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Sample records for plant amarillo texas

  1. Tiger Team Assessment of the Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-01

    This document contains the findings and associated root causes identified during the Tiger Team Assessment of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. This assessment was conducted by the Department's Office of Environment, Safety and Health between October 2 and 31, 1989. The scope of the assessment of the Pantex Plant covered all areas of environment, safety and health (ES H) activities, including compliance with federal, state, and local regulations, requirements, permits, agreements, orders and consent decrees, and DOE ES H Orders. The assessment also included an evaluation of the adequacy of DOE and site contractor ES H management programs. The draft findings were submitted to the Office of Defense Programs, the Albuquerque Operations Office, the Amarillo Area Office, and regulatory agencies at the conclusion of the on-site assessment activities for review and comment on technical accuracy. Final modifications and any other appropriate changes have been incorporated in the final report. The Tiger Team Assessment of the Pantex Plant is part of the larger Tiger Team Assessment program which will encompass over 100 DOE operating facilities. The assessment program is part of a 10-point initiative announced by Secretary of Energy James D. Watkins on June 27, 1989, to strengthen environmental protection and waste management activities in the Department. The results of the program will provide the Secretary with information on the compliance status of DOE facilities with regard to ES H requirements, root causes for noncompliance, adequacy of DOE and site contractor ES H management programs, and DOE-wide ES H compliance trends.

  2. Estimates of deep drainage rates at the U.S. Department of Energy Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayer, M.J.; Richmond, M.C.; Wigmosta, M.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kelley, M.E. [Battelle Environmental Restoration Dept., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1998-04-01

    In FY 1996, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provided technical assistance to Battelle Columbus Operations (BCO) in their ongoing assessment of contaminant migration at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. The objective of this report is to calculate deep drainage rates at the Pantex Plant. These deep drainage rates may eventually be used to predict contaminant loading to the underlying unconfined aquifer for the Pantex Plant Baseline Risk Assessment. These rates will also be used to support analyses of remedial activities involving surface alterations or the subsurface injection withdrawal of liquids or gases. The scope of this report is to estimate deep drainage rates for the major surface features at the Pantex Plant, including ditches and playas, natural grassland, dryland crop rotation, unvegetated soil, and graveled surfaces. Areas such as Pantex Lake that are outside the main plant boundaries were not included in the analysis. All estimates were derived using existing data or best estimates; no new data were collected. The modeling framework used to estimate the rates is described to enable future correlations, improvements, and enhancements. The scope of this report includes only data gathered during FY 1996. However, a current review of the data gathered on weather, soil, plants, and other information in the time period since did not reveal anything that would significantly alter the results presented in this report.

  3. Well-integrity survey (Phase II) of abandoned homestead water wells in the High Plains aquifer, former Pantex Ordance Plant and Texas Tech Research Farm near Amarillo, Texas, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Glenn A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the methods used and the results obtained during a field search for abandoned homestead sites and water wells at the former Pantex Ordnance Plant and Texas Tech Research Farm (Pantex site) near Amarillo, Texas. The search was the second phase of a three-phase well-integrity survey at the Pantex site proposed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

  4. Environmental Assessment for Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared pursuant to the implementing regulations to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which require federal agencies to assess the environmental impacts of a proposed action to determine whether that action requires the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or if a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) can be issued. The Pantex Plant does not possess permanent containerized waste staging facilities with integral secondary containment or freeze protection. Additional deficiencies associated with some existing staging facilities include: no protection from precipitation running across the staging pads; lack of protection against weathering; and facility foundations not capable of containing leaks, spills or accumulated precipitation. These shortcomings have raised concerns with respect to requirements under Section 3001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Deficiencies for these waste staging areas were also cited by a government audit team (Tiger Team) as Action Items. The provision for the staging of hazardous, mixed, and low level waste is part of the no-action altemative in the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the integrated ER/WM program. Construction of this proposed project will not prejudice whether or not this integration will occur, or how.

  5. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Project NO. 96-D-122 Pantex Plant Amarillo, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1999-05-27

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) addresses the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action regarding an upgrade of the Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF). Potential environmental consequences associated with the proposed action and alternative actions are provided. DOE proposes to design, build, and operate a new WWTF, consistent with the requirements of Title 30 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 317, ''Design Criteria for Sewage Systems,'' capable of supporting current and future wastewater treatment requirements of the Plant. Wastewater treatment at Pantex must provide sufficient operational flexibility to meet Pantex Plant's anticipated future needs, including potential Plant mission changes, alternative effluent uses, and wastewater discharge permit requirements. Treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water maybe used for irrigation on DOE-owned agricultural land. Five factors support the need for DOE action: (1) The current WWTF operation has the potential for inconsistent permit compliance. (2) The existing WWTF lies completely within the 100-year floodplain. (3) The Pantex Plant mission has the potential to change, requiring infrastructure changes to the facility. (4) The life expectancy of the existing facility would be nearing its end by the time a new facility is constructed. (5) The treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water would have a beneficial agricultural use through irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following factors are present and of concern at the proposed action site on Pantex Plant: (1) Periodic wastewater effluent permit exceedances; (2) Wetlands protection and floodplain management; (3) Capability of the existing facility to meet anticipated future needs of Pantex (4) Existing facility design life; and (5) Use of treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water for irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping

  6. Continuation application for the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, a higher education consortium consisting of Texas A and M University, Texas Tech University, and the University of Texas at Austin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-29

    This report describes the 5 tasks to be covered under this project and compiles budget information. Task 1 is to establish a Plutonium Information Resource, which has been established in Amarillo, Texas. Task 2, Advisory Functions, coordinates studies and activities relating to the disposition of excess weapons-grade plutonium. Task 3, Environmental, Public Health, and Safety, supports soil remediation activities. Task 4, Education and Outreach, is supporting four programs: K--12 education improvement in science and math courses; Academic intervention to identify and encourage high ability high school and middle school students with potential to become scientists and engineers; Graduate education evaluation; and Public outreach programs. Task 5, Plutonium and other Materials Studies, is currently funding two projects for the disposition of high explosives: a feasibility study of burning a mixture of high explosives and other materials in a commercial coal-fired power plant and synthesis of diamond by shock compression of bucky ball with explosives.

  7. 40 CFR 81.133 - Amarillo-Lubbock Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.133 Amarillo-Lubbock Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Amarillo-Lubbock Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Texas) consists of the territorial area encompassed... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amarillo-Lubbock Intrastate...

  8. Libraries in Texas: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/texas.html Libraries in Texas To use the sharing features on ... Amarillo Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Harrington Library of the Health Sciences 1400 Wallace Boulevard Amarillo, ...

  9. Final report of the Static Bonding Team, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.D.; Chen, K.C.; Holmes, S.W.

    1993-12-01

    The integrity of the electrostatic bonding procedures used to equilibrate operating technicians and weapon components was questioned during the course of the quality evaluation assessments of the W70, W68, and B57 dismantlement programs. A multi-disciplined, interlaboratory team was convened on an ad hoc basis to resolve certain static bonding issues. The accomplishments of this team in upgrading the integrity of the bonding process include recommendations on the proper use of wrist straps, training of technicians in their use, and procedures to reduce accumulation of static charge on components during routine handling operations.

  10. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium 1999 plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-30

    The purpose of the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium is to serve the Texas Panhandle, the State of Texas and the US Department of Energy by: conducting scientific and technical research; advising decision makers; and providing information on nuclear weapons materials and related environment, safety, health, and nonproliferation issues while building academic excellence in science and technology. This paper describes the electronic resource library which provides the national archives of technical, policy, historical, and educational information on plutonium. Research projects related to the following topics are described: Environmental restoration and protection; Safety and health; Waste management; Education; Training; Instrumentation development; Materials science; Plutonium processing and handling; and Storage.

  11. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium. Quarterly technical progress report, November 1, 1997--January 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report provides information on projects conducted by the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, a consortium of Texas A&M University, Texas Tech University, and the University of Texas. Progress is reported for four major areas: (1) plutonium information resource; (2) environmental, safety, and health; (3) communication, education, training, and community involvement; and (4) nuclear and other material studies. Environmental, safety, and health projects reported include a number of studies on high explosives. Progress reported for nuclear material studies includes storage and waste disposal investigations.

  12. An Archeological Overview and Management Plan for the Saginaw Army Aircraft Plant, Tarrant County, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-28

    Frank. 1975. Texas Plants - A Checklist and Ecological Suhmary. College Station: The Texas A & M University System, The Texas * -’.’Agriculture...the University of Texas Bulletin 3232. Simpson, G. G. 1941. Large Pleistocene Felines of North America. American Museum Noviatiates, No. 1136:19-27...Alternative View of Their Environment and Ecology . In Contemyorary Archeology, edited by Mark P. Leone, pp. 206-291. Carbondale, Edwardsville: Southern

  13. Analysis of vertical flow during ambient and pumped conditions in four monitoring wells at the Pantex Plant, Carson County, Texas, July-September 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Gregory P.; Thomas, Jonathan V.; Stoval, Jeffery

    2009-01-01

    The Pantex Plant is a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (USDOE/NNSA)-owned, contractor-operated facility managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC (B&W Pantex) in Carson County, Texas, approximately 17 miles northeast of Amarillo. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with B&W Pantex through the USDOE/NNSA, made a series of flowmeter measurements and collected other borehole geophysical logs during July–September 2008 to analyze vertical flow in screened intervals of four selected monitoring wells (PTX01–1012, PTX06–1044, PTX06–1056, and PTX06–1068) at the Pantex Plant. Hydraulic properties (transmissivity values) of the section of High Plains (Ogallala) aquifer penetrated by the wells also were computed. Geophysical data were collected under ambient and pumped flow conditions in the four monitoring wells. Unusually large drawdowns occurred at two monitoring wells (PTX06–1044 and PTX06–1056) while the wells were pumped at relatively low rates. A decision was made to redevelop those wells, and logs were run again after redevelopment in the two monitoring wells.

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pantex Facility, Amarillo, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Pantex Facility, conducted November 3 through 14, 1986.The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialist, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Pantex Facility. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Pantex Facility, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Pantex Facility Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey for the Pantex Facility. 65 refs., 44 figs., 27 tabs.

  15. Teenage Pregnancy in the Texas Panhandle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Myles, Rosa; Myles, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares rural and small-city teenage and adult pregnancies, with respect to complication rates and pregnancy outcomes. Methods: Chart review of Medicaid patients (513 teenage [under 20 years] and 174 adult controls [ages 25-34]) delivered (excluding multiple gestation) in Amarillo, Texas, from January 1999 to April 2001.…

  16. Teenage Pregnancy in the Texas Panhandle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Myles, Rosa; Myles, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares rural and small-city teenage and adult pregnancies, with respect to complication rates and pregnancy outcomes. Methods: Chart review of Medicaid patients (513 teenage [under 20 years] and 174 adult controls [ages 25-34]) delivered (excluding multiple gestation) in Amarillo, Texas, from January 1999 to April 2001.…

  17. Host plants of the tarnished plant bug (Heteroptera: Miridae) in Central Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, J F; Mowery, S V

    2007-08-01

    The tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), has taken on added importance as a pest of cotton in the Cotton Belt after successful eradication efforts for the boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman). Because the Southern Blacklands region of Central Texas is in advanced stages of boll weevil eradication, blooming weeds and selected row crops were sampled during a 3-yr study to determine lygus species composition and associated temporal host plants. L. lineolaris was the sole lygus species in the region. Thirteen previously unreported host plants were identified for L. lineolaris, of which 69% supported reproduction. Rapistrum rugosum L. Allioni and Ratibida columnifera (Nuttall) Wooton and Standley were primary weed hosts during the early season (17 March to 31 May). Conyza canadensis L. Cronquist variety canadensis and Ambrosia trifida L. were primary weed hosts during the midseason (1 June to 14 August) and late-season (15 August to 30 November), respectively. Sisymbrium irio L. and Lamium amplexicaule L. sustained L. lineolaris populations during the overwintering period (1 December to 16 March). The proportion of females and numbers of nymphs found in R. rugosum, C. canadensis, A. trifida, and S. irio suggests these weeds supported reproductive adults during the early, mid-, and late season and overwintering period, respectively. Medicago sativa L. was the leading crop host for L. lineolaris; Glycine max L. Merrill did not yield L. lineolaris. Few L. lineolaris were collected in Gossypium hirsutum L. These results provide a more comprehensive assessment of host plants contributing to L. lineolaris populations in central Texas.

  18. del colorante amarillo ácido 23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Eduardo Ayala

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Los colorantes que se descargan en las aguas residuales industriales se pueden destruir por procesos fisicoquímicos o biológicos, o se pueden recuperar para volverlos a usar en el proceso inicial. La recuperación del colorante se justifica si es un producto costoso y se encuentra en concentraciones que justifiquen la inversión. La recuperación del colorante es mucho más difícil en las aguas residuales, que en las etapas intermedias de la síntesis del colorante o en los procesos de teñido cuando se emplea el colorante. Una forma para recuperar los colorantes es la tecnología de membranas, estudiada en el presente trabajo, para lo cual se evaluó la membrana de nanofiltración —NF— NF90SR para la recuperación del colorante amarillo ácido 23. Este colorante es ampliamente usado en la coloración de textiles, así como en el sector alimenticio para dar el color deseado a las comidas o bebidas.El tratamiento con la membrana de nanofiltración NF90SR permitió obtener resultados de remoción de color superiores al 97% y en el sentido de valorización del residuo se realizó un proceso permanente de diafiltración (DF, la cual permitió la eliminación de la sal contenida en la solución en el 90%.

  19. Rare Plants and Animals of the Texas Hill Country: Educator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Dept. of Parks and Wildlife, Austin.

    Texas Hill Country is a land of fresh water springs, stony hills, and steep canyons and home to many rare plants and animals. Six activities for grades 3-5 and six activities for grades 6-12 are contained in this guide. Elementary activity highlights include using "The Lorax" by Dr. Seuss to stimulate critical thinking about environmental problems…

  20. Amarillo en prensa: El Heraldo de la Tarde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lic. Felipe de Jesús Fierro Alvídrez

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available El objeto de este trabajo es analizar sobre la base de los parámetros del libro "Amarillo en prensa", del doctor José Manuel de Pablos, las identidades del periódico sensacionalista por excelencia en la ciudad de Chihuahua (México como lo es el diario El Heraldo de la Tarde.

  1. Restoration of pitcher plant bogs in eastern Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald Mize; Robert E. Evans; Barbara R. MacRoberts; Michael H. MacRoberts; D. Craig Rudolph

    2005-01-01

    Pitcher plant bogs, also referred to as hillside seepages bogs or hillside bogs, are extremely restricted on the West Gulf Coastal Plain. the number and extent of extant bogs is in the low hundreds, comprising no more than a few thousand hectares of habitat. These bogs support a large number of plant species of significant conservation concern. threats to existing bogs...

  2. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the South Texas Project nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumgardner, J.D.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. South Texas Project was selected as a plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by the NRC inspectors in preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk important components at the South Texas Project plant.

  3. Ecological investigations at the Pantex Plant Site, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, C.E.; Mazaika, R.R.; Phillips, R.C.

    1993-09-01

    In 1992, Pantex requested that Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conduct a series of ecological surveys to provide baseline information for designing detailed ecological studies on the various ecosystems present at the Pantex plant site near Amarillo, Texas. To this end, PNL scientist and technicians visited the site at different times to conduct investigations and collect samples: July 6--13: birds, small mammals, general habitat assessment; August 10--14: wetland vegetation, birds, small mammals, Playa invertebrates; and September 7--11: birds, small mammals. This report presents the results of these three surveys.

  4. Phytoremediation of Groundwater at Air Force Plant 4, Carswell, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    swings in soil water potential through transpiration and by the continual addition of water-retentive organic matter. In essence , the 6 plant-microbe...ability of trees to act as pumps was noted in the late 19th century when Eucalyptus trees were planted in Italy and Algeria to dry up marshes. The...development of short rotation crops such as cottonwoods, hybrid poplar, willow, eucalyptus , or other energy crops, requires consideration of operational

  5. Marginal costs of water savings from cooling system retrofits: a case study for Texas power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, Aviva; Jaramillo, Paulina; Zhai, Haibo

    2016-10-01

    The water demands of power plant cooling systems may strain water supply and make power generation vulnerable to water scarcity. Cooling systems range in their rates of water use, capital investment, and annual costs. Using Texas as a case study, we examined the cost of retrofitting existing coal and natural gas combined-cycle (NGCC) power plants with alternative cooling systems, either wet recirculating towers or air-cooled condensers for dry cooling. We applied a power plant assessment tool to model existing power plants in terms of their key plant attributes and site-specific meteorological conditions and then estimated operation characteristics of retrofitted plants and retrofit costs. We determined the anticipated annual reductions in water withdrawals and the cost-per-gallon of water saved by retrofits in both deterministic and probabilistic forms. The results demonstrate that replacing once-through cooling at coal-fired power plants with wet recirculating towers has the lowest cost per reduced water withdrawals, on average. The average marginal cost of water withdrawal savings for dry-cooling retrofits at coal-fired plants is approximately 0.68 cents per gallon, while the marginal recirculating retrofit cost is 0.008 cents per gallon. For NGCC plants, the average marginal costs of water withdrawal savings for dry-cooling and recirculating towers are 1.78 and 0.037 cents per gallon, respectively.

  6. First year survival of barefoot and containerized hardwood tree seedlings planted in northeast Texas lignite minesoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, J.; Denman, J. [Texas Utilities Mining Company, Mt. Pleasant, TX (United States); Waxler, M.; Huber, D.A. [Weyerhaeuser, Hot Springs, AK (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Successful regeneration of hardwood tree seedlings is critical to the reclamation of quality wildlife habitat and commercial forests on lignite mines in northeast Texas. Because bareroot hardwood seedlings survival rates have often been lower than desired, the survival of containerized and bareroot hardwood tree seedlings was compared. Seven hardwood species, including six species of oaks, were planted in lignite minesoils on sites classified as bottomland, slope and upland. Three species were planted per site. Containerized seedlings were planted during the fall and winter, whereas bareroot seedlings were planted in the winter only. Survival was determined at the end of the first growing season. Results across all sites indicate that winter-planted containerized seedlings (74%) or bareroot seedlings (76%). Within the sites, the only significant difference was on upland sites where survival of winter-planted containerized seedlings (60%) was lower than bareroot seedlings (77%). Survival among species was not significantly different. There was no significant survival benefit from using more expensive containerized hardwood seedlings. The results also question the practice of planting containerized hardwood seedlings during the typical winter planting season for optimum survival.

  7. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions. [south Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Emissive and reflective data for 10 days, and IR data for 6 nights in south Texas scenes were analyzed after procedures were developed for removing cloud-affected data. HCMM radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures on nights when air temperature approached dewpoint temperatures; significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration; and, related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures. Vegetation greenness indexes calculated from visible and reflective IR bands of NOAA-6 to -9 meteorological satellites will be useful in the AgRISTARS program for seasonal crop development, crop condition, and drought applications.

  8. Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katherine Dombrowski

    2009-12-31

    This report presents the results of a multi-year test program conducted as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42779, 'Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD.' The objective of this program was to determine the level of mercury removal achievable using sorbent injection for a plant firing Texas lignite fuel and equipped with an ESP and wet FGD. The project was primarily funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. EPRI, NRG Texas, Luminant (formerly TXU), and AEP were project co-funders. URS Group was the prime contractor, and Apogee Scientific and ADA-ES were subcontractors. The host site for this program was NRG Texas Limestone Electric Generating Station (LMS) Units 1 and 2, located in Jewett, Texas. The plant fires a blend of Texas lignite and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Full-scale tests were conducted to evaluate the mercury removal performance of powdered sorbents injected into the flue gas upstream of the ESP (traditional configuration), upstream of the air preheater, and/or between electric fields within the ESP (Toxecon{trademark} II configuration). Phases I through III of the test program, conducted on Unit 1 in 2006-2007, consisted of three short-term parametric test phases followed by a 60-day continuous operation test. Selected mercury sorbents were injected to treat one quarter of the flue gas (e.g., approximately 225 MW equivalence) produced by Limestone Unit 1. Six sorbents and three injection configurations were evaluated and results were used to select the best combination of sorbent (Norit Americas DARCO Hg-LH at 2 lb/Macf) and injection location (upstream of the ESP) for a two-month performance evaluation. A mercury removal rate of 50-70% was targeted for the long-term test. During this continuous-injection test, mercury removal performance and variability were evaluated as the plant operated under normal conditions. Additional evaluations were made to determine any

  9. Preliminary assessment of perchlorate in ecological receptors at the Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant (LHAAP), Karnack, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P N; Theodorakis, C W; Anderson, T A; Kendall, R J

    2001-10-01

    There have been increasing human health and ecological concerns about ionic perchlorate (ClO4-) since it was detected in drinking water sources in 1997. Perchlorate is known to affect thyroid function, causing subsequent hormone disruption and potential perturbations of metabolic activities. According to current estimates, perchlorate is found in the surface of groundwater of 14 states, including Texas. Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, located in east central Texas, was a facility historically associated with perchlorate-containing propellants and rocket motors. Subsequently, perchlorate contamination in ground and surface waters at the facility has been reported. Soil, sediment, water, vegetation, and animal tissue samples were collected from several locations within the plant for a preliminary site assessment of perchlorate contamination. Perchlorate concentrations ranged from 555-5,557,000 ppb in vegetation, 811-2038 ppb in aquatic insects, below detection limits (ND) to 207 ppb in fish, ND-580 ppb in frogs, and ND-2328 ppb in mammals. Consistent with our hypothesis, aquatic organisms inhabiting perchlorate-contaminated surface water bodies contained detectable concentrations of perchlorate. Additionally, terrestrial organisms were exposed through pathways not necessarily related to contaminated surface waters. Therefore, these data demonstrate that aquatic and terrestrial species are exposed to perchlorate in the environment. To our knowledge, this represents the first incidence of perchlorate exposure among wild animals reported in the scientific literature.

  10. Sandrewia, n. gen., a problematical plant from the Lower Permian of Texas and Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamay, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    Sandrewia, n. gen., monotypified by S. texana, n. sp., is a plant from Lower Permian beds of north-central Texas and east-central Kansas. It is characterized by stout axes with spirally disposed, laxly inserted, petiolate leaves; the laminae are broadly flabelliform with coarse, open venation. The leaves are reminiscent of the vojnovskyalean Nephropsis, of the Permian Petchora Basin, U.S.S.R., but biologic relationships are only speculative because of limited material. However, leaf characteristics render Sandrewia easily identifiable. Its presently limited stratigraphic range, along with floristic associations, indicates it may be a useful guide fossil and supports the author's beliefs regarding important times and places in Paleozoic plant evolution. ?? 1975.

  11. Observation and modeling of the evolution of Texas power plant plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the second Texas Air Quality Study 2006 (TexAQS II, a full range of pollutants was measured by aircraft in eastern Texas during successive transects of power plant plumes (PPPs. A regional photochemical model is applied to simulate the physical and chemical evolution of the plumes. The observations reveal that SO2 and NOy were rapidly removed from PPPs on a cloudy day but not on the cloud-free days, indicating efficient aqueous processing of these compounds in clouds. The model reasonably represents observed NOx oxidation and PAN formation in the plumes, but fails to capture the rapid loss of SO2 (0.37 h−1 and NOy (0.24 h−1 in some plumes on the cloudy day. Adjustments to the cloud liquid water content (QC and the default metal concentrations in the cloud module could explain some of the SO2 loss. However, NOy in the model was insensitive to QC. These findings highlight cloud processing as a major challenge to atmospheric models. Model-based estimates of ozone production efficiency (OPE in PPPs are 20–50 % lower than observation-based estimates for the cloudy day.

  12. Los libros muerden!: Biblioterapia en el portal amarillo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Deberti Martins

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo se basa en una ponencia que fuera presentada en el VI Congreso Multidisciplinario  de Salud Comunitaria del Mercosur (Montevideo, setiembre de 2011. El mismo surge de nuestra experiencia como biblioterapeutas en la biblioteca del Portal Amarillo (Centro Nacional de Información y Referencia en Drogas. Se plantean reflexiones acerca del fenómeno de la lectura en general, y particularmente en lo relativo a su función reparadora del tejido social y del psiquismo,  mediante el proceso de simbolización.  Brindamos nuestra concepción de una biblioterapia posible, anclada en el psicoanálisis y según las ideas desarrolladas por Donald Winnicott en lo relativo a la transicionalidad. Se describen las sesiones de biblioterapia, y el perfil del biblioterapeuta.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Exiguobacterium sp. KKBO11, Isolated Downstream of a Wastewater Treatment Plant in Houston, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rupa; Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Exiguobacterium sp. KKBO11, isolated near a wastewater treatment plant in Houston, Texas, USA, possesses a large number of genes involved in stress response and transport critical to survival in adverse environmental conditions. An unusually high copy number of RNA genes also possibly contributes to this microorganism's versatility by promoting nutrient uptake.

  14. 78 FR 56025 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Determination of Endangered Status for Texas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... drought years of 1999- 2000 (Texas Water Resources Institute 2011, unpaginated) when the Chapel Hill site... golden gladecress or white bladderpod sites (Turner 2003, in Service 2010a, p. 3). Conservation The Texas... element of the San Augustine Glades Area Conservation Plan developed by TNC of Texas in 2003 (TNC...

  15. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium. Quarterly technical progress report, February 1, 1998--April 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    Activities from the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium are described. Areas of work include materials science of nuclear and explosive materials, plutonium processing and handling, robotics, and storage.

  16. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium. Quarterly technical progress report, May 1, 1997--July 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Progress summaries are provided from the Amarillo National Center for Plutonium. Programs include the plutonium information resource center, environment, public health, and safety, education and training, nuclear and other material studies.

  17. Texas Greenup

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    June 2007 was one of the wettest Junes on record for the state of Texas. Starting in late May, a string of low-pressure systems settled in over the U.S. Southern Plains and unleashed weeks of heavy to torrential rain. During the final week of June, much of Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas received more than 330 percent of their average rainfall, said the National Climatic Data Center. The widespread heavy rain brought deadly floods to the entire region. On July 6, the Associated Press reported that every major river basin in Texas was at flood stage, an event that had not occurred since 1957. In addition to causing floods, the rains stimulated plant growth. The grassy, often arid, plains and plateaus of northern Mexico (bottom left), Texas (center), and New Mexico (top, left of center) burst to life with dense vegetation as this vegetation anomaly image shows. Regions where plants were growing more quickly or fuller than average are green, while areas where growth is below average are brown. Most of Texas is green, with a concentrated deep green, almost black, spot where vegetation growth was greatest. This area of western Texas is where the Pecos River flows out of New Mexico and heads southeast to the Rio Grande. In the darkest areas, vegetation was more than 100 percent above average. The brown spots in northeastern Texas and Oklahoma (top, right of center) may be areas where persistent clouds or water on the ground are hiding the plants from the satellite's view. Plants may also be growing less than average if swamped by too much rain. The image was made with data collected by the SPOT satellite between June 11 and June 20, 2007. NASA imagery created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using SPOT data provided courtesy of the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service and processed by Jennifer Small and Assaf Anyamba of the GIMMS Group at NASA GSFC.

  18. Plant dieback under exceptional drought driven by elevation, not by plant traits, in Big Bend National Park, Texas, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth F. Waring

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, Big Bend National Park, Texas, USA, experienced the most severe single year drought in its recorded history, resulting in significant plant mortality. We used this event to test how perennial plant response to drought varied across elevation, plant growth form and leaf traits. In October 2010 and October 2011, we measured plant cover by species at six evenly-spaced elevations ranging from Chihuahuan desert (666 m to oak forest in the Chisos mountains (1,920 m. We asked the following questions: what was the relationship between elevation and stem dieback and did susceptibility to drought differ among functional groups or by leaf traits? In 2010, pre-drought, we measured leaf mass per area (LMA on each species. In 2011, the percent of canopy dieback for each individual was visually estimated. Living canopy cover decreased significantly after the drought of 2011 and dieback decreased with elevation. There was no relationship between LMA and dieback within elevations. The negative relationship between proportional dieback and elevation was consistent in shrub and succulent species, which were the most common growth forms across elevations, indicating that dieback was largely driven by elevation and not by species traits. Growth form turnover did not influence canopy dieback; differences in canopy cover and proportional dieback among elevations were driven primarily by differences in drought severity. These results indicate that the 2011 drought in Big Bend National Park had a large effect on communities at all elevations with average dieback for all woody plants ranging from 8% dieback at the highest elevation to 83% dieback at lowest elevations.

  19. Observation and modeling of the evolution of Texas power plant plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhou

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available During the second Texas Air Quality Study 2006 (TexAQS II, a full range of pollutants was measured by aircraft in eastern Texas during successive transects of power plant plumes (PPPs. A regional photochemical model is applied to simulate the physical and chemical evolution of the plumes. The observations reveal that SO2 and NOy were rapidly removed from PPPs on a cloudy day but not on the cloud-free days, indicating efficient aqueous processing of these compounds in clouds. The model reasonably represents observed NOx oxidation and PAN formation in the plumes, but fails to capture the rapid loss of SO2 (0.37 h−1 and NOy (0.24 h−1 in some plumes on the cloudy day. Adjustments to the cloud liquid water content (QC and the default metal concentrations in the cloud module could explain some of the SO2 loss. However, NOy in the model was insensitive to QC. These findings highlight cloud processing as a major challenge to atmospheric models. Model-based estimates of ozone production efficiency (OPE in PPPs are 20–50 % lower than observation-based estimates. Possible explanations for this discrepancy include the observed rapid NOy loss which biases high some observation-based OPE estimates, and the model's under-prediction of isoprene emissions.

  20. 78 FR 40970 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Six West Texas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ..., water quantity and quality, the effect of existing regulatory mechanisms and other potential threats... Board, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, the Texas Land Commission, and the Texas...; (2) focusing conservation activities; (3) providing educational benefits; and (4) preventing...

  1. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium quarterly technical progress report, August 1, 1997--October 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes activities of the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium during the quarter. The report describes the Electronic Resource Library; DOE support activities; current and future environmental health and safety programs; pollution prevention and pollution avoidance; communication, education, training, and community involvement programs; and nuclear and other material studies, including plutonium storage and disposition studies.

  2. Soybean Yield along the Texas Gulf Coast during Periods of Variable Rainfall as Influenced by Soybean Cultivar and Planting Date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Grichar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybeans (Glycine max can be planted along the upper Texas Gulf Coast from mid-March through May to take advantage of early season rains and to complete harvest before hurricane season and fall rains become a problem. When average to above average rainfall was received in May through July, yields were greater with the early April to mid-April planting; however, under high rainfall conditions throughout the season, the mid-April to early May planting produced the highest yields, with yields of over 4000 kg/ha. When rainfall was below normal, late March to early April plantings produced the greatest yields. When rainfall was above average, soybeans took longer to reach harvestability regardless of cultivar or plant dates, while under drought conditions the interval between planting and harvest was reduced. However, when planting was delayed, there was a greater risk of detrimental late-season effects from southern green stink bug (Nezara viridula or the brown stink bug (Euschistus heros.

  3. 77 FR 49601 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Status for Six West Texas Aquatic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... to be of ancient origin, with the water being estimated at 10,000 to 18,000 years old (Chowdhury et... of the larger West Texas Bolsons and is made up of connected sub-basins underlying Wild Horse...). (The term bolson is of Spanish origin and refers to a flat-floored desert valley that drains to a playa...

  4. Installation Restoration Program Records Search for Air Force Plant 4, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    Aj34 =4 . (D -4w o n.4.o 1 4 -4 0 Z1- 41 w 4J r-4 04.3 r. 00. w A ( 0 1 g - 000 44J -4 1.4P, , 3PL 14u Z~. 00 0- (n 0A ’ A’ 8A 0 0 0 0" 0’ 00V.40 to...Gebaur AFB, Missouri; Bergstrom AFB, Texas; and Cannon AFB, New Mexico . Mr. Moccia has directed the preparation of Remedial Action Master Plans (RAMP) for...Presented General Dynamics. Fort Worth, Texas. June 22, 1983. 12. General Dynamics. Letter to Directorate of Nuclear Safety, Kirkland AFB, New Mexico

  5. 75 FR 52924 - Designation for the Amarillo, TX; Cairo, IL; State of Louisiana; State of North Carolina; Belmond...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... information regarding the designation criteria in section 7(f)(l) of the USGSA (7 U.S.C. 79(f)) and determined... Headquarters location and telephone start end Amarillo Amarillo, TX (806-372-2152)........ 10/1/2010 9/30/2013 Additional Location: Guymon, OK.... Cairo Cairo, IL (618-734-1316) 10/1/2010 9/30/2013 Louisiana Baton...

  6. Industry Application ECCS / LOCA Integrated Cladding/Emergency Core Cooling System Performance: Demonstration of LOTUS-Baseline Coupled Analysis of the South Texas Plant Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Szilard, Ronaldo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Epiney, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Parisi, Carlo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Vaghetto, Rodolfo [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Vanni, Alessandro [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Neptune, Kaleb [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Under the auspices of the DOE LWRS Program RISMC Industry Application ECCS/LOCA, INL has engaged staff from both South Texas Project (STP) and the Texas A&M University (TAMU) to produce a generic pressurized water reactor (PWR) model including reactor core, clad/fuel design and systems thermal hydraulics based on the South Texas Project (STP) nuclear power plant, a 4-Loop Westinghouse PWR. A RISMC toolkit, named LOCA Toolkit for the U.S. (LOTUS), has been developed for use in this generic PWR plant model to assess safety margins for the proposed NRC 10 CFR 50.46c rule, Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) performance during LOCA. This demonstration includes coupled analysis of core design, fuel design, thermalhydraulics and systems analysis, using advanced risk analysis tools and methods to investigate a wide range of results. Within this context, a multi-physics best estimate plus uncertainty (MPBEPU) methodology framework is proposed.

  7. Identification of cotton fleahopper (Hemiptera: Miridae) host plants in central Texas and compendium of reported hosts in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, J F; Esquivel, S V

    2009-06-01

    The cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter), is an early-season pest of developing cotton in Central Texas and other regions of the Cotton Belt. Cotton fleahopper populations develop on spring weed hosts and move to cotton as weed hosts senesce or if other weed hosts are not readily available. To identify weed hosts that were seasonably available for the cotton fleahopper in Central Texas, blooming weed species were sampled during early-season (17 March-31 May), mid-season (1 June-14 August), late-season (15 August-30 November), and overwintering (1 December-16 March) periods. The leading hosts for cotton fleahopper adults and nymphs were evening primrose (Oenothera speciosa T. Nuttall) and Mexican hat [Ratibida columnifera (T. Nuttall) E. Wooton and P. Standley], respectively, during the early season. During the mid-season, silver-leaf nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium A. Cavanilles) was consistently a host for fleahopper nymphs and adults. Woolly croton (Croton capitatus A. Michaux) was a leading host during the late season. Cotton fleahoppers were not collected during the overwintering period. Other suitable hosts were available before previously reported leading hosts became available. Eight previously unreported weed species were documented as temporary hosts. A compendium of reported hosts, which includes >160 plant species representing 35 families, for the cotton fleahopper is provided for future research addressing insect-host plant associations. Leading plant families were Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, and Onagraceae. Results presented here indicate a strong argument for assessing weed species diversity and abundance for the control of the cotton fleahopper in the Cotton Belt.

  8. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER AT AIR FORCE PLANT 4, CARSWELL, TEXAS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 600 Cottonwood trees were planted over a shallow groundwater plume in an attempt to detoxify the trichloroethylene (TCE) in a groundwater plume at a former Air Force facility. Two planting techniques were used: rooted stock about two years old, and 18 inch cuttings were inst...

  9. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER AT AIR FORCE PLANT 4, CARSWELL, TEXAS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 600 Cottonwood trees were planted over a shallow groundwater plume in an attempt to detoxify the trichloroethylene (TCE) in a groundwater plume at a former Air Force facility. Two planting techniques were used: rooted stock about two years old, and 18 inch cuttings were inst...

  10. 78 FR 56071 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Texas Golden...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... (white bladderpod), an associated endangered plant, populations on their property). As preparation for... boundaries of critical habitat units we used a geographic information system (GIS) to overlay the appropriate...

  11. Herencia mendeliana en microsatélites de abulón amarillo Haliotis corrugata

    OpenAIRE

    Noé Díaz-Viloria; Ricardo Pérez-Enríquez; Pedro Cruz-Hernández; Daniel Aguilar-Osuna

    2013-01-01

    En México la pesquería de abulón amarillo (Haliotis corrugata) se ha visto fuertemente afectada por la sobrepesca y factores ambientales. En este contexto, la repoblación de los bancos silvestres mediante liberación de larvas o juveniles producidos en laboratorio se ha vislumbrado como una alternativa para incrementar la producción. Cualquier programa de repoblamiento debe considerar una estrategia de manejo genético que evite la pérdida de diversidad genética y que permita dar seguimiento de...

  12. LiDAR-Based Solar Mapping for Distributed Solar Plant Design and Grid Integration in San Antonio, Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan B. Le

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study represents advancements in the state-of-the-art of the solar energy industry by leveraging LiDAR-based building characterization for city-wide, distributed solar photovoltaics, solar maps, highlighting the distribution of solar energy across the city of San Antonio. A methodology is implemented to systematically derive the tilt and azimuth angles of each rooftop and to quantify solar direct, diffuse, and global horizontal irradiance for hundreds of buildings in a LiDAR tile scale, by using already established methodologies that are typically only applied to a single location or building rooftop. The methodology enables the formulation of typical meteorological data, measured or forecasted time series of irradiances over distributed assets. A new concept on the subject of distributed solar plant (DSP design is also introduced, by using the building rooftop tilt and azimuth angles, to strategically optimize the use and adoption of solar incentives according to the grid age and its vulnerabilities to solar variability in the neighborhoods. The method presented here shows that on an hourly basis DSP design could provide a 5% and 9% of net load capacity support per hour in the afternoon and morning times, respectively. Our results show that standard building rooftop tilt angles in the south Texas region has significant impact on the total amount of the energy over the course of a day, though its impact on the shapes of the daily energy profile is relatively insignificant when compared to the azimuth angle. Building surfaces’ azimuth angle is the most important factor to determine the shape of daily energy profile and its peak location within a day. The methodology developed in this study can be employed to study the potential solar energy in other regions and to match the design of distributed solar plants to the capacity needs on specified distribution grids.

  13. Remote sensing of aquatic plants. [New York, Florida, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, K. S.; Link, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Various sensors were tested in terms of their ability to detect and discriminate among noxious aquatic macrophytes. A survey of researchers currently studying the problem and a brief summary of their work is included. Results indicated that the sensor types best suited to assessment of the aquatic environment are color, color infrared, and black-and-white infrared film, which furnish consistently high contrasts between aquatic plants and their surroundings.

  14. 77 FR 55967 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Determination of Status for Texas Golden...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ...- shaped), 0.3-0.4 in (7-10 mm) long and 0.1-0.2 (3.5-5 mm) wide. The fruit is a slender seed capsule... in (2-5.5 mm)) and that contains 5-11 flattened, circular or spherically shaped seeds. The... seeds germinate during fall rains and the plants overwinter as small, tap-rooted rosettes. Flowering...

  15. Draft Environmental Impact Statement: Peacekeeper Rail Garrison Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    advanced culture characterized by an extensive trade network and a series of traits such as ceremonial architecture and maize (corn) agriculture...Statement, Pantex Plant Site, Amarillo , Texas (U.S. Department of Energy 1983), which covers nuclear weapons assembly, stockpile monitoring, maintenance...1983 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Pantex Plant Site, Amarillo ,_ Texas (DOE/EIS-0098). National Technical Information Service, Washington

  16. Characterization of stormwater runoff from the Naval Air Station and Naval Wepons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas, 1994-96

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, T.H.; Baldys, Stanley; Lizarraga, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    The characterization of stormwater runoff from the Naval Air Station (NAS) and the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant (NWIRP), Dallas, Texas, is necessary to determine if runoff from the facilities is contributing to off-site contamination of surface waters, A network of five fixed sites and four grab sites was established to collect stormwater-runoff samples from a substantial part of the drainage area of each facility. Fixed sites were instrumented to measure and store precipitation, stage, discharge, and runoff-volume data and to collect flow-weighted composite samples during a storm. Grab and composite samples were collected for six storms at each of the five fixed sites from October 1994 to March 1996. The grab samples were analyzed for about 100 properties and constituents including specific conductance, pH, water temperature, bacteria, trace elements, oil and grease, total phenols, and volatile organic compounds. The composite samples were analyzed for about 220 properties and constituents including specific conductance, pH, chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, major ions, suspended and dissolved solids, nutrients, trace elements, total organic carbon, volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, and organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides. Grab samples were collected for two storms (September 18,1995, and October 2,1995) at each of the four grab sites. The grab samples were analyzed for about 80 constituents including specific conductance, pH, water temperature, trace elements, and volatile organic compounds. Composite samples were collected for two of the six storms sampled at the fixed sites and analyzed for aquatic toxicity. Fathead minnow growth and survival toxicity tests and water flea reproduction and survival toxicity tests were done.

  17. Spatiotemporal relationships among Late Pennsylvanian plant assemblages: Palynological evidence from the Markley Formation, West Texas, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looy, Cindy V.; Hotton, Carol L.

    2014-01-01

    The Pennsylvanian lowlands of western Pangea are best known for their diverse wetland floras of arborescent and herbaceous ferns, and arborescent horsetails and clubmosses. In apparent juxtaposition, a very different kind of flora, dominated by a xerophilous assemblage of conifers, taeniopterids and peltasperms, is occasionally glimpsed. Once believed to represent upland or extrabasinal floras from well-drained portions of the landscape, these dryland floras more recently have been interpreted as lowland assemblages growing during drier phases of glacial/interglacial cycles. Whether Pennsylvanian dryland and wetland floras were separated spatially or temporally remains an unsettled question, due in large part to taphonomic bias toward preservation of wetland plants. Previous paleobotanical and sedimentological analysis of the Markley Formation of latest Pennsylvanian (Gzhelian) age, from north central Texas, U.S.A, indicates close correlation between lithofacies and distinct dryland and wetland megaflora assemblages. Here we present a detailed analysis one of those localities, a section unusual in containing abundant palynomorphs, from the lower Markley Formation. Paleobotanical, palynological and lithological data from a section thought to represent a single interglacial/glacial phase are integrated and analyzed to create a complex picture of an evolving landscape. Megafloral data from throughout the Markley Formation show that conifer-dominated dryland floras occur exclusively in highly leached kaolinite beds, likely eroded from underlying soils, whereas a mosaic of wetland floras occupy histosols, ultisols, and fluvial overbank deposits. Palynological data largely conform to this pattern but reveal a more complex picture. An assemblage of mixed wetland and dryland palynofloral taxa is interpolated between a dryland assemblage and an overlying histosol containing wetland taxa. In this section, as well as elsewhere in the Markley Formation, kaolinite and overlying

  18. Spatiotemporal relationships among Late Pennsylvanian plant assemblages: Palynological evidence from the Markley Formation, West Texas, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looy, Cindy V; Hotton, Carol L

    2014-12-01

    The Pennsylvanian lowlands of western Pangea are best known for their diverse wetland floras of arborescent and herbaceous ferns, and arborescent horsetails and clubmosses. In apparent juxtaposition, a very different kind of flora, dominated by a xerophilous assemblage of conifers, taeniopterids and peltasperms, is occasionally glimpsed. Once believed to represent upland or extrabasinal floras from well-drained portions of the landscape, these dryland floras more recently have been interpreted as lowland assemblages growing during drier phases of glacial/interglacial cycles. Whether Pennsylvanian dryland and wetland floras were separated spatially or temporally remains an unsettled question, due in large part to taphonomic bias toward preservation of wetland plants. Previous paleobotanical and sedimentological analysis of the Markley Formation of latest Pennsylvanian (Gzhelian) age, from north central Texas, U.S.A, indicates close correlation between lithofacies and distinct dryland and wetland megaflora assemblages. Here we present a detailed analysis one of those localities, a section unusual in containing abundant palynomorphs, from the lower Markley Formation. Paleobotanical, palynological and lithological data from a section thought to represent a single interglacial/glacial phase are integrated and analyzed to create a complex picture of an evolving landscape. Megafloral data from throughout the Markley Formation show that conifer-dominated dryland floras occur exclusively in highly leached kaolinite beds, likely eroded from underlying soils, whereas a mosaic of wetland floras occupy histosols, ultisols, and fluvial overbank deposits. Palynological data largely conform to this pattern but reveal a more complex picture. An assemblage of mixed wetland and dryland palynofloral taxa is interpolated between a dryland assemblage and an overlying histosol containing wetland taxa. In this section, as well as elsewhere in the Markley Formation, kaolinite and overlying

  19. Female vibration discourages male courtship behaviour in the Amarillo fish (Girardinichthys multiradiatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Medina, Lourdes; Macías Garcia, Constantino; Flores Urbina, Amira; Manjarrez, Javier; Moyaho, Alejandro

    2013-11-01

    Amarillo fish females (Girardinichthys multiradiatus) vibrate when conspecific males approach them; the reason behind this behaviour is unclear. Hypotheses are that females vibrate either to avoid aggression from males or to court them. We prevented females from vibrating by temporarily blocking their lateral line organs and eyes, on the assumption that they rely on these senses to detect approaching males. Females with the lateral line organs obstructed vibrated less frequently than females with the lateral line intact, indicating that the mechanosensory lateral line system is necessary for perceiving approaching males. Males displayed more courtship behaviour to sighted females with the lateral line organs obstructed than to sighted females with the lateral line intact. A general tendency indicated that the less the females vibrated the more the males courted them. These findings indicate that female vibration discourages male courtship behaviour.

  20. DINÁMICA ESPACIO-TEMPORAL DEL HUMEDAL JUAN AMARILLO ENTRE 1950 - 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BEJARANO MORA PATRICIA ANDREA

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    RESUMEN

    Se analizó la dinámica del Humedal Juan Amarillo durante el periodo comprendido entre los años 1950-2005. Los resultados muestran que la configuración paisajística del ecosistema ha cambiado notoriamente con una tendencia al incremento en el número, tamaño y tipo de parches. Igualmente se presentan diferencias estructurales importantes entre los diversos periodos de tiempo analizados, ocasionados principalmente por la disminución y desaparición de espejos de agua y el aumento de pasto kikuyo (Pennisetum clandestinum. En cuanto al arreglo espacial de los elementos paisajísticos, no sucedieron cambios importantes en los patrones de distribución espacial de los elementos paisajísticos del humedal. De acuerdo con la dimensión fractal, los elementos del paisaje presentan dos tendencias en cuanto a su complejidad: los elementos introducidos poseen las formas más complejas y los elementos propios del ecosistema tienen formas más regulares. Finalmente, la dinámica del humedal fue modelada con el fin de interpretar cómo las múltiples interacciones entre los elementos paisajísticos han influido en la configuración del humedal a lo largo del tiempo.

    Palabras clave: Humedal Juan Amarillo, estructura, composición, dimensión fractal.


    ABSTRACT

    The dynamics of Juan Amarillos’ wetland were analyzed during 55 year between 1950 and 2005. The results showed that the landscape configuration of the ecosystems has dramatically changed within a trend to increase in number, size, and patch type. Likewise, important structural differences came up between the various periods in question; such differences appear to be related to the reduction and disappearance of the pond and the significant increase of the non native kikuyo grass (Pennisetum clandestinum. Regarding the spatial

  1. Proceedings of the AESOP conference. [Association for Energy Systems, Operations, and Programming, Amarillo, Texas, April 18--20, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-07-01

    Individual abstracts were prepared for 22 of the items in these proceedings. The remaining two have already been cited in ERA, and can be located by referring to CONF-780423- in the Report Number Index. (RWR)

  2. Aceptabilidad de empanizados enriquecidos con harina de pota (Dosidicus gigas), huevo de codorniz (Coturnix coturnix) y pimiento amarillo (Capsicum annuum)

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero Hurtado, Emma Del Rosario; Palomino Pezzutti, Ricardo Ramiro; Tamariz Grados, Nelly Norma; Cajaleón Asencios, Delia Haydee; Dextre Mendoza, Rodolfo Willian; Carreño Mundo, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: Evaluar la aceptabilidad de empanizados enriquecidos con harina de pota (Dosidicus gigas), huevo de codorniz (Coturnix coturnix) y pimiento amarillo (Capsicum annuum). Métodos: Optimizar una formulación de alimento listo para el consumo humano, conforme a requisitos: NTP NDECOPI: Harina de trigo, NTP 205. 027. 1996, NTP-CODEX STAN 166:2014 -Barritas, Porciones y Filetes de pescado empanizados o rebozados congelados. Resultados: El aroma, color y textura de los empanizados formula...

  3. DINÁMICA ESPACIO-TEMPORAL DEL HUMEDALJUAN AMARILLO ENTRE 1950 - 2005 Dynamics Space Temporary Juan Amarillo WetlandBetween 1950-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIA ANDREA BEJARANO MORA

    Full Text Available Se analizó la dinámica del Humedal Juan Amarillo durante el periodo comprendido entre los años 1950-2005. Los resultados muestran que la configuración paisajística del ecosistema ha cambiado notoriamente con una tendencia al incremento en el número, tamaño y tipo de parches. Igualmente se presentan diferencias estructurales importantes entre los diversos periodos de tiempo analizados, ocasionados principalmente por la disminución y desaparición de espejos de agua y el aumento de pasto kikuyo (Pennisetum clandestinum. En cuanto al arreglo espacial de los elementos paisajísticos, no sucedieron cambios importantes en los patrones de distribución espacial de los elementos paisajísticos del humedal. De acuerdo con la dimensión fractal, los elementos del paisaje presentan dos tendencias en cuanto a su complejidad: los elementos introducidos poseen las formas más complejas y los elementos propios del ecosistema tienen formas más regulares. Finalmente, la dinámica del humedal fue modelada con el fin de interpretar cómo las múltiples interacciones entre los elementos paisajísticos han influido en la configuración del humedal a lo largo del tiempo.The dynamics of Juan Amarillos’ wetland were analyzed during 55 year between 1950 and 2005. The results showed that the landscape configuration of the ecosystems has dramatically changed within a trend to increase in number, size, and patch type. Likewise, important structural differences came up between the various periods in question; such differences appear to be related to the reduction and disappearance of the pond and the significant increase of the non native kikuyo grass (Pennisetum clandestinum. Regarding the spatial arrangement of the landscape elements, there were no significant changes in spatial distribution patterns. According to the fractal dimension and complexity, the landscape elements showed two trends: non native and man-made elements are more complex in shape, whereas

  4. Texas Yehaa !!!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellberg, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    Indtryk fra et besøg på SLA, Special Libraries Associations årlige konference, San Antonio, Texas, USA, 9.-13. juni 2001. "An Information Odyssey: Seizing the Competitive Advantage"......Indtryk fra et besøg på SLA, Special Libraries Associations årlige konference, San Antonio, Texas, USA, 9.-13. juni 2001. "An Information Odyssey: Seizing the Competitive Advantage"...

  5. Texas Yehaa !!!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellberg, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    Indtryk fra et besøg på SLA, Special Libraries Associations årlige konference, San Antonio, Texas, USA, 9.-13. juni 2001. "An Information Odyssey: Seizing the Competitive Advantage"......Indtryk fra et besøg på SLA, Special Libraries Associations årlige konference, San Antonio, Texas, USA, 9.-13. juni 2001. "An Information Odyssey: Seizing the Competitive Advantage"...

  6. FORRAJE Y GRANO DE HÍBRIDOS DE MAÍZ AMARILLOS PARA VALLES ALTOS DE MÉXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Tadeo-Robledo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la producción de grano y de forraje en híbridos trilineales amarillos. Se establecieron en el año 2009 tres experimentos, comparando híbridos trilineales amarillos con híbridos comerciales blancos y el híbrido Búho de Asgrow; dos experimentos en el Campo Experimental de Valle de México del INIFAP, donde se evaluó la productividad de grano y otro en la Facultad de Estudios Superiores Cuautitlán de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, para evaluación de forraje a una densidad de 70 000 plantas/ha. El análisis combinado para rendimiento detectó diferencias altamente significativas para híbridos, sitios y la interacción híbridos x sitios. El coeficiente de variación fue de 17,7% y la media general de 7113 kg/ha. La comparación de medias ubicó en el primer grupo de significancia a los híbridos de grano blanco comerciales Puma 1167 y Puma 1163 con 9549 kg/ha y 8748 kg/ha, respectivamente. Los híbridos amarillos 501X497 y 501X555 fueron superiores 36,0% y 12,4% con respecto a H-48 y el híbrido testigo. Búho presentó similar rendimiento en materia verde, que Puma 1163 y fue superior (P<0,05 a los otros híbridos evaluados. El híbrido Puma 1163 por su buen rendimiento de grano, materia verde y materia seca se sugiere validarlo a nivel comercial en doble propósito.

  7. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER AT AIR FORCE PLANT 4, CARSWELL, TEXAS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT (CD-ROM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 600 Cottonwood trees were planted over a shallow groundwater plume in an attempt to detoxify the tricWoroethylene (TCE) in a groundwater plume at a former Air Force facility. Two planting techniques were used: rooted stock about two years old, and 18 inch cuttings were insta...

  8. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER AT AIR FORCE PLANT 4, CARSWELL, TEXAS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT (CD-ROM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 600 Cottonwood trees were planted over a shallow groundwater plume in an attempt to detoxify the tricWoroethylene (TCE) in a groundwater plume at a former Air Force facility. Two planting techniques were used: rooted stock about two years old, and 18 inch cuttings were insta...

  9. RENDIMIENTO DE VARIEDADES PRECOCES DE MAÍZ GRANO AMARILLO PARA VALLES ALTOS DE MÉXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Espinosa-Calder\\u00F3n

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se estableció como objetivo determinar la capacidad productiva de variedades de grano amarillo desarrolladas en la Facultad de Estudios Superiores Cuautitlán, de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (FESC-UNAM y en el Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agrícolas y Pecuaria (INIFAP. Fueron establecidos, dos experimentos uniformes, uno en el Campo Experimental Valle de México (CEVAMEX, en Santa Lucía de Prías y otro en la Facultad de Estudios Superiores de Cuautitlán, de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (FESC-UNAM, en comparación con un testigo comercial de grano blanco y dos testigos de grano amarillo; ambos se sembraron en la segunda quincena de junio de 2010. Se evaluaron trece variedades, en un diseño experimental de bloques completos al azar, con tres repeticiones. El mayor rendimiento medio se obtuvo en CEVAMEX (5887 kg/ha, el cual fue superior al obtenido en FESC-UNAM (3799 kg/ha. En el grupo de mayor rendimiento de grano se ubicaron las variedades ORO ULTRA UNAM C (6913 kg/ha, V-55 A (6284 kg/ha, V-53 A (6035 kg/ha y V-54 A (5405 kg/ha.

  10. South Texas Maquiladora Suppliers Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, J. Michael

    This project was undertaken to assist South Texas industries in improving export to nearby Mexican maquiladoras (factories). The maquiladora program is based on co-production by two plants under a single management, one on each side of the border. Activities addressed four objectives: (1) to determine the dollar value, quantity, and source of the…

  11. Texas Helimak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenneth W. GENTLE; HUANG He

    2008-01-01

    Helimak is an experimental approximation to the ideal cylindrical slab, a one-dimensional magnetized plasma with magnetic curvature and shear. The Texas Helimak real-izes this approximation to a large degree; the finite size of the device can be neglected for many phenomena. Specifically, the drift-wave turbulence characteristic of a slab is observed with scale lengths small compared with the device size. The device and the general features of its behavior are described here. The device is capable of studying drift-wave turbulence, scrape-off layer (SOL) turbulence, and the stabilization of turbulence by imposing velocity shear.

  12. Amarillo National Resource Center for plutonium. Work plan progress report, November 1, 1995--January 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cluff, D. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The Center operates under a cooperative agreement between DOE and the State of Texas and is directed and administered by an education consortium. Its programs include developing peaceful uses for the materials removed from dismantled weapons, studying effects of nuclear materials on environment and public health, remedying contaminated soils and water, studying storage, disposition, and transport of Pu, HE, and other hazardous materials removed from weapons, providing research and counsel to US in carrying out weapons reductions in cooperation with Russia, and conducting a variety of education and training programs.

  13. Comparing post-combustion CO2 capture operation at retrofitted coal-fired power plants in the Texas and Great Britain electric grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stuart M.; Chalmers, Hannah L.; Webber, Michael E.; King, Carey W.

    2011-04-01

    This work analyses the carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system operation within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) and Great Britain (GB) electric grids using a previously developed first-order hourly electricity dispatch and pricing model. The grids are compared in their 2006 configuration with the addition of coal-based CO2 capture retrofits and emissions penalties from 0 to 100 US dollars per metric ton of CO2 (USD/tCO2). CO2 capture flexibility is investigated by comparing inflexible CO2 capture systems to flexible ones that can choose between full- and zero-load CO2 capture depending on which operating mode has lower costs or higher profits. Comparing these two grids is interesting because they have similar installed capacity and peak demand, and both are isolated electricity systems with competitive wholesale electricity markets. However, differences in capacity mix, demand patterns, and fuel markets produce diverging behaviours of CO2 capture at coal-fired power plants. Coal-fired facilities are primarily base load in ERCOT for a large range of CO2 prices but are comparably later in the dispatch order in GB and consequently often supply intermediate load. As a result, the ability to capture CO2 is more important for ensuring dispatch of coal-fired facilities in GB than in ERCOT when CO2 prices are high. In GB, higher overall coal prices mean that CO2 prices must be slightly higher than in ERCOT before the emissions savings of CO2 capture offset capture energy costs. However, once CO2 capture is economical, operating CO2 capture on half the coal fleet in each grid achieves greater emissions reductions in GB because the total coal-based capacity is 6 GW greater than in ERCOT. The market characteristics studied suggest greater opportunity for flexible CO2 capture to improve operating profits in ERCOT, but profit improvements can be offset by a flexibility cost penalty.

  14. El maíz amarillo cultivado bajo contrato en México 2000-2005: Reflexiones sobre un programa de comercialización de granos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Steffen Riedemann

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Más del 95% del maíz que se produce en México es blanco. En los últimos años el Estado mexicano ha impulsado la agricultura por contrato de maíz amarillo con la finalidad de contribuir a la sustitución de las más de 5 millones de toneladas que se importan anualmente, volumen necesario para satisfacer la demanda del sector pecuario y de la industria de derivados alimenticios y químicos del maíz. Además busca reconvertir al maíz amarillo un porcentaje de la superficie sembrada con maíz blanco, grano este último que, según datos oficiales, se vería afectado por una sobreproducción estimada de más de 2 millones de toneladas. Los objetivos que se propone este trabajo son conocer las condiciones en que se está dando esta experiencia, valorar qué posibilidad de éxito y expansión tiene la agricultura bajo contrato en el caso del maíz amarillo ante un mercado totalmente abierto a partir del 2008 y explicar los efectos que tiene la producción bajo contrato de este grano en los distintos sujetos participantes.

  15. Texas Heart Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine today with a keynote from Texas State Senator Paul Bettencourt Dr. Taylor received the ... in cardiovascular discovery is happening here at the Texas Heart Institute. Visit www.thenextfirst.org . Your Heart ...

  16. Treasured Texas Theaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Dallas artist Jon Flaming's deep love of Texas is evident in his paintings and sculpture. Although he has created one sculptural Texas theater, his work primarily showcases old Texas barbershops, vacant homes, and gas stations. In this article, the author describes how her students, inspired by Flaming's works, created three-dimensional historical…

  17. Análisis de la dinámica del Humedal Juan Amarillo (Colombia y su sostenibilidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillot M. Gabriel H.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available La recuperación y mantenimiento del humedal Juan Amarillo requiere de un sistema de soporte, subsidiado
    y respaldado por el sistema económico del cual el hombre hace parte. Si bien esto implica una inversión, está plenamente justificada por las ganancias que se reciben a cambio, tal como se demuestra con el estudio de los principales flujos de energía y el contenido emergético asociado a estos flujos. Adicionalmente, constituye en primer lugar en un deber del hombre sustituir lo que en cierto momento deterioró, y en segundo lugar es obligación de la administración distrital en proporcionar ambientes sanos para la comunidad. El hombre es ahora el principal actor que regula las relaciones energéticas de los componentes del sistema, es decir, los flujos energéticos que determinan la sostenibilidad, y consecuentemente, explican el comportamiento del sistema y la naturaleza de sus fluctuaciones; por lo tanto, este agente artificial es el factor determinante para su funcionamiento.

  18. Polychlorinated Biphenyls in suspended-sediment samples from outfalls to Meandering Road Creek at Air Force Plant 4, Fort Worth, Texas, 2003-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Christopher L.; Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2010-01-01

    Meandering Road Creek is an intermittent stream and tributary to Lake Worth, a reservoir on the West Fork Trinity River on the western edge of Fort Worth, Texas. U.S. Air Force Plant 4 (AFP4) is on the eastern shore of Woods Inlet, an arm of Lake Worth. Meandering Road Creek gains inflow from several stormwater outfalls as it flows across AFP4. Several studies have characterized polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the water and sediments of Lake Worth and Meandering Road Creek; sources of PCBs are believed to originate primarily from AFP4. Two previous U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reports documented elevated PCB concentrations in surficial sediment samples from Woods Inlet relative to concentrations in surficial sediment samples from other parts of Lake Worth. The second of these two previous reports also identified some of the sources of PCBs to Lake Worth. These reports were followed by a third USGS report that documented the extent of PCB contamination in Meandering Road Creek and Woods Inlet and identified runoff from outfalls 4 and 5 at AFP4 as prominent sources of these PCBs. This report describes the results of a fourth study by the USGS, in cooperation with the Lockheed Martin Corporation, to investigate PCBs in suspended-sediment samples in storm runoff from outfalls 4 and 5 at AFP4 following the implementation of engineering controls designed to potentially alleviate PCB contamination in the drainage areas of these outfalls. Suspended-sediment samples collected from outfalls 4 and 5 during storms on March 2 and November 10, 2008, were analyzed for selected PCBs. Sums of concentrations of 18 reported PCB congeners (Sigma PCBc) in suspended-sediment samples collected before and after implementation of engineering controls are compared. At both outfalls, the Sigma PCBc before engineering controls was higher than the Sigma PCBc after engineering controls. The Sigma PCBc in suspended-sediment samples collected at AFP4 before and after implementation of

  19. Microbial response to drought in a Texas highplains shortgrass prairie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, D W

    1974-10-01

    The population of the microbial flora of a mixed blue gramma grass (Bouteloua gracilis H. B. K.) and prickly pear (Opuntia polyacantha Haw.) prairie near Amarillo, Texas, was studied during 1971 after a severe drought. Bacteria, fungi, and algae were estimated by plate count and terminal dilution procedures. Rates of grass and paper decomposition were determined. The microbial flora of soil associated with bovine-grazed grass did not differ significantly from the flora associated with ungrazed grass, either qualitatively or quantitatively. During drought, a greater number of fungi were found in soil associated with prickly pear than in that associated with blue gramma grass. The microbial biomass decreased one full log between the surface and a depth of 50 cm, and the percentage of anaerobes increased with depth. The maximum numbers of fungi and algae detected were 8 x 10 and 6 x 10/g respectively. A linear relationship existed between the microbial biomass and soil moisture. The maximum number of aerobic, heterotrophic bacteria detected was 1.5 x 10 viable cells per g of soil.

  20. CAMBIOS EN LA ACTIVIDAD DE a-AMILASA, PECTINMETILESTERASA Y POLIGALACTURONASA DURANTE LA MADURACIÓN DEL MARACUYÁ AMARILLO (Passiflora edulis VAR. FLAVICARPA DEGENER)

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    El maracuyá amarillo (Passiflora edulis var. Flavicarpa Degener) es una fruta tropical muy apreciada por su sabor. Los componentes responsables del sabor se desarrollan durante la maduración, como resultado del incremento en la actividad metabólica. En el presente trabajo se evaluó la producción de CO2 y el desarrollo del color como indicadores de la maduración, así como la actividad de la a-amilasa, poligalacturonasa (PG) y pectinmetilesterasa (PME), con relación a la presencia de diversos c...

  1. Molecular survey of the Texas Phoenix decline phytoplasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    symptoms of Texas Phoenix decline (TPD) in West Central Florida. The IGS region was .... DNA from a healthy plant, and a water control (no DNA template). The PCR .... supplement sequencing data which may be subject to sequencing errors.

  2. Confiabilidad de la detección de problemas de desarrollo mediante el semáforo de la prueba de Evaluación del Desarrollo Infantil: ¿es diferente un resultado amarillo de uno rojo?

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Rizzoli-Córdoba; Fernando Ortega-Ríosvelasco; Miguel Ángel Villasís-Keever; Mariel Pizarro-Castellanos; Guillermo Buenrostro-Márquez; Daniel Aceves-Villagrán; Gabriel O'Shea-Cuevas; Onofre Muñoz-Hernández

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: La prueba Evaluación del Desarrollo Infantil (EDI) es un instrumento de tamizaje de problemas en el desarrollo diseñado y validado en México. La calificación obtenida se expresa como semáforo. Se consideran positivos tanto el resultado amarillo como el rojo, aunque se plantea una intervención diferente para cada uno. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la capacidad de la prueba EDI para discriminar entre los niños identificados con semáforo amarillo y los identificados con r...

  3. The environmental vegetation index: A tool potentially useful for arid land management. [Texas and Mexico, plant growth stress due to water deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T. I., Jr.; Mccrary, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The NOAA-6 AVHRR data sets acquired over South Texas and Mexico during the spring of 1980 and after Hurricane Allen passed inland are analyzed. These data were processed to produce the Gray-McCrary Index (GMI's) for each pixel location over the selected area, which area contained rangeland and cropland, both irrigated and nonirrigated. The variations in the GMI's appear to reflect well the availability of water for vegetation. The GMI area maps are shown to delineate and to aid in defining the duration of drought; suggesting the possibility that time changes over a selected area could be useful for irrigation management.

  4. CRECIMIENTO, ACUMULACIÓN DE MACRONUTRIENTES Y PRODUCCIÓN DE MELÓN CANTALOUPO Y AMARILLO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN WALDIR MENDOZA-CORTEZ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fueron conducidos dos experimentos individuales en el municipio de Mossoró, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Se empleó dos cultivares de melón, ‘Olimpic express’ (del tipo Cantaloupo e ‘Iracema’ (del tipo Amarillo, para evaluar el crecimiento y la acumulación de macronutrientes, bajo el diseño de bloques al azar con siete tratamientos (épocas de muestreo y tres repeticiones. Los muestreos de plantas fueron realizados a los 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49 y 56 días después del trasplante (DDT. El crecimiento fue lento hasta 28 DDT en ambos cultivares evaluados, intensificándose en el periodo siguiente, alcanzando a los 56 DDT, 246.4g planta-1, en ‘Olimpic express’,y 266.9 g planta-1, en ‘Iracema’, siendo la materia seca (MS de los frutos correspondientes a 60% y 64% de la MS total, respectivamente. Mayores acumulaciones de N, P y K fueron obtenidos en los frutos, mientras de Ca, Mg y S en las hojas. Al final del ciclo, en ‘Olimpic express’, cuya productividad fue de 32 t ha-1, fueron acumulados 173.4, 110.1, 101.1, 26.9, 15.6 y 13.5 kg ha-1 de K, Ca, N, Mg, S y P, respectivamente, y en ‘Iracema’, cuya productividad fue de 38 t ha-1, fueron acumulados 136.0, 93.9, 84.1, 22.6, 15.4 y 9.5 kg ha-1 de K, N, Ca, Mg, S y P, respectivamente. En relación al total acumulado, las exportaciones de N, P, K, Ca, Mg y S en los frutos fueron de 61, 73, 66, 9, 35 y 39% (‘Olimpic express’y 58, 70, 55, 6, 33 y 41% (‘Iracema’. Con una menor producción de frutos y una mayor acumulación de nutrientes, ‘Olimpic express’ ha demostrado ser menos eficiente en el uso de nutrientes que ‘Iracema’.

  5. Drogodependencia, Bruxismo y Trastornos Témporo-Mandibulares: Análisis comparativo en dos poblaciones: Muestra Nacional y población en tratamiento por consumo problemático de drogas en Portal Amarillo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Riva

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Estimar prevalencia de Bruxismo y Trastornos Temporomandibulares (TTM en dos poblaciones: muestra de Uruguay y de pacientes en tratamiento por consumo problemático de drogas en Portal Amarillo. Método: Dos estudios descriptivos, analíticos y transversales, uno nacional y otro en Portal Amarillo. Resultados: Portal Amarillo: síntomas TTM 67,6%, síntomas bruxismo 33,8%, signos TTM actual 42,3%, signos bruxismo actual o pasado 47,9%. Muestra nacional: síntomas TTM 61,3%, síntomas bruxismo 27,7%, signos TTM actual 37,3%, signos bruxismo actual o pasado 67,5%. Conclusiones: Tendencia a mayor prevalencia de TTM y Bruxismo actual en Portal Amarillo que en muestra uruguaya. En los aspectos que dan cuenta de signos de Bruxismo actual o pasado, prevalencia mayor en la población uruguaya. Nuevas investigaciones deberían revisar los efectos de la medicación administrada para el tratamiento de adicciones previo y durante su administración. En tanto recomendamos la instalación de dispositivos oclusales como medida para minimizar los efectos secundarios sobre las estructuras del sistema masticatorio

  6. Texas' forests, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Bentley; Consuelo Brandeis; Jason A. Cooper; Christopher M. Oswalt; Sonja N. Oswalt; KaDonna Randolph

    2014-01-01

    This bulletin describes forest resources of the State of Texas at the time of the 2008 forest inventory. This bulletin addresses forest area, volume, growth, removals, mortality, forest health, timber product output, and the economy of the forest sector.

  7. Typhus in Texas

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    Dr. Kristy Murray, an associate professor in pediatrics and assistant dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, discusses increased cases of typhus in southern Texas.  Created: 7/6/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  8. Quantifying Potential Groundwater Recharge In South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basant, S.; Zhou, Y.; Leite, P. A.; Wilcox, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater in South Texas is heavily relied on for human consumption and irrigation for food crops. Like most of the south west US, woody encroachment has altered the grassland ecosystems here too. While brush removal has been widely implemented in Texas with the objective of increasing groundwater recharge, the linkage between vegetation and groundwater recharge in South Texas is still unclear. Studies have been conducted to understand plant-root-water dynamics at the scale of plants. However, little work has been done to quantify the changes in soil water and deep percolation at the landscape scale. Modeling water flow through soil profiles can provide an estimate of the total water flowing into deep percolation. These models are especially powerful with parameterized and calibrated with long term soil water data. In this study we parameterize the HYDRUS soil water model using long term soil water data collected in Jim Wells County in South Texas. Soil water was measured at every 20 cm intervals up to a depth of 200 cm. The parameterized model will be used to simulate soil water dynamics under a variety of precipitation regimes ranging from well above normal to severe drought conditions. The results from the model will be compared with the changes in soil moisture profile observed in response to vegetation cover and treatments from a study in a similar. Comparative studies like this can be used to build new and strengthen existing hypotheses regarding deep percolation and the role of soil texture and vegetation in groundwater recharge.

  9. Hematological and hepatic alterations in nonsmoking residents exposed to benzene following a flaring incident at the British petroleum plant in Texas City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2014-12-20

    Human exposure to benzene is associated with multiple adverse health effects with an increased risk of developing carcinogenesis. Benzene exposure is known to affect many critical organs including the hematological, hepatic, renal, lung, and cardiac functions. The purpose of this study is to examine the health effects of benzene exposure among nonsmoking subjects from a prolonged flaring incident that occurred at the British petroleum (BP) refinery in the Texas City, Texas. The study included nonsmoking subjects who had been exposed and unexposed to benzene. Using medical charts, clinical data including white blood cell (WBC) counts, platelet counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate amino transferase (AST), and alanine amino transferase (ALT) in nonsmoking subjects exposed to benzene were reviewed and analyzed and compared with unexposed adults. A total of 1422 nonsmoking subjects (benzene exposed, n=1093 and unexposed, n=329) were included. Benzene exposed subjects had significantly higher levels of WBC (×10(3) per μL) counts (7.7±2.2 versus 6.8±1.7, P=0.001) and platelet (×10(3) per μL) counts (288.8±59.0 versus 245.3±54.4, P=0.001) compared with the unexposed subjects. The mean serum creatinine (mg/dL) levels were also significantly increased in the benzene exposed group compared with the unexposed group (1.1±0.4 versus 0.8±0.2, P=0.001). Serum levels of ALP (IU/L) was significantly elevated in the benzene exposed subjects compared with the unexposed subjects (87.3±22.6 versus 69.6±16.5, P=0.001). Similarly, benzene exposed subjects had significantly higher levels of AST and ALT compared with those unexposed subjects. Benzene exposure from the prolonged BP flaring incident caused significant alterations in hematological and liver markers indicating that these nonsmoking residents exposed to refinery chemicals may be at a higher risk of developing hepatic or blood related disorders.

  10. Industrial hygiene walk-through survey report of E. I. Dupont de Nemours and Company, Inc. , Chocolate Bayou Plant, Alvin, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajen, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    A walkthrough survey of EI duPont deNemours and Company, Incorporated, Alvin, Texas was conducted in November, 1984. The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on the 1,3-butadiene monomer manufacturing process and the potential for exposure. The facility manufactured a crude product stream containing 1,3-butadiene as a coproduct of its ethylene process. The crude was refined to a 99.5% 1,3-butadiene product. The refining process occurred in a closed system, tightly maintained for economic, fire, and health-hazard reasons. The product was transferred by way of a pipeline to storage spheres for later transport off site. The facility used an open-loop cylinder (bomb) technique for quality control sampling. All pumps were equipped with single mechanical seals, which were in the process of being replaced by tandem seals. Since 1962, the facility had experienced process changes and three changes of ownership. Because of these changes, records from previous owners of industrial hygiene monitoring were not available. Job titles identified as having potential exposure were processors, wage employee supervisors, production engineers, and laboratory technicians. The author concludes that a closed-loop manual quality-control sampling system should be installed to reduce exposure from this source.

  11. The Texas Twin Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, K Paige; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M; Tackett, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Socioeconomic position, racial/ethnic minority status, and other characteristics of the macro-environment may be important moderators of genetic influence on a wide array of psychosocial outcomes. Designed to maximize representation of low socioeconomic status families and racial/ethnic minorities, the Texas Twin Project is an ongoing study of school-age twins (preschool through 12th grade) enrolled in public schools in the Austin, Texas and Houston, Texas metropolitan areas. School rosters are used to identify twin families from a target population with sizable populations of African American (18%), Hispanic/Latino (48%), and non-Hispanic White (27%) children and adolescents, over half of whom meet US guidelines for classification as economically disadvantaged. Initial efforts have focused on a large-scale, family-based survey study involving both parent and child reports of personality, psychopathology, physical health, academic interests, parent-child relationships, and aspects of the home environment. In addition, the Texas Twin Project is the basis for an in-laboratory study of adolescent decision-making, delinquency, and substance use. Future directions include geographic expansion of the sample to the entire state of Texas (with a population of over 25 million) and genotyping of participating twins.

  12. Ecological Baseline, Fort Hood, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Table 5). Other tree species were Texas oak, netleaf hackberry, live oak, slippery elm (Ulmus rubra), red mulberry ( Morus rubra), Mexican plum (Prunus...included Texas oak, Texas ash, black walnut (Juglans nigra ), and Ashe juniper. Total density was about 760 trees per ha, and basal area was about 27 m

  13. Forests of east Texas, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry J.W. Dooley

    2017-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in east Texas based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station (SRS) in cooperation with Texas A&M Forest Service. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into seven FIA survey units—Southeast (unit 1),...

  14. Transforming Developmental Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Developmental Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, with support from the Texas Legislature, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has funded various developmental education initiatives, including research and evaluation efforts, to help Texas public institutions of higher education provide more effective programs and services to underprepared students. Based on evaluation…

  15. Validación del campímetro ATD de doble modulación con sujetos normales: estudio del canal cromático koniocelular azul-amarillo

    OpenAIRE

    Bonilla Lopezosa, María Teresa; Fez Saiz, Dolores de; Camps Sanchis, Vicente Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Este proyecto se orienta al estudio de la validación del campímetro ATD de doble modulación mediante el análisis estadístico de la repetibilidad intraobservador en el canal cromático D Koniocelular (oponente azul- amarillo). Después de realizar una serie de pruebas preeliminares, se seleccionaron 20 sujetos sin ningún tipo de patologías. A todos ellos se les midió la sensibilidad con el campímetro ATD en el canal D (azul-amarillo), usando estímulos con frecuencia espacial 0.5 cpg y temporal 2...

  16. An Archeological Overview and Management Plan for the H.F. Denton Radio Station Property, Denton County, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-04

    Frank. 1975. Texas Plants - A Checklist and Ecological Sunmary. College Station: The Texas A & M University System, The Texas Agriculture Experiment... Ecology of North America. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. Shope, Bill. 1983. Personal communication. Facility Engineering Division, Red River Army...Ammunition Plant. Simpson, G.G. 1941. Large Pleistocene Felines of North America. American Museum Noviatiates, No. 1136:19-27. • 1945. Notes on

  17. Análisis económico del sistema de producción de maíz amarillo en el valle del medio y bajo sinú, departamento de córdoba

    OpenAIRE

    Serpa, Malvin; Castillo, Omar; Rodríguez, Luis Felipe

    2010-01-01

    En este trabajo se analizo la economia de la produccion de maiz amarillo (Zea mayz) en el valle del medio y bajo rio Sinu, en el departamento de Cordoba (Colombia), con informacion procedente de una encuesta a 1.417 agricultores, realizada en el semestre A de 2001. Los resultados indican que la mayor oferta proviene de los agricultores medianos y grandes; sin embargo, en el analisis de costos minimos, los agricultores pequenos resultan ser mas eficientes economicamente que las explotaciones d...

  18. Tornado from Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Santa Fe School Superintendent Yvonne Gonzales, the "Texas Tornado," was hired to fix a 40% student-dropout rate and a white/Hispanic gap in achievement test scores. Gonzales is an avid integrationist; relies on humor, appeasement, and persuasion tactics; and has alienated some school employees by increasing central office…

  19. Outdoor Education in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Ray H.

    In Dallas in 1970, high school outdoor education began as a cocurricular woods and waters boys' club sponsored by a community sportsman. Within one year, it grew into a fully accredited, coeducational, academic course with a curriculum devoted to the study of wildlife in Texas, ecology, conservation, hunting, firearm safety, fishing, boating and…

  20. Outdoor Education in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Ray H.

    In Dallas in 1970, high school outdoor education began as a cocurricular woods and waters boys' club sponsored by a community sportsman. Within one year, it grew into a fully accredited, coeducational, academic course with a curriculum devoted to the study of wildlife in Texas, ecology, conservation, hunting, firearm safety, fishing, boating and…

  1. Library Laws of Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Richard E., Comp.

    Compiled to provide a central reference point for all legislative information pertaining to libraries in the State of Texas, this publication includes all pertinent legislation as amended through the 71st Legislature, 1989, Regular Session. This update of the 1980 edition has been expanded to include statutes pertaining to the school and academic…

  2. Plant water use characteristics of five dominant shrub species of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, USA: implications for shrubland restoration and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Arjun; White, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    The biogeographic distribution of plant species is inherently associated with the plasticity of physiological adaptations to environmental variation. For semi-arid shrublands with a legacy of saline soils, characterization of soil water-tolerant shrub species is necessary for habitat restoration given future projection of increased drought magnitude and persistence in these ecosystems. Five dominant native shrub species commonly found in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, TX, USA, were studied, namely Acacia farnesiana, Celtis ehrenbergiana, Forestiera angustifolia, Parkinsonia aculeata and Prosopis glandulosa. To simulate drought conditions, we suspended watering of healthy, greenhouse-grown plants for 4 weeks. Effects of soil salinity were also studied by dosing plants with 10% NaCl solution with suspended watering. For soil water deficit treatment, the soil water potential of P. glandulosa was the highest (-1.20 MPa), followed by A. farnesiana (-4.69 MPa), P. aculeata (-5.39 MPa), F. angustifolia (-6.20 MPa) and C. ehrenbergiana (-10.02 MPa). For the soil salinity treatment, P. glandulosa also had the highest soil water potential value (-1.60 MPa), followed by C. ehrenbergiana (-1.70 MPa), A. farnesiana (-1.84 MPa), P. aculeata (-2.04 MPa) and F. angustifolia (-6.99 MPa). Within the species, only C. ehrenbergiana and F. angustifolia for soil water deficit treatment and A. farnesiana for the salinity treatment had significantly lower soil water potential after 4 weeks of treatment (P water potential, stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis of the species significantly reduced over time for both treatments (P water availability, some species demonstrated limited tolerance for extreme water stress that may be important for management of future shrub diversity in Lower Rio Grande Valley.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of mercury contamination in fish-eating waterbirds of Lavaca Bay, Texas: Phase I report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1966, the Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA) began operating a chlor-alkali plant at its Point Comfort facility in Calhoun County, Texas. This plant produced...

  4. Caracterización de agregaciones de langostino colorado (Pleuroncodes monodon y langostino amarillo (Cervimunida johni mediante un sistema de filmación remolcado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Ahumada

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Para caracterizar agregaciones de langostino colorado (Pleuroncodes monodon y langostino amarillo (Cervimunida johni, se utilizó un sistema de filmación remolcado sobre fondos marinos situados en la región de Coquimbo, Chile. Las filmaciones fueron realizadas en 2009 y 2010, a profundidades variables entre 102 y 215 m, a partir de las cuales se estimaron densidades medias por filmación entre 3 y 63 ind m-2 para P. monodon y entre 0,2 y 2,8 ind m-2 para C. johni. Igualmente, se registró la presencia de parejas de C. johni en julio de 2009 (~200 m de profundidad, presumiblemente en proceso de apareamiento. Los resultados indicaron que el sistema de filmación remolcado es un medio efectivo de registro de ejemplares de ambas especies, permitiendo tanto la caracterización cuantitativa del stock sobre el fondo, como la observación de su comportamiento y hábitat. El sistema tiene perspectivas de uso en la evaluación directa de abundancia y en la caracterización del hábitat tanto en términos bióticos como abióticos.

  5. Caso clínico. Aspergiloma traqueal en guacamayo azul y amarillo (Ara ararauna - Tracheal aspergilloma in a Blue and Gold Macaw (Ara ararauna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dra. Rossana Raineri

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl presente artículo expone el caso clínico de un Guacamayo azul y amarillo (Ara ararauna atendido como emergencia por un cuadro de disnea intensa estableciéndose una metodología de atención por etapas, logrando la estabilización inicial de los signos vitales del ave en un primer tiempo para luego determinar la causa y extirpar por mínimo acceso, gracias a la endoscopía, un gran fragmento de aspergiloma que obstruía la traquea, lográndose la confirmación del diagnostico por métodos de laboratorio e indicándose un tratamiento especifico para este tipo de patologías.Summaryin this paper we present a clinical case of a Blue and Gold Macaw (Araararauna treated in emergency with symptoms of severe dyspnea. Weapproached the case achieving the stabilization of vital signs of the bird in a first time. Then we determined the cause of dyspnea by minimal access, by endo-tracheal endoscopic examination, and we removed a large aspergilloma that was obstructing the trachea. We obtained the confirmation of the diagnosis by laboratory methods and decided a specific treatment for the disease.

  6. Abandoned Texas oil fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

  7. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Upper Coast of Texas: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for endangered plants for the Upper Coast of Texas. Vector polygons in this data set represent occurrence...

  8. Groundwater recharge and chemical evolution in the southern High Plains of Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryar, Alan; Mullican, William; Macko, Stephen

    2001-11-01

    The unconfined High Plains (Ogallala) aquifer is the largest aquifer in the USA and the primary water supply for the semiarid southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico. Analyses of water and soils northeast of Amarillo, Texas, together with data from other regional studies, indicate that processes during recharge control the composition of unconfined groundwater in the northern half of the southern High Plains. Solute and isotopic data are consistent with a sequence of episodic precipitation, concentration of solutes in upland soils by evapotranspiration, runoff, and infiltration beneath playas and ditches (modified locally by return flow of wastewater and irrigation tailwater). Plausible reactions during recharge include oxidation of organic matter, dissolution and exsolution of CO2, dissolution of CaCO3, silicate weathering, and cation exchange. Si and 14C data suggest leakage from perched aquifers to the High Plains aquifer. Plausible mass-balance models for the High Plains aquifer include scenarios of flow with leakage but not reactions, flow with reactions but not leakage, and flow with neither reactions nor leakage. Mechanisms of recharge and chemical evolution delineated in this study agree with those noted for other aquifers in the south-central and southwestern USA. Résumé. L'aquifère libre des Hautes Plaines (Ogallala) est le plus vaste aquifère des états-Unis et la ressource de base pour l'eau potable de la région semi-aride du sud des Hautes Plaines du Texas et du Nouveau-Mexique. Des analyses de l'eau et des sols prélevés au nord-est d'Amarillo (Texas), associées à des données provenant d'autres études dans cette région, indiquent que des processus intervenant au cours de l'infiltration contrôlent la composition de l'eau de la nappe libre dans la moitié septentrionale du sud des Hautes Plaines. Les données chimiques et isotopiques sont compatibles avec une séquence de précipitation épisodique, avec la reconcentration en solut

  9. Forests of East Texas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Brandeis

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in east Texas derived from an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Texas A&M Forest Service. These estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and are...

  10. Forests of east Texas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.J.W. Dooley; T.J. Brandeis

    2014-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in east Texas based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Texas A&M Forest Service. Forest resource estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and...

  11. CBTE: The Ayes of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, W. Robert; Howsam, Robert B.

    1974-01-01

    A heated controversy occurred when the Texas State Board of Education mandated competency based teacher education (CBTE) for all of the State's 66 teacher preparatory institutions. This is an account of developments in Texas by two major proponents of CBTE. (Author/JF)

  12. Coeficientes de digestibilidad aparente de harina de pescado peruana y maíz amarillo duro para Colossoma macropomum (Actinopterygii, Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Walter Gutierrez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Los Coeficientes de Digestibilidad Aparente (CDA de la materia seca (MS, proteína cruda (PC, lípido crudo(LC y energía bruta (EB de los ingredientes alimenticios harina de pescado peruana (HPP y de maíz amarillo duro (MAD fueron determinados en juveniles de Colossoma macropomum (150,0 ± 25,5 g. En el experimento la dieta de referencia se mezcló con cada uno de los ingredientes prueba en una relación de 70:30. El óxido crómico se usó como indicador inerte. La dieta de referencia y las dietas prueba fueron suministradas a C. macropomum, criada a 27 ºC, 7 mg/L de oxígeno disuelto y pH entre 7,5. Las muestras fecales fueron colectadas por sifoneo. Los CDA para MS, PC, LC y EB de la HPP fueron de 88,06 ± 0,83%, 87,08 ± 1,34%, 85,87 ± 2,69 y 87,29 ± 1,57% respectivamente. Igualmente los CDA para MS, PC, LC y EB del MAD fueron de 82,38 ± 1,02%, 75,46 ± 1,53%, 76,17 ± 2,43% y 75,04 ± 1,80% respectivamente. La energía digestible aparente calculada fue de 3950 Kcal/kg para la HPP y 2830 kcal/kg para el MAD. Se concluye que C. macropomum digiere mejor las fracciones proteicas y energéticas de la HPP. Al mismo tiempo muestra que digiere también la fracción energética del MAD, proveniente de los carbohidratos solubles.

  13. Quantitation of selected terpenoids and mercaptans in the dual-purpose hop varieties Amarillo, Citra, Hallertau Blanc, Mosaic, and Sorachi Ace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibaka, Marie-Lucie Kankolongo; Gros, Jacques; Nizet, Sabrina; Collin, Sonia

    2015-03-25

    Free terpenoids and both free and bound polyfunctional thiols were investigated in five selected dual-purpose hop cultivars. Surprisingly, the dual-purpose Sorachi Ace variety was found to contain higher amounts of farnesene (2101 mg/kg) than aromatic hops such as Saaz but only traces of 3-methylbutylisobutyrate, a compound that usually distinguishes all bitter varieties. All five cultivars investigated here showed an exceptional citrus-like potential explained by either monoterpenic alcohols or polyfunctional thiols. Among the monoterpenic alcohols, β-citronellol at concentrations above 7 mg/kg distinguished Amarillo, Citra, Hallertau Blanc, Mosaic, and Sorachi Ace from Nelson Sauvin and Tomahawk, two previously investigated dual-purpose hops, while linalool (312 mg/kg) and geraniol (211 mg/kg) remained good discriminating compounds for Nelson Sauvin and Tomahawk, respectively. Regarding polyfunctional thiols, higher amounts of 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate (27 μg/kg) characterized the Citra variety. Free 4-sulfanyl-4-methylpentan-2-one proved discriminant for Sorachi Ace, while the bound form is predominant in Nelson Sauvin. On the other hand, an S-conjugate of 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol was found in Sorachi Ace at levels not far from those previously reported for Cascade, although the free form was undetected here. Both free and bound grapefruit-like 3-sulfanyl-4-methylpentan-1-ol (never evidenced before the present work) emerged as discriminating compounds for the Hallertau Blanc variety. The apotryptophanase assay also allowed us to evidence for the first time an S-conjugate of 2-sulfanylethan-1-ol.

  14. TEXAS MIGRANT LABOR, THE 1964 MIGRATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    THE MAJORITY OF TEXAS MIGRANTS LIVE IN SOUTH TEXAS AND APPROXIMATELY 95 PERCENT OF THEM ARE OF MEXICAN EXTRACTION. MOST OF THE OTHER FIVE PERCENT ARE EAST TEXAS NEGROES. THE MECHANIZATION OF COTTON HARVESTING AND THE EXPIRATION OF THE "BRACERO PROGRAM" IN 1964 HAVE CAUSED MORE TEXAS MIGRANTS TO SEEK EMPLOYMENT OUTSIDE OF THE STATE. DURING 1964,…

  15. 50 CFR 32.63 - Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Texas. 32.63 Section 32.63 Wildlife and... Texas. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in... the Texas South Zone, and goose regular season in the Texas East Zone, with the exception that we will...

  16. Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program: A Collaboration between the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, South Texas College, and Texas A&M University-Commerce. CBE Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca; Glancey, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This case study is part of a series on newer competency-based degree programs that have been emerging in recent years. In January 2014, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), South Texas College (STC), and Texas A&M University-Commerce (A&M Commerce) launched the Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program, the state's first…

  17. Simulating the hydrologic impact of Arundo donax invasion on the headwaters of the Nueces River in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arundo donax (hereafter referred to as Arundo), which is a robust herbaceous plant, has invaded the riparian zones of the Rio Grande River and the rivers of the Texas Hill Country over the last two decades. Arundo was first observed along the Nueces River in central Texas in 1995 by the Nueces Rive...

  18. Technical Training seminar: Texas Instruments

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Monday 6 November TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR 14:00 to 17:30 - Training Centre Auditorium (bldg. 593) Texas Instruments Technical Seminar Michael Scholtholt, Field Application Engineer / TEXAS INSTRUMENTS (US, D, CH) POWER - A short approach to Texas Instruments power products Voltage mode vs. current mode control Differentiating DC/DC converters by analyzing control and compensation schemes: line / load regulation, transient response, BOM, board space, ease-of-use Introduction to the SWIFT software FPGA + CPLD power solutions WIRELESS / CHIPCON Decision criteria when choosing a RF platform Introduction to Texas Instruments wireless products: standardized platforms proprietary platforms ( 2.4 GHz / sub 1 GHz) development tools Antenna design: example for 2.4 GHz questions, discussion Industrial partners: Robert Medioni, François Caloz / Spoerle Electronic, CH-1440 Montagny (VD), Switzerland Phone: +41 24 447 0137, email: RMedioni@spoerle.com, http://www.spoerle.com Language: English. Free s...

  19. Water Finance Forum-Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Finance Forum: Financing Resilient and Sustainable Water Infrastructure, held in Addison, Texas, September 10-11, 2015.Co-sponsored by EPA's Water Infrastructure and Resiliency Finance Center and the Environmental Finance Center Network.

  20. 2001 Harris County, Texas Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set was received by the NOAA Coastal Services Center from the Texas Natural Resources Information System. The data was collected in October of 2001 by...

  1. Coastal Inlets of Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Caney Creek Freeport Ship Channel San Luis Pass Galveston Pass Rollover Fish Pass Sabine Pass Texas Victoria Houston Port Arthur Corpus Christi...1960) provide design guidance for constructing fish passes along the Texas coast, it appears that an update based on more recent experiences and...Hall Pier at Corpus Christi; and bay gauges (Rawlings at Mouth of Colorado River; Lavaca, and Port Isabel in the lower Laguna Madre ) for year 1999

  2. Panola NGL (natural gas liquid) line laid in east Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-11-01

    Construction is complete on the Panola Products Pipeline Co. 8-in. NGL line in E. Texas. The 60-mile pipeline, which traverses rolling timber country, lightly developed commercial areas, and low-lying wetlands, will ultimately gather liquids from gas plants in E. Texas. Initially, this system is designed to transport natural gas liquids mix from the Carthage Plant, operated by Champlin Petroleum Co., to Gulf Pipeline Co.'s injection station at Lufkin, Texas. Final delivery will be made to various petrochemical facilities in the Mont Belvieu, Texas area. To minimize right-of-way problems, the line was routed parallel to an existing United Gas 22-in. pipeline for a distance of 36 miles from Carthage to near Nacogdoches. The pipeline has a design pressure of 1,480 psi. A back pressure of approx. 450 psi will be maintained on the line at all times to keep the mix in a liquid state. The predominant pipe used along the route is API 5LX-52 with a wall thickness of 0.219-in. Heavier wall thickness pipe, up to 0.375-in., is used for road, railroad, and major water crossings.

  3. Chagas Disease Risk in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sahotra; Strutz, Stavana E.; Frank, David M.; Rivaldi, Chissa–Louise; Sissel, Blake; Sánchez–Cordero, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species) in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. Methods and Findings The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five–stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post–1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc–minute). The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence–based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag–York–Mollié model and post–1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This risk

  4. Use of watershed factors to predict consumer surfactant toxic units in the upper Trinity river, Texas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, David; Sanderson, Hans; Atkinson, Sam

    2009-01-01

    wastewater treatment plant effluents. The Trinity River that flows through the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area, Texas, is an ideal study site for surfactants due to the high ratio of wastewater treatment plant effluent to river flow (> 95%) during late summer months, providing an interesting scenario...

  5. Abortions in Texas Dropped Dramatically After Restrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an undue burden on women seeking access to abortion care in Texas," said researcher Dr. Daniel Grossman. Grossman is an investigator with the Texas Policy Evaluation Project, which studies the impact of state legislation affecting women's reproductive health. He's ...

  6. 76 FR 50708 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ...: Railroad Commission of Texas, 1701 North Congress Ave., Austin, Texas 78711-2967, Telephone: (512) 463-6900... CFR Part 943 Intergovernmental relations, Surface mining, Underground mining. Dated: June 23, 2011...

  7. 21 CFR 808.93 - Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Texas. 808.93 Section 808.93 Food and Drugs FOOD... and Local Exemptions § 808.93 Texas. (a) The following Texas medical device requirement is enforceable... that, in enforcing this requirement, Texas apply the definition of “used hearing aid” in § 801.420(a)(6...

  8. Texas Migrant Labor. Annual Report, 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    Among the responsibilities of the Good Neighbor Commission of Texas are (1) a survey of conditions and (2) a study of problems related to migrant labor in Texas. This annual report of the 1969 migrant scene shows the results of that survey and study. Beginning with an overview of Texas migrant labor, which goes back several years and includes a…

  9. Texas, 2010 forest inventory and analysis factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Bentley

    2012-01-01

    This science update summarizes the findings of the statewide annual inventory conducted by the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program in cooperation with the Texas Forest Service of the forest resource attributes in Texas. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into seven FIA survey units – southeast (unit 1), northeast (unit 2), north central (unit 3...

  10. Texas, 2008 forest inventory and analysis factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Bentley

    2011-01-01

    This science update summarizes the findings of the first statewide annual inventory conducted by the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program in cooperation with the Texas Forest Service of the forest resource attributes in Texas. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into seven FIA survey units—southeast (unit 1), the northeast (unit 2), the north...

  11. 40 CFR 81.344 - Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Texas. 81.344 Section 81.344... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.344 Texas. Texas... X 1 EPA designation replaces State designation. Texas—Carbon Monoxide Designated Area Designation...

  12. The Demographics of Corporal Punishment in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examined the student discipline policies of 1,025 Texas school districts, as well as data from the Texas Education Agency's Academic Excellence Indicator System in order to identify demographic patterns regarding corporal punishment policies in Texas schools. The study also studied the relationship between a district's…

  13. The Demographics of Corporal Punishment in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examined the student discipline policies of 1,025 Texas school districts, as well as data from the Texas Education Agency's Academic Excellence Indicator System in order to identify demographic patterns regarding corporal punishment policies in Texas schools. The study also studied the relationship between a district's corporal…

  14. Hydrogeology of Webb County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Rebecca B.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Webb County, in semiarid South Texas on the U.S.-Mexico border, is a region confronted by increasing stresses on natural resources. Laredo (fig. 1), the largest city in Webb County (population 193,000 in 2000), was one of the 10 fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country during 1990-2000 (Perry and Mackun, 2001). Commercial and industrial activities have expanded throughout the region to support the maquiladora industry (manufacturing plants in Mexico) along the border and other growth as a result of the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Rio Grande currently (2002) is the primary source of public water supply for Laredo and other cities along the border in Webb County (fig. 1). Other cities, such as Bruni and Mirando City in the southeastern part of the county, rely on ground-water supplies to meet municipal demands. Increased water demand associated with development and population growth in the region has increased the need for the City of Laredo and Webb County to evaluate alternative water sources to meet future demand. Possible options include (1) supplementing the surface-water supply with ground water, and (2) applying artificial storage and recovery (ASR) technology to recharge local aquifers. These options raise issues regarding the hydraulic capability of the aquifers to store economically substantial quantities of water, current or potential uses of the resource, and possible effects on the quality of water resulting from mixing ground water with alternative source waters. To address some of these issues, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Laredo, began a study in 1996 to assess the ground-water resources of Webb County. A hydrogeologic study was conducted to review and analyze available information on the hydrogeologic units (aquifers and confining units) in Webb County, to locate available wells in the region with water-level and water-quality information from the aquifers, and

  15. Licuefacción enzimática y caracterización de las propiedades reológicas de pulpa de maracuyá amarillo (Passiflora edulis var. flavicarpa)

    OpenAIRE

    Bejarano Alva, Isabel; Quispe Condori, Sócrates; Silva Baigorria, Samuel; Crisóstomo Gordillo, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    El objetivo de esta investigación fue realizar el proceso de licuefacción enzimática y caracterizar las propiedades reológicas en pulpa de maracuyá amarillo. Para ello, se obtuvo el mejor tratamiento enzimático a través de un diseño de superficie  de respuesta, analizando la influencia de concentración de la enzima RAPIDASE® TF, temperatura y tiempo de licuefacción sobre el contenido de sólidos solubles y rendimiento. Se estudió el comportamiento reológico de la pulpa antes y luego de la licu...

  16. Habilidades visuales en niños y niñas de educación primaria con problemas de lectura e influencia de un filtro amarillo en la visión y la lectura

    OpenAIRE

    Palomo Álvarez, Catalina

    2009-01-01

    El presente estudio evaluó la función binocular, acomodativa, movimientos oculares, percepción visual, síntomas y nivel lector de una población no clínica de niños/as de educación primaria con problemas de lectura, sin dislexia y con un nivel cognitivo dentro de la normalidad y analizó la influencia del uso de un filtro amarillo durante tres meses en una lente con antirreflejante en gafa y con la mejor corrección óptica del niño/a en la visión y la lectura. Las habilidades visuales y lectora...

  17. A Big LEAP for Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Loraine; Roach, David; Williamson, Celia

    2014-01-01

    In Texas, educators working to coordinate the efforts of fifty community colleges, thirty-eight universities, and six university systems are bringing the resources of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP) initiative to bear in order to ensure that the state's nearly 1.5…

  18. "Fisher v. Texas": Strictly Disappointing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieli, Russell K.

    2013-01-01

    Russell K. Nieli writes in this opinion paper that as far as the ability of state colleges and universities to use race as a criteria for admission goes, "Fisher v. Texas" was a big disappointment, and failed in the most basic way. Nieli states that although some affirmative action opponents have tried to put a more positive spin on the…

  19. Red Tide off Texas Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Red tides (algae) bloomed late this summer along a 300-mile stretch of Texas' Gulf Coast, killing millions of fish and shellfish as well as making some people sick. State officials are calling this the worst red tide bloom in 14 years. The algae produces a poison that paralyzes fish and prevents them from breathing. There is concern that the deadly algae could impact or even wipe out this year's oyster harvest in Texas, which usually peaks during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. The red tides were first observed off the Texas coast in mid-August and have been growing steadily in size ever since. Red tides tend to bloom and subside rapidly, depending upon changes in wind speed and direction, water temperature, salinity, and rainfall patterns (as the algae doesn't do as well in fresher water). This true-color image of the Texas Gulf Coast was acquired on September 29, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The red tide can be seen as the dark reddish discoloration in the ocean running southwest to northeast along the coast. In this scene, the bloom appears to be concentrated north and east of Corpus Christi, just off Matagorda Island. The image was made at 500-meter resolution using a combination of MODIS' visible bands 1 (red), 4 (green), and 3 (blue). The city of Houston can be seen clearly as the large, greyish cluster of pixels to the north and west of Galveston Bay, which is about mid-way up the coastline in this image. Also visible in this image are plumes of smoke, perhaps wildfires, both to the north and northeast of Houston. For more information about red tides, refer to the Texas Red Tide Web site. Image courtesy Andrey Savtchenko, MODIS Data Support Team, and the MODIS Ocean Team, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

  20. Nest success and reproductive ecology of the Texas Botteri’s Sparrow (Peucaea botterii texana) in exotic and native grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Katherine S.; McCarthy, Erin M.; Woodin, Marc C.; Withers, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Very little information is available for Peucaea botterii texana (Texas Botteri's Sparrow) and nothing is known about its nesting ecology, in part due to its cryptic behavior and nesting strategies. Our goal was to examine the nesting ecology of Texas Botteri's Sparrows and compare reproductive success between exotic and native grasslands. We searched for and monitored nests in 2004 and 2005 on the King Ranch in southern Texas. We found no relationship in reproductive effort, nest characteristics, and plant species richness around the nest between grassland types. Vegetation surrounding Texas Botteri's Sparrow nests was significantly taller and denser in native grasslands than in exotic grasslands. Further research on nesting ecology for the Texas Botteri's Sparrow is necessary to determine its habitat needs and its role as an indicator of grassland quality.

  1. Influence of planting depths on the incidence of sorghum head smut, caused by Sporisorium reilianum

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted at the Texas A&M Experiment Station in Beeville, Texas, to determine the effect of planting depths on the incidence of sorghum head smut. In both years, the incidence of head smut decreased with planting depth. In year 2, the number of smutted plants was two-fold and three...

  2. FOUR NOTCH ROADLESS AREA, TEXAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, B.B.; Ryan, George S.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and geochemical investigation of the Four Notch Roadless Area, Texas, was conducted. The area has a probable resource potential for oil and gas. There is, however, little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources or other energy resources. Acquisition of seismic data and detailed comparisons with logs from wells from the vicinity of the Four Notch Roadless Area is necessary to better determine if the subsurface stratigraphy and structures are favorable for the accumulation of oil or gas.

  3. Guadalupian studies in West Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, R.E.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Rohr, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Murchison established the Permian System in the Ural Mountains of Russia in 1841. The first North American Permian fossils were discovered by Hall (1856) about 15 years later. The fossils, which were collected in New York State, were initially described as Carboniferous (Hall, 1856) but were subsequently recognized as Permian by Girty (1902). Benjamin F. Shumard (1858), however, was the first to place an unequivocal Permian designation on some North American fossils, which has been collected by his brother George G. Shumard from the Guadalupe Mountains in Texas. A half a century passed before Girty (1908) made known an extensive Guadalupian fauna, although his field work in Texas and his study of this fauna already lead him to propose a Guadalupian "period" (Girty, 1902). Girty's suggestion was accepted only when it was formalized as the Guadalupe Series by Adams et al. (1939). The "Guadalupian fauna" was based upon fossils that Girty collected in 1901 on an expedition headed by Robert T. Hill, a revered figure in Texas geology.

  4. Oceanographic measurements from the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Texas Automated Buoy System contains daily oceanographic measurements from seven buoys off the Texas coast from Brownsville to Sabine. The Texas General Land...

  5. Simulating the Hydrologic Impact of Arundo donax Invasion on the Headwaters of the Nueces River in Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Shailee Jain; Srinivasulu Ale; Clyde L. Munster; R. James Ansley; James R. Kiniry

    2015-01-01

    Arundo donax (hereafter referred to as Arundo), a robust herbaceous plant, has invaded the riparian zones of the Rio Grande River and the rivers of the Texas Hill Country over the last two decades. Arundo was first observed along the Nueces River in central Texas in 1995 by the Nueces River Authority (NRA). It then spread rapidly downstream due to its fast growth rate and availability of streamflow for its consumptive use, and it completely displaced the native vegetation, primarily Panicum v...

  6. Effect of fungicides on sorghum anthracnose and grain mold in Burleson County, Texas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    The experiment was conducted at the Texas A&M AgriLife Experiment Station near College Station (Burleson County), using the hybrids BH3822 and BH 5566. The seed was planted 10 Apr in a Belk clay soil. There were four replicates per treatment arranged in a randomized, blocked factorial design. Tre...

  7. Effect of fungicides on anthracnose and grain mold of sorghum in Wharton County, Texas, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    The experiment was conducted in Wharton County, Texas using the hybrid BH 5566. There were four replicates per treatment arranged in a randomized, blocked factorial design. Each replicate consisted of four, 20.5-ft rows, with 38-in. row spacing and a plant spacing of 1.9 in. within rows. Three fu...

  8. Effect of fungicides on sorghum anthracnose and grain mold in Burleson County, Texas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    The experiment was conducted at the Texas AgriLife Experiment Station near College Station. The hybrids BH3822 and BH 5566 were planted in replicated plots and treatment arranged in a randomized, blocked factorial design. Each replicate consisted of four, 20 ft rows, with 30-in. row spacing and a ...

  9. Distribution of wild taro (Colocasia esculenta) in subtropical Texas, growth of young colonies, and tolerance to simulated herbivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-native wild taro (Colocasia esculenta) is an ornamental plant that is an emerging invasive weed in moist riparian areas in subtropical and warm temperate river systems in Texas, with potential impacts on native plant species, habitat quality and water use in the Lower Rio Grande Basin. Observati...

  10. Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffington, Warren M.; Eggebrecht, James A.

    2007-02-24

    This project benefited the public by assisting manufacturing plants in the United States to save costly energy resources and become more profitable. Energy equivalent to over 75,000 barrels of oil was conserved. The Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) visited 96 manufacturing plants and spent 101 days in those plants during the contract period from August 9, 2002, through November 30, 2006. Recommended annual energy savings for manufacturers were 37,400,000 kWh (127,600 MMBtu—site basis) of electricity and 309,000 MCF (309,000 MMBtu) of natural gas. Each manufacturer subsequently was surveyed, and based on these surveys reportedly implemented 79% of the electricity savings and 36% of the natural gas savings for an overall energy savings of 48% of recommended. Almost 800 (798) projects were recommended to manufacturers, and they accomplished two-thirds of the projects. Cost savings recommended were $12.3 million and implemented savings were $5.7 million or 47%. During the contract period our average time between site visit and report submittal averaged 46 days; and decreased from 48 days in 2003 to 44 days in 2006. Serving clients well and promptly has been a priority. We visited five ESA overflow clients during FY 06. The Texas A&M University IAC pioneered the presentation of air pollution information in reports, and includes NOx and CO2 reductions due to energy savings in all reports. We also experimented with formal PowerPoint BestPractices presentations called Lunchtime/Showtime in each plant and with delivering electronic versions of the report. During the period of the contract, the director served on the Texas Industries of the Future (IOF) Refining and Chemicals Committee, which oversaw the showcases in 2003 and 2006. The assistant director was the Executive Director of the International Energy Technology Conference held annually. The director and assistant director became qualified specialists in the Process Heating Assessment Scoping

  11. Texas Migrant Labor, 1974 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    Organized under a 1943 Federal grant and later funded by legislative appropriations, the Good Neighbor Commission of Texas coordinates the work of Federal, State, and local government units endeavoring to improve the travel, living, and working conditions of Texas migrant farmworkers and their families. The 1974 annual report chronicles the facts,…

  12. TEXAS MIGRANT LABOR, THE 1966 MIGRATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    THE CALENDAR YEAR 1966 WAS THE SECOND FULL YEAR IN WHICH NO BRACEROS WERE IMPORTED FROM MEXICO. CRITICAL LABOR SHORTAGES OCCURRED IN SOME AREAS, HOWEVER, THE DOMESTIC LABOR SUPPLY BECAME MORE STABLE AND FEWER PROBLEMS WERE EXPERIENCED THAN IN 1965. THE MAJORITY OF TEXAS MIGRANTS LIVE IN SOUTH TEXAS AND APPROXIMATELY 95 PERCENT OF THEM ARE OF…

  13. Texas Migrant Labor. Annual Report, 1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    The Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, organized under a Federal grant in 1943 and later constituted as an agency of state government by legislative mandate, is charged under its basic law to coordinate the work of the Federal, State, and local government units endeavoring to improve the travel and working conditions of Texas migrant farm workers.…

  14. TEXAS MIGRANT LABOR, THE 1965 MIGRATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    THE CALENDAR YEAR 1965 WAS THE FIRST FULL YEAR IN WHICH NO BRACEROS WERE IMPORTED FROM MEXICO. CROP LOSSES OCCURRED IN SOME AREAS OF THE COUNTRY DUE TO LABOR SHORTAGES, HOWEVER, GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS STATE THAT THESE SHORTAGES CAN BE AVOIDED IN THE FUTURE. THE MAJORITY OF TEXAS MIGRANTS LIVE IN SOUTH TEXAS AND APPROXIMATELY 95 PERCENT OF THEM ARE…

  15. Texas Migrant Labor. 1975 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    The Good Neighbor Commission of Texas coordinates the work of the Federal, State, and local government toward the improvement of travel and living and working conditions of Texas migrant laborers and their families. Covering the full spectrum of migrant labor activity directly related to the improvement of the well-being of migrant and seasonal…

  16. 78 FR 39822 - Texas Disaster #TX-00409

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00409 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 06/25/2013... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  17. 75 FR 70763 - Texas Disaster #TX-00363

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00363 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 11/09/2010... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  18. 76 FR 35260 - Texas Disaster # TX-00375

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00375 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of TEXAS dated 04/26... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  19. 40 CFR 81.429 - Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Texas. 81.429 Section 81.429 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.429 Texas. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land...

  20. Texas Migrant Council, Inc. Siempre Unidos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Migrant Council, Inc., Laredo.

    In 1969 the Texas Migrant Council Mobile Head Start began a program of year-round day care/head start services that would follow migrant children from their South Texas winter home to certain northern states during the summer. Services included educational, medical and nutritional help. Prime grantee for the project was initially the Colorado…

  1. 76 FR 40765 - Texas Disaster #TX-00378

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00378 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 07/05/2011. Incident: Dyer Mills Fire. Incident Period: 06/19/2011 through 06/26/2011. Effective Date:...

  2. Energy Reliability Related to Water Availability under Climate Extremes in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedy, R. C.; Scanlon, B. R.; Duncan, I.; Young, M.; Wolaver, B. D.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding linkages between water and energy is critical during climate extremes, particularly droughts. With 40% reduction in per capita water storage since the 1980s, Texas is much more vulnerable to droughts now than in the past. Texas experienced the most extreme one year drought on record in 2011, with 60% reduction in precipitation and 40% reduction in reservoir storage relative to the long term mean. Power plants in Texas rely almost entirely on surface water for cooling. We evaluated water requirements for power plants based on fuel types and cooling technologies to assess their vulnerability to future droughts. Water demand was estimated for electricity generation using multiple sources, including Energy Information Agency, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, and Texas Water Development Board. The following analysis reflects 2010 data; however, 2011 data will be analyzed as soon as they are made available. Analysis of 2010 data showed that Texas generated 411 million MWHr of electricity, mostly from natural gas (46%), coal (37%), nuclear (10%), and renewables (7%). Approximately 70% of net electricity generation in 2010 required water for cooling. Water consumption for electricity generation totaled 0.6 km3, which represents 3% of the states total water consumption in 2010 (22 km3). Water withdrawals totaled 28 km3; however, 97% of this water is returned to the system. Water consumption varies with fuel source (coal, natural gas, nuclear, renewables) and cooling system technology (once-through, pond, and recirculating tower). Coal plants accounted for the majority of water consumption in 2010, followed by natural gas, nuclear, and other. Water consumption varied by cooling system technology, with ponds accounting for most water consumption, followed by recirculating towers, and once-through cooling systems. The vulnerability of the different systems to drought was examined with water requirements for withdrawal and consumption relative to water

  3. A preliminary uncertainty analysis of phenomenological inputs in TEXAS-V code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. H.; Kim, H. D.; Ahn, K. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Uncertainty analysis is important step in safety analysis of nuclear power plants. The better estimate for the computer codes is on the increase instead of conservative codes. These efforts aim to get more precise evaluation of safety margins, and aim at determining the rate of change in the prediction of codes with one or more input parameters varies within its range of interest. From this point of view, a severe accident uncertainty analysis system, SAUNA, has been improved for TEXAS-V FCI uncertainty analysis. The main objective of this paper is to present the TEXAS FCI uncertainty analysis results implemented through the SAUNA code

  4. Estudio de la prevalencia de la comorbilidad entre el distrés psicológico y el abuso de drogas en usuarios del Portal Amarillo, Montevideo - Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Domenech

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available La comorbilidad psiquiátrica en personas con trastorno por consumo de alcohol y otras drogas tiene alta prevalencia, impacta en la salud individual y familiar y genera mayores costos. Este estudio epidemiológico descriptivo, multicéntrico, transversal, estima la prevalencia de la comorbilidad del distrés psicológico en 134 pacientes mayores de 18 años en tratamiento en el Portal Amarillo de Montevideo - Uruguay. Describe las características sociodemográficas, consumo de drogas, funcionalidad familiar, y grado de satisfacción de la población usuaria. Para la recolección de datos se usaron los cuestionarios EULAC-CICAD, K-10 y APGAR-familiar. La prevalencia de distrés severo y muy severo fue de un 71.6%; el 90.6% refirió estar satisfecho con la atención recibida y el 48% percibió que su familia no presentaba disfunción. Por ende, es necesario contemplar la presencia de comorbilidad psiquiátrica en el abordaje de usuarios con trastorno por consumo de sustancias en Centros de tratamiento.

  5. 9 CFR 72.5 - Area quarantined in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Area quarantined in Texas. 72.5... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.5 Area quarantined in Texas. The area quarantined in Texas is the quarantined area...

  6. The Texas Ten Percent Plan's Impact on College Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Martorell, Paco; McFarlin, Isaac, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The Texas Ten Percent Plan (TTP) provides students in the top 10 percent of their high-school class with automatic admission to any public university in the state, including the two flagship schools, the University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M. Texas created the policy in 1997 after a federal appellate court ruled that the state's previous…

  7. Texas Public School Technology Survey, 1988. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Jon; Davis, Trina; Strader, Arlen; Jessup, George

    The Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA) with technical support from the South Central Regional Technology in Education Consortia-Texas (SCR*TEC-TX) conducted a survey of the technology infrastructure in all public schools in Texas. This document provides the final report of the 1998 Texas Public School Technology Survey. Following…

  8. 27 CFR 9.155 - Texas Davis Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Texas Davis Mountains. 9... Texas Davis Mountains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas Davis Mountains.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Texas...

  9. The Texas Ten Percent Plan's Impact on College Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Martorell, Paco; McFarlin, Isaac, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The Texas Ten Percent Plan (TTP) provides students in the top 10 percent of their high-school class with automatic admission to any public university in the state, including the two flagship schools, the University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M. Texas created the policy in 1997 after a federal appellate court ruled that the state's previous…

  10. 33 CFR 165.804 - Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels-safety zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Snake Island, Texas City, Texas... Guard District § 165.804 Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels—safety zone. (a) The following is a safety zone: (1) The west and northwest shores of Snake Island; (2)...

  11. SECURES: Austin, Texas demonstration results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Glynn; Shaw, Scott; Scharf, Peter; Stellingworth, Bob

    2003-09-01

    The Law Enforcement technology development community has a growing interest in the technologies associated with gunshot detection and localization. These interests revolve around community-oriented policing. Technologies of interest include those associated with muzzle blast and bullet shockwave detection and the inter-netting of these acoustic sensors with electro-optic sensors. To date, no one sensor technology has proven totally effective for a complete solution. PSI has a muzzle blast detection and localization product which is wireless, highly mobile and reconfigurable, with a user-friendly laptop processor and display unit, which completed a one-year demonstration in Austin, Texas on July 6, 2002. This demonstration was conducted under a Cooperative Agreement with the National Institute of Justice and in cooperation with the Austin Police Department. This paper will discuss the details of the demonstrations, provide a summarized evaluation, elucidate the lessons learned, make recommendations for future deployments and discuss the developmental directions indicated for the future.

  12. Solar Leasing Summary, Houston Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, Mary [City of San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-02-14

    A relatively new option for homeowners looking to add solar to their home is the solar lease. At present, the solar lease option can be found in California, Arizona, Texas, Colorado, Hawaii, New York and Oregon. The most active companies currently offering solar leases are NRG Energy, Sungevity, Solar City and Sun Run. With the uncertainty and/or lack of subsidies the states participating in these programs have ebbed and flowed over the last few years. However, there is an expectation that in the current market solar leasing will make solar viable without the utility and federal subsidies. NRG Energy is currently testing this expectation in Houston, TX where currently no subsidies or incentives beyond the federal tax incentives, exist. Following is an explanation on the state of solar leasing in Houston, TX and explanation of the current financing options.

  13. From Delirium to Coherence: Shamanism and Medicine Plants in Silko's "Ceremony"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weso, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    A nondescript rock shelter in Texas provides the evidence for shamanism in Leslie Marmon Silko's novel, "Ceremony". There, archaeologists found identifiable images of antlered human figures and entheogenic plant substances, which are medicinal plants, associated with shamanistic practices.

  14. Outbreak of Nosocomial Listeriosis — Texas, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Invasive listeriosis is a potentially fatal foodborne disease caused by Listeria monocytogenes. In February 2010, a listeriosis cluster was identified in Texas. We investigated to confirm the outbreak, identify the source, and prevent additional infections. Methods: All clinical isol...

  15. 25th Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Frank M.; van Eldik, Christopher; Hofmann, Werner

    The 25th Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics (TEXAS 2010) was held in Heidelberg, Germany, during December, 6-10, 2010. More than 350 astrophysicists attended a very interesting meeting, designed to exchange ideas and results, and to discuss future directions in Relativistic Astrophysics. A wide range of scientific results were discussed in about 100 oral and about 200 poster contributions during nine parallel afternoon sessions and one highlight evening session. Further information, including the full program, can be found on the conference webpage: http://www.mpi-hd.mpg.de/texas2010/. The papers published here in these proceedings represent the contributions accepted for the parallel sessions and the main poster session at TEXAS 2010.

  16. Texas Students Rank Prestige of Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Dennis

    1979-01-01

    A survey of 701 Texas high school students revealed that they ranked the prestige of six careers in the following order: (1) minister, (2) television reporter, (3) accountant, (4) policeman, (5) high school teacher, (6) newspaper reporter. (GT)

  17. 77 FR 8144 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... Division of the Railroad Commission of Texas or the director's representative. We find that there is no... Part 943 Intergovernmental relations, Surface mining, Underground mining. Dated: November 9, 2011...

  18. Making Texas Restaurants Healthier for Children

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-30

    Sylvia Crixell, PhD, RD, Professor of Nutrition at Texas State University, discusses her study which details the success of a community-based program in Texas aimed at combatting childhood obesity by improving children’s menus in restaurants.  Created: 12/30/2014 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/30/2014.

  19. Ecopigmentos cerámicos verdes y amarillos de Pr2Mo2O9 dopados con calcio obtenidos en presencia de mineralizadores y por coprecipitación química

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monrós, G.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the synthesis of Pr2-xCaxMo2O9 solid solutions by ceramic route is presented. Crystallography and colour evolution from green to yellow described on literature have been checked. When enamelled in a lead free double firing ceramic glaze, pigments produces light yellow colours not better than b*=19. Using NH4Cl, NaF and Na2SiF6 as mineralizers in the (Pr2-xCaxMo2O9 x=0,1 composition with the same molar addition of halogens (0.84 mols per formula weight, a structural effect of fluoride ion is observed but the yellow colour on enamelled samples do not improve. Finally, using an ammonia coprecipitation method in the x=0.6 sample, a similar crystallization to the homologous ceramic sample is detected, but x ray diffraction peaks are more intense and less wide, pointing to a more regular and higher crystal size crystallization which is checked by electronic scanning microscopy. This microstruture give more intense yellow coloured powders and improve their resistance against glaze, producing significantly best yellow colours than ceramic samples.En el presente trabajo se presenta la síntesis de disoluciones sólidas (Pr2-xCaxMo2O9 vía cerámica, comprobándose la evolución cristalográfica y de coloración del verde al amarillo, al aumentar la cantidad de iones calcio (x en la disolución sólida descrita en la literatura. Se ha estudiado el comportamiento al esmaltar plaquetas cerámicas con una frita de bicocción sin plomo, coloreada al 5% en peso del pigmento, la cual rinde colores amarillos suaves que no superan el valor de la coordenada cromática b*=19. La mineralización con NH4Cl, NaF y Na2SiF6 de la composición (Pr2-xCaxMo2O9 con x=0,1 e igual cantidad molar de halógenos (0,84 moles por peso fórmula, desarrolla un efecto estructural del ión fluoruro sobre la disolución sólida que no se traduce en una mejor coloración en el esmalte. La utilización de la coprecipitación amoniacal en la muestra x=0,6 produce una

  20. Parasites of the collared peccary from Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, W M; Low, W A

    1970-01-01

    Results of a survey of the parasites of the collared peccary (Dicotyles tajacu angulatus) in Texas are presented. Three ectoparasites, Amblyomma cajennense, Dermacentor variabilis, and Pulex porcinus were very common on peccaries from south Texas, but less common or absent in arid west Texas. Sucking lice, Pecaroecus javalii, were common on peccaries from west Texas, but were not found in south Texas. The known range of this louse in Texas is extended into the Big Bend area. Two ticks, Amnblyomma inornatumn and Haemaphysalis leporis-palustris, were found infrequently. Five of nine species of endoparasites found in this survey (Dirofilaria acutiuscula, Parabronema pecatriae, Parostertagia heterospiculum, Physocephalus sp., and Texicospirura turki) were prevalent. Three species, D. acutiuscula, Gongylonema baylisi, and Fascioloides magna, are reported from North American peccaries for the first time. The geographic distribution of the large American liver fluke, F. magna, coincided with an area where the parasite is enzootic in white-tailed deer. It is concluded that parasitism was of little importance in population control of peccaries during the period of the study.

  1. Rising Above the Storm: DIG TEXAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K. K.; Miller, K. C.; Bednarz, S. W.; Mosher, S.

    2011-12-01

    For a decade Texas educators, scientists and citizens have shown a commitment to earth science education through planning at the national and state levels, involvement in earth science curriculum and teacher professional development projects, and the creation of a model senior level capstone Earth and Space Science course first offered in 2010 - 2011. The Texas state standards for Earth and Space Science demonstrate a shift to rigorous content, career relevant skills and use of 21st century technology. Earth and Space Science standards also align with the Earth Science, Climate and Ocean Literacy framework documents. In spite of a decade of progress K-12 earth science education in Texas is in crisis. Many school districts do not offer Earth and Space Science, or are using the course as a contingency for students who fail core science subjects. The State Board for Educator Certification eliminated Texas' secondary earth science teacher certification in 2009, following the adoption of the new Earth and Space Science standards. This makes teachers with a composite teacher certification (biology, physics and chemistry) eligible to teach Earth and Space Science, as well other earth science courses (e.g., Aquatic Science, Environmental Systems/Science) even if they lack earth science content knowledge. Teaching materials recently adopted by the State Board of Education do not include Earth and Space Science resources. In July 2011 following significant budget cuts at the 20 Education Service Centers across Texas, the Texas Education Agency eliminated key staff positions in its curriculum division, including science. This "perfect storm" has created a unique opportunity for a university-based approach to confront the crisis in earth science education in Texas which the Diversity and Innovation in the Geosciences (DIG) TEXAS alliance aims to fulfill. Led by the Texas A&M University College of Geosciences and The University of Texas Jackson School of Geosciences, with

  2. Reactividad Química de los Azo Colorantes Amarillo Anaranjado y Rojo Allura mediante Descriptores Globales y la Función de Fukui Chemical Reactivity of the Azo dyes Sunset Yellow and Allura Red by Global Descriptors and the Fukui Function

    OpenAIRE

    Ensuncho,Adolfo E.; Jesús M López; Juana Robles

    2012-01-01

    Se calcularon descriptores globales y locales de la reactividad para los colorantes amarillo anaranjado y rojo allura con el fin de analizar su reactividad química intrínseca. Los cálculos computacionales se llevaron a cabo tanto en vacio como en la fase acuosa, la cual se representó por medio de una constante dieléctrica de 78.5 e introducida por el modelo de solvente del continuo polarizado. Los resultados mostraron que el colorante rojo allura es menos susceptible a la adición nucleofílica...

  3. Reconocimiento de parasitoides y evaluación de un cebo tóxico para el control de las moscas del botón floral dasiops spp. (diptera: lonchaeidae) del maracuyá amarillo y la pitaya amarilla en el Valle del Cauca

    OpenAIRE

    Quintero Quintero, Edgar Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Actualmente, el control de las moscas de los botones florales del maracuyá amarillo Dasiops inedulis Steyskal y de la pitaya amarilla, D. saltans Townsend (Diptera: Lonchaeidae), se basa en aplicaciones de insecticidas de amplio espectro que contaminan el medio ambiente y afectan negativamente la entomofauna benéfica (p.ej., enemigos naturales y polinizadores). Los objetivos principales de este estudio fueron la evaluación de un cebo tóxico de origen natural y la búsqueda de parasitoides para...

  4. Use of trees by the Texas ratsnake (Elaphe obsoleta) in eastern Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josh B. Pierce; Robert R. Fleet; Lance McBrayer; D. Craig Rudolph

    2008-01-01

    We present information on the use of trees by Elaphe obsoleta (Texas Ratsnake) in a mesic pine-hardwood forest in eastern Texas. Using radiotelemetry, seven snakes (3 females, 4 males) were relocated a total of 363 times from April 2004 to May 2005, resulting in 201 unique locations. Snakes selected trees containing cavities and used hardwoods and...

  5. The 1984 Institute of Texas Studies: The Texas Experience to 1865--An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Linda T.; Holahan, Carole K.

    Forty-four participants completed a questionnaire (Appendix A) designed to evaluate the Institute of Texas Studies: "The Texas Experience to 1865." Section 1 of the questionnaire consisted of a listing of 20 presentations and activities of the institute and one general institute evaluation item. The remaining sections (2-10) were…

  6. Simulating evapotranspiration (ET) and corn yield response to irrigation management in the Texas High Plains using DSSAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grain corn (Zea mays L) continues to be a major irrigated crop in the northern Texas High Plains. Improvements in irrigation system efficiency, irrigation management, and plant genetics have increased average yields while decreasing seasonal water use in the last 40 years. However, declining water l...

  7. Texas site selection and licensing status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avant, R.V. Jr.

    1989-11-01

    Texas has identified a potential site in Hudspeth County in far West Texas near the town of Fort Hancock. Over the past year the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority has been conducting detailed geology, hydrology, meteorology, soils, and flora and fauna evaluations. An authorization by the Board of Directors of the Authority to proceed with a license application, assuming that the detailed evaluation indicates that the site is suitable, is expected by September. A prototype license has been prepared in anticipation of the order to proceed with licensing, and the formal license application is expected to be submitted to the Texas Department of Health-Bureau of Radiation Control in December, meeting the license application milestone. Although site selection processes in all siting areas across the country have experienced organized opposition, El Paso County has funded a particularly well-organized, well-financed program to legally and technically stop consideration of the Fort Hancock site prior to the licensing process. Many procedural, regulatory, and technical issues have been raised which have required responses from the Authority in order to proceed with licensing. This has provided a unique perspective of what to expect from well-organized opposition at the licensing stage. This paper presents an update on the Texas siting activity with detailed information on the site evaluation and license application. Experience of dealing with issues raised by opposition relating to NRC guidelines and rules is also discussed.

  8. Wind data in Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, V.; McGaughey, D.

    1980-08-01

    Two major objectives of the project reported were (1) to update Texas wind energy resource information and (2) prepare a Texas wind resource publication for use by the general public. Both of these objectives were viewed as having major benefit for the growth of wind energy utilization in Texas. Meteorological data on magnetic tapes for all the major National Weather Service stations (18) were obtained from Texas Natural Resources Information Systems (generally for the years 1961 to 1966). Windspeed, pressure, and temperature data were then used to tabulate windspeed histograms and to calculate the wind energy for each station. Average month and year windspeed histograms were also calculated. From this data, the State was divided into five regions depending on the availability of wind energy. The windspeed histograms for each region were combined with the power curve for fifteen commercially available wind turbines to calculate the average energy output per year. To help individuals assess the economic feasibility of acquiring wind turbines, cost and benefit factors for the wind turbines were calculated for the various regions of the State. Basically, the years to payback for the installed wind tubines were calculated for different electricity rates (3, 5, and 7 cents/kWh) and different carrying charges (11, 15, and 19%). The above information was incorporated into A Consumer's Guide for Wind Energy in Texas, which describes wind energy and power, wind turbines and their applications, economics, and tips on siting.

  9. Pregnant Women Should Avoid Zika-Hit Texas Town: CDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162573.html Pregnant Women Should Avoid Zika-Hit Texas Town: CDC ... 15, 2016 THURSDAY, Dec. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women should avoid traveling to a south Texas ...

  10. North Central Texas Cities Renew Partnership to Address Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    DALLAS - (Feb. 12, 2014) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) are working with cities in north central Texas to address key environmental issues in the area. Several cities formed

  11. Texas Reports 1st Likely Case of Local Zika Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Texas Reports 1st Likely Case of Local Zika Infection Woman had no travel-related risk factors, ... reported its first possible case of locally transmitted Zika infection on Monday. If confirmed, Texas would join ...

  12. Sweetwater, Texas Large N Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumy, D. F.; Woodward, R.; Barklage, M.; Hollis, D.; Spriggs, N.; Gridley, J. M.; Parker, T.

    2015-12-01

    From 7 March to 30 April 2014, NodalSeismic, Nanometrics, and IRIS PASSCAL conducted a collaborative, spatially-dense seismic survey with several thousand nodal short-period geophones complemented by a backbone array of broadband sensors near Sweetwater, Texas. This pilot project demonstrates the efficacy of industry and academic partnerships, and leveraged a larger, commercial 3D survey to collect passive source seismic recordings to image the subsurface. This innovative deployment of a large-N mixed-mode array allows industry to explore array geometries and investigate the value of broadband recordings, while affording academics a dense wavefield imaging capability and an operational model for high volume instrument deployment. The broadband array consists of 25 continuously-recording stations from IRIS PASSCAL and Nanometrics, with an array design that maximized recording of horizontal-traveling seismic energy for surface wave analysis over the primary target area with sufficient offset for imaging objectives at depth. In addition, 2639 FairfieldNodal Zland nodes from NodalSeismic were deployed in three sub-arrays: the outlier, backbone, and active source arrays. The backbone array consisted of 292 nodes that covered the entire survey area, while the outlier array consisted of 25 continuously-recording nodes distributed at a ~3 km distance away from the survey perimeter. Both the backbone and outlier array provide valuable constraints for the passive source portion of the analysis. This project serves as a learning platform to develop best practices in the support of large-N arrays with joint industry and academic expertise. Here we investigate lessons learned from a facility perspective, and present examples of data from the various sensors and array geometries. We will explore first-order results from local and teleseismic earthquakes, and show visualizations of the data across the array. Data are archived at the IRIS DMC under stations codes XB and 1B.

  13. 75 FR 19340 - FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Jewett, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Jewett, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission..., proposing the allotment of FM Channel 232A at Jewett, Texas, as a first local service. The reference.... Section 73.202(b), the Table of FM Allotments under Texas, is ameded by adding Jewett, Channe 232A...

  14. East Texas, 2011 forest inventory and analysis factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason A. Cooper; James W. Bentley

    2012-01-01

    This science update summarizes the findings of the annual inventory conducted by the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program in cooperation with the Texas Forest Service of the forest resource attributes in east Texas. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into 7 FIA survey units—southeast (unit 1), northeast (unit 2), north central (unit 3), south (...

  15. East Texas, 2012—Forest Inventory and Analysis Factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Brandeis; Jason A. Cooper; James W. Bentley

    2014-01-01

    This science update summarizes the findings of the statewide annual inventory of the forest resource attributes in Texas conducted by the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program in cooperation with the Texas A&M Forest Service. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into seven FIA survey units—southeast (unit 1), northeast (unit 2), north central (...

  16. Organizational Behavior Analysis Focusing on the University of Texas System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Bobby K.

    2011-01-01

    This project analyzes the organizational behavior of the University of Texas System. The University of Texas System is comprised of nine academic and six health institutions. The University of Texas System has over 85,000 employees; the student enrollment is 202,240 with a budget of $2.25 billion dollars. This project has a total of four parts and…

  17. 40 CFR 282.93 - Texas State-Administered Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Underground Storage Tank Program, Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, P.O. Box 13087, Austin, TX... reference herein for enforcement purposes. (A) The statutory provisions include: (1) Texas Water Code, Title... Resource Conservation Commission (2) 31 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 337—Enforcement. (i) Subchapter...

  18. Using Workforce Information for Degree Program Planning in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Butterfield, Lindsay; Lavery, Diana; Miller, Trey; Daugherty, Lindsay; Beleche, Trinidad; Han, Bing

    2015-01-01

    In May 2013, the Texas Legislature passed House Bill 1296, requiring a report on Texas's future workforce needs that would help inform decisions to develop or expand postsecondary education programs. Educators and policymakers in Texas and elsewhere have a wide variety of quantitative and qualitative workforce information available for planning…

  19. Texas Ranch House: Interactive Programming from Thirteen/WNET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlevy, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Texas Ranch House, produced by Thirteen/WNET and Wall to Wall Television, is a dynamic look at life in Texas in the 1860s, before the development of modem conveniences. In addition to the video program series, Texas Ranch House boasts an extensive interactive website (www.pbs.org/wnetlranchhouse) that will be of interest to teachers and students.…

  20. Species Distribution Model for Management of an Invasive Vine in Forestlands of Eastern Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Hsuan Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Invasive plants decrease biodiversity, modify vegetation structure, and inhibit growth and reproduction of native species. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb. is the most prevalent invasive vine in the forestlands of eastern Texas. Hence, we aimed to identify potential factors influencing the distribution of the species, quantify the relative importance of each factor, and test possible management strategies. We analyzed an extensive dataset collected as part of the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA Forest Service to quantify the range expansion of Japanese honeysuckle in the forestlands of eastern Texas from 2006 to 2011. We then identified potential factors influencing the likelihood of presence of Japanese honeysuckle using boosted regression trees. Our results indicated that the presence of Japanese honeysuckle on sampled plots almost doubled during this period (from 352 to 616 plots, spreading extensively, geographically. The probability of invasion was correlated with variables representing landscape conditions, climatic conditions, forest features, disturbance factors, and forest management activities. Habitats most at risk to invasion under current conditions occurred primarily in northeastern Texas, with a few invasion hotspots in the south. Estimated probabilities of invasion were reduced most by artificial site regeneration, with habitats most at risk again occurring primarily in northeastern Texas.

  1. Comparación de harina de chontaduro entero (Bactris gasipaes H.B.K contra alimentos balanceados y maíz amarillo como fuentes de nutrientes en la alimentación de pollos de engorde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz P. Julián F.

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Para elaborar la harina los frutos pre-cocidos se trozaron y secaron al sol. Se obtuvo 50 % de harina por kilogramo de fruto. La harina de chontaduro entero se ofreció separada de la harina de pescado a grupos de 10 pollos sin sexar de la línea Arbor Acres desde la primera semana de edad. El diseño experimental fue completamente al azar y estuvo constituido por cuatro tratamientos: la ración balanceada que sirvió como testigo y O (T2, 50 (T3 Y 100 % (T4 de sustición del maíz amarillo por harina de chontaduro. Con la ración testigo los pollos alcanzaron los mayores pesos y el mayor consumo; los pollos con el mayor nivel de harina de chontaduro disminuyeron el consumo pero alcanzaron mayor peso que los de T 2 y T3. En el aspecto de costos, el testigo obtuvo los mejores resultados en la época de baja cosecha, pero fue superado por T4 en la época de alta cosecha de frutos de chontaduro.The whole chontaduro meal was obtained simple process which permitted conserve of the nutritional value. Efficiency of the meal were 50 % of fruit weight. The whole chontaduro meals were offered with fish meal to four groups of ten unsexed "Arbor Acres" broiler chicks one day old. Since the first weeks the chicks received 1I1etreatments diets. Four treatments were compared: control (T¡,100% yellow corn +fish meal (T2, 50% yellow com +50% whole chontaduro meal + fish meal (T3 and 100 % whole chontaduro meal + fish meal (T4 Feed consumption (10 weeks were: 7,563.30 (T1, 7228.50 (T2,7156.50(T3 and 7100.90 g (T4. Body weight were: 2605.00 (T ¡, 1 717.50 (T2, 1 718.50: (T3 and 1 780.50 9 (T 4. Net entry into high production of fruit of T4 to overcome the concentrate food.

  2. Ligamentum flavum hematoma: a case report and literature review Hematoma del ligamento amarillo: caso clínico y revisión de la literatura Hematoma de ligamento amarelo: relato de caso e revisão da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericson Sfreddo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to present a rare case of ligamentum flavum hematoma in the lumbar region, discuss its physiopathology and treatment and review the literature. A woman aged 68 presented with neurogenic claudication due to degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis that evolved into a sudden worsening with cauda equina syndrome. The magnetic resonance imagining (MRI showed signs of degeneration of the lumbar spine, with a narrow spinal canal from L2 to S1, anterolisthesis L4 L5 and an expansive lesion hyperintense on T1-weighted and hypointense on T2-weighted images considered compatible with hematoma in the topography of the yellow ligament in L1-L2. The patient underwent laminectomy and lumbar fixation. Her evolution was good in the postoperative period and at 18 months of follow-up hse walked alone, despite the pain that is controlled with simple medications. Even though rare, it seems that ligamentum flavum hematoma has a relationship with the degeneration and rupture of small vessels associated with micro trauma to the spine. Its physiopathology is not well defined and treatment is similar to other spine compression processes.El objetivo es presentar un caso raro de un hematoma ligamento flavum en la región lumbar, discutir su fisiopatología y el tratamiento y revisión de la literatura. Una mujer de 68 años presentó claudicación neurogénica debido a la espondilolistesis lumbar degenerativa y que se convirtió en un repentino empeoramiento con el síndrome de cauda equina. Una imagen de resonancia magnética (RM mostró signos de degeneración de la columna lumbar, con canal espinal estrecho de L2 a S1, anterolistesis L4 L5 y en la L1-L2, un proceso expansivo redondeado e hiperintenso en T1 y hipointenso en los bordes en T2, compatible con hematoma en la topografía del ligamento amarillo. La paciente fue sometida a laminectomía y fijación lumbar. Su evolución fue buena en el postoperatorio y, a los 18 meses de seguimiento caminaba sola, a

  3. Clostridium difficile in retail meat and processing plants in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile (Cd) have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains of Cd. Toxigenic Cd has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer ...

  4. Texas Migrant Labor. Annual Report 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    The Texas farm labor pool is made up almost entirely of Mexican Americans; many of these are naturalized but the majority are native-born American citizens whose families and ethnic ties remain in and around the border. All of these field workers have, at some time, migrated to a job or in search of a job either interstate or within the boundaries…

  5. Texas Migrant Labor. 1973 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    The Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, organized under a 1943 Federal grant and later constituted as a State agency, coordinates the work of the Federal, State, and local governments in improving travel and working conditions of migrant farm workers. The basic responsibilities presented in its 1973 annual report are: (1) surveying conditions and…

  6. Texas Migrant Labor. Annual Report, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    Organized under a 1943 Federal grant and later constituted as a state agency, the Good Neighbor Commission of Texas is charged with coordinating the work of Federal, state, and local government units in improving travel and working conditions of migrant farm workers. A basic responsibility is surveying conditions and determining problem areas…

  7. Working Together for Transition in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Theresa; Serrano, John A.

    2016-01-01

    When Texas state budgets resulted in a loss of direct funding for the transition of deaf and hard of hearing students', collaboration efforts for assisting these students became critical. Theresa Johnson, MEd, outreach specialist at the Educational Resource Center on Deafness in Austin, and John A. Serrano, MA, director of Academic Affairs at the…

  8. 76 FR 53019 - Texas Disaster #TX-00380

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00380 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  9. 76 FR 60959 - Texas Disaster # TX-00382

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00382 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small...

  10. Texas Educational Reform: The Teacher Preparation Aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Ronald A.; Descamps, Jorge

    1988-01-01

    Recent Texas legislation eliminates undergraduate degrees in education and requires academic majors for certification. Intended and unplanned consequences of the legislation are examined. Discussed are implications for teacher shortages, accreditation of teacher preparation institutions, specific areas (e.g., physical education, elementary…

  11. Gastrointestinal helminths in raccoons in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresta, Amy E; Henke, Scott E; Pence, Danny B

    2009-01-01

    Raccoons (n=590) were collected from October 1999 to August 2003 from 35 counties across Texas, and gastrointestinal tracts were examined for helminth parasites. Prevalence was calculated and differences in mean abundance were examined among habitat ecoregions, age classes, and between sexes. Twenty different species of helminths (13 nematodes, two cestodes, two acanthocephalans, and three trematodes) were positively identified in the gastrointestinal tracts of 590 raccoons in Texas. Five of the 20 helminth species collected (Physaloptera rara, Placoconus lotoris, Molineus barbatus, Atriotaenia procyonis, and Macracanthorhynchus ingens) had a prevalence >20%. The total number of individuals of these five species (n=22,777) accounted for over 86% of the total number of individuals of all helminth species (n=26,426) collected. Subsequent analyses were based on these five helminths. Mean abundance differed among habitat ecoregions, age classes, and between sexes for all five parasites evaluated. This study is the most comprehensive statewide survey ever done of gastrointestinal helminths of raccoons across Texas. The five most prevalent helminths identified have all been reported in at least one previous survey, indicating that these parasites are not new to Texas and that raccoons are not naïve to the effects these parasites have on them. It may be helpful to wildlife rehabilitators, trappers, wildlife biologists, and other professionals to be aware of parasite abundance in raccoons from different areas of the state, as frequent human-raccoon interactions occur, and some of these parasites could be harmful to humans and domestic animals.

  12. Texas Scholars: Successful Partnerships and Linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William L.; Randolph, Joe; Devilbiss, Charles; Johnson, Annabel M.

    The Texas Scholars Program uses business and community involvement to motivate middle- and lower-ranked high school students to take and complete a rigorous academic curriculum to prepare them for the labor market or postsecondary education. The paper examines variables such as staff development, community involvement, support from the central…

  13. Texas Scholars: Investing in the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William; Johnson, Annabel M.; Randolph, Joe; Schmitz, Mary Alice

    1998-01-01

    The Texas Scholars Program, a joint business/education venture, is a low-cost program that motivates the "forgotten majority" (lower ranked students) to complete a rigorous academic curriculum preparing them for the labor market or postsecondary education. Since 1989, Eastman Chemical Company business leaders have been…

  14. 78 FR 72140 - Texas Disaster # TX-00417

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00417 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Caldwell, Hays, Travis. Contiguous Counties:...

  15. Austin, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Austin, Texas, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  16. 78 FR 36631 - Texas Disaster #TX-00408

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00408 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  17. 78 FR 48764 - Texas Disaster # TX-00413

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00413 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road.... Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington, DC 20416....

  18. Reading Attitudes of Texas High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussert-Webb, Kathy; Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    Through random sampling, we surveyed 2,568 high school students throughout Texas to determine their reading attitudes vis-à-vis individual and school background variables. Sources were the Rhody reading attitude scale and public domain campus summary data; the lenses of attitude theory and social justice informed this study. Significant…

  19. The Texas Water Education Network Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Water Development Board, Austin.

    The resource persons and program descriptions in this directory came from answers supplied in a 1988 survey mailed to 135 entities having some relationship to or interest in promoting the distribution of water education materials suitable for use in Texas elementary or secondary schools. This directory includes an update on the programs submitted…

  20. Sound Levels in East Texas Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Aaron Lynn

    A survey of sound levels was taken in several Texas schools to determine the amount of noise and sound present by size of class, type of activity, location of building, and the presence of air conditioning and large amounts of glass. The data indicate that class size and relative amounts of glass have no significant bearing on the production of…

  1. 77 FR 18738 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations on non- Federal and non-Indian lands... provides for the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations in accordance with the... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 943 Texas Regulatory Program AGENCY...

  2. 75 FR 21534 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... a State to assume primacy for the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations on... other things, ``a State law which provides for the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 943 Texas Regulatory Program AGENCY...

  3. 77 FR 66574 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... a State to assume primacy for the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations on... other things, ``a State law which provides for the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 943 Texas Regulatory Program AGENCY...

  4. 75 FR 81122 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ...) of the Act permits a State to assume primacy for the regulation of surface coal mining and... governments with regard to the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations. One of the... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 943 Texas Regulatory Program AGENCY...

  5. Innovative Developmental Education Programs: A Texas Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Eric A.; Capraro, Mary Margaret; Capraro, Robert M.; Chaudhuri, Nandita; Dyer, James; Marchbanks, Miner P., III

    2014-01-01

    This article provides insights from a 2-year, cross-site evaluation of state funded developmental education sites and serves as a focus article for response by those sites. Receiving grants from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), nine sites (5 community colleges and 4 universities) implemented innovative developmental education…

  6. Nathaniel Hawthorne Elementary School: San Antonio, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Educator, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the successful use of Core Knowledge Curriculum in one inner-city elementary school in San Antonio (Texas) that had previously reflected low student achievement, inconsistent attendance, and student behavioral problems. Improvements in these conditions as revealed through teacher observations are highlighted. (GR)

  7. Water-quality and ancillary data collected from the Arroyo Colorado near Rio Hondo, Texas, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Meghan C.; Canova, Michael G.; Asquith, William H.; Kiesling, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    The Arroyo Colorado is in the lower Rio Grande Valley of southern Texas and extends from near Mission, Texas, eastward to the Laguna Madre estuarine and coastal marine system, which separates Padre Island from the Texas mainland. Streamflow in the Arroyo Colorado primarily is sustained by effluent from municipal wastewater-treatment plants along the stream banks. Since 1986, the tidal segment of the Arroyo Colorado from the port of Harlingen to the Laguna Madre has been designated by the State of Texas as an impaired water body because of low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Efforts to develop predictive water-quality models for the tidal segment of the Arroyo Colorado have been hampered by a lack of physical, biological, and biochemical data. Specifically, data on primary algal productivity, nutrient cycling, sediment deposition rates, and the relations between these processes and dissolved oxygen dynamics in the stream have been inadequate to support water-quality modeling efforts. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, did a study in 2006 to collect data associated with primary algal productivity, nutrient cycling, and dissolved oxygen dynamics in the tidal segment (2201) of the Arroyo Colorado near Rio Hondo. Specific objectives of the study were to (1) characterize water quality by measuring basic properties; (2) characterize the concentrations of carbon and nutrients, biochemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and volatile suspended solids; (3) measure the seasonal differences of nutrient-dependent algal growth and algal production in the water column; (4) measure oxygen respiration or production rates; and (5) measure rates of sediment deposition.

  8. Creationism in the Grand Canyon, Texas Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, Peter

    2004-01-01

    AGU President Bob Dickinson, together with presidents of six other scientific societies, have written to Joseph Alston, Superintendent of Grand Canyon National Park, pointing out that a creationist book, The Grand Canyon: A Different View, is being sold in bookstores within the borders of the park as a scientific explanation about Grand Canyon geologic history. President Dickinson's 16 December letter urges that Alston clearly separate The Grand Canyon: A Different View from books and materials that discuss the legitimate scientific understanding of the origin of the Grand Canyon. The letter warns the Park Service against giving the impression that it approves of the anti-science movement known as young-Earth creationism, or that it endorses the advancement of religious tenets disguised as science. The text of the letter is on AGU's Web site http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/policy/sci_pol.html. Also, this fall, AGU sent an alert to Texas members about efforts by intelligent design creationists aimed at weakening the teaching of biological evolution in textbooks used in Texas schools. The alert pointed scientists to a letter, drafted by AGU, together with the American Institute of Physics, the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and the American Astronomical Society, that urged the Texas State Board of Education to adopt textbooks that presented only accepted, peer-reviewed science and pedagogical expertise. Over 550 scientists in Texas added their names to the letter (http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/policy/texas_textbooks.pdf ), sent to the Board of Education on 1 November prior to their vote to adopt a slate of new science textbooks. The Board voted 11-5 in favor of keeping the textbooks free of changes advocated by groups supporting intelligent design creationism.

  9. Impact of insecticides on parasitoids of the leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii, in pepper in south Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ricardo; Harris, Marvin; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2011-01-01

    Liriomyza leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are cosmopolitan, polyphagous pests of horticultural plants and many are resistant to insecticides. Producers in South Texas rely on insecticides as the primary management tool for leafminers, and several compounds are available. The objective of this study is to address the efficacy of these compounds for controlling Liriomyza while minimizing their effects against natural enemies. Research plots were established at Texas AgriLife research center at Weslaco, Texas in fall 2007 and spring 2008 seasons, and peppers were used as a model crop. Plots were sprayed with novaluron, abamectin, spinetoram, lambda-cyhalothrin and water as treatments according to leafminer infestation; insecticide efficacy was monitored by collecting leaves and infested foliage. Plant phenology was also monitored. Novaluron was the most effective insecticide and lambda-cyhalothrin showed resurgence in leafminer density in fall 2007 and no reduction in spring 2008. Other compounds varied in efficacy. Novaluron showed the least number of parasitoids per leafminer larva and the lowest parasitoid diversity index among treatments followed by spinetoram. Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) was the sole leafminer species on peppers, and 19 parasitoid species were found associated with this leafminer. Application of these insecticides for management of leafminers with conservation of natural enemies is discussed.

  10. Stream and aquifer biology of south-central Texas; a literature review, 1973-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ourso, R.T.; Hornig, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes in table format 32 aquatic vertebrate (primarily fish), 54 aquatic invertebrate, and 13 aquatic plant studies available for the area of the South-Central Texas study unit of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment. The studies, published mostly during 1973?97, pertain to the Guadalupe, San Antonio, and Nueces River Basins, the San Antonio-Nueces and Nueces-Rio Grande Coastal Basins, and the Edwards aquifer where it underlies the upper parts of the three river basins. The biology of the study-unit streams is determined mostly by the characteristics of the ecoregions they transect?the Edwards Plateau, Texas Blackland Prairies, East Central Texas Plains, Western Gulf Coastal Plain, and Southern Texas Plains. About 20 percent of the previous fish and invertebrate studies and about 75 percent of the aquatic plant surveys have centered on Comal Springs in Comal County and San Marcos Springs in Hays County. Although several important studies are available for the San Antonio region, documentation of aquatic biology for the remainder of the study unit is relatively sparse. The streams in the study unit, particularly in the Edwards Plateau, support three dominant biological groups?fish, aquatic invertebrates, and plants. Potential threats to these organisms include impoundments and flood-control projects, siltation from erosion, ground-water pumping, recreational activities, wastewater discharge, and introduction of non-native species. More than 30 non-native fish, invertebrate, and plant species have been introduced into the region. Of the 19 aquatic species Federally listed as endangered or threatened in Texas, 8 are associated with springs and spring runs in the study unit. All of the endangered species in the study unit are associated with springs and spring runs. A large number of endemic species in the study unit are associated with subterranean aquatic ecosystems, most likely a consequence of the unique proximity of the

  11. Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

    2012-04-01

    Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are characterized by high temperatures and high pressures with correspondingly large quantities of dissolved methane. Due to these characteristics, the reservoirs provide two sources of energy: chemical energy from the recovered methane, and thermal energy from the recovered fluid at temperatures high enough to operate a binary power plant for electricity production. Formations with the greatest potential for recoverable energy are located in the gulf coastal region of Texas and Louisiana where significantly overpressured and hot formations are abundant. This study estimates the total recoverable onshore geopressured geothermal resource for identified sites in Texas and Louisiana. In this study a geopressured geothermal resource is defined as a brine reservoir with fluid temperature greater than 212 degrees F and a pressure gradient greater than 0.7 psi/ft.

  12. 78 FR 17390 - Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on March 1, 2013 Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline LLC (KM Texas), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002... Lee Baskin, Director, Regulatory, Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline Group, 1001 Louisiana Street,...

  13. Underdiagnosis of dengue--Laredo, Texas, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-02

    Dengue outbreaks have been reported in communities along the Mexico-U.S. border since 1980; however, during 1987-July 1999, no cases were reported from Laredo, Texas (1999 population: 162,000). During January-July 1999, approximately 300-325 dengue cases were reported from Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico (1999 population: 274,000), a city across the Rio Grande from Laredo. To determine whether undiagnosed or unreported dengue cases had occurred in Laredo, the Texas Department of Health (TDH) reviewed medical records from five Laredo health facilities (the two city hospitals and the three largest of five community clinics). This report summarizes the findings of the review, which indicated that during July 23-August 20, 1999, 50% of suspected case-patients had undiagnosed dengue infection. Recognition of the diagnosis of dengue can be improved through heightened surveillance, professional and public education, and prompt reporting of cases by the health-care providers to local or state health departments.

  14. Medicaid Expansion in Texas: What's at Stake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Benjamin D

    2016-04-01

    Texas is one of nearly 20 states yet to expand its Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and is home to the largest number of uninsured Americans of any state in the country. For many of the state's 5 million uninsured, this decision has left them without an option for affordable health insurance. A comparison with other Southern states that have expanded Medicaid shows how this decision has left many low-income Texans less able to afford their medical bills, to pay for needed prescription drugs, and to obtain regular care for chronic conditions. These problems have been compounded by the state's opposition to outreach and enrollment assistance for many Texans who are eligible for coverage under the ACA. Ongoing efforts from stakeholders and consumer groups to persuade state leaders to expand coverage have significant implications for the well-being of millions of low-income adults in Texas.

  15. Reemergence of Dengue in Southern Texas, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dana L; Santiago, Gilberto A; Abeyta, Roman; Hinojosa, Steven; Torres-Velasquez, Brenda; Adam, Jessica K; Evert, Nicole; Caraballo, Elba; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L; Smith, Brian; Banicki, Alison; Tomashek, Kay M; Gaul, Linda; Sharp, Tyler M

    2016-06-01

    During a dengue epidemic in northern Mexico, enhanced surveillance identified 53 laboratory-positive cases in southern Texas; 26 (49%) patients acquired the infection locally, and 29 (55%) were hospitalized. Of 83 patient specimens that were initially IgM negative according to ELISA performed at a commercial laboratory, 14 (17%) were dengue virus positive by real-time reverse transcription PCR performed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue virus types 1 and 3 were identified, and molecular phylogenetic analysis demonstrated close identity with viruses that had recently circulated in Mexico and Central America. Of 51 household members of 22 dengue case-patients who participated in household investigations, 6 (12%) had been recently infected with a dengue virus and reported no recent travel, suggesting intrahousehold transmission. One household member reported having a recent illness consistent with dengue. This outbreak reinforces emergence of dengue in southern Texas, particularly when incidence is high in northern Mexico.

  16. Wind/solar resource in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, V.; Starcher, K.; Gaines, H. [West Texas A& M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Data are being collected at 17 sites to delineate a baseline for the wind and solar resource across Texas. Wind data are being collected at 10, 25, and 40 m (in some cases at 50 m) to determine wind shear and power at hub heights of large turbines. Many of the sites are located in areas of predicted terrain enhancement. The typical day in a month for power and wind turbine output was calculated for selected sites and combination of sites; distributed systems. Major result to date is that there is the possibility of load matching in South Texas during the summer months, even though the average values by month indicate a low wind potential.

  17. Aptitud combinatoria y predicción de híbridos de maíz (Zea mays L.) de grano amarillo a partir de cruzas dialélicas, evaluadas en dos localidades de la zona baja de Guatemala, 1989

    OpenAIRE

    Quemé de León, José Luis; Larios Bobadilla, Luis; Pérez Rodas, Carlos; Soto León, Nery

    2016-01-01

    Por la importancia que tiene el maíz de grano amarillo en el crecimiento normal para humanos y animales y con el propósito de incrementar la producción de maíz en Guatemala, el Programa de Maíz del ICTA realizó la presente investigación utilizando 10 líneas en su mayoría con diferente origen genético y cuyo objetivo general planteado es generar cruzas dobles (CD) y de tres líneas (CT) que superen al mejor híbrido comercial HA-46; los objetivos específicos fueron: 1) Estimar los efectos de apt...

  18. Effect of varying dietary protein levels on growth, feeding efficiency, and proximate composition of yellow snapper Lutjanus argentiventris (Peters, 1869 Efecto de diferentes niveles de proteína en la dieta, sobre el crecimiento, eficiencia alimenticia y composición proximal del pargo amarillo Lutjanus argentiventris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva Maldonado-García

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dietary protein (31, 41, 45, and 55% was evaluated in quadruplicate in the yellow snapper (Lutjanus argentiventris. Specimens were kept in sixteen 200 L plastic tanks for 95 days and the values of growth rate, feeding efficiency and proximate composition of yellow snapper (18 g were examined. Every 15 days were carried out individual weight measurements and standard length of the total population. At the beginning and end of the experiment, liver and muscle samples were taken for proximate analysis of crude protein and ether extract. In general, the highest gain was obtained with fish fed with 55% crude protein in the diet. The best feed conversion ratio (FCR, specific growth rate (SGR, percent weight gain (WG%, average daily gain (ADG, and feed efficiency rate (FER were obtained with the fish fed 55% of protein (CP. The protein content in liver decreased in fish fed with protein levels and higher energy compared with the initial fish. Finally, the use of practical diets containing 55% CP is appropriate for optimal growth and efficiency of feed utilization of yellow snapper. The results obtained in this study may be due to the early stage of development of yellow snapper where protein and energy requirements are higher.El efecto de diferentes niveles de proteína en la dieta (31, 41, 45 y 55% fue evaluado por cuadruplicado en el pargo amarillo Lutjanus argentiventris. Los organismos fueron mantenidos en 16 tanques de plástico de 200 L por 95 días y los valores de crecimiento, eficiencia alimenticia y composición proximal del pargo amarillo (18 g fueron examinados. Cada 15 días se llevaron a cabo mediciones de peso individual y longitud estándar del total de la población. Al inicio y al final del experimento, muestras de hígado y músculo fueron tomadas para análisis proximal de proteína cruda y extracto etéreo. En general, la ganancia de peso más alta fue obtenida con los peces alimentados con 55% de proteína. La mejor

  19. Defining Mara Salvatrucha’s Texas network

    OpenAIRE

    Arredondo, Juan M.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis examines the criminal networks used to penetrate Texas by the Mara Salvatrucha (MS 13) street gang. MS 13’s internal reach is analyzed by examining the existing and potential horizontal integration of the known cliques (gang cells). Additionally, the organizations’ existing reach and potential transnational reach are analyzed by examining the existing and potential vertical integration between its domestic and Central Ameri...

  20. The Energy-Water Nexus in Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Ashlynn S. Stillwell; Carey W. King; Webber, Michael E.; Ian J. Duncan; Amy Hardberger

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the nexus between energy and water - water used for energy and energy used for water - has become increasing important in a changing world. As growing populations demand more energy supplies and water resources, research aims to analyze the interconnectedness of these two resources. Our study sought to quantify the energy-water relationship in Texas, specifically the relationship between electricity generation and water resources as it pertains to policy and society. We examined...

  1. Defining Mara Salvatrucha’s Texas Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    recruiting, and its understanding of the culture could pose a risk to cities in South Texas. Hypothetically, if a young man or woman has an option...children to be massacred with impunity.’”58 Expectedly, the campesinos had a very different perception of the Hundred Hour War. The campesinos, whose...Quoted in Byrne, El Salvador’s Civil War, 20. 63 Julie Mazzei, Death Squads or Self -Defense Forces?: How Paramilitary Groups Emerge and Challenge

  2. Sediment Management Options for Galveston Island, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-15

    considered the “Face of Galveston.” Sediment Budget Morang (2006) calculated a sediment budget for the north Texas shore between Sabine Pass and San Luis...cross- shore beach profiles. The sediment budget was completed by hand and then the results were added to the Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS...University (Dellapenna, personal communications 2003) conducted seismic studies detecting sandy facies offshore of the south jetty making an

  3. The Texas petawatt laser and current experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Mikael; Bang, Woosuk; Dyer, Gilliss; Wang Xiaoming; Gaul, Erhard; Borger, Teddy; Ringuette, Martin; Spinks, Michael; Quevedo, Hernan; Bernstein, Aaron; Donovan, Michael; Ditmire, Todd [Center for High Energy Density Science, University of Texas at Austin 1 University Station Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Laser Plasma Acceleration Group, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin 1 University Station Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Center for High Energy Density Science, University of Texas at Austin 1 University Station Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    The Texas Petawatt Laser is operational with experimental campaigns executed in both F/40 and F3 target chambers. Recent improvements have resulted in intensities of >2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} on target. Experimental highlights include, accelerated electron energies of >2 GeV, DD fusion ion temperatures >25 keV and isochorically heated solids to 10-50 eV.

  4. Research at The University of Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, Elaine

    1983-01-01

    Research in artificial intelligence at the University of Texas at Austin is diverse. It is spread across many departments(Computer Science, Mathematics, the Institute for Computer Science and Computer Applications, and the Linguistics Research Center) and it covers most of the major subareas with AI (natural language, theorem proving, knowledge representation, languages for AI, and applications). Related work is also being done in several other departments, including EE (low-level vision), Ps...

  5. The Energy-Water Nexus in Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Ashlynn S. Stillwell; Carey W. King; Michael E. Webber; Ian J. Duncan; Amy Hardberger

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the nexus between energy and water - water used for energy and energy used for water - has become increasing important in a changing world. As growing populations demand more energy supplies and water resources, research aims to analyze the interconnectedness of these two resources. Our study sought to quantify the energy-water relationship in Texas, specifically the relationship between electricity generation and water resources as it pertains to policy and society. We examined...

  6. Redotex ingestions reported to Texas poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2010-09-01

    Although the multi-component weight loss supplement Redotex is banned in the United States, the supplement can be obtained in Mexico. The intent of this report was to describe the pattern of Redotex calls received by a statewide poison center system. Cases were all Redotex calls received by Texas poison centers during 2000-2008. The distribution of total calls and those involving ingestion of the supplement were determined for selected demographic and clinical factors. Of 34 total Redotex calls received, 55.9% came from the 14 Texas counties that border Mexico. Of the 22 reported Redotex ingestions, 77.3% of the patients were female and 45.5% 20 years or more. Of the 17 ingestions involving no co-ingestants, 52.9% were already at or en route to a health care facility, 41.2% were managed on site, and 5.9% was referred to a health care facility. The final medical outcome was no effect in 23.5% cases, minor effect in 5.9%, moderate effect in 11.8%, not followed but minimal clinical effects possible in 47.1%, and unable to follow but judged to be potentially toxic in 11.8%. Most Redotex calls to the Texas poison center system originated from counties bordering Mexico.

  7. Texas floods of September and October 1955

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliken, D.L.; Goines, W.H.

    1957-01-01

    This report on the floods of September and and October 1955 in the Nueces, Brazos, and Pecos River basins, Texas, was prepared in the Texas District Office, Surface Water Branch, under the direction of Trigg Twichell, District Engineer.Records of discharge were collected and compiled in cooperation with the Texas State Board of Water Engineers, the Pecos River Commission, and other agencies.The isohyetal map of the upper Brazos River basin, which was the basis for figure 4, was furnished by the Corps of Engineers. The "bucket" survey of rainfall in the Nueces River basin was conducted by the U.S. Weather Bureau, and the "bucket" survey in the upper Brazos River basin was conducted by the U.S. Weather Bureau, the Corps of Engineers, and the U.S. Soil Conservation Service. The U.S. Conservation Service furnished "A Report describing the effects of the storm of September 23-25, 1955, on the Upper Brazos River Watershed, above Possum Kingdom Dam" from which some data in this report were taken.

  8. Enhanced surveillance of maternal mortality in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Larissa J; Lloyd, Linda E; Selwyn, Beatrice J

    2012-12-01

    Maternal mortality is often used to measure health and well-being for women. Improved surveillance efforts can improve maternal mortality estimates and inform the development of strategies to address the needs of maternal and child health populations. The purpose of this study was to provide better estimates of maternal mortality in Texas by using enhanced surveillance methods. Results from our analyses of fetal death and live birth records in Texas from 2000 through 2006 were then linked to pregnancy-related death records and death records of women of childbearing age (15-44 years) in Texas from 2001 through 2006. Enhanced surveillance identified almost 3.5 times as many deaths that might be associated with pregnancy than do current methods and confirmed a persistent race/ethnicity trend in maternal mortality. The leading cause of these 2001-2006 pregnancy-associated deaths was accidents. Enhanced surveillance allows the identification of additional deaths possibly associated with pregnancy and provides a stable foundation to investigate trends further and to review maternal mortality cases systematically.

  9. Reactividad Química de los Azo Colorantes Amarillo Anaranjado y Rojo Allura mediante Descriptores Globales y la Función de Fukui Chemical Reactivity of the Azo dyes Sunset Yellow and Allura Red by Global Descriptors and the Fukui Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo E Ensuncho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se calcularon descriptores globales y locales de la reactividad para los colorantes amarillo anaranjado y rojo allura con el fin de analizar su reactividad química intrínseca. Los cálculos computacionales se llevaron a cabo tanto en vacio como en la fase acuosa, la cual se representó por medio de una constante dieléctrica de 78.5 e introducida por el modelo de solvente del continuo polarizado. Los resultados mostraron que el colorante rojo allura es menos susceptible a la adición nucleofílica que el amarillo anaranjado, ya que los sustituyentes electrodonadores metilo y metoxilo disminuyen la capacidad del grupo azo para aceptar electrones. El análisis de la función condensada de Fukui para el ataque nucleofílico e índice de electrofilicidad local, mostraron que el sitio preferido de ataque del agente reductor (ión bisulfito fue C4, lo cual estuvo en concordancia con los reportes experimentales.In the present work local and global descriptors of the reactivity were calculated for sunset yellow and allura red to analyze its intrinsic reactivity. The computational calculations were carried out in vacuum and aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is represented by a dielectric constant of 78.5, introduced by polarizable continuum model. The results show that allura red is less susceptible to nucleophilic addition than sunset yellow, because the electrodonor substituents methyl and methoxy decrease the capability of the azo group to accept electrons. The analysis of condensed Fukui function for a nucleophilic attack and local electrophilicity index showed that the preferred direction of attack the reducing agent (bisulfite ion occurs on C4, which was in good agreement with experimental reports.

  10. M-X Environmental Technical Report. Environmental Characteristics of Alternative Designated Deployment Areas, Native Americans (Texas/New Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-22

    encountered Apaches, Jicarillas, Conejeros, Ochos, and Rio Colorados on the Cimarron River and described Apaches (and Pueblos) as harvesting maize ...January of 1879 and returned to Tierra Amarillo --in response to Anglo depredations on the Mescalero reservation. Finally in 1880, a reservation was

  11. Texas Barrier Islands Region ecological characterization: environmental synthesis papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shew, D.M.; Baumann, R.H.; Fritts, T.H.; Dunn, L.S.

    1981-09-01

    This report is a synthesis of selected environmental literature for the Texas Barrier Islands Region and is a part of the Texas Barrier Islands Region Ecological Characterization Study. The Texas Barrier Islands Region is defined to include the coastal counties and extends 64 km inland and offshore to the State-Federal demarcation. These papers deal with six drainage basins along the Texas coast: Galveston, Matagorda-Brazos, San Antonio, Copano-Aransas, Corpus Christi and Laguna Madre; as well as the marine system offshore. The papers address the geology, climate, hydrology and hydrography, and the biology of each basin.

  12. Earthtech, Dig-Texas and Upward Bound: Outreach to At-Risk Students with Interdisciplinary STEM Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgin, J. G.; Güereque, M.; Pennington, D. D.; Everett, A.; Dixon, J. G.; Reyes, A.; Houser, P. I. Q.; Baker, J. A.; Stocks, E.; Ellins, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Geological Sciences department at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) hosted the EarthTech outreach program - a one-week intensive summer camp for low-income, at-risk high school students. The EarthTech program engaged students in STEM activities from geological and environmental sciences. Developed and led by university student-mentors with guidance from a supervising faculty member, the course engaged Upward Bound students with lectures, interactive projects, and excursions to local ecological preserves and geological sites around El Paso, Texas. Topics covered plant and animal distribution and diversity, water and soil dynamics, evolution and paleontology, geohazards, and planetary science. Field trips were combined with hands-on activities, including activities from DIG Texas teaching modules. The NSF-funded DIG Texas Instructional Blueprints project is organizing vetted, high quality online educational resources and learning activities into teaching modules. The modules follow a storyline and demonstrate congruency with the Next Generation Science Standards. Selected DIG Texas resources were included in the daily curriculum to complement the field trip and other hands-on activities. EarthTech students created ESRI Online GIS story maps in which they showed the locations of the field trips, incorporated photographs they had taken, and provided written reflections about their camp experiences. The DIG Texas project evaluation collected survey and interview data from the university student mentors throughout the week to ascertain the efficacy of the program. This poster presentation will include an overview of the program, including examples of work and evaluation results.

  13. Commercial Space Port Planning in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L.; Looke, B.

    2002-01-01

    The Texas Legislature is providing funding to support research and planning activities aimed at creating a commercial spaceport in the state. These monies have been allocated to regional Spaceport Development Corporations that have been established in three countries containing candidate site locations: Willacy County (in South Texas); Brazoria County (East Texas); and Pecos County (West Texas). This program is being sponsored and coordinated by the Texas Aerospace Commission (TAC). The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) at the University of Houston is providing research, planning and design support to TAC and is a member of each of the three regional development teams. Planning must carefully consider special support requirements and operational characteristics of all prospective launch systems along with geographic, infrastructure and environmental factors at each site. Two of the candidate sites are in coastal areas; a priority for certain launch service providers; whereas the third inland site is more attractive to others. Candidate launch systems include winged horizontal takeoff air-launch vehicles, vertical multi-stage reusable launch vehicles, and expendable sub-orbital surrounding rockets. Important research and planning activities include environmental impact assessments, analyses of overflight hazards, investigations of economic impacts and business plan development. The results of these activities will guide master plan development for each site, including: a physical plan (site layout, infrastructure improvements and facility construction); and a strategic plan (user agreements, licenses, finance sources and participants). Commercial spaceport development demands compliance with stringent FAA regulations established by the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST) which exceed minimum standards allowed for U.S. Government spaceport facilities. Key among these requirements are 15,000 ft. radius on-site clear zones

  14. Crustal deformation and seismic measurements in the region of McDonald Observatory, West Texas. [Texas and Northern Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The arrival times of regional and local earthquakes and located earthquakes in the Basin and Range province of Texas and in the adjacent areas of Chihuahua, Mexico from January 1976 to August 1980 at the UT'NASA seismic array are summarized. The August 1931 Texas earthquake is reevaluated and the seismicity and crustal structure of West Texas is examined. A table of seismic stations is included.

  15. Cancer mortality among petroleum refinery and chemical manufacturing workers in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S P; Labarthe, D; Downs, T; Burau, K; Whitehead, L; Vernon, S; Spitz, M; New, B; Sigurdson, A

    1997-01-01

    Epidemiologic historical cohort studies of petroleum refinery and chemical manufacturing workers in Texas were reviewed to examine their cancer mortality in comparison to the U.S. and to assess the possible impact of cancer mortality among these workers on the State of Texas as a whole. Summary standardized mortality ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for 20 cancer types, taking into account the heterogeneity of individual studies. There were 4314 cancer deaths among the 92,318 workers employed in 10 independent plant populations. Overall, there was a significant deficit in cancer mortality among petrochemical workers compared with the general U.S. population (SMR = 88, 95% CI = 80 to 96). Only the summary SMRs for brain cancer (SMR = 113, 95% CI = 96 to 133) and leukemias (SMR = 112, 95% CI = 94 to 130) approached statistical significance. Lung and liver cancer mortality excesses, noted for Texas as a whole, were decreased in these workers. Additional follow-up of these cohorts, their expansion to include minority and female workers, and additional study of possible occupational contributions to leukemia and brain cancer are recommended.

  16. Differences in Soil Moisture Dynamics across Landforms in South Texas Shrublands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basant, S.; Wilcox, B. P.

    2016-12-01

    To understand the water budget for a landscape, it is important to understand the hydrologic differences between different landforms constituting the landscape. The Tamaulipas Biotic Province shrublands in South Texas are characterized by primarily three different landforms - the sandy loam uplands, clay loam intermittent drainage woodlands and closed basin depressions situated in intermittent drainage ways, also referred to as `playas'. Texas A&M's La Copita Research Area (LCRA) in South Texas is a similar landscape where previous research has been limited to soil water movement in uplands and localized water accumulation in the playa landforms. The objective of this research is to understand the hydrology of different landforms and integrate them to complete a landscape scale water budget. Deep soil water movement will be measured at LCRA using neutron moisture gauges. Over 50 access tubes distributed around the site will be used to cover the dominant landforms and vegetation classes. Soil moisture will be measured up to a depth of 2m at different times of the year - so as to capture the variability in response to different rain events and also to different seasons. This will be complimented by over 6 years of run off data collected from controlled plots which will provide an estimate on the amount of overland water exchange from uplands to drainage and playas. The depth-wise soil moisture data collected over time will also be used to estimate the variability in plant water uptake rates across different sites.

  17. Aster yellows group (16SrI), subgroups 16SrI-A and 16SrI-B, phytoplasmas associated with lettuce yellows in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2013, an epidemic of lettuce yellows occurred in the Winter Garden region of Texas. The infected plants were stunted with blanching and chlorosis in young heart leaves. A total of thirteen samples, including three apparently asymptomatic, from Romaine and leaf lettuce cultivars, on two different...

  18. Texas Disasters II: Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Assist the Texas Forest Service in Mapping and Analyzing Fuel Loads and Phenology in Texas Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Michael; Williams, Meredith; Fenn, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The risk of severe wildfires in Texas has been related to weather phenomena such as climate change and recent urban expansion into wild land areas. During recent years, Texas wild land areas have experienced sequences of wet and dry years that have contributed to increased wildfire risk and frequency. To prevent and contain wildfires, the Texas Forest Service (TFS) is tasked with evaluating and reducing potential fire risk to better manage and distribute resources. This task is made more difficult due to the vast and varied landscape of Texas. The TFS assesses fire risk by understanding vegetative fuel types and fuel loads. To better assist the TFS, NASA Earth observations, including Landsat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Specrtoradiometer (MODIS) data, were analyzed to produce maps of vegetation type and specific vegetation phenology as it related to potential wildfire fuel loads. Fuel maps from 2010-2011 and 2014-2015 fire seasons, created by the Texas Disasters I project, were used and provided alternating, complementary map indicators of wildfire risk in Texas. The TFS will utilize the end products and capabilities to evaluate and better understand wildfire risk across Texas.

  19. Report of the Advisory Committee on Agriculturally Derived Fuels to the Texas Energy and Natural Resources Advisory Council

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Reagan V.; Clayton, Bill; Armstrong, Bob; Walton, Bill; Baen, Jr., Spencer; Carmichael, Jack; Cowley, Raymond; Quick, Joe; King, Carl; Harp, Elbert; Nelson, Bill; Wagoner, Ed; McDonald, Dr., Richard; Swanson, Stan

    1979-09-03

    For the purpose of the Committee, biomass was defined as the volume of living material or residues of living material (organic material) available in Texas for conversion into energy. Statistical reports from the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and other sources indicate that in addition to surplus and distressed grains and certain other crops, there are roughly 27 million tons of agricultural residues currently being left in the fields or at the processing plants after harvest. The average annual residue from five crops - sorghum, corn, wheat, rice and cotton - is more than 20 million tons with a theoretical heat value of 270 trillion Btus. This represents 64 percent of the total energy input for Texas agriculture in 1973. Additionally, 4.1 million tons of dry manure is economically recoverable from Texas feedlots which could be converted into 14 trillion Btus of energy each year in the form of methane gas. Municipal solid waste, much of which is comprised of residues of living materials, currently amounts to about 13 million tons annually. The principal processes for converting the referenced resources into energy include: (1) direct combustion; (2) fermentation; (3) gasification/pyrolysis; (4) anaerobic digestion; and (5) petroculture - the production of certain non-traditional plants. Texas produces huge quantities of biomass, and has the potential of producing even more, which can be converted through various processes into significant quantities of usable energy to help meet the needs of the agricultural industry and the general public. Some of the technology required for the conversion processes is already sufficiently advanced to support immediate production and use while others will require additional research and development. The report discusses the current level of development of the relevant technologies.

  20. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae on survival and growth of perennial grasses in lignite overburden in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Call, C.A.; Davies, F.T.

    1988-12-01

    Seedlings of sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), Indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans), and kleingrass (Panicum coloratum) were inoculated with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi (Glomus fasciculatum and Gigaspora margarita) in a containerized system and transplanted into lignite overburden in the Post Oak Savannah region of Texas, U.S.A. After three growing seasons without cultural inputs, plants inoculated with VAM fungi had greater survival percentages, basal diameters, and above-ground biomass than noninoculated plants. Inoculated plants had higher levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in above-ground biomass than noninoculated plants. Root colonization percentages of inoculated plants remained fairly stable while noninoculated plants showed low levels of colonization over the 3-year study period. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae enhanced the survival and growth of the 3 grass species by making effective use of limited resources in the lignite overburden. 31 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. 78 FR 26255 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Approval of Texas Low...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Texas Low Emission Diesel Fuel Rule Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION...: http://epa.gov/region6/r6coment.htm . Please click on ``6PD'' (Multimedia) and select ``Air''...

  2. Costs of water treatment due to diminished water quality: A case study in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearmont, David; McCarl, Bruce A.; Tolman, Deborah A.

    1998-04-01

    The cost of municipal water treatment due to diminished water quality represents an important component of the societal costs of water pollution. Here the chemical costs of municipal water treatment are expressed as a function of raw surface water quality. Data are used for a 3-year period for 12 water treatment plants in Texas. Results show that when regional raw water contamination is present, the chemical cost of water treatment is increased by 95 per million gallons (per 3785 m3) from a base of 75. A 1% increase in turbidity is shown to increase chemical costs by 0.25%.

  3. Instructional Technology Practices in Developmental Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Nara M.; Kennon, J. Lindsey; Saxon, D. Patrick; Edmonson, Stacey L.; Skidmore, Susan T.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the current state of technology integration in developmental education in Texas higher education. Analyzing survey data from developmental education faculty members in 70 2- and 4-year colleges in Texas, researchers identified instructor-reported best instructional technology practices in developmental…

  4. Student Achievement and Size of District in North Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manahan, Jerry

    This study examined the relationship between student achievement on the Texas Assessment of Basic Skills (TABS) test and the total student population in 206 school districts in North Texas. Regression analyses results indicated that average student performance on the TABS was positively affected by local expenditures, negatively affected as the…

  5. 75 FR 59711 - Audit Program for Texas Flexible Permit Holders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... waiver of the gravity component of any penalties resulting from noncompliance uncovered by the Audit... on the Audit Program for Texas flexible permit holders, please contact Mr. John Jones, Air...). EPA is proposing the Audit Program as a mechanism for Texas Flexible Permit holders to transition...

  6. 78 FR 40402 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Roaring Springs, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Roaring Springs, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications... Channel 227A and deletes FM Channel 249A at Roaring Springs, Texas, and allots FM Channel 249C3 and deletes FM Channel 276C3 at Roaring Springs. These allotment changes are part of a rule making and...

  7. A Model for Health Professional Education in South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie; Vela, Leonel; Cigarroa, Francisco G.

    2008-01-01

    In 1997, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio established the Regional Academic Health Center (RAHC) for the Lower Rio Grande Valley in south Texas. Through medical education programs, research facilities, and partnerships with health-care providers, the RAHC aims to improve the health status and access to health services…

  8. The Political Economy of Education Finance: The Case of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, Thomas; Kenny, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Texas has one of the largest primary and secondary school systems in the United States. Funding equity has been a concern in the state courts, and significant legislative actions have been taken. We examine two votes taken in the Texas State Legislature in 1993 and 2006 that follow the directives from a series of education finance equity legal…

  9. 76 FR 60478 - Record of Decision, Texas Clean Energy Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... capture rate during the demonstration period. (2) Summit shall develop jointly with the Texas Bureau of... Bureau of Economic Geology and the Texas Railroad Commission in the certification of the sequestration of... measurable impacts on local, regional or global climate and meteorology. However, operations of the TCEP will...

  10. Instructional Technology Practices in Developmental Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Nara M.; Kennon, J. Lindsey; Saxon, D. Patrick; Edmonson, Stacey L.; Skidmore, Susan T.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the current state of technology integration in developmental education in Texas higher education. Analyzing survey data from developmental education faculty members in 70 2- and 4-year colleges in Texas, researchers identified instructor-reported best instructional technology practices in developmental…

  11. Population trends of red-cockaded woodpeckers in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz; D. Craig Rudolph

    2006-01-01

    tracked population trends of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) in eastern Texas from 1983 through 2004. After declining precipitously during the 1980s, woodpecker population trends on federal lands (National Forests and Grasslands in Texas, but excluding the Big Thicket National Preserve) increased between 1990 and 2000, and have been...

  12. 27 CFR 9.144 - Texas High Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... viticultural area are six U.S.G.S. topographical maps of the 1:250,000 scale. They are titled: (1) “Clovis, New... Clovis, New Mexico; Texas, where it intersects the Texas-New Mexico border; (7) The boundary then...

  13. Animal Antics. Program Guide for the Texas Reading Club, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jeanette

    Developed for the Texas Reading Club, a program sponsored cooperatively by local libraries and the Texas State Library and designed to encourage children and their parents to read and to use the library, this guide is intended to inspire program ideas, including activities, crafts, books, and audiovisuals, appropriate to the Reading Club's 1987…

  14. Directory of Special Libraries and Information Centers in Texas, 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidseg, Mitchell, Ed.

    Based on 403 responses to a survey of the 980 libraries on the Texas State Library Mailing List, this directory is designed to describe the variety and depth of special information resources in Texas and to provide a tool for identifying special information not readily obtainable through other means. A listing of special libraries includes…

  15. Regulating Abortion: Impact on Patients and Providers in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Silvie; Joyce, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The State of Texas began enforcement of the Woman's Right to Know (WRTK) Act on January 1, 2004. The law requires that all abortions at or after 16 weeks' gestation be performed in an ambulatory surgical center (ASC). In the month the law went into effect, not one of Texas's 54 nonhospital abortion providers met the requirements of a surgical…

  16. Arsenic and Associated Trace Metals in Texas Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L.; Herbert, B. E.

    2002-12-01

    The value of groundwater has increased substantially worldwide due to expanding human consumption. Both the quantity and quality of groundwater are important considerations when constructing policies on natural resource conservation. This study is focused on evaluating groundwater quality in the state of Texas. Historical data from the Texas Water Development Board and the National Uranium Resource Evaluation were collected into a GIS database for spatial and temporal analyses. Specific attentions were placed on arsenic and other trace metals in groundwater. Recent studies in the United States have focused on isolated incidences of high arsenic occurrence, ignoring possible connections between arsenic and other trace metals. Descriptive statistics revealed strong correlations in groundwater between arsenic and other oxyanions including vanadium, selenium and molybdenum. Arsenic and associated trace metals were clustered at three physiographic hotspots, the Southern High Plains, the Gulf Coastal Plains of Texas, and West Texas. A geologic survey showed that arsenic and other trace metals in Texas groundwater follow local geologic trends. Uranium deposits and associated mineralization were found to occur in the same physiographic locations. Uranium mineralization may be a significant natural source of arsenic and other trace metals in Texas groundwater. Recharge, evaporative concentration, and aquifer characteristics were also contributing factors to the occurrence of trace metals in Texas groundwater. Spatial statistics were used to delineate natural sources from anthropogenic inputs. Similarly, the natural background was estimated from the spatial distribution of trace metal observations in Texas groundwater.

  17. Regulating Abortion: Impact on Patients and Providers in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Silvie; Joyce, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The State of Texas began enforcement of the Woman's Right to Know (WRTK) Act on January 1, 2004. The law requires that all abortions at or after 16 weeks' gestation be performed in an ambulatory surgical center (ASC). In the month the law went into effect, not one of Texas's 54 nonhospital abortion providers met the requirements of a surgical…

  18. Kratom exposures reported to Texas poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2013-01-01

    Kratom use is a growing problem in the United States. Kratom exposures reported to Texas poison centers between January 1998 and September 2013 were identified. No kratom exposures were reported from 1998 to 2008 and 14 exposures were reported from 2009 to September 2013. Eleven patients were male, and 11 patients were in their 20s. The kratom was ingested in 12 patients, inhaled in 1, and both ingested and inhaled in 1. Twelve patients were managed at a healthcare facility and the remaining 2 were managed at home.

  19. Suspended sediment yield in Texas watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coonrod, Julia Ellen Allred

    The Texas Water Development Board collected suspended sediment samples across the state of Texas for approximately 60 years. Until this research, no comprehensive analysis of the data had been conducted. This study compiles the suspended sediment data along with corresponding streamflow and rainfall. GIS programs are developed which characterize watersheds corresponding to the sediment gauging stations. The watersheds are characterized according to topography, climate, soils, and land use. All of the data is combined to form several SAS data sets which can subsequently be analyzed using regression. Annual data for all of the stations across the state are classified temporally and spatially to determine trends in the sediment yield. In general, the suspended sediment load increases with increasing runoff but no correlation exists with rainfall. However, the annual average rainfall can be used to classify the watersheds according to climate, which improves the correlation between sediment load and runoff. The watersheds with no dams have higher sediment loads than watersheds with dams. Dams in the drier parts of Texas reduce the sediment load more than dams in the wetter part of the state. Sediment rating curves are developed separately for each basin in Texas. All but one of the curves fall into a band which varies by about two orders of magnitude. The study analyzes daily time series data for the Lavaca River near Edna station. USGS data are used to improve the sediment rating curve by the addition of physically related variables and interaction terms. The model can explain an additional 41% of the variability in sediment concentration compared to a simple bivariate regression of sediment load and flow. The TWDB daily data for the Lavaca River near Edna station are used to quantify temporal trends. There is a high correlation between sediment load and flowrate for the Lavaca River. The correlation can be improved by considering a flow-squared term and by

  20. Texas youth stage rally against guns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary; Alice; Robbins; 李小平

    2000-01-01

    Young Texans Against Gun Violence rallied atthe State Capitol on Monday and called for the Legisla-ture to pass laws that would make it more difficult toget guns.“It is time for our state Legislature to pass laws tohelp protect us,”Marianne Moreno,a high school se-nior from the Dallas area,told a crowd of about 125students who attended the“Packing Peace Rally.”“As Texas law stands today,anyone—even acriminal—can walk into a gun show and purchase asemi-automatic weapon or any other type of firearm,...

  1. Texas review of hydraulic fracturing water use and consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicot, J.; Reedy, R. C.; Costley, R.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) has a long history in the state of Texas where are located (1) several established plays, such as the Barnett Shale, (2) plays of recent interest, such as the Eagle Ford or the Wolfcamp, and (3) older plays being revisited such as the Wolfberry or the Granite Wash. We compiled current water use for year 2011 (about 82,000 acre-feet) and compared it to an older analysis done for year 2008 (about 36,000 acre-feet). A private database compiling state information and providing water use is complemented by a survey of the industry. Industry survey is the only way to access fresh water consumption estimated to be only a fraction of the total water use because of reuse of flowback water, use of recycled water from treatment plants and produced water, and use of brackish water. We analyzed these different components of the HF budget as well as their source, surface water vs. groundwater, with a focus on impacts on aquifers and groundwater resources.

  2. Planting geometry and plant population affect dryland maize grain yield and harvest index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water for dryland grain production in the Texas panhandle is limited. Agronomic practices such as reduction in plant population or change in sowing time may help increase maize (Zea mays L.) yield potential. Tiller formation under dryland conditions leads to more vegetative growth and reduced yield....

  3. Genetic evidence of enzootic leishmaniasis in a stray canine and Texas mouse from sites in west and central Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan J Kipp

    Full Text Available We detected Leishmania mexicana in skin biopsies taken from a stray canine (Canis familiaris and Texas mouse (Peromyscus attwateri at two ecologically disparate sites in west and central Texas using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. A single PCR-positive dog was identified from a sample of 96 stray canines and was collected in a peri-urban area in El Paso County, Texas. The PCR-positive P. attwateri was trapped at a wildlife reserve in Mason County, Texas, from a convenience sample of 20 sylvatic mammals of different species. To our knowledge, this represents the first description of L. mexicana in west Texas and extends the known geographic range of the parasite to an area that includes the arid Chihuahuan Desert. Our finding of L. mexicana in P. attwateri represents a new host record and is the first description of the parasite in a wild peromyscid rodent in the United States.

  4. Genetic evidence of enzootic leishmaniasis in a stray canine and Texas mouse from sites in west and central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Evan J; Mariscal, Jacqueline; Armijos, Rodrigo X; Weigel, Margaret; Waldrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We detected Leishmania mexicana in skin biopsies taken from a stray canine (Canis familiaris) and Texas mouse (Peromyscus attwateri) at two ecologically disparate sites in west and central Texas using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A single PCR-positive dog was identified from a sample of 96 stray canines and was collected in a peri-urban area in El Paso County, Texas. The PCR-positive P. attwateri was trapped at a wildlife reserve in Mason County, Texas, from a convenience sample of 20 sylvatic mammals of different species. To our knowledge, this represents the first description of L. mexicana in west Texas and extends the known geographic range of the parasite to an area that includes the arid Chihuahuan Desert. Our finding of L. mexicana in P. attwateri represents a new host record and is the first description of the parasite in a wild peromyscid rodent in the United States. PMID:27759765

  5. South Texas Quaternary karst: Paleoclimatic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prouty, J.S. (Corpus Christi State Univ., TX (United States)); Lovejoy, D.W. (W. Palm Beach Atlantic Coll., FL (United States))

    1993-02-01

    A beachrock correlative with the Ingleside complex of the late Pleistocene Beaumont Formation crops out discontinuously along the mainland shore of Laguna Madre, extending approximately 10 km southward from Baffin Bay, Texas. Carbon-14 dating yields ages of 23, 430 to 33,390 yrs. B.P.; the beachrock formed along a Gulf shoreline in a zone of converging longshore currents during the last sea level highstand of the late Wisconsinan. The beachrock shows intense karstification. Vertical, steep-walled solution pipes penetrate the outcrops, and reddish-brown laminated caliche crusts coat outcrop surfaces and solution-pipe walls in many places. These karst features probably formed by subaerial exposure and weathering of the beachrock during the latest sea level lowstand. Today in semiarid South Texas, rainfall averages only 28 inches per year. Local features of late Pleistocene age include river gravels coarser than modern loads of those same rivers, and relict drainage networks far denser than modern ones. Such features indicate that during the late Pleistocene this region was more humid than now. Karst is typical of humid to subhumid climates, also suggesting that during karstification of the beachrock wetter climates prevailed.

  6. An updated understanding of Texas bumble bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) species presence and potential distributions in Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Texas is the second largest state in the United States of America, and the largest state in the contiguous USA at nearly 700,000 sq. km. Several Texas bumble bee species have shown evidence of declines in portions of their continental ranges, and conservation initiatives targeting these species will be most effective if species distributions are well established. To date, statewide bumble bee distributions for Texas have been inferred primarily from specimen records housed in natural history collections. To improve upon these maps, and help inform conservation decisions, this research aimed to (1) update existing Texas bumble bee presence databases to include recent (2007–2016) data from citizen science repositories and targeted field studies, (2) model statewide species distributions of the most common bumble bee species in Texas using MaxEnt, and (3) identify conservation target areas for the state that are most likely to contain habitat suitable for multiple declining species. The resulting Texas bumble bee database is comprised of 3,580 records, to include previously compiled museum records dating from 1897, recent field survey data, and vetted records from citizen science repositories. These data yielded an updated state species list that includes 11 species, as well as species distribution models (SDMs) for the most common Texas bumble bee species, including two that have shown evidence of range-wide declines: B. fraternus (Smith, 1854) and B. pensylvanicus (DeGeer, 1773). Based on analyses of these models, we have identified conservation priority areas within the Texas Cross Timbers, Texas Blackland Prairies, and East Central Texas Plains ecoregions where suitable habitat for both B. fraternus and B. pensylvanicus are highly likely to co-occur. PMID:28828241

  7. An updated understanding of Texas bumble bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) species presence and potential distributions in Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Jessica L; Atkinson, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Texas is the second largest state in the United States of America, and the largest state in the contiguous USA at nearly 700,000 sq. km. Several Texas bumble bee species have shown evidence of declines in portions of their continental ranges, and conservation initiatives targeting these species will be most effective if species distributions are well established. To date, statewide bumble bee distributions for Texas have been inferred primarily from specimen records housed in natural history collections. To improve upon these maps, and help inform conservation decisions, this research aimed to (1) update existing Texas bumble bee presence databases to include recent (2007-2016) data from citizen science repositories and targeted field studies, (2) model statewide species distributions of the most common bumble bee species in Texas using MaxEnt, and (3) identify conservation target areas for the state that are most likely to contain habitat suitable for multiple declining species. The resulting Texas bumble bee database is comprised of 3,580 records, to include previously compiled museum records dating from 1897, recent field survey data, and vetted records from citizen science repositories. These data yielded an updated state species list that includes 11 species, as well as species distribution models (SDMs) for the most common Texas bumble bee species, including two that have shown evidence of range-wide declines: B. fraternus (Smith, 1854) and B. pensylvanicus (DeGeer, 1773). Based on analyses of these models, we have identified conservation priority areas within the Texas Cross Timbers, Texas Blackland Prairies, and East Central Texas Plains ecoregions where suitable habitat for both B. fraternus and B. pensylvanicus are highly likely to co-occur.

  8. Hispanic AIDS education in South Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, J

    1988-04-01

    The Hispanic AIDS Committee for Education and Resources (HACER) was established in 1987 as an AIDS education program targeted at the Mexicano population of South Texas. The word "Mexicano" is used because "Hispanic" refers to a larger, more diversified group. "Mexicano" refers specifically to people of South Texas who are either Mexican-Americans (people of Mexican descent, born and educated in the US) or Mexicans (people born and educated in Mexico). Mexicanos constitute 56% of the population of South Texas and 54% of the population of San Antonio. Mexican-Americans, in general, speak and read English and listen to English-language television and radio. Mexicans are poorer and less educated, Spanish-speaking, and often illiterate. The Mexicanos do not constitute a high risk group for AIDS; at present there are only 64 Mexicano AIDS patients in San Antonio. AIDS education campaigns on television which are directed at the whole Hispanic community may be counter-productive when directed at the Mexicano population because they know that AIDS is not yet a serious problem among them, and scare tactics only cause hysteria. AIDS education is essential, but it must be specifically geared to the Mexicano community, which, in general, is a very conservative community, in which subjects like sex, homosexuality, condoms, or anal intercourse are not discussed in public. But it is also a community of young (median age 23) sexually active people. An AIDS education program directed at them must use simple, elementary language in standard Mexican Spanish for the Mexicans and in English for the young Mexican-Americans. The single most effective way to reach the Mexicano population would be public service announcements aired on television during the time when the telenovelas (soap operas) are on. Not only are the telenovelas widely watched, but their actors are popular heros, who will be listened to by their audience. The use of radio for public service announcements would be useful

  9. Regulating Abortion: Impact on Patients and Providers in Texas.

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The state of Texas began enforcement of the Woman's Right to Know (WRTK) Act on January 1, 2004. The law requires that all abortions at 16 weeks gestation or later be performed in an ambulatory surgical center (ASC). In the month the law went into effect, not one of Texas's 54 non-hospital abortion providers met the requirements of a surgical center. The effect was immediate and dramatic. The number of abortions performed in Texas at 16 weeks gestation or later dropped 88 %, from 3642 in 2003...

  10. Rural southeast Texas air quality measurements during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Gunnar W; Khan, Siraj; Park, Changhyoun; Boedeker, Ian

    2011-10-01

    The authors conducted air quality measurements of the criteria pollutants carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and ozone together with meteorological measurements at a park site southeast of College Station, TX, during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study II (TexAQS). Ozone, a primary focus of the measurements, was above 80 ppb during 3 days and above 75 ppb during additional 8 days in summer 2006, suggestive of possible violations of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) in this area. In concordance with other air quality measurements during the TexAQS II, elevated ozone mixing ratios coincided with northerly flows during days after cold front passages. Ozone background during these days was as high as 80 ppb, whereas southerly air flows generally provided for an ozone background lower than 40 ppb. Back trajectory analysis shows that local ozone mixing ratios can also be strongly affected by the Houston urban pollution plume, leading to late afternoon ozone increases of as high as 50 ppb above background under favorable transport conditions. The trajectory analysis also shows that ozone background increases steadily the longer a southern air mass resides over Texas after entering from the Gulf of Mexico. In light of these and other TexAQS findings, it appears that ozone air quality is affected throughout east Texas by both long-range and regional ozone transport, and that improvements therefore will require at least a regionally oriented instead of the current locally oriented ozone precursor reduction policies.

  11. Effects of Drought Stress and Ozone Exposure on Isoprene Emissions from Oak Seedlings in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madronich, M. B.; Harte, A.; Schade, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    Isoprene is the dominant hydrocarbon emitted by plants to the atmosphere with an approximate global emission of 550 Tg C yr-1. Isoprene emission studies have elucidated plants' isoprene production capacity, and the controlling factors of instantaneous emissions. However, it is not yet well understood how long-term climatic factors such as drought and increasing ozone concentrations affect isoprene emission rates. Drought reduces photosynthetic activity and is thus expected to reduce isoprene emission rate, since isoprene production relies on photosynthates. On the other hand, ozone is also known to negatively affect photosynthesis rates, but can instead increase isoprene emissions. These apparent inconsistencies and a lack of experimental data make it difficult to accurately parameterize isoprene emission responses to changing environmental conditions. The objective of this work is to reduce some of these uncertainties, using oak seedlings as a study system. Our project focuses on isoprene emission responses of oak trees to typical summer drought and high ozone conditions in Texas. We report on experiments conducted using a laboratory whole-plant chamber and leaf-level data obtained from greenhouse-grown seedlings. The chamber experiment studied the effects of ozone and drought on isoprene emissions from >3 year old oak seedlings under controlled conditions of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), temperature, soil-moisture and the chamber's air composition. Stress in plants was induced by manipulating potted soil-moisture and ozone concentration in the chamber. The greenhouse study focused on understanding the effects of drought under Texas climatic conditions. For this study we used two year old seedlings of water oak (Quercus nigra) and post oak (Quercus stellata). Temperature, humidity and light in the greenhouse followed local conditions. Leaf-level conductance, photosynthesis measurements and isoprene sampling were carried out under controlled leaf

  12. Fluid mechanics of mathematics testing in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The performance of Texas high school students on mathematics exams is tightly connected to the level of poverty in the school. I will employ the coarse-graining techniques that lead from molecular motions to fluid mechanics in order to find how student scores evolve over time. I will show that the points of divergence between well-off and low-income kids are particularly clear when viewed as streamlines of a flow in the space of grade-level and score. The results can also be cast in the form of a Fokker-Planck equation, which highlights the separate roles of convection and diffusion. I will use the results the assess the plausibility of using charter schools, highly qualified teachers, and accountability systems as primary agents of school reform.

  13. Turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak

    CERN Document Server

    Toufen, Dennis L; Caldas, Iberê L; Marcus, Francisco A; Gentle, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak (K. W. Gentle and Huang He, Plasma Sci. and Technology, 10, 284 (2008)), a toroidal plasma device with one-dimensional equilibrium with magnetic curvature and shear. Alterations on the radial electric field, through an external voltage bias, change spectral plasma characteristics inducing a dominant frequency for negative bias values and a broad band frequency spectrum for positive bias values. For negative biased plasma discharges, the transport is high where the waves propagate with phase velocities near the plasma flow velocity, an indication that the transport is strongly affected by a wave particle resonant interaction. On the other hand, for positive bias the plasma has a reversed shear flow and we observe that the transport is almost zero in the shearless radial region, an evidence of a transport barrier in this region.

  14. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

    2011-11-14

    This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

  15. The Texas Advanced Directive Law: Unfinished Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapottos, Michael; Youngner, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The Texas Advance Directive Act allows physicians and hospitals to overrule patient or family requests for futile care. Purposefully not defining futility, the law leaves its determination in specific cases to an institutional process. While the law has received several criticisms, it does seem to work constructively in the cases that come to the review process. We introduce a new criticism: While the law has been justified by an appeal to professional values such as avoiding harm to patients, avoiding the provision of unseemly care, and good stewardship of medical resources, it is applied incompletely. It allows physicians and institutional committees to refuse "futile" treatments desired by patients and families while at the same time providing no way of regulating physicians who recommend or even push "futile" treatments in similar cases. In this sense, the TADA is incomplete on its own terms.

  16. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  17. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  18. Methylphenidate abuse in Texas, 1998-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2006-06-01

    Methylphenidate is a stimulant used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and is subject to abuse. This study describes the patterns of methylphenidate abuse and drug identification (ID) calls received by several poison control centers in Texas. Cases were calls involving methylphenidate received by Texas poison control centers during 1998-2004. Drug ID and drug abuse calls were assessed by call year and geographic location. Drug abuse calls were then compared to all other human exposure (nonabuse) calls with respect to various factors. Of 6798 calls received involving methylphenidate, 35% were drug IDs and 56% human exposures. Of the human exposures, 9% involved abuse. The number of drug ID calls and drug abuse calls received per year both declined during the first part of 7-yr period but then increased. Male patients accounted for approximately 60% of both drug abuse and nonabuse calls. Adolescent patients comprised 55% of drug abuse calls and children less than 13 yr old comprised 62% of nonabuse calls. Although the majority of both types of human exposures occurred at the patient's own residence, drug abuse calls were more likely than non-abuse calls to involve exposures at school (15% vs. 6%) and public areas (3% vs. 0.4%). While drug abuse calls were less likely than nonabuse calls to present with no clinical effects (29% vs. 52%), they were more likely to show more serious medical outcomes. Methylphenidate abusers are more likely to be adolescents. Methylphenidate abuse as compared to other exposures is more likely to occur outside of the person's home and to involve more serious medical outcomes.

  19. Paris, Texas. Saksamaal ja sinu peas / Kairi Prints

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Prints, Kairi

    2010-01-01

    6.- 12. oktoobrini Tallinnas ja Tartus toimuval filmifestivalil "Uus Saksa Kino" saab vaadata Wim Wendersi muusikadokumentaale. "Film ja filosoofia" rubriigis koha- ja rahvusespetsiifika eksistentsist tänapäeva filmikunstis ja W. Wendersi filmist "Paris, Texas" (USA 1984)

  20. Zika May Have Caused Death of Texas Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160325.html Zika May Have Caused Death of Texas Newborn Baby ... birth defect linked to fetal exposure to the Zika virus, state health officials say. According to a ...

  1. Initial Contaminants Survey of Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge, Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An initial contaminants survey was conducted at Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge (HNWR) in north central Texas. Contaminants from a variety of sources have the...

  2. DWD International, LCC Agrees to Address RCRA Violations in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    DALLAS - (May 28, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently issued a consent agreement and final order to DWD International, LLC in Houston, Texas. The company violated laws under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) relat

  3. Contaminants investigation of the San Antonio River of Texas, 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1992, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducted a contaminants investigation on fish collected from the San Antonio and Guadalupe Rivers in southeast Texas....

  4. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Sabine Lake, Texas Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The toxicity of sediments in Sabine Lake, Texas, and adjoining Intracoastal Waterway canals was determined as part of bioeffects assessment studies managed by NOAA's...

  5. Digital Geologic Faults of Sherman Quadrangle, North-Central Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set contains the geologic faults for the 1:250,000-scale Sherman quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma. The original data are from the Bureau of Economic...

  6. Paris, Texas. Saksamaal ja sinu peas / Kairi Prints

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Prints, Kairi

    2010-01-01

    6.- 12. oktoobrini Tallinnas ja Tartus toimuval filmifestivalil "Uus Saksa Kino" saab vaadata Wim Wendersi muusikadokumentaale. "Film ja filosoofia" rubriigis koha- ja rahvusespetsiifika eksistentsist tänapäeva filmikunstis ja W. Wendersi filmist "Paris, Texas" (USA 1984)

  7. 76 FR 42573 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma and Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma and Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications... Review filed by Rawhide Radio, LLC, Capstar TX Limited Partnership, Clear Channel Broadcasting...

  8. Virginia Tech Horse Judging Team leaves its mark in Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, Lori A.

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Horse Judging Team completed a successful spring competition season with a win at the American Paint Horse Association's Spring Intercollegiate Horse Judging Sweepstakes in Fort Worth, Texas.

  9. Digital Geologic Map of Sherman Quadrangle, North-Central Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set contains geologic formations for the 1:250,000-scale Sherman quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma. The original data are from the Bureau of Economic...

  10. 76 FR 67397 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Llano, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Llano, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez,...

  11. 78 FR 42700 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Matagorda, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Matagorda, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Audio Division, at the request of Tejas Broadcasting Ltd., LLP... broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Assistant Chief, Audio Division, Media...

  12. 78 FR 27342 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Moran, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Moran, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission..., Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Assistant Chief, Audio...

  13. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Texas County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Texas County, OK. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  14. Groundwater Policy Research: Collaboration with Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jeffrey W.; Johnson, Phillip N.; Guerrero, Bridget L.; Weinheimer, Justin; Amosson, Stephen H.; Almas, Lal K.; Golden, Bill B.; Wheeler-Cook, Erin

    2011-01-01

    The unique nature of the Ogallala Aquifer presents interesting and confounding problems for water policymakers who are coping with changing groundwater rules in Texas. The purpose of this article is to link previous efforts in water policy research for the Ogallala Aquifer in Texas with current collaborations that are ongoing with regional water planners. A chronological progression of economic water modeling efforts for the region is reviewed. The results of two recent collaborative studies ...

  15. Conference Summary - 20th Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Weinberg, Steven

    2001-01-01

    This is the written version of the summary talk given at the 20th Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics in Austin, Texas, on December 15, 2000. After a brief summary of some of the highlights at the conference, comments are offered on three special topics: theories with large additional spatial dimensions, the cosmological constant problems, and the analysis of fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background.

  16. Groundwater Policy Research: Collaboration with Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jeffrey W.; Johnson, Phillip N.; Guerrero, Bridget L.; Weinheimer, Justin; Amosson, Stephen H.; Almas, Lal K.; Golden, Bill B.; Wheeler-Cook, Erin

    2011-01-01

    The unique nature of the Ogallala Aquifer presents interesting and confounding problems for water policymakers who are coping with changing groundwater rules in Texas. The purpose of this article is to link previous efforts in water policy research for the Ogallala Aquifer in Texas with current collaborations that are ongoing with regional water planners. A chronological progression of economic water modeling efforts for the region is reviewed. The results of two recent collaborative studies ...

  17. Shoaling Analysis at Brazos Island, Harbor Inlet, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Channel Shoaling Project, waves, currents, water levels, bathymetry, and sediment samples are being collected in and around BIH. These data will be... Texas by Ernest R. Smith, Tahirih C. Lackey, David B. King, and Richard Styles PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note...compared to recent events. INTRODUCTION: Brazos Island Harbor (also called Brazos Santiago Pass) is located on the lower Gulf of Mexico Texas coast

  18. Bioturbation by Fire Ants in the Coastal Prairie of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, G.; Williams, L.

    2001-12-01

    Fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) were introduced to the US in the early part of the last century. They have spread throughout the southeastern US in the absence of native competitors and predators with a range limited by abiotic factors. Each fire ant mound contains thousands of individuals, can be large, and can be numerous enough to comprise a dominant feature of the landscape. Studies of this species have focused upon its spread, formation of single- and multiple-queen colonies, genetic structure, and impact on native fauna and human health. Some studies have analyzed native fire ant-soil interactions, but few studies have examined the process of bioturbation by introduced fire ants in native ecosystems. Fire ants on the coastal prairie of Texas primarily are of the multiple-queen type that exhibit a much higher density of mounds than the single-queen type. Consequently, mound-building activities by fire ants can have a marked effect upon soil structure and nutrient content and may affect soil organisms and plants. Fire ant activity, mound density, mound dispersion, soil texture, soil permeability, soil moisture content, and soil nutrients were measured. Fire ants mounds are visible aboveground from April-November. Density of mounds was 117-738/ha, and average mound lifespan was 3.6 months with only 9% of the mounds remaining active throughout the entire season. Mounds were dispersed randomly. Foraging activity by fire ants was from June through October with a peak in July. Annual soil turnover was estimated by collecting and weighing mounds. There was no effect of ant mounds on soil texture, but water infiltration was higher in areas with ant mounds. Early-season samples showed no nutrient differences, but late-season samples showed that ant mounds contained higher amounts of micronutrients than random samples of soil. These data are compared to similar data on effects of mounds from native ants and from native and introduced ants in different habitats.

  19. Pesticide/environmental exposures and Parkinson's disease in East Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Amanpreet S; Tarbutton, G Lester; Levin, Jeffrey L; Plotkin, George M; Lowry, Larry K; Nalbone, J Torey; Shepherd, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that pesticides and other environmental exposures may have a role in the etiology of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). However, there is little human data on risk associated with specific pesticide products, including organic pesticides such as rotenone with PD. Using a case-control design, this study examined self-reports of exposure to pesticide products, organic pesticides such as rotenone, and other occupational and environmental exposures on the risk of PD in an East Texas population. The findings demonstrated significantly increased risk of PD with use of organic pesticides such as rotenone in the past year in gardening (OR = 10.9; 95% CI = 2.5-48.0) and any rotenone use in the past (OR = 10.0; 95% CI = 2.9-34.3). Use of chlorpyrifos products (OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.02-3.8), past work in an electronics plant (OR = 5.1; 95% CI = 1.1-23.6), and exposure to fluorides (OR = 3.3; 95% CI = 1.03-10.3) were also associated with significantly increased risk. A trend of increased PD risk was observed with work history in paper/lumber mill (OR = 6.35; 95% CI = 0.7-51.8), exposure to cadmium (OR = 5.3; 95% CI = 0.6-44.9), exposure to paraquat (OR = 3.5; 95% CI = 0.4-31.6), and insecticide applications to farm animals/animal areas and agricultural processes (OR = 4.4; 95% CI = 0.5-38.1). Cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and fish intake were associated with reduced risk. In summary, this study demonstrates an increased risk of PD associated with organic pesticides such as rotenone and certain other pesticides and environmental exposures in this population.

  20. Deployment Area Selection and Land Withdrawal/Acquisition. M-X/MPS (M-X/Multiple Protective Shelter) Environmental Technical Report. Native Americans Texas/New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-02

    Apaches, licarillas, Conejeros, Ochos, and Rio Colorados on the Cimarron River and desc-ibed Apaches (and Pueblos) as harvesting maize , pumpkins...sent south in 1878. The 32 left in January of 1879 and returned to Tierra Amarillo --in response to Anglo depredations on the Mescalero reservation

  1. RCRA Facility Investigation Report Texas Solid Waste Management Units Fort Bliss El Paso, Texas. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    associations: the Pintura -Dona Ana of Otero Area, New Mexico, or the Hueco-Wink of El Paso County, Texas. 1.4.6.1 Description The five soil associations...by erosion (DOA, 1981). 1 1-28 I A. si. / -Z - W0 A i~ Pintura -Dona Ana ~r~*~>~ Tome-Mimbres IFI BlTuneyBeintOnieWn Fiur v- RCRA F....i. Soil Ma...material. Although the Pintura soils are the most 3 common and most extensive soils formed in this manner, all of the soils described contain undulating and

  2. The Myth of the Texas Miracle in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walt Haney

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available I summarize the recent history of education reform and statewide testing in Texas, which led to introduction of the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS in 1990-91. A variety of evidence in the late 1990s led a number of observers to conclude that the state of Texas had made near miraculous progress in reducing dropouts and increasing achievement. The passing scores on TAAS tests were arbitrary and discriminatory. Analyses comparing TAAS reading, writing and math scores with one another and with relevant high school grades raise doubts about the reliability and validity of TAAS scores. I discuss problems of missing students and other mirages in Texas enrollment statistics that profoundly affect both reported dropout statistics and test scores. Only 50% of minority students in Texas have been progressing from grade 9 to high school graduation since the initiation of the TAAS testing program. Since about 1982, the rates at which Black and Hispanic students are required to repeat grade 9 have climbed steadily, such that by the late 1990s, nearly 30% of Black and Hispanic students were "failing" grade 9. Cumulative rates of grade retention in Texas are almost twice as high for Black and Hispanic students as for White students. Some portion of the gains in grade 10 TAAS pass rates are illusory. The numbers of students taking the grade 10 tests who were classified as "in special education" and hence not counted in schools' accountability ratings nearly doubled between 1994 and 1998. A substantial portion of the apparent increases in TAAS pass rates in the 1990s are due to such exclusions. In the opinion of educators in Texas, schools are devoting a huge amount of time and energy preparing students specifically for TAAS, and emphasis on TAAS is hurting more than helping teaching and learning in Texas schools, particularly with at-risk students, and TAAS contributes to retention in grade and dropping out. Five different sources of evidence about

  3. State Agency Applications of EOS Data in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, G. L.

    2001-05-01

    Texas offers a good model for the introduction of remotely sensed data products into the daily operations of state agencies by virtue of its large size and population. The diversity of the Texas landscape coupled with the long distances traveled to perform site inspections place special burdens on the land resource agencies responsible for monitoring crop conditions, water availability, environmental hazards and other natural resource issues. To assist these agencies, the Texas Synergy team has adopted a two-phase approach that incorporates framework geospatial data products designed for the broad user community with remote sensing applications developed for user-specific analyses. A key element to the success of the effort is the development of remote sensing products within a Texas Reference Frame that corresponds to the components of the high-resolution National Spatial Data Infrastructure developed by the state, such as 1-meter CIR digital orthophotographs, digital elevation models, and vector layers for hypsography, hydrography, soils, transportation and boundaries. Users accustomed to working with NSDI products can easily begin to include recently-collected EOS data presented within the same reference frame. Examples of statewide data products made available through the Texas Synergy project are AVHRR NDVI and MODIS imagery, Landsat 7 ETM+ scenes and SPOT 10-meter panchromatic image tiles. Delivery of the products involves a number of mechanisms from CD distribution to Internet FTP downloads, but increasingly relies upon Internet map services, such as ESRI's ArcIMS. Beyond release of the base imagery products, the Texas Synergy team has worked with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Texas Soil and Water Conservation Board, Texas Department of Agriculture, Texas Water Development Board, National Park Service and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service on a wide range of data applications. Throughout 1999-2000, the magnitude of drought conditions was

  4. Degradation State and Sequestration Potential of Carbon in Coastal Wetlands of Texas: Mangrove Vs. Saltmarsh Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterne, A. M. E.; Kaiser, K.; Louchouarn, P.; Norwood, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The estimated magnitude of the organic carbon (OC) stocks contained in the first meter of US coastal wetland soils represents ~10% of the entire OC stock in US soils (4 vs. 52 Pg, respectively). Because this stock extends to several meters below the surface for many coastal wetlands, it becomes paramount to understand the fate of OC under ecosystem shifts, varying natural environmental constraints, and changing land use. In this project we analyze the major classes of biochemicals including total hydrolysable neutral carbohydrates, enantiomeric amino acids, phenols, and cutins/suberins at two study sites located on the Texas coastline to investigate chemical composition and its controls on organic carbon preservation in mangrove (Avicennia germinans) and saltmarsh grass (Spartina alterniflora) dominated wetlands. Results show neutral carbohydrates and lignin contribute 30-70% and 10-40% of total OC, respectively, in plant litter and surface sediments at both sites. Sharp declines of carbohydrate yields with depth occur parallel to increasing Ac/AlS,V ratios indicating substantial decomposition of both the polysaccharide and lignin components of litter detritus. Contrasts in the compositions and relative abundances of all previously mentioned compound classes are further discussed to examine the role of litter biochemistry in OC preservation. For example, the selective preservation of cellulose over hemicellulose in sediments indicates macromolecular structure plays a key role in preservation between plant types. It is concluded that the chemical composition of litter material controls the composition and magnitude of OC stored in sediments. Ultimately, as these ecosystems transition from one dominant plant type to another, as is currently observed along the Texas coastline, there is the potential for OC sequestration efficiency to shift due to the changing composition of OC input to sediments.

  5. Epidemiology of neurocysticercosis in Houston, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del la Garza, Yazmin; Graviss, Edward A; Daver, Naval G; Gambarin, Kimberley J; Shandera, Wayne X; Schantz, Peter M; White, A Clinton

    2005-10-01

    We identified 114 patients with neurocysticercosis admitted to Ben Taub General Hospital in Houston, Texas between January 1994 and June 1997. Most of these patients were born in Mexico (78%) or Central America (16%), but 6% were born in the United States. Review of neurology clinic records identified 54 patients diagnosed with neurocysticercosis, representing 2% of all neurology clinic patients and 16% of all Hispanics diagnosed with seizures. Forty-one patients were interviewed and all reported significant risk factors for infection, including ingestion of undercooked pork, pig husbandry, immigration from and frequent travel to villages in disease-endemic areas, or personal/family history of taeniasis. Among Mexican immigrants, most were born in rural areas in Central (31%) or north central Mexico (38%). Significantly fewer of the patients were from the border states (15%). The median period from immigration to diagnosis was 58 months, but it was 28 months for the 13 patients who had not left the United States after immigration. Although neurocysticercosis is being diagnosed with increasing frequency in the United States, acquisition of infection is still strongly associated with pig husbandry in rural Latin America, with little evidence of local transmission. Even among urban immigrants to the United States and United States-born cases, there is close ongoing contact with disease-endemic villages.

  6. Strong reinforcing selection in a Texas wildflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Robin; Guerrero, Rafael F; Rausher, Mark D; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2014-09-08

    Reinforcement, the process of increased reproductive isolation due to selection against hybrids, is an important mechanism by which natural selection contributes to speciation [1]. Empirical studies suggest that reinforcement has generated reproductive isolation in many taxa (reviewed in [2-4]), and theoretical work shows it can act under broad selective conditions [5-11]. However, the strength of selection driving reinforcement has never been measured in nature. Here, we quantify the strength of reinforcing selection in the Texas wildflower Phlox drummondii using a strategy that weds a population genetic model with field data. Reinforcement in this system is caused by variation in two loci that affect flower color [12]. We quantify sharp clines in flower color where this species comes into contact with its congener, Phlox cuspidata. We develop a spatially explicit population genetic model for these clines based on the known genetics of flower color. We fit our model to the data using likelihood, and we searched parameter space using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. We find that selection on flower color genes generated by reinforcement is exceptionally strong. Our findings demonstrate that natural selection can play a decisive role in the evolution of reproductive isolation through the process of reinforcement.

  7. How big is big? How often is often? Characterizing Texas petroleum refining upset air emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Britney J.; Fischbeck, Paul S.; Gerard, David

    2010-11-01

    This work examines the magnitude and frequency of Texas petroleum refineries upset air emissions over a 44-month period. Upset emissions occur during plant start-ups, shut-downs, maintenance, malfunctions and flaring incidents, and these emissions are typically exempt from regulation. These emissions contain a variety of chemicals, including benzene, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and butadiene. Unlike other states, Texas has detailed reporting requirements, regulations in place, and an extensive upset emissions database. A key scientific and public policy question is whether upset emissions have significant impacts on local air quality and public health. However, it is not possible to address this question without first understanding the magnitude and properties of upsets. We merge related databases to examine over 3,900 upset emission events and find that upset emissions are significant in both size and occurrence when compared to routine operation emissions. It is determined that these events are not random, being more likely to occur during the summer, in the morning, and early in the workweek. A regional analysis of Port Arthur suggests that upset emissions from co-located refineries are equivalent to having an additional refinery within the region. Because of uncertainties within the reporting process and an obvious underestimation by some refineries, there is a need for better tracking of upset emissions.

  8. Characteristics of a ringtail (Bassariscus astutus) population in Trans Pecos, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, B.K.; Harveson, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the common occurrence of ringtails (Bassariscus astutus) few studies have been conducted to assess population characteristics. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) habitat selection, (2) home range, (3) denning characteristics, and (4) food habits of ringtails in the Trans Pecos region of west Texas. Seventeen ringtails were captured between November 1999 and January 2001 using Havahart live box traps. Second- and third-order habitat selection was determined for a ringtail population using range sites, slope, elevation, and vegetation communities. Diets were determined from volumetric scat analysis. The mean summer and winter range sizes (100% Minimum Convex Polygon [MCP]) for ringtails (n = 5) were 0.28 ?? 0.163 km2 and 0.63 ?? 0.219 km2, respectively. Overlap between ringtail ranges averaged 33.3%. Ringtails preferred catclaw (Mimosa biuncifera), persimmon (Diospyros texana), oak (Quercus sp.) bottom and catclaw/goldeneye (Viguiera stenoloba), sideoats (Bouteloua curtipendula) slope communities. Rock dens were used exclusively by ringtails, with 80.6% of dens found on slopes between 30-60%. Plant (seeds and miscellaneous vegetation) and animal material were found in 74.6 and 86.6% of scats, respectively. Findings suggest that ringtails in Trans Pecos, Texas, are an important component of the ecosystem and that management practices should conserve canyon habitats and adjacent slopes for ringtails.

  9. Nest success of snowy plovers (Charadrius nivosus) in the Southern high plains of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saalfeld, S.T.; Conway, Warren C.; Haukos, D.A.; Johnson, W.P.

    2011-01-01

    Snowy Plovers (Charadrius nivosus) nesting on edges of saline lakes within the Southern High Plains (SHP) of Texas are threatened by habitat degradation due to reduced artesian spring flow, making many saline lakes unsuitable for nesting and migrating shorebirds. Factors influencing nest success were evaluated, current nest success estimates in the SHP of Texas were compared to estimates obtained ten years prior, and causes and timing of nest failures determined. Overall, 215 nests were monitored from three saline lakes in 20082009, with nest success estimates from Program MARK ranging from 7-33% ( x??= 22%). The leading causes of nest failures were attributed to predation (40%) and weather (36%). Nest success was negatively influenced by number of plants within 707-cm 2 plot, positively influenced by percent surface water availability, and at one saline lake, negatively influenced by day during the nesting season (i.e., nest success declined later in the nesting season). When compared to estimates ten years prior (19981999), mean nest success has declined by 31%. If nesting Snowy Plovers continue to experience increased predation rates, decreased hydrological integrity, and habitat alterations, populations will continue to decline throughout this region.

  10. Ground Water Atlas of the United States: Segment 4, Oklahoma, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Paul D.

    1996-01-01

    from about 0.2 inch in the western part of the Oklahoma panhandle and parts of west Texas to about 20 inches in southeastern Oklahoma. Comparison of the precipitation and runoff maps shows that runoff is greater where precipitation is greater. However, precipitation is greater than runoff everywhere in the two-State area. Much of the precipitation that falls on the area is returned to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration, which is the combination of evaporation from surface-water bodies, such as lakes and marshes, and transpiration from plants. Part of the precipitation percolates downward through the soil and permeable rocks and is available for aquifer recharge throughout the area. Oklahoma and Texas lie within six major physiographic provinces which are differentiated on the basis of differences in landforms and geology (fig. 3). The physiographic features vary greatly and range from the low, flat Coastal Plain Province through the high, gently rolling High Plains Province to mountain ranges in the Ouachita and the Basin and Range Provinces.

  11. The Health Insurance Gap After Implementation of the Affordable Care Act in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Gordon; Huey, Cassandra C; Johnson, Coleman; Curti, Debra; Philips, Billy U

    2017-03-01

    Households with incomes between 18% and 99% of the federal poverty level (FPL) are ineligible for Medicaid or enrollment in the health insurance exchange marketplace in Texas, resulting in the health insurance gap. We sought to determine the number of non-elderly adult Texans (NEATs) aged between 18 and 64 years in the insurance gap in rural vs urban areas in East Texas, West Texas, and South Texas. Data were obtained from the US Census Bureau website. In 2014, there were 1,101,000 NEATs in the insurance gap, accounting for 24.5% of all uninsured persons in Texas. The gap was significantly higher in rural vs urban areas in East and South Texas and in Texas as a whole. Large coverage gaps in states like Texas not expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act pose major hurdles to reducing the number of uninsured individuals in these states.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Texas. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Texas.

  13. BLM/OCS South Texas Outer Continental Shelf (STOCS) Project Sediment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The South Texas Outer Continental Shelf Project (STOCS) conducted by the University of Texas and the USGS with funding from BLM/NOAA. The USGS produced geochemical...

  14. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Patchy Shapefile Map - Lower Laguna Madre

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM) requested the creation of benthic habitat data along the southern Texas coast to support the Texas Seagrass Monitoring...

  15. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Patchy Shapefile Map - San Antonio Bay and Espiritu Santo Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM) requested the creation of benthic habitat data along the southern Texas coast to support the Texas Seagrass Monitoring...

  16. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Patchy Shapefile Map - Lower Laguna Madre (NODC Accession 0070784)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Coastal Services Center (CSC) requested the creation of benthic habitat data along the southern Texas coast to support the Texas Seagrass Monitoring...

  17. "Kinder En Ingles." English for the Spanish-speaking Pre-schooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, John S.

    1970-01-01

    Their producer describes a series of instructional programs shown on commercial television in Amarillo, Texas that are designed to help Spanish speaking preschoolers learn enough English to prepare them for public school. (LS)

  18. "Kinder En Ingles." English for the Spanish-speaking Pre-schooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, John S.

    1970-01-01

    Their producer describes a series of instructional programs shown on commercial television in Amarillo, Texas that are designed to help Spanish speaking preschoolers learn enough English to prepare them for public school. (LS)

  19. Implementing robotics in the Department of Energy Dismantlement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A.T.

    1997-12-31

    Since the end of the cold war, as our nuclear stockpile has decreased, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been working rapidly to safely dismantle weapons returned by the military. In order to be retired, weapons must be returned to the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. There they are reduced to their component parts. Although many of these parts are not hazardous, some, including certain explosive assemblies and radioactive materials, are sufficiently hazardous so that special handling systems are necessary. This paper will describe several of these systems developed by Sandia for Pantex and their technical basis.

  20. Detection of Mycoplasma agassizii in the Texas Tortoise (Gopherus berlandieri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Amanda L.; White, C. LeAnn; Brown, Mary B.; deMaar, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma agassizii causes upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in Texas tortoises (Gopherus berlandieri). To determine exposure to and shedding of M. agassizii, we collected blood samples and nasal swabs from 40 free-ranging Texas tortoises on public and private lands in Texas, USA, from May to October 2009. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect M. agassizii–specific antibodies. Eleven (28%) tortoises were antibody positive, three (8%) were suspect, and the remaining 26 (65%) were negative. Nasal lavage samples were collected from 35 of the 40 tortoises for M. agassizii culture and PCR to detect shedding of M. agassizii. Current infection with M. agassizii was confirmed in one tortoise that had mild clinical signs of URTD and was positive by ELISA (antibody titer >512), PCR, and culture. The clinical isolate was confirmed as M. agassizii by restriction fragment length polymorphism and immunobinding.

  1. Historical descriptions of some soils and landscapes of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Darrell G.

    Europeans explorers, immigrants, and travelers have been crisscrossing Texas for almost 5 centuries, recording their observations of soils and landscapes through the lens of their own times. In the early 16th century, Cabeza de Vaca was struck by how the natives among whom he lived used soil as a part of their diet. In the 17th century, as a member of the La Salle expedition to Texas, Henri Joutel described the soils and landscapes he saw in considerable detail, perhaps with an eye to possible future French settlement. To 19th century immigrants, the soil was the source of their future wealth, but also, so they thought, of the source of the various illnesses that inflicted them. With their distinctive micro-topography and large cracks when dry, Vertisols have elicited some of the most interesting early descriptions of Texas soils.

  2. Public perceptions and information gaps in solar energy in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Varun; Beck, Ariane L.

    2015-07-01

    Studying the behavioral aspects of the individual decision-making process is important in identifying and addressing barriers in the adoption of residential solar photovoltaic (PV). However, there is little systematic research focusing on these aspects of residential PV in Texas, an important, large, populous state, with a range of challenges in the electricity sector including increasing demand, shrinking reserve margins, constrained water supply, and challenging emissions reduction targets under proposed federal regulations. This paper aims to address this gap through an empirical investigation of a new survey-based dataset collected in Texas on solar energy perceptions and behavior. The results of this analysis offer insights into the perceptions and motivations influencing intentions and behavior toward solar energy in a relatively untapped market and help identify information gaps that could be targeted to alleviate key barriers to adopting solar, thereby enabling significant emissions reductions in the residential sector in Texas.

  3. Preliminary disease surveillance in west Texas quail (galliformes: odontophoridae) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Kristyn N; Gibson, Anna G; Dabbert, C Brad; Presley, Steven M

    2013-04-01

    Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) and Scaled Quail (Callipepla squamata) occur throughout northwestern Texas and overall population numbers have been declining for the past 30 yr. This decline has been attributed to habitat loss associated with intensive agricultural practices. We propose that disease may be a contributing factor to decline. Our findings suggest that West Nile virus (WNV) infection may be common in wild quail populations on the Rolling Plains of northwestern Texas. Serum samples (n=301) from wild-caught Northern Bobwhite and Scaled Quail were collected during 2008-10 from seven private properties across the Rolling Plains Region; 5.3% had detectable antibodies against WNV using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To our knowledge, this is the first report of antibodies to WNV in Scaled Quail and wild-caught Northern Bobwhite from the Rolling Plains of Texas.

  4. Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science: 25 Years of Early College STEM Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    The University of North Texas's Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science began admitting students to its 2-year early college entrance science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) program in the fall of 1988. This program provided accelerated entry for top students in Texas in the areas of mathematics and science. Approximately 200…

  5. A Case Study of Women Presidents of Texas Private Colleges and Universities and Their Followership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Shelley E.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this current case study was to document how women presidents of private Texas colleges and universities describe their leadership. The percentage of Texas women presidents (24.3%) closely mirrors the U.S. national average (26.4%) of women presidents of colleges and universities, yet the percentage of Texas women presidents of…

  6. Gambling in Texas: 1995 Surveys of Adult and Adolescent Gambling Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallisch, Lynn S.

    The impact of the Texas State Lottery on gambling patterns, expenditures on gambling, and the prevalence of problem gambling in Texas is assessed. Background and methodology is presented in Part 1. Data are compared with a survey run prior to the introduction of the first state lottery. Part 2, "Gambling among Texas Adults," includes…

  7. 76 FR 14052 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Sabine River Authority of Texas, Quitman, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Sabine River Authority of Texas, Quitman, TX AGENCY... of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of Sabine River Authority of Texas... assessment of the human remains was made by University of North Texas and the Sabine River Authority of...

  8. Math Readiness of Texas Community College Developmental Education Students: A Multiyear Statewide Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Reni A.; Slate, John R.; Saxon, D. Patrick; Barnes, Wally

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, we examined the college readiness in math of Texas community college students using archival data from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Data analyzed were the rate of all first-time in college (FTIC) developmental education students who scored below the Texas college readiness standards in math and the rates of…

  9. 78 FR 9047 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Texas AGENCY: United States... that the State of Texas is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Texas...

  10. 77 FR 35676 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Texas AGENCY: United States... that the State of Texas is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Texas...

  11. Appreciative Inquiry of Texas Elementary Classroom Assessment: Action Research for a School-Wide Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clint, Frank Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative, action-research study used themes from appreciative interviews of Texas elementary teachers to recommend a framework for a school-wide assessment model for a Texas elementary school. The specific problem was that the Texas accountability system used a yearly measurement that failed to track progress over time and failed to…

  12. Archeological Investigations in the Truscott Reservoir Area. King and Knox Counties, Texas,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-01

    Texas Panhandle. Actas del 41 Congreso Inter- nacional de Americanistas, Vol. 1, pp. 270-278. Institute Nacional de Antropologia e Historia... Manual of Sedimentological Computer Programs: West Texas State University Press, Canyon, Texas. Visher, G. S., 1969, Grain Size Distributions and Depo

  13. Perceptions of Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassadors on Career Development, Higher Education, and Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanolini, William F.; Rayfield, John; Ripley, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Selected 4-H youth participated in the Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassador program. Forty-five youth participated in the 3-day program delivered by university professors and staff, Texas AgriLife Extension faculty and industry representatives. An instrument was developed and administered to the Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassadors at the end of their first…

  14. Exploring the Power Output of Small Wind Turbines in Urban San Antonio, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Jose; Sperduti, Stephanie; Cardenas, Rosa

    2015-03-01

    The means of transporting power from a centralized power plant by transmission lines has several disadvantages. Electricity transmission and distribution networks are costly, require long planning processes and are unsightly to residents. These networks are also susceptible to natural disasters creating massive disruptions to consumers. For these reasons distributed power sources such as solar panels and small wind turbines are becoming a more desirable and viable means of energy production. We report on the status of a study to determine the maximum output power of small wind turbines in urban San Antonio, Texas. Wind speed data along with power measurements from small wind turbines in urban San Antonio will be reported. U.S. Department of Education Title V HSI-STEM and Articulation Award No. P031C110145.

  15. Potential environmental impacts arising from geopressured-geothermal energy development Texas--Louisiana Gulf Coast region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, T.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin); McGraw, M.M.; Tandy, M.; Parker, F.; Wohlschlag, D.E.; Meriwether, J.

    1977-11-16

    Geopressured-geotheermal resources of the Gulf Coast of Texas and Louisiana are currently being evaluated as thermal-hydraulic energy sources to drive turbines to generate electrical power. Gulf Coast geothermal fluids are brines with salinities generally in excess of 40,000 ppM and tempertures up to 283/sup 0/C (520/sup 0/F). The proportions of dissolved ions in geothermal fluids is markedly different than that of sea water, and the fluids are expected to be saturated with methane. As much as 54,000 m/sup 3/ (310,000 bbls) of fluids per day at a temperature of 049/sup 0/C (300/sup 0/F) will be required to feed one 25 megawatt power plant. The energy resource, the ecological resources of the Gulf Coast, and the potential effects of the development of geothermal energy on ecological resources are described.

  16. Texas LPG fuel cell development and demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2004-07-26

    The State Energy Conservation Office has executed its first Fuel Cell Project which was awarded under a Department of Energy competitive grant process. The Texas LPG Fuel Processor Development and Fuel Cell Demonstration Program is a broad-based public/private partnership led by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO). Partners include the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division (AFRED) of the Railroad Commission of Texas; Plug Power, Inc., Latham, NY, UOP/HyRadix, Des Plaines, IL; Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), San Antonio, TX; the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The team proposes to mount a development and demonstration program to field-test and evaluate markets for HyRadix's LPG fuel processor system integrated into Plug Power's residential-scale GenSys(TM) 5C (5 kW) PEM fuel cell system in a variety of building types and conditions of service. The program's primary goal is to develop, test, and install a prototype propane-fueled residential fuel cell power system supplied by Plug Power and HyRadix in Texas. The propane industry is currently funding development of an optimized propane fuel processor by project partner UOP/HyRadix through its national checkoff program, the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC). Following integration and independent verification of performance by Southwest Research Institute, Plug Power and HyRadix will produce a production-ready prototype unit for use in a field demonstration. The demonstration unit produced during this task will be delivered and installed at the Texas Department of Transportation's TransGuide headquarters in San Antonio, Texas. Simultaneously, the team will undertake a market study aimed at identifying and quantifying early-entry customers, technical and regulatory requirements, and other challenges and opportunities that need to be addressed in planning commercialization of the units

  17. Wineries' Involvement in Promoting Tourism Online: The Case of Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasch, Leslie

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Wine tourism has become an important driver of business for wineries in many regions around the world, while Texas wine regions are only starting to emerge as important tourism destinations. A study was conducted to investigate how effectively Texas wineries market tourism to their own establishments as well as in a regional context. A specific focus was placed on indications of collaborative wine tourism marketing practices on winery websites. The results indicate that wineries provide basic visitor information but are missing out on strategic opportunities to market wine tourism to their areas.

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi screening in Texas blood donors, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M N; Woc-Colburn, L; Rossmann, S N; Townsend, R L; Stramer, S L; Bravo, M; Kamel, H; Beddard, R; Townsend, M; Oldham, R; Bottazzi, M E; Hotez, P J; Murray, K O

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease is an important emerging disease in Texas that results in cardiomyopathy in about 30% of those infected with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Between the years 2008 and 2012, about 1/6500 blood donors were T. cruzi antibody-confirmed positive. We found older persons and minority populations, particularly Hispanic, at highest risk for screening positive for T. cruzi antibodies during routine blood donation. Zip code analysis determined that T. cruzi is associated with poverty. Chagas disease has a significant disease burden and is a cause of substantial economic losses in Texas.

  19. Texas Hydrogen Education Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, David; Bullock, Dan

    2011-06-30

    The Texas Hydrogen Education project builds on past interest in hydrogen and fuel cells to help create better informed leaders and stakeholders and thereby improve decision making and planning for inclusion of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies as energy alternatives in Texas. In past years in Texas, there was considerable interest and activities about hydrogen and fuel cells (2000-­2004). During that time, the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) created a fuel cell consortium and a fuel cell testing lab. Prior to 2008, interest and activities had declined substantially. In 2008, in cooperation with the Texas H2 Coalition and the State Energy Conservation Office, HARC conducted a planning process to create the Texas Hydrogen Roadmap. It was apparent from analysis conducted during the course of this process that while Texas has hydrogen and fuel cell advantages, there was little program and project activity as compared with other key states. Outreach and education through the provision of informational materials and organizing meetings was seen as an effective way of reaching decision makers in Texas. Previous hydrogen projects in Texas had identified the five major urban regions for program and project development. This geographic targeting approach was adopted for this project. The project successfully conducted the five proposed workshops in four of the target metropolitan areas: San Antonio, Houston, Austin, and the Dallas-­Ft. Worth area. In addition, eight outreach events were included to further inform state and local government leaders on the basics of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The project achieved its primary objectives of developing communication with target audiences and assembling credible and consistent outreach and education materials. The major lessons learned include: (1) DOE’s Clean Cities programs are a key conduit to target transportation audiences, (2) real-­world fuel cell applications (fuel cell buses, fuel cell fork lifts

  20. Oil and gas rises again in a diversified Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Mine K. Yücel; Jackson Thies

    2011-01-01

    The oil and gas industry has been a driver of the Texas economy for the past 40 years. Its contribution declined with the oil-led recession of 1986 and appeared to slip further in the 1990s as the high-tech industry boomed. But oil and natural gas prices have risen since 1999, reaching record highs in 2008. This resurgence has boosted energy activity and factored into the recent economic recovery in Texas, affirming the industry’s long-held prominence in the state. ; An econometric model deve...

  1. Energy Policy Case Study - Texas: Wind, Markets, and Grid Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrell, Alice C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Homer, Juliet S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bender, Sadie R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weimar, Mark R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-19

    This document presents a case study of energy policies in Texas related to power system transformation, renewable energy and distributed energy resources (DERs). Texas has experienced a dramatic increase in installed wind capacity, from 116 MW in 2000 to over 15,000 MW in 2015. This achievement was enabled by the designation of Competitive Renewable Energy Zones (CREZs) and new transmission lines that transmit wind to load centers. This report highlights nascent efforts to include DERs in the ERCOT market. As costs decline and adoption rates increase, ERCOT expects distributed generation to have an increasing effect on grid operations, while bringing potentially valuable new resources to the wholesale markets.

  2. The contribution of mangrove expansion to salt marsh loss on the Texas Gulf Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Anna R; Highfield, Wesley E; Brody, Samuel D; Louchouarn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Landscape-level shifts in plant species distribution and abundance can fundamentally change the ecology of an ecosystem. Such shifts are occurring within mangrove-marsh ecotones, where over the last few decades, relatively mild winters have led to mangrove expansion into areas previously occupied by salt marsh plants. On the Texas (USA) coast of the western Gulf of Mexico, most cases of mangrove expansion have been documented within specific bays or watersheds. Based on this body of relatively small-scale work and broader global patterns of mangrove expansion, we hypothesized that there has been a recent regional-level displacement of salt marshes by mangroves. We classified Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper images using artificial neural networks to quantify black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) expansion and salt marsh (Spartina alterniflora and other grass and forb species) loss over 20 years across the entire Texas coast. Between 1990 and 2010, mangrove area grew by 16.1 km(2), a 74% increase. Concurrently, salt marsh area decreased by 77.8 km(2), a 24% net loss. Only 6% of that loss was attributable to mangrove expansion; most salt marsh was lost due to conversion to tidal flats or water, likely a result of relative sea level rise. Our research confirmed that mangroves are expanding and, in some instances, displacing salt marshes at certain locations. However, this shift is not widespread when analyzed at a larger, regional level. Rather, local, relative sea level rise was indirectly implicated as another important driver causing regional-level salt marsh loss. Climate change is expected to accelerate both sea level rise and mangrove expansion; these mechanisms are likely to interact synergistically and contribute to salt marsh loss.

  3. The contribution of mangrove expansion to salt marsh loss on the Texas Gulf Coast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R Armitage

    Full Text Available Landscape-level shifts in plant species distribution and abundance can fundamentally change the ecology of an ecosystem. Such shifts are occurring within mangrove-marsh ecotones, where over the last few decades, relatively mild winters have led to mangrove expansion into areas previously occupied by salt marsh plants. On the Texas (USA coast of the western Gulf of Mexico, most cases of mangrove expansion have been documented within specific bays or watersheds. Based on this body of relatively small-scale work and broader global patterns of mangrove expansion, we hypothesized that there has been a recent regional-level displacement of salt marshes by mangroves. We classified Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper images using artificial neural networks to quantify black mangrove (Avicennia germinans expansion and salt marsh (Spartina alterniflora and other grass and forb species loss over 20 years across the entire Texas coast. Between 1990 and 2010, mangrove area grew by 16.1 km(2, a 74% increase. Concurrently, salt marsh area decreased by 77.8 km(2, a 24% net loss. Only 6% of that loss was attributable to mangrove expansion; most salt marsh was lost due to conversion to tidal flats or water, likely a result of relative sea level rise. Our research confirmed that mangroves are expanding and, in some instances, displacing salt marshes at certain locations. However, this shift is not widespread when analyzed at a larger, regional level. Rather, local, relative sea level rise was indirectly implicated as another important driver causing regional-level salt marsh loss. Climate change is expected to accelerate both sea level rise and mangrove expansion; these mechanisms are likely to interact synergistically and contribute to salt marsh loss.

  4. 78 FR 11579 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Section 503(a) of the Act permits a State to assume primacy for the regulation of surface coal mining and... surface mining regulations; and section 12.560(c)(2)(A) and (B), and (3)(A) and (B) of its underground mining regulations regarding ground cover requirements and woody plant standards for areas with the post...

  5. An early Eocene florule from central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Edward Wilber

    1925-01-01

    In 1916 I described a florule collected by Alexander Deussen and L. W. Stephenson at the town of Earle, in Bexar County, Tex. This florule was tentatively considered of Midway age by these geologists, and examination of the fossil plants tended to confirm this assignment, particularly because of their lack of

  6. Computed discharges at five sites in lower Laguna Madre near Port Isabel, Texas, June 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Jeffrey W.; Solis, R.S.; Ockerman, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Texas Water Development Board (TWDB), Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD), and Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) are charged by the Texas Legislature with determining freshwater inflows required to maintain the ecological health of streams, bays, and estuaries in Texas. To determine required inflows, the three agencies collect data and conduct studies on the needs for freshwater inflows to estuaries. The TWDB uses estuarine hydrodynamic and conservativetransport computer models to predict the effects of altering freshwater inflows on estuarine circulation and salinity. To calibrate these models, a variety of water-quality and discharge data are needed.

  7. 75 FR 30800 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Texas Clean Energy Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Texas Clean Energy Project, Ector County... Federal funding for the proposed Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP) near Odessa, Texas. The project would comprise planning, design, construction and operation by Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC (Summit) of a coal...

  8. Investigation into rainwater use by cotton under multiple irrigation management conditions in the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, T.; Lascano, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Irrigation management practices in the Texas High Plains (THP) might be improved if we could ascertain the proportion of rainfall utilized by the crop in any given rainfall event. For instance, the primary source of irrigation water in the THP is pumped from the Ogallala Aquifer (OA), and can be enriched in 18O compared to rainfall-captured water. Given this expected difference, it should be possible to determine if the crop is utilizing the water from a rainfall event. To this end, cotton was grown using three irrigation management practices: subsurface drip, center pivot, and no irrigation (dry land). The water used for irrigation was pumped from the Ogallala aquifer, and rainfall was gathered in a rain gauge with mineral oil to prevent evaporation. Additionally, plant and soil samples were collected following each precipitation event every two hours and every eight hours respectively. Water was then extracted from the soil and plant samples using cryogenic vacuum distillation, and analyzed for 18O/16O ratios using the DLT-100 Liquid-Water Isotope Analyzer from Los Gatos Research Inc. The difference in isotope concentrations in the extracts from soils was used to determine infiltration depth into the soil profile at each location. The isotopic composition of the plant water was used to determine if the was used to compare rainwater use across the different irrigation management practices. Results might suggest changes to the way in which we apply irrigation water that would improve root growth and distribution to enhance the capture of rainfall.

  9. An analysis of producing ethanol and electric power from woody residues and agricultural crops in East Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismayilova, Rubaba Mammad

    The increasing U.S. dependence on imported oil; the contribution of fossil fuels to the greenhouse gas emissions and the climate change issue; the current level of energy prices and other environmental concerns have increased world interest in renewable energy sources. Biomass is a large, diverse, readily exploitable resource. This dissertation examines the biomass potential in Eastern Texas by examining a 44 county region. This examination considers the potential establishment of a 100-megawatt (MW) power plant and a 20 million gallon per year (MMGY) ethanol plant using lignocellulosic biomass. The biomass sources considered are switchgrass, sugarcane bagasse, and logging residues. In the case of electricity generation, co-firing scenarios are also investigated. The research analyzes the key indicators involved with economic costs and benefits, environmental and social impacts. The bioenergy production possibilities considered here were biofeedstock supported electric power and cellulosic ethanol production. The results were integrated into a comprehensive set of information that addresses the effects of biomass energy development in the region. The analysis indicates that none of the counties in East Texas have sufficient biomass to individually sustain either a 100% biomass fired power plant or the cellulosic ethanol plant. Such plants would only be feasible at the regional level. Co-firing biomass with coal, however, does provide a most attractive alternative for the study region. The results indicate further that basing the decision solely on economics of feedstock availability and costs would suggest that bioenergy, as a renewable energy, is not a viable energy alternative. Accounting for some environmental and social benefits accruing to the region from bioenergy production together with the feedstock economics, however, suggests that government subsidies, up to the amount of accruing benefits, could make the bioenergies an attractive business opportunity

  10. Tight Focus on Instruction Wins Texas District Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    It took a while for four-time finalist Aldine, Texas, to win the Broad Prize for Urban Education. But it took even longer to craft the system that ultimately put the district over the top. Educators in Aldine district have been working for more than a decade to refine their "managed instruction" system. Reviewers examined how the school…

  11. Pulling Success from Failure: The Texas War for Independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    the eastern tip of the Yucatan Peninsula approximately thirteen hundred miles from Monclova. It is unrealistic to expect a 19th century army to have...of Texas, routed Grant’s small contingent at Agua Dulce Creek. Hardin, The Alamo , 52-53. 74 History has not been kind to Fannin nor should it be

  12. Education of Undocumented Children in Texas: A Status Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intercultural Development Research Association, San Antonio, TX.

    The education of undocumented children in Texas is an issue that has been sparked by public opinion and media exposure and fueled by a series of state and federal court suits challenging state and local policies which exclude these children from the benefits of tuition free public education. The controversy is based on a 1975 revision in the state…

  13. Texas Hold'em, a game of skill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borm, Peter; van der Genugten, B.B.

    The methodology of relative skill, by means of a detailed mathematical analysis of realistic approximations of Texas Hold’em cash games and tournaments as provided in van der Genugten and Borm [2012], and Borm and van der Genugten [2009] respectively, reconfirms the findings of the court in The

  14. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2013-14. IDRA Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intercultural Development Research Association, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This infographic shows how Texas public schools are losing one out of four students. The statistics show that schools are twice as likely to lose Hispanic students and Black students before they graduate, and universal high school education is at least a quarter of a century away. The flyer also provides information on getting informed, getting…

  15. Associations between residential greenness and birth outcomes across Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Leanne; Larkin, Andrew; Carozza, Sue; Hystad, Perry

    2017-01-01

    The amount of greenness around mothers' residences has been associated with positive birth outcomes; however, findings are inconclusive. Here we examine residential greenness and birth outcomes in a population-based birth cohort in Texas, a state with large regional variation in greenness levels, several distinct cities, and a diverse population. We used Vital Statistics data to create a birth cohort (n=3,026,603) in Texas from 2000 to 2009. Greenness exposure measures were estimated from full residential addresses across nine months of pregnancy, and each trimester specifically, using the mean of corresponding MODIS satellite 16-day normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) surfaces at a 250m resolution, which have not been previously used. Logistic and linear mixed models were used to determine associations with preterm birth, small for gestational age (SGA) and term birth weight, controlling for individual and neighborhood factors. Unadjusted results demonstrated consistent protective effects of residential greenness on adverse birth outcomes for all of Texas and the four largest cities (Houston, San Antonio, Dallas, and Austin). However, in fully adjusted models these effects almost completely disappeared. For example, mothers with the highest (>0.52) compared to the lowest (Texas and diverse populations, we did not observe consistent associations between residential greenness and birth outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2013-14. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  17. Texas Hold’em : A Game of Skill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Genugten, B.B.; Borm, P.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of the detailed mathematical analysis of realistic approximations of Texas Hold’em cash games and tournaments as provided in [1] and [2], respectively, this paper reconfirms the findings of the court in The Hague [3] that on the basis of the methodology of relative skill it can be

  18. Everything's Bigger in Texas: Except the Medmal Settlements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Baker (Tom); E. Helland (Eric); J.M. Klick (Jonathan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractRecent work using Texas closed claim data finds that physicians are rarely required to use personal assets in medical malpractice settlements even when plaintiffs secure judgments above the physician's insurance limits. In equilibrium, this should lead physicians to purchase less

  19. Initial Results from the New Stress Map of Texas Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund Snee, J. E.; Zoback, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Modern techniques for characterizing tectonic stress orientation and relative magnitude have been successfully used for more than 35 years. Nevertheless, large areas of North America lack high spatial resolution maps of stress orientation, magnitude, and faulting regime. In Texas, for example, geothermal resources. This year, we launched the Texas Stress Map project to characterize tectonic stress patterns at higher spatial resolution across Texas and nearby areas. Following a successful effort just completed in Oklahoma, we will evaluate borehole breakouts, drilling-induced tensile fractures, shear wave anisotropy, and earthquake data. The principal data source will be FMI (fullbore formation microimager), UBI (ultrasonic borehole imager), cross-dipole sonic, density, and caliper logs provided by private industry. Earthquake moment tensor solutions from the U.S. Geological Survey, Saint Louis University and other sources will also be used. Our initial focus is on the Permian Basin and Barnett Shale petroleum plays due to the availability of data, but we will expand our analysis across the state as the project progresses. In addition, we hope to eventually apply the higher spatial resolution data coverage to understanding tectonic and geodynamic characteristics of the southwestern United States and northeastern Mexico. Here we present early results from our work to constrain stress orientations and faulting regime in and near Texas, and we also provide a roadmap for the ongoing research.

  20. Economic Analysis of Water Conservation Policies in the Texas Panhandle

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Robert H.; Almas, Lal K.; Colette, W. Arden

    2007-01-01

    Due to declining water availability from the Ogallala Aquifer, management policy alternatives for extending the life of the aquifer to sustain rural economies in the Texas Panhandle are evaluated. The study concludes that water conservation policies for the region significantly impact crop mix, resource usage, and net present value of farm profits over a sixty-year planning horizon.

  1. Incidense of spider mites in South Texas cotton fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of spider mites was evaluated· in four locations of south Texas between Progreso (Hidalgo Co.) to Bishop (Nueces Co.). This is an area with a south to north transect of 125 miles from south Progreso to north Bishop (respectively).The other two intermediate sampled locations were Harlin...

  2. Carbon monoxide exposures after hurricane Ike - Texas, September 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-14

    During power outages after hurricanes, survivors can be at risk for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning if they use portable generators improperly. On September 13, 2008, Hurricane Ike struck the coast of Texas, leaving approximately 2.3 million households in the southeastern portion of the state without electricity. Six days later, 1.3 million homes were still without electrical power. To assess the impact of storm-related CO exposures and to enhance prevention efforts, CDC analyzed data from five disparate surveillance sources on CO exposures reported during September 13--26 in counties of southeast Texas that were declared disaster areas by the federal government. This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that one data source, Texas poison centers, received reports of 54 persons with storm-related CO exposures during the surveillance period. Another data source, the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) hyperbaric oxygen treatment database, reported that 15 persons received hyperbaric oxygen treatment for storm-related CO poisoning. Medical examiners, public health officials, and hospitals in Texas reported that seven persons died from storm-related CO poisoning. Among the data sources, the percentage of reported storm-related CO exposures caused by improper generator use ranged from 82% to 87%. These findings underscore the need for effective prevention messages during storm preparation, warnings, and response periods regarding the correct use of generators and the installation and maintenance of battery-powered CO detectors.

  3. Delft Delta Design: The Houston Galveston Bay Region, Texas, USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kothuis, B.L.M.; Brand, A.D.; Sebastian, A.G.; Nillesen, A.L.; Jonkman, S.N.

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, Hurricane Ike devastated Bolivar Peninsula, narrowly missing the more heavily industrialized and populated areas in the region. In the aftermath of the hurricane, the Severe Storm Prediction, Education and Evacuation from Disasters (SSPEED) Center at Rice University in Houston, and Texas A&

  4. 75 FR 34445 - Audit Program for Texas Flexible Permit Holders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... regulatory stability for holders of Texas flexible permits. EPA is requesting informal comment on the Audit... implementation of the Audit Program at its discretion, as warranted. DATES: All comments should be submitted by...: Submit comments on the Audit Program, identified by Docket ID No. EPA-R06-OAR-2010-0510, by one of the...

  5. Chemical composition of acid precipitation in central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hal B. H., Jr. Cooper; Jerry M. Demo; Jose A. Lopez

    1976-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine factors affecting composition of acidic precipitation formation in the Austin area of Central Texas. The study was initiated to determine background levels of acid and alkalinity producing constituents in an area with elevated natural dust levels from nearby limestone rock formations. Results showed normal rainfall pH values of 6.5...

  6. 2014 Texas Military Value Task Force: Preparing for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    open communications. Fort Bliss coordinates any encroachment issues with White Sands Missile Range and Holloman AFB in New Mexico . NAS Corpus...Solutions of Central Texas, and Marriage Management.1 Fort Bliss community programs and services include Freedom Fiesta , El Paso Community College

  7. Economic analysis of water conservation policies in the Texas Panhandle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to declining water availability from the Ogallala Aquifer, management policy alternatives for extending the life of the aquifer to sustain rural economies in the Texas Panhandle are evaluated. The study concludes that water conservation policies for the region significantly impact crop mix, reso...

  8. Predicting Children's Asthma Hospitalizations: Rural and Urban Differences in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grineski, Sara E.

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is the number one chronic health condition facing children today; however, little is known about rural-urban inequalities in asthma. This "area effects on health" study examines rural-urban differences in childhood asthma hospitalizations within the state of Texas using negative binomial regression models. Effects associated with…

  9. Differences between the Texas phoenix palm phytoplasma and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ntushk

    Key words: nusA, hflB, phytoplasma, Texas Phoenix decline. INTRODUCTION .... The reagent made a total volume of 50 µL and the PCR reaction consisted of 35 cycles, ... The ligated PCR product was transformed into Top 10 chemically competent. Escherichia coli cells (Invitrogen Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA,. USA).

  10. Educational enhancements to the Texas High Plains Evapotranspiration (ET) network

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, an irrigation scheduling and management tool was developed for addressing large acreage and multiple field irrigated farms, particularly those in the Texas High Plains where the declining Ogallala Aquifer is the primary source of irrigation water. This tool, while providing in-season ...

  11. Feeding habits of songbirds in East Texas clearcuts during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald W. Worthington; R. Montague Jr. Whiting; James G. Dickson

    2004-01-01

    This east Texas study was undertaken to determine the importance of seeds of forbs, grasses, and woody shrubs to songbirds wintering in young pine plantations which had been established utilizing the clearcut regeneration system. The feeding habits and preferences of four species of songbirds, northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), song sparrows...

  12. Predicting Children's Asthma Hospitalizations: Rural and Urban Differences in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grineski, Sara E.

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is the number one chronic health condition facing children today; however, little is known about rural-urban inequalities in asthma. This "area effects on health" study examines rural-urban differences in childhood asthma hospitalizations within the state of Texas using negative binomial regression models. Effects associated with…

  13. Dimensions of Inservice Education. The Texas Teacher Corps Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, H. Jerome, Ed.; Olivarez, Ruben Dario, Ed.

    This collection of articles offers viewpoints on issues, concerns, and processes related to the teacher education activities of Teacher Corps Projects in the state of Texas. The first section sets forth a definition for inservice education, a perspective of its past, present, and future, and the impact of innovations on teacher and teacher…

  14. Programmatic Issues in Teacher Education: The Texas Teacher Corps Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivarez, Ruben Dario, Ed.

    Various aspects of program planning and implementation in the Texas Teacher Corps Network are explored. The following topics are covered: 1) program conceptualization and design; 2) intern and team leader recruitment; 3) Teacher Corps experiences dealing with graduate admission processes and their implications for change; 4) management of Teacher…

  15. Mission Possible: Spy a Book! 2003 Texas Reading Club Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Adriana Flores; Ingham, Donna; McDermott, Joe; Meyer, Sally; Parrish, Leila; Schill, Victor; Trevino, Rose

    The purpose of this manual for the 2003 Texas Reading Club, "Mission Possible: Spy a Book!" is to assist library staff who serve youth by suggesting ideas for programs that will attract children to the library. The following chapters are included: (1) Marketing, Cooperation and PR; (2) Serving Children with Disabilities; (3) Theme Songs;…

  16. Rural Teacher's Perceptions of Safety on Texas High School Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ronald J., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study used narrative inquiry to explore the perceptions of safety of rural Texas high school teachers as it related to a campus intruder or active shooter. The investigator utilized Creswell's (2012) six steps in analyzing and interpreting the qualitative data. The results of the study showed that…

  17. Reforming Preparation Programs for Leadership Improvement: The Case of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Elizabeth Murakami; Byng, June; Garza, Encarnacion; Thompson, David P.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a case of how changes in standards for principal certification--as required by the State Board of Educator Certification since its establishment in 1995--were meant to promote changes in principal preparation programs in the state of Texas. The examination considers whether the changes were significant in terms of intended…

  18. Statewide Factbook: Community and Technical Colleges of Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin. Div. of Community and Technical Colleges.

    Included in this statewide factbook for Texas community and technical colleges are the following eight sections, each with its own summary analysis. Section 1 reports on the annual headcount enrollment, which includes academic year 1994-1995 enrollment charts by type of major, gender, race/ethnicity, and tuition status, and a chart for enrollment…

  19. Measuring Customer Satisfaction. A Central Texas JTPA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, P. Linda

    A study was conducted to determine the baseline by which to measure expected improvements in customer satisfaction for Central Texas Job Training Partnership (JTPA) programs. The survey was designed to facilitate assessment of the current level of customer satisfaction with service delivery and influences on customer satisfaction. Data were…

  20. Degrees of Separation: Latino Students' Transitions to a Texas HBCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Taryn Ozuna; Stone, Ashley N.

    2016-01-01

    A successful transition to college is the foundation for future academic success, and this process is particularly important for a quickly growing Latino population. This qualitative study explored the transitional experiences of eight Latino students who enrolled in a historically Black university in Texas. Focusing specifically on their…

  1. Closing the Gaps: 2015. The Texas Higher Education Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Texas is profiting from a diverse, vibrant and growing economy. Yet this prosperity could turn to crisis if steps are not taken quickly to ensure an educated population and workforce for the future. At present, the proportion of Texans enrolled in higher education is declining. Too few higher education programs are noted for excellence and too few…

  2. Texas Occurrence of Lyme Disease and Its Neurological Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandashi, Jad A; Nizamutdinov, Damir; Dayawansa, Samantha; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Huang, Jason H

    2016-06-01

    Today, Lyme disease is the most commonly reported tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. The culprits behind Lyme disease are the Borrelia species of bacteria. In the USA, Borrelia burgdorferi causes the majority of cases, while in Europe and Asia Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii carry the greatest burden of disease. The clinical manifestations of Lyme disease have been identified as early localized, early disseminated, and late chronic. The neurological effects of Lyme disease include both peripheral and central nervous systems involvement, including focal nerve abnormalities, cranial neuropathies, painful radiculoneuritis, meningitis, and/or toxic metabolic encephalopathy, known as Lyme encephalopathy. Given the geographic predominance of Lyme disease in the Northeast and Midwest of the USA, no major studies have been conducted regarding Southern states. Between 2005 and 2014, the Center for Disease Control has reported 582 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Texas. Because of the potential for increased incidence and prevalence in Texas, it has become essential for research and clinical efforts to be diverted to the region. The Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Lyme Lab has been investigating the ecology of Lyme disease in Texas and developing a pan-specific serological test for Lyme diagnosis. This report aimed to exposure materials and raise awareness of Lyme disease to healthcare providers.

  3. Texas Agricultural Science Teachers' Attitudes toward Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ryan; Williams, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The researchers sought to find the Agricultural Science teachers' attitude toward five innovations (Computer-Aided Design, Record Books, E-Mail Career Development Event Registration, and World Wide Web) of information technology. The population for this study consisted of all 333 secondary Agricultural science teachers from Texas FFA Areas V and…

  4. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Texas. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater, and…

  5. Economic Analysis of Water Conservation Policies in the Texas Panhandle

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Robert H.; Almas, Lal K.; Colette, W. Arden

    2007-01-01

    Due to declining water availability from the Ogallala Aquifer, management policy alternatives for extending the life of the aquifer to sustain rural economies in the Texas Panhandle are evaluated. The study concludes that water conservation policies for the region significantly impact crop mix, resource usage, and net present value of farm profits over a sixty-year planning horizon.

  6. Racial Threat and White Opposition to Bilingual Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Lynn M.; Dowling, Julie A.; Boardman, Jason D.; Ellison, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines local contextual conditions that influence opposition to bilingual education among non-Hispanic Whites, net of individual-level characteristics. Data from the Texas Poll (N = 615) are used in conjunction with U.S. Census data to test five competing hypotheses using binomial and multinomial logistic regression models. Our…

  7. Woodland Birds in Three Different Forest Types in Eastern Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford E. Shackelford; Richard N. Conner

    1996-01-01

    Birds were censusedalong three routes through relatively mature forest in eastern Texas using the fixed circular plot technique. The routes sampled three forest types (based on tree species composition): (1)longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) Savannah, (2) mixed pine-hardwood forest, and (3) bottomland hardwood forest. Each route consisted of 20 plots censused twice...

  8. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Texas. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater, and…

  9. Report of the Select Committee on Higher Education, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    A report of a study of issues in public higher education in Texas is presented, along with recommendations of the Select Committee on Higher Education to improve access, quality, and management. Attention is directed to: institutional role and mission statements, general funding policies, research and technology funding, faculty compensation,…

  10. Real Estate Education in Community Colleges: The Texas Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Robert

    The paper describes courses and enrollments for the 43 Texas community colleges offering real estate courses during the 1973-74 school year. The most frequently offered courses were principles, appraisal, finance, law, practice, and brokerage. Results of questionnaire surveys of the 43 community colleges indicate a larger part-time enrollment by…

  11. 78 FR 8960 - Texas (Splenetic) Fever in Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... vectors for bovine babesiosis. The disease is referred to in the regulations as splenetic or tick fever... capable of transmitting microscopic parasites (Babesia) that cause bovine babesiosis. We are amending the..., Texas fever, bovine piroplasmosis, redwater, and bovine babesiosis all refer to the same disease...

  12. Middle Level Best Practice and Student Achievement in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dawn Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the implementation level of best practice strategies for middle level education in the state of Texas described by This We Believe (AMLE, 2010) and to determine the relationship of those practices with the schools' academic achievement in math and reading. A survey was distributed to principals of all…

  13. Why Minority Recruiting Is Alive and Well in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selingo, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    Capitalizing on the ban on affirmative action in college admissions in Texas, a number of out-of-state colleges are aggressively recruiting in that state and offering generous financial aid packages. Oklahoma was one of the first states to do so. For many students, financial aid makes the difference in college attendance. (MSE)

  14. Reforming Preparation Programs for Leadership Improvement: The Case of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Elizabeth Murakami; Byng, June; Garza, Encarnacion; Thompson, David P.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a case of how changes in standards for principal certification--as required by the State Board of Educator Certification since its establishment in 1995--were meant to promote changes in principal preparation programs in the state of Texas. The examination considers whether the changes were significant in terms of intended…

  15. "Robin Hood" on Ropes in Texas School Aid Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Texas has had its Robin Hood school financing system in place since 1993, when the legislature adopted the system in response to a state supreme court order to equalize state spending on public schools. Under the arrangement, any district that has taxable property values exceeding $305,000 per student is not allowed to keep all of its property-tax…

  16. Rural Teacher's Perceptions of Safety on Texas High School Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ronald J., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study used narrative inquiry to explore the perceptions of safety of rural Texas high school teachers as it related to a campus intruder or active shooter. The investigator utilized Creswell's (2012) six steps in analyzing and interpreting the qualitative data. The results of the study showed that…

  17. 76 FR 49760 - Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... section 7(b) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) for authorization to abandon in place four reciprocating compressor units with a total of 4,400 horsepower and related appurtenances at Station No. 21-A of its Uniontown Compressor Station located in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. Texas Eastern states that there...

  18. Violent Women: Findings from the Texas Women Inmates Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Joycelyn M.; Mullings, Janet L.; Crouch, Ben M.

    2006-01-01

    Prior research on violent crime by female offenders is reviewed. A Texas female prisoner sample is used to explore specific questions raised by the literature review. Violent and nonviolent offenders were compared, looking specifically at race, socioeconomic status, having been raised in single-parent homes, criminal history, gang membership,…

  19. Tight Focus on Instruction Wins Texas District Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    It took a while for four-time finalist Aldine, Texas, to win the Broad Prize for Urban Education. But it took even longer to craft the system that ultimately put the district over the top. Educators in Aldine district have been working for more than a decade to refine their "managed instruction" system. Reviewers examined how the school district,…

  20. Texas State Department of Health Migrant Project. Annual Report 1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Dept. of Health Resources, Austin.

    The Texas Migrant Health Project under the State Department of Health aims to: (1) promote and improve medical, dental, and public health services for the domestic agricultural worker and his dependents and (2) encourage and support migrant efforts to participate in and be responsible for personal and family health. During 1969-70, the state was…

  1. A Critical Policy Analysis of Texas' "Closing the Gaps 2015"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Katherine Cumings; Thackik, Stefani Leigh

    2016-01-01

    This critical policy analysis uses critical race theory to provide a counter narrative to the P-16 initiative in Texas known as "Closing the Gaps 2015". Findings indicate that while these reforms aim to increase educational access and achievement for people of color, they fall short of addressing systemic inequities such as enduring…

  2. Biscalitheca suzanneana, N. Sp., from the uppermost Pennsylvanian of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamay, S.H.

    1972-01-01

    Biscalitheca suzanneana, n. sp., is described from specimens found in an uppermost Pennsylvanian deposit in north-central Texas. The genus was identified primarily on the basis of impressions of the unique sporangial annuli. The occurrence establishes for Biscalitheca a stratigraphic range equivalent to nearly the entire Upper Pennsylvanian Series. ?? 1972.

  3. 78 FR 12010 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Pearsall, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Pearsall, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications....415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal...

  4. 76 FR 65775 - Environmental Impact Statement: Harris County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Harris County, Texas AGENCY: Federal... this notice to advise the public that an environmental impact statement (EIS) will be prepared for the... Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). FOR FURTHER...

  5. Wildlife Contact Rates at Artificial Feeding Sites in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Tyler A.; Long, David B.; Shriner, Susan A.

    2013-06-01

    Given the popularity of feeding white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus) in Texas and the increasing amount of corn that is distributed, more information is needed on the impacts of this activity on non-target wildlife. Our objectives were to report visitation, intra- and interspecific contact, and contact rates of wildlife at artificial feeding sites in Texas. Our study was conducted at three sites in Kleberg and Nueces counties, Texas. We trapped animals from February to April and August to September, 2009 and marked animals with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. At each site and season, we placed one feeder system containing a PIT tag reader within 600 m of trap locations. Readers detected PIT tags from a distance of 25 cm. We determined a contact event to occur when two different PIT tags were detected by feeder systems within 5 s. We recorded 62,719 passes by raccoons ( Procyon lotor), 103,512 passes by collared peccaries ( Pecari tajacu), 2,923 passes by feral swine ( Sus scrofa), 1,336 passes by fox squirrels ( Sciurus niger), and no passes by opossums ( Didelphis virginiana) at feeder systems. For site-season combinations in which contact events occurred, we found intraspecific contact rates (contacts per day) for raccoons, collared peccaries, and feral swine to be 0.81-124.77, 0.69-38.08, and 0.0-0.66, respectively. Throughout our study we distributed ~2,625 kg of whole kernel corn, which resulted in 6,351 contact events between marked wildlife (2.4 contacts per kg of corn). If 136 million kg of corn is distributed in Texas annually, we would expect >5.2 billion unnatural contact events between wildlife would result from this activity each year in Texas. Consequently, we do not believe that it is wise for natural resource managers to maintain artificial feeding sites for white-tailed deer or other wildlife due to pathogen transmission risks.

  6. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

  7. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

  8. Evaluations of NOx and highly reactive VOC emission inventories in Texas and their implications for ozone plume simulations during the Texas Air Quality Study 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.; McKeen, S. A.; Frost, G. J.; Lee, S.-H.; Trainer, M.; Richter, A.; Angevine, W. M.; Atlas, E.; Bianco, L.; Boersma, K. F.; Brioude, J.; Burrows, J. P.; de Gouw, J.; Fried, A.; Gleason, J.; Hilboll, A.; Mellqvist, J.; Peischl, J.; Richter, D.; Rivera, C.; Ryerson, T.; Te Lintel Hekkert, S.; Walega, J.; Warneke, C.; Weibring, P.; Williams, E.

    2011-11-01

    Satellite and aircraft observations made during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) detected strong urban, industrial and power plant plumes in Texas. We simulated these plumes using the Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model with input from the US EPA's 2005 National Emission Inventory (NEI-2005), in order to evaluate emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the cities of Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth. We compared the model results with satellite retrievals of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns and airborne in-situ observations of several trace gases including NOx and a number of VOCs. The model and satellite NO2 columns agree well for regions with large power plants and for urban areas that are dominated by mobile sources, such as Dallas. However, in Houston, where significant mobile, industrial, and in-port marine vessel sources contribute to NOx emissions, the model NO2 columns are approximately 50%-70% higher than the satellite columns. Similar conclusions are drawn from comparisons of the model results with the TexAQS 2006 aircraft observations in Dallas and Houston. For Dallas plumes, the model-simulated NO2 showed good agreement with the aircraft observations. In contrast, the model-simulated NO2 is ~60% higher than the aircraft observations in the Houston plumes. Further analysis indicates that the NEI-2005 NOx emissions over the Houston Ship Channel area are overestimated while the urban Houston NOx emissions are reasonably represented. The comparisons of model and aircraft observations confirm that highly reactive VOC emissions originating from industrial sources in Houston are underestimated in NEI-2005. The update of VOC emissions based on Solar Occultation Flux measurements during the field campaign leads to improved model simulations of ethylene, propylene, and formaldehyde. Reducing NOx emissions in the Houston Ship Channel and increasing highly reactive VOC emissions

  9. Evaluations of NOx and highly reactive VOC emission inventories in Texas and their implications for ozone plume simulations during the Texas Air Quality Study 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ryerson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite and aircraft observations made during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS detected strong urban, industrial and power plant plumes in Texas. We simulated these plumes using the Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry (WRF-Chem model with input from the US EPA's 2005 National Emission Inventory (NEI-2005, in order to evaluate emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the cities of Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth. We compared the model results with satellite retrievals of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2 columns and airborne in-situ observations of several trace gases including NOx and a number of VOCs. The model and satellite NO2 columns agree well for regions with large power plants and for urban areas that are dominated by mobile sources, such as Dallas. However, in Houston, where significant mobile, industrial, and in-port marine vessel sources contribute to NOx emissions, the model NO2 columns are approximately 50%–70% higher than the satellite columns. Similar conclusions are drawn from comparisons of the model results with the TexAQS 2006 aircraft observations in Dallas and Houston. For Dallas plumes, the model-simulated NO2 showed good agreement with the aircraft observations. In contrast, the model-simulated NO2 is ~60% higher than the aircraft observations in the Houston plumes. Further analysis indicates that the NEI-2005 NOx emissions over the Houston Ship Channel area are overestimated while the urban Houston NOx emissions are reasonably represented. The comparisons of model and aircraft observations confirm that highly reactive VOC emissions originating from industrial sources in Houston are underestimated in NEI-2005. The update of VOC emissions based on Solar Occultation Flux measurements during the field campaign leads to improved model simulations of ethylene, propylene, and formaldehyde. Reducing NOx emissions in the Houston Ship Channel and increasing highly

  10. Evaluations of NOx and highly reactive VOC emission inventories in Texas and their implications for ozone plume simulations during the Texas Air Quality Study 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ryerson

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Satellite and aircraft observations made during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS detected strong urban, industrial and power plant plumes in Texas. We simulated these plumes using the Weather Research and Forecasting – Chemistry (WRF-Chem model with input from the US EPA's 2005 National Emission Inventory (NEI-2005, in order to evaluate emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the cities of Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth. We compared the model results with satellite retrievals of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2 columns and airborne in-situ observations of several trace gases including NOx and a number of VOCs. The model and satellite NO2 columns agree well for regions with large power plants and for urban areas that are dominated by mobile sources, such as Dallas. However, in Houston, where significant mobile, industrial, and in-port marine vessel sources contribute to NOx emissions, the model NO2 columns are approximately 50 %–70 % higher than the satellite columns. Similar conclusions are drawn from comparisons of the model results with the TexAQS 2006 aircraft observations in Dallas and Houston. For Dallas plumes, the model-simulated NO2 showed good agreement with the aircraft observations. In contrast, the model-simulated NO2 is ~60 % higher than the aircraft observations in the Houston plumes. Further analysis indicates that the NEI-2005 NOx emissions over the Houston Ship Channel area are overestimated while the urban Houston NOx emissions are reasonably represented. The comparisons of model and aircraft observations confirm that highly reactive VOC emissions originating from industrial sources in Houston are underestimated in NEI-2005. The update of VOC emissions based on Solar Occultation Flux measurements during the field campaign leads to improved model simulations of ethylene, propylene, and formaldehyde. Reducing NOx emissions in the Houston Ship Channel and increasing highly

  11. Space Radar Image of Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This image of Houston, Texas, shows the amount of detail that is possible to obtain using spaceborne radar imaging. Images such as this -- obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying aboard the space shuttle Endeavor last fall -- can become an effective tool for urban planners who map and monitor land use patterns in urban, agricultural and wetland areas. Central Houston appears pink and white in the upper portion of the image, outlined and crisscrossed by freeways. The image was obtained on October 10, 1994, during the space shuttle's 167th orbit. The area shown is 100 kilometers by 60 kilometers (62 miles by 38 miles) and is centered at 29.38 degrees north latitude, 95.1 degrees west longitude. North is toward the upper left. The pink areas designate urban development while the green-and blue-patterned areas are agricultural fields. Black areas are bodies of water, including Galveston Bay along the right edge and the Gulf of Mexico at the bottom of the image. Interstate 45 runs from top to bottom through the image. The narrow island at the bottom of the image is Galveston Island, with the city of Galveston at its northeast (right) end. The dark cross in the upper center of the image is Hobby Airport. Ellington Air Force Base is visible below Hobby on the other side of Interstate 45. Clear Lake is the dark body of water in the middle right of the image. The green square just north of Clear Lake is Johnson Space Center, home of Mission Control and the astronaut training facilities. The black rectangle with a white center that appears to the left of the city center is the Houston Astrodome. The colors in this image were obtained using the follow radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); green represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received). Spaceborne Imaging Radar

  12. 78 FR 49305 - Luminant Generation Company LLC, Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Luminant Generation Company LLC, Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2; Application... Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2, respectively, located in Somervell County, Texas. The...

  13. 76 FR 55638 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Snowy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding... Kansas; the southern Texas coast into northeast Mexico; and the central Mexican plateau) (AOU 1957, pp... of plants, and any distinct population segment of any species of vertebrate fish or wildlife...

  14. School Social Workers in Texas: A Comparative Demographic Analysis of the Texas-Mexico Border and Non-Border Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Cecilia; Landeck, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the role of school social workers as potential agents of change in the educational system, with a special focus on their major demographic characteristics in Texas and along the Mexico border region. The border region of the state has chronic poverty and limited educational attainment levels and demonstrates a need for…

  15. Draft Environmental Impact Statement Disposal and Reuse of Carswell AFB, Texas. Disposal and Reuse of Carswell Air Force Base, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    a building through small spaces and openings, accumulating in enclosed areas, such as basements. The cancer risk caused by exposure, through the...asper Texas speargrass Stipa leucotricha "* Herbs and Shrubs Ragweed Amerosia spp. Milkweed Asciepias spp. Trumpet creeper Campsis radicans Water...illness, cancer , stroke, hypertension, sudden cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrhythmias. Of these, hypertension is the most

  16. Actions to control high blood pressure among hypertensive adults in Texas counties along the Mexico border: Texas BRFSS, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Carma; Fang, Jing; Escobedo, Luis; Pan, Stephen; Balcazar, Hector G; Wang, Guijing; Merritt, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We examined the prevalence of actions taken to control blood pressure as measured by taking antihypertensive medication or making lifestyle modifications among hypertensive adults residing along the Texas/Mexico border. We used self-reported data from the 2007 Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, with oversampling of border counties. We calculated the age-standardized prevalence of actions taken to control hypertension by selected characteristics. In analyses that combined ethnicity with predominant language spoken, those least likely to take any action to control their blood pressure--either by taking an antihypertensive medication or by making any of four lifestyle modifications--were Spanish-speaking Hispanic people (83.2% ± 2.7% standard error [SE]), with English-speaking non-Hispanic people (88.9% ± 0.8% SE) having the highest prevalence of taking action to control blood pressure. When analyzed by type of medical category, uninsured Hispanic people (63.8% ± 4.8% SE) had the lowest prevalence of taking action to control their blood pressure compared with uninsured non-Hispanic people (75.4% ± 4.7% SE). Nonborder Texas residents with hypertension were more likely to take antihypertensive medications (78.4% ± 1.0% SE) than border county residents with hypertension (70.7% ± 2.0% SE). Public health efforts must be undertaken to improve the control of hypertension among residents of Texas counties along the Mexico border, particularly for uninsured Hispanic people.

  17. 75 FR 36710 - The Texas Engineering Experiment Station/Texas A&M University System; Notice of Acceptance for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... Manager, Research and Test Reactors Licensing Branch, Division of Policy and Rulemaking, Office of Nuclear... Facility Operating License No. R-83 (``Application''), which currently authorizes the Texas Engineering... (NSC) Reactor at a maximum steady- state thermal power of 1,000 kilowatts (kW) thermal power....

  18. A Reference Handbook of the Texas Health Professions and their Support Personnel; The Health Professions in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Nurses Association.

    The fields of dentistry, dietetics, medicine, medical technology, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physical therapy, and social work are defined in the handbook. The entrance requirements, educational institutions, and licensure regulations in Texas are treated for each major and allied support field. The functions or types of…

  19. School Social Workers in Texas: A Comparative Demographic Analysis of the Texas-Mexico Border and Non-Border Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Cecilia; Landeck, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the role of school social workers as potential agents of change in the educational system, with a special focus on their major demographic characteristics in Texas and along the Mexico border region. The border region of the state has chronic poverty and limited educational attainment levels and demonstrates a need for…

  20. NFLUENCE OF PLANTING DEPTHS ON THE INCIDENCE OF SORGHUM HEAD SMUT, CAUSED BY Sporisorium reilianum

    OpenAIRE

    Louis K. Prom; Noe Montes-Garcia; Gary N. Odvody

    2014-01-01

    Th e study was conducted at the Texas A M Experiment Station in Beeville, TX, to determine the effect of planting depths on the incidence of sorghum head smut . In both years, the incidence of head smut decreased with planting depth. In year 1, no significant difference in head smut incidence was noted in the different planting depths; whereas, in year 2, the number of smutted plants was two - fold and three - fol d higher at 6 cm planting depth than at the 15 cm and 22 cm planting depths. Th...

  1. Monitoring indicators of harmful cyanobacteria in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesling, Richard L.; Gary, Robin H.; Gary, Marcus O.

    2008-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms can occur when certain types of microscopic algae grow quickly in water, forming visible patches that might harm the health of the environment, plants, or animals. In freshwater, species of Cyanobacteria (also known as bluegreen algae) are the dominant group of harmful, bloom-forming algae. When Cyanobacteria form a harmful algal bloom, potential impairments include restricted recreational activities because of algal scums or algal mats, potential loss of public water supply because of taste and odor compounds (for example, geosmin), and the production of toxins (for example, microcystin) in amounts capable of threatening human health and wildlife.

  2. Probabilistic seismic hazard characterization and design parameters for the Pantex Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernreuter, D. L.; Foxall, W.; Savy, J. B.

    1998-10-19

    The Hazards Mitigation Center at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) updated the seismic hazard and design parameters at the Pantex Plant. The probabilistic seismic hazard (PSH) estimates were first updated using the latest available data and knowledge from LLNL (1993, 1998), Frankel et al. (1996), and other relevant recent studies from several consulting companies. Special attention was given to account for the local seismicity and for the system of potentially active faults associated with the Amarillo-Wichita uplift. Aleatory (random) uncertainty was estimated from the available data and the epistemic (knowledge) uncertainty was taken from results of similar studies. Special attention was given to soil amplification factors for the site. Horizontal Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) and 5% damped uniform hazard spectra were calculated for six return periods (100 yr., 500 yr., 1000 yr., 2000 yr., 10,000 yr., and 100,000 yr.). The design parameters were calculated following DOE standards (DOE-STD-1022 to 1024). Response spectra for design or evaluation of Performance Category 1 through 4 structures, systems, and components are presented.

  3. Synopsis of wetland functions and values: bottomland hardwoods with special emphasis on eastern Texas and Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, D.L.; Schneller-McDonald, K.; Olson, R.W.; Auble, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    hardwoods and downstream through detrital export. A large number of studies detail the extensive utilization of bottomland hardwoods by animals. Several basic habitat components contribute to this support function, including: 1. Fluctuating water levels and permanent bodies of water, 2. Hard mast (e.g., acorns), 3. Dens and cavities, 4. High soil fertility, 5. Diversity of food and cover, 6. Predominance of woody plant communities, 7. Close proximity of diverse structural features, and 8. Linear features providing movement corridors. The second section of the report focuses on the bottomlands of eastern Texas and Oklahoma, including topics such as climate, soils, water resources, historical perspective, vegetation, and fauna. Considerable attention is given to structural characteristics in this section, in order to provide contrasts with bottomland hardwood ecosystems in other areas. In general, the bottomland hardwoods of eastern Texas and Oklahoma are very similar to those elsewhere in the southeastern United States. Differences include the occurrence and relative importance of some community types and plant species and the greater importance of reservoir construction as a source of bottomland hardwoods loss in eastern Texas and Oklahoma. Again, information on faunal utilization is extensive relative to the information available concerning other functions.

  4. Addiction treatment outcomes, process and change: Texas Institute of Behavioral Research at Texas Christian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D Dwayne; Joe, George W; Dansereau, Donald F; Flynn, Patrick M

    2011-10-01

    For more than 40 years the Texas Institute of Behavioral Research (IBR) has given special attention to assessment and evaluation of drug user populations, addiction treatment services and various cognitive and behavioral interventions. Emphasis has been on studies in real-world settings and the use of multivariate methodologies to address evaluation issues within the context of longitudinal natural designs. Historically, its program of addiction treatment research may be divided into three sequential epochs-the first era dealt mainly with client assessment and its role in treatment outcome and evaluation (1969-89), the second focused upon modeling the treatment process and the importance of conceptual frameworks (1989-2009) in explaining the relationships among treatment environment, client attributes, treatment process and outcome, and the third (and current) era has expanded into studying tactical deployment of innovations and implementation. Recent projects focus upon adapting and implementing innovations for improving early engagement in adolescent residential treatment settings and drug-dependent criminal justice populations. Related issues include the spread of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome and other infectious diseases, organizational and systems functioning, treatment costs and process related to implementation of evidence-based practices.

  5. Reflectance-Based Estimation of Soil Heat Fluxes in the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, P. H.; Colaizzi, P. D.; O'Shaughnessy, S.; Ha, W.; Howell, T. A.

    2010-12-01

    Soil heat flux (G) is one of the terms required for estimating evapotranspiration rates using an energy balance. Numerous reflectance-based models are available in the literature for estimating G fluxes. However, these models have shown wide variation in their performance. Therefore, operational ET remote sensing programs may require locally developed/calibrated models for accurately estimating G. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate reflectance-based empirical G models for the semi-arid Texas High Plains. Soil heat flux was measured at 0.15 hz interval and averaged every 15 minutes at five different locations within a 4.7 ha lysimeter field with Pullman clay loam soil during the 2010 summer growing season. The field was planted to soybean and managed under dryland conditions. In each location, G was measured at 8 cm depth with two Campbell Scientific HFT3 soil heat flux plates. Soil temperature was measured at 2 and 6 cm above the soil heat flux plates. Soil moisture was measured in the 2-8 cm layer using Acclima SDI-12 sensors. Hourly G fluxes at the surface were calculated by adding the measured G fluxes at 8 cm to the energy stored above the heat flux plates. A multispectral radiometer (MSR, CROPSCAN, Inc.) and hand-held thermometer (EVEREST Interscience Inc.) measured surface reflectance in red and near infrared bandwidths and surface temperature (ST), respectively, daily at 11:30 AM CST to be consistent with the Landsat 5 overpass time. Fraction crop cover (FC) was measured by digital photographs taken twice a week. A set of G models was developed for estimating hourly fluxes based on measured reflectance, net radiation, ST, NDVI, and FC,. Resulting models were compared for performance with existing models available in the literature. In this presentation, we will discuss our G models for the Texas High Plains and the statistical results.

  6. State power plant productivity programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    The findings of a working group formed to review the status of efforts by utilities and utility regulators to increase the availability and reliability of generating units are presented. Representatives from nine state regulatory agencies, NRRI, and DOE, participated on the Working Group. The Federal government has been working cooperatively with utilities, utility organizations, and with regulators to encourage and facilitate improvements in power plant productivity. Cooperative projects undertaken with regulatory and energy commissions in California, Illinois, New York, Ohio, Texas, North Carolina and Mighigan are described. Following initiation of these cooperative projects, DOE funded a survey to determine which states were explicitly addressing power plant productivity through the regulatory process. The Working Group was formed following completion of this survey. The Working Group emphasized the need for those power plant productivity improvements which are cost effective. The cost effectiveness of proposed availability improvement projects should be determined within the context of opportunities for operating and capital improvements available to an entire utility. The Working Group also identified the need for: allowing for plant designs that have a higher construction cost, but are also more reliable; allowing for recovery and reducing recovery lags for productivity-related capital expenditures; identifying and reducing disincentives in the regulatory process; ascertaining that utilities have sufficient money available to undertake timely maintenance; and support of EPRI and NERC to develop a relevant and accurate national data base. The DOE views these as extremely important aspects of any regulatory program to improve power plant productivity.

  7. V-54 A, nueva variedad de maíz de grano amarillo para siembras de temporal retrasado en Valles altos de México V-54 A, new variety of yellow grain maize for delayed rainfall in highland areas in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Espinosa Calderón

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available En los Valles Altos de la Mesa Central de México ubicados en altitudes de 2 200 a 2 600 m, se cultivan cerca de 1.5 millones de hectáreas con maíz, lo que representa cerca del 20% de la superficie nacional establecida con esta especie, de esta extensión 800 000 hectáreas se cultiva en temporal estricto, el cual generalmente se presenta en forma tardía, lo que limita la fecha de siembra y con ello la productividad del cultivo. En el estado de México, de las 600 000 hectáreas que se siembran con maíz se estima que en 300 000 de ellas la productividad es limitada (1.2 t ha-1, por el temporal limitado y fecha de siembra tardía, que frecuentemente coincide con la incidencia de heladas tempranas. Una opción para estas condiciones lo representa el uso de variedades de ciclo corto, que aprovechen las condiciones agroclimáticas disponibles; sin embargo, es limitada la oferta de este tipo de variedades, usándose por lo general variedades criollas. Las anteriores variedades mejoradas liberadas fueron V-26 A (Cuapiaxtla, no usándose comercialmente en la actualidad, la otra variedad denominada Amarillo Zanahoria, liberada por ICAMEX en 1990, tampoco se emplea actualmente.In Highland Valleys of Mexico is located in altitudes of 2 200 to 2 600 masl, they are cultivated near 1.5 million hectares with maize, which represents near 20% of the established national surface with this species, of this extension 800 000 hectares is cultivated in strict weather, which appears generally in delayed form, which in this way limits the date of sowing and the productivity of the culture. In the State of Mexico, of the 600 000 hectares that seed with maize esteem that in 300 000 of them the productivity is limited (1.2 t ha-1, by the limited rainfall and date of delayed sowing, that frequently agrees with the incidence of early frosts. An option for these conditions represents the use of varieties of short cycle, that take advantage of the agroclimatic conditions

  8. Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor.

  9. Controls of Carbon Preservation in Coastal Wetlands of Texas: Mangrove vs. Saltmarsh Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterne, A. M. E.; Louchouarn, P.; Norwood, M. J.; Kaiser, K.

    2014-12-01

    The estimated magnitude of the carbon (C) stocks contained in the first meter of US coastal wetland soils represents ~10% of the entire C stock in US soils (4 vs. 52 Pg, respectively). Because this stock extends to several meters below the surface for many coastal wetlands, it becomes paramount to understand the fate of C under ecosystem shifts, varying natural environmental constraints, and changing land use. In this project we analyze total hydrolysable carbohydrates, amino acids, phenols and stable isotopic data (δ13C) at two study sites located on the Texas coastline to investigate chemical compositions and the stage of decomposition in mangrove and marsh grass dominated wetlands. Carbohydrates are used as specific decomposition indicators of the polysaccharide component of wetland plants, whereas amino acids are used to identify the contribution of microbial biomass, and acid/aldehyde ratios of syringyl (S) and vanillyl (V) phenols (Ac/AlS,V) follow the decomposition of lignin. Preliminary results show carbohydrates account for 30-50 % of organic carbon in plant litter and surface sediments at both sites. Sharp declines of carbohydrate yields with depth occur parallel to increasing Ac/AlS,V ratios indicating substantial decomposition of both the polysaccharide and lignin components of litter detritus. Ecological differences (between marsh grass and mangrove dominated wetlands) are discussed to better constrain the role of litter biochemistry and ecological shifts on C preservation in these anoxic environments.

  10. The micromorphology of Younger Dryas-aged black mats from Nevada, Arizona, Texas and New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Parks, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Black mats are organic-rich sediments and soils that form in wet environments associated with spring discharge. Micromorphological and geochemical analyses of 25 black mats dating to the Younger Dryas Chronozone (12.9-11.7 ka) and early Holocene were conducted to determine their composition and depositional environment. Samples were collected from Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and Nevada. Micromorphological analyses were conducted on thin sections using polarized and blue fluorescent light. These analyses determined that black mats contain humic acids, fine (5-20 μm) plant fragments, diatoms, phytoliths, and gastropods. The dominant type of organic matter in black mats is derived from herbaceous plants, contradicting previous studies that supported algal or charcoal sources. Differences in the micromorphological characteristics of the samples revealed that black mats formed as three different types, organic horizons, moist soils and, ponded sediments, depending on their topographic position in relation to the water table. The microscopic evidence found in black mats supports the presence of widespread wet environments in Nevada and Arizona during the Younger Dryas Chronozone, clearly indicating a sustained period of greater effective moisture, optimal for spring discharge and black mat formation.

  11. Minority Talent Loss and the Texas Top 10% Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Sunny Xinchun; Sullivan, Teresa; Tienda, Marta

    2008-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine how knowledge about the Texas top 10% law influences college enrollment decisions of high achieving students minority and nonminority students. DATA AND METHODS: Using a representative survey of graduates from Texas public high schools in 2002, we compare self-reported and transcript-verified class rank and estimate probit models to assess the likelihood that top-ranked minority students know about the law. RESULTS: Family socioeconomic status largely explains why highly ranked black and Hispanic students know less about the top 10% law than comparable whites, but parents' lack of fluency in English is a significant information barrier for college-bound, top 10% Hispanic students from predominantly minority high schools. Nearly one-fifth of college-oriented black and Hispanic top 10% seniors who did not know about the law failed to enroll anywhere. CONCLUSION: Inadequate information about the top 10% law undermines enrollment of talented minorities in higher education.

  12. Texas Instruments Technical Seminar: Power Management and Wireless

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Monday 6 November TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR 14:00 to 17:30 - Training Centre Auditorium (bldg. 593) Texas Instruments Technical Seminar: Power Management and Wireless Michael Scholtholt, Field Application Engineer / TEXAS INSTRUMENTS (US, D, CH) The range of power management products available today offers the possibility to find the best solution for each application. To select the right product it is therefore necessary to understand system requirements, how power supply products work, and where they differentiate. This Technical Training Seminar will also present an overview of how to choose the right RF platform based on markets and applications: nowadays almost everbody has at least one wireless product in use, and this tendency seems to increase significantly. Power Management Voltage mode vs. current mode control Differentiating DC/DC converters by analyzing control and compensation schemes: line / load regulation, transient response, BOM, board space, ease-of-use Introduction to evaluati...

  13. Texas Instruments Technical Seminar: Power Management and Wireless

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Monday 6 November TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR 14:00 to 17:30 - Training Centre Auditorium (bldg. 593) Texas Instruments Technical Seminar: Power Management and Wireless Michael Scholtholt, Field Application Engineer / TEXAS INSTRUMENTS (US, D, CH) The range of power management products available today offers the possibility to find the best solution for each application. To select the right product it is therefore necessary to understand system requirements, how power supply products work, and where they differentiate. This Technical Training Seminar will also present an overview of how to choose the right RF platform based on markets and applications: nowadays almost everbody has at least one wireless product in use, and this tendency seems to increase significantly. Power Management Voltage mode vs. current mode control Differentiating DC/DC converters by analyzing control and compensation schemes: line / load regulation, transient response, BOM, board space, ease-of-use Introduction to evalu...

  14. Texas and Louisiana coastal vulnerability and shelf connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyng, Kristen M; Hetland, Robert D

    2017-03-15

    A numerical study of connectivity between the continental shelf and coast in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico using a circulation model and surface-limited numerical drifters shows that despite seasonal changes in winds, the overall connectivity of the shelf with the coastline is similar in the winter and summer, though it extends more offshore in Texas in summer. However, there is a spatial pattern to the connectivity: more of the inner shelf is connected with the coast in Texas as compared with Louisiana. Subsets of the coast do have seasonal variability: the coast near both Galveston and Port Aransas has more connectivity from upcoast in the winter and from offshore and downcoast in the summer. In both seasons, we find drifters reach the Port Aransas coast most frequently, with a stronger trend in the summer. These results are important for assessing likely pathways for spilled oil and other potentially hazardous material. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A unique funding opportunity for public health in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Thomas; Huber, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the Affordable Care Act, states are more frequently turning to Medicaid waivers to achieve the "Triple Aim" goals of improving the experience of care, improving population health, and reducing per capita costs. These demonstration waivers provide opportunities to test innovative ways to finance and deliver care. Texas is currently implementing a waiver known as the Transformation and Quality Improvement Program. Its inclusion of public health agencies is a unique approach to a system typically limited to traditional providers. San Antonio Metropolitan Health District is one public health agency taking advantage of this new funding opportunity to implement 6 new or expanded programs targeting health issues of highest priority in this south Texas region. This article discusses the use of Medicaid waivers and the advantages and challenges of public health agency participation.

  16. Pricing of open-access transmission services in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baughman, Martin L. [Texas Univ., Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept., Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the reorganization of the electricity industry within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) and the system of administration and pricing of transmission of services that has been adopted and was placed into service in ERCOT starting January 1, 1997. Included is a summary of the physical and geographical ownership of the Texas system, with information on the mix of fuels and generation ownership patterns, and ownership of the transmission grid. How the electricity industry is being restructured within the interconnection to provide for open-access transmission is discussed, including discussion of the services that will be provided by the transmission segment of the industry, who is responsible for providing them, how they will be priced, and the role of the Independent System Operator (ISO). (author)

  17. THE RELIGIOUS ECONOMY OF TEXAS: AN HISTORICAL PERSPECTWE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Lile

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the changing market shares of major Texas religious groups during this century. Market shares are computed by dividing membership by Texas population. Results show that certain religious groups (firms have performed much better in terms of market share than others. The better performers are the more conservative Protestant denominations along with the Roman Catholic Church. Groups losing market share tendto be the more liberal Protestant denominations. This finding would appear to be consistent with Niebuhr’s church-sect theory which, among other things, predicts that religious groups (sects characterized by a high degree of tension with society grow whereas groups (churches characterized by alow degree of tension with society tend to decline.

  18. Are Increasing Test Scores in Texas Really a Myth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Toenjes

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Pass rates by Texas tenth-graders on the high school exit exam improved from 52 percent in 1994 to 72 percent in 1998. In his article "The Myth of the Texas Miracle in Education" (EPAA, August 2000 Professor Walt Haney argued that some part of this increased pass rate was, as he put it, an illusion. Haney contended that the combined effects of students dropping out of school prior to taking the 10th grade TAAS and special education exemptions accounted for much of the increase in TAAS pass rates. Relying on the same methodology and data that Haney used, we demonstrate that his conclusion is incorrect. None of the 20 percent improvement in the TAAS exit test pass rate between 1994 and 1998 is explained by combined increases in dropout rates or special education exemptions.

  19. A Texas Flood from Land to Ocean Observed by SMAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, S.; Reager, J. T., II; Lee, T.; Vazquez, J.; David, C. H.; Gierach, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    Floods are natural hazards that can have damaging impacts not only on affected land areas but also on the adjacent coastal waters. NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission provides measurements of both surface soil moisture and sea surface salinity (SSS), offering the opportunity to study the effects of flooding events on both terrestrial and marine environments. Here, we present analysis of a severe flood that occurred in May 2015 in Texas using SMAP observations and ancillary satellite and in situ data that describe the precipitation intensity, the evolving saturation state of the land surface, the flood discharge peak, and the resulting freshwater plume in the Gulf of Mexico. We describe the spatiotemporal evolution of the different variables, their relationships, and the associated physical processes. Specifically, we identify a freshwater plume in the north-central Gulf, being distinct from the typical Mississippi River plume, that is attributable to the Texas flood.

  20. Aerobiology of Juniperus Pollen in Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levetin, Estelle; Bunderson, Landon; VandeWater, Pete; Luvall, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Pollen from members of the Cupressaceae are major aeroallergens in many parts of the world. In the south central and southwest United States, Juniperus pollen is the most important member of this family with J. ashei (JA) responsible for severe winter allergy symptoms in Texas and Oklahoma. In New Mexico, pollen from J. monosperma (JM) and other Juniperus species are important contributors to spring allergies, while J. pinchotii (JP) pollinates in the fall affecting sensitive individuals in west Texas, southwest Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico. Throughout this region, JA, JM, and JP occur in dense woodland populations. Generally monitoring for airborne allergens is conducted in urban areas, although the source for tree pollen may be forested areas distant from the sampling sites. Improved pollen forecasts require a better understanding of pollen production at the source. The current study was undertaken to examine the aerobiology of several Juniperus species at their source areas for the development of new pollen forecasting initiatives.

  1. Pricing and University Autonomy: Tuition Deregulation in Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongeun Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates changes in tuition policies in the wake of tuition deregulation in Texas, which in 2003 transferred tuition-setting authority from the state legislature to institutions. We find that price increases accelerated, particularly at the most selective institutions. Institutions also began differentiating price by undergraduate program, raising relative prices for the most costly and lucrative majors, including engineering, business, nursing, and architecture. Price increases were particularly large for institutions with the highest initial costs and for programs with a high earnings premium within institutions, though lower for institutions with more low-income students. These distinctions suggest that public postsecondary institutions respond to microeconomic incentives when given greater autonomy to set price, and take some measures to alleviate impacts on low-income students. The Texas experience suggests that decentralized price-setting generates greater price differentiation within the public higher education system, both across and within institutions.

  2. Steven Hawking to visit Texas A&M in spring

    CERN Multimedia

    Xavier, D

    2002-01-01

    Stephen Hawking will visit Texas A&M University from Feb. 24 to March 21 2003 to participate in the inaugural meeting of the George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics. This institute will bring several of the world's top physicists to A&M for a month-long exploration of the latest ideas on topics ranging from superstrings to M-theory and supergravity (1/2 page).

  3. Vegetative Analysis of the Flookplain of the Trinity River, Texas,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-09-30

    Celtis laevigata ) and green ash (Fraxinus pensylvanica -associated with decid- uous holly !Ilex decidua), hawthorn ( Crataegus spp.) and honey locust... laevigata ), cedar elm (Ulmus crassifolia) and bush palmetto (Sabal minor) in the bottomlands (Tharp, 1926, 1939, 1952; BraunT950). The soils are...Community 2 were Texas sugar- berry (Celtis laevigata ), box elder and cedar elm (Ulmus crassifolia) (Table 4). American elm (Ulmus americana), swamp

  4. Furrow Dike Water Conservation Practices in the Texas High Plains

    OpenAIRE

    Wistrand, Glen L.

    1984-01-01

    Furrow diking can prevent irrigation and rainfall runoff, conserve energy use, prevent soil loss, amd allow producers to reclaim land otherwise unusable, depending on soil, climate, and crops grown in a given area. Initial investment to use this technique may be recovered within the first season. This study analyzes the effects of diking on water and soil conservation, crop yields, costs, and energy use in farming, using examples of farms in the Texas High Plains area.

  5. What Do Test Scores in Texas Tell Us?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P. Klein et al

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the results on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS, the highest-profile state testing program and one that has recorded extraordinary recent gains in math and reading scores. To investigate whether the dramatic math and reading gains on the TAAS represent actual academic progress, we have compared these gains to score changes in Texas on another test, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP. Texas students did improve significantly more on a fourth-grade NAEP math test than their counterparts nationally. But, the size of this gain was smaller than their gains on TAAS and was not present on the eighth-grade math test. The stark differences between the stories told by NAEP and TAAS are especially striking when it comes to the gap in average scores between whites and students of color. According to the NAEP results, that gap in Texas is not only very large but increasing slightly. According to TAAS scores, the gap is much smaller and decreasing greatly. Many schools are devoting a great deal of class time to highly specific TAAS preparation. While this preparation may improve TAAS scores, it may not help students develop necessary reading and math skills. Schools with relatively large percentages of minority and poor students may be doing this more than other schools. We raise serious questions about the validity of those gains, and caution against the danger of making decisions to sanction or reward students, teachers and schools on the basis of test scores that may be inflated or misleading. Finally, we suggest some steps that states can take to increase the likelihood that their test results merit public confidence and provide a sound basis for educational policy.

  6. The Texas A&M Radioisotope Production and Radiochemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akabani, Gamal [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The main motivation of the project at Texas A&M University was to carry out the production of critically needed radioisotopes used in medicine for diagnostic and therapy, and to establish an academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods. After a lengthy battle with the Texas A&M University Radiation Safety Office, the Texas Department of State Health Services granted us a license for the production of radionuclides in July 2015, allowing us to work in earnest in our project objectives. Experiments began immediately after licensing, and we started the assembly and testing of our target systems. There were four analytical/theoretical projects and two experimental target systems. These were for At-211 production and for Zn- 62/Cu-62 production. The theoretical projects were related to the production of Mo-99/Tc-99m using (a) a subcritical aqueous target system and (b) production of Tc-99m from accelerator-generated Mo-99 utilizing a photon-neutron interaction with enriched Mo-100 targets. The two experimental projects were the development of targetry systems and production of At-211 and Zn-62/Cu-62 generator. The targetry system for At-211 has been tested and production of At-211 is chronic depending of availability of beam time at the cyclotron. The installation and testing of the targetry system for the production of Zn-62/Cu-62 has not been finalized. A description of the systems is described. The academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods was initiated in the fall of 2011; due to the lack of a radiochemistry laboratory, it was suspended. We expect to re-start the academic program at the Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies under the Molecular Imaging Program.

  7. The Texas A&M Radioisotope Production and Radiochemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akabani, Gamal [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering. Dept. of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences

    2016-10-28

    The main motivation of the project at Texas A&M University was to carry out the production of critically needed radioisotopes used in medicine for diagnostics and therapy, and to establish an academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods. After a lengthy battle with the Texas A&M University Radiation Safety Office, the Texas Department of State Health Services granted us a license for the production of radionuclides in July 2015, allowing us to work in earnest in our project objectives. Experiments began immediately after licensing, and we started the assembly and testing of our target systems. There were four analytical/theoretical projects and two experimental target systems. These were for At-211 production and for Zn-62/Cu-62 production. The theoretical projects were related to the production of Mo-99/Tc-99m using a) a subcritical aqueous target system and b) production of Tc-99m from accelerator generated Mo-99 utilizing a photon-neutron interaction with enriched Mo-100 targets. The two experimental projects were the development of targetry systems and production of At-211 and Zn-62/Cu-62 generator. The targetry system for At-211 has been tested and production of At-211 is chronic depending of availability of beam time at the cyclotron. The installation and testing of the targetry system for the production of Zn-62/Cu-62 has not been finalized. A description of the systems is described. The academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods was initiated in the fall of 2011 and due to the lack of a radiochemistry laboratory it was suspended. We expect to re-start the academic program at the Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies under the Molecular Imaging Program.

  8. Base Realignment Activities at Bergstrom Air Force Base, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-08

    areas such as West Texas and the Gulf of Mexico . Only a small percentage of flight time is involved Vithflight over occupied areas such as Bergstrom AFB...of Mexico prevail during the mmer. Tropical storms occasionally occur in the area bringing strong winds and significant amounts of precipitation...Possibility of groundwater contamination by volatile organic carbons (VOCs), petroleum hydrocarbons and lead are being addressed. 26 I 2. MOCAS spill at motor

  9. The Texas A&M Radioisotope Production and Radiochemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akabani, Gamal [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The main motivation of the project at Texas A&M University was to carry out the production of critically needed radioisotopes used in medicine for diagnostic and therapy, and to establish an academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods. After a lengthy battle with the Texas A&M University Radiation Safety Office, the Texas Department of State Health Services granted us a license for the production of radionuclides in July 2015 allowing us to work in earnest in our project objectives. Experiments began immediately after licensing and we started the assembly and testing of our target systems. There were four analytical/theoretical projects and two experimental target systems. These were for At-211 production and for Zn- 62/Cu-62 production. The theoretical projects were related to the production of Mo-99/Tc-99m using a) a subcritical aqueous target system and b) production of Tc-99m from accelerator generated Mo-99 utilizing a photon-neutron interaction with enriched Mo-100 targets. The two experimental projects were the development of targetry systems and production of At-211 and Zn-62/Cu-62 generator. The targetry system for At-211 has been tested and production of At-211 is chronic depending of availability of beam time at the cyclotron. The installation and testing of the targetry system for the production of Zn-62/Cu-62 has not been finalized. A description of the systems is described. The academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods was initiated in the fall of 2011 and due to the lack of a radiochemistry laboratory it was suspended. We expect to re-start the academic program at the Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies under the Molecular Imaging Program.

  10. Furrow Dike Water Conservation Practices in the Texas High Plains

    OpenAIRE

    Wistrand, Glen L.

    1984-01-01

    Furrow diking can prevent irrigation and rainfall runoff, conserve energy use, prevent soil loss, amd allow producers to reclaim land otherwise unusable, depending on soil, climate, and crops grown in a given area. Initial investment to use this technique may be recovered within the first season. This study analyzes the effects of diking on water and soil conservation, crop yields, costs, and energy use in farming, using examples of farms in the Texas High Plains area.

  11. Ground-water geology of Grayson County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, E.T.

    1963-01-01

    Grayson County in north-central Texas is near the north edge of the West Gulf Coastal Plain. The county has an area of 927 square miles and had an estimated population of 79,500 in 1957. The major town is Sherman, which has an estimated population of 31,000. The northern two-thirds of the county is drained by tributaries of the Red River; the southern one-third is drained by tributaries of the Trinity River

  12. Bilateral adrenal histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent man from Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J. Rog

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated histoplasmosis affecting the adrenal gland(s of immunocompetent adults is a very rare infection. Here, we present a case of bilateral adrenal histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent, 62-year-old gentleman from Texas along with a brief review of the published literature. Given the risk of patient decompensation secondary to adrenal insufficiency and the wide availability of effective treatments, adrenal histoplasmosis must be considered even in immunocompetent adults who acquire adrenal masses.

  13. Geothermal and heavy-oil resources in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seni, S.J.; Walter, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    In a five-county area of South Texas, geopressured-geothermal reservoirs in the Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group lie below medium- to heavy-oil reservoirs in the Eocene Jackson Group. This fortuitous association suggests the use of geothermal fluids for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR). Geothermal fairways are formed where thick deltaic sandstones are compartmentalized by growth faults. Wilcox geothermal reservoirs in South Texas are present at depths of 11,000 to 15,000 ft (3,350 to 4,570 m) in laterally continuous sandstones 100 to 200 ft (30 to 60 m) thick. Permeability is generally low (typically 1 md), porosity ranges from 12 to 24 percent, and temperature exceeds 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C). Reservoirs containing medium (20{degrees} to 25{degrees} API gravity) to heavy (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) oil are concentrated along the Texas Coastal Plain in the Jackson-Yegua Barrier/Strandplain (Mirando Trend), Cap Rock, and Piercement Salt Dome plays and in the East Texas Basin in Woodbine Fluvial/Deltaic Strandplain and Paluxy Fault Line plays. Injection of hot, moderately fresh to saline brines will improve oil recovery by lowering viscosity and decreasing residual oil saturation. Smectite clay matrix could swell and clog pore throats if injected waters have low salinity. The high temperature of injected fluids will collapse some of the interlayer clays, thus increasing porosity and permeability. Reservoir heterogeneity resulting from facies variation and diagenesis must be considered when siting production and injection wells within the heavy-oil reservoir. The ability of abandoned gas wells to produce sufficient volumes of hot water over the long term will also affect the economics of TEOR.

  14. Vertebrate richness and biogeography in the Big Thicket of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael H MacRoberts; Barbara R. MacRoberts; D. Craig Rudolph

    2010-01-01

    The Big Thicket of Texas has been described as rich in species and a “crossroads:” a place where organisms from many different regions meet. We examine the species richness and regional affiliations of Big Thicket vertebrates. We found that the Big Thicket is neither exceptionally rich in vertebrates nor is it a crossroads for vertebrates. Its vertebrate fauna is...

  15. Evolution of the Texas Heart Institute Distant Organ Procurement Program

    OpenAIRE

    Reece, Ian J.; Painvin, G. Arnaud; Okereke, O.U. John; Chandler, Linda B.; Krudewig, Thomas W.; Igo, Stephen R.; Cooley, Denton A.; Frazier, O. H.

    1984-01-01

    Between August and December 1983, the Texas Heart Institute Transplantation Service performed 10 cardiac transplants. All hearts were removed at outside hospitals and transported to the Heart Institute. Adequate return of cardiac function occurred in all groups after ischemic times of 58.5 minutes for hearts procured within Houston (range, 56-62 minutes) and 152 minutes for those procured in other cities (range, 130-179 minutes). Eight of the transplant patients are alive and well following o...

  16. Assessment of cultural competence in Texas nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzilli, Collen

    2016-10-01

    Cultural competence [CC] is an essential component of nursing education and nursing practice yet there is a gap in the research evaluating CC in faculty and how to practically develop this skillset for faculty members. To explore CC in faculty as evaluated with the Nurses' Cultural Competence Scale [NCCS] and apply the findings to the Purnell Model of Cultural Competence [PMCC] to guide professional development opportunities for faculty members. This was a concurrent mixed-methods study. Faculty members teaching in Texas nursing programs were recruited for the study. Quantitative data was collected using an online survey tool and qualitative data was collected over the phone. 89 Texas faculty members completed the quantitative strand and a subset of 10 faculty members completed the qualitative strand. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the quantitative data and Strauss and Corbin's methodology guided the evaluation of the qualitative data. These two strands were used to support the results. Faculty in Texas are moderately culturally competent. The qualitative findings support the application of the PMCC to the areas identified by the NCCS. The PMCC may be applied to the application of culture and values in nursing professional education as supported by the NCCS. Recommendations are to include the PMCC as a structure for the creation of professional development opportunities for faculty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The prevalence of academic dishonesty in Texas dental hygiene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhney, Kelly A; Gutmann, Marylou E; Schneiderman, Emet; DeWald, Janice P; McCann, Ann; Campbell, Patricia R

    2008-11-01

    The media has given much attention to the academic cheating crisis in America. A majority of college students believe that, in today's global environment, it is necessary to cheat in order to get ahead and to compete with their peers. The prevalence and attitudes concerning academic dishonesty of health professions students, including those in medical, dental, and nursing schools, have been extensively researched. No such studies exist in the discipline of dental hygiene. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of cheating in Texas dental hygiene programs. Four hundred surveys were mailed to twenty Texas dental hygiene schools for graduating students to complete. A total of 289 usable surveys was returned for a response rate of 72.25 percent. Data were analyzed using SPSS with frequencies and chi-square tests. Findings from this study reveal that 86.5 percent of graduating Texas dental hygiene students have cheated a minimum of one time during matriculation. Students identified the demands of what they considered academic overload as the primary justification for cheating behavior.

  18. The Texas concurrent characterization, licensing, and development process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avant, R.V. Jr. [Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority, Austin, TX (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The 72nd Texas Legislature specifically delineated a 400-square-mile area in southeast Hudspeth County where siting activities would be limited. The Authority was given unprecedented powers of property access and eminent domain and expanded budget authority to conduct site selection, characterization, and licensing. In the summer of 1991, the Authority identified five general siting areas in the prescribed region, and in the fall of 1991, the Authority narrowed the siting area to one large ranch composed of about 16,000 acres--called the Faskin Ranch. Site characterization began in 1991 and will be complete by September 1993. In September 1991, Authority staff began preparing the license application and included all available information on the Faskin Ranch. At its February meeting, the Authority`s board directed staff to submit the license application to the Texas Water Commission (the new Texas radiation control agency). The license application was submitted on March 2, 1992, and on April 15, 1992, the Commission determined that the application was sufficiently complete to begin review. Discrete technical packages such as groundwater hydrology, surface water hydrology, design, etc., will be submitted to the agency for review on the completion of each package. A schedule has been developed to allow the regulators the maximum time possible to review critical technical areas while minimizing the total review period.

  19. Influence of Climate Oscillations on Extreme Precipitation in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, N.; Singh, V. P.; Srivastav, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    Much research in the field of hydroclimatology is focusing on the impact of climate variability on hydrologic extremes. Recent studies show that the unique geographical location and the enormous areal extent, coupled with extensive variations in climate oscillations, have intensified the regional hydrologic cycle of Texas. The state-wide extreme precipitation events can actually be attributed to sea-surface pressure and temperature anomalies, such as Bermuda High and Jet Streams, which are further triggered by such climate oscillations. This study aims to quantify the impact of five major Atlantic and Pacific Ocean related climate oscillations: (i) Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), (ii) North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), (iii) Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), (iv) Pacific North American Pattern (PNA), and (v) Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), on extreme precipitation in Texas. Their respective effects will be determined for both climate divisions delineated by the National Climatic Data Centre (NCDC) and climate regions defined by the Köppen Climate Classification System. This study will adopt a weighted correlation approach to attain the robust correlation coefficients while addressing the regionally variable data outliers for extreme precipitation. Further, the variation of robust correlation coefficients across Texas is found to be related to the station elevation, historical average temperature, and total precipitation in the months of extremes. The research will shed light on the relationship between precipitation extremes and climate variability, thus aiding regional water boards in planning, designing, and managing the respective systems as per the future climate change.

  20. Texas Teacher at Sea on the BOLIVAR Project Geophysical Cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelan, M.; Sullivan, S.; Ellins, K.

    2004-12-01

    UTIG provides K-12 teachers with research experiences in field programs that involve UTIG scientists. I am a 6th-9th grade science teacher in Van Vleck, Texas and in April 2004 I sailed to the southeastern Caribbean aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing as a member of the BOLIVAR Project alongside scientists from the U.S. and Venezuela. Our goal was collect seismic data to image the crust and mantle beneath the Caribbean as part of a study of the tectonic processes accompanying different stages of the Caribbean arc/South America continental collision process. Throughout the 52-day cruise I worked as a watch stander, interpreted newly collected seismic reflection data, helped deploy the streamer, maintained a cruise blog (a chronological journal weblog documenting personal thoughts about my experience), spoke with students in Texas with the telephone on loan from Iridium Satellite Solutions, and responded to email inquiries from shore-based students. It was hard work, but most importantly, a voyage of discovery. With guidance from scientists and GK-12 Fellows at UTIG, I am using my experience and the data collected as the basis for K-12 curriculum resources, including learning activities and a video documentary. Support for my participation and post-cruise activities was provided by the NSF and the Trull Foundation in Texas. If given the opportunity to do this again, I would, without reservation!

  1. Eight cases of feline cutaneous leishmaniasis in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, K E; Porter, B F; Logan, K S; Hoffman, R J; Snowden, K F

    2010-11-01

    Leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease caused by intracellular Leishmania protozoa that are transmitted by sandflies. The disease occurs in 3 forms: cutaneous, mucocutaneous, and visceral. Cutaneous leishmaniasis has been reported in cats in Europe and South America and in 1 cat from Texas. Leishmania mexicana is endemic in Texas and has been reported to cause cutaneous lesions in humans. This article describes the pathology of 8 biopsy cases of feline cutaneous leishmaniasis presented to the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory over a 3.5-year period. The median age of the cats was 3 years; each was presented with nodular, ulcerative lesions on the pinnae and less commonly on the muzzle and periorbital skin. Histologically, the lesions were nodular to diffuse histiocytic dermatitis with numerous amastigotes (2-4 μm) within macrophages and occasionally within the interstitium. Organisms were often contained within round, clear, intracellular vacuoles. In areas of necrosis, organisms were also free within the interstitium. The overlying epidermis was hyperkeratotic, hyperplastic, and often ulcerated. The organisms were not argyrophilic (Gomori methenamine silver), reacted poorly with periodic acid-Schiff reagent, and were inconsistently basophilic with Giemsa. Although not readily visible histologically, kinetoplasts were evident in amastigotes in cytologic preparations. The lesions were similar to those described for cutaneous L. mexicana infection in humans. In 5 of the 8 cats, Leishmania mexicana DNA was amplified from paraffin-embedded tissue by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced.

  2. Concepts and criteria for evaluating topsoil substitutes: The Texas experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askenasy, P.; Senkayi, A.L. [Railroad Commission of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Joseph, W.L. [Office of Surface Mining, Alton, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Presented in this paper are: (1) historical background, (2) Federal and State regulatory basis and authority, and (3) justification for selected criteria and parameters which are currently used to evaluate the quality of topsoil-substitute materials and postmine soils in Texas. The specific parameters and concepts discussed include (1) acid- and toxic-forming materials (AFM and TFM), (2) quantification procedures for AFM and TFM, (3) procedures used to identify topsoil substitutes that are {open_quotes}equal to or more suitable than{close_quotes} existing premine native soils, and (4) current interpretations of what is meant by {open_quotes}the best available material to support revegetation{close_quotes} of surface-mined areas. To support these interpretations, reference is made throughout the paper to relevant sections of the (1) Texas Coal Mining Regulations (TCMR), (2) Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA), and (3) Federal regulations promulgated by the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) to implement SMCRA. The success of the Texas reclamation program, as indicated by the quality of the reclaimed soils is also discussed. This success is partly attributed to the rigorous application of the quantification concepts and parameters discussed in this paper.

  3. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-11-01

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. there were two main objectives for this reporting period. first, they wanted to collect wilcox coal samples from depths similar to those of probable sequestration sites, with the objective of determining accurate parameters for reservoir model description and for reservoir simulation. The second objective was to pursue opportunities for determining permeability of deep Wilcox coal to use as additional, necessary data for modeling reservoir performance during CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. In mid-summer, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation agreed to allow the authors to collect Wilcox Group coal samples from a well that was to be drilled to the Austin Chalk, which is several thousand feet below the Wilcox. In addition, they agreed to allow them to perform permeability tests in coal beds in an existing shut-in well. Both wells are in the region of the Sam K. Seymour power station, a site that they earlier identified as a major point source of CO{sub 2}. They negotiated contracts for sidewall core collection and core analyses, and they began discussions with a service company to perform permeability testing. To collect sidewall core samples of the Wilcox coals, they made structure and isopach maps and cross sections to select coal beds and to determine their depths for coring. On September 29, 10 sidewall core samples were obtained from 3 coal beds of the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group. The samples were desorbed in 4 sidewall core canisters. Desorbed gas samples were sent to a laboratory for gas compositional analyses, and the coal samples were sent to another laboratory to measure CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} sorption isotherms. All analyses should be finished by the end of

  4. Predicting Student Success on the Texas Chemistry STAAR Test: A Logistic Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William L.; Johnson, Annabel M.; Johnson, Jared

    2012-01-01

    Background: The context is the new Texas STAAR end-of-course testing program. Purpose: The authors developed a logistic regression model to predict who would pass-or-fail the new Texas chemistry STAAR end-of-course exam. Setting: Robert E. Lee High School (5A) with an enrollment of 2700 students, Tyler, Texas. Date of the study was the 2011-2012…

  5. Baylisascaris procyonis in raccoons in Texas and its relationship to habitat characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresta, Amy E; Henke, Scott E; Pence, Danny B

    2010-07-01

    Raccoons (n=590) were collected from October 1999 to August 2003 from 35 counties across Texas, USA, and gastrointestinal tracts were examined for Baylisascaris procyonis. We documented B. procyonis in central and eastern Texas. Baylisascaris procyonis occurred in 5.4% raccoons in Texas with an overall mean abundance and mean intensity of 0.4+/-0.1 and 7.4+/-2.3, respectively. Prevalence was higher in central Texas ecoregions and on clayey soil texture than other regions or soil textures of Texas. Mean parasite abundance was highest in the Postoak Savanna ecoregion located in central Texas. Our findings expanded the range of B. procyonis in Texas and confirmed that areas of Texas with clayey soil texture are more vulnerable to B. procyonis transmission. This study gives a better understanding of where B. procyonis may occur in Texas and which environmental characteristics are better suited for B. procyonis occurrence and transmission, especially in areas where likelihood of frequent human contact with raccoons and their feces increases.

  6. Techniques to estimate generalized skew coefficients of annual peak streamflow for natural basins in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Linda J.; Asquith, William H.; Slade, Raymond M.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents two techniques to estimate generalized skew coefficients used for log-Pearson Type III peak-streamflow frequency analysis of natural basins in Texas. A natural basin has less than 10 percent impervious cover, and less than 10 percent of its drainage area is controlled by reservoirs. The estimation of generalized skew coefficients is based on annual peak and historical peak streamflow for all U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations having at least 20 years of annual peak-streamflow record from natural basins in Texas. Station skew coefficients calculated for each of 255 Texas stations were used to estimate generalized skew coefficients for Texas.

  7. USGS Zebra Mussel Monitoring Program for north Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Christopher J.; Baldys, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Zebra Mussel Monitoring Program for north Texas provides early detection and monitoring of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) by using a holistic suite of detection methods. The program is designed to assess zebra mussel occurrence, distribution, and densities in north Texas waters by using four approaches: (1) SCUBA diving, (2) water-sample collection with plankton tow nets (followed by laboratory analyses), (3) artificial substrates, and (4) water-quality sampling. Data collected during this type of monitoring can assist rapid response efforts and can be used to quantify the economic and ecological effects of zebra mussels in the north Texas area. Monitoring under this program began in April 2010. The presence of large zebra mussel populations often causes undesirable economic and ecological effects, including damage to water-processing infrastructure and hydroelectric powerplants (with an estimated 10-year cost of $3.1 billion), displacement of native mussels, increases in concentrations of certain species of cyanobacteria, and increases in concentrations of geosmin (an organic compound that results in taste and odor issues in water). Since no large-scale, environmentally safe eradication method has been developed for zebra mussels, it is difficult to remove established populations. Broad physicochemical adaptability, prolific reproductive capacity, and rapid dispersal methods have enabled zebra mussels, within a period of about 20 years, to establish populations under differing environmental conditions across much of the eastern part of the United States. In Texas, the presence of zebra mussels was first confirmed in April 2009 in Lake Texoma in the Red River Basin along the Texas-Oklahoma border. They were most likely introduced into Lake Texoma through overland transport from an infested water body. Since then, the presence of zebra mussels has been reported in both the Red River and Washita River arms of Lake Texoma, in

  8. Texas Clean Energy Project: Topical Report, Phase 1 - February 2010-December 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Karl

    2012-11-01

    Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC (STCE) is developing the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP or the project) to be located near Penwell, Texas. The TCEP will include an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with a nameplate capacity of 400 megawatts electric (MWe), combined with the production of urea fertilizer and the capture, utilization and storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) sold commercially for regional use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Permian Basin of west Texas. The TCEP will utilize coal gasification technology to convert Powder River Basin subbituminous coal delivered by rail from Wyoming into a synthetic gas (syngas) which will be cleaned and further treated so that at least 90 percent of the overall carbon entering the facility will be captured. The clean syngas will then be divided into two high-hydrogen (H2) concentration streams, one of which will be combusted as a fuel in a combined cycle power block for power generation and the other converted into urea fertilizer for commercial sale. The captured CO2 will be divided into two streams: one will be used in producing the urea fertilizer and the other will be compressed for transport by pipeline for offsite use in EOR and permanent underground sequestration. The TCEP was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) for cost-shared co-funded financial assistance under Round 3 of its Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). A portion of this financial assistance was budgeted and provided for initial development, permitting and design activities. STCE and the DOE executed a Cooperative Agreement dated January 29, 2010, which defined the objectives of the project for all phases. During Phase 1, STCE conducted and completed all objectives defined in the initial development, permitting and design portions of the Cooperative Agreement. This topical report summarizes all work associated with the project objectives, and additional work

  9. Plant Science. IV-A-1 to IV-F-2. Basic V.A.I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This packet contains six units of informational materials and transparency masters, with accompanying scripts, for teachers to use in a plant science course in vocational agriculture. Designed especially for use in Texas, the first unit introduces the course through the following topics: economic importance of major crops, major areas of…

  10. Origin, composition and quality of suspended particulate organic matter in relation to freshwater inflow in a South Texas estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Benoit; Beseres Pollack, Jennifer; Blomberg, Brittany; Palmer, Terence A.; Adams, Leslie; Guillou, Gaël; Montagna, Paul A.

    2016-03-01

    South Texas has a semi-arid climate with a large interannual variability of freshwater inflows. This study sought to define how changes in freshwater inflow affect the composition, quantity and quality of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) in a South Texas estuary: the Mission-Aransas estuary. The study was implemented 1.5 months after a large rain event in September 2010 and continued for 10 months of drought conditions. The composition of SPOM originating from rivers, the Gulf of Mexico and the estuary were determined using stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N and δ34S). The quantity and quality of SPOM were assessed using organic carbon content, chlorophyll a concentrations and C/chl a ratios. Our results demonstrated that autochthonous phytoplankton was the dominant component of SPOM in the Mission-Aransas estuary during droughts. Benthic organic matter from local primary producers (i.e., seagrass, salt marsh plants, benthic microalgae) did not influence SPOM composition, either as fresh material or as detritus. A comparison with a positive estuary (i.e., Sabine-Neches estuary, TX) indicates that decreases in freshwater inflow may lead to decreases of terrestrial organic matter inputs and to increase the ratio of autochtonous phytoplanktonic material in SPOM.

  11. Elevated DDE and toxaphene residues in fishes and birds reflect local contamination in the lower Rio Grande valley Texas USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Kennedy, H.R.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Ribick, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    A potential organochlorine pesticide problem was identified near Mission, Texas, by the National Park Monitoring Program. Fish samples from this site have consistently contained elevated levels of DDE since 1968. Surveys were made in 1976, 1978, and 1979 to determine the extent of organochlorine pesticide contamination in fishes and birds of the area. Freshwater fishes of Arroyo Colorado, a major waterway traversing the lower Rio Grande Valley, were highly contaminated with DDE and toxaphene residues compared to samples from other areas in the Valley; both DDE and toxaphene ranged up to 31.5 ppm wet wt in whole-fish composite samples. Median DDE residues in fish-eating bird carcasses from this area ranged up to 34 ppm wet wt, and 81 ppm in individual specimens. The levels of contaminants detected in fishes and birds were within, or above, the range producing adverse effects in certain species. The major sources of contamination to the Arroyo Colorado system likely stem from past and present use of persistent pesticides on surrounding croplands, and possibly from an abandoned pesticide plant at Mission, Texas.

  12. Elevated DDE and toxaphene residues in fishes and birds reflect local contamination in the lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Kennedy, H.D.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Ribick, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    A potential organochlorine pesticide problem was identified near Mission, Texas, by the National Pesticide Monitoring Program. Fish samples from this site have consistently contained elevated levels of DDE since 1968. Surveys were made in 1976, 1978, and 1979 to determine the extent of organochlorine pesticide contamination in fishes and birds of the area. Freshwater fishes of the Arroyo Colorado, a major waterway traversing the lower Rio Grande Valley, were highly contaminated with DDE and toxaphene residues compared to samples from other areas in the Valley; both DDE and toxaphene ranged up to 31.5 ppm wet weight in whole-fish composite samples. In addition, median DDE residues in fish-eating bird carcasses from this area ranged up to 34 ppm wet weight, and 81 ppm in individual specimens. The levels of contaminants detected in fishes and birds were within, or above, the range producing adverse effects in certain species. The major sources of contamination to the Arroyo Colorado system likely stem from past and present use of persistent pesticides on surrounding croplands, and possibly from an abandoned pesticide plant at Mission, Texas.

  13. Seasonal detection of atrazine and atzA in man-made waterways receiving agricultural runoff in a subtropical, semi-arid environment (Hidalgo County, Texas, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Ibdanelo; Vitek, Christopher J; Persans, Michael W; Lowe, Kristine L

    2017-02-01

    Atrazine is a widely-used herbicide that can impact non-target organisms in the environment but can be biologically degraded by several types of microorganisms. In this study, the gene atzA, which encodes for the initial step in bacterially-mediated atrazine degradation, was used as an indicator of atrazine pollution in agricultural canals located in Hidalgo County, Texas, USA. The concentration of atrazine and atzA were monitored once per month for 12 months during 2010-2011. Atrazine was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; atzA abundance was monitored using Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (Q-PCR) analyses. Abundance of atrazine and atzA were compared with rainy versus dry months and during planting versus non-planting months. Results showed that atrazine levels varied from below detection to 0.43 ppb and were not influenced by precipitation or planting season. Concentrations of the gene atzA were significantly different in rainy versus dry months; during planting versus non-planting times of the year; and in the interaction of precipitation and planting season. The highest concentration of atzA, approx. 4.57 × 10(8) gene copies ml(-1), was detected in July 2010-a rainy, planting month in Hidalgo County, South Texas. However, atrazine was below detection during that month. We conclude that Q-PCR using atzA as an indicator gene is a potential method for monitoring low levels of atrazine pollution in environmental samples.

  14. Influence of Vegetation Cover on Rain Pulse Responses in Semi-Arid Savannas in Central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, M.; Heilman, J.; McInnes, K.; Thijs, A.; Kjelgaard, J.

    2007-12-01

    Savannas in central Texas are dominated by live oak (Quercus virginiana) and Ashe juniper (Juniperus asheii) underlain by perennial, C3/C4 grasslands, and are increasingly becoming juniper and mesquite dominated due to overgrazing and suppression of wildfires. Since 2004, we have been investigating how carbon, water and energy exchange in these rain-limited savannas respond to rainfall variability and this observed vegetation change. In semi-arid regions, rainfall pulses provide inputs of soil moisture and trigger biotic activity in the form of plant gas exchange and microbial metabolism as well as water dependent physical processes in the soil. Each of these components has a different characteristic response curve to soil moisture and integrates soil water content over a different range of depths. Here we focus on examining how the observed increase of woody species in central Texas savannas alters the response of net ecosystem exchange and its components, ecosystem respiration and gross ecosystem exchange, to rain pulses. Using data we have collected over the last three years from three Ameriflux tower sites at Freeman Ranch near San Marcos, TX (C3/C4 grassland, juniper/mesquite savanna with 50 percent woody cover, and oak/juniper woodland), we quantify the responses of both ecosystem respiration and daily carbon uptake to rainfall pulses throughout the year. Specifically, we look at the enhancement and persistence of ecosystem respiration and carbon uptake responses following a pulse, and isolate the main controlling factors on the observed response: seasonality, antecedent soil moisture and temperature, or previous pulses. In all three land covers, the general response to precipitation pulses is a respiration pulse followed by an increase in total carbon uptake. Differences in pulse responses observed at the savanna site compared to the grassland and woodland sites can be explained, in part, by the observed differences in rooting structure and photosynthetic

  15. Preliminary Public Design Report for the Texas Clean Energy Project: Topical Report - Phase 1, June 2010-July 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Karl

    2012-02-01

    Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC (Summit) is developing the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP or the project) to be located near Penwell, Texas. The TCEP will include an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with a nameplate capacity of 400 megawatts electric (MWe), combined with the production of urea fertilizer and the capture, utilization and storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) sold commercially for regional use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Permian Basin of west Texas. The TCEP will utilize coal gasification technology to convert Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal delivered by rail from Wyoming into a synthetic gas (syngas) which will be cleaned and further treated so that at least 90 percent of the overall carbon entering the facility will be captured. The clean syngas will then be divided into two high-hydrogen (H2) concentration streams, one of which will be combusted as a fuel in a combined cycle power block for power generation and the other converted into urea fertilizer for commercial sale. The captured CO2 will be divided into two streams: one will be used in producing the urea fertilizer and the other will be compressed for transport by pipeline for offsite use in EOR. The TCEP was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) for cost-shared co-funded financial assistance under Round 3 of its Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). A portion of this financial assistance was budgeted and provided for initial development, permitting and design activities. Front-end Engineering and Design (FEED) commenced in June 2010 and was completed in July 2011, setting the design basis for entering into the detailed engineering phase of the project. During Phase 1, TCEP conducted and completed the FEED, applied for and received its air construction permit, provided engineering and other technical information required for development of the draft Environmental Impact Statement, and

  16. Coal geology of the Paleocene-Eocene Calvert Bluff Formation (Wilcox Group) and the Eocene Manning Formation (Jackson Group) in east-central Texas; field trip guidebook for the Society for Organic Petrology, Twelfth Annual Meeting, The Woodlands, Texas, August 30, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Peter D.; Crowley, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    The Jackson and Wilcox Groups of eastern Texas (fig. 1) are the major lignite producing intervals in the Gulf Region. Within these groups, the major lignite-producing formations are the Paleocene-Eocene Calvert Bluff Formation (Wilcox) and the Eocene Manning Formation (Jackson). According to the Keystone Coal Industry Manual (Maclean Hunter Publishing Company, 1994), the Gulf Coast basin produces about 57 million short tons of lignite annually. The state of Texas ranks number 6 in coal production in the United States. Most of the lignite is used for electric power generation in mine-mouth power plant facilities. In recent years, particular interest has been given to lignite quality and the distribution and concentration of about a dozen trace elements that have been identified as potential hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. As pointed out by Oman and Finkelman (1994), Gulf Coast lignite deposits have elevated concentrations of many of the HAPs elements (Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Se, U) on a as-received gm/mmBtu basis when compared to other United States coal deposits used for fuel in thermo-electric power plants. Although regulations have not yet been established for acceptable emissions of the HAPs elements during coal burning, considerable research effort has been given to the characterization of these elements in coal feed stocks. The general purpose of the present field trip and of the accompanying collection of papers is to investigate how various aspects of east Texas lignite geology might collectively influence the quality of the lignite fuel. We hope that this collection of papers will help future researchers understand the complex, multifaceted interrelations of coal geology, petrology, palynology and coal quality, and that this introduction to the geology of the lignite deposits of east Texas might serve as a stimulus for new ideas to be applied to other coal basins in the U.S. and abroad.

  17. Los espacios vectoriales, el amarillo, el rojo y el azul

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Miguel

    2001-01-01

    El objetivo de este artículo será el de facilitar a los alumnos la comprensión y memorización del tema de los espacios vectoriales mediante una bella analogía existente a nuestro alrededor. Para tal fin haremos uso de los colores y de la mezcla de sus pigmentos. Aclararemos conceptos como el de combinación lineal de vectores (mezcla de colores), el de dependencia e independencia lineal, el de sistema generador (conjunto de colores con los que se puede pintar un cuadro), el de base (en el cuad...

  18. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Patchy Shapefile Map - San Antonio Bay and Espiritu Santo Bay (NODC Accession 0070784)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Coastal Services Center (CSC) requested the creation of benthic habitat data along the southern Texas coast to support the Texas Seagrass Monitoring...

  19. Hurricane Rita Aerial Photography: High-Resolution Imagery of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast After Landfall

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast after Hurricane Rita made landfall. The regions photographed range from San Luis Pass, Texas...

  20. 76 FR 70479 - Draft Environmental Assessment and Safe Harbor Agreement for the Houston Toad Within Nine Texas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    .... U.S. Mail: 17629 El Camino Real, Suite 211, Houston, Texas 77058. In-Person Drop-off, Viewing, or... business hours at 17629 El Camino Real, Suite 211, Houston, Texas 77058. For more information on locations...