLI (PLI > 1), the values of all sampling sites indicate a localized pollution in the study area. Current study could be useful as baseline data for heavy metals in sand and sediments nearby a desalination plant.

  17. Waste disposal options report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes the potential options for the processing and disposal of mixed waste generated by reprocessing spent nuclear fuel at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. It compares the proposed waste-immobilization processes, quantifies and characterizes the resulting waste forms, identifies potential disposal sites and their primary acceptance criteria, and addresses disposal issues for hazardous waste

  18. Waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive waste, as a unavoidable remnant from the use of radioactive substances and nuclear technology. It is potentially hazardous to health and must therefore be managed to protect humans and the environment. The main bulk of radioactive waste must be permanently disposed in engineered repositories. Appropriate safety standards for repository design and construction are required along with the development and implementation of appropriate technologies for the design, construction, operation and closure of the waste disposal systems. As backend of the fuel cycle, resolving the issue of waste disposal is often considered as a prerequisite to the (further) development of nuclear energy programmes. Waste disposal is therefore an essential part of the waste management strategy that contributes largely to build confidence and helps decision-making when appropriately managed. The International Atomic Energy Agency provides assistance to Member States to enable safe and secure disposal of RW related to the development of national RWM strategies, including planning and long-term project management, the organisation of international peer-reviews for research and demonstration programmes, the improvement of the long-term safety of existing Near Surface Disposal facilities including capacity extension, the selection of potential candidate sites for different waste types and disposal options, the characterisation of potential host formations for waste facilities and the conduct of preliminary safety assessment, the establishment and transfer of suitable technologies for the management of RW, the development of technological solutions for some specific waste, the building of confidence through training courses, scientific visits and fellowships, the provision of training, expertise, software or hardware, and laboratory equipment, and the assessment of waste management costs and the provision of advice on cost minimisation aspects

  19. Information integration in control rooms and technical offices in nuclear power plants. Report prepared within the framework of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The majority of the nuclear power plants in the world were designed 25 to 45 years ago. The information, instrumentation, safety, and control systems in these plant designs were based on analog, relay, and primitive digital technology. Computers that were available when most of the nuclear power plants were built were unsophisticated compared with those currently available. These less powerful machines with limited computational capabilities and memory were used to collect and store information. The main means for obtaining information from the plant were analog meters and strip chart recorders. In many cases these pieces of data had to be integrated and correlated with other data manually, in order to be usable. Procedures and plant information resided on paper only and were frequently hard to find and access in a timely manner. This report provides guidance to help with the integration of information in order to enhance the usability and usefulness of the information. It can also be used to help avoid the pitfalls that can occur when implementing new systems with respect to the information they need and produce. This reports philosophy is based on three important issues that allow the convenient structuring of the problem and to keep all of its important features. The first issue is the process of information systems integration and use. This is achieved by long term planning and the creation of the plant infrastructure plan. The second is to take care of the end users' needs in relation to their abilities. This is realized through analyses of user needs. Third is the design of the human-system interface (HSI), for example to distinguish between types of information for use in the plant control room and in technical offices. The development of this report was initiated by the IAEA International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (IWG-NPPCI). It is a logical follow-up to IAEA-TECDOC-1016, Modernization of Instrumentation and Control

  20. Thermal drying of sewage plant sludge and its disposal; El secado termico de fangos de EDAR y su disposicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, X.

    2002-07-01

    Thermal drying is one more link in the sludge treatment chain. The thickeners transfer the wastes water contaminant to the primary sludge, which contains around 5% of dry matter (DM). Mechanical dehydration brings the proportion of DM up to between 20% and 40%. Thermal drying raises the proportion of DM to between 85% and 95%. These are the solutions that have been adopted in most of the European Union. The next step consists in eliminating the organic fraction, which makes up from 40% to 60% of the DM, from the sludge. This can be done by pyrolysis-gasification or incineration. Although incineration provides the energy needed to dry the sludge and also complies with the Directive that limits the disposal of fermentable matter on dumps, it inevitably leaves behind the inorganic waste presents in the sludge. Vitrification is a simple, complementary technology for making the inorganic fraction inert while allowing it to be valorized. It thus closes the cycle and achieves zero dumping. (Author) 28 refs.

  1. Surface Disposal of Waste Water Treatment Plant Biosludge--an Important Source of Perfluorinated Compound Contamination in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    What are “Biosolids”?- “Biosolids” are what remains after WWTP processing Sewage sludge probably a more accurate term - Could contain anything that comes down the pipe to the WWTP, varies greatly depending on community type, industry effluents, plant desig...

  2. Recovery Room

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    defined postoperative unit or on the hospital ward. Patients were frequently transferred from the operating room directly to the ward where they were placed close to the nursing station. In 1947 the. Anesthesia Study Commission of the Philadelphia.

  3. Uniformity of environmental conditions and plant growth in a hydroponic culture system for use in a growth room with aerial CO2 control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessey, J. K.; York, E. K.; Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    A portable system of hydroponic culture was developed that maintained temperature, pH, and nutrient concentrations of circulating nutrient solutions. The hydroponic system is used within a controlled-environment room (CER) for control of aerial environment. The CER was equipped with an auto-calibrating system for atmospheric CO2 control. The control systems for the hydroponic chambers were able to maintain acidity within +/- 0.2 pH units and the temperature with +/- 0.5 degree C. Mixing time for the 200-liter volume of solution within a hydroponic chamber was less than 12 min. The CO2 control system was able to maintain aerial concentrations within +/- 10 ppm CO2 during the light period. The only gradient found to occur within the hydroponic chambers or CER was a slight gradient in aerial temperature along the length of hydroponic chambers. Growth of soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] was characterized during a 3-week period of vegetative development by leaf number and area, plant dry weight, total N content of plants, and N depletion from the nutrient solution. The growth characteristics among populations for three hydroponic chambers within the CER were not significantly different, and the percent standard errors of means of the measurements within populations from each chamber were nearly all less than 10%. Thus, the uniformity of plant growth reflected the uniformity of environmental conditions.

  4. Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neerdael, B.; Marivoet, J.; Put, M.; B-Verstricht, J.; Van Iseghem, P.; Buyens, M.

    1998-01-01

    This contribution describes the main activities of the Waste and Disposal Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK-CEN. Achievements in 1997 in three topical areas are reported on: performance assessments, waste forms/packages and near-and far field studies

  5. Human errors and work performance in a nuclear power plant control room: associations with work-related factors and behavioral coping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kecklund, L.J.; Svenson, O.

    1997-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between the operator's appraisal of his own work situation and the quality of his own work performance, as well as self-reported errors in a nuclear power plant control room. In all, 98 control room operators from two nuclear power units filled out a questionnaire and several diaries during two operational conditions, annual outage and normal operation. As expected, the operators reported higher work demands in annual outage as compared to normal operation. In response to the increased demands, the operators reported that they used coping strategies such as increased effort, decreased aspiration level for work performance quality, and increased use of delegation of tasks to others. This way of coping does not reflect less positive motivation for the work during the outage period. Instead, the operators maintain the same positive motivation for their work, and succeed in being more alert during morning and night shifts. However, the operators feel less satisfied with their work result. The operators also perceive the risk of making minor errors as increasing during outage. (Author)

  6. Feasibility of Using Mycorrhizal Fungi for Enhancement of Plant Establishment on Dredged Material Disposal Sites. A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    Alfalfa Lambert et al. (1980c); 0’Bannon et al. (1980); Owusu- Bennoah and Mosse (1979) (Continued) 48 Scientific Name Common Name Source Persea americana...with VA Mycorrhizal Fungi," Annual Meeting of the Pacific Division of the American Phytopathologi- cal Society, Phytopathology, Vol 73, No. 6, pp 956...Mycorrhizae and Plant Disease Research, The American Phytopathological Society, Vol 72, No. 8, pp 1108-1114. Carling, D. E., et al. 1979. "Colonization

  7. Research helps EdF improve operating practices and control rooms [at nuclear power plants in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leckner, J.-M.

    1989-01-01

    In September 1982, EdF set up a team to analyse incidents occurring in nuclear plants in France and elsewhere. This team consists of two groups of analysts: one for studying technical factors and one for investigating human factors. Medium-term objectives for the team involve work on the principal causes of malfunction and the extent to which significant incidents recur. Experience feedback, training and multifactor events, are the group's prime concerns. Information is gathered from two sources: simulators provide an analysis of operator behaviour in incident and accident situations; and plants themselves provide in-service data. The malfunctions which are examined are significant incidents listed according to ten criteria, the main ones being scrams, safety injection, events relating to technical specifications, malicious acts, discharge of radioactive substances and exposure of staff to ionizing radiation. Every week, all incidents are examined and communicated to the relevant analysts. The analyst must then draw up a summary, to include: a description of the facts; an analysis of the causes; and ideas for preventive actions. Many of the recommendations have now been carried out, with the result that recent years have seen a decline in human errors at French plants. (author)

  8. Evaluation of training programs and entry-level qualifications for nuclear-power-plant control-room personnel based on the systems approach to training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.M.; Selby, D.L.; Hanley, M.J.; Mercer, R.T.

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes results of research sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to initiate the use of the Systems Approach to Training in the evaluation of training programs and entry level qualifications for nuclear power plant (NPP) personnel. Variables (performance shaping factors) of potential importance to personnel selection and training are identified, and research to more rigorously define an operationally useful taxonomy of those variables is recommended. A high-level model of the Systems Approach to Training for use in the nuclear industry, which could serve as a model for NRC evaluation of industry programs, is presented. The model is consistent with current publically stated NRC policy, with the approach being followed by the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations, and with current training technology. Checklists to be used by NRC evaluators to assess training programs for NPP control-room personnel are proposed which are based on this model

  9. Evaluation of training programs and entry-level qualifications for nuclear-power-plant control-room personnel based on the systems approach to training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, P M; Selby, D L; Hanley, M J; Mercer, R T

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes results of research sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to initiate the use of the Systems Approach to Training in the evaluation of training programs and entry level qualifications for nuclear power plant (NPP) personnel. Variables (performance shaping factors) of potential importance to personnel selection and training are identified, and research to more rigorously define an operationally useful taxonomy of those variables is recommended. A high-level model of the Systems Approach to Training for use in the nuclear industry, which could serve as a model for NRC evaluation of industry programs, is presented. The model is consistent with current publically stated NRC policy, with the approach being followed by the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations, and with current training technology. Checklists to be used by NRC evaluators to assess training programs for NPP control-room personnel are proposed which are based on this model.

  10. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: a study of postclosure safety of in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock. Volume 3: geosphere model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanchell, F.W.; Davison, C.C.; Melnyk, T.W.; Scheier, N.W.; Chan, T.

    1996-06-01

    This report discusses the approach we used to develop a model of the 3-D network of transport pathways through the geosphere from the location of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault at a depth of 500 m in a hypothetical permeable plutonic rock mass. The transport pathways correspond to the pathways of advective groundwater movement through this permeable rock from the disposal vault to discharge areas at groundsurface. In this analysis we assumed the permeability of the region of rock immediately surrounding the waste emplacement areas of the disposal vault was considerably higher than the permeability used in the geosphere model for the EIS case study. We also assumed the porosity of the rock could fall within the range 10 -3 to 10 -5 to represent the range of effects by alternative conceptual models of flow through fracture networks in the rock. Advection by the groundwater flow field in the rock surrounding the disposal vault entirely controls the rate and direction of transport from the vault in this geosphere model. The hydrogeological environment we assumed for this geosphere model is entirely hypothetical, unlike the model we developed for the EIS case study which was a conservative, yet realistic, representation of the hydrogeological conditions encountered at the site of our Underground Research Laboratory in the Whiteshell Research Area. We used the same geometry of rock structures for this model as we used in the geosphere model for the EIS case study but we assigned hydrogeologic properties to the various rock domains of the model that result in relatively rapid groundwater flow from the depth of the disposal vault to surface discharge areas. This report desribes the modelling and sensitivity analyses we performed with the MOTIF finite element model to develop the GEONET transport network for this hypothetical geosphere situation. The geosphere model accounts for the effects of natural geothermal heat and vault-induced heat on transport pathways

  11. Human errors and work performance in a nuclear power plant control room: associations with work-related factors and behavioral coping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kecklund, Lena Jacobsson; Svenson, Ola

    1997-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between the operator's appraisal of his own work situation and the quality of his own work performance as well as self-reported errors in a nuclear power plant control room. In all, 98 control room operators from two nuclear power units filled out a questionnaire and several diaries during two operational conditions, annual outage and normal operation. As expected, the operators reported higher work demands in annual outage as compared to normal operation. In response to the increased demands, the operators reported that they used coping strategies such as increased effort, decreased aspiration level for work performance quality and increased use of delegation of tasks to others. This way of coping does not reflect less positive motivation for the work during the outage period. Instead, the operators maintain the same positive motivation for their work, and succeed in being more alert during morning and night shifts. However, the operators feel less satisfied with their work result. The operators also perceive the risk of making minor errors as increasing during outage. The decreased level of satisfaction with work result during outage is a fact despite the lowering of aspiration level for work performance quality during outage. In order to decrease relative frequencies for minor errors, special attention should be given to reduce work demands, such as time pressure and memory demands. In order to decrease misinterpretation errors special attention should be given to organizational factors such as planning and shift turnovers in addition to training. In summary, the outage period seems to be a significantly more vulnerable window in the management of a nuclear power plant than the normal power production state. Thus, an increased focus on the outage period and human factors issues, addressing the synergetic effects or work demands, organizational factors and coping resources is an important area for improvement of

  12. Development of the Korean Reference Vertical Disposal System Concept for Spent Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.Y.; Cho, D.K.; Kim, S.G.; Choi, H.J.; Choi, J.W.; Hahn, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    The development of a deep geologic disposal system for the spent fuel from nuclear power plants has been carried out since this program was launched at 1997 in Korea. In ' this paper, a pre-conceptual design of the Korean Reference HLW Vertical disposal System (KRS-V1) is presented. Though no site for the underground repository has yet been specified in Korea, a generic site with granitic rock is considered for reference HLW repository design. Depth of the repository is assumed to be 500 meters. The repository consists of the disposal area, technical rooms with four shafts to connect them to the ground level in the controlled area and technical rooms with an access tunnel and three shafts to connect them to the ground level in the uncontrolled area. Disposal area consists of disposal tunnels, panel tunnels and a central tunnel. The repository will be excavated, operated and backfilled in several phases including an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) phase. The result of this preliminary conceptual design will be used for an evaluation of the feasibility, analyses of the long term safety, information for public communication and a cost estimation etc. (authors)

  13. Engineering geological conditions of the Loviisa power plant area relating to the final disposal of reactor waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anttila, Pekka

    1988-12-01

    The bedrock in the study area consists of Precambrian rapakivi granite with its varieties. The rock type is mostly fresh and strong. Alteration and weathering of the rock material occurs only in association with the fracturing. Fracture properties - orientation, aperture, hydraulic conductivity, filling and weathering - have been treated with respect to final disposal and siting of the repository. The results achieved have been compared with corresponding results obtained in Finland and other countries. Two vertical and one horizontal or gently dipping fracture sets typical of granitic rocks are present, the last mentioned of which are dominant. The hydraulic conductivity of the fractures varies greatly, generally between k=10 -9 and 10 -5 m/s, owing to, e.g. the state of stress in the rock, cementation and filling of the fractures. According to the sorption tests, weathering of the fracture surfaces as well as the filling material of the fractures has been found to increase remarkably the sorption capacity of the rock mass. A three-dimensional engineering geological model has been prepared of the bedrock. According to the model, three gently dipping fracture zones divide the rock mass into different zones of intact and broken rock. The zones are considered as hydraulic units, for which hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity were determined. In the fracture zones the values for these are in the order of k = 10 -6 m/s and 0 = 4 . 10 -3 average. In the intact rock zones, the corresponding values are generally one decade less. The study area has two separate groundwater zones in the bedrock. The surface parat of the groundwater is fresh, with relic seawater of the Baltic Sea below; its salinity reaches some 1% at the maximum. The main fracture zones seem to determine the groundwater level and flow. The water flow is mainly concentrated to the fresh groundwater zone, the saline groundwater being nearly stagnant. The construction properties of the bedrock have

  14. New thinking for the boiler room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Wayne

    2008-09-01

    Wayne Rose, marketing manager at integrated plant room manufacturer Armstrong Integrated Systems, explains how increasing use of off-site manufacture, the latest 3D modelling technology, and advances in control technology, are revolutionising boiler room design and construction.

  15. The waste isolation pilot plant transuranic waste repository: A case study in radioactive waste disposal safety and risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Leif G. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) deep geological defense-generated transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW) repository in the United States was certified on the 13 of May 1998 and opened on the 26 of March 1999. Two sets of safety/performance assessment calculations supporting the certification of the WIPP TRUW repository show that the maximum annual individual committed effective dose will be 32 times lower than the regulatory limit and that the cumulative amount of radionuclide releases will be at least 10 times, more likely at least 20 times, lower than the regulatory limits. Yet, perceptions remain among the public that the WIPP TRUW repository imposes an unacceptable risk.

  16. The waste isolation pilot plant transuranic waste repository: A case study in radioactive waste disposal safety and risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Leif G.

    1999-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) deep geological defense-generated transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW) repository in the United States was certified on the 13 of May 1998 and opened on the 26 of March 1999. Two sets of safety/performance assessment calculations supporting the certification of the WIPP TRUW repository show that the maximum annual individual committed effective dose will be 32 times lower than the regulatory limit and that the cumulative amount of radionuclide releases will be at least 10 times, more likely at least 20 times, lower than the regulatory limits. Yet, perceptions remain among the public that the WIPP TRUW repository imposes an unacceptable risk

  17. 50 CFR 12.33 - Disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... other equipment), except wildlife or plants, in accordance with current Federal Property Management..., TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES Disposal of Forfeited or Abandoned Property § 12.33 Disposal. (a) The Director shall...

  18. Municipal sludge disposal economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J L [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA; Bomberger, Jr, D C; Lewis, F M

    1977-10-01

    Costs for disposal of sludges from a municipal wastewater treatment plant normally represents greater than or equal to 25% of the total plant operating cost. The following 5 sludge handling options are considered: chemical conditioning followed by vacuum filtration, and incineration; high-pressure wet-air oxidation and vacuum filtration or filter press prior to incineration; thermal conditioning, vacuum filtraton, and incineration; high-pressure wet-air oxidation and vacuum filtration, with ash to landfill; aerobic or anaerobic digestion, followed by chemical conditioning, vacuum filtration, and disposal on land; and chemical conditioning, followed by a filter press, flash dryer, and sale as fertilizer. The 1st 2 options result in the ultimate disposal of small amounts of ash in a landfill; the digestion options require a significant landfill; the fertilizer option requires a successful marketing and sales effort. To compare the economies of scale for the options, analyses were performed for 3 plant capacities - 10, 100, and 500 mgd; as plant size increases, the economies of scale for incineration system are quite favorable. The anaerobic digestion system has a poorer capital cost-scaling factor. The incinerator options which start with chemical conditioning consume much less electrical power at all treatment plant sizes; incinerator after thermal conditioning uses more electricity but less fuel. Digestion requires no direct external fossil fuel input. The relative use of fuel is constant at all plant sizes for other options. The incinerator options can produce a significant amount of steam which may be used. The anaerobic digestion process can be a significant net producer of fuel gas.

  19. Standard criteria for disposal of liquid radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants into surface waters (river systems)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, V.V.; Tsybizov, I.S.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive products discharge into natural water streams results in the necessity to regulate nuclear power plant discharges to ensure radiation safety (RS) for population using a river and surrounding river territory. To ensure RS it is necessary to set scientific-founded standards of permissible discharge level of liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) from nuclear power plant assuring observance of hygienic requirements for surface water puring. Volume of permissible LRW discharge into river systems must be set both with provision for concrete physical-geographycal conditions, specficity of utilizing the river and river valley and social-economical peculiarities of crtical population groups. The value of permissible LRW discharge into river systems is determined by three criterion groups: radiological, ecological and hydrological ones. By means of radiological group the internal and external irradiation doses for the whole body and its separate organs are set and RS of population is determined. Ecological criteria include a number of parameters (coefficients of accumulation, distribution and transition) determining quantitative ratios between radioactive element contents in water and separate links of biological chains: soil/water, fish/water, vegetables/water and others. Hydrological criteria determine the degree of waste dilution in rivers, control radioactive contamination of flood-lands areas and in common with ecological criteria determine radionuclide contents in soil and food products. A method of determining average annual values of LRW dilution in river waters is presented [ru

  20. A control room lighting study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, V.V.; Iwasa-Madge, K.M.; Howard, B.; Willson, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Operators at a Heavy Water Plant in Ontario, Canada complained about lighting-related difficulties in the control room. The Human Factors Engineering Unit was requested to perform a lighting survey and make recommendations to improve the control centre lighting conditions. This paper describes the control room, the operator tasks, the procedures used for the lighting survey, the findings, and the changes recommended

  1. A preliminary user-friendly, digital console for the control room parameters supervision in old-generation Nuclear Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memmi, F.; Falconi, L.; Cappelli, M.; Palomba, M.; Santoro, E.; Bove, R.; Sepielli, M. [UTFISST, ENEA Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, Rome (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Improvements in the awareness of a system status is an essential requirement to achieve safety in every kind of plant. In particular, in the case of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), a progress is crucial to enhance the Human Machine Interface (HMI) in order to optimize monitoring and analyzing processes of NPP operational states. Firstly, as old-fashioned plants are concerned, an upgrading of the whole console instrumentation is desirable in order to replace an analog visualization with a full-digital system. In this work, we present a novel instrument able to interface the control console of a nuclear reactor, developed by using CompactRio, a National Instruments embedded architecture and its dedicated programming language. This real-time industrial controller composed by a real-time processor and FPGA modules has been programmed to visualize the parameters coming from the reactor, and to storage and reproduce significant conditions anytime. This choice has been made on the basis of the FPGA properties: high reliability, determinism, true parallelism and re-configurability, achieved by a simple programming method, based on LabVIEW real-time environment. The system architecture exploits the FPGA capabilities of implementing custom timing and triggering, hardware-based analysis and co-processing, and highest performance control algorithms. Data stored during the supervisory phase can be reproduced by loading data from a measurement file, re-enacting worthwhile operations or conditions. The system has been thought to be used in three different modes, namely Log File Mode, Supervisory Mode and Simulation Mode. The proposed system can be considered as a first step to develop a more complete Decision Support System (DSS): indeed this work is part of a wider project that includes the elaboration of intelligent agents and meta-theory approaches. A synoptic has been created to monitor every kind of action on the plant through an intuitive sight. Furthermore, another important

  2. A preliminary user-friendly, digital console for the control room parameters supervision in old-generation Nuclear Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memmi, F.; Falconi, L.; Cappelli, M.; Palomba, M.; Santoro, E.; Bove, R.; Sepielli, M.

    2012-01-01

    Improvements in the awareness of a system status is an essential requirement to achieve safety in every kind of plant. In particular, in the case of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), a progress is crucial to enhance the Human Machine Interface (HMI) in order to optimize monitoring and analyzing processes of NPP operational states. Firstly, as old-fashioned plants are concerned, an upgrading of the whole console instrumentation is desirable in order to replace an analog visualization with a full-digital system. In this work, we present a novel instrument able to interface the control console of a nuclear reactor, developed by using CompactRio, a National Instruments embedded architecture and its dedicated programming language. This real-time industrial controller composed by a real-time processor and FPGA modules has been programmed to visualize the parameters coming from the reactor, and to storage and reproduce significant conditions anytime. This choice has been made on the basis of the FPGA properties: high reliability, determinism, true parallelism and re-configurability, achieved by a simple programming method, based on LabVIEW real-time environment. The system architecture exploits the FPGA capabilities of implementing custom timing and triggering, hardware-based analysis and co-processing, and highest performance control algorithms. Data stored during the supervisory phase can be reproduced by loading data from a measurement file, re-enacting worthwhile operations or conditions. The system has been thought to be used in three different modes, namely Log File Mode, Supervisory Mode and Simulation Mode. The proposed system can be considered as a first step to develop a more complete Decision Support System (DSS): indeed this work is part of a wider project that includes the elaboration of intelligent agents and meta-theory approaches. A synoptic has been created to monitor every kind of action on the plant through an intuitive sight. Furthermore, another important

  3. Floristic composition and plant succession on near-surface radioactive-waste-disposal facilities in the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierney, G.D.; Foxx, T.S.

    1982-03-01

    Since 1946, low-level radioactive waste has been buried in shallow landfills within the confines of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Five of these sites were studied for plant composition and successional patterns by reconnaissance and vegetation mapping. The data show a slow rate of recovery for all sites, regardless of age, in both the pinon-juniper and ponderosa pine communities. The sites are not comparable in succession or composition because of location and previous land use. The two oldest sites have the highest species diversity and the only mature trees. All sites allowed to revegetate naturally tend to be colonized by the same species that originally surrounded the sites. Sites on historic fields are colonized by the old field flora, whereas those in areas disturbed only by grazing are revegetated by the local native flora

  4. Floristic composition and plant succession on near-surface radioactive-waste-disposal facilities in the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierney, G.D.; Foxx, T.S.

    1982-03-01

    Since 1946, low-level radioactive waste has been buried in shallow landfills within the confines of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Five of these sites were studied for plant composition and successional patterns by reconnaissance and vegetation mapping. The data show a slow rate of recovery for all sites, regardless of age, in both the pinon-juniper and ponderosa pine communities. The sites are not comparable in succession or composition because of location and previous land use. The two oldest sites have the highest species diversity and the only mature trees. All sites allowed to revegetate naturally tend to be colonized by the same species that originally surrounded the sites. Sites on historic fields are colonized by the old field flora, whereas those in areas disturbed only by grazing are revegetated by the local native flora.

  5. Americium product solidification and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Campbell, D.O.; Bell, J.T.; Collins, E.D.

    1987-01-01

    The americium product from the TRUEX processing plant needs to be converted into a form suitable for ultimate disposal. An evaluation of the disposal based on safety, number of process steps, demonstrated operability of the processes, production of low-level alpha waste streams, and simplicity of maintenance with low radiation exposures to personnel during maintenance, has been made. The best process is to load the americium on a cation exchange resin followed by calcination or oxidation of the resin after loading

  6. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container. type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3). nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.). building concerned. details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting o...

  7. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container; type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3); nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.); building concerned; details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting...

  8. Disposal options for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of the radionuclide composition and the relative toxicity of radioactive wastes, a range of different options are available for their disposal. Practically all disposal options rely on confinement of radioactive materials and isolation from the biosphere. Dilution and dispersion into the environment are only used for slightly contaminated gaseous and liquid effluents produced during the routine operation of nuclear facilities, such as power plants. For the bulk of solid radioactive waste, whatever the contamination level and decay of radiotoxicity with time are, isolation from the biosphere is the objective of waste disposal policies. The paper describes disposal approaches and the various techniques used in this respect, such as shallow land burial with minimum engineered barriers, engineered facilities built at/near the surface, rock cavities at great depth and finally deep geologic repositories for long-lived waste. The concept of disposing long-lived waste into seabed sediment layers is also discussed, as well as more remote possibilities, such as disposal in outer space or transmutation. For each of these disposal methods, the measures to be adopted at institutional level to reinforce technical isolation concepts are described. To the extent possible, some comments are made with regard to the applicability of such disposal methods to other hazardous wastes. (au)

  9. Thermal properties of fly ash substituted slag cement waste forms for disposal of Savannah River Plant salt waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Kaushal, S.; Licastro, P.H.; Langton, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Waste processing at the Savannah River Plant will involve reconstitution of the salts (NaNO 3 , NaNO 2 , NaOH, etc.) into a concentrated solution (32 weight percent salts) followed by solidification in a cement-based waste form for burial. The stability and mechanical durability of such a 'saltstone monolith' will depend largely on the temperature reached due to heat of hydration and the thermal properties of the waste form. Fly ash has been used as an inexpensive constituent and to moderate the hydration and setting processes so as to avoid reaching prohibitively high temperatures which could cause thermal stresses. Both high-calcium and low-calcium fly ashes have been studied for this purpose. Other constituents of these mixes include granulated blast furnace slag and finely crushed limestone. Adiabatic temperature increase and thermal conductivity of these mixes have been studied and related x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy studies carried out to understand the hydration process

  10. Water supply and disposal in the City of Kiev following the accident at Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzarik, N.

    1990-01-01

    Kiev is the capital of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, and is the USSR's third largest city, with a population of 2.7 million people. The city water supply is dependent on three sources; two surface ones, i.e. the rivers Dniepr and Desna, and one underground one. The average total water consumption of the city amounts to 1.5 x 10 6 m 3 /day. The Chernobyl Power Plant accident posed a threat to the normal operation of the Kiev water supply system. In the circumstances, it became necessary to adopt the most urgent measures aimed at ensuring a continuous delivery of potable water to the city under conditions of the potential radioactive contamination of water supply sources. Round-the-clock monitoring of the radioactivity of the water source has taken place, including the control of water quality at various treatment stages, the variation of radioactivity of different filter loading materials and the radioactivity of waste waters, sludge and silt. The main concern was the threat of contamination of the Kiev reservoir. However the concentration of radionuclides in the drinking water supply has not exceeded the permissible limits. Various requirements for the water supply in the face of radioactive contamination are mentioned such as several water supplies, one of which is preferably an underground source, flexible conditions of water treatment and continuous radiation monitoring of the water supply (UK)

  11. Ecophysiological and biochemical traits of three herbaceous plants growing on the disposed coal combustion fly ash of different weathering stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajić Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ecophysiological and biochemical traits of Calamagrostis epigejos (Roth. Festuca rubra L. and Oenothera biennis L. growing on two fly ash lagoons of different weathering stage (L1-3 years and L2-11 years of the “Nikola Tesla- A” thermoelectric plant (Obrenovac, Serbia were studied. Species-dependent variations were observed at the L1 lagoon; the greatest vitality (Fv/Fm and Fm/Fo followed by higher photopigment and total phenolic contents were measured in O. biennis in relation to C. epigejos (p<0.001 and F. rubra (p<0.001. At the L2 site, higher vitality was found in O. biennis (p<0.001 and F. rubra (p<0.01 compared to C. epigejos. O. biennis had the highest photosynthetic capacity. The results obtained in this study indicate that all examined species maintained a level of photosynthesis that allowed them to survive and grow under the stressful conditions in ash lagoons, albeit with lower than optimal success. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173018

  12. Disposable electrochemical sensor to evaluate the phytoremediation of the aquatic plant Lemna minor L. toward Pb(2+) and/or Cd(2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagu, Daniela; Arduini, Fabiana; Quintana, Josefina Calvo; Di Cori, Patrizia; Forni, Cinzia; Moscone, Danila

    2014-07-01

    In this work a miniaturized and disposable electrochemical sensor was developed to evaluate the cadmium and lead ion phytoremediation potential by the floating aquatic macrophyte Lemna minor L. The sensor is based on a screen-printed electrode modified "in-situ" with bismuth film, which is more environmentally friendly than the mercury-based sensor usually adopted for lead and cadmium ion detection. The sensor was coupled with a portable potentiostat for the simultaneous measurement of cadmium and lead ions by stripping analysis. The optimized analytical system allows the simultaneous detection of both heavy metals at the ppb level (LOD equal to 0.3 and 2 ppb for lead and cadmium ions, respectively) with the advantage of using a miniaturized and cost-effective system. The sensor was then applied for the evaluation of Pb(2+) or/and Cd(2+) uptake by measuring the amount of the heavy metals both in growth medium and in plant tissues during 1 week experiments. In this way, the use of Lemna minor coupled with a portable electrochemical sensor allows the set up of a model system able both to remove the heavy metals and to measure "in-situ" the magnitude of heavy metal removal.

  13. Application of pathways analyses for site performance prediction for the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Oblow, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility for shallow-land burial of low-level radioactive waste is evaluated using pathways analyses. The analyses rely on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Conceptual and numerical models are developed using data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations and are used to simulate the long-term transport of contamination to man. Conservatism is built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events have to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics exist. Maximum potential doses to man are calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. The sites are found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations. Conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability are drawn. In reaching these conclusions, some consideration is given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed. 18 refs., 9 figs

  14. Reserves for nuclear power plant decommissioning and radwaste disposal in Germany. An analysis and evaluation from the angle of energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, V.

    1998-01-01

    The study, which is the first of its kind in Germany, presents a comprehensive survey of total reserves set up by the German nuclear industry for liabilities and costs for nuclear power plant decommissioning and resulting radwaste disposal, which is a legal and foreseeable responsibility but uncertain in amount. The study looks into the various ways the earmarked money was invested and analyses the funds with respect to their efficiency and reliability to provide financial security for the given tasks and purpose. The question put in this context is: Are the reserves set up so far in line with official cost estimates, i.e. will they cover estimated costs, or do they even exceed the estimated amounts? The conclusions drawn and explained in this document are: The reserves for nuclear decommissioning have been used by the nuclear power plant operators and electricity companies as a significant capital source. Some of the capital accrued is being increasingly used at present to cover expenses arising for restructuring of business and diversification into new business segments of interest in the open national and European electricity markets. Companies such as RWE, Preussen Elektra, and Bayernwerk, which until deregulation of the energy sector were just power supply companies, have been transformed into conglomerate companies and international players in the markets, like RWE Holding, VEBA, and VIAG. It can be safely assumed that the companies would not have been able to reach the important positions they currently hold in the German economy without tapping the reserves for nuclear decommissioning. (orig./CB) [de

  15. Analysis of environmental risks with an encapsulation plant and a final disposal repository; Miljoeriskanalys foer inkapslingsanlaeggning och slutfoervar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan; Herly, Lucien; Pettersson, Lars [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-05-15

    This report covers non-radiological environmental risks related to an encapsulation plant and a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. All stages of the above are covered. This means construction, operation, demolition and sealing. A risk, in this report, is defined as a combination of probability and consequence of an undesired event. An extensive and systematic effort has been made in order to identify all risks. If risks remain undetected it should be low probability events. The risks are also evaluated to see which risks are the more serious ones. A large part of the existing risks are oil or diesel on the ground. In general the main risks occur during the construction phase and they are similar to normal risks at every large construction project. Most of the above are discharges of oil products on the ground within the construction area. With a good organisation and a high environmental profile these discharges can be minimized and when needed cleaned. For some of the other risks the same is valid - with a good preventive work they can be reduced considerably. One event which has a relatively high probability for occurrence and which may not easily be cleaned is a damaged lorry leaking oil. The resulting damage depends on where it occurs and maybe also when. Neither in Forsmark nor in Oskarshamn there are common sources of water supply in direct connection to where lorries pass and the probability for a lorry accident to cause damage to the environment is limited. After the assessment and evaluation of risk reducing measures there is one risk that appears serious even though the probability is low. This risk is the possible influence of the final repository on the subsoil water. It is most important that a large effort is put on reducing this risk. The probability of traffic accidents with injuries or fatalities will increase slightly, especially during the second phase of the construction period, since the amount of traffic is expected to increase then. Of

  16. HLW disposal dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrei, V.; Glodeanu, F.

    2003-01-01

    The radioactive waste is an inevitable residue from the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine, and from the operation of generating electricity nuclear power stations. The management and disposal of such waste is therefore an issue relevant to almost all countries. Undoubtedly the biggest issue concerning radioactive waste management is that of high level waste. The long-lived nature of some types of radioactive wastes and the associated safety implications of disposal plans have raised concern amongst those who may be affected by such facilities. For these reasons the subject of radioactive waste management has taken on a high profile in many countries. Not one Member State in the European Union can say that their high level waste will be disposed of at a specific site. Nobody can say 'that is where it is going to go'. Now, there is a very broad consensus on the concept of geological disposal. The experts have little, if any doubt that we could safely dispose of the high level wastes. Large sectors of the public continue to oppose to most proposals concerning the siting of repositories. Given this, it is increasingly difficult to get political support, or even political decisions, on such sites. The failure to advance to the next step in the waste management process reinforces the public's initial suspicion and resistance. In turn, this makes the political decisions even harder. In turn, this makes the political decisions even harder. The management of spent fuel from nuclear power plant became a crucial issue, as the cooling pond of the Romanian NPP is reaching saturation. During the autumn of 2000, the plant owner proceeded with an international tendering process for the supply of a dry storage system to be implemented at the Cernavoda station to store the spent fuel from Unit 1 and eventually from Unit 2 for a minimum period of 50 years. The facility is now in operation. As concern the disposal of the spent fuel, the 'wait and see

  17. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: a study of postclosure safety of in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock. Volume 4: biosphere model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, R.; Amiro, B.D.; Bird, G.A.; Macdonald, C.R.; Sheppard, M.I.; Sheppard, S.C.; Szekely, J.G.

    1996-06-01

    AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) has developed a disposal concept for Canada's nuclear fuel waste, which calls for a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The concept has been fully, documented in an environmental impact statement (EIS) for review by a panel under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency. The EIS includes the results of the EIS postclosure assessment case study to address the long term safety of the disposal concept. To more fully demonstrate the flexibility of the disposal concept and our assessment methodology, we are now carrying out another postclosure assessment study, which involves different assumptions and engineering options than those used in the EIS. In response to these changes, we have updated the BIOTRAC (BIOsphere Transport and Assessment Code) model developed for the EIS postclosure assessment case study. The main changes made to the BIOTRAC model are the inclusion of 36 Cl, 137 Cs, 239 Np and 243 Am; animals inhalation pathway; International Commission on Radiological Protection 60/61 human internal dose conversion factors; all the postclosure assessment nuclides in the dose calculations for non-human biota; and groundwater dose limits for 14 C, 16 C1 and 129 I for non-human biota to parallel these limits for humans. We have also reviewed and changed several parameter values, including evasion rates of gaseous nuclides from soil and release fractions of various nuclides from domestic water, and indicated changes that affect the geosphere/biosphere interface model. These changes make the BIOTRAC model more flexible. As a result of all of these changes, the BIOTRAC model has been significantly expanded and improved, although the changes do not greatly affect model predictions. The modified model for the present study is called BIOTRAC2 (BIOTRAC - Version 2). The full documentation of the BIOTRAC2 model includes the report by Davis et al. (1993a) and this report. (author). 105 refs., 13 tabs., 8 figs

  18. The disposal of Canada`s nuclear fuel waste: a study of postclosure safety of in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock. Volume 4: biosphere model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zach, R; Amiro, B D; Bird, G A; Macdonald, C R; Sheppard, M I; Sheppard, S C; Szekely, J G

    1996-06-01

    AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) has developed a disposal concept for Canada`s nuclear fuel waste, which calls for a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The concept has been fully, documented in an environmental impact statement (EIS) for review by a panel under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency. The EIS includes the results of the EIS postclosure assessment case study to address the long term safety of the disposal concept. To more fully demonstrate the flexibility of the disposal concept and our assessment methodology, we are now carrying out another postclosure assessment study, which involves different assumptions and engineering options than those used in the EIS. In response to these changes, we have updated the BIOTRAC (BIOsphere Transport and Assessment Code) model developed for the EIS postclosure assessment case study. The main changes made to the BIOTRAC model are the inclusion of {sup 36}Cl, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Np and {sup 243}Am; animals inhalation pathway; International Commission on Radiological Protection 60/61 human internal dose conversion factors; all the postclosure assessment nuclides in the dose calculations for non-human biota; and groundwater dose limits for {sup 14}C, {sup 16}C1 and {sup 129}I for non-human biota to parallel these limits for humans. We have also reviewed and changed several parameter values, including evasion rates of gaseous nuclides from soil and release fractions of various nuclides from domestic water, and indicated changes that affect the geosphere/biosphere interface model. These changes make the BIOTRAC model more flexible. As a result of all of these changes, the BIOTRAC model has been significantly expanded and improved, although the changes do not greatly affect model predictions. The modified model for the present study is called BIOTRAC2 (BIOTRAC - Version 2). The full documentation of the BIOTRAC2 model includes the report by Davis et al. (1993a) and this report. (author). 105

  19. Test Room Stability Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This plan documents the combination of designs, installations, programs, and activities that ensures that the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in which transuranic (TRU) waste may be emplaced during the Test Phase, will remain sufficiently stable and safe during that time. The current ground support systems installed at the WIPP are the result of over ten years of data collection from hundreds of geomechanical instruments and thousands of hours of direct observation of the changing conditions of the openings. In addition, some of the world's most respected experts on salt rock mechanics have provided input in the design process and concurrence on the suitability of the final design. The general mine rockbolt pattern and the ground support system for the test rooms are designed to specifically address the fracture and deformation geometries observed today at the WIPP. After an introductory chapter, this plan describes the general underground design, then proceeds to an account of general ground support performance, and finally focuses on the details of the special test room ground support systems. One such system already installed in Room 1, Panel 1, is described in comprehensive detail. Other test rooms in Panel 1, whether full-size or smaller, will be equipped with systems that ensure stability to the same or equivalent extent. They will benefit from the experience gained in the first test room, which in turn benefitted from the data and knowledge accumulated during previous stages (e.g., the Site and Preliminary Design Validation program) of the project

  20. Disposal of fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.; Foley, C.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical arguments and pilot plant results have shown that the transport of fly-furnace ash from the power station to the disposal area as a high concentration slurry is technically viable and economically attractive. Further, lack of free water, when transported as a high concentration slurry, offers significant advantages in environmental management and rehabilitation of the disposal site. This paper gives a basis for the above observations and discusses the plans to exploit the above advantages at the Stanwell Power Station. (4 x 350 MWe). This will be operated by the Queensland Electricity Commission. The first unit is to come into operation in 1992 and other units are to follow progressively on a yearly basis

  1. Creators Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversholt, Lene; Iversholt Toft, Karina

    2012-01-01

    Creators Room er et koncept til daginsitutioner, der indrammer og giver bud på en forståelse mellem inkluderende pædagogik og fysiske rammer. Konceptet er udviklet i et tværfagligt procesforløb, hvor formålet har været at skabe stadig bedre indendørsmiljøer for børn ved at forene pædagogiske...

  2. Loviisa starts low-level operating waste disposal in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snellman, J.

    1996-01-01

    At an early stage Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) decided to construct a waste repository for Loviisa NPP. The suitability of the power plant site for final disposal of low- and intermediate- level operating waste was studied. In the site report in 1982 the plant site was found to be geologically suitable and economically feasible for construction. The necessary preparations started in 1992. The repository will be constructed in three phases. The first phase will cover the transport tunnel, construction of one maintenance waste tunnel and the excavation of another maintenance waste tunnel together with a hall for solidified wastes. This phase will be finished by the end of 1996. During the second phase in the beginning of next century the remaining already excavated rooms will be furnished. Finally in the third phase the repository will be extended for the decommissioning waste somewhere around years 2020-2025. (3 figs., 1 tab.)

  3. A Development Method of Mobile Computerized Procedure System for the Cooperation among Field Workers and Main Control Room Operators in Korean Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Jin; Seong, No Kyu; Jung, Yeon Sub

    2014-01-01

    Human errors can occur during the test and maintenance of steam generator, safety injection system and other various systems and devices in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Most of human errors can be improved by the human error prevention techniques such as self-check, peer-check, concurrent verification and etc. Another important technique is to share work information among main control room (MCR) operators and field workers. Various field service automation tools have been developed with recent information technology in many countries. APR1400 computerized procedure system (CPS) has been developed for the MCR operators of Shin-Kori 3 and 4 units. Especially, the concurrent verification support design is applied in the construction project of Shin-Hanul 1 and 2 CPS. It is expected that the proposed mobile CPS can enhance the reduction of human errors by supporting human error prevention techniques and information sharing. This paper describes the technical issues of the mobile CPS (mobile CPS) in the initial development stage. Based on the design of APR1400, CRI CPS has been developed and operated for SKN 3 and 4 HFE V and V and license test for the MCR operating staff. Therefore the mobile CPS will be developed by upgrading the CRI CPS with improved features

  4. A Development Method of Mobile Computerized Procedure System for the Cooperation among Field Workers and Main Control Room Operators in Korean Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Jin; Seong, No Kyu; Jung, Yeon Sub [KHNP ,Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Human errors can occur during the test and maintenance of steam generator, safety injection system and other various systems and devices in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Most of human errors can be improved by the human error prevention techniques such as self-check, peer-check, concurrent verification and etc. Another important technique is to share work information among main control room (MCR) operators and field workers. Various field service automation tools have been developed with recent information technology in many countries. APR1400 computerized procedure system (CPS) has been developed for the MCR operators of Shin-Kori 3 and 4 units. Especially, the concurrent verification support design is applied in the construction project of Shin-Hanul 1 and 2 CPS. It is expected that the proposed mobile CPS can enhance the reduction of human errors by supporting human error prevention techniques and information sharing. This paper describes the technical issues of the mobile CPS (mobile CPS) in the initial development stage. Based on the design of APR1400, CRI CPS has been developed and operated for SKN 3 and 4 HFE V and V and license test for the MCR operating staff. Therefore the mobile CPS will be developed by upgrading the CRI CPS with improved features.

  5. Application of FMEA-DEA (Failure Modes and Effect Analysis - Data Envelopment Analysis) to the air conditioning system of the control room a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa Junior, Gilberto Varanda

    2007-03-01

    This dissertation presents the FMEA-DEA analysis application to the air conditioning system of the control room of a nuclear power plant. After obtaining the failure modes, the index associated to the occurrence probability, the severity of the effects and the potential of detention, a priority order is established for the failure modes or deviations. This number is obtained by multiplying the three mentioned index that vary in a natural scale from 1 to 10, where the higher the index, the more critical the situation will be. In this work, it is intended to use a model based on the data envelopment analysis, DEA jointly with the FMEA, to identify the current efficiency of the system and which failure modes or deviations are considered more critical, and by means of the weights attributed for the mathematical modeling to identify which index are contributing more for these deviations. From this identification, improvements can be set, which may consider administrative changes, operator training and so on, thus adding value to the final product. (author)

  6. Disposal - practical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hycnar, J.; Pinko, L.

    1995-01-01

    Most Polish power plants have stockyards for storage of fly ash and slag. This paper describes the: methods of fly ash and slag storage used, methods of conveying the waste to the stockpiles (by railway cars, trucks, belt conveyors or hydraulically); construction of wet stockyards and dry stockyards and comparison of the ash dumped, development of methods of ash disposal in mine workings; composition and properties of fly ash and slag from hard coal; and the effects of ash storage yards on the environment (by leaching of trace elements, dust, effect on soils, and noise of machinery). 16 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Disposal of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomeke, J.O.; Ferguson, D.E.; Croff, A.G.

    1978-01-01

    Based on preliminary analyses, spent fuel assemblies are an acceptable form for waste disposal. The following studies appear necessary to bring our knowledge of spent fuel as a final disposal form to a level comparable with that of the solidified wastes from reprocessing: 1. A complete systems analysis is needed of spent fuel disposition from reactor discharge to final isolation in a repository. 2. Since it appears desirable to encase the spent fuel assembly in a metal canister, candidate materials for this container need to be studied. 3. It is highly likely that some ''filler'' material will be needed between the fuel elements and the can. 4. Leachability, stability, and waste-rock interaction studies should be carried out on the fuels. The major disadvantages of spent fuel as a disposal form are the lower maximum heat loading, 60 kW/acre versus 150 kW/acre for high-level waste from a reprocessing plant; the greater long-term potential hazard due to the larger quantities of plutonium and uranium introduced into a repository; and the possibility of criticality in case the repository is breached. The major advantages are the lower cost and increased near-term safety resulting from eliminating reprocessing and the treatment and handling of the wastes therefrom

  8. Proceedings of the International Atomic Energy Agency specialists' meeting on advanced information methods and artificial intelligence in nuclear power plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of the meeting is to provide a forum for exchange of information among the participating experts both at this meeting and later through the publication of the meeting's proceedings. The following topics are considered: experiences from use of information technology in the control room, including operator interfaces, operator support systems and complete control rooms; human aspects of introducing information technology in the control room; design and evaluation of advanced control rooms. 26 papers were presented at the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Comments on conceptual questions concerning the clearance of wastes for disposal on a dump site during the decommissioning and dismantling of the nuclear power plant Obrigheim (KWO); Stellungnahme zu konzeptionellen Fragen der Freigabe zur Beseitigung auf einer Deponie bei Stilllegung und Abbau des Kernkraftwerks Obrigheim (KWO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueppers, Christian

    2015-08-03

    The comments on conceptual questions concerning the clearance of wastes for disposal on a dump site during the decommissioning and dismantling of the nuclear power plant Obrigheim (KWO) cover the following issues: fundamentals of the 10 micro-Sv concept for clearance; specific regulations for the clearance of wastes from the dismantling of KWO for disposal on a dump site; disposal concept at shutdown and dismantling of KWO; measurements and control during clearance for disposal during shutdown and dismantling of KWO; documentation and reports.

  10. Alternative Concept to Enhance the Disposal Efficiency for CANDU Spent Fuel Disposal System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Youl; Cho, Dong Geun; Kook, Dong Hak; Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Heui Joo

    2011-01-01

    There are two types of nuclear reactors in Korea and they are PWR type and CANDU type. The safe management of the spent fuels from these reactors is very important factor to maintain the sustainable energy supply with nuclear power plant. In Korea, a reference disposal system for the spent fuels has been developed through a study on the direct disposal of the PWR and CANDU spent fuel. Recently, the research on the demonstration and the efficiency analyses of the disposal system has been performed to make the disposal system safer and more economic. PWR spent fuels which include a lot of reusable material can be considered being recycled and a study on the disposal of HLW from this recycling process is being performed. CANDU spent fuels are considered being disposed of directly in deep geological formation, since they have little reusable material. In this study, based on the Korean Reference spent fuel disposal System (KRS) which was to dispose of both PWR type and CANDU type, the more effective CANDU spent fuel disposal systems were developed. To do this, the disposal canister for CANDU spent fuels was modified to hold the storage basket for 60 bundles which is used in nuclear power plant. With these modified disposal canister concepts, the disposal concepts to meet the thermal requirement that the temperature of the buffer materials should not be over 100 .deg. C were developed. These disposal concepts were reviewed and analyzed in terms of disposal effective factors which were thermal effectiveness, U-density, disposal area, excavation volume, material volume etc. and the most effective concept was proposed. The results of this study will be used in the development of various wastes disposal system together with the HLW wastes from the PWR spent fuel recycling process.

  11. Ocean Disposal Site Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is responsible for managing all designated ocean disposal sites. Surveys are conducted to identify appropriate locations for ocean disposal sites and to monitor the impacts of regulated dumping at the disposal sites.

  12. Waste disposal: preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, J.F. de.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of high level radioactive waste disposal is analyzed, suggesting an alternative for the final waste disposal from irradiated fuel elements. A methodology for determining the temperature field around an underground disposal facility is presented. (E.G.) [pt

  13. Overview of nuclear waste disposal in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, E.E.; Priest, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    One option receiving consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) is the space disposal of certain high-level nuclear wastes. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is assessing the space disposal option in support of DOE studies on alternatives for nuclear waste management. The space disposal option is viewed as a complement, since total disposal of fuel rods from commercial power plants is not considered to be economically practical with Space Shuttle technology. The space disposal of certain high-level wastes may, however, provide reduced calculated and perceived risks. The space disposal option in conjunction with terrestrial disposal may offer a more flexible and lower risk overall waste management system. For the space disposal option to be viable, it must be demonstrated that the overall long-term risks associated with this activity, as a complement to the mined geologic repository, would be significantly less than the long-term risk associated with disposing of all the high-level waste. The long-term risk benefit must be achieved within an acceptable short-term and overall program cost. This paper briefly describes space disposal alternatives, the space disposal destination, possible waste mixes and forms, systems and typical operations, and the energy and cost analysis

  14. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

    1993-01-01

    A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures

  15. Radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, H.; Closs, K.D.; Kuhn, K.

    1981-01-01

    The solutions to the technical problem of the disposal of radioactive waste are limited by a) the state of knowledge of reprocessing possibilites, b) public acceptance of the use of those techniques which are known, c) legislative procedures linking licensing of new nuclear power plants to the solution of waste problems, and d) other political constraints. Wastes are generated in the mining and enriching of radioactive elements, and in the operation of nuclear power plants as well as in all fields where radioactive substances may be used. Waste management will depend on the stability and concentration of radioactive materials which must be stored, and a resolution of the tension between numerous small storage sites and a few large ones, which again face problems of public acceptability

  16. Disposal of tritiated effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, K.; Bruecher, H.

    1981-06-01

    After some introductory remarks on the origin of tritium, its properties and its behaviour in a reprocessing plant three alternative methods for the disposal of tritiated effluents produced during reprocessing are described (deep well injection, in-situ solidification, deep-sea dumping) and compared with each other under various aspects. The study is based on the concept of a 1400 t/a reprocessing plant for LWR fuel, which annually produces 3000 m 3 of tritiated waste water with a tritium content of 6.5 x 10 12 Bq/m 3 as well as a residual fission product and actinide content. An assessment of the three methods under the aspects of simplicity, reliability, safety, costs, state of development and materials handling revealed advantages in favour of 'injection', followed by 'dumping' and 'in-situ solidification'. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Financing of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, J.

    1989-01-01

    Waste disposal is modelled as a financial calculus. In this connection the particularity is not primarily the dimension to be expected of financial requirement but above all the uncertainty of financial requirement as well as the ecological, socio-economic and especially also the temporal dimension of the Nuclear Waste Disposal project (disposal of spent fuel elements from light-water reactors with and without reprocessing, decommissioning = safe containment and disposal of nuclear power plants, permanent isolation of radioactive waste from the biosphere, intermediate storage). Based on the above mentioned factors the author analyses alternative approaches of financing or financial planning. He points out the decisive significance of the perception of risks or the evaluation of risks by involved or affected persons - i.e. the social acceptance of planned and designed waste disposal concepts - for the achievement and assessment of alternative solutions. With the help of an acceptance-specific risk measure developed on the basis of a mathematical chaos theory he illustrates, in a model, the social influence on the financing of nuclear waste disposal. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Modelling soil and soil to plant transfer processes of radionuclides and toxic chemicals at long time scales for performance assessment of Radwaste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Achim; Miquel, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Performance assessments for surface nuclear waste disposal facilities require simulation of transfer processes from the waste canisters to a reference group living near-by. Such simulations need to be extended over several hundred to hundred thousand years, depending on waste type, restraining possibilities to represent short term system complexity and variability. Related modelling can be simplified as long as processes are represented conservatively with assessment endpoints estimated larger compared to more realistic modelling approaches. The indicators are doses for radionuclides (RN) and risk factors for toxic chemicals (TC, i.e. heavy metals, nitrate). We discuss a new simulation tool (SCM-Andra-multilayer-model, SAMM) that, among others, allows to model situations where RN/TC move through a soil profile characterised by temporal undersaturation and root growth (soil-plant subsystem of the biosphere model compared to the adjacent saturated geosphere). SAMM describes all relevant transfer and reaction processes (advection, diffusion, root transport, radioactive decay, chemical reactions incl. sorption - desorption) using well known differential equations solved numerically within MATLAB with scenario description and parameterisation defined in Excel sheets. With this conservative approach in mind, we apply global parameters for which the solid-solution (Kd) or soil-to-plant (TF) distribution coefficients are the most relevant. Empirical data are available for homogeneous situations, such as one compartment pot experiments, but rare for entire soil profiles. Similarly soil hydrology, in particular upward and downward advective fluxes are modelled using an empirical approach solely based on key soil hydrological parameters (precipitation, evapotranspiration, irrigation, water table level) and the soil porosity. Variability of soil hydrology in space and time, likely to change drastically even on hourly bases (i.e. intense precipitation event) or within a single

  19. Development of digital device based work verification system for cooperation between main control room operators and field workers in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Min, E-mail: jewellee@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 305-353, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Chul, E-mail: leehc@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 305-353, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jun Su, E-mail: junsu.ha@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University of Science Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi P.O. Box 127788 (United Arab Emirates); Seong, Poong Hyun, E-mail: phseong@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A digital device-based work verification and cooperation support system was developed. • Requirements were derived by interviewing field operators having experiences with mobile-based work support systems. • The usability of the proposed system was validated by conducting questionnaire surveys. • The proposed system will be useful if the manual or the set of guidelines is well constructed. - Abstract: Digital technologies have been applied in the nuclear field to check task results, monitor events and accidents, and transmit/receive data. The results of using digital devices have proven that these devices can provide high accuracy and convenience for workers, allowing them to obtain obvious positive effects by reducing their workloads. In this study, as one step forward, a digital device-based cooperation support system, the nuclear cooperation support and mobile documentation system (Nu-COSMOS), is proposed to support communication between main control room (MCR) operators and field workers by verifying field workers’ work results in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The proposed system consists of a mobile based information storage system to support field workers by providing various functions to make workers more trusted by MCR operators; also to improve the efficiency of meeting, and a large screen based information sharing system supports meetings by allowing both sides to share one medium. The usability of this system was estimated by interviewing field operators working in nuclear power plants and experts who have experience working as operators. A survey to estimate the usability of the suggested system and the suitability of the functions of the system for field working was conducted for 35 subjects who have experience in field works or with support system development-related research. The usability test was conducted using the system usability scale (SUS), which is widely used in industrial usability evaluation. Using questionnaires

  20. Development of digital device based work verification system for cooperation between main control room operators and field workers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Min; Lee, Hyun Chul; Ha, Jun Su; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A digital device-based work verification and cooperation support system was developed. • Requirements were derived by interviewing field operators having experiences with mobile-based work support systems. • The usability of the proposed system was validated by conducting questionnaire surveys. • The proposed system will be useful if the manual or the set of guidelines is well constructed. - Abstract: Digital technologies have been applied in the nuclear field to check task results, monitor events and accidents, and transmit/receive data. The results of using digital devices have proven that these devices can provide high accuracy and convenience for workers, allowing them to obtain obvious positive effects by reducing their workloads. In this study, as one step forward, a digital device-based cooperation support system, the nuclear cooperation support and mobile documentation system (Nu-COSMOS), is proposed to support communication between main control room (MCR) operators and field workers by verifying field workers’ work results in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The proposed system consists of a mobile based information storage system to support field workers by providing various functions to make workers more trusted by MCR operators; also to improve the efficiency of meeting, and a large screen based information sharing system supports meetings by allowing both sides to share one medium. The usability of this system was estimated by interviewing field operators working in nuclear power plants and experts who have experience working as operators. A survey to estimate the usability of the suggested system and the suitability of the functions of the system for field working was conducted for 35 subjects who have experience in field works or with support system development-related research. The usability test was conducted using the system usability scale (SUS), which is widely used in industrial usability evaluation. Using questionnaires

  1. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., laboratory culture of micro-organisms and plant pathogens, and introduced avian products must be removed from... dispose of waste by open burning prior to March 1, 1994, allowance shall be made for the wind direction...

  2. Dependence of leaf surface potential response of a plant (Ficus Elastica) to light irradiation on room temperature; Shokubutsu (gomunoki) hamen den`i no hikari shosha oto no shitsuon izonsei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, H; Kenmoku, Y; Sakakibara, T [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan); Nakagawa, S [Maizuru National College of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Kawamoto, T [Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    In order to clarify plant body potential information, study was made on a leaf surface potential response to light irradiation. The leaf surface potential change, total transpiration and transpiration rate of Ficus Elastica were measured using light irradiation period and room temperature as parameters. The leaf surface potential change shows a positive peak after the start of light irradiation, while a negative peak after its end. Arrival time to both peaks is constant regardless of the light irradiation period, while decrease with an increase in room temperature. Although the total transpiration increases with room temperature, this tendency disappears with an increase in light irradiation period. The transpiration rate shows its peak after the start of light irradiation. Arrival time to the peak is saturated with the light irradiation period of 60min, while decreases with an increase in room temperature. These results suggest that opening of stomata becomes active with an increase in room temperature, and the peak of the leaf surface potential after the start of light irradiation relates to the opening. 3 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Disposal phase experimental program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility comprises surface and subsurface facilities, including a repository mined in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2,150 feet. It has been developed to safely and permanently isolate transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes in a deep geological disposal site. On April 12, 1996, the DOE submitted a revised Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The DOE anticipates receiving an operating permit from the NMED; this permit is required prior to the start of disposal operations. On October 29, 1996, the DOE submitted a Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in accordance with the WIPP land Withdrawal Act (LWA) of 1992 (Public Law 102-579) as amended, and the requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) Parts 191 and 194. The DOE plans to begin disposal operations at the WIPP in November 1997 following receipt of certification by the EPA. The disposal phase is expected to last for 35 years, and will include recertification activities no less than once every five years. This Disposal Phase Experimental Program (DPEP) Plan outlines the experimental program to be conducted during the first 5-year recertification period. It also forms the basis for longer-term activities to be carried out throughout the 35-year disposal phase. Once the WIPP has been shown to be in compliance with regulatory requirements, the disposal phase gives an opportunity to affirm the compliance status of the WIPP, enhance the operations of the WIPP and the national TRU system, and contribute to the resolution of national and international nuclear waste management technical needs. The WIPP is the first facility of its kind in the world. As such, it provides a unique opportunity to advance the technical state of the art for permanent disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes

  4. Safety of laboratories, plants, facilities being dismantled, waste processing, interim storage and disposal facilities. Lessons learned from events reported in 2009 and 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the cross-disciplinary analysis performed by IRSN relating to significant events reported to the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) during 2009 - 2010 for LUDD-type facilities (laboratories, plants, facilities being dismantled, and waste processing, interim storage and disposal facilities). It constitutes a follow-up to DSU Report 215 published in December 2009, relating to events reported to ASN during 2005 to 2008. The main developments observed since the analysis presented in that report have been underlined here, in order to highlight improvements, opportunities for progress and the main areas requiring careful attention. The present report is a continuation of DSU Report 215. Without claiming to be exhaustive, it presents lessons from IRSN's cross-disciplinary analysis of events reported to ASN during 2009 and 2010 at LUDD facilities while highlighting major changes from the previous analysis in order to underline improvements, areas where progress has been made, and main points for monitoring. The report has four sections: - the first gives a brief introduction to the various kinds of LUDD facilities and highlights changes with DSU Report 215; - the second provides a summary of major trends involving events reported to ASN during 2007-2010 as well as overall results of consequences of events reported during 2009 and 2010 for workers, the general public and the environment; - the third section gives a cross-disciplinary analysis of significant events reported during 2009 and 2010, performed from two complementary angles (analysis of main types of events grouped by type of risk and analysis of generic causes). Main changes from the analysis given in DSU Report 215 are considered in detail; - the last section describes selected significant events that occurred in 2009 and 2010 in order to illustrate the cross-disciplinary analysis with concrete examples. IRSN will publish this type of report periodically in coming years in order to

  5. Disposal Situation of Sewage Sludge from Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs) and Assessment of the Ecological Risk of Heavy Metals for Its Land Use in Shanxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Baoling; Zhang, Wuping; Zheng, Haixia; Wu, Chunyan; Zhang, Qiang; Bu, Yushan

    2017-07-21

    Land use of sewage sludge is the primary disposal method in Shanxi, accounting for 42.66% of all. To determine the ecological risk of heavy metals in sewage sludge, contents of seven heavy metals in sewage sludge from 9 municipal waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) that had the highest application for land use were determined. The order of the measured concentrations was: Zn > Cr > Cu > Ni > Pb > As > Cd, and all heavy metals contents were within the threshold limit values of the Chinese Control Standards for Pollutants in Sludge from Agriculture Use (GB4284-84). Four indices were used to assess the pollution and the ecological risk of heavy metals. By the mean values of the geoaccumulation index (I geo ), heavy metals were ranked in the following order: Cd > Zn > Cu > As > Cr > Ni > Pb. The values showed that the pollution of Zn in station 3 and Cd in station 1, 2, 3, 4, 8 and 9 were heavily; Cu in station 8 and 9, Zn in station 1, 2, 4, 8 and 9 and Cd in station 5 and 7 were moderately to heavily, and the accumulation of other heavy metals were not significant. The single-factor pollution index (PI) suggested that none of the stations had heavy metals contamination, except for Cu in station 9, Zn in station 3 and 8, and Cd in station 1 and 9, which were at a moderate level. According to the results of the Nemerow's synthetic pollution index (PN), sewage sludge from all stations was safe for land use with respect to heavy metals contamination, except for stations 3, 8 and 9, which were at the warning line. The monomial potential ecological risk coefficient (Eri) revealed that heavy metals ecological risks in most stations were low. However, station 9 had a moderate risk for Cu; station 6 had a moderate risk, stations 5 and 7 had high risk, other stations had very high risk for Cd. According to the results of the potential ecological risk index (RI), station 1, 8 and 9 had high risk; station 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 had a moderate risk, and station 6 had a low risk. The

  6. Disposal Situation of Sewage Sludge from Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs and Assessment of the Ecological Risk of Heavy Metals for Its Land Use in Shanxi, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoling Duan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Land use of sewage sludge is the primary disposal method in Shanxi, accounting for 42.66% of all. To determine the ecological risk of heavy metals in sewage sludge, contents of seven heavy metals in sewage sludge from 9 municipal waste water treatment plants (WWTPs that had the highest application for land use were determined. The order of the measured concentrations was: Zn > Cr > Cu > Ni > Pb > As > Cd, and all heavy metals contents were within the threshold limit values of the Chinese Control Standards for Pollutants in Sludge from Agriculture Use (GB4284-84. Four indices were used to assess the pollution and the ecological risk of heavy metals. By the mean values of the geoaccumulation index (Igeo, heavy metals were ranked in the following order: Cd > Zn > Cu > As > Cr > Ni > Pb. The values showed that the pollution of Zn in station 3 and Cd in station 1, 2, 3, 4, 8 and 9 were heavily; Cu in station 8 and 9, Zn in station 1, 2, 4, 8 and 9 and Cd in station 5 and 7 were moderately to heavily, and the accumulation of other heavy metals were not significant. The single-factor pollution index (PI suggested that none of the stations had heavy metals contamination, except for Cu in station 9, Zn in station 3 and 8, and Cd in station 1 and 9, which were at a moderate level. According to the results of the Nemerow’s synthetic pollution index (PN, sewage sludge from all stations was safe for land use with respect to heavy metals contamination, except for stations 3, 8 and 9, which were at the warning line. The monomial potential ecological risk coefficient (Eri revealed that heavy metals ecological risks in most stations were low. However, station 9 had a moderate risk for Cu; station 6 had a moderate risk, stations 5 and 7 had high risk, other stations had very high risk for Cd. According to the results of the potential ecological risk index (RI, station 1, 8 and 9 had high risk; station 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 had a moderate risk, and station 6 had a

  7. Using TOUGH2 to model the coupled effects of gas generation, repository consolidation, and multiphase brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W.; Davies, P.B.; Webb, S.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a US Department of Energy facility designed to demonstrate the safe underground disposal of transuranic waste. Following waste emplacement, each room will be backfilled with crushed salt. Due to deviatoric stress introduced by excavation, the walls of the waste disposal rooms in the repository will deform over time, consolidating waste containers and salt backfill, thereby decreasing the void volume of the repository. Long-term repository assessment must consider the processes of gas generation, room closure and expansion due to salt creep, and multiphase (brine and gas) fluid flow, as well as the complex coupling between these three processes. Stone (1992) used the mechanical creep closure code SANCHO to simulate the closure of a single, perfectly sealed disposal room filled with waste and backfill. The results of the SANCHO f-series simulations provide a relationship between gas generation, room closure, and room pressure. Several methods for coupling this relationship with multiphase fluid flow into and out of a room were examined by Freeze et al. TOUGH2 was employed to couple the processes of gas generation, room closure/consolidation, and multiphase brine and gas flow. Two empirically-based methods for approximating salt creep and room consolidation were implemented in TOUGH2: the pressure-time-porosity line interpolation approach and the fluid-phase-salt approach. Both approaches utilized links to the SANCHO f-series simulation results to calculate room-void-volume changes with time during a simulation

  8. SACRI: A measure of situation awareness for use in the evaluation of nuclear power plant control room systems providing information about the current process state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogg, D.N.; Follesoe, K.; Volden, F.S.; Torralba, B.

    1994-01-01

    Control room operator support systems and their interface designs have as one goal the enhancement of the operators' situation awareness of the dynamically changing process state. This paper describes a technique for measuring situation awareness within the Human Factors evaluation of control room operator-system interfaces. The technique, referred to as SACRI, has been evaluated in four simulator studies and the main findings from these studies are summarized in this paper. It is concluded that SACRI can be a useful supplement to operator performance measures currently existing for use within control room interface evaluations. (author). 16 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  9. An analysis of impact on the environmental pollution under accident conditions due to the disposal of ashes from the Nikola Tesla B thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milovanovic, D.; Zlvkovic, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The ash disposal area of Nikola Tesla B TPP is presenting considerable potential source of environmental pollution. Due to its vast area, that is for an effective plot of about 400 ha, under unfavorable meteorological conditions the emerging of ash cloud spreading over the surrounding area at distances of over 15 km could be produced. This paper deals with accident conditions at ash disposal area which, after stopping of sprinkling operation or in case of an inadequate sequence of ash tapping, when larger portions of disposal area are dried, turn into area of air polluting sources. Computations of particle dispersions under such conditions have been performed for different meteorological conditions and the results are represented as space distribution of particle deposition on the soil and their concentration in the air. (author). 5 figs., 4 refs

  10. Waste disposal into the ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mawson, C A

    1955-07-01

    The establishment of an atomic energy project is soon followed by the production of a variety of radioactive wastes which must be disposed of safely, quickly and cheaply. Experience has shown that much more thought has been devoted to the design of plant and laboratories than to the apparently dull problem of what to do with the wastes, but the nature of the wastes which will arise from nuclear power production calls for a change in this situation. We shall not be concerned here with power pile wastes, but disposal problems which have occurred in operation of experimental reactors have been serious enough to show that waste disposal should be considered during the early planning stages. (author)

  11. Development, construction and testing of a transportable experimental plant for the disposal of problematic sewage with the goal of environmental protection. Final report. Entwicklung, Bau und Erprobung einer transportablen Versuchsanlage zur Entsorgung von Problemabwaessern mit dem Ziel der Umweltentlastung. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, N.; Richter, J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of stage I of the project was the development of a complete disposal chain for problematic sewage, separating it into pure utility water, emitable gases and concentrated waste sludge. In stage II of the project, for which NUKEM GmbH was responsible, the central goal was calcination of the waste materials, i.e. thermal treatment of the organic and heavy-metal compounds and solidification and containment of the waste substances in solid bodies of any desired form that undergo minimal or no elution. Because of its complex organic/inorganic load and the difficulties inherent in its disposal, garbage water from waste disposal sites was selected as an example of problematic sewage. The scientific goal of stage I was achieved with the development and laboratory testing of a hybrid separation process based on a series of reverse-osmosis and evaporation steps and sludge centrifugation. The construction and field testing of an experimental plant was not carried out. As a result of the premature termination of stage II it was no longer possible to achieve the goal of a complete disposal chain. The funding of the project was not sufficient to cover the increased development costs of stage I required to meet the project goal. An assessment of the expected investment costs and operating costs associated with the technique on a practical scale revealed a poor cost-benefit ratio, so that these appear to be no short-term prospects of commercial exploitation. (orig.) With 43 refs., 2 tabs., 17 figs.

  12. Low level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthoux, A.

    1985-01-01

    Final disposal of low level wastes has been carried out for 15 years on the shallow land disposal of the Manche in the north west of France. Final participant in the nuclear energy cycle, ANDRA has set up a new waste management system from the production center (organization of the waste collection) to the disposal site including the setting up of a transport network, the development of assessment, additional conditioning, interim storage, the management of the disposal center, records of the location and characteristics of the disposed wastes, site selection surveys for future disposals and a public information Department. 80 000 waste packages representing a volume of 20 000 m 3 are thus managed and disposed of each year on the shallow land disposal. The disposal of low level wastes is carried out according to their category and activity level: - in tumuli for very low level wastes, - in monoliths, a concrete structure, of the packaging does not provide enough protection against radioactivity [fr

  13. The Dutch geologic radioactive waste disposal project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamstra, J.; Verkerk, B.

    1981-01-01

    The Final Report reviews the work on geologic disposal of radioactive waste performed in the Netherlands over the period 1 January 1978 to 31 December 1979. The attached four topical reports cover detailed subjects of this work. The radionuclide release consequences of an accidental flooding of the underground excavations during the operational period was studied by the institute for Atomic Sciences in Agriculture (Italy). The results of the quantitative examples made for different effective cross-sections of the permeable layer connecting the mine excavations with the boundary of the salt dome, are that under all circumstances the concentration of the waste nuclides in drinking water will remain well within the ICRP maximum permissible concentrations. Further analysis work was done on what minima can be achieved for both the maximum local rock salt temperatures at the disposal borehole walls and the maximum global rock salt temperatures halfway between a square of disposal boreholes. Different multi-layer disposal configurations were analysed and compared. A more detailed description is given of specific design and construction details of a waste repository such as the shaft sinking and construction, the disposal mine development, the mine ventilation and the different plugging and sealing procedures for both the disposal boreholes and the shafts. Thanks to the hospitality of the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlenforschung, an underground working area in the Asse mine became available for performing a dry drilling experiment, which resulted successfully in the drilling of a 300 m deep disposal borehole from a mine room at the -750 m level

  14. Treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants. Program for encapsulation, deep geologic deposition and research, development and demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Programs for RD and D concerning disposal of radioactive waste are presented. Main topics include: Design, testing and manufacture of canisters for the spent fuels; Design of equipment for deposition of waste canisters; Material and process for backfilling rock caverns; Evaluation of accuracy and validation of methods for safety analyses; Development of methods for defining scenarios for the safety analyses. 471 refs, 67 figs, 21 tabs

  15. Two-phase anaerobic digestion of partially acidified sewage sludge: a pilot plant study for safe sludge disposal in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passio, Luca; Rizzoa, Luigi; Fuchs, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    The unsafe disposal of wastewater and sludge in different areas of developing countries results in significant environmental pollution, particularly for groundwater, thus increasing the risk of waterborne diseases spreading. In this work, a two-phase anaerobic digestion process for post-treatment of partially acidified sewage sludge was investigated to evaluate its feasibility as a safe sludge disposal system. Pilot tests showed that an effective sludge stabilization can be achieved (total volatile solids content <65%, organic acid concentration <200 mg/L at flow rate = 50 L/d and hydraulic residence time = 18 d) as well as a relative low faecal coliform density (<1000 most probable number per g total solids), showing that land application of the sludge without restrictions is possible according to US Environmental Protection Agency criteria for safe sludge disposal. A biogas production as high as 390 L/d with a 60% methane content by volume was achieved, showing that energy production from biogas may be achieved as well.

  16. Annual report of 1991 groundwater monitoring data for the Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin at the Y-12 Plant: Reporting and statistical evaluation of the subsequent year (sixth) data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, L.W.; Mercier, T.M.

    1992-02-01

    This annual report has historically been prepared to meet the annual reporting requirements of the Tennessee Department of and Environment and Conservation (TDEC), Hazardous Waste Management Regulation 1200-1-11-.05 (6)(e), for detection monitoring data collected on Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wells in place around facilities which are accorded interim status. The regulatory authority for these units at the Y-12 Plant is currently in transition. A Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) with an effective date of January 1, 1992, has been negotiated with the Department of Energy (DOE) for the Oak Ridge Reservation. This agreement provides a framework for remediation of the Oak Ridge Reservation so that both RCRA and CERCLA requirements are integrated into the remediation process and provides for State, EPA, and DOE to proceed with CERCLA as the lead regulatory requirement and RCRA as an applicable or relevant and appropriate requirement. This report is presented for the RCRA certified wells for two interim status units at the Y-12 Plant. These units are Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin. Kerr Hollow is currently undergoing clean closure under RCRA. The Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) was closed in 1989 under a TDEC approved RCRA closure plan. The relevance of a RCRA Post-Closure Permit to either of these units is a matter of contention between DOE and TDEC since the FFA does not contemplate post-closure permits

  17. Recycling of plastic packaging material from separate collection from the dual system Germany. Current LCA results compared to disposal in thermal waste incineration plants; Werkstoffliche Verwertung von Verpackungskunststoffen aus der Getrenntsammlung Dualer Systeme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyde, Michael; Gerke, Gilian; Muehle, Sarah [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Kreislaufwirtschaft und Rohstoffe (DKR) mbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Due to the implementation of the European waste framework directive into German law it is discussed which contribution waste incineration makes to resource protection and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. A number of players question if it is still contemporary to adhere to recycling as a priority. The following article compares today's recycling of separately collection of plastics waste from the German packaging recovery system and the disposal in thermal waste treatment plants under ecological aspects. The separate collected of packaging waste materials is a prerequisite of high quality recycling. If this were to be abandoned and - hypothetically - this waste stream would be disposed in thermal waste treatment plants in Germany, significant drawbacks in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and primary energy demand would arise. This is shown in a study conducted by the Institute fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung (ifeu) in Heidelberg. Further it could be proved that there is still optimization potential in the recycling market that has been developed over the last two decades in Germany. However, to max this potential significantly depends on stable political framework requirements. The following article underlines that recycling and high quality energy recovery cause remarkable savings of CO{sub 2}-emissions and energy. (orig.)

  18. Radioactive wastes and their disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, L.

    1984-01-01

    The classification of radioactive wastes is given and the achievements evaluated in the disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants. An experimental pilot unit was installed at the Jaslovske Bohunice nuclear power plant for the bituminization of liquid radioactive wastes. UJV has developed a mobile automated high-output unit for cementation. In 1985 the unit will be tested at the Jaslovske Bohunice and the Dukovany nuclear power plants. A prototype press for processing solid wastes was manufactured which is in operation at the Jaslovske Bohunice plant. A solidification process for atypical wastes from long-term storage of spent fuel elements has been developed to be used for the period of nuclear power plant decommissioning. (E.S.)

  19. Human-factors control-room-design review draft audit report: Detroit Edison Company, Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant--Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    A human factors audit of the Fermi-2 control room was conducted April 27 through May 1, 1981. This report contains the audit team findings, organized according to the draft NUREG-0700 guidelines sections. The discrepancies identified during the audit are categorized according to their severity and the required schedule for their resolution

  20. Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Treated non-hazardous and non-radioactive liquid wastes are collected and then disposed of through the systems at the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). More...

  1. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: engineering for a disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, G.R.; Baumgartner, P.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents some general considerations for engineering a nuclear fuel waste disposal facility, alternative disposal-vault concepts and arrangements, and a conceptual design of a used-fuel disposal centre that was used to assess the technical feasibility, costs and potential effects of disposal. The general considerations and alternative disposal-vault arrangements are presented to show that options are available to allow the design to be adapted to actual site conditions. The conceptual design for a used-fuel disposal centre includes descriptions of the two major components of the disposal facility, the Used-Fuel Packaging Plant and the disposal vault; the ancillary facilities and services needed to carry out the operations are also identified. The development of the disposal facility, its operation, its decommissioning, and the reclamation of the site are discussed. The costs, labour requirements and schedules used to assess socioeconomic effects and that may be used to assess the cost burden of waste disposal to the consumer of nuclear energy are estimated. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is funded jointly by AECL and Ontario Hydro under the auspices of the CANDU Owners Group. (author)

  2. Radwaste disposal drum centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, L.S.; Deltete, C.P.; Crook, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    The drum or processing bowl of the DDC becomes the disposal container when the filling operation is completed. Rehandling of the processed resin is eliminated. By allowing the centrifugally compacted resin to remain in the processing container, extremely efficient waste packaging can be achieved. The dewatering results and volume reductions reported during 1986 were based upon laboratory scale testing sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Department of Energy (DOE). Since the publication of these preliminary results, additional testing using a full-scale prototype DDC has been completed, again under the auspices of the DOE. Full-scale testing has substantiated the results of earlier testing and has formed the basis for preliminary discussions with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regarding DDC licensing for radioactive applications. A comprehensive Topical Report and Process Control Program is currently being prepared for submittal to the NRC for review under a utility licensing action. Detailed cost-benefit analyses for actual plant operations have been prepared to substantiate the attractiveness of the DDC. Several methods to physically integrate a DDC into a nuclear power plant have also been developed

  3. Geological aspects of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobera, P.

    1985-01-01

    Geological formations suitable for burying various types of radioactive wastes are characterized applying criteria for the evaluation and selection of geological formations for building disposal sites for radioactive wastes issued in IAEA technical recommendations. They are surface disposal sites, disposal sites in medium depths and deep disposal sites. Attention is focused on geological formations usable for injecting self-hardening mixtures into cracks prepared by hydraulic decomposition and for injecting liquid radioactive wastes into permeable rocks. Briefly outlined are current trends of the disposal of radioactive wastes in Czechoslovakia and the possibilities are assessed from the geological point of view of building disposal sites for radioactive wastes on the sites of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants at Jaslovske Bohunice, Mochovce, Dukovany, Temelin, Holice (eastern Bohemia), Blahoutovice (northern Moravia) and Zehna (eastern Slovakia). It is stated that in order to design an optimal method of the burial of radioactive waste it will be necessary to improve knowledge of geological conditions in the potential disposal sites at the said nuclear plants. There is usually no detailed knowledge of geological and hydrological conditions at greater depths than 100 m. (Z.M.)

  4. Future control room design (modernization of control room systems)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reischl, Ludwig; Freitag, Timo; Dergel, Rene

    2009-01-01

    In the frame of lifetime extension for nuclear power plants the modernization of the complete safety and operational control technology will be digitalized. It is also recommended to modernize the operator facilities, monitoring systems in the control room, the back-up shut-down center and the local control stations. The authors summarize the reasons for the modernization recommendations and discuss possible solutions for display-oriented control rooms. A concept for control room backfitting includes generic requirements, requirements of the local authorities, ergonomic principles information content and information density, and the design process. The backfitting strategy should include a cooperation with the operational personnel, The quality assurance and training via simulator needs sufficient timing during the implementation of the backfitting.

  5. Incineration plant for low active waste at Inshass, LAWI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, W.; Thoene, L.; Schmitz, H.J.; Abdelrazek, I.D.

    1993-10-01

    The LAWI (Low Active Waste Incinerator) prototype incinerating plant was devised and constructed according to the principle of the Juelich thermoprocess and installed at the Egyptian research centre Inshass. In parallel, AEA Cairo devised and constructed their own operations building for this plant with all the features, infrastructural installations and rooms required for operating the plant and handling and treating low-level radioactive wastes. The dimensions of this incinerator were selected so as to be sufficient for the disposal of solid, weakly radioactive combustible wastes from the Inshass Research Centre and the environment (e.g. Cairo hospitals). (orig./DG) [de

  6. Postconstruction report of the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakley, L.B.; Siberell, J.K.; Voskuil, T.L.

    1993-06-01

    Remedial actions conducted under the auspices of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) were completed at the Y-12 United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Disposal Site in August 1992. The purpose of this Postconstruction Report is to summarize numerous technical reports and provide CERCLA documentation for completion of the remedial actions. Other CERCLA reports, such as the Feasibility Study for the UNC Disposal Site, provide documentation leading up to the remedial action decision. The remedial action chosen, placement of a modified RCRA cap, was completed successfully, and performance standards were either met or exceeded. This remedial action provided solutions to two environmentally contaminated areas and achieved the goal of minimizing the potential for contamination of the shallow groundwater downgradient of the site, thereby providing protection of human health and the environment. Surveillance and maintenance of the cap will be accomplished to ensure cap integrity, and groundwater monitoring downgradient of the site will continue to confirm the acceptability of the remedial action chosen.

  7. Guidelines for control room design reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The control room design review is part of a broad program being undertaken by the nuclear industry and the government to ensure consideration of human factors in nuclear power plant design and operation. The purpose of the control room design review described by these guidelines is to (1) review and evaluate the control room workspace, instrumentation, controls, and other equipment from a human factors engineering point of view that takes into account both system demands and operator capabilities; and (2) to identify, assess, and implement control room design modifications that correct inadequate or unsuitable items. The scope of the control room design review described by these guidelines covers the human engineering review of completed control rooms; i.e., operational control rooms or those at that stage of the licensing process where control room design and equipment selection are committed. These guidelines should also be of use during the design process for new control rooms. However, additional analyses to optimize the allocation of functions to man and machine, and further examination of advanced control system technology, are recommended for new control rooms. Guidelines and references for comprehensive system analyses designed to incorporate human factors considerations into the design and development of new control rooms are presented in Appendix B. Where possible, a generic approach to the control room design review process is encouraged; for example, when control room designs are replicated wholly or in part in two or more units. Even when designs are not replicated exactly, generic reviews which can be modified to account for specific differences in particular control rooms should be considered. Industry organizations and owners groups are encouraged to coordinate joint efforts and share data to develop generic approaches to the design review process. The control room design review should accomplish the following specific objectives. To determine

  8. Control room and ergonomic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinz, W.

    1984-01-01

    The important basis for the configuration of the control room of a nuclear power station is the concept for controlling a fault and that for controlling normal operation. The tasks resulting from this for the control room personnel are decided by the control room concept. In this configuration process (from the division of process control tasks between the system components operators and control technology to the configuration of individual means of operation) the characteristics and capabilities of the personnel, which are subject to special requirements as regards their qualifications, are observed. New concepts which are only now technically feasible are therefore being developed for information processing and display, in order to give the personnel a better oversight of the state and trends of the plant. (orig./DG) [de

  9. Radioactive waste disposal: Waste Isolation Pilot Plants (WIPP). March 1978-November 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for Mar 78-Nov 89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a geologic repository located in New Mexico for transuranic wastes generated by the U.S. Government. Articles follow the development of the program from initial site selection and characterization through construction and testing, along with research programs on environmental impacts, structural design, and radionuclide landfill gases. Existing plants and facilities, pilot plants, migration, rock mechanics, economics, regulations, and transport of wastes to the site are also included. The Salt Repository Project and the Crystalline Repository Project are referenced in related published bibliographies. (Contains 184 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  10. Methodology for the identification of the factors that can influence the performance of operators of nuclear power plants control room under emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, Bernardo Spitz; Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti

    2009-01-01

    In order to minimize the human errors of the operators in a nuclear power plan control room, during emergency situations, it has to be considered the factors which affect the human performance. Work situations adequately projected, compatible with the necessities, capacities and human limitations, taking into consideration the factors which affect the operator performance . This paper aims to develop a methodology for identification of the factors affecting the operator performance under emergency situation, using the aspects defined by the human reliability analysis focusing the judgment done by specialists

  11. Exploitation of new information technologies to improve the man-machine interface in particular in nuclear power plants control rooms (SR 2039/7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassmann, W.

    1994-01-01

    The establishment of a uniform computer-based user surface requires a qualification of the employed hard- and software which meets safety demands. This problem is outlined, pointing out those parts of safety instrumentation and control which for the time being have to be conventional in order to ensure sufficient safety precaution. Ergonomic problems of man-machine interaction, which have to be assessed when licensing computerized control rooms or mixed ones, are worked out and a way of solving them is shown. In this regard, observational and operational tasks are considered; activities, however, which are related to the modification of computer software remain unconsidered. (orig./DG) [de

  12. The power plant portal from handling to operation management - from control room to headquarters; Das Kraftwerksportal von der Bedienung bis zur Betriebsfuehrung - von der Warte bis zur Hauptverwaltung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, J. [Produktmanagement, ABB, Mannheim (Germany); Lauxtermann, S. [Plant und Business Optimization, ABB, Minden (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    A power plant portal allows power and heat producers to make use of all the functionalities already available, while benefiting from the convenience of a consistent user interface philosophy. The system's range of functions by far exceeds the capabilities of traditional operating and monitoring systems and effectively integrates the procedures of information management, engineering and asset optimisation. Users have context-based direct access to plant- and company-wide information. A wide variety of PCS, DCS and power plant components can be monitored with the help of the integrated software modules. Asset optimisation features enable plant owners to minimise the costs of corrective and preventive maintenance measures. In addition, they support and optimise the workflow of maintenance and calibration activities. (orig.)

  13. Calculation note - Consequences of a fire in the sorting and repackaging glovebox in room 636 of bldg 2736-ZB - Plutonium Finishing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOHNSON, L.E.

    1999-01-01

    This Calculation Note provides a conservative estimate of the grams of plutonium released from Building 2736-ZB of the Plutonium Finishing Plant as a result of a fire within Glovebox 636, without consideration of mitigation

  14. Multipass mining sequence room closures: In situ data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, D.E.; Jones, R.L.; Northrop-Salazar, C.L.; Woerner, S.J.

    1992-12-01

    During the construction of the Thermal/Structural In Situ Test Rooms at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility, measurements of the salt displacements were obtained at very early times, essentially concurrent with the mining activity. This was accomplished by emplacing manually read closure gage stations directly at the mining face, actually between the face and the mining machine, immediately upon mining of the intended gage location. Typically, these mining sequence closure measurements were taken within one hour of mining of the location and within one meter of the mining face. Readings were taken at these gage stations as the multipass mining continued, with the gage station reestablished as each successive mining pass destroyed the earlier gage points. Data reduction yields the displacement history during the mining operation. These early mining sequence closure data, when combined with the later data of the permanently emplaced closure gages, gives the total time-dependent closure displacements of the test rooms. This complete closure history is an essential part of assuring that the in situ test databases will provide an adequate basis for validation of the predictive technology of salt creep behavior, as required by the WIPP technology development program for disposal of radioactive waste in bedded salt

  15. Anlagen- und Kraftwerksrohrleitungsbau Greifswald GmbH plan and build wet decontamination plant for disposal of components of Russian nuclear submarines; Anlagen- und Kraftwerksrohrleitungsbau Greifswald GmbH plant und errichtet eine Nassdekontaminationsanlage zur Entsorgung von Komponenten russischer Atom U-Boote

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jan; Konitzer, Arnold; Luedeke, Michael [AKB Anlagen- und Kraftwerksrohrleitungsbau Greifswald GmbH (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Anlagen- und Kraftwerksrohrleitungsbau Greifswald, on behalf of Energiewerke Nord GmbH, Lubmin, plan and build a wet decontamination facility for the waste management center at Saida Bay, Russia (EZS). The plant is part of a large project with a total volume on the order of 3-digit millions funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economics and Technology. This project involves construction at Saida Bay near the port city of Murmansk of a complete waste management center and a long-term interim store for radioactively contaminated components. These components are mainly parts of decommissioned nuclear vessels and submarines whose metals, after decontamination, can be returned to economic use. The basis of the wet decontamination plant is a former AKB project for disposal and re-use of contaminated metal components of Energiewerke Nord GmbH at Lubmin, which is being adapted and developed further. The plant is to allow unrestricted re-use of the metals after surface cleaning and surface abrasion, respectively. For this purpose, the contaminated layer is removed far enough for the clearance limits under the Radiation Protection Ordinance to be met. A large fraction of the metals can be re-used after cleaning and do not have to be stored in a financially and logistically expensive process. The contract gives AKB an excellent opportunity to demonstrate its capabilities in plant construction, especially in the very sensitive area of disposal of radioactively contaminated objects. (orig.)

  16. Nuclear power station main control room habitability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschal, W.B.; Knous, W.S.

    1989-01-01

    The main control room at a nuclear power station must remain habitable during a variety of plant conditions and postulated events. The control room habitability requirement and the function of the heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and air treatment system are to control environmental factors, such as temperature, pressure, humidity, radiation, and toxic gas. Habitability requirements provide for the safety of personnel and enable operation of equipment required to function in the main control room. Habitability as an issue has been gaining prominence with the Advisor Committee of Reactor Safeguards and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission since the incident at Three Mile Island. Their concern is the ability of the presently installed habitability systems to control the main control room environment after an accident. This paper discusses main control room HVAC systems; the concern, requirements, and results of NRC surveys and notices; and an approach to control room habitability reviews

  17. Improving operating room safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett Jill

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the introduction of the Universal Protocol, patient safety in surgery remains a daily challenge in the operating room. This present study describes one community health system's efforts to improve operating room safety through human factors training and ultimately the development of a surgical checklist. Using a combination of formal training, local studies documenting operating room safety issues and peer to peer mentoring we were able to substantially change the culture of our operating room. Our efforts have prepared us for successfully implementing a standardized checklist to improve operating room safety throughout our entire system. Based on these findings we recommend a multimodal approach to improving operating room safety.

  18. Quarter-scale modeling of room convergence effects on CH [contact-handled] TRU drum waste emplacements using WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] reference design geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VandeKraats, J.

    1987-11-01

    This study investigates the effect of horizontal room convergence on CH waste packages emplaced in the WIPP Reference Design geometry (rooms 13 feet high by 33 feet wide, with minus 3/8 inch screened backfill emplaced over and around the waste packages) as a function of time. Based on two tests, predictions were made with regard to full-scale 6-packs emplaced in the Reference Design geometry. These are that load will be transmitted completely through the stack within the first five years after waste emplacement and all drums in all 6-packs will be affected; that virtually all drums will show some deformation eight years after emplacement; that some drums may breach before the eighth year after emplacement has elapsed; and that based on criteria developed during testing, it is predicted that 1% of the drums emplaced will be breached after 8 years and, after 15 years, approximately 12% of the drums are predicted to be breached. 8 refs., 41 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Operation for Rokkasho Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamizono, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The Rokkasho Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Disposal Center is located in Oishitai, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikitagun, of Aomori Prefecture. This district is situated in the southern part of Shimohita Peninsula in the northeastern corner of the prefecture, which lies at the northern tip of Honshu, Japan's main island. The Rokkasho LLW Disposal Center deals with only LLW generated by operating of nuclear power plants. The No.1 and No.2 disposal facility are now in operation. The disposal facilities in operation have a total dispose capacity of 80,000m 3 (equivalent to 400,000 drums). Our final business scope is to dispose of radioactive waste corresponding to 600,000 m 3 (equivalent to 3000,000 drums). For No.1 disposal facility, we have been disposing of homogeneous waste, including condensed liquid waste, spent resin, solidified with cement and asphalt, etc. For No.2 disposal facility, we can bury a solid waste solidified with mortar, such as activated metals and plastics, etc. Using an improved construction technology for an artificial barrier, the concrete pits in No.2 disposal facility could be constructed more economical and spacious than that of No.1. Both No.1 and No.2 facility will be able to bury about 200,000 waste packages (drums) each corresponding to 40,000 m 3 . As of March 17, 2008, Approximately 200,00 waste drums summing up No.1 and No.2 disposal facility have been received from Nuclear power plants and buried. (author)

  20. Disposal of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This Safety Requirements publication applies to the disposal of radioactive waste of all types by means of emplacement in designed disposal facilities, subject to the necessary limitations and controls being placed on the disposal of the waste and on the development, operation and closure of facilities. The classification of radioactive waste is discussed. This Safety Requirements publication establishes requirements to provide assurance of the radiation safety of the disposal of radioactive waste, in the operation of a disposal facility and especially after its closure. The fundamental safety objective is to protect people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. This is achieved by setting requirements on the site selection and evaluation and design of a disposal facility, and on its construction, operation and closure, including organizational and regulatory requirements.

  1. Alternative methods of salt disposal at the seven salt sites for a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This study discusses the various alternative salt management techniques for the disposal of excess mined salt at seven potentially acceptable nuclear waste repository sites: Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas; Richton and Cypress Creek Domes, Mississippi; Vacherie Dome, Louisiana; and Davis and Lavender Canyons, Utah. Because the repository development involves the underground excavation of corridors and waste emplacement rooms, in either bedded or domed salt formations, excess salt will be mined and must be disposed of offsite. The salt disposal alternatives examined for all the sites include commercial use, ocean disposal, deep well injection, landfill disposal, and underground mine disposal. These alternatives (and other site-specific disposal methods) are reviewed, using estimated amounts of excavated, backfilled, and excess salt. Methods of transporting the excess salt are discussed, along with possible impacts of each disposal method and potential regulatory requirements. A preferred method of disposal is recommended for each potentially acceptable repository site. 14 refs., 5 tabs

  2. Review of the nuclear waste disposal problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poch, L.A.; Wolsko, T.D.

    1979-10-01

    Regardless of future nuclear policy, a nuclear waste disposal problem does exist and must be dealt with. Even a moratorium on new nuclear plants leaves us with the wastes already in existence and wastes yet to be generated by reactors in operation. Thus, technologies to effectively dispose of our current waste problem must be researched and identified and, then, disposal facilities built. The magnitude of the waste disposal problem is a function of future nuclear policy. There are some waste disposal technologies that are suitable for both forms of HLW (spent fuel and reprocessing wastes), whereas others can be used with only reprocessed wastes. Therefore, the sooner a decision on the future of nuclear power is made the more accurately the magnitude of the waste problem will be known, thereby identifying those technologies that deserve more attention and funding. It is shown that there are risks associated with every disposal technology. One technology may afford a higher isolation potential at the expense of increased transportation risks in comparison to a second technology. Establishing the types of risks we are willing to live with must be resolved before any waste disposal technology can be instituted for widespread commercial use

  3. No nuclear power. No disposal facility?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinhals, J. [DMT GmbH und Co.KG, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Countries with a nuclear power programme are making strong efforts to guarantee the safe disposal of radioactive waste. The solutions in those countries are large disposal facilities near surface or in deep geological layers depending on the activity and half-life of the nuclides in the waste. But what will happen with the radioactive waste in countries that do not have NPPs but have only low amounts of radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities as well as from research reactors? Countries producing only low amounts of radioactive waste need convincing solutions for the safe and affordable disposal of their radioactive waste. As they do not have a fund by an operator of nuclear power plants, those countries need an appropriate and commensurate solution for the disposal of their waste. In a first overview five solutions seem to be appropriate: (i) the development of multinational disposal facilities by using the existing international knowhow; (ii) common disposal with hazardous waste; (iii) permanent storage; (iv) use of an existing mine or tunnel; (v) extension of the borehole disposal concept for all the categories of radioactive wastes.

  4. Room temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sleight, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    If the Holy Grail of room temperature superconductivity could be achieved, the impact on could be enormous. However, a useful room temperature superconductor for most applications must possess a T c somewhat above room temperature and must be capable of sustaining superconductivity in the presence of magnetic fields while carrying a significant current load. The authors will return to the subject of just what characteristics one might seek for a compound to be a room temperature superconductor. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  5. Measurement of Total Site Mercury Emissions from a Chlor-Alkali Plant Using Ultraviolet Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy and Cell Room Roof-Vent Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury-cell chlor-alkali plants can emit significant quantities of fugitive elemental mercury vapor to the air as part of production operations and maintenance activities. In the fall of 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a measurement project at a ch...

  6. New Mexico waste plant sits idle amid controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovejoy, L.A. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hopes to permanently dispose of radioactive waste from its weapons program at a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant about 26 miles from Carlsbad, New Mexico. The plant has been plagued by problems, according to Lindsay A. Lovejoy, Jr., an assistant attorney general of New Mexico. Among them are cracks in the walls of some of the underground rooms slated for storage of radioactive waste. Meanwhile, above-ground problems involve DOE's struggle toward regulatory compliance. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), under the Resource Conservation Recovery Act, has assumed a regulatory role over DOE's radioactive waste-disposal efforts, which is a new role for the agency. Lovejoy proposes that EPA, in its regulation of the New Mexico plant, develop compliance criteria and involve DOE and the public in ongoing open-quotes dialogue aimed at ferreting out any and all problems before a single scrap of radioactive waste is deposited into the earth beneath new Mexico.close quotes

  7. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomeke, J.O.

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive waste management and disposal requirements options available are discussed. The possibility of beneficial utilization of radioactive wastes is covered. Methods of interim storage of transuranium wastes are listed. Methods of shipment of low-level and high-level radioactive wastes are presented. Various methods of radioactive waste disposal are discussed

  8. Hydrologic study of the unsaturated zone adjacent to a radioactive-waste disposal site at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, P.

    1980-01-01

    Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity as a function of soil-water content and soil-water pressure head of field soils in the vicinity of a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site was measured for a period of 28 days following steady-state infiltration. Tensiometer and a neutron probe measurements were replicated four times at various depth intervals of from 12.0 to 120.00 inches below land surface in two 12 foot square plots. Values of soil-water content, soil-water flux, and hydraulic conductivity at each depth were calculated during the period of drainage using a computer program called SOIL. After drainage of soil-water through the 120 inch profile ceased, duplicate undisturbed soil cores from opposite sides of each plot and from disturbed and undisturbed sites within the burial grounds were recovered and subjected to pressure-plate analysis for the calculation of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. Laboratory analyses also included the determination of soil bulk density, particle-size distribution, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Calculation of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in the laboratory was made using a computer program called HYDRO, based upon the relationship of the soil-water content/soil-water pressure curve. Soils in the study area and the burial ground exhibited similar physical and hydrologic characteristics. Field derived hydraulic conductivity correlated well with laboratory derived conductivity. Variability of soil characteristics due to burial operations were minimal when compared to undisturbed natural soils in the study area. Two textural discontinuities were found to exist in the soil profile at depths of 12 to 24 inches and at 130 inches, which inhibit soil-water movement and thereby reduce the quantity and rate of recharge to the underlying water-table aquifer

  9. Post depositional memory record of mercury in sediment near effluent disposal site of a chlor-alkali plant in Thane Creek-Mumbai Harbour, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ram, A.; Rokade, M.A.; Zingde, M.D.; Borole, D.V.

    in landfills, mine tailings, contaminated industrial sites, soils and sediments. Estuaries and coastal marine regions form an essential link in the global biogeochemical cycling of Hg between the terrestrial environment - the major repository for atmospheric... by close relationship with organic matter, and Fe and Al oxides or sorbed onto the mineral particles [8]. Hence, sediments adjacent to the outfalls of chlor-alkali plants frequently contain high levels of Hg [7,10-15]. Some natural processes (water, soil...

  10. Disposal facility in Olkiluoto, description of above ground facilities in tunnel transport alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukkola, T.

    2006-11-01

    The above ground facilities of the disposal plant on the Olkiluoto site are described in this report as they will be when the operation of the disposal facility starts in the year 2020. The disposal plant is visualised on the Olkiluoto site. Parallel construction of the deposition tunnels and disposal of the spent fuel canisters constitute the principal design basis of the disposal plant. The annual production of disposal canisters for spent fuel amounts to about 40. Production of 100 disposal canisters has been used as the capacity basis. Fuel from the Olkiluoto plant and from the Loviisa plant will be encapsulated in the same production line. The disposal plant will require an area of about 15 to 20 hectares above ground level. The total building volume of the above ground facilities is about 75000 m 3 . The purpose of the report is to provide the base for detailed design of the encapsulation plant and the repository spaces, as well as for coordination between the disposal plant and ONKALO. The dimensioning bases for the disposal plant are shown in the Tables at the end of the report. The report can also be used as a basis for comparison in deciding whether the fuel canisters are transported to the repository by a lift or a by vehicle along the access tunnel. (orig.)

  11. Disposal facility in olkiluoto, description of above ground facilities in lift transport alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukkola, T.

    2006-11-01

    The above ground facilities of the disposal plant on the Olkiluoto site are described in this report as they will be when the operation of the disposal facility starts in the year 2020. The disposal plant is visualised on the Olkiluoto site. Parallel construction of the deposition tunnels and disposal of the spent fuel canisters constitute the principal design basis of the disposal plant. The annual production of disposal canisters for spent fuel amounts to about 40. Production of 100 disposal canisters has been used as the capacity basis. Fuel from the Olkiluoto plant and from the Loviisa plant will be encapsulated in the same production line. The disposal plant will require an area of about 15 to 20 hectares above ground level. The total building volume of the above ground facilities is about 75000 m 3 . The purpose of the report is to provide the base for detailed design of the encapsulation plant and the repository spaces, as well as for coordination between the disposal plant and ONKALO. The dimensioning bases for the disposal plant are shown in the Tables at the end of the report. The report can also be used as a basis for comparison in deciding whether the fuel canisters are transported to the repository by a lift or by a vehicle along the access tunnel. (orig.)

  12. Greater Confinement Disposal trench and borehole operations status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, J.P. Jr.; Wilhite, E.L.; Jaegge, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) facilities have been constructed within the operating burial ground at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) to dispose of the higher activity fraction of SRP low-level waste. GCD practices of waste segregation, packaging, emplacement below the root zone, and waste stabilization are being used in the demonstration. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. How to dispose of the other radwaste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    While the US Department of Energy searches for a repository for the highly radioactive spent fuel from nuclear power plants, federal law requires the states by January to have plans for establishing regional landfill sites for the disposal of so-called low-level radioactive waste. But a recent report from the Radioactive Waste Campaign in New York calls for ending the landfill approach to disposal of low-level waste in order to avoid the leakage and contamination of water supplies that have wracked existing landfills. According to physicist Marvin Resnikoff, author of the report, low-level waste is a misnomer for what often includes extremely long-lived radioactive waste requiring more careful disposal. Because 99% of the radioactivity and 70% of the volume of low-level waste comes from power reactors, Resnikoff advocates disposal on the plant site. He also advocates separation of wastes by their half-life and reclassification as high level of the long-lived radioactive waste from decommissioned plants. The much smaller volume of industrial and institutional waste should be supercompacted and also transferred to the plants for storage. The report further recommends a Manhattan Project-style effort to deal with the problem of radioactive waste as a whole

  14. Shaking table test of a base isolated model in main control room of nuclear power plant using LRB (lead rubber bearing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, K. W.; Lee, K. J.; Suh, Y. P.

    2005-01-01

    LRB(Lead Rubber Bearing) is a widely used isolation system which is installed between equipment and foundation to reduce seismic vibration from ground. LRB is consist of bearings which are resistant to lateral motion and torsion and has a high vertical stiffness. For that reason, several studies are conducted to apply LRB to the nuclear power plant. In this study, we designed two types of main control floor systems (type I, type II) and a number of shaking table tests with and without isolation system were conducted to evaluate floor isolation effectiveness of LRB

  15. Visualizing the characteristics of a work process being observed from the main control room of nuclear power plants - identifying underlying requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jinkyun; Jung, Wondea [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    One of the disseminated approaches is to identify and manage vulnerable tasks (i.e., error-prone tasks) by applying many kinds of human reliability assessment (HRA) techniques. That is, if HRA practitioners are able to identify plausible error forcing factors (e.g., performance shaping factors; PSFs) under a given task context, effective countermeasures that are helpful for reducing the possibility of human error can be drawn by deducing how to eliminate the associated PSFs. In order to reduce the variability of HRA results, the development of an objective criterion for determining the level of each PSF could be the most plausible countermeasure. In order to address this issue, this paper applied a process mining technique to the analysis of communication logs gathered from main control room (MCR) crews in NPPs, which could be useful for visualizing their characteristics in terms of the Work process. In this study, before providing additional information that is helpful for HRA practitioners in determining the quality of the Work process, three kinds of underlying requirements are identified. They are: (1) an ability to describe the flow of a work, (2) an ability to incorporate time and spatial information into the flow of a work, and (3) an ability to identify the flow of symptoms and/or knowledge being employed by an MCR crew. In order to satisfy these requirements, a couple of techniques can be used. This might allow partial pooling of log information according to how the information can be clustered.' In other words, the process mining technique is very useful for discovering the flow of a work being involved in a given situation, it is strongly expected that the analysis of communication logs that allow us to understand what and how they did in order to cope with a situation at hand. If so, it is possible to visualize necessary information that is essential for minimizing the variability of HRA practitioners who have to determine the quality of the Work

  16. Visualizing the characteristics of a work process being observed from the main control room of nuclear power plants - identifying underlying requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jinkyun; Jung, Wondea

    2015-01-01

    One of the disseminated approaches is to identify and manage vulnerable tasks (i.e., error-prone tasks) by applying many kinds of human reliability assessment (HRA) techniques. That is, if HRA practitioners are able to identify plausible error forcing factors (e.g., performance shaping factors; PSFs) under a given task context, effective countermeasures that are helpful for reducing the possibility of human error can be drawn by deducing how to eliminate the associated PSFs. In order to reduce the variability of HRA results, the development of an objective criterion for determining the level of each PSF could be the most plausible countermeasure. In order to address this issue, this paper applied a process mining technique to the analysis of communication logs gathered from main control room (MCR) crews in NPPs, which could be useful for visualizing their characteristics in terms of the Work process. In this study, before providing additional information that is helpful for HRA practitioners in determining the quality of the Work process, three kinds of underlying requirements are identified. They are: (1) an ability to describe the flow of a work, (2) an ability to incorporate time and spatial information into the flow of a work, and (3) an ability to identify the flow of symptoms and/or knowledge being employed by an MCR crew. In order to satisfy these requirements, a couple of techniques can be used. This might allow partial pooling of log information according to how the information can be clustered.' In other words, the process mining technique is very useful for discovering the flow of a work being involved in a given situation, it is strongly expected that the analysis of communication logs that allow us to understand what and how they did in order to cope with a situation at hand. If so, it is possible to visualize necessary information that is essential for minimizing the variability of HRA practitioners who have to determine the quality of the Work

  17. Disposal of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-01-15

    The problem of disposal can be tackled in two ways: the waste can be diluted and dispersed so that the radiation to which any single individual would be subjected would be negligible, or it can be concentrated and permanently isolated from man and his immediate environment. A variety of methods for the discharge of radioactive waste into the ground were described at the Monaco conference. They range from letting liquid effluent run into pits or wells at appropriately chosen sites to the permanent storage of high activity material at great depth in geologically suitable strata. Another method discussed consists in the incorporation of high level fission products in glass which is either buried or stored in vaults. Waste disposal into rivers, harbours, outer continental shelves and the open sea as well as air disposal are also discussed. Many of the experts at the Monaco conference were of the view that most of the proposed, or actually applied, methods of waste disposal were compatible with safety requirements. Some experts, felt that certain of these methods might not be harmless. This applied to the possible hazards of disposal in the sea. There seemed to be general agreement, however, that much additional research was needed to devise more effective and economical methods of disposal and to gain a better knowledge of the effects of various types of disposal operations, particularly in view of the increasing amounts of waste material that will be produced as the nuclear energy industry expands

  18. Discussion on control room habitability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bing; Chen Yingying; Xiao Jun; Yang Duanjie; Cui Hao

    2014-01-01

    The discussion on control room envelope integrity, source term analysis in habitability assessments and other impact factors for dose consequence is provided combined with regulatory requirements and the current status of domestic NPPs. Considering that the infiltration is an important factor for control room habitability assessment, CRE integrity test should be performed to demonstrate the CRE's infiltration characteristics. The consequence assessment should be performed based on different DBAs and different pathways, such as pathways internal to the plant. (authors)

  19. Improvement of main control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Sung Ki; Ham, Chang Sik; Kwon, Ki Chun

    1991-07-01

    Information display system, advanced alarm system and fiber optical communication system were developed to improve the main control room in nuclear power plant. Establishing the new hierachical information structure of plant operation data, plant overview status board(POSB) and digital indicator(DI) were designed and manufactured. The prototype advanced alarm system which employed the new alarm logics and algorithm compared with the conventional alarm system were developed and its effectiveness was proved. Optical communication system which has multi-drop feature and capability of upgrading to large-scale system by using BITBUS communication protocol which is proven technology, were developed. Reliability of that system was enhanced by using distributed control. (Author)

  20. Proposals for a revision and amendment of the 'Guide for the examination of control room personnel of nuclear power plants, technical and expert knowledge required'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, W.; Kersting, E.; Meissner, R.; Mester, W.; Richter, H.; Weber, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    a) Proposals are presented for amending the Guide in section 5 and 6 (Table I and II) and in the Annex (Examples of problems and answers), relating to three special subjects, namely: Thermohydraulics; Methods and procedures of analyzing the current operational state of a plant in case of incidents, malfunction failure indication; Plant operational performance and behaviour in cases exceeding design limits (especially analysis and counter-measures in case of reactor core damage, general behaviour in critical situations). b) Revision of all examples of problems to be put in examinations, and of the answers, as given in the Annex. Revision with regard to correctness and balanced distribution of difficulty of problems to be put in the various subject fields, and with regard to correctness of answers. This revision shall include an examination of the problems for their suitability to show the candidate's efficiency in diagnosis, prognosis and appropriate action. c) Proposals for amending and improving the Guide, resulting from an evaluation of the results and the experience gained in previous examinations. (orig.) [de

  1. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1982-01-01

    This book provides information on the origin, characteristics and methods of processing of radioactive wastes, as well as the philosophy and practice of their storage and disposal. Chapters are devoted to the following topics: radioactive wastes, characteristics of radioactive wastes, processing liquid and solid radioactive wastes, processing wastes from spent fuel reprocessing, processing gaseous radioactive wastes, fixation of radioactive concentrates, solidification of high-level radioactive wastes, use of radioactive wastes as raw material, radioactive waste disposal, transport of radioactive wastes and economic problems of radioactive wastes disposal. (C.F.)

  2. Subseabed disposal safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koplick, C.M.; Kabele, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes the status of work performed by Analytic Sciences Corporation (TASC) in FY'81 on subseabed disposal safety analysis. Safety analysis for subseabed disposal is divided into two phases: pre-emplacement which includes all transportation, handling, and emplacement activities; and long-term (post-emplacement), which is concerned with the potential hazard after waste is safely emplaced. Details of TASC work in these two areas are provided in two technical reports. The work to date, while preliminary, supports the technical and environmental feasibility of subseabed disposal of HLW

  3. Waste disposal technologies: designs and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Many states and compacts are presently in the throes of considering what technology to select for their low level waste disposal site. Both the technical and economic aspects of disposal technology are important considerations in these decisions. It is also important that they be considered in the context of the entire system. In the case of a nuclear power plant, that system encompasses the various individual waste streams that contain radioactivity, the processing equipment which reduces the volume and/or alters the form in which the radioisotopes are contained, the packaging of the processed wastes in shipment, and finally its disposal. One further part of this is the monitoring that takes place in all stages of this operation. This paper discusses the results of some research that has been sponsored by EPRI with the principal contractor being Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation. Included is a description of the distinguishing features found in disposal technologies developed in a generic framework, designs for a selected set of these disposal technologies and the costs which have been derived from these designs. In addition, a description of the early efforts towards defining the performance of these various disposal technologies is described. 5 figures, 1 table

  4. Control room habitability study: findings and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) has raised a number of concerns related to control room habitability and has recommended actions which they believe could alleviate these concerns. As a result of the ACRS's concerns, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) in conjunction with the Offices of Research and Inspection and Enforcement, and the NRC regional offices, embarked upon a program to reevaluate Control Room Habitability. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted by the NRC to perform a Control Room Habitability Study on twelve licensed power reactors. The plants selected for the study were chosen based upon architect engineer, nuclear steam system supplier, utility, and plant location. Participants in the study review the plant design as contained in the Updated Safety Analysis Report, Technical Specifications, Three Mile Island action item III.D.3.4 submittal on Control Room Habitability, NRC staff evaluation of the III.D.3.4 submittal, appropriate plant operating procedures, system drawings, and significant Licensee Event Reports on Loss of Cooling to the Control Room Envelope. A two-day visit is then made to the plant to determine if the as-built systems are built, operated, and surveillance performed as described in the documentation reviewed prior to the visit. The major findings of this study are included in this report along with generic recommendations of the review team that apply to control room HVAC systems. Although the study is not complete, at the time of publication of this report, the results obtained to date should be useful to persons responsible for Control Room Habitability in evaluating their own systems

  5. The psychosocial consequences of spent fuel disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paavola, J.; Eraenen, L.

    1999-03-01

    In this report the potential psychosocial consequences of spent fuel disposal to inhabitants of a community are assessed on the basis of earlier research. In studying the situation, different interpretations and meanings given to nuclear power are considered. First, spent fuel disposal is studied as fear-arousing and consequently stressful situation. Psychosomatic effects of stress and coping strategies used by an individual are presented. Stress as a collective phenomenon and coping mechanisms available for a community are also assessed. Stress reactions caused by natural disasters and technological disasters are compared. Consequences of nuclear power plant accidents are reviewed, e.g. research done on the accident at Three Mile Island power plant. Reasons for the disorganising effect on a community caused by a technological disaster are compared to the altruistic community often seen after natural disasters. The potential reactions that a spent fuel disposal plant can arouse in inhabitants are evaluated. Both short-term and long-term reactions are evaluated as well as reactions under normal functioning, after an incident and as a consequence of an accident. Finally an evaluation of how the decision-making system and citizens' opportunity to influence the decision-making affect the experience of threat is expressed. As a conclusion we see that spent fuel disposal can arouse fear and stress in people. However, the level of the stress is probably low. The stress is at strongest at the time of the starting of the spent fuel disposal plant. With time people get used to the presence of the plant and the threat experienced gets smaller. (orig.)

  6. Concept development for saltstone and low level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhite, E.L.

    1987-03-01

    A low-level alkaline salt solution will be a byproduct in the processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). This solution will be incorporated into a cement wasteform, saltstone, and placed in surface vaults. Laboratory and field testing and mathematical modeling have demonstrated the predictability of contaminant release from cement wasteforms. Saltstone disposal in surface vaults will meet drinking water standards in shallow groundwater at the disposal area boundary. Planning for new Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal could incorporate concepts developed for saltstone disposal

  7. CSN's New Emergency Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sendin, P.

    2005-01-01

    During the month of July 2005 the physical renovation works and technological updating of the basic infrastructures of the CSN Emergency Room (SALEM) were finished, allowing the Room to now have greater functionality and a broader technical capacity. Nevertheless, the technological improvement process of SALEM will reach its full potential within the next few years, once the installation currently underway of the new information integration and monitoring systems and the decision making support systems have been completed. This article describes the improvements introduced to the Room and the objectives pursued in this renovation project to convert the SALEM into a new generation room in accordance with its current technological context. (Author) 4 refs

  8. Simulation and experimental studies of operators' decision styles and crew composition while using an ecological and traditional user interface for the control room of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkati, N.; Buller, B.J.; Azadeh, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    A traditional human factors (i.e., microergonomic) approach to complex human-machine systems is only concerned with improving the workstation (user interface) design. This approach, by ignoring the importance of the integration of the user interface with job and organizational design, results in systems which lead, at best, only to sub-optimization and are therefore inherently error- and failure-prone. Such systems, when eventually faced with the concentration of certain fault events, will suffer from this open-quotes resident pathogenclose quotes and, as such, are doomed to failure. Also, when complex technological systems, such as nuclear power plants, move from routine to non-routine (normal to emergency) operation, the controlling operators need to dynamically match the system's new requirements. This mandates integrated and harmonious changes in information presentation (display), changes in (job) performance requirements in part because of operators' inevitable involuntary transition to different levels of cognitive control, and reconfigurations of the operators' team (organizational) structure and communication. It is also demonstrated that the skill, rule, and knowledge (SRK) model, developed by Rasmussen, is a high-potential and powerful framework that could be utilized for the proposed integration purpose. The objective of this research was threefold: (1) using the SRK model, to develop an integrated information processing conceptual framework (for integration of workstation, job, and team design); (2) to evaluate the user interface component of this framework -- the ecological display; and (3) to analyze the effect of operators' individual information processing behavior and decision styles on handling plant disturbances, on their performance and preference for traditional and ecological user interfaces

  9. Nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrett, G.J.; Gillespie, P.A.

    1983-07-01

    This report discusses events and processes that could adversely affect the long-term stability of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault or the regions of the geosphere and the biosphere to which radionuclides might migrate from such a vault

  10. Disposal leachates treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulomb, I.; Renaud, P. (SITA, 75 - Paris (France)); Courant, P. (FD Conseil, 78 - Gargenville (France)); Manem, J.; Mandra, V.; Trouve, E. (Lyonnaise des Eaux-Dumez, 78 - Le Pecq (France))

    1993-12-01

    Disposal leachates are complex and variable effluents. The use of a bioreactor with membranes, coupled with a reverse osmosis unit, gives a new solution to the technical burying centers. Two examples are explained here.

  11. Safe Disposal of Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Toxics Environmental Information by Location Greener Living Health Land, Waste, and Cleanup Lead Mold Pesticides Radon Science ... or www.earth911.com . Think before disposing of extra pesticides and containers: Never reuse empty pesticide containers. ...

  12. Disposal of Iodine-129

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, M.T.; Moore, J.G.; Devaney, H.E.; Rogers, G.C.; Williams, C.; Newman, E.

    1978-01-01

    One of the problems to be solved in the nuclear waste management field is the disposal of radioactive iodine-129, which is one of the more volatile and long-lived fission products. Studies have shown that fission products can be fixed in concrete for permanent disposal. Current studies have demonstrated that practical cementitious grouts may contain up to 18% iodine as barium iodate. The waste disposal criterion is based on the fact that harmful effects to present or future generations can be avoided by isolation and/or dilution. Long-term isolation is effective in deep, dry repositories; however, since penetration by water is possible, although unlikely, release was calculated based on leach rates into water. Further considerations have indicated that sea disposal on or in the ocean floor may be a more acceptable alternative

  13. Nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal is based on disposing of the waste in a vault excavated 500-1000 m deep in intrusive igneous rock of the Canadian Shield. The author believes that, if the concept is accepted following review by a federal environmental assessment panel (probably in 1995), then it is important that implementation should begin without delay. His reasons are listed under the following headings: Environmental leadership and reducing the burden on future generations; Fostering public confidence in nuclear energy; Forestalling inaction by default; Preserving the knowledge base. Although disposal of reprocessing waste is a possible future alternative option, it will still almost certainly include a requirement for geologic disposal

  14. Integrated Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the center of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site is the Integrated Disposal Facility, also known as the IDF.This facility is a landfill similar in concept...

  15. Shallow land disposal technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillette-Cousin, L. [Nuclear Environment Technology Insitute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of Korea )

    1997-12-31

    This paper covers the radioactive waste management policy and regulatory framework, the characteristics of low and intermediate level radioactive waste, the characteristics of waste package, the waste acceptance criteria, the waste acceptance and related activities, the design of the disposal system, the organization of waste transportation, the operation feature, the safety assessment of the Centre de L`Aube, the post closure measures, the closure of the Centre de la Mache disposal facility, the licensing issues. 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  16. Shallow land disposal technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillette-Cousin, L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper covers the radioactive waste management policy and regulatory framework, the characteristics of low and intermediate level radioactive waste, the characteristics of waste package, the waste acceptance criteria, the waste acceptance and related activities, the design of the disposal system, the organization of waste transportation, the operation feature, the safety assessment of the Centre de L'Aube, the post closure measures, the closure of the Centre de la Mache disposal facility, the licensing issues. 3 tabs., 7 figs

  17. Disposal Of Waste Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Hyeon; Lee, Seung Mu

    1989-02-01

    This book deals with disposal of waste matter management of soiled waste matter in city with introduction, definition of waste matter, meaning of management of waste matter, management system of waste matter, current condition in the country, collect and transportation of waste matter disposal liquid waste matter, industrial waste matter like plastic, waste gas sludge, pulp and sulfuric acid, recycling technology of waste matter such as recycling system of Black clawson, Monroe and Rome.

  18. A disposal centre for immobilized nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This report describes a conceptual design of a disposal centre for immobilized nuclear waste. The surface facilities consist of plants for the preparation of steel cylinders containing nuclear waste immobilized in glass, shaft headframe buildings and all necessary support facilities. The underground disposal vault is located on one level at a depth of 1000 m. The waste cylinders are emplaced into boreholes in the tunnel floors. All surface and subsurface facilities are described, operations and schedules are summarized, and cost estimates and manpower requirements are given. (auth)

  19. Effect of explicit representation of detailed stratigraphy on brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian-Frear, T.L.; Webb, S.W.

    1996-04-01

    Stratigraphic units of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal room horizon includes various layers of halite, polyhalitic halite, argillaceous halite, clay, and anhydrite. Current models, including those used in the WIPP Performance Assessment calculations, employ a ''composite stratigraphy'' approach in modeling. This study was initiated to evaluate the impact that an explicit representation of detailed stratigraphy around the repository may have on fluid flow compared to the simplified ''composite stratigraphy'' models currently employed. Sensitivity of model results to intrinsic permeability anisotropy, interbed fracturing, two-phase characteristic curves, and gas-generation rates were studied. The results of this study indicate that explicit representation of the stratigraphy maintains higher pressures and does not allow as much fluid to leave the disposal room as compared to the ''composite stratigraphy'' approach. However, the differences are relatively small. Gas migration distances are also different between the two approaches. However, for the two cases in which explicit layering results were considerably different than the composite model (anisotropic and vapor-limited), the gas-migration distances for both models were negligible. For the cases in which gas migration distances were considerable, van Genuchten/Parker and interbed fracture, the differences between the two models were fairly insignificant. Overall, this study suggests that explicit representation of the stratigraphy in the WIPP PA models is not required for the parameter variations modeled if ''global quantities'' (e.g., disposal room pressures, net brine and gas flux into and out of disposal rooms) are the only concern

  20. Effect of explicit representation of detailed stratigraphy on brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian-Frear, T.L.; Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geohydrology Dept.

    1996-04-01

    Stratigraphic units of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal room horizon includes various layers of halite, polyhalitic halite, argillaceous halite, clay, and anhydrite. Current models, including those used in the WIPP Performance Assessment calculations, employ a ``composite stratigraphy`` approach in modeling. This study was initiated to evaluate the impact that an explicit representation of detailed stratigraphy around the repository may have on fluid flow compared to the simplified ``composite stratigraphy`` models currently employed. Sensitivity of model results to intrinsic permeability anisotropy, interbed fracturing, two-phase characteristic curves, and gas-generation rates were studied. The results of this study indicate that explicit representation of the stratigraphy maintains higher pressures and does not allow as much fluid to leave the disposal room as compared to the ``composite stratigraphy`` approach. However, the differences are relatively small. Gas migration distances are also different between the two approaches. However, for the two cases in which explicit layering results were considerably different than the composite model (anisotropic and vapor-limited), the gas-migration distances for both models were negligible. For the cases in which gas migration distances were considerable, van Genuchten/Parker and interbed fracture, the differences between the two models were fairly insignificant. Overall, this study suggests that explicit representation of the stratigraphy in the WIPP PA models is not required for the parameter variations modeled if ``global quantities`` (e.g., disposal room pressures, net brine and gas flux into and out of disposal rooms) are the only concern.