WorldWideScience

Sample records for planar tumor imaging

  1. Echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) with high-resolution matrix in intra-axial brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, R.; Scheidler, J.; Porn, U.; Reiser, M. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich (Germany); Seelos, K.; Yousry, T. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich (Germany); Exner, H. [Institute for Medical Epidemiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Rosen, B.R. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, NMR Center, Charlestown, MA (United States)

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of high-speed interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) to achieve diagnostic image quality comparable to T2-weighted imaging in patients with brain tumors. Seventeen patients with intra-axial, supratentorial tumors (10 untreated gliomas, 7 radiated gliomas) were investigated on a 1.5-T scanner. The conventional scan (SE, TR/TE = 2200/80 ms, 18 slices) was acquired in 8 min, 4 s, and EPI (TR/TE = 3000/80 ms, 18 slices) was completed in 25 s. The films were compared in a blinded trail by three radiologists. On the general impression and anatomic display, both sequences were rated to be of similar quality. Artifacts were slightly more pronounced at the skull base and around surgical clips using EPI. Tumor delineation was nearly equivalent using EPI, compared with the T2-weighted sequence. Echo-planar imaging reached diagnostic quality in all patients. Interleaved high-resolution EPI yielded sufficient quality to depict intra-axial, supratentorial brain tumors. Since EPI can be obtained in a small fraction of the time needed for conventional spin echo, in addition to other indications it could be considered to study patients unable to cooperate. (orig.) With 3 figs., 3 tabs., 27 refs.

  2. Readout-segmented echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging in the assessment of orbital tumors: comparison with conventional single-shot echo-planar imaging in image quality and diagnostic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoquan; Wang, Yanjun; Hu, Hao; Su, Guoyi; Liu, Hu; Shi, Haibin; Wu, Feiyun

    2017-01-01

    Background Readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RS-EPI) could improve the imaging quality of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in various organs. However, whether it could improve the imaging quality and diagnostic performance for the patients with orbital tumors is still unknown. Purpose To compare the image quality and diagnostic performance of RS-EPI DWI with that of conventional single-shot EPI (SS-EPI) DWI in patients with orbital tumors. Material and Methods SS-EPI and RS-EPI DW images of 32 patients with pathologically diagnosed orbital tumors were retrospectively analyzed. Qualitative imaging parameters (imaging sharpness, geometric distortion, ghosting artifacts, and overall imaging quality) and quantitative imaging parameters (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC], signal-to-noise ratio [SNR], contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio [CNR]) were assessed by two independent radiologists, and compared between SS-EPI and RS-EPI DWI. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the diagnostic value of ADC in differentiating malignant from benign orbital tumors. Results RS-EPI DW imaging produced less geometric distortion and ghosting artifacts, and better imaging sharpness and overall imaging quality than SS-EPI DWI (for all, P P P P P = 0.137). There was no significant difference on the diagnostic performance between SS-EPI and RS-EPI DWI, when using ADC as the differentiating index ( P = 0.529). Conclusion Compared with SS-EPI, RS-EPI DWI provided significantly better imaging quality and comparable diagnostic performance in differentiating malignant from benign orbital tumors.

  3. Usefulness of free-breathing readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RESOLVE) for detection of malignant liver tumors: Comparison with single-shot echo-planar imaging (SS-EPI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokoro, Hirokazu [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Fujinaga, Yasunari, E-mail: fujinaga@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Ohya, Ayumi; Ueda, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Shiobara, Aya; Kitou, Yoshihiro; Ueda, Hitoshi [Radiology Division of Shinshu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Kadoya, Masumi [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A prospective study revealed the usefulness of RESOLVE for detecting malignant liver tumor. • The scanning time of RESOLVE was shorter than that of respiratory-triggered SS-EPI. • RESOLVE minimized susceptibility artifact in the right lobe of the liver. • RESOLVE provides a comparable detectability of malignant liver tumor compared with SS-EPI. - Abstract: Purpose: We aimed to clarify the usefulness of free-breathing readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RESOLVE), which is multi-shot echo-planar imaging based on a 2D-navigator-based reacquisition technique, for detecting malignant liver tumor. Materials and methods: In 77 patients with malignant liver tumors, free-breathing RESOLVE and respiratory-triggered single-shot echo-planar imaging (SS-EPI) at 3-T MR unit were performed. We set a scan time up to approximately 5 min (300 s) before examination, measured actual scan time and assessed (1) susceptibility and (2) motion artifacts in the right and left liver lobes (3, no artifact; 1, marked), and (3) detectability of malignant liver tumors (3, good; 1, poor) using a 3-point scale. Results: The median actual scan time of RESOLVE/SS-EPI was 365/423 s. The median scores of each factor in RESOLVE/SS-EPI were as following in this order: (1) 3/2 (right lobe); 3/3 (left lobe), (2) 2/3 (right lobe); 1/2 (left lobe), and (3) 3/3, respectively. Significant differences were noted between RESOLVE and SS-EPI in all evaluated factors (P < 0.05) except for susceptibility of left lobe and detectability of the lesions. Conclusion: Despite the effect of motion artifacts, RESOLVE provides a comparable detectability of the lesion and the advantage of reducing scanning time compared with SS-EPI.

  4. Imaging Properties of Planar Microlens Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The planar microlens arrays is a two-dimensional array of optical component which is fabricated monolithically available. Imaging properties of planar microlens arrays are described, which provide both image multiplexer and erect, unit magnification images.

  5. Image Alignment by Piecewise Planar Region Matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, Z.; Gevers, T.

    2014-01-01

    Robust image registration is a challenging problem, especially when dealing with severe changes in illumination and viewpoint. Previous methods assume a global geometric model (e.g., homography) and, hence, are only able to align images under predefined constraints (e.g., planar scenes and parallax-

  6. Biodistribution and planar gamma camera imaging of {sup 123}I- and {sup 131}I-labeled F(ab'){sub 2} and Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody 14C5 in nude mice bearing an A549 lung tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burvenich, Ingrid J.G. [Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, University of Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)]. E-mail: ingrid.burvenich@ugent.be; Schoonooghe, Steve [Department of Biomedical Research, Flanders Institute of Biotechnology (VIB), University of Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Blanckaert, Peter [Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, University of Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Bacher, Klaus [Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vervoort, Liesbet [Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, University of Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Coene, Elisabeth [N. Goormaghtigh Institute of Pathology, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Mertens, Nico [Department of Biomedical Research, Flanders Institute of Biotechnology (VIB), University of Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vos, Filip de [Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, University of Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Slegers, Guido [Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, University of Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2007-04-15

    Detection of antigen 14C5, involved in substrate adhesion and highly expressed on the membrane of many carcinomas, including lung cancer, provides important diagnostic information that can influence patient management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution and planar gamma camera imaging characteristics of radioiodinated F(ab'){sub 2} and Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody (mAb) 14C5 in tumor-bearing mice. Methods: F(ab'){sub 2} and Fab 14C5 fragments were radioiodinated using the Iodo-Gen method. In vitro stability, binding specificity and affinity of {sup 125}I-labeled 14C5 fragments were studied in A549 lung carcinoma cells. Biodistribution, blood clearance and tumor-targeting characteristics of {sup 131}I-labeled 14C5 fragments and intact mAb 14C5 were studied in Swiss nu/nu mice bearing A549 lung carcinoma tumors. Planar gamma imaging illustrated the potential use of these {sup 123}I-labeled 14C5 fragments for radioimmunodetection (RID). Results: Saturation binding experiments showed highest affinity for {sup 125}I-labeled F(ab'){sub 2} fragments (K {sub d}=0.37{+-}0.10 nmol/L) and lowest affinity for {sup 125}I-labeled Fab fragments (K {sub d}=2.25{+-}0.44 nmol/L). Blood clearance studies showed that the alpha half-life (t1/2{alpha}) value for Fab, F(ab'){sub 2} and mAb 14C5 was 14.9, 21 and 118 min, respectively. The beta half-life t1/2{beta} value for Fab, F(ab'){sub 2} and mAb 14C5 was 439, 627 and 4067 min, respectively. {sup 131}I-Fab fragments showed highest tumor uptake 3 h after injection (2.4{+-}0.8 %ID/g), {sup 131}I-labeled F(ab'){sub 2} showed highest tumor uptake 6 h after injection (4.7{+-}0.7 %ID/g) and for {sup 131}I-labeled mAb highest tumor uptake was observed at 24 h (10.7{+-}2.3 %ID/g). In planar gamma imaging, both labeled fragments gave better tumor-to-background contrast than {sup 123}I-mAb 14C5. Conclusion: Fab and F(ab'){sub 2} fragments derived from intact mAb 14C5 have

  7. Vortex gyroscope imaging of planar superfluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powis, A T; Sammut, S J; Simula, T P

    2014-10-17

    We propose a robust imaging technique that makes it possible to distinguish vortices from antivortices in quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates from a single image of the density of the atoms. Tilting the planar condensate prior to standard absorption imaging excites a generalized gyroscopic mode of the condensate, revealing the sign and location of each vortex. This technique is anticipated to enable experimental measurement of the incompressible kinetic energy spectrum of the condensate and the observation of a negative-temperature phase transition of the vortex gas, driven by two-dimensional superfluid turbulence.

  8. Single-Shot Echo-Planar Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging at 3T and 1.5T for Differentiation of Benign Vertebral Fracture Edema and Tumor Infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Rho, Myung Ho; Chung, Eun Chul; Kim, Mi Sung; Kwon, Heon Ju; Youn, In Young [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 03181 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value using single-shot echo-planar imaging sequences at 3T and 1.5T for differentiation of benign fracture edema and tumor infiltration of the vertebral body. A total of 46 spinal examinations were included in the 1.5T MRI group, and a total of 40 spinal examinations were included in the 3T MRI group. The ADC values of the lesion were measured and calculated. The diagnostic performance of the conventional MR image containing sagittal T2-weighted fat saturated image and each diffusion weighted image (DWI) with an ADC value with different b values were evaluated. The mean ADC value of the benign lesions was higher than that of the malignant lesions on 1.5T and 3T (p < 0.05). The sensitivity of the diagnostic performance was higher with an additional DWI in both 1.5T and 3T, but the sensitivities were similar with the addition of b values of 400 and 1000. The specificities of the diagnostic performances did not show significant differences (p value > 0.05). The diagnostic accuracies were higher when either of the DWIs (b values of 400 and 1000) was added to routine MR image for 1.5T and 3T. Statistical differences between 1.5T and 3T or between b values of 400 and 1000 were not seen. The ADC values of the benign lesions were significantly higher than those of the malignant lesions on 1.5T and 3T. There was no statistically significant difference in the diagnostic performances when either of the DWIs (b values of 400 and 1000) was added to the routine MR image for 1.5T and 3T.

  9. Photoacoustic imaging using acoustic reflectors to enhance planar arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, Robert; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2014-12-01

    Planar sensor arrays have advantages when used for photoacoustic imaging: they do not require the imaging target to be enclosed, and they are easier to manufacture than curved arrays. However, planar arrays have a limited view of the acoustic field due to their finite size; therefore, not all of the acoustic waves emitted from a photoacoustic source can be recorded. This loss of data results in artifacts in the reconstructed photoacoustic image. A detection array configuration which combines a planar Fabry–Pérot sensor with perpendicular acoustic reflectors is described and experimentally implemented. This retains the detection advantages of the planar sensor while increasing the effective detection aperture in order to improve the reconstructed photoacoustic image.

  10. Automated curved planar reformation of 3D spine images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrtovec, Tomaz; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2005-10-07

    Traditional techniques for visualizing anatomical structures are based on planar cross-sections from volume images, such as images obtained by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, planar cross-sections taken in the coordinate system of the 3D image often do not provide sufficient or qualitative enough diagnostic information, because planar cross-sections cannot follow curved anatomical structures (e.g. arteries, colon, spine, etc). Therefore, not all of the important details can be shown simultaneously in any planar cross-section. To overcome this problem, reformatted images in the coordinate system of the inspected structure must be created. This operation is usually referred to as curved planar reformation (CPR). In this paper we propose an automated method for CPR of 3D spine images, which is based on the image transformation from the standard image-based to a novel spine-based coordinate system. The axes of the proposed spine-based coordinate system are determined on the curve that represents the vertebral column, and the rotation of the vertebrae around the spine curve, both of which are described by polynomial models. The optimal polynomial parameters are obtained in an image analysis based optimization framework. The proposed method was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on five CT spine images. The method performed well on both normal and pathological cases and was consistent with manually obtained ground truth data. The proposed spine-based CPR benefits from reduced structural complexity in favour of improved feature perception of the spine. The reformatted images are diagnostically valuable and enable easier navigation, manipulation and orientation in 3D space. Moreover, reformatted images may prove useful for segmentation and other image analysis tasks.

  11. Immunoscintigraphy using /sup 111/In-DTPA labeled monoclonal antibodies: Comparison between ETC and planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Happ, J.; Baum, R.P.; Frohn, J.; Weimer, B.; Hoer, G.; Halbsguth, A.; Lochner, B.; Brandhorst, I.

    1987-12-01

    The present study was done in order to examine if the use of /sup 111/In-DTPA-labeled MAb fragments in place of /sup 131/I-labeled MAb fragments increases the sensitivity of tomographic immunoscintigraphy to reach the level of that of planar imaging techniques. In 11 patients with various primary tumors, local recurrences or metastases (colorectal carcinoma (n=7), ovarian carcinoma (n=2), papillary thyroid carcinoma (n=1), undifferentiated carcinoma of the lung (n=1)), immuniscintigraphy (IS) was carried out using /sup 111/In-DTPA-labeled F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments of various MAbs (anti-CEA, OC 125, anti-hTG) and planar and tomographic imaging were compared intraindividually. By conventional diagnostic procedures, the presence of a tumor mass was confirmed (transmission computer tomography, ultrasound) or verified (/sup 131/I whole-body scintigraphy, histology) in all cases. Immunoscintigraphy was positive in 9 out of 11 cases by ECT and in 10 out of 11 cases by planar imaging. When using /sup 111/In-labeled MAb fragments, intraindividual comparison of ECT and planar imaging resulted in a similar sensitivity. The increased sensitivity of ECT using this tracer in contrast to /sup 131/I-labeled MAb fragments may be attributed to the fact that the physical properties of /sup 111/In are much more suitable for the gamma cameras most commonly used (single detector, 38'' crystal); using /sup 111/In-labelled MAb fragments, count rates sufficient for ECT can be obtained within a reasonable acquisition time. This allows to combine IS with the advantages of ECT regarding tumour localization and prevention of artefacts due to superposition of background.

  12. Imaging in Pediatric Infratentorial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hajiahmadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial tumors are the second cause of malignancies in childhood following leukemia. The overall incidence varies between 1:20000 and 1:100000 in different series. They are the most common solid tumors that occur in childhood .The most important diagnostic feature of an intracranial mass is its location. They can be supratentorial or infratentorial. With the exception of the first year of life, infratentorial brain tumors are more frequent than supratentorial tumors in the first decade of life. In particular, these are cerebellar low-grade astrocytomas, medulloblastomas, brain stem gliomas and ependymomas of the fourth ventricle. .Posterior fossa tumors also are readily identified with both CT and MRI. Spectroscopy in the analysis of brain tumors has recently come on the scene but may be of limited practical value when it comes to differentiating tumors. However, CT and especially MRI are the primary imaging modalities for the investigation of brain tumors. Sonography can be used in the neonates. With modern imaging, it is relatively easy to detect the presence of a tumor in most patients. The purpose of this essay is to illustrate the imaging features of various infratentorial brain tumors to make a clue for differentiation them by these features.

  13. Imaging tumors of the patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadei, R., E-mail: roberto.casadei@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Kreshak, J., E-mail: j.kreshak@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Rinaldi, R. [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Rimondi, E., E-mail: eugenio.rimondi@ior.it [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Bianchi, G., E-mail: giuseppe.bianchi@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Alberghini, M., E-mail: marco.alberghini@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Ruggieri, P. [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D., E-mail: daniel.vanel@ior.it [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Background: Patellar tumors are rare; only a few series have been described in the literature and radiographic diagnosis can be challenging. We reviewed all patellar tumors at one institution and reviewed the literature. Materials and methods: In an evaluation of the database at one institution from 1916 to 2009, 23,000 bone tumors were found. Of these, 41 involved the patella. All had imaging studies and microscopic diagnostic confirmation. All medical records, imaging studies, and pathology were reviewed. Results: There were 15 females and 26 males, ranging from 8 to 68 years old (average 30). There were 30 benign tumors; eight giant cell tumors, eight chondroblastomas, seven osteoid osteomas, two aneurysmal bone cysts, two ganglions, one each of chondroma, exostosis, and hemangioma. There were 11 malignant tumors: five hemangioendotheliomas, three metastases, one lymphoma, one plasmacytoma, and one angiosarcoma. Conclusion: Patellar tumors are rare and usually benign. As the patella is an apophysis, the most frequent lesions are giant cell tumor in the adult and chondroblastoma in children. Osteoid osteomas were frequent in our series and easily diagnosed. Metastases are the most frequent malignant diagnoses in the literature; in our series malignant vascular tumors were more common. These lesions are often easily analyzed on radiographs. CT and MR define better the cortex, soft tissue extension, and fluid levels. This study presents the imaging patterns of the more common patellar tumors in order to help the radiologist when confronted with a lesion in this location.

  14. Imaging Tumor Necrosis with Ferumoxytol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Aghighi

    Full Text Available Ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO are promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. USPIO mediated proton relaxation rate enhancement is strongly dependent on compartmentalization of the agent and can vary depending on their intracellular or extracellular location in the tumor microenvironment. We compared the T1- and T2-enhancement pattern of intracellular and extracellular USPIO in mouse models of cancer and pilot data from patients. A better understanding of these MR signal effects will enable non-invasive characterizations of the composition of the tumor microenvironment.Six 4T1 and six MMTV-PyMT mammary tumors were grown in mice and imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. R1 relaxation rates were calculated for different tumor types and different tumor areas and compared with histology. The transendothelial leakage rate of ferumoxytol was obtained by our measured relaxivity of ferumoxytol and compared between different tumor types, using a t-test. Additionally, 3 patients with malignant sarcomas were imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. T1- and T2-enhancement patterns were compared with histopathology in a descriptive manner as a proof of concept for clinical translation of our observations.4T1 tumors showed central areas of high signal on T1 and low signal on T2 weighted MR images, which corresponded to extracellular nanoparticles in a necrotic core on histopathology. MMTV-PyMT tumors showed little change on T1 but decreased signal on T2 weighted images, which correlated to compartmentalized nanoparticles in tumor associated macrophages. Only 4T1 tumors demonstrated significantly increased R1 relaxation rates of the tumor core compared to the tumor periphery (p<0.001. Transendothelial USPIO leakage was significantly higher for 4T1 tumors (3.4±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100cm3 compared to MMTV-PyMT tumors (1.0±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100 cm3. Likewise, ferumoxytol imaging in patients showed similar findings with

  15. Tumor Molecular Imaging with Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging (MI can provide not only structural images using traditional imaging techniques but also functional and molecular information using many newly emerging imaging techniques. Over the past decade, the utilization of nanotechnology in MI has exhibited many significant advantages and provided new opportunities for the imaging of living subjects. It is expected that multimodality nanoparticles (NPs can lead to precise assessment of tumor biology and the tumor microenvironment. This review addresses topics related to engineered NPs and summarizes the recent applications of these nanoconstructs in cancer optical imaging, ultrasound, photoacoustic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and radionuclide imaging. Key challenges involved in the translation of NPs to the clinic are discussed.

  16. Line matching based on planar homography for stereo aerial images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanbiao; Zhao, Liang; Huang, Shoudong; Yan, Lei; Dissanayake, Gamini

    2015-06-01

    We propose an efficient line matching algorithm for a pair of calibrated aerial photogrammetric images, which makes use of sparse 3D points triangulated from 2D point feature correspondences to guide line matching based on planar homography. Two different strategies are applied in the proposed line matching algorithm for two different cases. When three or more points can be found coplanar with the line segment to be matched, the points are used to fit a plane and obtain an accurate planar homography. When one or two points can be found, the approximate terrain plane parallel to the line segment is utilized to compute an approximate planar homography. Six pairs of rural or urban aerial images are used to demonstrate the efficiency and validity of the proposed algorithm. Compared with line matching based on 2D point feature correspondences, the proposed method can increase the number of correctly matched line segments. In addition, compared with most line matching methods that do not use 2D point feature correspondences, the proposed method has better efficiency, although it obtains fewer matches. The C/C++ source code for the proposed algorithm is available at

  17. An Endothelial Planar Cell Model for Imaging Immunological Synapse Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Roberta; Carman, Christopher V

    2015-12-24

    Adaptive immunity is regulated by dynamic interactions between T cells and antigen presenting cells ('APCs') referred to as 'immunological synapses'. Within these intimate cell-cell interfaces discrete sub-cellular clusters of MHC/Ag-TCR, F-actin, adhesion and signaling molecules form and remodel rapidly. These dynamics are thought to be critical determinants of both the efficiency and quality of the immune responses that develop and therefore of protective versus pathologic immunity. Current understanding of immunological synapses with physiologic APCs is limited by the inadequacy of the obtainable imaging resolution. Though artificial substrate models (e.g., planar lipid bilayers) offer excellent resolution and have been extremely valuable tools, they are inherently non-physiologic and oversimplified. Vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells have emerged as an important peripheral tissue (or stromal) compartment of 'semi-professional APCs'. These APCs (which express most of the molecular machinery of professional APCs) have the unique feature of forming virtually planar cell surface and are readily transfectable (e.g., with fluorescent protein reporters). Herein a basic approach to implement endothelial cells as a novel and physiologic 'planar cellular APC model' for improved imaging and interrogation of fundamental antigenic signaling processes will be described.

  18. Pseudo planar images obtained from pulmonary SPECT: Agreement of reading and comparison to planar images; Images pseudoplanaires issues des tomographies pulmonaires: etude de la reproductibilite de lecture et comparaison aux images planaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciappuccini, R.; Boichot, C.; Cochet, A.; Touzery, C.; Dygai-Cochet, I.; Berriolo-Riedinger, A.; Toubeau, M.; Brunotte, F. [Centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 21 - Dijon (France)

    2009-02-15

    Purpose Due to a long time of acquisition, performing during the same examination planar and pulmonary tomography is time expensive. Then, pseudo planar images have been advocated to be used instead of planar images in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. We aim to compare both kinds of images in terms of probability and to assess intra- and inter-observer agreement. Materials and methods Thirty-four patients referred to our unit to diagnose or rule out pulmonary embolism, underwent a planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) lung scan and a V/Q lung SPECT. Using the SPECT projections, eight pseudo planar images were created for each examination. Two experienced physicians read twice both sets of anonymous planar and pseudo planar images. They checked the probability of pulmonary embolism using the modified PIOPED criteria but without the chest X-ray. Results For both readers, intra-observer agreement for pseudo planar images is good (kw = 0.69 and 0.78), and similar to the planar images agreement. Interobserver agreement (kw = 0.63) is also good. Both modalities show a good agreement in terms of probability of pulmonary embolism. Conclusions We showed that pseudo planar pulmonary images have a good intra- and interobserver agreement. Furthermore, in our population, these images lead to the same results in terms of probability of pulmonary embolism as those obtained using the standard planar technique. (authors)

  19. Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Umeno, Marc M.

    2011-09-13

    A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

  20. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: planar images generated from V/Q SPECT are not a reliable substitute for traditional planar V/Q scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Abgral, Ronan; Jaffrelot, Morgan; Delluc, Aurelien; Gut-Gobert, Christophe; Querellou, Solène; Cornily, Jean-Christophe; Le Gal, Grégoire; Salaün, Pierre-Yves

    2012-07-01

    The use of summed planar images generated from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy has been proposed as a substitute for planar V/Q scans in order to use the revised PIOPED interpretation criteria when only SPECT acquisition is performed in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. The aim was to evaluate the accuracy of angular summed planar scans in comparison with true planar images. Patients included in the 'SPECT study' assessing the diagnostic performance of V/Q SPECT were analysed. Angular summed planar images were generated from SPECT acquisition data and compared with true planar scans. Angular summed planar images were successfully generated for 246 patients. Regarding interobserver variability, the interpretation result was different for 15 (6%) summed planar scans with an excellent degree of agreement (κ=0.92; 95% confidence interval 0.88-0.96). With regard to intermodality interpretation variability between conventional planar and angular summed images, the result was different for 63 (26%) of 246 patients with an intermodality degree of agreement of κ=0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.58-0.73). Planar images generated from SPECT V/Q scintigraphy are not a reliable substitute for true planar V/Q images.

  1. 131I activity quantification of gamma camera planar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquero, Raquel; Garcia, Hugo P.; Incio, Monica G.; Minguez, Pablo; Cardenas, Alexander; Martínez, Daniel; Lassmann, Michael

    2017-02-01

    A procedure to estimate the activity in target tissues in patients during the therapeutic administration of 131I radiopharmaceutical treatment for thyroid conditions (hyperthyroidism and differentiated thyroid cancer) using a gamma camera (GC) with a high energy (HE) collimator, is proposed. Planar images are acquired for lesions of different sizes r, and at different distances d, in two HE GC systems. Defining a region of interest (ROI) on the image of size r, total counts n g are measured. Sensitivity S (cps MBq-1) in each acquisition is estimated as the product of the geometric G and the intrinsic efficiency η 0. The mean fluence of 364 keV photons arriving at the ROI per disintegration G, is calculated with the MCNPX code, simulating the entire GC and the HE collimator. Intrinsic efficiency η 0 is estimated from a calibration measurement of a plane reference source of 131I in air. Values of G and S for two GC systems—Philips Skylight and Siemens e-cam—are calculated. The total range of possible sensitivity values in thyroidal imaging in the e-cam and skylight GC measure from 7 cps MBq-1 to 35 cps MBq-1, and from 6 cps MBq-1 to 29 cps MBq-1, respectively. These sensitivity values have been verified with the SIMIND code, with good agreement between them. The results have been validated with experimental measurements in air, and in a medium with scatter and attenuation. The counts in the ROI can be produced by direct, scatter and penetration photons. The fluence value for direct photons is constant for any r and d values, but scatter and penetration photons show different values related to specific r and d values, resulting in the large sensitivity differences found. The sensitivity in thyroidal GC planar imaging is strongly dependent on uptake size, and distance from the GC. An individual value for the acquisition sensitivity of each lesion can significantly alleviate the level of uncertainty in the measurement of thyroid uptake activity for each patient.

  2. Echo-Planar Imaging: Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Fraction of a Second

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehling, Michael K.; Turner, Robert; Mansfield, Peter

    1991-10-01

    Progress has recently been made in implementing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques that can be used to obtain images in a fraction of a second rather than in minutes. Echo-planar imaging (EPI) uses only one nuclear spin excitation per image and lends itself to a variety of critical medical and scientific applications. Among these are evaluation of cardiac function in real time, mapping of water diffusion and temperature in tissue, mapping of organ blood pool and perfusion, functional imaging of the central nervous system, depiction of blood and cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics, and movie imaging of the mobile fetus in utero. Through shortened patient examination times, higher patient throughput, and lower cost per MRI examination, EPI may become a powerful tool for early diagnosis of some common and potentially treatable diseases such as ischemic heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

  3. Phyllodes tumor: review of key imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Michael Jonathan; Swintelski, Cara; Yaziji, Hadi; Torres-Salichs, Manuel; Esserman, Lisa E

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is rare and often resembles the more commonly seen fibroadenoma at imaging and histologically. As core biopsy cannot always distinguish the two, assessing radiologic-pathologic concordance is essential to guide appropriate clinical management. We review the imaging characteristics of phyllodes tumor at mammography, ultrasound, and MRI to help the interpreting radiologist be aware of key imaging features that should alert him to the possibility of a phyllodes tumor even if not verified by initial core biopsy.

  4. Dielectric Covered Planar Antennas at Submillimeter Wavelengths for Terahertz Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Gill, John J.; Skalare, Anders; Lee, Choonsup; Llombart, Nuria; Siegel, Peter H.

    2011-01-01

    Most optical systems require antennas with directive patterns. This means that the physical area of the antenna will be large in terms of the wavelength. When non-cooled systems are used, the losses of microstrip or coplanar waveguide lines impede the use of standard patch or slot antennas for a large number of elements in a phased array format. Traditionally, this problem has been solved by using silicon lenses. However, if an array of such highly directive antennas is to be used for imaging applications, the fabrication of many closely spaced lenses becomes a problem. Moreover, planar antennas are usually fed by microstrip or coplanar waveguides while the mixer or the detector elements (usually Schottky diodes) are coupled in a waveguide environment. The coupling between the antenna and the detector/ mixer can be a fabrication challenge in an imaging array at submillimeter wavelengths. Antennas excited by a waveguide (TE10) mode makes use of dielectric superlayers to increase the directivity. These antennas create a kind of Fabry- Perot cavity between the ground plane and the first layer of dielectric. In reality, the antenna operates as a leaky wave mode where a leaky wave pole propagates along the cavity while it radiates. Thanks to this pole, the directivity of a small antenna is considerably enhanced. The antenna consists of a waveguide feed, which can be coupled to a mixer or detector such as a Schottky diode via a standard probe design. The waveguide is loaded with a double-slot iris to perform an impedance match and to suppress undesired modes that can propagate on the cavity. On top of the slot there is an air cavity and on top, a small portion of a hemispherical lens. The fractional bandwidth of such antennas is around 10 percent, which is good enough for heterodyne imaging applications.The new geometry makes use of a silicon lens instead of dielectric quarter wavelength substrates. This design presents several advantages when used in the submillimeter

  5. Multimodality Imaging of Tumor Response to Doxil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang, Lei Zhu, Gang Liu, Naoki Hida, Guangming Lu, Henry S. Eden, Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Early assessment of tumor responses to chemotherapy could enhance treatment outcomes by ensuring that, from the beginning, treatments meet the individualized needs of patients. In this study, we applied multiple modality molecular imaging techniques to pre-clinical monitoring of early tumor responses to Doxil, focusing on imaging of apoptosis.Methods: Mice bearing UM-SCC-22B human head and neck squamous cancer tumors received either PBS or 1 to 2 doses of Doxil® (doxorubicin HCl liposome injection (10 mg/kg/dose. Bioluminescence signals from an apoptosis-responsive reporter gene were captured for apoptosis evaluation. Tumor metabolism and proliferation were assessed by 18F-FDG and 3'-18F-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine (18F-FLT positron emission tomography. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI was performed to calculate averaged apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs for the whole tumor volume. After imaging, tumor samples were collected for histological evaluation, including terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL, anti-CD31, and Ki-67 immunostaining.Results: Two doses of Doxil significantly inhibited tumor growth. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI indicated apoptosis of tumor cells after just 1 dose of Doxil treatment, before apparent tumor shrinkage. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET imaging identified decreased tumor metabolism and proliferation at later time points than those at which BLI indicated apoptosis. MRI measurements of ADC altered in response to Doxil, but only after tumors were treated with 2 doses. Decreased tumor proliferation and increased apoptotic cells were confirmed by changes of Ki-67 index and apoptotic ratio.Conclusion: Our study of tumor responses to different doses of Doxil demonstrated that it is essential to combine apoptosis imaging strategies with imaging of other critical biological or pathological pathways, such as metabolism and proliferation, to improve clinical decision making

  6. Imaging Functions of Quasi-Periodic Nanohole Array as an Ultra-Thin Planar Optical Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung Sheng Kao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the lensing functions and imaging abilities of a quasi-periodic nanohole array in a metal screen have been theoretically investigated and demonstrated. Such an optical binary mask with nanoholes designed in an aperiodic arrangement can function as an ultra-thin planar optical lens, imaging complex structures composed of multiple light sources at tens of wavelengths away from the lens surface. Via resolving two adjacent testing objects at different separations, the effective numerical aperture (N.A. and the effective imaging area of the planar optical lens can be evaluated, mimicking the imaging function of a conventional lens with high N.A. Furthermore, by using the quasi-periodic nanohole array as an ultra-thin planar optical lens, important applications such as X-ray imaging and nano-optical circuits may be found in circumstances where conventional optical lenses cannot readily be applied.

  7. A correction method of the spatial distortion in planar images from γ-Camera systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanasas, D.; Georgiou, E.; Giokaris, N.; Karabarbounis, A.; Maintas, D.; Papanicolas, C. N.; Polychronopoulou, A.; Stiliaris, E.

    2009-06-01

    A methodology for correcting spatial distortions in planar images for small Field Of View (FOV) γ-Camera systems based on Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes (PSPMT) and pixelated scintillation crystals is described. The process utilizes a correction matrix whose elements are derived from a prototyped planar image obtained through irradiation of the scintillation crystal by a 60Co point source and without a collimator. The method was applied to several planar images of a SPECT experiment with a simple phantom construction at different detection angles. The tomographic images are obtained using the Maximum-Likelihood Expectation-Maximization (MLEM) reconstruction technique. Corrected and uncorrected images are compared and the applied correction methodology is discussed.

  8. Imaging Tumor Cell Movement In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Entenberg, David; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Sahai, Erik; Condeelis, John; Segall, Jeffrey E

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the methods that we have been developing for analyzing tumor cell motility in mouse and rat models of breast cancer metastasis. Rodents are commonly used both to provide a mammalian system for studying human tumor cells (as xenografts in immunocompromised mice) as well as for following the development of tumors from a specific tissue type in transgenic lines. The Basic Protocol in this unit describes the standard methods used for generation of mammary tumors and imaging th...

  9. The diagnostic value of adding dynamic scintigraphy to standard delayed planar imaging for sentinel node identification in melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marie Kristina Rue; Chakera, Annette H; Hesse, Birger;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare early dynamic imaging combined with delayed static imaging and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT with delayed, planar, static imaging alone for sentinel node (SN) identification in melanoma patients....

  10. The diagnostic value of adding dynamic scintigraphy to standard delayed planar imaging for sentinel node identification in melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marie Kristina Rue; Chakera, Annette H; Hesse, Birger;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare early dynamic imaging combined with delayed static imaging and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT with delayed, planar, static imaging alone for sentinel node (SN) identification in melanoma patients.......The aim of this study was to compare early dynamic imaging combined with delayed static imaging and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT with delayed, planar, static imaging alone for sentinel node (SN) identification in melanoma patients....

  11. Clinical application of several tumor imaging agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Neoplasms is one of the main diseases for harming health.It is difficult to prevent the neoplasms because the factors of bringing out them are complex.To raise survival rate the early diagnosis of tumors is very important.Radionuclide imaging is useful to detect recurrent or residual diseaseand to identificate benign or malignant tumor.Several tumorimaging agents as following have clinical significance indiagnosing tumors.

  12. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2017-04-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. It is different from normal tissue in the extracellular matrix, vascular and lymphatic networks, as well as physiologic conditions. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment provides a better understanding of its function in cancer biology, and thus allowing for the design of new diagnostics and therapeutics for early cancer diagnosis and treatment. The clinical translation of cancer molecular imaging is often hampered by the high cost of commercialization of targeted imaging agents as well as the limited clinical applications and small market size of some of the agents. Because many different cancer types share similar tumor microenvironment features, the ability to target these biomarkers has the potential to provide clinically translatable molecular imaging technologies for a spectrum of cancers and broad clinical applications. There has been significant progress in targeting the tumor microenvironment for cancer molecular imaging. In this review, we summarize the principles and strategies of recent advances made in molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment, using various imaging modalities for early detection and diagnosis of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. MR imaging manifestations of skin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong-hyon; Kim, Jee Young [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Chun, Kyung Ah [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary Hospital, Uijeongbu, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Jee, Won-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea); Sung, Mi-Sook [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Holy family Hospital, Bucheon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea)

    2008-11-15

    In this study, we evaluated MR imaging findings of skin tumors and categorized them into four types: (1) discrete mass lesions of the dermis and epidermis, (2) mass lesions of the subcutis with or without abutment to the skin, (3) diffuse or localized skin thickening without a true mass, and (4) a skin mass with bone destruction. The categorization of MR images may be useful in the differential diagnosis of skin tumors. (orig.)

  14. Particle imaging through planar shock waves and associated velocimetry errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, G.E.; Orlicz, G.C.

    2015-01-01

    When imaging particles through a shock wave, the resulting particle image appears blurred and at the wrong location, which is referred to as a position error. Particle image doublets are observed if only part of the light scattered by a particle is deflected or reflected by the shock. These optical

  15. Study of turbulent flow using Half-Fourier Echo-Planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, A.O. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion en Imagenologia e Instrumentacion Medica

    2006-03-15

    The Echo-Planar Imaging technique combined with a partial Fourier acquisition method was used to obtain velocity images for liquid flows in a circular cross-section pipe at Reynolds number of up to 8000. This partial-Fourier imaging scheme is able to generate shorter echo times than the full-Fourier Echo-Planar Imaging methods, reducing the signal attenuation due to T2{sup *} and flow. Velocity images along the z axis were acquired with a time-scale of 80 ms thus obtaining a real-time description of flow in both the laminar and turbulent regimes. Velocity values and velocity fluctuations were computed with the flow image data. A comparison plot of NMR velocity and bulk velocity and a plot of velocity fluctuations were calculated to investigate the feasibility of this imaging technique. Flow encoded Echo-Planar Imaging together with a reduced data acquisition method can provide us with a real-time technique to capture instantaneous images of the flow field for both laminar and turbulent regimes. (author)

  16. Real-time planar segmentation of depth images: from three-dimensional edges to segmented planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javan Hemmat, Hani; Bondarev, Egor; de With, Peter H. N.

    2015-09-01

    Real-time execution of processing algorithms for handling depth images in a three-dimensional (3-D) data framework is a major challenge. More specifically, considering depth images as point clouds and performing planar segmentation requires heavy computation, because available planar segmentation algorithms are mostly based on surface normals and/or curvatures, and, consequently, do not provide real-time performance. Aiming at the reconstruction of indoor environments, the spaces mainly consist of planar surfaces, so that a possible 3-D application would strongly benefit from a real-time algorithm. We introduce a real-time planar segmentation method for depth images avoiding any surface normal calculation. First, we detect 3-D edges in a depth image and generate line segments between the identified edges. Second, we fuse all the points on each pair of intersecting line segments into a plane candidate. Third and finally, we implement a validation phase to select planes from the candidates. Furthermore, various enhancements are applied to improve the segmentation quality. The GPU implementation of the proposed algorithm segments depth images into planes at the rate of 58 fps. Our pipeline-interleaving technique increases this rate up to 100 fps. With this throughput rate improvement, the application benefit of our algorithm may be further exploited in terms of quality and enhancing the localization.

  17. MR imaging of gestational trophoblastic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Bum; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Hak Hee; Lee, Eun Ja; Lee, Jae Hee; Song, Ha Hun; Kim, Taek Geun; Ro, Sang Chun; Jee, Mi Kyung; Chung, Jae Geun [Catholic University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-09-15

    To evaluate the MR findings of gestational trophoblastic tumor(GTT) in correlation with pathological results. Nine patients who confirmed the diagnosis (four choriocarcinomas and five invasive moles) constituted the basis of our study. Pathologic specimens were taken from the tumors corresponding to the regions of interest on MR images The MR images were analyzed in respect of the morphology and signal intensity of the tumors, uterine and adnexal vascularity, and the adnexal lesion. The MR findings of four choriocarcinomas were well-defined, hemorrhagic masses with central necrosis; the masses were hyperintense on T1-weighted images. In contrast, the five invasive moles showed irregular and permeative masses with densely enhanced solid components and tiny cystic lesion. The trophoblstic proliferation, coagulation necrosis, and molar villi had variable signal intensities on T1- and T2-weighted images. Our results suggest that MR imaging is a promising tool for noninvasive morphologic analysis of GTTS.

  18. Planar laser-induced fluorescence fuel imaging during gas-turbine relight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Read, Robert; Rogerson, J.W.; Hochgreb, S.

    2013-01-01

    This experimental study investigates the influence of fuel distribution on ignition outcome during high-altitude relight of a gas turbine. Planar laser-induced fluorescence is used to image fuel inside a lean direct-injection combustor under realistic conditions. A novel apparatus is developed...... to permit planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging, in which large quantities of poorly atomized fuel impinges on the internal surfaces of the combustor. Results reveal high variability in atomization quality. In the absence of flame, small droplets are confined to areas of recirculating flow, whereas...... of ignition when the airflow rate is high. In the presence of flame, medium-sized burning droplets are observed close to the injector centerline. Flame interference resulting from fluorescence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is apparent, but small, suggesting that kerosene planar laser...

  19. TUMORS INVADING PARAPHARYNGEAL SPACE: REFINED IMAGING DIAGNOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuang Qixin; Cheng Yingsheng; Yang Shixun; Shang kezhong; Yan Xinhua

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To investigate imaging findings of tumors invading parapharyngeal space. Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)and digital subtruation angiography (DSA) findings of 19patients with tumors infiltrating parapharyngeal space by surgery and pathology were analysed, including four branchial cleft cysts, three jugular glomus tumors, four carotid body tumors, three neurilemomas and five carcinomas of nasopharynx involving parapharyngeal space. Fifteen patients underwent MRI scanning nine patients had CT scanning, three patients MRA and five patients DSA. Results: MRI provided clinically useful informations about the size, shape, extent and site of the parapharyngeal space tumors, and also their effects on adjacent structures. The main MRI features of paraganglioma presented as many low signal tortuous and creeping vessels in the tumor. The main CT features of jugular glomus tumor revealed as jugular foramen enlargement with bone destruction. Tumor vessels were clearly displayed by MRA and DSA. Conclusion: MRI was superior to CT in the diagnosis of tumors invading parapharyngeal space. The location and nature of the lesions could be diagnosed accurately by MRI combined with CT or DSA.

  20. Imaging of childhood inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguz, Berna; Ozcan, Hatice Nursun; Omay, Burak; Ozgen, Burce; Haliloglu, Mithat [Division of Pediatric Radiology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Altindag / Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-10-15

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a rare benign neoplasm and most commonly involves the lung but occurs in extrapulmonary locations. To present imaging findings in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors in children based on a single-centre experience. We retrospectively reviewed CT and MRI findings of children diagnosed with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a single institution. We identified 15 children (range: 1-17 years) with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. The tumor was localized to the lung (n = 5), mediastinum (n = 3), trachea (n = 1), bronchus (n = 1), abdomen (n = 2) and orbit (n = 3). All the extraorbital tumors were solid masses with homogeneous or heterogeneous enhancement. Four lung tumors and one posterior mediastinal tumor contained calcification. Local recurrence following surgical removal occurred in two children with invasion of the esophagus and of the left atrium in one. Localized masses were seen in all children with orbital tumour. Two of these had episcleritis and perineuritis; one had episcleritis, tendonitis, perineuritis, myositis and dacryoadenitis. The locations and imaging features of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are variable. (orig.)

  1. Molecular Imaging System for Monitoring Tumor Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, Esra; Burcin Unlu, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    In cancer, non-invasive imaging techniques that monitor molecular processes associated with the tumor angiogenesis could have a central role in the evaluation of novel antiangiogenic and proangiogenic therapies as well as early detection of the disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) can serve as specific biological targets for imaging of angiogenesis since expression of MMPs is required for angiogenesis and has been found to be upregulated in every type of human cancer and correlates with stage, invasive, metastatic properties and poor prognosis. However, for most cancers it is still unknown when, where and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis [1]. Development of high-resolution, high sensitivity imaging techniques in parallel with the tumor models could prove invaluable for assessing the physical location and the time frame of MMP enzymatic acitivity. The goal of this study is to understand where, when and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis. We will accomplish this goal by following two objectives: to develop a high sensitivity, high resolution molecular imaging system, to develop a virtual tumor simulator that can predict the physical location and the time frame of the MMP activity. In order to achieve our objectives, we will first develop a PAM system and develop a mathematical tumor model in which the quantitative data obtained from the PAM can be integrated. So, this work will develop a virtual tumor simulator and a molecular imaging system for monitoring tumor angiogenesis. 1.Kessenbrock, K., V. Plaks, and Z. Werb, MMP:regulators of the tumor microenvironment. Cell, 2010. 141(1)

  2. Characterizing intraocular tumors with photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Xue, Yafang; Gursel, Zeynep; Slimani, Naziha; Wang, Xueding; Demirci, Hakan

    2016-03-01

    Intraocular tumors are life-threatening conditions. Long-term mortality from uveal melanoma, which accounts for 80% of primary intraocular tumors, could be as high as 25% depending on the size, ciliary body involvement and extraocular extension. The treatments of intraocular tumors include eye-sparing approaches such as radiotherapy and thermotherapy, and the more aggressive enucleation. The accurate diagnosis of intraocular tumors is thereby critical in the management and follow-up of the patients. The diagnosis of intraocular tumors is usually based on clinical examination with acoustic backscattering based ultrasonography. By analyzing the high frequency fluctuations within the ultrasound (US) signals, microarchitecture information inside the tumor can be characterized. However, US cannot interrogate the histochemical components formulating the microarchitecture. One representative example is the inability of US imaging (and other contemporary imaging modalities as well) in differentiating nevoid and melanoma cells as the two types of cells possesses similar acoustic backscattering properties. Combining optical and US imaging, photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode both the microarchitecture and histochemical component information in biological tissue. This study attempts to characterize ocular tumors by analyzing the high frequency signal components in the multispectral PA images. Ex vivo human eye globes with melanoma and retinoblastoma tumors were scanned using less than 6 mJ per square centimeters laser energy with tunable range of 600-1700 nm. A PA-US parallel imaging system with US probes CL15-7 and L22-14 were used to acquire the high frequency PA signals in real time. Preliminary results show that the proposed method can identify uveal melanoma against retinoblastoma tumors.

  3. Quantification of iodine-131 in tumors using a threshold based on image contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeNardo, G.L.; Shen, Sui; DeNardo, S.J.; Liao Shuquinn; DeNardo, D.A.; Yuan, A. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of California at Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Lamborn, K.R. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Accurate and reproducible quantification of tumor radioactivity by imaging requires definition of a region of interest (ROI) for the tumor. The use of a threshold for creating the tumor ROI based on tumor-to-background image contrast (image contrast) was examined. Quantification of iodine-131 in spheres in a phantom that simulated tumors in patients was investigated using planar imaging and geometric-mean and effective-point-source methods. Thresholds that provided the least quantitative error for spheres with different diameters (1-5 cm) and locations (0-11 cm deep in the body), {sup 131}I concentrations (0.037-3.2 MBq/ml), and sphere-to-background concentration ratios (1:0, 14:1 and 7:1) were investigated. The correlation between threshold and sphere image contrast was examined. The phantom study showed that an appropriate threshold value for quantification of tumor radioactivity could be determined using image contrast for a single view, provided that image contrast was {>=}1.5. The error of quantification was less than 10% for spheres with high image contrast ({>=}1.5) but was greater than 17% for spheres with low image contrast (<1.5). When image contrast-dependent thresholds were applied to patient studies, {sup 131}I concentrations determined by imaging were in good agreement with the concentrations determined by counting biopsy samples. Additionally, reproducibility was improved when compared with a visual boundary method. It is concluded that accurate and reproducible quantification of radioactivity in tumors is achievable using thresholds based on image contrast if image contrast is greater than or equal to 1.5. Optimal thresholds for quantification of tumor radioactivity were similar if image contrast was similar despite differing tumor diameters, locations and {sup 131}I concentrations. Under certain circumstances, the effective-point-source method was preferable to the geometric-mean method. (orig.) With 6 figs., 2 tabs., 29 refs.

  4. Quantitative planar Raman imaging through a spectrograph: visualisation of a supersonic wedge flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolboom, R.A.L.; Dam, N.J.; Meulen, J.J. ter; Bakker, P.G.

    2005-01-01

    Planar Raman imaging through a spectrograph is demonstrated as a diagnostic tool for quantitative flow visualisation of internal supersonic wedge flow. A dedicated Bayesian deconvolution filter is used to remove the spectral structure that is introduced by the spectrograph. The 2D density field is d

  5. Localization of the cortical motor area by functional magnetic resonance imaging with gradient echo and echo-planar methods, using clinical 1.5 Tesla MR imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, K

    1997-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gradient echo and echo-planar sequences was applied to healthy volunteers and neurological patients to evaluate the feasibility of detecting and localizing the motor cortex. Time course of the change in signal intensity by an alternate repetition of motor task (squeezing hand) and rest periods was also examined. The motor cortex was localized as the area of signal increase in 88.9% of 45 healthy volunteers by gradient echo method, which mainly reflected the cortical vein, and 83.3% of 30 healthy volunteers by echo-planar method, which mainly reflected the cerebral gyrus. Among 21 volunteers who participated in the both studies, success rate in the localization for the motor cortex was 90.5% (21 volunteers) by gradient echo method and 81% (17 volunteers) by echo-planar method. It was also shown from the time course of the change in signal intensity that signal increase in the most significantly activated area generally corresponded with the periods of the motor task, and the latency between the onset of signal increase and the onset of motor task was usually about 4 seconds. In four of 6 patients with brain tumor, the motor cortex was localized, although activated areas were displaced or distorted. The results indicate that fMRI, either with gradient echo or echo-planar sequence, is a useful method for localizing the primary motor area activated during the motor task and clinically available for noninvasive evaluation of the anatomical relation between brain tumors and the motor area before surgical therapy.

  6. MR imaging and histopathology of cartilage tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, Hirokazu; Ohba, Satoru; Ohtsuka, Takanobu; Matui, Norio; Nakamura, Takaaki (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1994-05-01

    The MR imaging-pathologic correlation of cartilaginous bone tumors and the value of intravenously administered Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging was studied. The MR studies were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-seven cases were examined with 0.5 T and 1.0 T scanner and all cases were pathologically proved. We discussed the following MR findings: signal intensities of tumors, Gd-DTPA features, morphological findings, and associated findings. Hyaline cartilage tumors showed low signal intensity on T[sub 1]-weighted images and very high signal intensity on T[sub 2]-weighted images. Lobulated marginal enhancements were recognized in chondrosarcomas. This may be an important finding to suspect chondrosarcoma. (author).

  7. Image distortion due to refraction by planar surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arizaga, R; Cap, N; Rabal, H; Trivi, M [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CONICET La Plata-CIC) and OPTIMO Dto de Ciencias Basicas, Fac. de Ingenieria UNLP, PO Box 3, 1897 Gonnet, La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-01-15

    The term 'apparent depth' is commonly treated in textbooks as an issue easily understandable from the point of view of paraxial optical geometrical optics. Nevertheless, everyday life tells us that most of the time the observation of objects immersed in water is made under a great range of visual angles where the paraxial approximation is not valid. Here we developed a non-paraxial treatment to calculate the position and shape of the image of objects immersed in liquids of different refractive indices. The approach was focused on the parametric positions of the images of a single point at different viewing angles. Then we calculated how the image of an extended object is distorted. By using the Matlab software, it is possible to visualize the images for different geometrical conditions. We also include the analysis for refractive index with negative values as is the case of metamaterials.

  8. Low-Mass Planar Photonic Imaging Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a revolutionary electro-optical (EO) imaging sensor concept that provides a low-mass, low-volume alternative to the traditional bulky optical telescope...

  9. Estimating the Euler Characteristic of a planar set from a digital image

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiderlen, Markus

    2006-01-01

    A new estimator (approximation) for the Euler–Poincare characteristic of a planar set K in the extended convex ring is suggested. As input, it uses only the digital image of K, which is modeled as the set of all points of a regular lattice falling in K. The key idea is to estimate the two planar...... Betti numbers of K (number of connected components and number of holes) by approximating K and its complement by polygonal sets derived from the digitization. In contrast to earlier methods, only certain connected components of these approximations are counted. The estimator of the Euler characteristic...

  10. PET tracer for imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    There is provided a radiolabelled peptide-based compound for diagnostic imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). The compound may thus be used for diagnosis of malignant diseases. The compound is particularly useful for imaging of somatostatin overexpression in tumors, wherein the compound...... is capable of being imaged by PET when administered with a target dose in the range of 150-350 MBq, such as 150-250 MBq, preferable in the range of 191-210 MBq....

  11. Using Integrins for Tumor Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Roland Haubner; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Beer, Ambros J.; Eugenija Vabuliene; Daniel Reim; Mario Sarbia; Karl-Friedrich Becker; Michael Goebel; Rüdiger Hein; Hans-Jürgen Wester; Horst Kessler; Markus Schwaiger

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The integrin alphavbeta3 plays an important role in angiogenesis and tumor cell metastasis, and is currently being evaluated as a target for new therapeutic approaches. Several techniques are being studied to enable noninvasive determination of alphavbeta3 expression. We developed [(18)F]Galacto-RGD, a (18)F-labeled glycosylated alphavbeta3 antagonist, allowing monitoring of alphavbeta3 expression with positron emission tomography (PET). METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here we show by quant...

  12. Preoperative imaging diagnosis of carotid body tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Ojeda, Luis A; Martínez-Viteri, Miguel A

    2010-01-01

    Carotid body tumors (CBTs) are relatively frequent lesions encountered at high altitudes, such in as the Andean Mountains. A correct preoperative diagnosis is essential for surgical planning and performance. For this reason, we have reviewed the evolution of our experience in the imaging diagnosis of these tumors. Between 1980 and June 2008, 160 CBTs were diagnosed. A total of 138 tumors were operated on, 4 are waiting for surgery, and 18 were not operated on because of age, medical conditions, or patient refusal. We have reviewed retrospectively the modalities of imaging diagnosis in our patients who underwent operation. Among the 138 tumors operated on, a correct preoperative diagnosis was done in 127 cases (92%). The preoperative diagnosis of the remaining 11 patients was unspecified benign tumor for 6 patients and neck lymph node for 5 patients. The imaging methods performed by different radiologists were conventional ultrasound, color Doppler ultrasound, carotid conventional angiography (CA), axial tomography, magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance angiography, and computed tomographic angiography (CTA). Most patients had more than one image study. Review of radiologist reports revealed a correct diagnosis in all carotid CA, magnetic resonance studies, and CTA. Additionally, CTA appeared to be a valuable method to predict the Shamblin group. Clinical suspicion and current image techniques permit a correct diagnosis in practically all cases of CBT.

  13. Initial experience in perfusion MR imaging of intracranial major artery occlusion with echo-planar technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Mizutani, Yoshiyuki; Inaoka, Sayuki; Hachiya, Junichi [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of perfusion MR imaging using a single-shot echo-planar technique in occlusion of intracranial main arteries. Our patient group consisted of 16 patients with internal carotid artery occlusion (n=9), Moyamoya disease (n=4), and middle cerebral artery occlusion (n=3). We performed the echo-planar perfusion studies with a 1.5-T unit using a free-induction-decay-type echo-planar sequence. With a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA, 30 consecutive scans were obtained at 10 sections every 2 seconds. The data were analyzed in three ways: a time-intensity curves in the territory of the involved artery (n=16); semiquantitative flow map of each section representing signal changes due to passage of Gd-DTPA (n=15); and serial images at a selected section (n=7). The time intensity curves were abnormal in 13 patients. The peak of signal drop was delayed in all of them. Flow maps showed focal flow abnormalities in 11 patients, but they were apparently normal in 4 patients probably due to collateral flow. In serial images, delay in appearance and/or disappearance of Gd-DTPA was noted in 6 patients. In patients with occlusion of intracranial main arteries, MR single-shot echo-planar technique is of clinical use because it can provide information about hemodynamic changes in a short examination time, in multiple sections, and with good temporal resolution. (author)

  14. Planar velocity analysis of diesel spray shadow images

    CERN Document Server

    Sedarsky, David; Blaisot, J-B; Rozé, C

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this work is to demonstrate how spatially resolved image information from diesel fuel injection events can be obtained using a forward-scatter imaging geometry, and used to calculate the velocities of liquid structures on the periphery of the spray. In order to obtain accurate velocities directly from individual diesel spray structures, those features need to be spatially resolved in the measurement. The distributed structures measured in a direct shadowgraphy arrangement cannot be reliably analyzed for this kind of velocity information. However, by utilizing an intense collimated light source and adding imaging optics which modify the signal collection, spatially resolved optical information can be retrieved from spray edge regions within a chosen object plane. This work discusses a set of measurements where a diesel spray is illuminated in rapid succession by two ultrafast laser pulses generated by a mode-locked Ti-Sapphire oscillator seeding a matched pair of regenerative amplifiers. Light fro...

  15. Selected Applications of Planar Imaging Velocimetry in Combustion Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willert, Christian; Stockhausen, Guido; Voges, Melanie; Klinner, Joachim; Schodl, Richard; Hassa, Christoph; Schürmans, Bruno; Güthe, Felix

    This chapter provides an overview on the application of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and Doppler global velocimetry (DGV) in combustion test facilities that are operated at pressures of up to 10 bar. Emphasis is placed on the experimental aspects of each application rather than the interpretation of the acquired flow-field data because many of the encountered problems and chosen solution strategies are unique to this area of velocimetry application. In particular, imaging configurations, seeding techniques, data-acquisition strategies as well as pre- and postprocessing methodologies are outlined.

  16. Two-Dimensional Image Fusion of Planar Bone Scintigraphy and Radiographs in Patients with Clinical Scaphoid Fracture: An Imaging Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O.M.; Lonsdale, M.N.; Jensen, T.D.

    2008-01-01

    experienced nuclear medicine physicians. In addition to the diagnosis, the degree of diagnostic confidence was scored in each case. Results: The addition of fusion images changed the interpretation of each of the three observers in seven, four, and two cases, respectively, reducing the number of positive....... Bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive for the detection of fractures, but exact localization of scintigraphic lesions may be difficult and can negatively affect diagnostic accuracy. Purpose: To investigate the influence of image fusion of planar bone scintigraphy and radiographs on image interpretation...... in patients with suspected scaphoid fracture. Material and Methods: In 24 consecutive patients with suspected scaphoid fracture, a standard planar bone scintigraphy of both hands was supplemented with fusion imaging of the injured wrist. Standard and fusion images were evaluated independently by three...

  17. Two-dimensional fusion imaging of planar bone scintigraphy and radiographs in patients with clinical scaphoid fracture: an imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto Mølby; Lonsdale, Markus Georg; Jensen, T D

    2009-01-01

    experienced nuclear medicine physicians. In addition to the diagnosis, the degree of diagnostic confidence was scored in each case. RESULTS: The addition of fusion images changed the interpretation of each of the three observers in seven, four, and two cases, respectively, reducing the number of positive....... Bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive for the detection of fractures, but exact localization of scintigraphic lesions may be difficult and can negatively affect diagnostic accuracy. PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of image fusion of planar bone scintigraphy and radiographs on image interpretation...... in patients with suspected scaphoid fracture. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 24 consecutive patients with suspected scaphoid fracture, a standard planar bone scintigraphy of both hands was supplemented with fusion imaging of the injured wrist. Standard and fusion images were evaluated independently by three...

  18. Two-Dimensional Image Fusion of Planar Bone Scintigraphy and Radiographs in Patients with Clinical Scaphoid Fracture: An Imaging Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O.M.; Lonsdale, M.N.; Jensen, T.D.

    2008-01-01

    experienced nuclear medicine physicians. In addition to the diagnosis, the degree of diagnostic confidence was scored in each case. Results: The addition of fusion images changed the interpretation of each of the three observers in seven, four, and two cases, respectively, reducing the number of positive....... Bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive for the detection of fractures, but exact localization of scintigraphic lesions may be difficult and can negatively affect diagnostic accuracy. Purpose: To investigate the influence of image fusion of planar bone scintigraphy and radiographs on image interpretation...... in patients with suspected scaphoid fracture. Material and Methods: In 24 consecutive patients with suspected scaphoid fracture, a standard planar bone scintigraphy of both hands was supplemented with fusion imaging of the injured wrist. Standard and fusion images were evaluated independently by three...

  19. Investigation of Metastatic Breast Tumor Heterogeneity and Progression Using Dual Optical/SPECT Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    tumors in the lungs or other internal organs. Figures 3c and 3d show images obtained first in air and then in gel, with the fiber displaced 10 mm from the...the mouse lungs and viscera, and characterize the advantages of this method for quantitative imaging. We have also demonstrated micro-SPECT imaging of...resolution, high-throughput screening. 3. Prototype Recently, a prototype system using CR image plates for co-registered 1-125 planar scintigraphy and x

  20. IC-compatible microspectrometer using a planar imaging diffraction grating.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grabarnik, S.; Emadi, A.; Wu, H.; De Graaf, G.; Vdovin, G.; Wolffenbutter, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    The design and performance of a highly miniaturized spectrometer fabricated using MEMS technologies are reported in this paper. Operation is based on an imaging diffraction grating. Minimizing fabrication complexity and assembly of the micromachined optical and electronic parts of the microspectrome

  1. Efficient probabilistic planar robot motion estimation given pairs of images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, O.; Kröse, B.; Zivkovic, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Estimating the relative pose between two camera positions given image point correspondences is a vital task in most view based SLAM and robot navigation approaches. In order to improve the robustness to noise and false point correspondences it is common to incorporate the constraint that the robot m

  2. Echo-Planar Imaging-Based, J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging for Improved Metabolite Detection in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    64 increments along the indirect spectral (t1) and 16 spatial ky dimensions. In Fig. 5A, an axial MRI of the abdomen is shown displaying the VOI...Fan X, Zamora MA, Karczmar GS. Reduction of spectral ghost artifacts in high-resolution echo-planar spectroscopic imaging of water and fat resonances

  3. Enhancement of Noisy Planar Nuclear Medicine Images using Mean Field Annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Falk, D L; Rubin, D M

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear medicine (NM) images inherently suffer from large amounts of noise and blur. The purpose of this research is to reduce the noise and blur while maintaining image integrity for improved diagnosis. The proposed solution is to increase image quality after the standard pre- and post-processing undertaken by a gamma camera system. Mean Field Annealing (MFA) is the image processing technique used in this research. It is a computational iterative technique that makes use of the Point Spread Function (PSF) and the noise associated with the NM image. MFA is applied to NM images with the objective of reducing noise while not compromising edge integrity. Using a sharpening filter as a post-processing technique (after MFA) yields image enhancement of planar NM images.

  4. Nanobubbles for enhanced ultrasound imaging of tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin T

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tinghui Yin1*, Ping Wang1*, Rongqin Zheng1, Bowen Zheng1, Du Cheng2, Xinling Zhang1, Xintao Shuai21Department of Medical Ultrasonic, Third Affiliated Hospital, 2PCFM Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The fabrication and initial applications of nanobubbles (NBs have shown promising results in recent years. A small particle size is a basic requirement for ultrasound contrast-enhanced agents that penetrate tumor blood vessel pores to allow for targeted imaging and therapy. However, the nanoscale size of the particles used has the disadvantage of weakening the imaging ability of clinical diagnostic ultrasound. In this work, we fabricated a lipid NBs contrast-enhanced ultrasound agent and evaluated its passive targeting ability in vivo. The results showed that the NBs were small (436.8 ± 5.7 nm, and in vitro ultrasound imaging suggested that the ultrasonic imaging ability is comparable to that of microbubbles (MBs. In vivo experiments confirmed the ability of NBs to passively target tumor tissues. The NBs remained in the tumor area for a longer period because they exhibited enhanced permeability and retention. Direct evidence was obtained by direct observation of red fluorescence-dyed NBs in tumor tissue using confocal laser scanning microscopy. We have demonstrated the ability to fabricate NBs that can be used for the in vivo contrast-enhanced imaging of tumor tissue and that have potential for drug/gene delivery.Keywords: phospholipids, ultrasound, contrast agent, tumor-targeted

  5. Echo planar diffusion-weighted imaging: possibilities and considerations with 12- and 32-channel head coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, John N; Saettele, Megan R; Rangaswamy, Rajesh A; Vu, Lan; Gerdes, Clint M; Zhang, Wei; Ai, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Interest in clinical brain magnetic resonance imaging using 32-channel head coils for signal reception continues to increase. The present investigation assesses possibilities for improving diffusion-weighted image quality using a 32-channel in comparison to a conventional 12-channel coil. The utility of single-shot (ss) and an approach to readout-segmented (rs) echo planar imaging (EPI) are examined using both head coils. Substantial image quality improvements are found with rs-EPI. Imaging with a 32-channel head coil allows for implementation of greater parallel imaging acceleration factors or acquisition of scans at a higher resolution. Specifically, higher resolution imaging with rs-EPI can be achieved by increasing the number of readout segments without increasing echo-spacing or echo time to the degree necessary with ss-EPI - a factor resulting in increased susceptibility artifact and reduced signal-to-noise with the latter.

  6. Echo Planar Diffusion-Weighted Imaging: Possibilities and Considerations with 12- and 32-Channel Head Coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N Morelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in clinical brain magnetic resonance imaging using 32-channel head coils for signal reception continues to increase. The present investigation assesses possibilities for improving diffusion-weighted image quality using a 32-channel in comparison to a conventional 12-channel coil. The utility of single-shot (ss and an approach to readout-segmented (rs echo planar imaging (EPI are examined using both head coils. Substantial image quality improvements are found with rs-EPI. Imaging with a 32-channel head coil allows for implementation of greater parallel imaging acceleration factors or acquisition of scans at a higher resolution. Specifically, higher resolution imaging with rs-EPI can be achieved by increasing the number of readout segments without increasing echo-spacing or echo time to the degree necessary with ss-EPI - a factor resulting in increased susceptibility artifact and reduced signal-to-noise with the latter.

  7. Proton MRS imaging in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarifi, Maria [Aghia Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Tzika, A.A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Shriners Burn Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques offer a noninvasive, non-irradiating yet sensitive approach to diagnosing and monitoring pediatric brain tumors. Proton MR spectroscopy (MRS), as an adjunct to MRI, is being more widely applied to monitor the metabolic aspects of brain cancer. In vivo MRS biomarkers represent a promising advance and may influence treatment choice at both initial diagnosis and follow-up, given the inherent difficulties of sequential biopsies to monitor therapeutic response. When combined with anatomical or other types of imaging, MRS provides unique information regarding biochemistry in inoperable brain tumors and can complement neuropathological data, guide biopsies and enhance insight into therapeutic options. The combination of noninvasively acquired prognostic information and the high-resolution anatomical imaging provided by conventional MRI is expected to surpass molecular analysis and DNA microarray gene profiling, both of which, although promising, depend on invasive biopsy. This review focuses on recent data in the field of MRS in children with brain tumors. (orig.)

  8. Development of -N4-NIM for Molecular Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S. Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nitro group of 2-nitroimidazole (NIM enters the tumor cells and is bioreductively activated and fixed in the hypoxia cells. 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (N4 has shown to be a stable chelator for 99mTc. The present study was aimed to develop 99mTc-cyclam-2-nitroimidazole (99mTc-N4-NIM for tumor hypoxia imaging. N4-NIM precursor was synthesized by reacting N4-oxalate and 1,3-dibromopropane-NIM, yielded 14% (total synthesis. Cell uptake of 99mTc-N4-NIM and 99mTc-N4 was obtained in 13762 rat mammary tumor cells and mesothelioma cells in 6-well plates. Tissue distribution of 99mTc-N4-NIM was evaluated in breast-tumor-bearing rats at 0.5–4 hrs. Tumor oxygen tension was measured using an oxygen probe. Planar imaging was performed in the tumor-bearing rat and rabbit models. Radiochemical purity of 99mTc-N4-NIM was >96% by HPLC. Cell uptake of 99mTc-N4-NIM was higher than 99mTc-N4 in both cell lines. Biodistribution of 99mTc-N4-NIM showed increased tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle count density ratios as a function of time. Oxygen tension in tumor tissue was 6–10 mmHg compared to 40–50 mmHg in normal muscle tissue. Planar imaging studies confirmed that the tumors could be visualized clearly with 99mTc-N4-NIM in animal models. Efficient synthesis of N4-NIM was achieved. 99mTc-N4-NIM is a novel hypoxic probe and may be useful in evaluating cancer therapy.

  9. New approach to optical imaging of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilefu, Samuel I.; Bugaj, Joseph E.; Dorshow, Richard B.; Jimenez, Hermo N.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2001-07-01

    Site specific delivery of drugs and contrast agents to tumors protects normal tissues from the cytotoxic effect of drugs, and enhances the contrast between normal and diseased tissues. In optical medicine, biocompatible dyes can be used as phototherapeutics or as contrast agents. Previous studies have shown that the use of covalent or non-covalent dye conjugates of carriers such as antibiodies, liposomes, and polysaccharides improves the delivery of such molecules to tumors. However, large biomolecules can elicit adverse immunogenic reactions and also result in long blood clearance times, delaying visualization of target tissues. A viable alternative to this strategy is to use small bioactive molecule-dye conjugates. These molecules have several advantages over large biomolecules, including ease of synthesis of a variety of high purity compounds for combinatorial screening of new targets, enhanced diffusivity to solid tumors, and the ability to affect the pharmacokinetics of the conjugates by minor structural changes. Thus, we conjugated a near infrared absorbing dye to several bioactive peptides that specifically target overexpressed tumor receptors in established rat tumor lines. High tumor uptake of the conjugates was obtained without loss of either the peptide receptor affinity or the dye fluorescence. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of a small peptide-dye conjugate strategy for in vivo tumor imaging. Site-specific delivery of photodynamic therapy agents may also benefit from this approach.

  10. Comparison of inferior myocardial defect between planar and SPECT image of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine cardiac scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Momose, Mitsuru; Kashikura, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Nobusuke; Saito, Katsumi; Asano, Ryuta; Hosoda, Saichi; Kusakabe, Kiyoko [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1995-02-01

    Discordant findings of inferior MIBG defect between SPECT and planar images were sometimes observed in the clinical studies. In this study, we compared inferior myocardial findings between planar and SPECT image of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzyl-guanidine (MIBG) cardiac scintigraphy in 29 patients. All patients were estimated as normal in anterior accumulation of MIBG. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to the visual finding of inferior defect in the planar and SPECT image; normal group (normal inferior accumulation of MIBG both in the planar and SPECT image, N=10), discordance group (inferior MIBG defect was only observed in the SPECT image, but was not observed in the planar image, N=7), inferior defect group (inferior MIBG defect was observed both in the planar and SPECT image, N=12). Inferior/anterior count ratio of SPECT and planar image were 0.96{+-}0.11 vs. 0.97{+-}0.05 in normal group, 0.59{+-}0.21 vs. 0.99{+-}0.13 in discordance group, 0.46{+-}0.13 vs. 0.82{+-}0.04 in inferior defect group. Liver/heart count ratio was significantly higher in the discordance group (2.07{+-}0.49) than that in the normal (1.14{+-}0.15) and inferior defect group (1.45{+-}0.39). In phantom study, it has been reported that increased liver accumulation of MIBG causes artifactual inferior defect adjacent to the liver. These data indicate that increased liver/heart count ratio may cause artifactual inferior defect on MIBG SPECT image in the clinical studies. Planar image evaluation may be helpful to distinct the artifactual inferior defect on SPECT image. (author).

  11. Rigid motion correction of dual opposed planar projections in single photon imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, G. I.; Ryder, W. J.; Gillam, J. E.; Boisson, F.; Kyme, A. Z.; Fulton, R. R.; Meikle, S. R.; Kench, P. L.

    2017-05-01

    Awake and/or freely moving small animal single photon emission imaging allows the continuous study of molecules exhibiting slow kinetics without the need to restrain or anaesthetise the animals. Estimating motion free projections in freely moving small animal planar imaging can be considered as a limited angle tomography problem, except that we wish to estimate the 2D planar projections rather than the 3D volume, where the angular sampling in all three axes depends on the rotational motion of the animal. In this study, we hypothesise that the motion corrected planar projections estimated by reconstructing an estimate of the 3D volume using an iterative motion compensating reconstruction algorithm and integrating it along the projection path, will closely match the true, motion-less, planar distribution regardless of the object motion. We tested this hypothesis for the case of rigid motion using Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental phantom data based on a dual opposed detector system, where object motion was modelled with 6 degrees of freedom. In addition, we investigated the quantitative accuracy of the regional activity extracted from the geometric mean of opposing motion corrected planar projections. Results showed that it is feasible to estimate qualitatively accurate motion-corrected projections for a wide range of motions around all 3 axes. Errors in the geometric mean estimates of regional activity were relatively small and within 10% of expected true values. In addition, quantitative regional errors were dependent on the observed motion, as well as on the surrounding activity of overlapping organs. We conclude that both qualitatively and quantitatively accurate motion-free projections of the tracer distribution in a rigidly moving object can be estimated from dual opposed detectors using a correction approach within an iterative reconstruction framework and we expect this approach can be extended to the case of non-rigid motion.

  12. Quantitative imaging of a non-combusting diesel spray using structured laser illumination planar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, E.; Kristensson, E.; Hottenbach, P.; Aldén, M.; Grünefeld, G.

    2012-12-01

    Due to its transient nature, high atomization process, and rapid generation of fine evaporating droplets, diesel sprays have been, and still remain, one of the most challenging sprays to be fully analyzed and understood by means of non-intrusive diagnostics. The main limitation of laser techniques for quantitative measurements of diesel sprays concerns the detection of the multiple light scattering resulting from the high optical density of such a scattering medium. A second limitation is the extinction of the incident laser radiation as it crosses the spray, as well as the attenuation of the signal which is to be detected. All these issues have strongly motivated, during the past decade, the use of X-ray instead of visible light for dense spray diagnostics. However, we demonstrate in this paper that based on an affordable Nd:YAG laser system, structured laser illumination planar imaging (SLIPI) can provide accurate quantitative description of a non-reacting diesel spray injected at 1,100 bar within a room temperature vessel pressurized at 18.6 bar. The technique is used at λ = 355 nm excitation wavelength with 1.0 mol% TMPD dye concentration, for simultaneous LIF/Mie imaging. Furthermore, a novel dual-SLIPI configuration is tested with Mie scattering detection only. The results confirm that a mapping of both the droplet Sauter mean diameter and extinction coefficient can be obtained by such complementary approaches. These new insights are provided in this article at late times after injection start. It is demonstrated that the application of SLIPI to diesel sprays provides valuable quantitative information which was not previously accessible.

  13. MR imaging of intradural extramedullary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M.H.; Holtaas, S.; Larsson, E.M. (Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1992-05-01

    Thirty-one consecutive intradual extramedullary spinal tumors examined with MR at 0.3 T were reviewed. In 13 of the patients myelography had been performed. There were 11 patients with meningeoma, 14 with neuroma, one ependymoma, 3 metastases, and 2 lipomas. All tumours were surgically removed and verified by histology. The intradural extramedullary location of the tumors was accurately assessed by MR imaging in all patients and by myelography in 10 of 13. The MR diagnoses were in accordance with the histologic findings in 74% of cases. Compression of the spinal cord of cauda equina with widening of the subarachnoid space above and below the mass or outward displacement of epidural fat was characteristic of the intradural extramedullary tumors. The signal intensity of meningeoma as well as neuroma was slightly lower or equal to that of the cord on T1-weighted images, and equal to or higher than cord signal on T2-weighted images. Neuroma had a lower signal intensity on T1-weighted images and a higher signal intensity on T2-weighted images than meningeoma. Meningeoma appeared more homogeneous than neuroma and had a broad base towards the dura. (orig.).

  14. Single-shot echo-planar imaging with Nyquist ghost compensation: interleaved dual echo with acceleration (IDEA) echo-planar imaging (EPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poser, Benedikt A; Barth, Markus; Goa, Pål-Erik; Deng, Weiran; Stenger, V Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Echo planar imaging (EPI) is most commonly used for blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI, owing to its sensitivity and acquisition speed. A major problem with EPI is Nyquist (N/2) ghosting, most notably at high field. EPI data are acquired under an oscillating readout gradient and hence vulnerable to gradient imperfections such as eddy current delays and off-resonance effects, as these cause inconsistencies between odd and even k-space lines after time reversal. We propose a straightforward and pragmatic method herein termed "interleaved dual echo with acceleration (IDEA) EPI": two k-spaces (echoes) are acquired under the positive and negative readout lobes, respectively, by performing phase encoding blips only before alternate readout gradients. From these two k-spaces, two almost entirely ghost free images per shot can be constructed, without need for phase correction. The doubled echo train length can be compensated by parallel imaging and/or partial Fourier acquisition. The two k-spaces can either be complex averaged during reconstruction, which results in near-perfect cancellation of residual phase errors, or reconstructed into separate images. We demonstrate the efficacy of IDEA EPI and show phantom and in vivo images at both 3 T and 7 T.

  15. Phyllodes tumor: diagnostic imaging and histopathology findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Alina Cristiana; Roşca, Elena; Daina, Lucia Georgeta; Muţiu, Gabriela; Pirte, Adriana Nicoleta; Rahotă, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all primary tumors of the breast. Histologically, phyllodes tumors can be divided into benign (60%), borderline (20%) and malignant (20%). The mammography examination was performed by means of a digital mammography system Giotto 3D Images; the ultrasound examination was performed through a GE Logiq P6 device and histological confirmation was possible after surgery or following the histological biopsy. We grouped the nine patients who presented clinically palpable nodules into two groups, namely: the six patients presenting histological benign results into Group I, and Group II where we included those with borderline and malignant histological results. Mammography performed in 77.7% revealed a well-circumscribed round or oval opacity or with contour lobules. Ultrasound examination was performed in all patients. Mammography and ultrasound have limitation in differentiating between benign lesion and phyllodes tumor. In the nine analyzed cases, mammographic and ultrasound examinations did not allow the differentiation into the three groups of phyllodes tumor. Histopathological examination is considered the golden standard for their diagnosis. Correlations between mammographic and microscopic aspects were inconclusive for determining the degree of differentiation, ultrasound changes could be correlated with the histopathological aspects.

  16. Stereoscopic Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging at 500 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medford, Taylor L.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Jiang, N.; Webster, M.; Lempert, Walter; Miller, J.; Meyer, T.

    2011-01-01

    A new measurement technique for obtaining time- and spatially-resolved image sequences in hypersonic flows is developed. Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) has previously been used to investigate transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hypersonic boundary layers using both planar and volumetric imaging capabilities. Low flow rates of NO were typically seeded into the flow, minimally perturbing the flow. The volumetric imaging was performed at a measurement rate of 10 Hz using a thick planar laser sheet that excited NO fluorescence. The fluorescence was captured by a pair of cameras having slightly different views of the flow. Subsequent stereoscopic reconstruction of these images allowed the three-dimensional flow structures to be viewed. In the current paper, this approach has been extended to 50,000 times higher repetition rates. A laser operating at 500 kHz excites the seeded NO molecules, and a camera, synchronized with the laser and fitted with a beam-splitting assembly, acquires two separate images of the flow. The resulting stereoscopic images provide three-dimensional flow visualizations at 500 kHz for the first time. The 200 ns exposure time in each frame is fast enough to freeze the flow while the 500 kHz repetition rate is fast enough to time-resolve changes in the flow being studied. This method is applied to visualize the evolving hypersonic flow structures that propagate downstream of a discrete protuberance attached to a flat plate. The technique was demonstrated in the NASA Langley Research Center s 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Different tunnel Reynolds number conditions, NO flow rates and two different cylindrical protuberance heights were investigated. The location of the onset of flow unsteadiness, an indicator of transition, was observed to move downstream during the tunnel runs, coinciding with an increase in the model temperature.

  17. Two-Dimensional Image Fusion of Planar Bone Scintigraphy and Radiographs in Patients with Clinical Scaphoid Fracture: An Imaging Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, O.M.; Lonsdale, M.N.; Jensen, T.D.; Weikop, K.L.; Holm, O.; Duus, B.; Friberg, L. (Dept. of Clinical Physiology/Nuclear Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup (Denmark))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now considered the gold standard in second-line imaging of patients with suspected scaphoid fracture and negative radiographs, bone scintigraphy can be used in patients with pacemakers, metallic implants, or other contraindications to MRI. Bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive for the detection of fractures, but exact localization of scintigraphic lesions may be difficult and can negatively affect diagnostic accuracy. Purpose: To investigate the influence of image fusion of planar bone scintigraphy and radiographs on image interpretation in patients with suspected scaphoid fracture. Material and Methods: In 24 consecutive patients with suspected scaphoid fracture, a standard planar bone scintigraphy of both hands was supplemented with fusion imaging of the injured wrist. Standard and fusion images were evaluated independently by three experienced nuclear medicine physicians. In addition to the diagnosis, the degree of diagnostic confidence was scored in each case. Results: The addition of fusion images changed the interpretation of each of the three observers in seven, four, and two cases, respectively, reducing the number of positive interpretations of two of the observers from 11 and nine cases to six and seven cases, respectively. The degree of diagnostic confidence increased significantly in two observers, and interobserver agreement increased in all three pairs of observers from 0.83, 0.57, and 0.73 to 0.89, 0.8, and 0.9, respectively. Conclusion: Image fusion of planar bone scintigrams and radiographs has a significant influence on image interpretation and increases both diagnostic confidence and interobserver agreement

  18. Comparison of Fourier transform and continuous wavelet transform to study echo-planar imaging flow maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez G, A.; Bowtell, R.; Mansfield, P. [Area de Procesamiento Digital de Senales e Imagenes Biomedicas. Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa. Mexico D.F. 09340 Mexico (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    Velocity maps were studied combining Doyle and Mansfield method (1986) with each of the following transforms: Fourier, window Fourier and wavelet (Mexican hat). Continuous wavelet transform was compared against the two Fourier transform to determine which technique is best suited to study blood maps generated by Half Fourier Echo-Planar Imaging. Coefficient images were calculated and plots of the pixel intensity variation are presented. Finally, contour maps are shown to visualize the behavior of the blood flow in the cardiac chambers for the wavelet technique. (Author)

  19. Nontraumatic femoral head necrosis. Classification of bone scintigraphic findings and diagnostic value of SPECT following planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Anzai, Yoshimi; Uno, Kimiichi; Arimizu, Noboru (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine bone scintigraphic findings in nontraumatic femoral head avascular necrosis and diagnostic value of SPECT imaging following a conventional planar imaging. Forty-three femoral heads in twenty-six cases with idiopathic femoral head necrosis (n=2), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=22), aplastic anemia (n=1), and renal transplantation (n=1) were studied. The diagnosis for femoral head necrosis was based on magnetic resonance imaging as well as other diagnostic studies in all cases. Scintigraphic findings of planar and SPECT images were classified into six categories: normal (N); cold or decrease (C); partial increase with cold or decrease (PH+C); ring-like increase with a cold center (RH+C); partial increase (PH); diffuse and/or irregular increase (DH). Avascular necrosis was confirmed in twenty-four femoral heads, in which planar and SPECT images showed scintigraphic findings of N (n=3, 2), C (n=1, 3), PH+C (n=2, 8), RH+C (n=2, 3), PH (n=9, 2), and DH (n=7, 6), respectively. Femoral heads without avascular necrosis demonstrated planar and SPECT findings of N (n=16, 12), C (n=0, 6), and DH (n=3, 1), respectively. When considering C, PH+C, and RH+C as diagnostic findings for avascular necrosis, sensitivities of planar and SPECT images were 21% and 58%, and specificities were 100% and 68%, respectively. In nineteen femoral heads with normal planar findings (N), SPECT correctly identified avascular necrosis in two femoral heads and misidentified six normal femoral heads as avascular necrosis. In nineteen femoral heads with nondiagnostic abnormalities (PH, DH), SPECT correctly identified avascular necrosis in seven femoral heads and showed no false positive. Diagnostic planar findings in five femoral heads were concordant with SPECT diagnosis. These results indicate that SPECT imaging is most valuable when planar images show nondiagnostic abnormalities based on the proposed classification of scintigraphic findings. (author).

  20. Curved planar reconstruction of MR images in focal cortical dysplasia of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Gyung Ho; Lee, Sang Yong; Kim, Chong So; Kim, Young Kon; Lee, Young Hwan; Jeong, Su Hyun [Medical School of Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-01

    To describe curved planar reconstruction imaging (CPR) and determine its usefulness in the evaluation of focal cortical dysplasia of the brain. In 17 cases of focal cortical dysplasia (cortical dysplasia (n=9)), schizencephaly (n=5), and heterotopia (n=3), CPR images were created using a multiplanar reconstruction program and imaging data obtained during T1 magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo MR imaging. We assessed the precise configuration of abnormalities and their relation to adjacent gyri and sulci. CPRI showed the brain cortex as a 2D panoramic image, demonstrating the precise configurations and locations of dysplasia-associated abnormalities and their relation to adjacent gyri and sulci, and the precise shape of the gray-white matter interface. CPRI can provide important radiological information about the extension and configuration of focal cortical dysplasia, and its relation to neighboring cortical structures. We believe that CPRI should form an essential part of the routine investigation os suspected cases of focal cortical dysplasia.

  1. Comparison of I-123 MIBG planar imaging and SPECT for the detection of decreased heart uptake in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jin-Kyoung; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Song, In-Uk; Kim, Joong-Seok; Chung, Yong-An

    2015-10-01

    Decreased myocardial uptake of I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an important finding for diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study compared I-123 MIBG SPECT and planar imaging with regard to their diagnostic yield for PD. 52 clinically diagnosed PD patients who also had decreased striatal uptake on FP-CIT PET/CT were enrolled. 16 normal controls were also included. All underwent cardiac MIBG planar scintigraphy and SPECT separately. Myocardial I-123 MIBG uptake was interpreted on planar and SPECT/CT images separately by visual and quantitative analysis. The final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. Kappa analyses were performed to determine inter-observer agreement for both methods. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were compared with McNemar's test. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 84.6, 100, and 88.2% for planar images and 96.2, 100 and 97.1% for SPECT, respectively, with a significant difference between the two imaging methods (p diagnostic performance for PD than planar images. Increased lung uptake may cause false-negative results on planar imaging.

  2. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Hofstadt, M. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hüttener, M.; Juárez, A. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, G., E-mail: ggomila@ibecbarcelona.eu [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. - Highlights: • Gelatine coatings used to weakly attach bacterial cells onto planar substrates. • Use of the dynamic jumping mode as a non-perturbing bacterial imaging mode. • Nanoscale resolution imaging of unperturbed single living bacterial cells. • Growth and division of single bacteria cells on planar substrates observed.

  3. Sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Wald, Lawrence L; Belliveau, John W; Posse, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provides spatially resolved metabolite information that is invaluable for both neuroscience studies and clinical applications. However, lengthy data acquisition times, which are a result of time-consuming phase encoding, represent a major challenge for MRSI. Fast MRSI pulse sequences that use echo-planar readout gradients, such as proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI), are capable of fast spectral-spatial encoding and thus enable acceleration of image acquisition times. Combining PEPSI with recent advances in parallel MRI utilizing RF coil arrays can further accelerate MRSI data acquisition. Here we investigate the feasibility of ultrafast spectroscopic imaging at high field (3T and 4T) by combining PEPSI with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) MRI using eight-channel head coil arrays. We show that the acquisition of single-average SENSE-PEPSI data at a short TE (15 ms) can be accelerated to 32 s or less, depending on the field strength, to obtain metabolic images of choline (Cho), creatine (Cre), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), and J-coupled metabolites (e.g., glutamate (Glu) and inositol (Ino)) with acceptable spectral quality and localization. The experimentally measured reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) of metabolite resonances were well explained by both the g-factor and reduced measurement times. Thus, this technology is a promising means of reducing the scan times of 3D acquisitions and time-resolved 2D measurements.

  4. Water management in a planar air-breathing fuel cell array using operando neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coz, E.; Théry, J.; Boillat, P.; Faucheux, V.; Alincant, D.; Capron, P.; Gébel, G.

    2016-11-01

    Operando Neutron imaging is used for the investigation of a planar air-breathing array comprising multiple cells in series. The fuel cell demonstrates a stable power density level of 150 mW/cm2. Water distribution and quantification is carried out at different operating points. Drying at high current density is observed and correlated to self-heating and natural convection. Working in dead-end mode, water accumulation at lower current density is largely observed on the anode side. However, flooding mechanisms are found to begin with water condensation on the cathode side, leading to back-diffusion and anodic flooding. Specific in-plane and through-plane water distribution is observed and linked to the planar array design.

  5. Scatter correction in planar imaging and SPECT by constrained factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, J.; Younes, R.B.; Bellaton, B.; Bidet, R. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Jean Minjoz, 25 - Besancon (France). Lab. de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire); Hannequin, P. (Centre d' Imagerie Nucleaire, 74 -Annecy (France))

    1990-11-01

    A new approach to Compton scatter correction based on factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) is presented in this study. The innovation is the use of a constrained photopeak factor. This novel algorithm is evaluated both on planar imaging and SPECT data using Monte Carlo simulations and real phantoms. A comparison with the modified method of Jaszczak is also presented. Different parameters are significantly improved with the authors' recombination method in SPECT studies; particularly after attenuation compensation by the iterative method of Chang. Compared with the subtraction method the contrast is increased by 1.5 for planar Monte Carlo simulations and the scatter fraction is reduced four times with the recombination method. (author).

  6. Intracranial solitary fibrous tumor: Imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarencon, Frederic, E-mail: fredclare5@msn.com [Department of Neuroradiology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, APHP, 75013 Paris (France); Bonneville, Fabrice [Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital Rangueil, Toulouse University Hospital, 31000 Toulouse (France); Rousseau, Audrey [Department of Neuropathology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (France); Galanaud, Damien [Department of Neuroradiology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, APHP, 75013 Paris (France); Kujas, Michele [Department of Neuropathology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (France); Naggara, Olivier [Department of Neuroradiology, St Anne Hospital, 75014 Paris (France); Cornu, Philippe [Department of Neurosurgery, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (France); Chiras, Jacques [Department of Neuroradiology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, APHP, 75013 Paris (France)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To study the neuroimaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors (ISFTs). Materials and methods: Retrospective study of neuroimaging features of 9 consecutive histopathologically proven ISFT cases. Location, size, shape, density, signal intensity and gadolinium uptake were studied at CT and MRI. Data collected from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (3 patients), perfusion imaging and MR spectroscopy (2 patients), and DSA (4 patients) were also analyzed. Results: The tumors most frequently arose from the intracranial meninges (7/9), while the other lesions were intraventricular. Tumor size ranged from 2.5 to 10 cm (mean = 6.6 cm). They presented multilobular shape in 6/9 patients. Most ISFTs were heterogeneous (7/9) with areas of low T2 signal intensity that strongly enhanced after gadolinium administration (6/8). Erosion of the skull was present in about half of the cases (4/9). Components with decreased apparent diffusion coefficient were seen in 2/3 ISFTs on DWI. Spectroscopy revealed elevated peaks of choline and myo-inositol. MR perfusion showed features of hyperperfusion. Conclusion: ISFT should be considered in cases of extra-axial, supratentorial, heterogeneous, hypervascular tumor. Areas of low T2 signal intensity that strongly enhance after gadolinium injection are suggestive of this diagnosis. Restricted diffusion and elevated peak of myo-inositol may be additional valuable features.

  7. Echo-Planar Imaging-Based, J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging for Improved Metabolite Detection in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    16 July 2015, Accepted: 17 July 2015, Published online in Wiley Online Library : 7 September 2015 (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI: 10.1002/nbm.3373 NMR...published online at www.rsna2014.rsna.org, Abstract LL-PHE118, 2014. Accelerated echo planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging in prostate cancer: a...than 13 min and we were able to detect and quantify several metabolites. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Keywords: MRS; prostate cancer; 4D

  8. MRI of intraspinal tumors. Usefulness of the transaxial images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Hiromi; Takemoto, Kazumasa; Fukuda, Teruo

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 24 patients with intraspinal tumors were reviewed. This study included 8 intramedullary tumors, 11 intradural extramedullary tumors, and 5 extradural tumors. In all cases sagittal spin echo (SE) images with an echo time (TE) of 40 msec and a repetition time (TR) of 600 msec and transaxial SE images with a TE of 40 msec and a TR of 1000 msec were obtained using a 0.5 T MR scanner. Coronal SE images were obtained in 11 of 24 cases. In all intraspinal tumors except for a case of seeding into the subarachnoid space from an intracranial glioblastoma, differentiation of intramedullary tumors from extramedullary ones and intradural extramedullary tumors from extradural ones was able to be made on MR images. The extradural sign, which was demonstrated as a low intensity band between the tumor and the cord, was of diagnostic value in distinguishing intradural tumors from extradural ones. This extradural sign was more frequently shown on the transaxial images than sagittal and coronal images. MR imaging shows the location of intraspinal tumors without an invasive technique. Particularly the transaxial images always provide good delineation of both intraspinal tumors and the spinal cord. Therefore, the transaxial SE images should be routinely obtained in the evaluation of intraspinal tumors by MR imaging.

  9. Diffusion-weighted imaging in the prostate: an apparent diffusion coefficient comparison of half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo and echo planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babourina-Brooks, Ben; Cowin, Gary J; Wang, Deming

    2012-02-01

    Prostate cancer detection using diffusion-weighted imaging is highly affected by the accuracy of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in an image. Echo planar imaging (EPI) is a fast sequence commonly used for diffusion imaging but has inherent magnetic susceptibility and chemical shift artefacts associated. A diffusion sequence that is less affected by these artefacts is therefore advantageous. The half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence was chosen. The diffusion sequences were compared in image quality, repeatability of the ADC value and the effect on the ADC value with varied b values. Eight volunteers underwent three scans of each sequence, on a 1.5-T Siemens system, using b values of 0, 150, 300, 450, 600, 750, 900 and 1000 s/mm(2). ADC maps were created to address the reproducibility of the ADC value when using two b values compared to eight b values. The ADC value using all b values with the HASTE sequence gave the best performance in all tested categories. Both sequences gave significantly different ADC mean values for two b values compared to when using eight b values (Perror is present when using two b values. HASTE was shown to be an improvement over EPI in terms of repeatability, signal variation within a region of interest and standard deviation over the volunteer set. The improved accuracy of the ADC value in the HASTE sequence makes it potentially a more sensitive tumor detection technique.

  10. Efficient correction of inhomogeneous static magnetic field-induced distortion in Echo Planar Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Dominic; Kuperman, Joshua M; Dale, Anders M

    2010-03-01

    Single-shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is one of the most efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition schemes, producing relatively high-definition images in 100 ms or less. These qualities make it desirable for Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI). However, EPI suffers from severe spatial and intensity distortion due to B(0) field inhomogeneity induced by magnetic susceptibility variations. Anatomically accurate, undistorted images are essential for relating DTI and fMRI images with anatomical MRI scans, and for spatial registration with other modalities. We present here a fast, robust, and accurate procedure for correcting EPI images from such spatial and intensity distortions. The method involves acquisition of scans with opposite phase encoding polarities, resulting in opposite spatial distortion patterns, and alignment of the resulting images using a fast nonlinear registration procedure. We show that this method, requiring minimal additional scan time, provides superior accuracy relative to the more commonly used, and more time consuming, field mapping approach. This method is also highly computationally efficient, allowing for direct "real-time" implementation on the MRI scanner. We further demonstrate that the proposed method can be used to recover dropouts in gradient echo (BOLD and DSC-MRI) EPI images.

  11. High-resolution small field-of-view magnetic resonance image acquisition system using a small planar coil and a pneumatic manipulator in an open MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Kohei; Masamune, Ken

    2015-10-01

    Low-field open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used for performing image-guided neurosurgical procedures. Intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images are useful for tracking brain shifts and verifying residual tumors. However, it is difficult to precisely determine the boundary of the brain tumors and normal brain tissues because the MR image resolution is low, especially when using a low-field open MRI scanner. To overcome this problem, a high-resolution MR image acquisition system was developed and tested. An MR-compatible manipulator with pneumatic actuators containing an MR signal receiver with a small radiofrequency (RF) coil was developed. The manipulator had five degrees of freedom for position and orientation control of the RF coil. An 8-mm planar RF coil with resistance and inductance of 2.04 [Formula: see text] and 1.00 [Formula: see text] was attached to the MR signal receiver at the distal end of the probe. MR images of phantom test devices were acquired using the MR signal receiver and normal head coil for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) testing. The SNR of MR images acquired using the MR signal receiver was 8.0 times greater than that of MR images acquired using the normal head coil. The RF coil was moved by the manipulator, and local MR images of a phantom with a 2-mm grid were acquired using the MR signal receiver. A wide field-of-view MR image was generated from a montage of local MR images. A small field-of-view RF system with a pneumatic manipulator was integrated in a low-field MRI scanner to allow acquisition of both wide field-of-view and high-resolution MR images. This system is promising for image-guided neurosurgery as it may allow brain tumors to be observed more clearly and removed precisely.

  12. Reliable LIF/Mie droplet sizing in sprays using structured laser illumination planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Yogeshwar Nath; Kristensson, Elias; Berrocal, Edouard

    2014-02-24

    In this article, Structured Laser Illumination Planar Imaging (SLIPI) is used in combination with the LIF/Mie ratio technique for extracting a reliable two-dimensional mapping of the droplets Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD). We show that even for the case of a fairly dilute spray, where single scattering events are in majority, the conventional LIF/Mie technique still remains largely affected by errors introduced by multiple light scattering. To remove this unwanted light intensity on both the LIF and Mie images SLIPI is used prior to apply the image ratio. For the first time, the SLIPI LIF/Mie results are calibrated and compared with measurement data from Phase Doppler Interferometry (PDI).

  13. Quantitative bioluminescence imaging of mouse tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Kung, Andrew L

    2015-01-05

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has become an essential technique for preclinical evaluation of anticancer therapeutics and provides sensitive and quantitative measurements of tumor burden in experimental cancer models. For light generation, a vector encoding firefly luciferase is introduced into human cancer cells that are grown as tumor xenografts in immunocompromised hosts, and the enzyme substrate luciferin is injected into the host. Alternatively, the reporter gene can be expressed in genetically engineered mouse models to determine the onset and progression of disease. In addition to expression of an ectopic luciferase enzyme, bioluminescence requires oxygen and ATP, thus only viable luciferase-expressing cells or tissues are capable of producing bioluminescence signals. Here, we summarize a BLI protocol that takes advantage of advances in hardware, especially the cooled charge-coupled device camera, to enable detection of bioluminescence in living animals with high sensitivity and a large dynamic range.

  14. T2 selective π Echo-Planar Imaging for porous media MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2017-04-01

    The π Echo Planar Imaging (PEPI) method has recently been modified to permit proton density imaging of fluids in porous media with moderate T2 and short T2∗ signal components. In many applications, it is desirable to discriminate multiple T2 components within each image voxel. T2 selective imaging is explored in this paper through adiabatic inversion as a magnetization preparation with PEPI readout. When prior information of the sample relaxation times is known, responses of different species to broadband adiabatic inversion pulses can be predicted by Bloch equation simulation. Different relaxation components can be acquired by combining the images with and without inversion preparation pulses. T2 weighting can be easily introduced in the PEPI sequence by shifting the spatial encoding gradients based on its spin echo nature. T2 decay curves can be extracted for each image voxel from a series of T2 weighted images and spatially resolved T2 distributions can be generated. This method is reliable but slow. The two methods were implemented to image porous media samples with PEPI the common basis of spatial resolution. The results of both methods agree remarkably well.

  15. Imaging Findings of Scrotal Tumors in Children: A Pictorial Essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Hee [Kang-Dong Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jee Eun [Gachon University, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hye [Sungkyunkwan University, Samsung Medical Center, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dal Mo [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    The diagnosis of scrotal tumors in children can be challenging because of the rarity, vague symptoms, and varied imaging features of the tumors. The pathology and frequency of scrotal tumors that occur in children are different from tumors that arise in adults. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate the imaging findings of scrotal tumors in children with pathological correlations. In addition, we present the clinical manifestations that are valuable for a differential diagnosis. Familiarity with the imaging findings and clinical manifestations of pediatric scrotal tumors may be helpful in making an accurate diagnosis and providing proper patient management

  16. Implementing Tumor Detection and Area Calculation in Mri Image of Human Brain Using Image Processing Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil L. Bangare; Madhura Patil

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on the research on Human Brain Tumor which uses the MRI imaging technique to capture the image. In this proposed work Brain Tumor area is calculated to define the Stage or level of seriousness of the tumor. Image Processing techniques are used for the brain tumor area calculation and Neural Network algorithms for the tumor position calculation. Also in the further advancement the classification of the tumor based on few parameters is also expected. Proposed wor...

  17. Groupwise registration of MR brain images with tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wu, Yihong; Fan, Yong

    2017-09-01

    A novel groupwise image registration framework is developed for registering MR brain images with tumors. Our method iteratively estimates a normal-appearance counterpart for each tumor image to be registered and constructs a directed graph (digraph) of normal-appearance images to guide the groupwise image registration. Particularly, our method maps each tumor image to its normal appearance counterpart by identifying and inpainting brain tumor regions with intensity information estimated using a low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image representation technique. The estimated normal-appearance images are groupwisely registered to a group center image guided by a digraph of images so that the total length of ‘image registration paths’ to be the minimum, and then the original tumor images are warped to the group center image using the resulting deformation fields. We have evaluated our method based on both simulated and real MR brain tumor images. The registration results were evaluated with overlap measures of corresponding brain regions and average entropy of image intensity information, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were adopted to compare different methods with respect to their regional overlap measures. Compared with a groupwise image registration method that is applied to normal-appearance images estimated using the traditional low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image inpainting, our method achieved higher image registration accuracy with statistical significance (p  =  7.02  ×  10-9).

  18. Automated generation of curved planar reformations from MR images of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrtovec, Tomaz [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ourselin, Sebastien [CSIRO ICT Centre, Autonomous Systems Laboratory, BioMedIA Lab, Locked Bag 17, North Ryde, NSW 2113 (Australia); Gomes, Lavier [Department of Radiology, Westmead Hospital, University of Sydney, Hawkesbury Road, Westmead NSW 2145 (Australia); Likar, Bostjan [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pernus, Franjo [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2007-05-21

    A novel method for automated curved planar reformation (CPR) of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spine is presented. The CPR images, generated by a transformation from image-based to spine-based coordinate system, follow the structural shape of the spine and allow the whole course of the curved anatomy to be viewed in individual cross-sections. The three-dimensional (3D) spine curve and the axial vertebral rotation, which determine the transformation, are described by polynomial functions. The 3D spine curve passes through the centres of vertebral bodies, while the axial vertebral rotation determines the rotation of vertebrae around the axis of the spinal column. The optimal polynomial parameters are obtained by a robust refinement of the initial estimates of the centres of vertebral bodies and axial vertebral rotation. The optimization framework is based on the automatic image analysis of MR spine images that exploits some basic anatomical properties of the spine. The method was evaluated on 21 MR images from 12 patients and the results provided a good description of spine anatomy, with mean errors of 2.5 mm and 1.7{sup 0} for the position of the 3D spine curve and axial rotation of vertebrae, respectively. The generated CPR images are independent of the position of the patient in the scanner while comprising both anatomical and geometrical properties of the spine.

  19. Automated generation of curved planar reformations from MR images of the spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtovec, Tomaz; Ourselin, Sébastien; Gomes, Lavier; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo

    2007-05-01

    A novel method for automated curved planar reformation (CPR) of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spine is presented. The CPR images, generated by a transformation from image-based to spine-based coordinate system, follow the structural shape of the spine and allow the whole course of the curved anatomy to be viewed in individual cross-sections. The three-dimensional (3D) spine curve and the axial vertebral rotation, which determine the transformation, are described by polynomial functions. The 3D spine curve passes through the centres of vertebral bodies, while the axial vertebral rotation determines the rotation of vertebrae around the axis of the spinal column. The optimal polynomial parameters are obtained by a robust refinement of the initial estimates of the centres of vertebral bodies and axial vertebral rotation. The optimization framework is based on the automatic image analysis of MR spine images that exploits some basic anatomical properties of the spine. The method was evaluated on 21 MR images from 12 patients and the results provided a good description of spine anatomy, with mean errors of 2.5 mm and 1.7° for the position of the 3D spine curve and axial rotation of vertebrae, respectively. The generated CPR images are independent of the position of the patient in the scanner while comprising both anatomical and geometrical properties of the spine.

  20. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for malignant otitis externa: lesion not shown on planar image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hung; Hsieh, Hung-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Malignant otitis externa is a severe and rare infection of the external acoustic meatus. Triphasic bone and (67)Ga scintigraphies are used to initial detect and follow-up the response of therapy. With single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography images, the diagnostic sensitivity is higher. We presented a case with malignant otitis externa with initial negative planar scintigraphic finding. The lesion was detected by photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography images. We concluded that the photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography should be performed routinely for patients with suspected malignant otitis externa, even without evidence of lesion on planar images.

  1. Multi-Echo-Based Echo-Planar Spectroscopic Imaging Using a 3T MRI Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon K. Furuyama

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of spin-echoes has been employed in an Echo-Planar Spectroscopic Imaging (EPSI sequence to collect multiple phase encoded lines within a single TR in a Multi-Echo-based Echo-Planar Spectroscopic Imaging technique (MEEPSI. Despite the T2 dependence on the amplitude of the spin-echoes, the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM of the derived multi-echo Point Spread Function (PSF is shown to decrease, indicating an improved overall spatial resolution without requiring any additional scan time. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated in the one-dimensional (1D spatial profiles of the N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA singlet along the phase encode dimension in a gray matter phantom. Although the improved spatial resolution comes at the expense of spectral resolution, it is shown in vivo that peak broadening due to T2* decay is more significant than the loss of resolution from using spin-echoes and therefore does not affect the ability to quantify metabolites using the LCModel fitting algorithm.

  2. The effect of residual Nyquist ghost in quantitative echo-planar diffusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D A; Calamante, F; Gadian, D G; Connelly, A

    1999-08-01

    Single-shot diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging (EPI) is typically used for most clinical diffusion studies due to its low sensitivity to patient motion. Although the Nyquist ghost artifact in EPI can be substantially reduced, there is frequently a residual ghost with low signal intensity. As reported in this study, this residual ghost can produce severe artifacts when maps of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) are calculated from single-shot echo-planar images. The artifacts presented in this paper appear as regions of apparently low ADC which simulate regions of reduced diffusion, but are in fact generated by b-value dependent Nyquist ghosts of the orbits. Data acquired in vivo were used to demonstrate that these artifacts can be avoided by including standard methods of spatial presaturation or fluid-suppression in the diffusion-weighted EPI protocol. In addition, phantom studies were used to illustrate how phase and amplitude variations in the ghost generate the artifacts and theoretical expressions, derived elsewhere, were used to provide a detailed understanding of the artifacts observed in vivo. The level of Nyquist ghost reported for the current generation of commercial scanners suggests that this is a general phenomenon which should be a consideration in all EPI-based diffusion studies. Magn Reson Med 42:385-392, 1999.

  3. A new simple and cheap, high-resolution planar optode imaging system: Application to oxgen and pH sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten; Borisov, Sergey M.; Gunwald, Björn

    2011-01-01

    A simple, high resolution colormetric planar optode imaging approach is presented. The approach is simple and inexpensive yet versatile, and can be used to study the two-dimensional distribution and dynamics of a range of analytes. The imaging approach utilizes the inbuilt color filter of standar...

  4. A simple and inexpensive high resolution color ratiometric planar optode imaging approach: application to oxygen and pH sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.; Borisov, S. M.; Grunwald, B.

    2011-01-01

    A simple, high resolution colormetric planar optode imaging approach is presented. The approach is simple and inexpensive yet versatile, and can be used to study the two-dimensional distribution and dynamics of a range of analytes. The imaging approach utilizes the inbuilt color filter of standar...

  5. Non-FDG PET imaging of brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zemin; GUAN Yihui; ZUO Chuantao; ZHANG Zhengwei; XUE Fangping; LIN Xiangtong

    2007-01-01

    Due to relatively high uptake of glucose in the brain cortex, the use of FDG PET imaging is greatly limited in brain tumor imaging, especially for low-grade gliomas and some metastatic tumours. More and more tracers with higher specificity were developed lately for brain tumor imaging. There are 3 main types of non-FDG PET tracers:amino acid tracers, choline tracers and nucleic acid tracers. These tracers are now widely applied in many aspects of brain tumor imaging. This article summarized the general use of non-FDG PET in different aspects of brain tumor imaging.

  6. Valine-based biphenylsulphonamide matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors as tumor imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltenfreiter, Ruth [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)]. E-mail: ruth.oltenfreiter@ugent.be; Staelens, Ludovicus [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Kersemans, Veerle [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cornelissen, Bart [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Frankenne, Francis [Laboratory of Tumor and Developmental Biology, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Foidart, Jean-Michel [Laboratory of Tumor and Developmental Biology, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Gent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Slegers, Guido [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2006-06-15

    Among matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the subfamily of gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) is of particular interest due to their ability to degrade type IV collagen and other non-fibrillar collagen domains and proteins such as fibronectin and laminin. Whilst malignant cells often over-express various MMPs, the gelatinases have been most consistently detected in malignant tissues and associated with tumor growth, metastatic potential and angiogenesis. Radiosynthesis of carboxylic (1') and hydroxamic (2') MMPIs resulted in radiochemical yields of 70+/-5% (n=6) and 60+/-5% (n=4), respectively. Evaluation in A549-inoculated athymic mice showed a tumor uptake of 2.0+/-0.7%ID/g (3h p.i.), a tumor/blood ratio of 0.5 and a tumor/muscle ratio of 4.6 at 48hp.i. for 1'. For compound 2' a tumor uptake of 0.7+/-0.2%ID/g (3hp.i.), a tumor/blood ratio of 1.2 and a tumor/muscle ratio of 1.8 at 24hp.i. were observed. HPLC analysis of the blood (plasma) showed no dehalogenation or other metabolites of 1' 2hp.i. For compound 2', 65.4% of intact compound was found in the blood (plasma) and one polar metabolite (31%) was detected whereas in the tumor 91.8% of the accumulated activity was caused by intact compound and only 8.1% by the metabolite. Planar imaging, using a Toshiba GCA-9300A/hg SPECT camera, showed that tumor tissue could be visualized and that image quality improved by decreasing specific activity resulting in lower liver uptake, indicating some degree of saturable binding in the liver. In vivo evaluation of these radioiodinated carboxylic and hydroxamic MMP inhibitor tracers revealed that MMP inhibitors could have potential as tumor imaging agents, but that further research is necessary.

  7. Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence imaging of subgrain boundaries, twins and planar deformation features in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, M. F.; Pennock, G. M.; Drury, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    The study of deformation features has been of great importance to determine deformation mechanisms in quartz. Relevant microstructures in both growth and deformation processes include dislocations, subgrains, subgrain boundaries, Brazil and Dauphiné twins and planar deformation features (PDFs). Dislocations and twin boundaries are most commonly imaged using a transmission electron microscope (TEM), because these cannot directly be observed using light microscopy, in contrast to PDFs. Here, we show that red-filtered cathodoluminescence imaging in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a useful method to visualise subgrain boundaries, Brazil and Dauphiné twin boundaries. Because standard petrographic thin sections can be studied in the SEM, the observed structures can be directly and easily correlated to light microscopy studies. In contrast to TEM preparation methods, SEM techniques are non-destructive to the area of interest on a petrographic thin section.

  8. 100 kHz thousand-frame burst-mode planar imaging in turbulent flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, James B; Venkateswaran, Prabhakar; Miller, Joseph D; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh; Meyer, Terrence R

    2014-02-15

    High-repetition-rate, burst-mode lasers can achieve higher energies per pulse compared with continuously pulsed systems, but the relatively few number of laser pulses in each burst has limited the temporal dynamic range of measurements in unsteady flames. A fivefold increase in the range of timescales that can be resolved by burst-mode laser-based imaging systems is reported in this work by extending a hybrid diode- and flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG-based amplifier system to nearly 1000 pulses at 100 kHz during a 10 ms burst. This enables an unprecedented burst-mode temporal dynamic range to capture turbulent fluctuations from 0.1 to 50 kHz in flames of practical interest. High pulse intensity enables efficient conversion to the ultraviolet for planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nascent formaldehyde and other potential flame radicals.

  9. Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Bone Tumors: Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz Pekcevik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study aims to determine whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC can help differentiate benign and malignant bone tumors. Materials and Methods: From January 2012 to February 2013, we prospectively included 26 patients. Of these 15 patients were male and 11 were female; ranging in age from 8 to 76 years (mean age, 34.5 years. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR imaging was obtained with a single-shot echo-planar imaging sequence using a 1.5T MR scanner. We grouped malignant lesions as primary, secondary, and primary tumor with chondroid matrix. The minimum ADC was measured in the tumors and mean minimum ADC values were selected for statistical analysis. ADC values were compared between malignant and benign tumors using the Mann-Whitney U-test and receiver operating curve analysis were done to determine optimal cut-off values. Results: The mean ADC values from the area with lowest ADC values of benign and malignant tumors were 1.99 ± 0.57 × 10−3 mm 2 /s and 1.02 ± 1.0 × 10−3 mm 2 /s, respectively. The mean minimum ADC values of benign and malignant tumors were statistically different (P = 0.029. With cut-off value of 1.37 (10−3 mm 2 /s, sensitivity was 77.8% and specificity was 82.4%, for distinguishing benign and malignant lesion. Benign and secondary malignant tumors showed statistically significant difference (P = 0.002. There was some overlap in ADC values between benign and malignant tumors. The mean minimum ADC values of benign and malignant chondroid tumors were high. Giant cell tumor, non-ossifying fibroma and fibrous dysplasia showed lower ADC values. Conclusion: Although there is some overlap, ADC values of benign and malignant bone tumors seem to be different. Further studies with larger patient groups are needed to find an optimal cut-off ADC value.

  10. Localized fibrous tumor of the liver: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecesne, R.; Drouillard, J.; Laurent, F. [Service d`Imagerie Medicale-Radiologie Diagnostique et Therapeutique, Hopital du Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Pessac (France); Le Bail, B. [Department d`Anatomie et Cytologie Pathologiques, Groupe Hospitalier Pellegrin, CHU Bordeaux, Place Amelie Raba-Leon, Bordeaux (France); Saric, J. [Service de Chirurgie Digestive, Groupe Saint-Andre, CHU Bordeaux (France); Balabaud, C. [Service des Maladies de L`Appareil Digestif, Groupe Saint-Andre, CHU Bordeaux (France)

    1998-02-01

    We report the imaging of a localized fibrous tumor of the liver, focusing on color Doppler US, CT, MR imaging, and angiographic findings. We discuss the differential diagnosis of such a rare, benign lesion of the liver. Detailed imaging of this tumor has not been reported in the literature previously. (orig.) With 6 figs., 10 refs.

  11. Planar Fluorescence Imaging and Three-Dimensional Reconstructions of Capsule RCS Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Buck, Gregory M.; Mccrea, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flowfield visualization has been used to investigate reaction control system (RCS) jet flows in the wake of hypersonic capsule reentry vehicles. Pitch, roll, and yaw RCS jets were all studied. PLIF was used to obtain off-body flow images at planar slices in these flowfields, which are not easily visualized by other techniques owing to characteristically low gas density. When viewed individually, these slices are shown to provide spatially and temporally resolved information, including the locations and characteristics of turbulent flow structures and the location of the jet flow relative to the vehicle. In addition, ensembles of slices, acquired at multiple locations throughout the flowfield, are combined using computer visualization techniques to reconstruct the three-dimensional shape of the flow. Collectively, the off-body flow visualization data set acquired in these tests represents a valuable compliment to surface measurements, especially as a basis for explaining otherwise perplexing discrepancies between such measurements and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results. The tests described herein were conducted in the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center.

  12. Fast susceptibility-weighted imaging with three-dimensional short-axis propeller (SAP)-echo-planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Samantha J; Yeom, Kristen W; Moseley, Michael E; Skare, S

    2015-05-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in neuroimaging can be challenging due to long scan times of three-dimensional (3D) gradient recalled echo (GRE), while faster techniques such as 3D interleaved echo-planar imaging (iEPI) are prone to motion artifacts. Here we outline and implement a 3D short-axis propeller echo-planar imaging (SAP-EPI) trajectory as a faster, motion-correctable approach for SWI. Experiments were conducted on a 3T MRI system. The 3D SAP-EPI, 3D iEPI, and 3D GRE SWI scans were acquired on two volunteers. Controlled motion experiments were conducted to test the motion-correction capability of 3D SAP-EPI. The 3D SAP-EPI SWI data were acquired on two pediatric patients as a potential alternative to 2D GRE used clinically. The 3D GRE images had a better target resolution (0.47 × 0.94 × 2 mm, scan time = 5 min), iEPI and SAP-EPI images (resolution = 0.94 × 0.94 × 2 mm) were acquired in a faster scan time (1:52 min) with twice the brain coverage. SAP-EPI showed motion-correction capability and some immunity to undersampling from rejected data. While 3D SAP-EPI suffers from some geometric distortion, its short scan time and motion-correction capability suggest that SAP-EPI may be a useful alternative to GRE and iEPI for use in SWI, particularly in uncooperative patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Vascular Imaging of Solid Tumors in Rats with a Radioactive Arsenic-Labeled Antibody that Binds Exposed Phosphatidylserine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennewein, Marc; Lewis, Matthew A.; Zhao, Dawen; Tsyganov, Edward; Slavine, Nikolai; He, Jin; Watkins, Linda; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; O'Kelly, Sean; Kulkarni, Padmakar; Antich, Peter P.; Hermanne, Alex; Roösch, Frank; Mason, Ralph P.; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We recently reported that anionic phospholipids, principally phosphatidylserine, become exposed on the external surface of vascular endothelial cells in tumors, probably in response to oxidative stresses present in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that a chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds phosphatidylserine could be labeled with radioactive arsenic isotopes and used for molecular imaging of solid tumors in rats. Experimental Design Bavituximab was labeled with 74As (β+,T1/2 17.8 days) or 77As (β−,T1/2 1.6 days) using a novel procedure. The radionuclides of arsenic were selected because their long half-lives are consistent with the long biological half lives of antibodies in vivo and because their chemistry permits stable attachment to antibodies. The radiolabeled antibodies were tested for the ability to image subcutaneous Dunning prostate R3227-AT1 tumors in rats. Results Clear images of the tumors were obtained using planar γ-scintigraphy and positron emission tomography. Biodistribution studies confirmed the specific localization of bavituximab to the tumors. The tumor-to-liver ratio 72 h after injection was 22 for bavituximab compared with 1.5 for an isotype-matched control chimeric antibody of irrelevant specificity. Immunohistochemical studies showed that the bavituximab was labeling the tumor vascular endothelium. Conclusions These results show that radioarsenic-labeled bavituximab has potential as a new tool for imaging the vasculature of solid tumors. PMID:18316558

  14. Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tumor Volume with Histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Linehan, W. Marston; Wood, Bradford J.; Merino, Maria J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. Materials and Methods We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm3) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. Results There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p <0.0001), but a weak correlation between prostate specific antigen and histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p=0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r2=0.401, p <0.00001). On ROC analysis AUC values for magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age in estimating tumors larger than 0.5 cm3 at histopathology were 0.949 (p <0.0000001), 0.685 (p=0.001) and 0.627 (p=0

  15. Multi-centre evaluation of accuracy and reproducibility of planar and SPECT image quantification. An IAEA phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Brian E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Grosev, Darko [Univ. Hospital Centre Zagreb (Croatia); Buvat, Irene [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Paris (France); and others

    2017-08-01

    Accurate quantitation of activity provides the basis for internal dosimetry of targeted radionuclide therapies. This study investigated quantitative imaging capabilities at sites with a variety of experience and equipment and assessed levels of errors in activity quantitation in Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and planar imaging. Participants from 9 countries took part in a comparison in which planar, SPECT and SPECT with X ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) imaging were used to quantify activities of four epoxy-filled cylinders containing {sup 133}Ba, which was chosen as a surrogate for {sup 131}I. The sources, with nominal volumes of 2, 4, 6 and 23 mL, were calibrated for {sup 133}Ba activity by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, but the activity was initially unknown to the participants. Imaging was performed in a cylindrical phantom filled with water. Two trials were carried out in which the participants first estimated the activities using their local standard protocols, and then repeated the measurements using a standardized acquisition and analysis protocol. Finally, processing of the imaging data from the second trial was repeated by a single centre using a fixed protocol. In the first trial, the activities were underestimated by about 15% with planar imaging. SPECT with Chang's first order attenuation correction (Chang-AC) and SPECT-CT overestimated the activity by about 10%. The second trial showed moderate improvements in accuracy and variability. Planar imaging was subject to methodological errors, e.g., in the use of a transmission scan for attenuation correction. The use of Chang-AC was subject to variability from the definition of phantom contours. The project demonstrated the need for training and standardized protocols to achieve good levels of quantitative accuracy and precision in a multicentre setting. Absolute quantification of simple objects with no background was possible with the strictest protocol to

  16. Stereoscopic Imaging in Hypersonics Boundary Layers using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.; Jones, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    Stereoscopic time-resolved visualization of three-dimensional structures in a hypersonic flow has been performed for the first time. Nitric Oxide (NO) was seeded into hypersonic boundary layer flows that were designed to transition from laminar to turbulent. A thick laser sheet illuminated and excited the NO, causing spatially-varying fluorescence. Two cameras in a stereoscopic configuration were used to image the fluorescence. The images were processed in a computer visualization environment to provide stereoscopic image pairs. Two methods were used to display these image pairs: a cross-eyed viewing method which can be viewed by naked eyes, and red/blue anaglyphs, which require viewing through red/blue glasses. The images visualized three-dimensional information that would be lost if conventional planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging had been used. Two model configurations were studied in NASA Langley Research Center's 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Wind tunnel. One model was a 10 degree half-angle wedge containing a small protuberance to force the flow to transition. The other model was a 1/3-scale, truncated Hyper-X forebody model with blowing through a series of holes to force the boundary layer flow to transition to turbulence. In the former case, low flowrates of pure NO seeded and marked the boundary layer fluid. In the latter, a trace concentration of NO was seeded into the injected N2 gas. The three-dimensional visualizations have an effective time resolution of about 500 ns, which is fast enough to freeze this hypersonic flow. The 512x512 resolution of the resulting images is much higher than high-speed laser-sheet scanning systems with similar time response, which typically measure 10-20 planes.

  17. Design and construction of non-imaging planar concentrator for concentrator photovoltaic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, K.K.; Siaw, F.L.; Wong, C.W.; Wong, G.S. [Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Off Jalan Genting Kelang, Setapak, 53300 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan (Malaysia)

    2009-05-15

    A novel configuration of solar concentrator, which is the non-imaging planar concentrator, capable of producing much more uniform sunlight and reasonably high concentration ratio, is designed and constructed. This design is envisioned to be incorporated in concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) systems. The work presented here reports on the design, optical alignment and application of the prototype, which is installed at Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR), Malaysia. In the architecture of the prototype, 360 flat mirrors, each with a dimension of 4.0 cm x 4.0 cm, are arranged into 24 rows and 15 columns with a total reflection area of about 5760 cm{sup 2}. In addition to that, illumination distribution for the prototype is simulated and its results are then compared with the experiment result. (author)

  18. Planar Array Sensor for High-speed Component Distribution Imaging in Fluid Flow Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Hampel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel planar array sensor based on electrical conductivity measurements ispresented which may be applied to visualize surface fluid distributions. The sensor ismanufactured using printed-circuit board fabrication technology and comprises of 64 x 64interdigital sensing structures. An associated electronics measures the electricalconductivity of the fluid over each individual sensing structure in a multiplexed manner byapplying a bipolar excitation voltage and by measuring the electrical current flowing from adriver electrode to a sensing electrode. After interrogating all sensing structures, a two-dimensional image of the conductivity distribution over a surface is obtained which in turnrepresents fluid distributions over sensor’s surface. The employed electronics can acquire upto 2500 frames per second thus being able to monitor fast transient phenomena. The systemhas been evaluated regarding measurement accuracy and depth sensitivity. Furthermore, theapplication of the sensor in the investigation of two different flow applications is presented.

  19. Assessment of vascularization within hydroxyapatite ocular implant by bone scintigraphy: compartive analysis of planar and SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung Hee; Park, Soon Ah [College of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    Complete fibrovascular ingrowth within the hydroxyapatite ocular implant is necessary for peg drilling which is performed to prevent infection and to provide motility to the ocular prosthesis. We compared planar bone scintigraphy and SPECT for the evaluation of the vascularization within hydroxyapatite ocular implants. Seventeen patients (M:F=12:5, mean age: 50.4{+-}17.5 years) who had received a coralline hydroxyapatite ocular implant after enucleation surgery were enrolled. Patients underwent Tc-99m MDP planar bone and SPECT imaging by dual head gamma camera after their implant surgery (interval: 197{+-}81 days). Uptake on planar and SPECT images was graded visually as less than (grade 1), equal to (grade 2), and greater than (grade 3) nasal bridge activity. Quantitative ratio of implanted to non-implanted intraorbital activity was also measured. Vascularization within hydroxyapatite implants was confirmed by slit lamp examination and ocular movement. All but three patients were considered to be vascularized within hydroxyapatite implants. In visual analysis of planar image and SPECT, grade 1 was noted in 9/18 (50%) and 6/18 (33%), respectively. Grade 2 pattern 7/18 (39%) and 4/18 (22%), and grade 3 pattern was 2/18 (11%) and 8/18 (44%) respectively. When grade 2 or 3 was considered to be positive for vascularization, the sensitivity of planar and SPECT imaging were 60% (9/15) and 80% (12/15), respectively. In 3 patients with incomplete vascularization, both planar and SPECT showed grade 1 uptake. The orbital activity ratios on planar imaging were not significantly different between complete and incomplete vascularization (1.96{+-}9.87 vs 1.17{+-}0.08 , p>0.05), however, it was significantly higher on SPECT in patients with complete vascularization (8.44{+-}5.45 vs 2.20{+-}0.87, p<0.05). In the assessment of fibrovascular ingrowth within ocular implants by Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy, SPECT image appears to be more effective than planar scintigraphy.

  20. Three-dimensional echo-planar cine imaging of cerebral blood supply using arterial spin labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Manoj; Mildner, Toralf; Schlumm, Torsten; Robertson, Scott Haile; Möller, Harald

    2016-12-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) with CYlindrical Center-out spatiaL Encoding (EPICYCLE) is introduced as a novel hybrid three-dimensional (3D) EPI technique. Its suitability for the tracking of a short bolus created by pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) through the cerebral vasculature is demonstrated. EPICYCLE acquires two-dimensional planes of k-space along center-out trajectories. These "spokes" are rotated from shot to shot about a common axis to encode a k-space cylinder. To track a bolus of labeled blood, the same subset of evenly distributed spokes is acquired in a cine fashion after a short period of pCASL. This process is repeated for all subsets to fill the whole 3D k-space of each time frame. The passage of short pCASL boluses through the vasculature of a 3D imaging slab was successfully imaged using EPICYCLE. By choosing suitable sequence parameters, the impact of slab excitation on the bolus shape could be minimized. Parametric maps of signal amplitude, transit time, and bolus width reflected typical features of blood transport in large vessels. The EPICYCLE technique was successfully applied to track a short bolus of labeled arterial blood during its passage through the cerebral vasculature.

  1. Imaging guided differentiation of parotid tumors; Bildgebende Differenzierung von Parotistumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, C.; Horger, M.; Haap, M.; Ioanoviciu, S.D.; Boesmueller, H.

    2015-09-15

    Imaging guided differentiation of parotid tumors is helping diagnosis and therapy decision making. It is necessary to consider seldom tumor forms and their characteristic appearance. Modern techniques as diffusion supported NMR imaging sequences and correlated contrast agent kinetics may be helpful besides computer tomography and PET techniques.

  2. Benign bone tumors and tumor-like lesions: value of cross-sectional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, Klaus [Department of Radiology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675, Munich (Germany)

    2003-08-01

    This article reviews the role of CT and MR imaging in the diagnosis of benign bone tumors and tumor-like lesions of bone with with regard to differential diagnosis, the assessment of tumor-related complications, and the detection of postoperative recurrence. Indications for cross-sectional imaging of specific lesions, including osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, enchondroma, osteochondroma, intraosseous lipoma, hemangioma, giant cell tumor, aneurysmal bone cyst, simple bone cyst, and eosinophilic granuloma, are discussed, and advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging modalities are illustrated on the basis of pathologically confirmed cases. (orig.)

  3. Primary spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumor on MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoriya, Prashant J; Watal, Pankaj; Bahri, Nandini U; Rathod, Ketan

    2015-01-01

    Neoplasms in the region of filum terminale are not uncommon. Myxopapillary ependymoma is the commonest tumor at this location. The differentials reported for this entity are nerve sheath tumor, meningioma, paraganglioma, intradural metastases, lymphoma, other varieties of ependymoma, subependymoma, astrocytoma, ganglioglioma, hemangioblastoma, and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). PNET may very rarely present as an intradural thoracolumbar mass. We present pre- and post-therapy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of a patient with proven primary spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PSPNET) of peripheral subtype.

  4. Recommendations for imaging tumor response in neurofibromatosis clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombi, Eva; Ardern-Holmes, Simone L; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barker, Fred G; Connor, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Fisher, Michael J; Goutagny, Stephane; Harris, Gordon J; Jaramillo, Diego; Karajannis, Matthias A; Korf, Bruce R; Mautner, Victor; Plotkin, Scott R; Poussaint, Tina Y; Robertson, Kent; Shih, Chie-Schin; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2013-11-19

    Neurofibromatosis (NF)-related benign tumors such as plexiform neurofibromas (PN) and vestibular schwannomas (VS) can cause substantial morbidity. Clinical trials directed at these tumors have become available. Due to differences in disease manifestations and the natural history of NF-related tumors, response criteria used for solid cancers (1-dimensional/RECIST [Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors] and bidimensional/World Health Organization) have limited applicability. No standardized response criteria for benign NF tumors exist. The goal of the Tumor Measurement Working Group of the REiNS (Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis) committee is to propose consensus guidelines for the evaluation of imaging response in clinical trials for NF tumors. Currently used imaging endpoints, designs of NF clinical trials, and knowledge of the natural history of NF-related tumors, in particular PN and VS, were reviewed. Consensus recommendations for response evaluation for future studies were developed based on this review and the expertise of group members. MRI with volumetric analysis is recommended to sensitively and reproducibly evaluate changes in tumor size in clinical trials. Volumetric analysis requires adherence to specific imaging recommendations. A 20% volume change was chosen to indicate a decrease or increase in tumor size. Use of these criteria in future trials will enable meaningful comparison of results across studies. The proposed imaging response evaluation guidelines, along with validated clinical outcome measures, will maximize the ability to identify potentially active agents for patients with NF and benign tumors.

  5. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging with Dual-Echo Echo-Planar Imaging for Better Sensitivity to Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, S.J.; Yeom, K.W.; Antonucci, M.U.; Andre, J.B.; Rosenberg, J.; Aksoy, M.; Straka, M.; Fischbein, N.J.; Bammer, R.; Moseley, M.E.; Zaharchuk, G.; Skare, S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Parallel imaging facilitates the acquisition of echo-planar images with a reduced TE, enabling the incorporation of an additional image at a later TE. Here we investigated the use of a parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo EPI sequence to improve lesion conspicuity in diffusion-weighted imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS Parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo DWI data were acquired in 50 consecutive patients suspected of stroke at 1.5T. The dual-echo acquisition included 2 EPI for 1 diffusion-preparation period (echo 1 [TE = 48 ms] and echo 2 [TE = 105 ms]). Three neuroradiologists independently reviewed the 2 echoes by using the routine DWI of our institution as a reference. Images were graded on lesion conspicuity, diagnostic confidence, and image quality. The apparent diffusion coefficient map from echo 1 was used to validate the presence of acute infarction. Relaxivity maps calculated from the 2 echoes were evaluated for potential complementary information. RESULTS Echo 1 and 2 DWIs were rated as better than the reference DWI. While echo 1 had better image quality overall, echo 2 was unanimously favored over both echo 1 and the reference DWI for its high sensitivity in detecting acute infarcts. CONCLUSIONS Parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo diffusion-weighted EPI is a useful method for evaluating lesions with reduced diffusivity. The long TE of echo 2 produced DWIs that exhibited superior lesion conspicuity compared with images acquired at a shorter TE. Echo 1 provided higher SNR ADC maps for specificity to acute infarction. The relaxivity maps may serve to complement information regarding blood products and mineralization. PMID:24763417

  6. Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection Scanner for Imaging Magnetic Particles in Planar Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyobong; Lim, Eul-Gyoon; Jeong, Jae-Chan; Chang, Jiho; Shin, Sung-Woong; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-09

    The setup of a planar Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection (p-FMMD) scanner for performing Magnetic Particles Imaging (MPI) of flat samples is presented. It consists of two magnetic measurement heads on both sides of the sample mounted on the legs of a u-shaped support. The sample is locally exposed to a magnetic excitation field consisting of two distinct frequencies, a stronger component at about 77 kHz and a weaker field at 61 Hz. The nonlinear magnetization characteristics of superparamagnetic particles give rise to the generation of intermodulation products. A selected sum-frequency component of the high and low frequency magnetic field incident on the magnetically nonlinear particles is recorded by a demodulation electronics. In contrast to a conventional MPI scanner, p-FMMD does not require the application of a strong magnetic field to the whole sample because mixing of the two frequencies occurs locally. Thus, the lateral dimensions of the sample are just limited by the scanning range and the supports. However, the sample height determines the spatial resolution. In the current setup it is limited to 2 mm. As examples, we present two 20 mm × 25 mm p-FMMD images acquired from samples with 1 µm diameter maghemite particles in silanol matrix and with 50 nm magnetite particles in aminosilane matrix. The results show that the novel MPI scanner can be applied for analysis of thin biological samples and for medical diagnostic purposes.

  7. 'Snap-shot' velocity vector mapping using echo-planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayler, Alexander B; Sederman, Andrew J; Newling, Benedict; Mantle, Mick D; Gladden, Lynn F

    2010-06-01

    A 'snap-shot' ultra-fast MRI velocimetry technique based upon the echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence is presented. The new technique is an extension of the GERVAIS pulse sequence previously developed by Sederman et al. (2004) and is capable of acquiring both reference and velocity encoded phase maps following a single excitation for generation of three-component velocity vectors in under 125 ms. This approach allows velocity images of systems with a dynamic, non-periodic geometry to be obtained by MRI. The technique proved to be accurate within 5% error by comparison with Poiseuille flow in a pipe and for the transverse plane flow field in a Couette cell. It was further applied to obtain the velocity field around an impeller in a stirred vessel; an unsteady yet periodic system which otherwise could only be studied by triggered acquisitions. Good agreement was evident between the present technique and triggered conventional velocity encoded pulse sequences. Finally, new experimental data attainable only by the new sequence is demonstrated as the flow field within a mobile droplet of oil is captured as it rises through a column of water. The technique promises to be highly useful in velocimetric measurements of dynamic, non-periodic systems, and in particular for the characterisation of multiphase flow systems.

  8. Bone tumors of the pediatric foot: imaging appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro-Dominguez, Pablo; Navarro, Oscar M. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    Tumors of the foot are rare in children. This review illustrates radiographic, CT and MR imaging findings of foot bone tumors in children based on all cases presented in a tertiary pediatric hospital during the 15-year period of 1999-2014. This search revealed 155 tumors of the foot, 72 of the bones and 83 of the soft tissues. Osteochondroma, bone cyst and fibrous dysplasia were the most frequent benign bone lesions. Ewing sarcoma was the most common malignant osseous tumor. Some tumors showed higher prevalence in certain age ranges and others showed predilection for specific bones. Radiographs are useful for diagnosis in the majority of cases but CT and MR imaging provide additional valuable information in select cases for diagnosis and determining extent of the lesions. Radiologists should be aware of some typical imaging findings in bone tumors of the foot in order to establish diagnosis and facilitate patient management. (orig.)

  9. Anatomical and functional brain imaging using high-resolution echo-planar spectroscopic imaging at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Weiliang; Karczmar, Gregory S; Uftring, Stephen J; Du, Yiping P

    2005-06-01

    High-resolution echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) of water resonance (i.e. without water suppression) is proposed for anatomic and functional imaging of the human brain at 1.5 T. Water spectra with a resolution of 2.6 Hz and a bandwidth of 333 Hz were obtained in small voxels (1.7 x 1.7 x 3 mm3) across a single slice. Although water spectra appeared Lorentzian in most of the voxels in the brain, non-Lorentzian broadening of the water resonance was observed in voxels containing blood vessels. In functional experiments with a motor task, robust activation in motor cortices was observed in high-resolution T2* maps generated from the EPSI data. Shift of the water resonance frequency occurred during neuronal activation in motor cortices. The activation areas appeared to be more localized after excluding the voxels in which the lineshape of the water resonance had elevated T2* and became more non-Lorentzian during the motor task. These preliminary results suggest that high-resolution EPSI is a promising tool to study susceptibility-related effects, such as BOLD contrast, for improved anatomical and functional imaging of the brain. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  10. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  11. Narrow band imaging of tumors using gold nanoshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvanakrishnan, Priyaveena; Park, Jaesook; Diagaradjane, Parameshwaran; Schwartz, Jon A.; Coleman, Chris L.; Gill-Sharp, Kelly L.; Sang, Kristina L.; Payne, J. Donald; Krishnan, Sunil; Tunnell, James W.

    2009-02-01

    Gold nanoshells (GNS) are a new class of nanoparticles that can be optically tuned to scatter or absorb light from the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared (NIR) region by varying the core (dielectric silica) /shell (gold) ratio. In addition to spectral tunability, GNS are inert and bioconjugatable making them potential labels for in vivo imaging and therapy of tumors. We report the use of GNS as exogenous contrast agents for enhanced visualization of tumors using narrow band imaging (NBI). NBI takes advantage of the strong NIR absorption of GNS to distinguish between blood and nanoshells in the tumor by imaging in narrow wavelength bands in the visible and NIR, respectively. Using tissue-simulating phantoms, we determined the optimum wavelengths to enhance contrast between blood and GNS. We then used the optimum wavelengths for ex-vivo imaging of tumors extracted from human colon cancer xenograft bearing mice injected with GNS. Systemically delivered GNS accumulated passively in tumor xenografts by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Ex-vivo NBI of tumor xenografts demonstrated tumor specific heterogeneous distribution of GNS with a clear distinction from the tumor vasculature. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of using GNS as contrast agents to visualize tumors using NBI.

  12. Toward real-time tumor margin identification in image-guided robotic brain tumor resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Danying; Jiang, Yang; Belykh, Evgenii; Gong, Yuanzheng; Preul, Mark C.; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2017-03-01

    For patients with malignant brain tumors (glioblastomas), a safe maximal resection of tumor is critical for an increased survival rate. However, complete resection of the cancer is hard to achieve due to the invasive nature of these tumors, where the margins of the tumors become blurred from frank tumor to more normal brain tissue, but in which single cells or clusters of malignant cells may have invaded. Recent developments in fluorescence imaging techniques have shown great potential for improved surgical outcomes by providing surgeons intraoperative contrast-enhanced visual information of tumor in neurosurgery. The current near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores, such as indocyanine green (ICG), cyanine5.5 (Cy5.5), 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), are showing clinical potential to be useful in targeting and guiding resections of such tumors. Real-time tumor margin identification in NIR imaging could be helpful to both surgeons and patients by reducing the operation time and space required by other imaging modalities such as intraoperative MRI, and has the potential to integrate with robotically assisted surgery. In this paper, a segmentation method based on the Chan-Vese model was developed for identifying the tumor boundaries in an ex-vivo mouse brain from relatively noisy fluorescence images acquired by a multimodal scanning fiber endoscope (mmSFE). Tumor contours were achieved iteratively by minimizing an energy function formed by a level set function and the segmentation model. Quantitative segmentation metrics based on tumor-to-background (T/B) ratio were evaluated. Results demonstrated feasibility in detecting the brain tumor margins at quasi-real-time and has the potential to yield improved precision brain tumor resection techniques or even robotic interventions in the future.

  13. MR imaging of gestational trophoblastic tumor: role of gadolinium enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Si Young; Byun, Jae Young; Kim, Bum Su; Yun, Young Hyun; Mun, Kyung Mi; Park, Kyung Sin; Kim, Byung Kee; Bae, Seog Nyeon; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of gadolinium enhanced MR imaging in the evaluation of gestational trophoblastic tumors (invasive mole and choriocarcinoma). Pre-enhanced T1-and T2-weighted images and gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted images of 34 gestational trophoblastic tumors (15 choriocarcinomas, 19 invasive moles) were retrospectively evaluated and enhancement patterns were analyzed. Morphologica differences and structural characteristics were analyzed by the evaluation of tumor margin, patterns of hemorrhagic necroses, the development of intratumoral vascularity, and molar villi. Graded scores of MR findings between pre- and gadolinium enhanced images were based on the following criteria : 1) visualization of tumor margin 2) distinction between tumor necrosis and zone of trophoblastic proliferation ; and 3) molar villi. Statistical differences between graded scores of pre- and post-enhanced images were analyzed. Gadolinium enhanced MR imaging was helpful for the visualization of tumor characteristics in gestational trophoblastic tumors and in differential diagnosis between invasive mole and choriocarcinoma. (author). 16 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  14. Implementing Tumor Detection and Area Calculation in Mri Image of Human Brain Using Image Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil L. Bangare

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the research on Human Brain Tumor which uses the MRI imaging technique to capture the image. In this proposed work Brain Tumor area is calculated to define the Stage or level of seriousness of the tumor. Image Processing techniques are used for the brain tumor area calculation and Neural Network algorithms for the tumor position calculation. Also in the further advancement the classification of the tumor based on few parameters is also expected. Proposed work is divided in to following Modules: Module 1: Image Pre-Processing Module 2: Feature Extraction, Segmentation using K-Means Algorithm and Fuzzy C-Means Algorithm Module 3: Tumor Area calculation & Stage detection Module 4: Classification and position calculation of tumor using Neural Network

  15. A novel 99mTc-labeled molecular probe for tumor angiogenesis imaging in hepatoma xenografts model: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhao

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Visualization of tumor angiogenesis using radionuclide targeting provides important diagnostic information. In previous study, we proved that an arginine-arginine-leucine (RRL peptide should be a tumor endothelial cell specific binding sequence. The overall aim of this study was to evaluate whether (99mTc-radiolabeled RRL could be noninvasively used for imaging of malignant tumors in vivo, and act as a new molecular probe targeting tumor angiogenesis. METHODS: The RRL peptide was designed and radiosynthesized with (99mTc by a one-step method. The radiolabeling efficiency and radiochemical purity were then characterized in vitro. (99mTc-RRL was injected intravenously in HepG2 xenograft-bearing BALB/c nude mice. Biodistribution and in vivo imaging were performed periodically. The relationship between tumor size and %ID uptake of (99mTc-RRL was also explored. RESULTS: The labeling efficiencies of (99mTc-RRL reached 76.9% ± 4.5% (n = 6 within 30-60 min at room temperature, and the radiochemical purity exceeded 96% after purification. In vitro stability experiment revealed the radiolabeled peptide was stable. Biodistribution data showed that (99mTc-RRL rapidly cleared from the blood and predominantly accumulated in the kidneys and tumor. The specific uptake of (99mTc-RRL in tumor was significantly higher than that of unlabeled RRL blocking and free pertechnetate control test after injection (p<0.05. The ratio of the tumor-to-muscle exceeded 6.5, tumor-to-liver reached 1.98 and tumor-to-blood reached 1.95. In planar gamma imaging study, the tumors were imaged clearly at 2-6 h after injection of (99mTc-RRL, whereas the tumor was not imaged clearly in blocking group. The tumor-to-muscle ratio of images with (99mTc-RRL was comparable with that of (18F-FDG PET images. Immunohistochemical analysis verified the excessive vasculature of tumor. There was a linear relationship between the tumor size and uptake of (99mTc-RRL with R(2 = 0

  16. Three-dimensional acoustic imaging with planar microphone arrays and compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Fangli; Wei, Jingang; Qiu, Lianfang; Shi, Hongbing; Li, Xiaofan

    2016-10-01

    For obtaining super-resolution source maps, we extend compressive sensing (CS) to three-dimensional acoustic imaging. Source maps are simulated with a planar microphone array and a CS algorithm. Comparing the source maps of the CS algorithm with those of the conventional beamformer (CBF) and Tikhonov Regularization (TIKR), we find that the CS algorithm is computationally more effective and can obtain much higher resolution source maps than the CBF and TIKR. The effectiveness of the CS algorithm is analyzed. The CS algorithm can locate the sound sources exactly when the frequency is above 4000 Hz and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is above 12 dB. The location error of the CS algorithm increases as the frequency drops below the threshold, and the errors in location and power increase as SNR decreases. The further from the array the source is, the larger the location error is. The lateral resolution of the CS algorithm is much better than the range resolution. Finally, experimental measurements are conducted in a semi-anechoic room. Two mobile phones are served as sound sources. The results show that the CS algorithm can reconstruct two sound sources near the bottom of the two mobile phones where the speakers are located. The feasibility of the CS algorithm is also validated with the experiment.

  17. Imaging of canine tumors with /sup 11/C-methylputrescine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, T.R.; Siegel, B.A.; Fair, W.R.; Smith, E.K.; Welch, M.J.

    1978-10-01

    The polyamines--putrescine, spermidine, and spermine--are present in elevated concentrations in rapidly growing cell lines and in several neoplasms. Five dogs with benign or malignant tumors and one normal dog were imaged with a rectilinear scanner following I.V. administration of 2 to 8 mCi /sup 11/C-methylputrescine. High concentrations of /sup 11/C-methylputrescine were found in the liver, and in the kidneys and urine in the dogs with good renal function. Concentrations were higher in tumors than in skeletal muscle, blood, or lung. The tumor/blood ratio varied from 2 to 21; tumors were demonstrated by imaging in four dogs in which the ratio exceeded 4.0. /sup 11/C-methylputrescine is a possible tumor imaging agent.

  18. Terahertz Imaging of Three-Dimensional Dehydrated Breast Cancer Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Tyler; Wu, Yuhao; Gauch, John; Campbell, Lucas K.; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2017-06-01

    This work presents the application of terahertz imaging to three-dimensional formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast cancer tumors. The results demonstrate the capability of terahertz for in-depth scanning to produce cross section images without the need to slice the tumor. Samples of tumors excised from women diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma are investigated using a pulsed terahertz time domain imaging system. A time of flight estimation is used to obtain vertical and horizontal cross section images of tumor tissues embedded in paraffin block. Strong agreement is shown comparing the terahertz images obtained by electronically scanning the tumor in-depth in comparison with histopathology images. The detection of cancer tissue inside the block is found to be accurate to depths over 1 mm. Image processing techniques are applied to provide improved contrast and automation of the obtained terahertz images. In particular, unsharp masking and edge detection methods are found to be most effective for three-dimensional block imaging.

  19. Tumor homing indocyanine green encapsulated micelles for near infrared and photoacoustic imaging of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthaman, Saji; Bom, Joon-suk; Kim, Hyeon Sik; John, Johnson V; Bom, Hee-Seung; Kim, Seon-Jong; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Il; Park, In-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging analytical modality that is under intense preclinical development for the early diagnosis of various medical conditions, including cancer. However, the lack of specific tumor targeting by various contrast agents used in PAI obstructs its clinical applications. In this study, we developed indocyanine green (ICG)-encapsulated micelles specific for the CD 44 receptor and used in near infrared and photoacoustic imaging of tumors. ICG was hydrophobically modified prior to loading into hyaluronic acid (HA)-based micelles utilized for CD 44 based-targeting. We investigated the physicochemical characteristics of prepared HA only and ICG-encapsulated HA micelles (HA-ICG micelles). After intravenous injection of tumor-bearing mice, the bio-distribution and in vivo photoacoustic images of ICG-encapsulated HA micelles accumulating in tumors were also investigated. Our study further encourages the application of this HA-ICG-based nano-platform as a tumor-specific contrast agent for PAI.

  20. 6-Plex microsphere immunoassay with imaging planar array detection for mycotoxins in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jeroen; Cardall, Alice; Haasnoot, Willem; Nielen, Michel W F

    2014-08-21

    Mycotoxins are produced by fungi as secondary metabolites. They often multi-contaminate food and feed commodities posing a health risk to humans and animals. A fast and easy to apply multiplex screening of these commodities could be useful to detect multi-contamination. For this, we developed a semi-quantitative 6-plex immunoassay using a suspension array of paramagnetic colour-coded microspheres combined with imaging planar array detection for the mycotoxins aflatoxin B1, ochratoxin A, zearalenone, deoxynivalenol, T2-toxin, HT-2 toxin and fumonisin B1. Mycotoxin specific monoclonal antibodies were coupled to different sets of microspheres and mycotoxins conjugated to the fluorescent protein R-phycoerythrin served as reporter molecules. Competition between free mycotoxins in the sample and mixed reporter molecules for antibody binding sites on mixed microspheres created a multiplex direct inhibition immunoassay. The reagents were selected for no or low cross-interactions between the assays and cross-reactions with metabolites and possible masked forms were determined. A within-laboratory validation was carried out using blank and spiked barley samples. Furthermore, the 6-plex was used to screen available barley, and malted barley, reference materials. The validation showed very high inter and intra-day precision for all samples with a maximum relative standard deviation value of 10%. The screening assay allows easy and rapid multiplex detection of the target mycotoxins in barley according to EU legislation. With a cut off factor of 50%, based on the EU maximum levels, we were able to screen at 2 μg kg(-1) for aflatoxin B1, 2.5 μg kg(-1) for ochratoxin A, 625 μg kg(-1) for deoxynivalenol, 50 μg kg(-1) for zearalenone, 1000 μg kg(-1) for fumonisin B1 and 25 μg kg(-1) for T-2 toxin. Thanks to the transportable planar array system, the developed 6-plex has potential for future on-site testing. Future implementation of this method as a pre-screening tool, prior to

  1. Imaging of Pelvic Bone Metastasis from Malignant Phyllodes Breast Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Ba D.

    2015-01-01

    The author reports a patient with a malignant phyllodes breast tumor, who then had a ten-year disease free interval before she developed a left pelvic bone metastasis and soft tissue invasion. Cross-sectional and radionuclide imaging of its musculoskeletal metastasis is presented. Literature concerning bone metastasis from phyllodes tumor is also briefly reviewed and discussed, along with its epidemiology.

  2. PET tracers for somatostatin receptor imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors have shown rising incidence mainly due to higher clinical awareness and better diagnostic tools over the last 30 years. Functional imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with PET tracers is an evolving field that is continuously refining the affinity of new tracers in the search...... these PET tracers further....

  3. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  4. Imaging of brain tumors with histological correlations. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelegas, Antonios (ed.)

    2011-07-01

    This volume provides a deeper understanding of the diagnosis of brain tumors by correlating radiographic imaging features with the underlying pathological abnormalities. All modern imaging modalities are used to complete a diagnostic overview of brain tumors with emphasis on recent advances in diagnostic neuroradiology. High-quality illustrations depicting common and uncommon imaging characteristics of a wide range of brain tumors are presented and analysed, drawing attention to the ways in which these characteristics reflect different aspects of pathology. Important theoretical considerations are also discussed. Since the first edition, chapters have been revised and updated and new material has been added, including detailed information on the clinical application of functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. Radiologists and other clinicians interested in the current diagnostic approach to brain tumors will find this book to be an invaluable and enlightening clinical tool. (orig.)

  5. New functional imaging modalities for chromaffin tumors, neuroblastomas and ganglioneuromas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilias, Ioannis; Shulkin, Barry; Pacak, Karel

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear medicine modalities use radiolabeled ligands that either follow metabolic pathways or act on cellular receptors. Thus, they permit functional imaging of physiological processes and help to localize sites such as tumors that harbor pathological events. The application of positron emission tomography (PET) ligands to the specific pathways of synthesis, metabolism and inactivation of catecholamines found in chromaffin tumors, neuroblastomas and ganglioneuromas can be used to provide a more thorough localization of these types of tumor. Recent advances have been made in functional imaging to localize pheochromocytomas, paragangliomas, neuroblastomas and ganglioneuromas, including approaches based on PET with [(18)F]fluorodopamine, [(18)F]fluorohydroxyphenylalanine, [(11)C]epinephrine or [(11)C]hydroxyephedrine. Such functional imaging can complement computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging and other scintigraphic techniques to localize these tumors before surgical or medical therapeutic approaches are considered.

  6. Imaging techniques for the diagnosis of soft tissue tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso PD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available P Diana Afonso,1,2 VV Mascarenhas21Department of Radiology, Hospital Beatriz Angelo, Loures, 2Department of Radiology, Hospital da Luz, Lisbon, PortugalAbstract: The primary aim in soft tissue tumor imaging should be to reach a specific diagnosis or to narrow the differential diagnosis, and to help to decide whether biopsy, surgical intervention, or simple observation is required for further management. In addition to contributing toward diagnosis, imaging has an important role in the staging of soft tissue malignancies and potentially in response assessment. This general review article highlights a rational diagnostic imaging approach to patients presenting with soft tissue tumors, emphasizing the fundamental principles inherent to soft tissue tumor imaging and diagnosis.Keywords: soft tissue tumors, ultrasound, CT, PET, MRI

  7. CARS and non-linear microscopy imaging of brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Tamosaityte, Sandra; Geiger, Kathrin; Schackert, Gabriele; Steiner, Gerald; Koch, Edmund; Kirsch, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy offers a series of techniques that have the potential to be applied in vivo, for intraoperative identification of tumor border and in situ pathology. By addressing the different content of lipids that characterize the tumors with respect to the normal brain tissue, CARS microscopy enables to discern primary and secondary brain tumors from healthy tissue. A study performed in mouse models shows that the reduction of the CARS signal is a reliable quantity to identify brain tumors, irrespective from the tumor type. Moreover it enables to identify tumor borders and infiltrations at a cellular resolution. Integration of CARS with autogenous TPEF and SHG adds morphological and compositional details about the tissue. Examples of multimodal CARS imaging of different human tumor biopsies demonstrate the ability of the technique to retrieve information useful for histopathological diagnosis.

  8. High-resolution multiphoton imaging of tumors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Entenberg, David; Segall, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John

    2011-10-01

    Analysis of the individual steps in metastasis is crucial if insights at the molecular level are to be linked to the cell biology of cancer. A technical hurdle to achieving the analysis of the individual steps of metastasis is the fact that, at the gross level, tumors are heterogeneous in both animal models and patients. Human primary tumors show extensive variation in all properties ranging from growth and morphology of the tumor through tumor-cell density in the blood and formation and growth of metastases. Methods capable of the direct visualization and analysis of tumor-cell behavior at single-cell resolution in vivo have become crucial in advancing the understanding of mechanisms of metastasis, the definition of microenvironment, and the markers related to both. This article discusses the use of high-resolution multiphoton imaging of tumors (specifically breast tumors in mice) in vivo.

  9. Complex image method for RF antenna-plasma inductive coupling calculation in planar geometry. Part I: basic concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howling, A. A.; Guittienne, Ph; Jacquier, R.; Furno, I.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling between an inductive source and the plasma determines the power transfer efficiency and the reflected impedance in the primary circuit. Usually, the plasma coupling is analysed by means of a transformer equivalent circuit, where the plasma inductance and resistance are estimated using a global plasma model. This paper shows that, for planar RF antennas, the mutual inductance between the plasma and the primary circuit can be calculated using partial inductances and the complex image method, where the plasma coupling is determined in terms of the plasma skin depth and the distance to the plasma. To introduce the basic concepts, the mutual inductance is calculated here for a linear conductor parallel to the plasma surface. In the accompanying paper part II Guittienne et al (2015 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 24 065015), impedance measurements on a RF resonant planar plasma source are modeled using an impedance matrix where the plasma-antenna mutual impedances are calculated using the complex image method presented here.

  10. Self-assembled peptide nanoparticles as tumor microenvironment activatable probes for tumor targeting and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Ji, Tianjiao; Wang, Hai; Li, Suping; Zhao, Yuliang; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-03-10

    Design of specific and sensitive imaging probes for targeting tumor microenvironment holds great promise to achieve precise detection and rapid responsiveness to neoplastic tissues. Dysregulated pH, one of the most remarkable hallmarks of tumor microenvironment, can be considered as a good specific trigger for the design of broad-spectrum and local-environment responsive imaging probes. However, the current existing design strategies for pH-responsive systems are insufficient to meet the needs for a rapid and tumor-specific diagnosis. Here we reported a novel biomimetic nanostructure based on oligopeptide self-assembly that can quickly switch into dissociated stage with active fluorescence property from self-assembled stage with quenched fluorescence activity when encountering a subtle pH-change in tumor microenvironment (pH 6.8 vs. 7.4). This oligopeptide-assembly is examined as tumor microenvironment activatable probes for both intratumoral and intravenous in vivo tumor imaging. Through the distinct fluorescent intensities, it is validated that the acidic tumor microenvironment can activate stronger fluorescence signals. The tailor-made self-assembled oligopeptide nanomaterials have the potential for efficient and specific in situ diagnosis of various solid tumors with a weakly acidic microenvironment, which is expected to be of crucial importance for clinical tumor diagnostics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Current and Future Lymphatic Imaging Modalities for Tumor Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Murtaza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor progression is supported by the lymphatic system which should be scanned efficiently for tumor staging as well as the enhanced therapeutic outcomes. Poor resolution and low sensitivity is a limitation of traditional lymphatic imaging modalities; thus new noninvasive approaches like nanocarriers, magnetic resonance imaging, positron-emission tomography, and quantum dots are advantageous. Some newer modalities, which are under development, and their potential uses will also be discussed in this review.

  12. FIESTA-ET: high-resolution cardiac imaging using echo-planar steady-state free precession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Glenn S; Saranathan, Manojkumar

    2002-12-01

    This work describes a technique that combines multishot echo-planar imaging (EPI) with steady-state free precession (SSFP, also known as TrueFISP, FIESTA, and balanced FFE) for multislice, cine MR imaging of the heart. Unlike recently reported methods, the technique presented here (FIESTA-ET) is high-resolution and does not require offline reconstruction or postprocessing. It is therefore suitable for use on standard clinical scanners. FIESTA-ET was compared with conventional FIESTA imaging in 10 volunteers and quantitative analyses of myocardial signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and ventricular volumes were performed. While providing comparable image quality, FIESTA-ET required half the acquisition time per slice of conventional FIESTA. Because multiple slices could be imaged in a single breathhold, the entire heart could be scanned in less than 2 min. Although the FIESTA-ET images exhibited an unexpected increase (P FIESTA, the volumetric measurements showed excellent correlation. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. AIRWAY IDENTIFICATION WITHIN PLANAR GAMMA CAMERA IMAGES USING COMPUTER MODELS OF LUNG MORPHOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The quantification of inhaled aerosols could be improved if a more comprehensive assessment of their spatial distribution patterns among lung airways were obtained. A common technique for quantifying particle deposition in human lungs is with planar gamma scintigraphy. However, t...

  14. AIRWAY IDENTIFICATION WITHIN PLANAR GAMMA CAMERA IMAGES USING COMPUTER MODELS OF LUNG MORPHOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The quantification of inhaled aerosols could be improved if a more comprehensive assessment of their spatial distribution patterns among lung airways were obtained. A common technique for quantifying particle deposition in human lungs is with planar gamma scintigraphy. However, t...

  15. Cerenkov and radioluminescence imaging of brain tumor specimens during neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello Enrico; Schiariti, Marco P.; Grana, Chiara M.; Ferrari, Mahila; Cremonesi, Marta; Boschi, Federico

    2016-05-01

    We presented the first example of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and radioluminescence imaging (RLI) of human tumor specimens. A patient with a brain meningioma localized in the left parietal region was injected with 166 MBq of Y90-DOTATOC the day before neurosurgery. The specimens of the tumor removed during surgery were imaged using both CLI and RLI using an optical imager prototype developed in our laboratory. The system is based on a cooled electron multiplied charge coupled device coupled with an f/0.95 17-mm C-mount lens. We showed for the first time the possibility of obtaining CLI and RLI images of fresh human brain tumor specimens removed during neurosurgery.

  16. Intraoperative Molecular Imaging for Rapid Assessment of Tumor Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    determine the depth of embedded tumor fragments in the excise tissue or surgical cavity. Pilot animal data with the Licor IRDye800CW-2DG imaging agent in...and the tumor immediately removed with adjacent normal tissue. All tissue were soaked for 5 – 20 minutes in a solution of Licor IRDye800CW-2DG and... Licor IRDye800CW-2DG, showing a cross section of the tumor mass. These images show a significant amount of non-specific uptake of the probe in

  17. Primary spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumor on MR imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant J Thoriya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoplasms in the region of filum terminale are not uncommon. Myxopapillary ependymoma is the commonest tumor at this location. The differentials reported for this entity are nerve sheath tumor, meningioma, paraganglioma, intradural metastases, lymphoma, other varieties of ependymoma, subependymoma, astrocytoma, ganglioglioma, hemangioblastoma, and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET. PNET may very rarely present as an intradural thoracolumbar mass. We present pre- and post-therapy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features of a patient with proven primary spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PSPNET of peripheral subtype.

  18. Glomus Tumors: Symptom Variations and Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Weon Ham

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe typical clinical symptoms of glomus tumors are pain, tenderness, and sensitivity to temperature change, and the presence of these clinical findings is helpful in diagnosis. However, the tumors often pose diagnostic difficulty because of variations in presentation and the nonspecific symptoms of glomus tumors. To the best of our knowledge, few studies have reported on the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in diagnosing glomus tumors in patients with unspecific symptoms.MethodsThe inclusion criteria of this study were: having undergone surgery for subungual glomus tumor of the hand, histopathologic confirmation of glomus tumor, and having undergone preoperative MRI. Twenty-one patients were enrolled. The characteristics of the tumors and the presenting symptoms including pain, tenderness, and sensitivity to temperature change were retrospectively reviewed.ResultsFive out of 21 patients (23% did not show the typical glomus tumor symptom triad because they did not complain of pain provoked by coldness. Nevertheless, preoperative MRI showed well-defined small soft-tissue lesions on T1- and T2-weighted images, which are typical findings of glomus tumors. The tumors were completely resected and confirmed as glomus tumor histopathologically.ConclusionsEarly occult lesions of glomus tumor in the hand may not be revealed by physical examination because of their barely detectable symptoms. Moreover, subungual lesions may be particularly difficult to evaluate on physical examination. Our cases showed that MRI offers excellent diagnostic information in clinically undiagnosed or misdiagnosed patients. Preoperative MRI can accurately define the character and extent of glomus tumor, even though it is impalpable and invisible.

  19. The Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menze, Bjoern H.; Jakab, Andras; Bauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report the set-up and results of the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS) organized in conjunction with the MICCAI 2012 and 2013 conferences. Twenty state-of-the-art tumor segmentation algorithms were applied to a set of 65 multi-contrast MR scans of low......- and high-grade glioma patients – manually annotated by up to four raters – and to 65 comparable scans generated using tumor image simulation software. Quantitative evaluations revealed considerable disagreement between the human raters in segmenting various tumor sub-regions (Dice scores in the range 74...... a hierarchical majority vote yielded segmentations that consistently ranked above all individual algorithms, indicating remaining opportunities for further methodological improvements. The BRATS image data and manual annotations continue to be publicly available through an online evaluation system as an ongoing...

  20. Fuel concentration in isothermal Diesel sprays through structured planar laser imaging measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payri, R.; Gimeno, J.; Marti, P. [CMT Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Manin, J., E-mail: jmanin@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, 7011 East Ave., 94551 Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structured illumination has been implemented to quantify mixing in isothermal sprays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison to a gas-jet model conducted to Schmidt number below the unity (Sc = 0.8). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results showed incomplete momentum transfer due to velocity slip between droplets and ambient. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher injection pressures enhance momentum transfer and lead to better global mixing. - Abstract: The mixing of isothermal liquid sprays in engine-like conditions has been investigated by applying the structured planar laser imaging technique to remove multiple light scattering. The intensity of the illumination plane has been recovered by removing multiply scattered light and mapping the spray three-dimensionally via discrete tomography. Based on the extinction of light within the illumination plane, the number density has been extracted. Coupled with 2-D maps of droplet diameters obtained through LIF/Mie ratio, the number density allowed to calculate the fuel concentration in the sprays. The mixture fraction of DI Diesel sprays injected into an inert environment held at room temperature has been evaluated and compared to a 2-D model based on gas-jet theory. The experimental results showed good agreement with the predictions when a Gaussian radial distribution is assumed and the Schmidt number is correctly tuned. Differences in the radial distribution has been observed and related to incomplete momentum transfer between the liquid spray and the surrounding gases. For different testing conditions, while the influence of ambient density on mixing was expected, the effect of injection pressure has been found to provide additional information concerning the global mixing of liquid sprays.

  1. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of glial brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferda, Jiri, E-mail: ferda@fnplzen. [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Kastner, Jan [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Mukensnabl, Petr [Sikl' s Institute of Pathological Anatomy, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Choc, Milan [Department of Neurosurgery, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Horemuzova, Jana; Ferdova, Eva; Kreuzberg, Boris [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2010-06-15

    Aim: To evaluate the author's experience with the use of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) on patients with glial tumors. Methods: A retrospective evaluation of a group of 24 patients with glial tumors was performed. There were eight patients with Grade II, eight patients with Grade III and eight patients with Grade IV tumors with a histologically proven diagnosis. All the patients underwent routine imaging including T2 weighted images, multidirectional diffusion weighted imaging (measured in 60 non-collinear directions) and T1 weighted non-enhanced and contrast enhanced images. The imaging sequence and evaluation software were produced by Massachusetts General Hospital Corporation (Boston, MA, USA). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were calculated in all patients. The white matter FA changes were assessed within the tumorous tissue, on the tumorous borderline and in the normally appearing white matter adjacent to the tumor. A three-dimensional model of the white matter tract was created to demonstrate the space relationship of the tumor and the capsula interna or corpus callosum in each case using the following fiber tracing parameters: FA step 0.25 and a tensor declination angle of 45 gr. An additional assessment of the tumorous tissue enhancement was performed. Results: A uniform homogenous structure with sharp demargination of the Grade II tumors and the wide rim of the intermedial FA in all Grade III tumors respectively, were found during the evaluation of the FA maps. In Grade IV tumors a variable demargination was noted on the FA maps. The sensitivity and specificity for the discrimination of low- and high-grade glial tumors using FA maps was revealed to be 81% and 87% respectively. If the evaluation of the contrast enhancement was combined with the evaluation of the FA maps, both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. Conclusion: Although the evaluation of the fractional anisotropy maps is not sufficient for glioma grading, the

  2. Targeted Imaging of Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Cyanine 7-Labeled Mannose in Xenograft Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jiang MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose receptor is considered as a hallmark of M2-oriented tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, but its utility in TAMs was rarely reported. Therefore, deoxymannose (DM, a high-affinity ligand of mannose receptor, was labeled with near-infrared dye cyanine 7 (Cy7, and its feasibility of targeted imaging on TAMs was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The Cy7-DM was synthesized, and its binding affinity with induced TAMs in vitro, whole-body imaging in xenograft tumor mouse model in vivo, and the cellular localization in dissected tissues were evaluated. We demonstrated a high uptake of Cy7-DM by induced M2 macrophages and TAMs in tumor tissues. In vivo near-infrared live imaging visualized abundant TAMs in tumor lesions instead of inflammatory sites by Cy7-DM imaging, and the quantity of Cy7-DM signals in tumors was significantly higher than that shown in inflammatory sites from 1 to 8 hours of imaging. Our results suggest that mannose could rapidly and specifically target TAMs and is a promising candidate for targeted diagnosis of tumor with rich TAMs.

  3. Imaging of bone tumors and tumor-like lesions. Techniques and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, A. Mark [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom). MRI Dept.; Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States). Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Imaging Inst.; James, Steven L.J. (eds.) [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom). Imaging Dept.

    2009-07-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook that provides a detailed description of the imaging techniques and findings in patients with benign and malignant bone tumors. In the first part of the book, the various techniques and procedures employed for imaging bone tumors are discussed in detail. Individual chapters are devoted to MRI, CT, nuclear medicine, and interventional procedures. The second part of the book gives an authoritative review of the role of these imaging techniques in diagnosis, surgical staging, biopsy, and assessment of response to therapy. The third part of the book covers the imaging features of each major tumor subtype, with separate chapters on osteogenic tumors, cartilaginous tumors, etc. The final part of the book reviews the imaging features of bone tumors at particular anatomical sites such as the spine, ribs, pelvis, and scapula. Each chapter is written by an acknowledged expert in the field, and a wealth of illustrative material is included. This book will be of great value to musculoskeletal and general radiologists, orthopedic surgeons, and oncologists. (orig.)

  4. Imaging brain tumor proliferative activity with [I-124]iododeoxyuridine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasberg, RG; Roelcke, U; Weinreich, R; Beattie, B; von Ammon, K; Yonekawa, Y; Landolt, H; Guenther, [No Value; Crompton, NEA; Vontobel, P; Missimer, J; Maguire, RP; Koziorowski, J; Knust, EJ; Finn, RD; Leenders, KL

    2000-01-01

    Iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) uptake and retention was imaged by positron emission tomography (PET) at 0-48 min and 24 h after administration of 28.0-64.4 MBq (0.76-1.74 mCi) of [I-124]IUdR in 20 patients with brain tumors, including meningiomas and gliomas, The PET images were directly compared with gado

  5. Imaging of tumor specific antigens and microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    The events that drive tumor progression and metastatization initiate within the cancer cell itself, that accumulates mutations and de-differentiate until reaching a very unstable stage. But these events alone are not sufficient to maintain sustained metastasis development and growth. Support from

  6. Redefining circulating tumor cells by image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, Sjoerd

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the blood of patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. However, CTC are very heterogeneous in size and shape, and are present at very low frequencies. Missing or misjudging a few events may have great

  7. Redefining circulating tumor cells by image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, S.T.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the blood of patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. However, CTC are very heterogeneous in size and shape, and are present at very low frequencies. Missing or misjudging a few events may have great cons

  8. Redefining circulating tumor cells by image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, Sjoerd

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the blood of patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. However, CTC are very heterogeneous in size and shape, and are present at very low frequencies. Missing or misjudging a few events may have great cons

  9. Tumor-stroma interaction: Revealing fibroblast-secreted exosomes as potent regulators of Wnt-planar cell polarity signaling in cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luga, Valbona; Wrana, Jeffrey L

    2013-12-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) regulate tumor progression, but their role in cancer metastasis remains largely unexplored. Exosomes are secreted microvesicles that are emerging as potent mediators of cell-cell communication that are of particular importance in tumor-stroma interactions. The Wnt-planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is the primary regulator of convergent extension cell movements during vertebrate development, but the role of this signaling pathway in cancer cell migration and metastasis has been unclear. Recently, we revealed that fibroblasts secrete exosomes that promote breast cancer cell (BCC) protrusive activity, motility, and metastasis by activating autocrine Wnt-PCP signaling in BCCs. Moreover, we showed that Wnt ligands produced by BCCs tether to fibroblast exosomes upon trafficking of exosomes in BCCs. These findings have several implications that motivate promising future research in the fields of tumor-stroma communication, exosome function, and Wnt-PCP signaling in cancer metastasis.

  10. Diffusion-weighted imaging-guided MR spectroscopy in breast lesions using readout-segmented echo-planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Kun; Chai, Weimin; Zhan, Ying; Luo, Xianfu; Yan, Fuhua [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai (China); Fu, Caixia [Siemens MRI Center, Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd, Shenzhen (China); Shen, Kunwei [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-guided magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) using readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RS-EPI) to characterise breast lesions. A total of 258 patients with 258 suspicious breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter were examined using DWI-guided, single-voxel MRS with RS-EPI. The mean total choline-containing compound (tCho) signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and concentration were used for the interpretation of MRS data. T-tests, χ{sup 2}-tests, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses and Pearson correlations were conducted for statistical analysis. Histologically, 183 lesions were malignant, and 75 lesions were benign. Both the mean tCho SNR and concentration of malignant lesions were higher than those of benign lesions (6.23 ± 3.30 AU/mL vs. 1.26 ± 1.75 AU/mL and 3.17 ± 2.03 mmol/kg vs. 0.86 ± 0.83 mmol/kg, respectively; P < 0.0001). For a tCho SNR of 2.0 AU/mL and a concentration of 1.76 mmol/kg, the corresponding areas under the ROC curves were 0.93 and 0.90, respectively. The mean tCho SNR and concentration negatively correlated with apparent diffusion coefficients calculated from RS-EPI, with correlation coefficients of -0.54 and -0.48, respectively. DWI-guided MRS using RS-EPI is feasible and accurate for characterising breast lesions. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of tumor oxygenation and metabolic profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishna, Murali C.; Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is distinct from normal tissue as a result of abnormal vascular network characterized by hypoxia, low pH, high interstitial fluid pressure and elevated glycolytic activity. This poses a barrier to treatments including radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Imaging methods...... which can characterize such features non-invasively and repeatedly will be of significant value in planning treatment as well as monitoring response to treatment. The three techniques based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are reviewed here. Tumor pO2 can be measured by two MRI methods requiring...... an exogenous contrast agent: electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI). Tumor metabolic profile can be assessed by a third method, hyperpolarized metabolic MR, based on injection of hyperpolarized biological molecules labeled with 13C or 15N and MR...

  12. A pretargeting system for tumor PET imaging and radioimmunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise eKraeber-Bodéré

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Labeled antibodies, as well as their fragments and antibody-derived recombinant constructs, have long been proposed as general vectors to target radionuclides to tumor lesions for imaging and therapy. They have indeed shown promise in both imaging and therapeutic applications, but they have not fulfilled the original expectations of achieving sufficient image contrast for tumor detection or sufficient radiation dose delivered to tumors for therapy. Pretargeting was originally developed for tumor immunoscintigraphy. It was assumed that directly-radiolabled antibodies could be replaced by an unlabeled immunoconjugate capable of binding both a tumor-specific antigen and a small molecular weight molecule. The small molecular weight molecule would carry the radioactive payload and would be injected after the bispecific immunoconjugate. It has been demonstrated that this approach does allow for both antibody-specific recognition and fast clearance of the radioactive molecule, thus resulting in improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios. It was subsequently shown that pretargeting also held promise for tumor therapy, translating improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios into more specific delivery of absorbed radiation doses. Many technical approaches have been proposed to implement pretargeting, and two have been extensively documented. One is based on the avidin-biotin system, and the other on bispecific antibodies binding a tumor-specific antigen and a hapten. Both have been studied in preclinical models, as well as in several clinical studies, and have shown improved targeting efficiency. This article reviews the historical and recent preclinical and clinical advances in the use of bispecific-antibody-based pretargeting for radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of cancer. The results of recent evaluation of pretargeting in PET imaging also are discussed.

  13. Galactose as Broad Ligand for Multiple Tumor Imaging and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxiang; Chen, Haiyan; Su, Shanyuhan; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Congying; Fida, Guissi; Cui, Sisi; Zhao, Juan; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Galactose residues could be specifically recognized by the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) which is highly exhibited on liver tissues. However, ASGPR has not been widely investigated on different tumor cell lines except for hepatoma carcinoma cells, which motivates us to investigate the possibility of galactose serving as a board tumor ligand. In this study, a galactose (Gal)-based probe conjugated with fluorescence dye MPA (Gal-MPA) was constructed for the evaluation of tumor affinities/targeted ability on different tumor cell lines. In the vitro cell study, it was indicated that the fluorescence probe Gal-MPA displayed higher cell affinity to tumor cells (HepG2, MCF-7 and A549) than that of the normal liver cells l02. In the vivo dynamic study of Gal-MPA in tumor-bearing mice (HepG2, MCF-7, A549, HCT116, U87, MDA-MB-231 and S180), it was shown that its high tumor targeted ability with the maximal tumor/normal tissue ratio reached up to 6.8. Meanwhile, the fast tumor-targeted ability within 2 hours and long retention on tumor site up to 120 hours were observed. Our results demonstrated that galactose should be a promising broad ligand for multiple tumor imaging and targeted therapy. Subsequently, Gal was covalently conjugated to doxorubicin (DOX) to form prodrug Gal-DOX for tumor targeted therapy. The therapeutic results of Gal-DOX than DOX being better suggested that galactosylated prodrugs might have the prospective potential in tumor targeted therapy.

  14. Imaging of bone tumors for the musculoskeletal oncologic surgeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errani, C., E-mail: costantino.errani@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Kreshak, J., E-mail: j.kreshak@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Ruggieri, P., E-mail: pietro.ruggieri@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Alberghini, M., E-mail: marco.alberghini@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Picci, P., E-mail: piero.picci@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Research, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D., E-mail: daniel.vanel@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Research, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    The appropriate diagnosis and treatment of bone tumors requires close collaboration between different medical specialists. Imaging plays a key role throughout the process. Radiographic detection of a bone tumor is usually not challenging. Accurate diagnosis is often possible from physical examination, history, and standard radiographs. The location of the lesion in the bone and the skeleton, its size and margins, the presence and type of periosteal reaction, and any mineralization all help determine diagnosis. Other imaging modalities contribute to the formation of a diagnosis but are more critical for staging, evaluation of response to treatment, surgical planning, and follow-up.When necessary, biopsy is often radioguided, and should be performed in consultation with the surgeon performing the definitive operative procedure. CT is optimal for characterization of the bone involvement and for evaluation of pulmonary metastases. MRI is highly accurate in determining the intraosseous extent of tumor and for assessing soft tissue, joint, and vascular involvement. FDG-PET imaging is becoming increasingly useful for the staging of tumors, assessing response to neoadjuvant treatment, and detecting relapses.Refinement of these and other imaging modalities and the development of new technologies such as image fusion for computer-navigated bone tumor surgery will help surgeons produce a detailed and reliable preoperative plan, especially in challenging sites such as the pelvis and spine.

  15. Novel 99mTc labeled σ receptor ligand as a potential tumor imaging agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A novel 99mTc labeled complex, [N-[2-((2-oxo-2-(4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl) (2-mercaptoethyl)amino)acetyl]-2-aminoethanethiolato]Technetium(V) oxide (PPPE-MAMA′-99mTcO) ([99mTc]-2) has been designed and prepared based on the integrated approach. The corresponding rhenium complex (PPPE-MAMA′-ReO)(Re-2) has been prepared and characterized. In vitro competition binding assays show moderate affinity of Re-2 towards σ1 and σ2 receptors with Ki values of 8.67 ± 0.07 and 5.71 ± 1.88 μmol, respectively. Planar images obtained at 0.5 h, 4 h, 20 h after I.v. Injection indicate the accumulation of [99mTc]-2 in MCF-7 human breast tumor bearing mice at 20 h. Furthermore, the accumulation of [99mTc]-2 has been inhibited at 20 h after co-injection of [99mTc]-2 plus haloperidol (1 mg/kg). Biodistribution studies of [99mTc]-2 display an in vivo tumor uptake of 0.14% ± 0.01% ID/g at 24 h post I.v. Injection with a tumor/muscle ratio of 6.02 ± 0.87. The above results suggest that [99mTc]-2, derived from a previously published lead compound, retains certain tumor uptake and affinity for σ receptors. [99mTc]-2 may be used as a basis for further structural modifications to develop tumor imaging agents with high affinity for σ receptors.

  16. Far-field super-resolution imaging with a planar hyperbolic metamaterial lens beyond the Fabry-Perot resonance condition

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Cheng; Jiang, Xunya; Cao, Juncheng

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate achieving the far-field super-resolution imaging can be realized by using a planar hyperbolic metamaterial lens (PHML), beyond the Fabry-Perot resonance condition. Although the thickness of the PHML is much larger than wavelength, the PHML not only can transmit radiative waves and evanescent waves with high transmission, but also can collect all the waves in the image region with the amplitudes of them being the same order of magnitude. We present a design for a PHML to realize the far-field super-resolution imaging, with the distance between the sources and the images 10 times larger than wavelength. We show the superresolution of our PHML is robust against losses, and the PHML can be fabricated by periodic stacking of metal and dielectric layers.

  17. MHz-rate nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging in a Mach 10 hypersonic wind tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Naibo; Webster, Matthew; Lempert, Walter R; Miller, Joseph D; Meyer, Terrence R; Ivey, Christopher B; Danehy, Paul M

    2011-02-01

    Nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) imaging at repetition rates as high as 1 MHz is demonstrated in the NASA Langley 31 in. Mach 10 hypersonic wind tunnel. Approximately 200 time-correlated image sequences of between 10 and 20 individual frames were obtained over eight days of wind tunnel testing spanning two entries in March and September of 2009. The image sequences presented were obtained from the boundary layer of a 20° flat plate model, in which transition was induced using a variety of different shaped protuberances, including a cylinder and a triangle. The high-speed image sequences captured a variety of laminar and transitional flow phenomena, ranging from mostly laminar flow, typically at a lower Reynolds number and/or in the near wall region of the model, to highly transitional flow in which the temporal evolution and progression of characteristic streak instabilities and/or corkscrew-shaped vortices could be clearly identified.

  18. Mouse Hepatic Tumor Vascular Imaging by Experimental Selective Angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Kyum Kim

    Full Text Available Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has unique vascular features, which require selective imaging of hepatic arterial perfusion and portal venous perfusion with vascular catheterization for sufficient evaluation. Unlike in humans, vessels in mice are too small to catheterize, and the importance of separately imaging the feeding vessels of tumors is frequently overlooked in hepatic tumor models. The purpose of this study was to perform selective latex angiography in several mouse liver tumor models and assess their suitability.In several ectopic (Lewis lung carcinoma, B16/F10 melanoma cell lines and spontaneous liver tumor (Albumin-Cre/MST1fl/fl/MST2fl/fl, Albumin-Cre/WW45fl/fl, and H-ras12V genetically modified mouse models, the heart left ventricle and/or main portal vein of mice was punctured, and latex dye was infused to achieve selective latex arteriography and/or portography.H-ras12V transgenic mice (a HCC and hepatic adenoma model developed multiple liver nodules that displayed three different perfusion patterns (portal venous or hepatic artery perfusion predominant, mixed perfusion, indicating intra-tumoral vascular heterogeneity. Selective latex angiography revealed that the Lewis lung carcinoma implant model and the Albumin-Cre/WW45fl/fl model reproduced conventional angiography findings of human HCC. Specifically, these mice developed tumors with abundant feeding arteries but no portal venous perfusion.Different hepatic tumor models showed different tumor vessel characteristics that influence the suitability of the model and that should be considered when designing translational experiments. Selective latex angiography applied to certain mouse tumor models (both ectopic and spontaneous closely simulated typical characteristics of human HCC vascular imaging.

  19. Radioiodinated agents for imaging multidrug resistant tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P; Augustine, Ann M; Nearman, Jessica; McGarry, Jonathon; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2009-03-01

    Diagnostic agents enabling characterization of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumors can aid in the selection of chemotherapy regimens. We report here synthesis and evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals based on the second-generation MDR-reversing drug MS-209. 5-[3-{4-(2-Phenyl-2-(4'-[(125)I]iodo-phenyl)acetyl)piperazin-1-yl}-2-hydroxypropoxy]quino-line (17) was prepared from the 4'-tributylstannyl precursor (16) in >95% radiochemical yield. (16) was synthesized in a six-step process with the overall yield of 25%. In vitro studies were conducted in MES-SA (drug-sensitive) and MES-SA/Dx5 (MDR) human uterine sarcoma cell lines. In vivo studies were performed in athymic mice bearing MES-SA and MES-SA/Dx5 xenografts. The uptake of (17) is higher in MES-SA than MES-SA/Dx5 cells. The uptake and efflux of (17) depend on temperature and concentration, and indicate active transport mechanism(s). Incubation of drug sensitive MES-SA cells with verapamil or (15), a nonradioactive analog of (17), alters the cellular retention of radioactivity only marginally. However, MES-SA/Dx5 cells retain approximately 12% more of (17) when incubated with 10 muM verapamil. The addition of (15) or high concentrations of (17) also increase the uptake of (17) in MES-SA/Dx5 up to 200%, depending on the concentration and temperature. The dependence of (17) uptake on the MDR status is also evident in the ex vivo binding studies. In vivo tests in mice xenografted simultaneously with both tumor cell lines indicate distinct pharmacokinetics for each tumor. The absorption half-life in MES-SA/Dx5 xenograft is approximately 10x shorter and the mean residence time approximately 50% shorter compared to MES-SA xenograft in the same mouse. Radioiodinated derivatives of MS-209 appear to be good indicators of multidrug resistance.

  20. Brain tumor classification of microscopy images using deep residual learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yota; Washiya, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kota; Nagahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The crisis rate of brain tumor is about one point four in ten thousands. In general, cytotechnologists take charge of cytologic diagnosis. However, the number of cytotechnologists who can diagnose brain tumors is not sufficient, because of the necessity of highly specialized skill. Computer-Aided Diagnosis by computational image analysis may dissolve the shortage of experts and support objective pathological examinations. Our purpose is to support a diagnosis from a microscopy image of brain cortex and to identify brain tumor by medical image processing. In this study, we analyze Astrocytes that is a type of glia cell of central nerve system. It is not easy for an expert to discriminate brain tumor correctly since the difference between astrocytes and low grade astrocytoma (tumors formed from Astrocyte) is very slight. In this study, we present a novel method to segment cell regions robustly using BING objectness estimation and to classify brain tumors using deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) constructed by deep residual learning. BING is a fast object detection method and we use pretrained BING model to detect brain cells. After that, we apply a sequence of post-processing like Voronoi diagram, binarization, watershed transform to obtain fine segmentation. For classification using CNNs, a usual way of data argumentation is applied to brain cells database. Experimental results showed 98.5% accuracy of classification and 98.2% accuracy of segmentation.

  1. Photoacoustic imaging features of intraocular tumors: Retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Xue, Yafang; Özkurt, Zeynep Gürsel; Slimani, Naziha; Hu, Zizhong; Wang, Xueding; Xia, Kewen; Ma, Teng; Zhou, Qifa; Demirci, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the capability of photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) in assessing the unique molecular and architectural features in ocular tumors. A real-time PA and ultrasonography (US) parallel imaging system based on a research US platform was developed to examine retinoblastoma in mice in vivo and human retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma ex vivo. PA signals were generated by optical illumination at 720, 750, 800, 850, 900 and 950 nm delivered through a fiber optical bundle. The optical absorption spectra of the tumors were derived from the PA images. The optical absorption spectrum of each tumor was quantified by fitting to a polynomial model. The microscopic architectures of the tumors were quantified by frequency domain analysis of the PA signals. Both the optical spectral and architectural features agree with the histological findings of the tumors. The mouse and human retinoblastoma showed comparable total optical absorption spectra at a correlation of 0.95 (p<0.005). The quantitative PAI features of human retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma have shown statistically significant difference in two tailed t-tests (p<0.05). Fully compatible with the concurrent procedures, PAI could be a potential tool complementary to other diagnostic modalities for characterizing intraocular tumors. PMID:28231293

  2. Accelerated three-dimensional cine phase contrast imaging using randomly undersampled echo planar imaging with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate an accelerated three-dimensional (3D) cine phase contrast MRI sequence by combining a randomly sampled 3D k-space acquisition sequence with an echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. An accelerated 3D cine phase contrast MRI sequence was implemented by combining EPI readout with randomly undersampled 3D k-space data suitable for compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. The undersampled data were then reconstructed using low-dimensional structural self-learning and thresholding (LOST). 3D phase contrast MRI was acquired in 11 healthy adults using an overall acceleration of 7 (EPI factor of 3 and CS rate of 3). For comparison, a single two-dimensional (2D) cine phase contrast scan was also performed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) rate 2 and approximately at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation. The stroke volume and mean velocity in both the ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between two sequences using Bland-Altman plots. An average scan time of 3 min and 30 s, corresponding to an acceleration rate of 7, was achieved for 3D cine phase contrast scan with one direction flow encoding, voxel size of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) , foot-head coverage of 6 cm and temporal resolution of 30 ms. The mean velocity and stroke volume in both the ascending and descending aorta were statistically equivalent between the proposed 3D sequence and the standard 2D cine phase contrast sequence. The combination of EPI with a randomly undersampled 3D k-space sampling sequence using LOST reconstruction allows a seven-fold reduction in scan time of 3D cine phase contrast MRI without compromising blood flow quantification. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Collar Osteophytes Mimicking Osteonecrosis in Planar Bone Scintigraphy and Usefulness of SPECT/CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Jr-Jian; Chen, Yi-Hsing; Tsai, Shih-Chuan; Lin, Wan-Yu

    2017-03-01

    The use of prednisolone is one major risk factor for osteonecrosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Bone scintigraphy can be a diagnostic tool for early diagnosis. We present a case who had collar osteophytes at the bilateral femoral heads, which mimicked osteonecrosis in the planar bone scintigram. An SPECT/CT scan avoided this pitfall and increased the diagnostic accuracy for osteonecrosis.

  4. Imaging of Adrenal Masses with Emphasis on Adrenocortical Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Sundin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the more widespread and frequent use of cross-sectional techniques, mainly computed tomography (CT, an increasing number of adrenal tumors are detected as incidental findings (“incidentalomas”. These incidentaloma patients are much more frequent than those undergoing imaging because of symptoms related to adrenal disease. CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are in most patients sufficient for characterization and follow-up of the incidentaloma. In a minor portion of patients, biochemical screening reveals a functional tumor and further diagnostic work-up and therapy need to be performed according to the type of hormonal overproduction. In oncological patients, especially when the morphological imaging criteria indicate an adrenal metastasis, biopsy of the lesion should be considered after pheochromocytoma is ruled out biochemically. In the minority of patients in whom CT and MRI fail to characterize the tumor and when time is of essence, functional imaging mainly by positron emission tomography (PET is available using various tracers. The most used PET tracer, [18F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18FDG, is able to differentiate benign from malignant adrenal tumors in many patients. 11C-metomidate (11C-MTO is a more specialized PET tracer that binds to the 11-beta-hydroxylase enzyme in the adrenal cortex and thus makes it possible to differ adrenal tumors (benign adrenocortical adenoma and adrenocortical cancer from those of non-adrenocortical origin.

  5. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  6. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shoup, Timothy (Decatur, GA)

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  7. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shoup, Timothy (Decatur, GA)

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  8. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  9. Congenital salivary gland anlage tumor - in utero and postnatal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; Koch, Bernadette L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lim, Foong-Yen [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Elluru, Ravindhra G. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-03-01

    We present a case of an infant with congenital salivary gland anlage tumor, with fetal and postnatal imaging. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case describing the in utero imaging findings of salivary gland anlage tumor. A fetal MRI was performed secondary to the clinical finding of polyhydramnios, which identified a nasopharyngeal mass. Because findings were concerning for airway obstruction, the fetus was delivered by ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) to airway procedure. A postnatal CT confirmed the findings of the fetal MRI. The lesion was resected when the baby was 4 days old and recovery was uneventful. (orig.)

  10. Congenital salivary gland anlage tumor - in utero and postnatal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A; Lim, Foong-Yen; Elluru, Ravindhra G; Koch, Bernadette L

    2015-03-01

    We present a case of an infant with congenital salivary gland anlage tumor, with fetal and postnatal imaging. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case describing the in utero imaging findings of salivary gland anlage tumor. A fetal MRI was performed secondary to the clinical finding of polyhydramnios, which identified a nasopharyngeal mass. Because findings were concerning for airway obstruction, the fetus was delivered by ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) to airway procedure. A postnatal CT confirmed the findings of the fetal MRI. The lesion was resected when the baby was 4 days old and recovery was uneventful.

  11. Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008479 Preliminary study of MR elastography in brain tumors. XU Lei(徐磊), et al.Neurosci Imaging Center, Beijing Tiantan Hosp, Capital Med Univ, Beijing 100050.Chin J Radiol 2008;42(6):605-608. Objective To investigate the potential values of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for evaluating the brain tumor consistency in vivo. Methods Fourteen patients with known solid brain tumor (5 male, 9 female; age range: 16-63 years)

  12. In vivo quantification of {sup 177}Lu with planar whole-body and SPECT/CT gamma camera imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Dale L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Cumberland, NSW (Australia); Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); NETwork, Sydney Vital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Hennessy, Thomas M.; Willowson, Kathy P.; Henry, E. Courtney [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Chan, David L.H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia); NETwork, Sydney Vital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Aslani, Alireza [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia); Roach, Paul J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia); Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia)

    2015-09-17

    Advances in gamma camera technology and the emergence of a number of new theranostic radiopharmaceutical pairings have re-awakened interest in in vivo quantification with single-photon-emitting radionuclides. We have implemented and validated methodology to provide quantitative imaging of {sup 177}Lu for 2D whole-body planar studies and for 3D tomographic imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT. Whole-body planar scans were performed on subjects to whom a known amount of [{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-octreotate had been administered for therapy. The total radioactivity estimated from the images was compared with the known amount of the radionuclide therapy administered. In separate studies, venous blood samples were withdrawn from subjects after administration of [{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-octreotate while a SPECT acquisition was in progress and the concentration of the radionuclide in the venous blood sample compared with that estimated from large blood pool structures in the SPECT reconstruction. The total radioactivity contained within an internal SPECT calibration standard was also assessed. In the whole-body planar scans (n = 28), the estimated total body radioactivity was accurate to within +4.6 ± 5.9 % (range −17.1 to +11.2 %) of the correct value. In the SPECT reconstructions (n = 12), the radioactivity concentration in the cardiac blood pool was accurate to within −4.0 ± 7.8 % (range −16.1 to +7.5 %) of the true value and the internal standard measurements (n = 89) were within 2.0 ± 8.5 % (range −16.3 to +24.2 %) of the known amount of radioactivity contained. In our hands, state-of-the-art hybrid SPECT/CT gamma cameras were able to provide accurate estimates of in vivo radioactivity to better than, on average, ±10 % for use in biodistribution and radionuclide dosimetry calculations.

  13. Multimodal MRI in the characterization of glial neoplasms: the combined role of single-voxel MR spectroscopy, diffusion imaging and echo-planar perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonari, Paolo [Ospedale ' ' B. Ramazzini' ' , AUSL Modena, Neuroradiologia, Dipartimento Integrato di Neuroscienze, Carpi, Modena (Italy); Baraldi, Patrizia [Universita degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Fisiologia, Modena (Italy); Crisi, Girolamo [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Dipartimento ad Attivita Integrata di Neuroscienze, Parma (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) provide useful data for tumor evaluation. To assess the contribution of these multimodal techniques in grading glial neoplasms, we compared the value of DWI, PWI and MRS in the evaluation of histologically proven high- and low-grade gliomas in a population of 105 patients. Independently for each modality, the following variables were used to compare the tumors: minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and maximum relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) normalized values between tumor and healthy tissue, maximum Cho/Cr ratio and minimum NAA/Cr ratio in tumor, and scored lactate and lipid values in tumor. The Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests were employed to compare DWI, PWI and MRS between tumor types. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine which parameters best increased the diagnostic accuracy in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. ROC curves were determined for parameters with high sensitivity and specificity to identify threshold values to separate high- from low-grade lesions. Statistically significant differences were found for rCBV tumor/normal tissue ratio, and NAA/Cr ratio in tumor and Cho/Cr ratio in tumor between low- and high-grade tumors. The best performing single parameter for group classification was the normalized rCBV value; including all parameters, statistical significance was reached by rCBV tumor/normal tissue ratio, NAA/Cr tumor ratio and lactate. From the ROC curves, a high probability for a neoplasm to be a high-grade lesion was associated with a rCBV tumor/normal tissue ratio of >1.16 and NAA/Cr tumor ratio of <0.44. Combining PWI and MRS with conventional MR imaging increases the accuracy of the attribution of malignancy to glial neoplasms. The best performing parameter was found to be the perfusion level. (orig.)

  14. Imaging tumors with peptide-based radioligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, T. M.; Gotthardt, M.; Barth, A.; Behe, M. [Philipps-University of Marburg, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Marburg (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    Regulatory peptides are small, readily diffusable and potent natural substances with a wide spectrum of receptor-mediated actions in humans. High affinity receptors for these peptides are (over)-expressed in many neoplasms, and these receptors may represent, therefore, new molecular targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy. This review aims to give an overview of the peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals which are presently already commercially available or which are in advanced stages of their clinical testing so that their broader availability is anticipated soon. Physiologically, these peptides bind to and act through G protein-coupled receptors in the cell membrane. Historically, somatostatin analogs are the first class of receptor binding peptides having gained clinical application. In {sup 111}In-DTPA-(D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is the first and only radio peptide which has obtained regulatory approval in Europe and the United States to date. Extensive clinical studies involving several thousands of patients have shown that the major clinical application of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is the detection and the staging of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids). In these tumors, octreotide scintigraphy is superior to any other staging method. However, its sensitivity and accuracy in other, more frequent neoplasms is limited. Radiolabeled vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has been shown to visualize the majority of gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, as well as some neuroendocrine tumors, including insulinomas (the latter being often missed by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy). Due to the outstanding diagnostic accuracy of the pentagastrin test in detecting the presence, persistence, or recurrence of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), it was postulated the expression of the corresponding (i.e. cholecystokinin (CCK-)-B) receptor type in human MTC. This receptor is also widely expressed on human small-cell lung. Indeed, {sup 111}In-labeled DTPA

  15. Novel Approaches to Imaging Tumor Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Sui-Seng; Keshari, Kayvan R

    2015-01-01

    The field of metabolism research has made a dramatic resurgence in recent years, fueled by a newfound appreciation of the interactions between metabolites and phenotype. Metabolic substrates and their products can be biomarkers of a wide range of pathologies, including cancer, but our understanding of their in vivo interactions and pathways has been hindered by the robustness of noninvasive imaging approaches. The past 3 decades have been flushed with the development of new techniques for the study of metabolism in vivo. These methods include nuclear-based, predominantly positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, many of which have been translated to the clinic. The purpose of this review was to introduce both long-standing imaging strategies as well as novel approaches to the study of perturbed metabolic pathways in the setting of carcinogenesis. This will involve descriptions of nuclear probes labeled with C and F as well C for study using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging. Highlighting both advantages and disadvantages of each approach, the aim of this summary was to provide the reader with a framework for interrogation of metabolic aberrations in their system of interest.

  16. The role of imaging for translational research in bone tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benassi, Maria Serena, E-mail: mariaserena.benassi@ior.it [Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Rimondi, Eugenio, E-mail: eugenio.rimondi@ior.it [Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Balladelli, Alba, E-mail: alba.balladelli@ior.it [Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Ghinelli, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.ghinelli@ior.it [Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Magagnoli, Giovanna, E-mail: giovanna.magagnoli@ior.it [Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Vanel, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.vanel@ior.it [Bone Tumor Center, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of rare connective tissue tumors, representing 1% of adult and 15% of childhood cancers for which biological and pathological information is still incomplete. In bone tumors patients with metastatic disease at onset, those who relapse and those with post-surgical secondary lesions still have a dismal outcome because of poor response to current therapies. Different molecular biology approaches have identified activated cell signalling pathways or specific molecular endpoints that may be considered potential drug targets or markers useful for diagnosis/prognosis in musculoskeletal pathology. Recently, advances in the field of molecular imaging allow visualization of cell and metabolic functions with the use of targets that include cell membrane receptors, enzymes of intracellular transport. Moreover advanced non-invasive newer imaging techniques like 18-FDG PET, quantitative dynamic-contrast MR imaging, diffusion weighted imaging have all shown a potential in distinguish malignant from benign lesions, in revealing the efficacy of therapy in tumors, the onset of recurrence and a good reliability in reckoning the percentage of necrosis in Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcoma. Thus, in vivo detection of imaging cancer biomarkers may be useful to better characterize those complex pathologic processes, such as apoptosis, proliferation and angiogenesis that determine tumor aggressiveness, providing not only complementary information of prognostic metabolic indicators, but also data in real-time on the efficacy of the treatment through the modulation of the cell metabolism.

  17. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: role of imaging in diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, Dushyant V; Bonaffini, Pietro A; Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos; Blake, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that arise from cells of the diffuse neuroendocrine system and are characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. All NETs are potentially malignant but differ in their biologic characteristics and the probability of metastatic disease. The pathologic classification of these tumors relies on their proliferation and differentiation. In the past decades, several nomenclatures have been proposed to stratify neuroendocrine tumors, but the World Health Organization classification is the one that is most widely accepted and used. The diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumor relies on clinical manifestation, laboratory parameters, imaging features, and tissue biomarkers in a biopsy specimen. With improved understanding of the natural history and lesion biology, management of GEP-NETs has also evolved. Although surgery remains the only potentially curative therapy for patients with primary GEP-NETs, other available treatments include chemotherapy, interferon, somatostatin analogs, and targeted therapies. Recent improvements in both morphologic and functional imaging methods have contributed immensely to patient care. Morphologic imaging with contrast agent-enhanced multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is most widely used for initial evaluation and staging of disease in these patients, whereas functional imaging techniques are useful both for detection and prognostic evaluation and can change treatment planning.

  18. MR DIFFUSION WEIGHTED IMAGING FOR EVALUATION OF RADIOTHERAPEUTIC EFFECTS ON RABBIT VX2 TUMOR MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo Li; Hua-dan Xue; Xin-hai Wang; Fei Sun; Bo Jiang; Dong Liu; Jing Lei; Zheng-yu Jin

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) for evaluation of radiotherapeutic effects on rabbit VX2 tumor model.Methods Sixteen New Zealand white rabbits received a subcutaneous implantation of VX2 tumor cdl suspension 0.5 mL (4× 107cells/mL) in their right thighs to set up tumor model. And 2 weeks later they were randomly divided into therapy group (Group T, n = 10) and control group (Group C, n = 6). Group T received radiotherapy at a single dose of 10 Gy. MR imaging (MRI) scan including short TI inversion recovery echo-planar imaging DWI, T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) sequences were performed 1 day prior to as well as 1 day, 2 days, 3 days and 7 days after radiotherapy. Group C received only MRI scan at the same time points without any treatment. MRI appearance on T2WI, T1WI, and DWI images was compared and tumor volume was calculated. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the tumor were evaluated in all cases. HE staining was used for pathological study.Results Necrosis (n = 8) and hemorrhage (n = 2) were seen gradually on T2WI and T1WI images of Group T after time point of day 2 after irradiation. In Group C, no obvious necrosis was found until day 7. There was no significant difference in tumor volume between the two groups before radiotherapy. After radiotherapy, tumors in Group T showed a gradual growth but not as obvious as Group C. There was a significant difference in tumor volume between the two groups from day 2 on (P < 0.05). ADC value changed dramatically right from the 1st day after radio-therapy in Group T [(0.99 ± 0.15) ×10-3 mm2/s for 1 day before radiotherapy, (1.23 ± 0.08) ×10-3 , (1.45 ± 0.07) ×10-3 , (1.63 ± 0.06) ×10-3 , and (2.02 ± 0.18) ×10-3 mm2/s for day 1, 2, 3, and 7]; and ADC value had no significant changes after radiotherapy in Group C except day 7 [(1.07 ± 0.08) ×10-3 mm2/s for 1 day before radiotherapy, (1.03 ± 0.04) ×10

  19. Ultrasound imaging of breast tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Umphrey, Heidi; Lockhart, Mark; Robbin, Michelle; Forero-Torres, Andres

    2015-09-01

    A novel image processing strategy is detailed for simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. After normalization and tumor segmentation, a global time-intensity curve describing contrast agent flow was analyzed to derive surrogate measures of tumor perfusion (i.e., peak intensity, time-to-peak intensity, area under the curve, wash-in rate, wash-out rate). A maximum intensity image was generated from these same segmented image sequences, and each vascular component was skeletonized via a thinning algorithm. This skeletonized data set and collection of vessel segments were then investigated to extract parameters related to the neovascular network and physical architecture (i.e., vessel-to-tissue ratio, number of bifurcations, vessel count, average vessel length and tortuosity). An efficient computation of local perfusion parameters was also introduced and operated by averaging time-intensity curve data over each individual neovascular segment. Each skeletonized neovascular segment was then color-coded by these local measures to produce a parametric map detailing spatial properties of tumor perfusion. Longitudinal DCE-US image data sets were collected in six patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 transducer and Definity contrast agent. Patients were imaged using US before and after contrast agent dosing at baseline and again at weeks 6, 12, 18 and 24 after treatment started. Preliminary clinical results suggested that breast tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be associated with temporal and spatial changes in DCE-US-derived parametric measures of tumor perfusion. Moreover, changes in neovascular morphology parametric measures may also help identify any breast tumor response (or lack thereof) to systemic treatment. Breast cancer management from early detection to therapeutic

  20. Imaging findings in primary intracranial atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Hemant; Shroff, Manohar [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Hawkins, Cynthia [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neuropathology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bouffet, Eric [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neuro-Oncology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rutka, James [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neurosurgery, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-02-01

    Intracranial atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) are rare and extremely aggressive neoplasms seen primarily in childhood. Imaging features are often considered non-specific. However, correct diagnosis of AT/RT is important because these tumors have a markedly different clinical prognosis and require more aggressive therapy. To determine the imaging features of AT/RT. We retrospectively analyzed imaging findings in 11 patients with primary intracranial AT/RT presenting over a period of 5 years. CT (n=11), MR (n=7), clinical (n=11) and pathological (n=11) features were evaluated. FISH analysis showing monosomy of chromosome 22 (absence of bcr 22q11 locus) was available for three patients. Immunohistochemical staining for INI-1 (BAF47) was performed on all tumors. There were 11 patients, 6 boys and 5 girls. The age of presentation varied from 1 month to 15 years (average age 3 years 8 months). Six tumors were located in the posterior fossa and five in the supratentorial compartment. The tumors showed a hyperdense solid component (64%) that showed moderate to marked enhancement with contrast medium. On MR imaging, the predominant signal pattern was isointensity on T1-weighted images (57%) and T2 shortening with heterogeneity on T2-weighted images (86%). All tumors were large in size (average 4.2 x 3.7 cm), and there was a tendency for calcification (36%), hemorrhage (46%), necrosis (46%) and perifocal edema (100%). There was also a high tendency for subarachnoid dissemination, with five patients (46%) demonstrating brain and/or spinal metastasis. At follow-up (n=7), six patients showed local recurrence. At the time of recurrence, all these patients showed extensive leptomeningeal spread of the disease in both intracranial and intraspinal compartments. There are no specific imaging features for intracranial AT/RT. But a high tendency toward large size, a hyperdense solid component on CT scan with calcification, hemorrhage, necrosis and subarachnoid spread suggest

  1. Experimental validation of a convolution- based ultrasound image formation model using a planar arrangement of micrometer-scale scatterers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyöngy, Miklós; Makra, Ákos

    2015-06-01

    The shift-invariant convolution model of ultrasound is widely used in the literature, for instance to generate fast simulations of ultrasound images. However, comparison of the resulting simulations with experiments is either qualitative or based on aggregate descriptors such as envelope statistics or spectral components. In the current work, a planar arrangement of 49-μm polystyrene microspheres was imaged using macrophotography and a 4.7-MHz ultrasound linear array. The macrophotograph allowed estimation of the scattering function (SF) necessary for simulations. Using the coefficient of determination R(2) between real and simulated ultrasound images, different estimates of the SF and point spread function (PSF) were tested. All estimates of the SF performed similarly, whereas the best estimate of the PSF was obtained by Hanningwindowing the deconvolution of the real ultrasound image with the SF: this yielded R(2) = 0.43 for the raw simulated image and R(2) = 0.65 for the envelope-detected ultrasound image. R(2) was highly dependent on microsphere concentration, with values of up to 0.99 for regions with scatterers. The results validate the use of the shift-invariant convolution model for the realistic simulation of ultrasound images. However, care needs to be taken in experiments to reduce the relative effects of other sources of scattering such as from multiple reflections, either by increasing the concentration of imaged scatterers or by more careful experimental design.

  2. Characterizing Tumors Using Metabolic Imaging: PET Imaging of Cellular Proliferation and Steroid Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Mankoff

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment decisions in oncology are increasingly guided by information on the biologic characteristics of tumors. Currently, patient-specific information on tumor biology is obtained from the analysis of biopsy material. Positron emission tomography (PET provides quantitative estimates of regional biochemistry and receptor status and can overcome the sampling error and difficulty in performing serial studies inherent with biopsy. Imaging using the glucose metabolism tracer, 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG, has demonstrated PET's ability to guide therapy in clinical oncology. In this review, we highlight PET approaches to imaging two other aspects of tumor biology: cellular proliferation and tumor steroid receptors. We review the biochemical and biologic processes underlying the imaging, positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals that have been developed, quantitative image-analysis considerations, and clinical studies to date. This provides a basis for evaluating future developments in these promising applications of PET metabolic imaging.

  3. Adaptive Intuitionistic Fuzzy Enhancement of Brain Tumor MR Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, He; Deng, Wankai; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-10-27

    Image enhancement techniques are able to improve the contrast and visual quality of magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, conventional methods cannot make up some deficiencies encountered by respective brain tumor MR imaging modes. In this paper, we propose an adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy sets-based scheme, called as AIFE, which takes information provided from different MR acquisitions and tries to enhance the normal and abnormal structural regions of the brain while displaying the enhanced results as a single image. The AIFE scheme firstly separates an input image into several sub images, then divides each sub image into object and background areas. After that, different novel fuzzification, hyperbolization and defuzzification operations are implemented on each object/background area, and finally an enhanced result is achieved via nonlinear fusion operators. The fuzzy implementations can be processed in parallel. Real data experiments demonstrate that the AIFE scheme is not only effectively useful to have information from images acquired with different MR sequences fused in a single image, but also has better enhancement performance when compared to conventional baseline algorithms. This indicates that the proposed AIFE scheme has potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of brain tumors.

  4. Quantitative imaging of tumor vasculature using multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Michal R.; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Joseph, James; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2017-03-01

    The ability to evaluate tumor oxygenation in the clinic could indicate prognosis and enable treatment monitoring, since oxygen deficient cancer cells are often more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a hybrid technique combining the high contrast of optical imaging with spatial resolution and penetration depth similar to ultrasound. We hypothesized that MSOT could reveal both tumor vascular density and function based on modulation of blood oxygenation. We performed MSOT on nude mice (n=8) bearing subcutaneous xenograft PC3 tumors using an inVision 256 (iThera Medical). The mice were maintained under inhalation anesthesia during imaging and respired oxygen content was modified from 21% to 100% and back. After imaging, Hoechst 33348 was injected to indicate vascular perfusion and permeability. Tumors were then extracted for histopathological analysis and fluorescence microscopy. The acquired data was analyzed to extract a bulk measurement of blood oxygenation (SO2MSOT) from the whole tumor using different approaches. The tumors were also automatically segmented into 5 regions to investigate the effect of depth on SO2MSOT. Baseline SO2MSOT values at 21% and 100% oxygen breathing showed no relationship with ex vivo measures of vascular density or function, while the change in SO2MSOT showed a strong negative correlation to Hoechst intensity (r=- 0.92, p=0.0016). Tumor voxels responding to oxygen challenge were spatially heterogeneous. We observed a significant drop in SO2 MSOT value with tumor depth following a switch of respiratory gas from air to oxygen (0.323+/-0.017 vs. 0.11+/-0.05, p=0.009 between 0 and 1.5mm depth), but no such effect for air breathing (0.265+/-0.013 vs. 0.19+/-0.04, p=0.14 between 0 and 1.5mm depth). Our results indicate that in subcutaneous prostate tumors, baseline SO2MSOT levels do not correlate to tumor vascular density or function while the magnitude of the response to oxygen

  5. Imaging of soft tissue tumors: general imaging strategy and technical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyck, P; Gielen, J; Vanhoenacker, F M; De Schepper, A M; Parizel, P M

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the imaging strategy and protocol for detection, grading and staging, and posttherapeutic follow-up of soft tissue tumors (STT), used in our institution. The role of each imaging technique, with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging, is highlighted.

  6. Dynamic fluorescence imaging for multiparametric measurement of tumor vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Choi, Kyungsun; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Lee, Jungwhoi; Choi, Chulhee

    2011-04-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth and a promising target for cancer therapy. Blood vessel monitoring is an indispensable tool for evaluation and development of anti-angiogenic drugs. Here, we report a new noninvasive in vivo imaging tool, named dynamic fluorescence imaging (DyFI), for the simultaneous measurement of multiple vascular parameters including vascular density, perfusion rate, and permeability using spatiotemporal profiles of indocyanine green. Using DyFI in a tumor xenograft model, we quantitatively measured multiple vascular parameters in tumors and normal tissues with high spatial resolution. The multimodality of this method allowed us to find negative spatial correlations between perfusion and permeability. Moreover, DyFI was effective for revealing the early effects of an anti-angiogenic drug. We suggest that DyFI could be a useful tool for the preclinical development of anti-angiogenic drugs.

  7. Linear endoscopic ultrasonography vs magnetic resonance imaging in ampullary tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manta, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita; Castellani, Danilo; Messerotti, Alessandro; Bertani, Helga; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Vetruccio, Elena; Losi, Luisa; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To assess linear endoscopic ultrasound (L-EUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in biliary tract dilation and suspect small ampullary tumor. METHODS: L-EUS and MRI data were compared in 24 patients with small ampullary tumors; all with subsequent histological confirmation. Data were collected prospectively and the accuracy of detection, histological characterization and N staging were assessed retrospectively using the results of surgical or endoscopic treatment as a benchmark. RESULTS: A suspicion of ampullary tumor was present in 75% of MRI and all L-EUS examinations, with 80% agreement between EUS and histological findings at endoscopy. However, L-EUS and histological TN staging at surgery showed moderate agreement (κ = 0.54). CONCLUSION: L-EUS could be a useful adjunct as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected ampullary tumors. PMID:21105192

  8. History and evolution of brain tumor imaging: insights through radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-11-01

    This review recounts the history of brain tumor diagnosis from antiquity to the present and, indirectly, the history of neuroradiology. Imaging of the brain has from the beginning held an enormous interest because of the inherent difficulty of this endeavor due to the presence of the skull. Because of this, most techniques when newly developed have always been used in neuroradiology and, although some have proved to be inappropriate for this purpose, many were easily incorporated into the specialty. The first major advance in modern neuroimaging was contrast agent-enhanced computed tomography, which permitted accurate anatomic localization of brain tumors and, by virtue of contrast enhancement, malignant ones. The most important advances in neuroimaging occurred with the development of magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted sequences that allowed an indirect estimation of tumor cellularity; this was further refined by the development of perfusion and permeability mapping. From its beginnings with indirect and purely anatomic imaging techniques, neuroradiology now uses a combination of anatomic and physiologic techniques that will play a critical role in biologic tumor imaging and radiologic genomics.

  9. Mass Spectrometry Imaging for the Classification of Tumor Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascini, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can detect and identify many different molecules without the need for labeling. In addition, it can provide their spatial distributions as ‘molecular maps’. These features make MSI well suited for studying the molecular makeup of tumor tissue. Currently, there is an i

  10. In Vivo Imaging of Natural Killer Cell Trafficking in Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, Filippo; Rapisarda, Anna Serafina; Stabile, Helena; Malviya, Gaurav; Manni, Isabella; Bonanno, Elena; Piaggio, Giulia; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela; Signore, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NKs) are important effectors of the innate immune system, with marked antitumor activity. Imaging NK trafficking in vivo may be relevant to following up the efficacy of new therapeutic approaches aiming at increasing tumor-infiltrating NKs (TINKs). The specific aims of present

  11. Mass Spectrometry Imaging for the Classification of Tumor Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascini, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can detect and identify many different molecules without the need for labeling. In addition, it can provide their spatial distributions as ‘molecular maps’. These features make MSI well suited for studying the molecular makeup of tumor tissue. Currently, there is an i

  12. Intraspinal primitive neuroectodermal tumor: Imaging findings in six cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Xiaohui [Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiology, Traditional Chinese Medical Hospital of Guangdong Province, No. 111 Dade Road, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Ban Xiaohua [Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Liu Bo [Department of Radiology, Traditional Chinese Medical Hospital of Guangdong Province, No. 111 Dade Road, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Zhong Xiaomei; Guo Ruomi; Zhang Fang; Liang Biling [Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Shen Jun, E-mail: junshenjun@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review CT and MRI findings in a series of six intraspinal primitive neuroectoderal tumors and to find out their radiological features. Methods: CT and MRI of six patients with surgically and pathologically proved intraspinal primitive neuroectoderal tumor were retrospectively reviewed. The tumor location, morphological features, signal intensity, calcification, contrast enhancement characteristics, involvement of paraspinal soft tissues and adjacent bony structures were assessed. Results: Of six patients, four had extradural lesions and two had intradural, extramedullary lesions. Most lesions were well defined and manifested heterogeneous iso- or hypo-intense signal on T1-weighted imaging and hyper-intense signal on T2-weighted imaging and moderate attenuation on CT, and were heterogeneously enhanced after contrast enhancement. The lesion extending through the intervertebral foramen with a large paraspinal soft tissue mass formed was found in four patients and vertebral bone involvement was seen in four patients. Conclusions: Although imaging findings are not specific of intraspinal primitive neuroectoderal tumor, this diagnosis could be suggested when MR imaging depicts an intradural, extramedullary or extradural large well-circumscribed mass which extends out from intervertebral foramen and invades paraspinal soft tissues or vertebral bones in a young patient.

  13. Mass Spectrometry Imaging for the Classification of Tumor Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascini, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can detect and identify many different molecules without the need for labeling. In addition, it can provide their spatial distributions as ‘molecular maps’. These features make MSI well suited for studying the molecular makeup of tumor tissue. Currently, there is an

  14. Lung tumor segmentation in PET images using graph cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Fulham, Michael; Eberl, Stefan; Feng, David Dagan

    2013-03-01

    The aim of segmentation of tumor regions in positron emission tomography (PET) is to provide more accurate measurements of tumor size and extension into adjacent structures, than is possible with visual assessment alone and hence improve patient management decisions. We propose a segmentation energy function for the graph cuts technique to improve lung tumor segmentation with PET. Our segmentation energy is based on an analysis of the tumor voxels in PET images combined with a standardized uptake value (SUV) cost function and a monotonic downhill SUV feature. The monotonic downhill feature avoids segmentation leakage into surrounding tissues with similar or higher PET tracer uptake than the tumor and the SUV cost function improves the boundary definition and also addresses situations where the lung tumor is heterogeneous. We evaluated the method in 42 clinical PET volumes from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our method improves segmentation and performs better than region growing approaches, the watershed technique, fuzzy-c-means, region-based active contour and tumor customized downhill.

  15. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of intraorbital granular cell tumor (Abrikossoff's tumor): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei-Hsin; Lin, Tai-Chi; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Guo, Wan-You; Chang, Fu-Pang; Ho, Donald Ming-Tak

    2016-05-13

    Granular cell tumors are rare neoplasms which can occur in any part of the body. Granular cell tumors of the orbit account for only 3 % of all granular cell tumor cases. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the orbit have proven useful for diagnosing orbital tumors. However, the rarity of intraorbital granular cell tumors poses a significant diagnostic challenge for both clinicians and radiologists. We report a case of a 37-year-old Chinese woman with a rare intraocular granular cell tumor of her right eye presenting with diplopia, proptosis, and restriction of ocular movement. Preoperative orbital computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging with contrast enhancement revealed an enhancing solid, ovoid, well-demarcated, retrobulbar nodule. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging features included an intraorbital tumor which was isointense relative to gray matter on T1-weighted imaging and hypointense on T2-weighted imaging. No diffusion restriction of water was noted on either axial diffusion-weighted images or apparent diffusion coefficient maps. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features suggested an intraorbital hemangioma. However, postoperative pathology (together with immunohistochemistry) identified an intraorbital granular cell tumor. When intraorbital T2 hypointensity and free diffusion of water are observed on magnetic resonance imaging, a granular cell tumor should be included in the differential diagnosis of an intraocular tumor.

  16. Targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Hong Peng

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiang-Hong Peng1,4, Ximei Qian2,4, Hui Mao3,4, Andrew Y Wang5, Zhuo (Georgia Chen1,4, Shuming Nie2,4, Dong M Shin1,4*1Department of Medical Oncology/Hematology; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering; 3Department of Radiology; 4Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 5Ocean Nanotech, LLC, Fayetteville, AR, USAAbstract: Magnetic iron oxide (IO nanoparticles with a long blood retention time, biodegradability and low toxicity have emerged as one of the primary nanomaterials for biomedical applications in vitro and in vivo. IO nanoparticles have a large surface area and can be engineered to provide a large number of functional groups for cross-linking to tumor-targeting ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, or small molecules for diagnostic imaging or delivery of therapeutic agents. IO nanoparticles possess unique paramagnetic properties, which generate significant susceptibility effects resulting in strong T2 and T*2 contrast, as well as T1 effects at very low concentrations for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which is widely used for clinical oncology imaging. We review recent advances in the development of targeted IO nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy.Keywords: iron oxide nanoparticles, tumor imaging, MRI, therapy

  17. Spatially selective T2 and T2 ∗ measurement with line-scan echo-planar spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan-kuei; Oshio, Koichi; Panych, Lawrence P.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mulkern, Robert V.

    2004-11-01

    Line-scan echo planar spectroscopic imaging (LSEPSI) is applied to quickly measure the T2 and T2 ∗ relaxation time constants in pre-selected 2D or 3D regions. Results from brain imaging studies at 3 T suggest that the proposed method may prove valuable for both basic research (e.g., quantifying the changes of T2/T2 ∗ values in functional MRI with blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast) and clinical studies (e.g., measuring the T2' shortening due to iron deposition). The proposed spatially selective T2 and T2 ∗ mapping technique is especially well suited for studies, where T2/T2 ∗ quantification needs to be performed dynamically in a pre-selected 2D or 3D region.

  18. Numerical Simulations of MREIT Conductivity Imaging for Brain Tumor Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Jun Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT is a new modality capable of imaging the electrical properties of human body using MRI phase information in conjunction with external current injection. Recent in vivo animal and human MREIT studies have revealed unique conductivity contrasts related to different physiological and pathological conditions of tissues or organs. When performing in vivo brain imaging, small imaging currents must be injected so as not to stimulate peripheral nerves in the skin, while delivery of imaging currents to the brain is relatively small due to the skull’s low conductivity. As a result, injected imaging currents may induce small phase signals and the overall low phase SNR in brain tissues. In this study, we present numerical simulation results of the use of head MREIT for brain tumor detection. We used a realistic three-dimensional head model to compute signal levels produced as a consequence of a predicted doubling of conductivity occurring within simulated tumorous brain tissues. We determined the feasibility of measuring these changes in a time acceptable to human subjects by adding realistic noise levels measured from a candidate 3 T system. We also reconstructed conductivity contrast images, showing that such conductivity differences can be both detected and imaged.

  19. Numerical simulations of MREIT conductivity imaging for brain tumor detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zi Jun; Sajib, Saurav Z K; Chauhan, Munish; Sadleir, Rosalind J; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a new modality capable of imaging the electrical properties of human body using MRI phase information in conjunction with external current injection. Recent in vivo animal and human MREIT studies have revealed unique conductivity contrasts related to different physiological and pathological conditions of tissues or organs. When performing in vivo brain imaging, small imaging currents must be injected so as not to stimulate peripheral nerves in the skin, while delivery of imaging currents to the brain is relatively small due to the skull's low conductivity. As a result, injected imaging currents may induce small phase signals and the overall low phase SNR in brain tissues. In this study, we present numerical simulation results of the use of head MREIT for brain tumor detection. We used a realistic three-dimensional head model to compute signal levels produced as a consequence of a predicted doubling of conductivity occurring within simulated tumorous brain tissues. We determined the feasibility of measuring these changes in a time acceptable to human subjects by adding realistic noise levels measured from a candidate 3 T system. We also reconstructed conductivity contrast images, showing that such conductivity differences can be both detected and imaged.

  20. The Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menze, Bjoern H; Jakab, Andras; Bauer, Stefan; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Farahani, Keyvan; Kirby, Justin; Burren, Yuliya; Porz, Nicole; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Lanczi, Levente; Gerstner, Elizabeth; Weber, Marc-André; Arbel, Tal; Avants, Brian B; Ayache, Nicholas; Buendia, Patricia; Collins, D Louis; Cordier, Nicolas; Corso, Jason J; Criminisi, Antonio; Das, Tilak; Delingette, Hervé; Demiralp, Çağatay; Durst, Christopher R; Dojat, Michel; Doyle, Senan; Festa, Joana; Forbes, Florence; Geremia, Ezequiel; Glocker, Ben; Golland, Polina; Guo, Xiaotao; Hamamci, Andac; Iftekharuddin, Khan M; Jena, Raj; John, Nigel M; Konukoglu, Ender; Lashkari, Danial; Mariz, José Antonió; Meier, Raphael; Pereira, Sérgio; Precup, Doina; Price, Stephen J; Raviv, Tammy Riklin; Reza, Syed M S; Ryan, Michael; Sarikaya, Duygu; Schwartz, Lawrence; Shin, Hoo-Chang; Shotton, Jamie; Silva, Carlos A; Sousa, Nuno; Subbanna, Nagesh K; Szekely, Gabor; Taylor, Thomas J; Thomas, Owen M; Tustison, Nicholas J; Unal, Gozde; Vasseur, Flor; Wintermark, Max; Ye, Dong Hye; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Binsheng; Zikic, Darko; Prastawa, Marcel; Reyes, Mauricio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we report the set-up and results of the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS) organized in conjunction with the MICCAI 2012 and 2013 conferences. Twenty state-of-the-art tumor segmentation algorithms were applied to a set of 65 multi-contrast MR scans of low- and high-grade glioma patients-manually annotated by up to four raters-and to 65 comparable scans generated using tumor image simulation software. Quantitative evaluations revealed considerable disagreement between the human raters in segmenting various tumor sub-regions (Dice scores in the range 74%-85%), illustrating the difficulty of this task. We found that different algorithms worked best for different sub-regions (reaching performance comparable to human inter-rater variability), but that no single algorithm ranked in the top for all sub-regions simultaneously. Fusing several good algorithms using a hierarchical majority vote yielded segmentations that consistently ranked above all individual algorithms, indicating remaining opportunities for further methodological improvements. The BRATS image data and manual annotations continue to be publicly available through an online evaluation system as an ongoing benchmarking resource.

  1. Balloon Flight Background Measurement with Actively-Shielded Planar and Imaging CZT Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Bloser, P. F.; Narita, T; Jenkins, J. A.; Perrin, M.; Murray, R.; Grindlay, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    We present results from the flight of two prototype CZT detectors on a scientific balloon payload in September 2000. The first detector, referred to as ``CZT1,'' consisted of a 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm CZT crystal with a single gold planar electrode readout. This detector was shielded by a combination of a passive collimator surrounded by plastic scintillator and a thick BGO crystal in the rear. The second detector, ``CZT2,'' comprised two 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm CZT crystals, one made of eV Product...

  2. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH in the exhaust of a bi-propellant thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Phillip H.; Clemens, N. T.; Makel, D. B.

    1992-09-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of the hydroxyl radical has been performed on the flow produced by the exhaust of a subscale H2/O2 fueled bi-propellant rocket engine. Measurements were made to test the feasibility of OH (0,0) and (3,0) excitation strategies by using injection seeded XeCl and KrF excimer lasers, respectively. The flow is produced with hydrogen and oxygen reacting at a combustor chamber pressure of 5 atm which then exhausts to the ambient. The hydroxyl concentration in the exhaust flow is approximately 8 percent. Fluorescence images obtained by pumping the Q1(3) transition in the (0,0) band exhibited very high signals but also showed the effect of laser beam absorption. To obtain images when pumping the P1(8) transition in the (3,0) band it was necessary to use exceptionally fast imaging optics and unacceptably high intensifier gains. The result was single-shot images which displayed a signal-to-noise ratio of order unity or less when measured on a per pixel basis.

  3. Automated Brain Tumor Segmentation on MR Images Based on Neutrosophic Set Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan J; Krishnaveni V; Yanhui Huo

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumor segmentation for MR images is a difficult and challenging task due to variation in type, size, location and shape of tumors. This paper presents an efficient and fully automatic brain tumor segmentation technique. This proposed technique includes non local preprocessing, fuzzy intensification to enhance the quality of the MR images, k - means clustering method for brain tumor segmentation.

  4. Multimodality evaluation of ventricular function: comparison of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and planar and SPECT blood pool imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiglin, David H.; Krol, Andrzej; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen M.; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Thomas, Frank D.

    2001-05-01

    Fifteen patients underwent resting echocardiography (EC), ECG gated cardiac MR ventriculography (MRV) and blood pool planar and SPECT ventriculography (SPV) sequentially on the same day. In addition, 36 patients had sequential ECG gated blood pool and SPV and 20 normal volunteers, age > 18 years, had sequential ECG gated cardiac MRI performed on both Siemens closed, 1.5T, and open, 0.2T, magnets. Echocardiography was performed using a HP 5500 system equipped with an S4 transducer in 2D mode. MRV at 0.2T and 1.5T used a circular polarized body coil. Nuclear Medicine studies used 25 mCi Tc- 99m labeled red blood cells. Gated planar and SPV were acquired on a dual head Siemens E-Cam system. We have found that MRV affords the most accurate measurement of ventricular function. SPV and MRV provide similar estimations of left ventricular function (LVEF). Further, SPV consistently provides higher LVEF, as compared to the planar data simultaneously acquired. Observed significant differences in intermodality measurements indicate that follow up studies in patients, especially in patients whose management is critically dependent on functional measurement changes, should be monitored by one modality only.

  5. Utility of SPECT/CT as an adjunct to planar whole body I-131 imaging: liver metastasis from papillary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agriantonis, Demetrios J; Hall, Lance; Wilson, Michael A

    2009-04-01

    One of the major limitations of planar I-131 imaging is its lack of anatomic precision. SPECT/CT offers the benefit of precise anatomic localization that planar imaging lacks. Whether for confirmation of physiologic uptake or true pathology, SPECT/CT has an important role to play in clarifying equivocal findings. We present a case of papillary thyroid cancer metastatic to the liver, a relatively rare scenario. SPECT/CT allowed definitive lesion characterization at the time of the patient's visit to the nuclear medicine department.

  6. Phthalocyanine-labeled LDL for tumor imaging and photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Marotta, Diane; Kim, Soungkyoo; Chance, Britton; Glickson, Jerry D.; Busch, Theresa M.; Zheng, Gang

    2005-01-01

    Current limitation of both near-infrared (NIR) tumor imaging and photodynamic therapy (PDT) is their lack of sufficient tumor-to-tissue contrast due to the relatively non-specific nature of delivering dye to the tumor, which has led to false negatives for NIR imaging and inadequate therapeutic ratio for PDT. Hence, agents targeting "cancer signatures", i.e. molecules that accumulate selectively in cancer cells, are particular attractive. One of these signatures is low-density-lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), which is overexpressed in many tumors. We have developed pyropheophorbide cholesterol oleate reconstituted LDL as a LDLR-targeting photosensitizer (PS) and demonstrated its LDLR-mediated uptake in vitro and in vivo. To improve the labeling efficiency for achieving high probe/protein ratio, tetra-t-butyl silicon phthalocyanine bearing two oleate moieties at its axial positions, (tBu)4SiPcBOA, was designed and synthesized. This compound was designed to 1) prevent the PS aggregation; 2) improve the PS solubility in non-polar solvent; and 3) maximize the PS binding to LDL phospholipid monolayer. Using this novel strategy, (tBu)4SiPcBOA was reconstituted into LDL (r-SiPcBOA-LDL) with a very high payload (500:1 molar ratio). In addition, (tBu)4SiPcBOA reconstituted acetylated LDL (r-SiPcBOA)-AcLDL with similar payload was also prepared. Since Ac-LDL cannot bind to LDLR, (r-SiPcBOA)-AcLDL can serve as the negative control to evaluate LDLR targeting specificity. For biological evaluation of these new agents, confocal microscopy and in vitro PDT protocols were performed using LDLR-overexpressing human hepatoblastoma G2 (HepG2) tumor model. These studies suggest that LDL serves as a delivery vehicle to bring large amount of the NIR/PDT agents selectively to tumor cells overexpressing LDLR.

  7. 3-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging-guided tumor resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, W.A. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Depts. of Neurosurgery; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; University of Minnesota Medical Center (MMC), Minneapolis, MN (United States); Truwit, C.L. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Neurology; Hennepin Country Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-12-15

    Objective: We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of using 3-tesla (T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to guide brain tumor resection. Material and methods: From February 2004 to March 2006, fMRI was performed on 13 patients before surgical resection. Functional imaging was used to identify eloquent cortices for motor (8), speech (3), and motor and speech (2) activation using two different 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. Surgical resection was accomplished using a 1.5-T intraoperative MR system. Appropriate MR scan sequences were performed intraoperatively to determine and maximize the extent of the surgical resection. Results: Tumors included six oligodendrogliomas, three meningiomas, two astrocytomas and two glioblastomas multiforme. The fMRI data was accurate in all cases. After surgery, two patients had hemiparesis, two had worsening of their speech, and one had worsening of speech and motor function. Neurological function returned to normal in all patients within 1 month. Complete resections were possible in 10 patients (77%). Two patients had incomplete resections because of the proximity of their tumors to functional areas. Biopsy was performed in another patient with an astrocytoma in the motor strip. Conclusion: 3-T fMRI was accurate for locating neurologic function before tumor resection near eloquent cortex. (orig.)

  8. Imaging infrared spectroscopy for fixation-free liver tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, James V.; Chen, Zhaomin; Li, Ran; Butke, Ryan; Miller, Barrie; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Allen, Heather C.; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.

    2014-03-01

    Infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy of human liver tissue slices has been used to identify and characterize a liver metastasis of breast origin (mucinous carcinoma) which was surgically removed from a consenting patient and frozen without formalin fixation or dehydration procedures, so that lipids and water remain in the tissues. Previously, a set of IR metrics was determined for tumors in fixation-free liver tissues facilitating a k-means cluster analysis differentiating tumor from nontumor. Different and more in depth aspects of these results are examined in this work including three metric color imaging, differencing for lipid identification, and a new technique to simultaneously fit band lineshapes and their 2nd derivatives in order to better characterize protein changes.

  9. Functionalized Gold Nanorods for Tumor Imaging and Targeted Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gui, Chen; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanorods, as an emerging noble metal nanomaterial with unique properties, have become the new exciting focus of theoretical and experimental studies in the past few years. The structure and function of gold nanorods, especially their biocompatibility, optical property, and photothermal effects, have been attracting more and more attention. Gold nanorods exhibit great potential in applications such as tumor molecular imaging and photothermal therapy. In this article, we review some of the...

  10. Imaging of primary bone tumors in veterinary medicine: which differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanel, Maïa; Blond, Laurent; Vanel, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Veterinary medicine is most often a mysterious world for the human doctors. However, animals are important for human medicine thanks to the numerous biological similarities. Primary bone tumors are not uncommon in veterinary medicine and especially in small domestic animals as dogs and cats. As in human medicine, osteosarcoma is the most common one and especially in the long bones extremities. In the malignant bone tumor family, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma are following. Benign bone tumors as osteoma, osteochondroma and bone cysts do exist but are rare and of little clinical significance. Diagnostic modalities used depend widely on the owner willing to treat his animal. Radiographs and bone biopsy are the standard to make a diagnosis but CT, nuclear medicine and MRI are more an more used. As amputation is treatment number one in appendicular bone tumor in veterinary medicine, this explains on the one hand why more recent imaging modalities are not always necessary and on the other hand, that prognostic on large animals is so poor that it is not much studied. Chemotherapy is sometimes associated with the surgery procedure, depending on the aggressivity of the tumor. Although, the strakes differs a lot between veterinary and human medicine, biological behavior are almost the same and should led to a beneficial team work between all.

  11. Assessing Tumor Angiogenesis with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Coss, Emilio; Jackson, Edward F.

    2006-09-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a method able of assessing microvascular changes at high spatial resolution and without ionizing radiation. The microcirculation and structure of tumors are fundamentally chaotic in that tumor-derived factors stimulate the endothelial cells to form new small vessels (angiogenesis) and this vasculature deviates markedly from normal hierarchical branching patterns. The tumor-induced microvascular changes lead to blood flow that is both spatially and temporally more heterogeneous than the efficient and uniform perfusion of normal organs and tissues. DCE-MRI allows for the assessment of perfusion and permeability of the tumor microvasculature, including the network of vessels with diameters less than 100 μm, which are beyond the resolution of conventional angiograms. The microvessel permeability to small molecular weight contrast media as well as measures of tumor response can be assessed with different analysis techniques ranging from simple measures of enhancement to pharmacokinetic models. In this work, such DCE-MRI analysis techniques are discussed.

  12. Imaging of primary bone tumors in veterinary medicine: Which differences?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanel, Maïa, E-mail: maiavanel@yahoo.fr [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montreal, 3200 Rue Sicotte, PO Box 5000, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC (Canada); Blond, Laurent [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montreal, 3200 Rue Sicotte, PO Box 5000, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC (Canada); Vanel, Daniel [The Rizzoli Institute, Via del Barbiano 1-10, 40136, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Veterinary medicine is most often a mysterious world for the human doctors. However, animals are important for human medicine thanks to the numerous biological similarities. Primary bone tumors are not uncommon in veterinary medicine and especially in small domestic animals as dogs and cats. As in human medicine, osteosarcoma is the most common one and especially in the long bones extremities. In the malignant bone tumor family, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma are following. Benign bone tumors as osteoma, osteochondroma and bone cysts do exist but are rare and of little clinical significance. Diagnostic modalities used depend widely on the owner willing to treat his animal. Radiographs and bone biopsy are the standard to make a diagnosis but CT, nuclear medicine and MRI are more an more used. As amputation is treatment number one in appendicular bone tumor in veterinary medicine, this explains on the one hand why more recent imaging modalities are not always necessary and on the other hand, that pronostic on large animals is so poor that it is not much studied. Chemotherapy is sometimes associated with the surgery procedure, depending on the agressivity of the tumor. Although, the strakes differs a lot between veterinary and human medicine, biological behavior are almost the same and should led to a beneficial team work between all.

  13. Complicated giant polycystic ovary mimicking tumor: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeztoprak, Ibrahim; Eqilmez, Hulusi; Oeztoprak, Bilge; Guemues, Cesur [Cumhuriyet University, Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, AD Sivas (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    A previously healthy 14-year-old girl presented with a 1-year history of abdominal pain that had worsened during the past 4 days. She had a right lower abdominal mass that was initially diagnosed as an ovarian tumor. MR imaging revealed a unilaterally enlarged and partially torted left polycystic ovary. Polycystic ovary is a common cause of increased ovarian volume in women of reproductive age. It is characterized by numerous small peripherally located follicles and increased stroma. It may mimic a neoplasm and lead to difficulties in diagnosis. In this case report, we discuss the unusual MR imaging findings and the pitfalls in diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  15. A novel method for correction of temporally- and spatially-variant optical distortion in planar particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Kan; Busch, Stephen; Park, Cheolwoong; Miles, Paul C.

    2016-08-01

    In-cylinder flow measurements are necessary to gain a fundamental understanding of swirl-supported, light-duty Diesel engine processes for high thermal efficiency and low emissions. Planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) can be used for non-intrusive, in situ measurement of swirl-plane velocity fields through a transparent piston. In order to keep the flow unchanged from all-metal engine operation, the geometry of the transparent piston must adapt the production-intent metal piston geometry. As a result, a temporally- and spatially-variant optical distortion is introduced to the particle images. To ensure reliable measurement of particle displacements, this work documents a systematic exploration of optical distortion quantification and a hybrid back-projection procedure that combines ray-tracing-based geometric and in situ manual back-projection approaches. The proposed hybrid back-projection method for the first time provides a time-efficient and robust way to process planar PIV measurements conducted in an optical research engine with temporally- and spatially-varying optical distortion. This method is based upon geometric ray tracing and serves as a universal tool for the correction of optical distortion with an arbitrary but axisymmetric piston crown window geometry. Analytical analysis demonstrates that the ignorance of optical distortion change during the PIV laser temporal interval may induce a significant error in instantaneous velocity measurements. With the proposed digital dewarping method, this piston-motion-induced error can be eliminated. Uncertainty analysis with simulated particle images provides guidance on whether to back-project particle images or back-project velocity fields in order to minimize dewarping-induced uncertainties. The optimal implementation is piston-geometry-dependent. For regions with significant change in nominal magnification factor, it is recommended to apply the proposed back-projection approach to particle images prior to

  16. Skull-stripping for Tumor-bearing Brain Images

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Stefan; Reyes, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Skull-stripping separates the skull region of the head from the soft brain tissues. In many cases of brain image analysis, this is an essential preprocessing step in order to improve the final result. This is true for both registration and segmentation tasks. In fact, skull-stripping of magnetic resonance images (MRI) is a well-studied problem with numerous publications in recent years. Many different algorithms have been proposed, a summary and comparison of which can be found in [Fennema-Notestine, 2006]. Despite the abundance of approaches, we discovered that the algorithms which had been suggested so far, perform poorly when dealing with tumor-bearing brain images. This is mostly due to additional difficulties in separating the brain from the skull in this case, especially when the lesion is located very close to the skull border. Additionally, images acquired according to standard clinical protocols, often exhibit anisotropic resolution and only partial coverage, which further complicates the task. There...

  17. Electro- and photoluminescence imaging as fast screening technique of the layer uniformity and device degradation in planar perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufiani, Arman Mahboubi; Tayebjee, Murad J. Y.; Meyer, Steffen; Ho-Baillie, Anita; Sung Yun, Jae; MacQueen, Rowan W.; Spiccia, Leone; Green, Martin A.; Hameiri, Ziv

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we provide insights into planar structure methylammonium lead triiodide (MAPbI3) perovskite solar cells (PSCs) using electroluminescence and photoluminescence imaging techniques. We demonstrate the strength of these techniques in screening relatively large area PSCs, correlating the solar cell electrical parameters to the images and visualizing the features which contribute to the variation of the parameters extracted from current density-voltage characterizations. It is further used to investigate one of the major concerns about perovskite solar cells, their long term stability and aging. Upon storage under dark in dry glovebox condition for more than two months, the major parameter found to have deteriorated in electrical performance measurements was the fill factor; this was elucidated via electroluminescence image comparisons which revealed that the contacts' quality degrades. Interestingly, by deploying electroluminescence imaging, the significance of having a pin-hole free active layer is demonstrated. Pin-holes can grow over time and can cause degradation of the active layer surrounding them.

  18. Infrared microspectroscopic imaging of benign breast tumor tissue sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, H.; Lasch, P.; Boese, M.; Haensch, W.

    2003-12-01

    We have applied infrared microspectroscopic imaging for the examination of benign breast tumor tissue sections. The IR spectra of the sections were obtained by classical point microscopy with a movable stage and via a microscope equipped with a focal plane array detector. The infrared microscopic data were analysed using functional group mapping techniques and cluster analysis. The output values of the two procedures were reassembled into infrared images of the tissues, and were compared with standard staining images of the corresponding tissue region. The comparative examination of identical tissue sections by the two IR approaches enabled us to assess potential problems associated with tissue microheterogeneity. It was found that in case of fibroadenoma, a benign lesion located in breast ducts, point microscopy with a spot size of ˜30 μm is a useful practical approach which minimizes the possibility of 'contamination' of the spectra because of spectral averaging of all tissue components present in the corresponding microareas. A comparison of the spectra of the benign breast tumor with those of a malignant ductal carcinoma in situ revealed that IR microspectroscopy has the potential to differentiate between these two breast tumor types.

  19. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the sellar region: A comparison study of BLADE and single-shot echo planar imaging sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yiping, Lu [Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Rd. Middle, Shanghai 200040 (China); Hui, Liu [MR Collaboration NE Asia, Siemens Healthcare, Siemens Ltd., China, Shanghai 201318 (China); Kun, Zhou [MR PLM APPL, Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd., Shenzhen 518057 (China); Daoying, Geng, E-mail: GengdaoyingGDY@163.com [Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Rd. Middle, Shanghai 200040 (China); Bo, Yin, E-mail: yinbo7@163.com [Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Rd. Middle, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare BLADE diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with single-shot echo planar imaging (EPI) DWI on the aspects of feasibility of imaging the sellar region and image quality. Methods: A total of 3 healthy volunteers and 52 patients with suspected lesions in the sellar region were included in this prospective intra-individual study. All exams were performed at 3.0 T with a BLADE DWI sequence and a standard single-shot EP-DWI sequence. Phantom measurements were performed to measure the objective signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Two radiologists rated the image quality according to the visualisation of the internal carotid arteries, optic chiasm, pituitary stalk, pituitary gland and lesion, and the overall image quality. One radiologist measured lesion sizes for detecting their relationship with the image score. Results: The SNR in BLADE DWI sequence showed no significant difference from the single-shot EPI sequence (P > 0.05). All of the assessed regions received higher scores in BLADE DWI images than single-shot EP-DWI.

  20. 3D spatially encoded and accelerated TE-averaged echo planar spectroscopic imaging in healthy human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zohaib; Wilson, Neil E; Thomas, M Albert

    2016-03-01

    Several different pathologies, including many neurodegenerative disorders, affect the energy metabolism of the brain. Glutamate, a neurotransmitter in the brain, can be used as a biomarker to monitor these metabolic processes. One method that is capable of quantifying glutamate concentration reliably in several regions of the brain is TE-averaged (1) H spectroscopic imaging. However, this type of method requires the acquisition of multiple TE lines, resulting in long scan durations. The goal of this experiment was to use non-uniform sampling, compressed sensing reconstruction and an echo planar readout gradient to reduce the scan time by a factor of eight to acquire TE-averaged spectra in three spatial dimensions. Simulation of glutamate and glutamine showed that the 2.2-2.4 ppm spectral region contained 95% glutamate signal using the TE-averaged method. Peak integration of this spectral range and home-developed, prior-knowledge-based fitting were used for quantitation. Gray matter brain phantom measurements were acquired on a Siemens 3 T Trio scanner. Non-uniform sampling was applied retrospectively to these phantom measurements and quantitative results of glutamate with respect to creatine 3.0 (Glu/Cr) ratios showed a coefficient of variance of 16% for peak integration and 9% for peak fitting using eight-fold acceleration. In vivo scans of the human brain were acquired as well and five different brain regions were quantified using the prior-knowledge-based algorithm. Glu/Cr ratios from these regions agreed with previously reported results in the literature. The method described here, called accelerated TE-averaged echo planar spectroscopic imaging (TEA-EPSI), is a significant methodological advancement and may be a useful tool for categorizing glutamate changes in pathologies where affected brain regions are not known a priori. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Normalized fluorescence lifetime imaging for tumor identification and margin delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Adria J.; Papour, Asael; Bhargava, Siddharth; Taylor, Zach; Grundfest, Warren S.; Stafsudd, Oscar M.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a technique that has been proven to produce quantitative and qualitative differentiation and identification of substances with good specificity and sensitivity based on lifetime extracted information. This technique has shown the ability to also differentiate between a wide range of tissue types to identify malignant from benign tissue in vivo and ex vivo. However, the complexity, long duration and effort required to generate this information has limited the adoption of these techniques in a clinical setting. Our group has developed a time-resolved imaging system (patent pending) that does not require the extraction of lifetimes or use of complex curve fitting algorithms to display the needed information. The technique, entitled Lifetime Fluorescence Imaging (LFI, or NoFYI), converts fluorescence lifetime decay information directly into visual contrast. Initial studies using Fluorescein and Rhodamine-B demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. Subsequent studies demonstrated the ability to separate collagen and elastin powders. The technique uses nanosecond pulsed UV LEDs at 375 nm for average illumination intensities of ~4.5 μW on the tissue surface with detection by a gated CCD camera. To date, we have imaged 11 surgical head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and brain cancer biopsy specimens including 5 normal and 6 malignant samples. Images at multiple wavelengths clearly demonstrate differentiation between benign and malignant tissue, which was later confirmed by histology. Contrast was obtained between fluorophores with 35 μm spatial resolution and an SNR of ~30 dB allowing us to clearly define tumor margins in these highly invasive cancers. This method is capable of providing both anatomical and chemical information for the pathologist and the surgeon. These results suggest that this technology has a possible role in identifying tumors in tissue specimens and detecting tumor margins during procedures.

  2. Nuclear imaging to characterize adrenal tumors: Comparison with MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simone; Maurea; Pier; Paolo; Mainenti; Valeria; Romeo; Carmine; Mollica; Marco; Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To describe the role of nuclear imaging modalities using nor-cholesterol,metaiodobenzylguanidine(MIBG)and fluorine-deoxy-glucose(FDG)in adrenal tumors for lesion characterization in comparison with magnetic resonance(MR).METHODS:Population was classified in group 1 consisting of 30 patients with non-hypersecreting unilateral adrenal masses,in group 2 consisting of 34 patients with hypersecreting(n=19)or non-hypersecreting(n=15)adrenal adenomas and in group 3 consisting of 18 patients with chromaffin-tissue tumors(CTT),of which 14 were pheochromocytomas while 4 were paragangliomas(n=4).All patients underwent MR and nuclear studies(nor-cholesterol,MIBG and FDG).Pathology samples(n=63)or follow-up data in adenomas(n=19)were used as standard of reference forimaging studies interpretation.RESULTS:In group 1,MR findings were not highly accurate for lesion characterization,while the results of nuclear scans showed abnormal nor-cholesterol,MIBG and FDG concentration in all cases of adenomas,pheos and malignant tumors,respectively.In group 2,no differences in MR parameters were found between hyperfunctioning and non-hyperfunctioning adenomas,while nor-cholesterol uptake was significantly higher in hyperfunctioning compared to non-hyperfunctioning lesions.In group 3,no differences in MR parameters were found between benign and malignant CCT,while MIBG uptake was significantly higher in malignant compared to benign tumors.CONCLUSION:On the basis of our findings,nuclear imaging modalities using specific target agents are able to better characterize adrenal tumors,compared with MR.In particular,radionuclide techniques are able to identify the nature of adrenal incidentalomas and to differentiate between hypersecreting and non-hypersecreting adenomas as well as between benign and malignant CTT.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of a novel cyanine dye for tumor imaging with in vivo photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temma, Takashi; Onoe, Satoru; Kanazaki, Kengo; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-09-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PA imaging or PAI) has shown great promise in the detection and monitoring of cancer. Although nanocarrier-based contrast agents have been studied for use in PAI, small molecule contrast agents are required due to their ease of preparation, cost-effectiveness, and low toxicity. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of a novel cyanine dye IC7-1-Bu as a PAI contrast agent without conjugated targeting moieties for in vivo tumor imaging in a mice model. Basic PA characteristics of IC7-1-Bu were compared with indocyanine green (ICG), a Food and Drug Administration approved dye, in an aqueous solution. We evaluated the tumor accumulation profile of IC7-1-Bu and ICG by in vivo fluorescence imaging. In vivo PAI was then performed with a photoacoustic tomography system 24 and 48 h after intravenous injection of IC7-1-Bu into tumor bearing mice. IC7-1-Bu showed about a 2.3-fold higher PA signal in aqueous solution compared with that of ICG. Unlike ICG, IC7-1-Bu showed high tumor fluorescence after intravenous injection. In vivo PAI provided a tumor to background PA signal ratio of approximately 2.5 after intravenous injection of IC7-1-Bu. These results indicate that IC7-1-Bu is a promising PAI contrast agent for cancer imaging without conjugation of targeting moieties.

  4. Use of Radioiodinated Peptide Arg-Arg-Leu Targeted to Neovascularization as well as Tumor Cells in Molecular Tumor Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Lu; Ping Yan; Rong-fu Wang; Meng Liu; Ming-ming Yu; Chun-li Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To explore a tumor peptide imaging agent Arginine-Arginine-Leucine (Tyr-Cys-Gly-Gly-Arg-Arg-Leu-Gly-Gly-Cys,tripeptide RRL [tRRL]) that targeted to tumor cells and tumor-derived endothelial cells (TDECs) and primarily investigate the possible relationship between tRRL and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2).Methods:The tRRL sequence motif was identified as a tumor molecular marker specifically binding to TDECs.Tyrosine was conjugated to the amino terminal of RRL (Cys-Gly-Gly-Arg-Arg-Leu-Gly-Gly-Cys) for labeling with radionuclide iodine-131 (131I-tRRL).The uptake ability and molecular binding of tRRL to tumor cells and angiogenic endothelium were studied using flow cytometry and radioactivity counter in vitro.Whether VEGFR-2 is the binging site of tRRL was investigated.Biodistribution and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of 131I-tRRL were used to evaluate the effectiveness of this new imaging agent to visualize varied tumor xenografts in nude mice.Results:In vitro cellular uptake experiments revealed that tRRL could not only adhere to tumor angiogenic endothelial cells but also largely accumulate in malignant tumor cells.VEGFR-2,which is highly expressed on TDECs,was probably not the solely binding ligand for tRRL targeted to tumor angiogenic endothelium.131I-tRRL mainly accumulated in tumors in vivo,not other organs at 24 h after injection.SPECT imaging with 131I-tRRL clearly visualized tumors in nude mice,especially at 24 h.Conclusion:Radioiodinated tRRL offers a noninvasive nuclear imaging method for functional molecular imaging of tumors targeted to neovascularization,and may be a promising candidate for tumor radioimmunotherapeutic carrier.

  5. Retrospective correction of B0-field-induced geometric distortions in multislice echo planar images: a 3D solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Roderick W.; Coburn, Edward A.

    2000-04-01

    A method has been developed to utilize a 3D B0 fieldmap, with a multi-volume-of-interest segmentation map, to quantify and correct geometric distortions in echo-planar images. The purpose is to provide accurate co-registration of anatomical MRI to functional MRI time course sequences. A data structure capable of extracting and reporting the necessary information forms a central part of the solution. Images were obtained from a 1.5 Tesla scanner with an experimental y-gradient insert coil. Two 3D-gradient echo sequences supply the data needed to calculate the B0 map across the volume. Segmentation of the volume into brain/background produces the data needed for the phase unwrapping and volume(s) of interest generation, from which the global B0 variation map is obtained. Subsequent EPI acquisition yields the fMRI time- course information. Tests were carried out on a phantom and a human volunteer engaged in a motor task (finger-tapping). Strong distortions were measured, and subsequently corrected, particularly near the petrous bone/mastoid air cells and in the frontal and maxillary sinuses. Additionally, a strong eddy current resulting from the unshielded y-gradient was detected. The method facilitates geometric distortion correction through an imaging volume, containing multiple regions of interest within a slice, starting from a single starting point.

  6. In vivo measurement of regional brain metabolic response to hyperventilation using magnetic resonance: proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posse, S; Dager, S R; Richards, T L; Yuan, C; Ogg, R; Artru, A A; Müller-Gärtner, H W; Hayes, C

    1997-06-01

    A new rapid spectroscopic imaging technique with improved sensitivity and lipid suppression, referred to as Proton Echo Planar Spectroscopic Imaging (PEPSI), has been developed to measure the 2-dimensional distribution of brain lactate increases during hyperventilation on a conventional clinical scanner equipped with a head surface coil phased array. PEPSI images (nominal voxel size: 1.125 cm3) in five healthy subjects from an axial section approximately 20 mm inferior to the intercommissural line were obtained during an 8.5-min baseline period of normocapnia and during the final 8.5 min of a 10-min period of capnometry-controlled hyperventilation (end-tidal PCO2 of 20 mmHg). The lactate/N-acetyl aspartate signal increased significantly from baseline during hyperventilation for the insular cortex, temporal cortex, and occipital regions of both the right and left hemisphere, but not in the basal ganglia. Regional or hemispheric right-to-left differences were not found. The study extends previous work using single-voxel MR spectroscopy to dynamically study hyperventilation effects on brain metabolism.

  7. Sinusoidal echo-planar imaging with parallel acquisition technique for reduced acoustic noise in auditory fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapp, Jascha; Schmitter, Sebastian; Schad, Lothar R

    2012-09-01

    To extend the parameter restrictions of a silent echo-planar imaging (sEPI) sequence using sinusoidal readout (RO) gradients, in particular with increased spatial resolution. The sound pressure level (SPL) of the most feasible configurations is compared to conventional EPI having trapezoidal RO gradients. We enhanced the sEPI sequence by integrating a parallel acquisition technique (PAT) on a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. The SPL was measured for matrix sizes of 64 × 64 and 128 × 128 pixels, without and with PAT (R = 2). The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was examined for both sinusoidal and trapezoidal RO gradients. Compared to EPI PAT, the SPL could be reduced by up to 11.1 dB and 5.1 dB for matrix sizes of 64 × 64 and 128 × 128 pixels, respectively. The SNR of sinusoidal RO gradients is lower by a factor of 0.96 on average compared to trapezoidal RO gradients. The sEPI PAT sequence allows for 1) increased resolution, 2) expanded RO frequency range toward lower frequencies, which is in general beneficial for SPL, or 3) shortened TE, TR, and RO train length. At the same time, it generates lower SPL compared to conventional EPI for a wide range of RO frequencies while having the same imaging parameters. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Distinction between amorphous and healed planar deformation features in shocked quartz using composite color scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, Maartje F.; Pennock, Gill M.; Herwegh, Marco; Drury, Martyn R.

    2016-01-01

    Planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz are one of the most reliable and most widely used forms of evidence for hypervelocity impact. PDFs can be identified in scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images, but not all PDFs show the same CL behavior: there are nonluminescent

  9. A Systematic Review of Non-Echo Planar Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Detection of Primary and Postoperative Cholesteatoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Egmond, Sylvia L; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko; Aarts, Mark C J

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the diagnostic value of non-echo planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) for primary and recurrent/residual (postoperative) cholesteatoma in adults (≥18 years) after canal wall up surgery. DATA SOURCES: We conducted a systematic search in PubMed,

  10. Modeling tumor-associated edema in gliomas during anti-angiogenic therapy and its impact on imageable tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eHawkins-Daarud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically-driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor-cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR for tumors with lower proliferation rates.

  11. Imaging of non tumorous and tumorous human brain tissue with full-field optical coherence tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Assayag, Osnath; Devaux, Bertrand; Harms, Fabrice; Pallud, Johan; Chretien, Fabrice; Boccara, Claude; Varlet, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on neurosurgical samples from 18 patients to evaluate the use of Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) in brain tumor diagnosis. FF-OCT captures en face slices of tissue samples at 1\\mum resolution in 3D with a typical 200\\mum imaging depth. A 1cm2 specimen is scanned at a single depth and processed in about 5 minutes. This rapid imaging process is non-invasive and 30 requires neither contrast agent injection nor tissue preparation, which makes it particularly well suited to medical imaging applications. Temporal chronic epileptic parenchyma and brain tumors such as meningiomas, low- grade and high-grade gliomas, and choroid plexus papilloma were imaged. A subpopulation of neurons, myelin fibers and CNS vasculature were clearly identified. Cortex could be discriminated from white matter, but individual glial cells as astrocytes (normal or reactive) or oligodendrocytes were not observable. This study reports for the first time on the feasibility of using FF-OCT in a...

  12. Normal appearances of technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid in children on planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusuwan, P.; Reyes, L.; Gordon, I. [Department of Radiology, Hospital for Children NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-05-01

    Thirty-two children who underwent renal arteriography with normal results also underwent technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) imaging. Variations in the normal appearance of {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA images are described in these children. Criteria for high-quality {sup 99m}Tc DMSA images are defined in terms of kidney outline and contrast between the inner and the outer part of the kidney. Most of the images in this study were of high quality. The two most common features of normal {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA images were a round-shaped (50%) or flat (either lateral or medial aspect) (24.8%) contour. A small number of unusual appearances were observed and these have been illustrated. The mean differential function of the left kidney was 51% with a range of 45%-57%. (orig.) With 9 figs., 3 tabs., 15 refs.

  13. Balloon Flight Background Measurement with Actively-Shielded Planar and Imaging CZT Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; Jenkins, J A; Perrin, M; Murray, R; Grindlay, J E

    2001-01-01

    We present results from the flight of two prototype CZT detectors on a scientific balloon payload in September 2000. The first detector, referred to as ``CZT1,'' consisted of a 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm CZT crystal with a single gold planar electrode readout. This detector was shielded by a combination of a passive collimator surrounded by plastic scintillator and a thick BGO crystal in the rear. The second detector, ``CZT2,'' comprised two 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm CZT crystals, one made of eV Products high pressure Bridgman material and the other of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman material, each fashioned with a 4 x 4 array of gold pixels on a 2.5 mm pitch. The pixellated detectors were flip-chip-mounted side by side and read out by a 32-channel ASIC. This detector was also shielded by a passive/plastic collimator in the front, but used only additional passive/plastic shielding in the rear. Both experiments were flown from Ft. Sumner, NM on September 19, 2000 on a 24 hour balloon flight. CZT1 recorded a non-vetoed backgro...

  14. Molecular Imaging of Tumors Using a Quantitative T1 Mapping Technique via Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Herrmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM with molecular imaging agents would allow for the specific localization of brain tumors. Prior studies using T1-weighted MR imaging demonstrated that the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 molecular imaging agent labeled heterotopic xenograft models of brain tumors more intensely than non-specific contrast agents using conventional T1-weighted imaging techniques. In this study, we used a dynamic quantitative T1 mapping strategy to more objectively compare intra-tumoral retention of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent over time in comparison to non-targeted control agents. Our results demonstrate that the targeted SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent, a scrambled-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 control agent, and the non-specific clinical contrast agent Optimark™ all enhanced flank tumors of human glioma cells with similar maximal changes on T1 mapping. However, the retention of the agents differs. The non-specific agents show significant recovery within 20 min by an increase in T1 while the specific agent SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 is retained in the tumors and shows little recovery over 60 min. The retention effect is demonstrated by percent change in T1 values and slope calculations as well as by calculations of gadolinium concentration in tumor compared to muscle. Quantitative T1 mapping demonstrates the superior binding and retention in tumors of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent over time compared to the non-specific contrast agent currently in clinical use.

  15. Different imaging findings of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Fei Liu; Bao-Ming He; Xiao-Hui Ou-Yang; Zhi-Zhong Wang; Jia-Gui Su

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) in the liver is an uncommon lesion of uncertain pathogenesis.In most cases,symptomatological imaging and clinical studies suggest malignancy.We report a case of liver IMT with imaging findings from positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT),contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS).This report was the first to depict a PET/CT scan of a liver IMT that revealed an inhomogeneous,intense (fluorine 18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake.The CECT and CEUS images showed a hepatic artery supplying blood to the mass and necrosis.The characteristic histopathological features and the presence of spindle cells expressing smooth muscle actin,collagen fibers and lymphocytes allowed for the diagnosis of liver IMT.Recognizing such findings will help to achieve a correct diagnosis and may prevent inappropriate treatment.

  16. Early imaging findings in germ cell tumors arising from the basal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Mi [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In-One; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun-Hae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Woman' s University Mokdong Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); You, Sun Kyoung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chungnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is difficult to diagnosis early stage germ cell tumors originating in the basal ganglia, but early recognition is important for better outcome. To evaluate serial MR images of basal ganglia germ cell tumors, with emphasis on the features of early stage tumors. We retrospectively reviewed serial MR images of 15 tumors in 14 children and young adults. We categorized MR images of the tumors as follows: type I, ill-defined patchy lesions (<3 cm) without cyst; type II, small mass lesions (<3 cm) with cyst; and type III, large lesions (≥3 cm) with cyst. We also assessed temporal changes of the MR images. On the initial images, 8 of 11 (73%) type I tumors progressed to types II or III, and 3 of 4 (75%) type II tumors progressed to type III. The remaining 4 tumors did not change in type. All type II tumors (5/5, 100%) that changed from type I had a few tiny cysts. Intratumoral hemorrhage was observed even in the type I tumor. Ipsilateral hemiatrophy was observed in most of the tumors (13/15, 87%) on initial MR images. As tumors grew, cystic changes, intratumoral hemorrhage, and ipsilateral hemiatrophy became more apparent. Early stage basal ganglia germ cell tumors appear as ill-defined small patchy hyperintense lesions without cysts on T2-weighted images, are frequently associated with ipsilateral hemiatrophy, and sometimes show microhemorrhage. Tumors develop tiny cysts at a relatively early stage. (orig.)

  17. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungJoon Cho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995. Magn Reson Med 33, 506– 514 derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  18. Image-guided ablation therapy of bone tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Tarun; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Buy, Xavier; Gangi, Afshin

    2009-04-01

    A wide range of thermal and cryoablation methods is currently available for the curative eradication or palliative treatment of a variety of bone and soft-tissue tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been developed as a multipurpose tool for the skeletal system. Cryoablation has the added advantages of direct computed tomography or magnetic resonance visualization and monitoring of treatment outcome with less peri- and postoperative pain. Use of appropriate thermo-sensors and insulation techniques, like carbon dioxide insufflation, results in enhanced safety and efficacy. Ablation of weight-bearing bones has to be supplemented with cement consolidation. The authors present an overview of the current status of percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy of bone and soft-tissue tumors, analyze the merits and limitations of the various systems available, and discuss possible new applications for the future.

  19. Diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging in patients with recent myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deux, Jean-Francois [University Paris 12, Radiology Department, H. Mondor Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Creteil (France); University Paris 12, CNRS UMR 7054, Centre de Recherches Chirurgicales Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, IFR de Medecine, H. Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); H. Mondor Hospital, Radiology Department, Creteil (France); Maatouk, Mezri; Luciani, Alain; Lenczner, Gregory; Mayer, Julie; Kobeiter, Hicham; Rahmouni, Alain [University Paris 12, Radiology Department, H. Mondor Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Creteil (France); Vignaud, Alexandre [Siemens Medical France, Paris (France); Lim, Pascal; Dubois-Rande, Jean-Luc [University Paris 12, Cardiology Department, H. Mondor Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Creteil (France)

    2011-01-15

    To evaluate a diffusion-weighted (DW) black blood MR sequence for the detection of myocardium signal abnormalities in patients with recent myocardial infarction (MI). A DW black blood EPI sequence was acquired at 1.5 T in 12 patients with recent MI. One slice per patient was acquired with b = 0 and b = 50 s/mm{sup 2}. A standard short tau inversion recovery (STIR) T2-weighted sequence was acquired at the same level. Viability was assessed with delayed-enhancement sequences. Images were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. A non parametric Wilcoxon test was used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of P <.05. The mean quality of blood suppression was higher on DW EPI images than on STIR T2-weighted images (3.9 {+-} 0.3 and 3.0 {+-} 0.7, respectively; P = 0.01). Myocardial high signal areas were detected in respectively 100% (12/12) and 67% (8/12) of the patients on DW EPI and STIR T2-weighted images. The four patients (33%) with false-negative STIR T2 findings all had high signal areas on DW EPI images corresponding to the location of the MI on the delayed-enhanced images. DW EPI sequences are a feasible alternative to standard STIR T2-weighted sequences for detecting myocardium high signal areas in patients with recent MI. (orig.)

  20. Studying tumor metastasis by in vivo imaging and flow cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xunbin; Guo, Jin; Liu, Guangda; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Li; Tan, Yuan; Chen, Tong; Gu, Zhenqin; Wang, Chen

    2009-02-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world, with approximately 1,000,000 cases reported every year. This ranges from 15,000 cases in the United States to more than a 250,000 in China. About 80% of people with primary liver cancer are male. Although two-thirds of people have advanced liver disease when they seek medical help, one third of the patients have cancer that has not progressed beyond the liver. Primary liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma, or HCC) is associated with liver cirrhosis 60-80% of the time. HCC may metastasize to the lung, bones, kidney, and many other organs. Surgical resection, liver transplantation, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current HCC therapies. However the outcomes are poor-the survival rate is almost zero for metastatic HCC patients. Molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of HCC cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern liver tumor cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess liver tumor cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of liver tumor cells. A real-time quantitative monitoring of circulating liver tumor cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  1. Round Randomized Learning Vector Quantization for Brain Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Norul Huda Sheikh Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI classification into normal and abnormal is a critical and challenging task. Owing to that, several medical imaging classification techniques have been devised in which Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ is amongst the potential. The main goal of this paper is to enhance the performance of LVQ technique in order to gain higher accuracy detection for brain tumor in MRIs. The classical way of selecting the winner code vector in LVQ is to measure the distance between the input vector and the codebook vectors using Euclidean distance function. In order to improve the winner selection technique, round off function is employed along with the Euclidean distance function. Moreover, in competitive learning classifiers, the fitting model is highly dependent on the class distribution. Therefore this paper proposed a multiresampling technique for which better class distribution can be achieved. This multiresampling is executed by using random selection via preclassification. The test data sample used are the brain tumor magnetic resonance images collected from Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center and UCI benchmark data sets. Comparative studies showed that the proposed methods with promising results are LVQ1, Multipass LVQ, Hierarchical LVQ, Multilayer Perceptron, and Radial Basis Function.

  2. Photoacoustic endoscopic imaging study of melanoma tumor growth in a rat colorectum in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chiye; Yang, Joon-Mo; Chen, Ruimin; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Younan; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    We performed a photoacoustic endoscopic imaging study of melanoma tumor growth in a nude rat in vivo. After inducing the tumor at the colorectal wall of the animal, we monitored the tumor development in situ by using a photoacoustic endoscopic system. This paper introduces our experimental method for tumor inoculation and presents imaging results showing the morphological changes of the blood vasculature near the tumor region according to the tumor progress. Our study could provide insights for future studies on tumor development in small animals.

  3. Fast mapping of the T2 relaxation time of cerebral metabolites using proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Posse, Stefan; Lin, Yi-Ru; Ko, Cheng-Wen; Otazo, Ricardo; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2007-05-01

    Metabolite T2 is necessary for accurate quantification of the absolute concentration of metabolites using long-echo-time (TE) acquisition schemes. However, lengthy data acquisition times pose a major challenge to mapping metabolite T2. In this study we used proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) at 3T to obtain fast T2 maps of three major cerebral metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cre), and choline (Cho). We showed that PEPSI spectra matched T2 values obtained using single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS). Data acquisition for 2D metabolite maps with a voxel volume of 0.95 ml (32 x 32 image matrix) can be completed in 25 min using five TEs and eight averages. A sufficient spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for T2 estimation was validated by high Pearson's correlation coefficients between logarithmic MR signals and TEs (R2 = 0.98, 0.97, and 0.95 for NAA, Cre, and Cho, respectively). In agreement with previous studies, we found that the T2 values of NAA, but not Cre and Cho, were significantly different between gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM; P PEPSI and SVS scans was less than 9%. Consistent spatial distributions of T2 were found in six healthy subjects, and disagreement among subjects was less than 10%. In summary, the PEPSI technique is a robust method to obtain fast mapping of metabolite T2.

  4. Linear Response Equilibrium versus echo-planar encoding for fast high-spatial resolution 3D chemical shift imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Rudolf Fritz; Baltes, Christof; Weiss, Kilian; Pazhenkottil, Aju; Rudin, Markus; Boesiger, Peter; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2011-07-01

    In this work Linear Response Equilibrium (LRE) and Echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) are compared in terms of sensitivity per unit time and power deposition. In addition an extended dual repetition time scheme to generate broad stopbands for improved inherent water suppression in LRE is presented. The feasibility of LRE and EPSI for assessing cholesterol esters in human carotid plaques with high spatial resolution of 1.95 × 1.15 × 1.15 mm 3 on a clinical 3T MR system is demonstrated. In simulations and phantom experiments it is shown that LRE has comparable but lower sensitivity per unit time relative to EPSI despite stronger signal generated. This relates to the lower sampling efficiency in LRE relative to EPSI as a result of limited gradient performance on clinical MR systems. At the same time, power deposition of LRE is significantly reduced compared to EPSI making it an interesting niche application for in vivo high field spectroscopic imaging of metabolites within a limited bandwidth.

  5. Fiber-coupled, 10 kHz simultaneous OH planar laser-induced fluorescence/particle-image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Paul S; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2013-01-15

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle-image velocimetry (PIV) techniques that employ free-standing optics face severe challenges when implemented in harsh environments associated with practical combustion facilities because of limited optical access and restrictions on operation of sensitive laser systems. To circumvent this problem, we have developed and implemented a fiber-coupled, high-speed ultraviolet (UV) PLIF/PIV system for measuring hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration and velocity in a realistic 4 MW combustion rig. This system permits delivery of high-power, 10 kHz, nanosecond-duration OH-PLIF excitation pulses (283 nm) and PIV pulses (532 nm) through a common 6 m long, 600 μm core, deep-UV-enhanced multimode fiber. Simultaneous OH-PLIF and PIV imaging at a data-acquisition rate of 10 kHz is demonstrated in turbulent premixed flames behind a bluff body. The effects of delivering high-repetition-rate, intense UV and visible beams through a long optical fiber are investigated, and potential system improvements are discussed.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of pseudomalignant osseous tumor of the hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehara, Shigeru [Center for Radiological Sciences, Iwate Medical Univ. School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Nishida, Jun [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Iwate Medical Univ. School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Abe, Masataka [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Iwate Medical Univ. School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Mizutani, Hirokazu [Dept. of Radiology, Nagoya City Univ. School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ohba, Satoru [Dept. of Radiology, Nagoya City Univ. School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    1994-10-01

    Noninfectious, nonneoplastic reactive processes of the hand, such as myositis ossificans circumscripta, pseudomalignant osseous tumor of soft tissue, and florid reactive periostitis, appear similar radiologically and histologically and are often difficult to differentiate. Magnetic resonance (MR) findings in two such lesions are reported. The extensive reactive change in the extraosseous soft tissue and the bone marrow and the relatively small extent of ossification may be characteristic. Although low-grade infection and small osseous neoplasms with reactive changes, such as osteoid osteoma, may still remain possible causes, MR imaging provides essential evidence for including noninfective, nonneoplastic reactive processes of uncertain cause in the list of differential diagnoses. (orig.)

  7. Balloon flight background measurement with actively-shielded planar and imaging CZT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Narita, Tomohiko; Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Perrin, Marshall; Murray, Ruth; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2002-01-01

    We present results from the flight of two prototype CZT detectors on a scientific balloon payload in September 2000. The first detector, referred to as CZT1, consisted of a 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm CZT crystal with a single gold planar electrode readout. This detector was shielded by a combination of a passive collimator in the front, giving a 40 degree field of view and surrounded by plastic scintillator, and a thick BGO crystal in the rear. The second detector, CZT2, comprised two 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm CZT crystals, one made of eV Products high pressure Bridgman material and the other of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman material, each fashioned with a 4 x 4 array of gold pixels on a 2.5 mm pitch. The pixellated detectors were flip-chip-mounted side by side and read out by a 32-channel ASIC. This detector was also shielded by a passive/plastic collimator in the front, but used only additional passive/plastic shielding in the rear. Both experiments were flown from Ft. Sumner, NM on September 19, 2000 on a 24 hour balloon flight. Both instruments performed well. CZT1 recorded a non-vetoed background level at 100 keV of approximately 1 x 10-3 cm-2s-1keV-1. Raising the BGO threshold from 50 keV to approximately 1 MeV produced only an 18% increase in this level. CZT2 recorded a background at 100 keV of approximately 4 times 10-3 cts cm-2s-1keV-1 in the eV Products detector and approximately 6 x 10-3 cts cm-2s-1keV-1 in the IMARAD detector, a difference possibly due to our internal background subtracting procedure. Both CZT1 and CZT2 spectra were in basic agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, though both recorded systematically higher count rates at high energy than predicted. No lines were observed, indicating that neutron capture reactions, at least those producing decay lines at a few 100 keV, are not significant components of the CZT background. Comparison of the CZT1 and CZT2 spectra indicates that passive/plastic shielding may provide adequately low background levels for

  8. Echo-Planar Imaging-Based, J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging for Improved Metabolite Detection in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    2014;27:191-201. 6. Keys R. Cubic convolution interpolation for digital image processing . IEEE transactions on acoustics, speech, and signal processing ...diagnosis have become a priority for many health care professionals. Another method for staging prostate cancer is through imaging techniques... processing fronts. 6 A B C Figure 2.A. An MRI axial slice image of the prostate phantom showing the VOI localization (white box) and

  9. Fast diffusion tensor imaging and tractography of the whole cervical spinal cord using point spread function corrected echo planar imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Hans Magnus Henrik; Barthelemy, Dorothy; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging has been used in a number of spinal cord studies, but severe distortions caused by susceptibility induced field inhomogeneities limit its applicability to investigate small volumes within acceptable acquisition times. A way to evaluate image distortions is to map the poin...... artifacts or in high-field imaging settings where off-resonance effects are pronounced. Magn Reson Med, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  10. Accounting for anatomical noise in search-capable model observers for planar nuclear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Anando; Gifford, Howard C

    2016-01-01

    Model observers intended to predict the diagnostic performance of human observers should account for the effects of both quantum and anatomical noise. We compared the abilities of several visual-search (VS) and scanning Hotelling-type models to account for anatomical noise in a localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) study involving simulated nuclear medicine images. Our VS observer invoked a two-stage process of search and analysis. The images featured lesions in the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. Lesion contrast and the geometric resolution and sensitivity of the imaging collimator were the study variables. A set of anthropomorphic mathematical phantoms was imaged with an analytic projector based on eight parallel-hole collimators with different sensitivity and resolution properties. The LROC study was conducted with human observers and the channelized nonprewhitening, channelized Hotelling (CH) and VS model observers. The CH observer was applied in a "background-known-statistically" protocol while the VS observer performed a quasi-background-known-exactly task. Both of these models were applied with and without internal noise in the decision variables. A perceptual search threshold was also tested with the VS observer. The model observers without inefficiencies failed to mimic the average performance trend for the humans. The CH and VS observers with internal noise matched the humans primarily at low collimator sensitivities. With both internal noise and the search threshold, the VS observer attained quantitative agreement with the human observers. Computational efficiency is an important advantage of the VS observer.

  11. Functionalized gold nanorods for tumor imaging and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Chen; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2012-12-01

    Gold nanorods, as an emerging noble metal nanomaterial with unique properties, have become the new exciting focus of theoretical and experimental studies in the past few years. The structure and function of gold nanorods, especially their biocompatibility, optical property, and photothermal effects, have been attracting more and more attention. Gold nanorods exhibit great potential in applications such as tumor molecular imaging and photothermal therapy. In this article, we review some of the main advances made over the past few years in the application of gold nanorods in surface functionalization, molecular imaging, and photothermal therapy. We also explore other prospective applications and discuss the corresponding concepts, issues, approaches, and challenges, with the aim of stimulating broader interest in gold nanorod-based nanotechnology and improving its practical application.

  12. Imaging Review of Skeletal Tumors of the Pelvis—Part I: Benign Tumors of the Pelvis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandikota Girish

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The osseous pelvis is a well-recognized site of origin of numerous primary and secondary musculoskeletal tumors. The radiologic evaluation of a pelvic lesion often begins with the plain film and proceeds to computed tomography (CT, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and possibly biopsy. Each of these modalities, with inherent advantages and disadvantages, has a role in the workup of pelvic osseous masses. Clinical history and imaging characteristics can significantly narrow the broad differential diagnosis for osseous pelvic lesions. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the radiologist with the presentation and appearance of some of the common benign neoplasms of the osseous pelvis and share our experience and approach in diagnosing these lesions.

  13. Double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging: basic concepts and application in brain tumors for the assessment of tumor blood volume and vascular permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Uematsu, Hidemasa; Maeda, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using contrast agents plays a key role in characterizing tumors of the brain. We have shown that double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging (DEPWI) is potentially useful in assessing brain tumors. Quantitative indices, such as tumor blood volume, are obtained using DEPWI, which allows correction of underestimation of tumor blood volume due to leakage of contrast agents from tumor vessels, in addition to simultaneous acquisition of tumor vessel...

  14. Accelerated proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) using GRAPPA with a 32-channel phased-array coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Posse, Stefan; Lin, Yi-Ru; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Wald, Lawrence L; Wiggins, Graham C; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2008-05-01

    Parallel imaging has been demonstrated to reduce the encoding time of MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Here we investigate up to 5-fold acceleration of 2D proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) at 3T using generalized autocalibrating partial parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) with a 32-channel coil array, 1.5 cm(3) voxel size, TR/TE of 15/2000 ms, and 2.1 Hz spectral resolution. Compared to an 8-channel array, the smaller RF coil elements in this 32-channel array provided a 3.1-fold and 2.8-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the peripheral region and the central region, respectively, and more spatial modulated information. Comparison of sensitivity-encoding (SENSE) and GRAPPA reconstruction using an 8-channel array showed that both methods yielded similar quantitative metabolite measures (P > 0.1). Concentration values of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), choline (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), and the sum of glutamate and glutamine (Glx) for both methods were consistent with previous studies. Using the 32-channel array coil the mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLB) were less than 8% for NAA, tCr, and Cho and less than 15% for mI and Glx at 2-fold acceleration. At 4-fold acceleration the mean CRLB for NAA, tCr, and Cho was less than 11%. In conclusion, the use of a 32-channel coil array and GRAPPA reconstruction can significantly reduce the measurement time for mapping brain metabolites.

  15. Joint 2D and 3D phase processing for quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to 2D echo-planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongjiang; Zhang, Yuyao; Gibbs, Eric; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) measures tissue magnetic susceptibility and typically relies on time-consuming three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (GRE) MRI. Recent studies have shown that two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI), which is commonly used in functional MRI (fMRI) and other dynamic imaging techniques, can also be used to produce data suitable for QSM with much shorter scan times. However, the production of high-quality QSM maps is difficult because data obtained by 2D multi-slice scans often have phase inconsistencies across adjacent slices and strong susceptibility field gradients near air-tissue interfaces. To address these challenges in 2D EPI-based QSM studies, we present a new data processing procedure that integrates 2D and 3D phase processing. First, 2D Laplacian-based phase unwrapping and 2D background phase removal are performed to reduce phase inconsistencies between slices and remove in-plane harmonic components of the background phase. This is followed by 3D background phase removal for the through-plane harmonic components. The proposed phase processing was evaluated with 2D EPI data obtained from healthy volunteers, and compared against conventional 3D phase processing using the same 2D EPI datasets. Our QSM results were also compared with QSM values from time-consuming 3D GRE data, which were taken as ground truth. The experimental results show that this new 2D EPI-based QSM technique can produce quantitative susceptibility measures that are comparable with those of 3D GRE-based QSM across different brain regions (e.g. subcortical iron-rich gray matter, cortical gray and white matter). This new 2D EPI QSM reconstruction method is implemented within STI Suite, which is a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  17. Imaging of soft tissue tumors with Tc(V)-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid. A new tumor-seeking agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, H.; Endo, K.; Fujita, T.; Nakajima, T.; Sakahara, H.; Torizuka, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Hata, N.; Masuda, H.; Horiuchi, K.

    1984-10-01

    Tumor scintigraphy, using Tc(V)-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (Tc(V)-DMS) was performed in 58 patients with soft tissue tumors, and the results were compared with that of Ga-67 citrate. Tc(V)-DMS was found to have a sensitivity of 90% for malignant tumors including aggressive fibromatosis compared to that of Ga-67 citrate, which was 56%. However, the specificity of Tc(V)-DMS for these tumors was 71% but with Ga-67 citrate the specificity was 80%. The imaging accuracy in soft tissue tumors with Tc(V)-DMS and Ga-67 citrate was 78% and 71%, respectively. Although the accumulation of Tc(V)-DMS has been detected in some benign soft tissue tumors, the reduced accumulation in inflammatory lesions compared to Ga-67 citrate was recognized, and Tc(V)-DMS could be of great use in the detection of extension or location of malignant soft tissue tumors.

  18. Parosteal osteoliposarcoma: A new bone tumor (from imaging to immunophenotype)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larousserie, F. [Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris (France); Department of Pathology, Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy); Chen, X. [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan hospital, Beijing (China); Ding, Y. [Department of pathology, Beijing Jishuitan hospital, Beijing (China); Kreshak, J.; Cocchi, S. [Department of Pathology, Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy); Huang, Xiaoyuan [Department of pathology, Beijing Jishuitan hospital, Beijing (China); Niu, Xiaohui, E-mail: niuxiaohui@263.net [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan hospital, Beijing (China); Alberghini, M.; Vanel, D. [Department of Pathology, Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: Parosteal osteosarcomas and well-differentiated liposarcomas (WDLPS) of soft tissue share several features: they are slowly progressive, locally aggressive tumors, tend to recur locally, and rarely or never metastasizes if not dedifferentiated. Their treatment is wide surgical resection. Microscopically, both are well differentiated tumors, very like their normal tissue counterpart. They share simple karyotypes with supernumerary ring chromosomes or giant marker chromosomes containing amplified 12q sequences including MDM2 and CDK4 genes, with subsequent overexpression of MDM2 and CDK4 proteins. We present the case of a parosteal osteoliposarcoma made of closely intermingled components of a low-grade osteosarcoma and a WDLPS. Case: In a 34 year-old woman with a slowly growing mass of the arm, imaging revealed a large well-defined heterogeneous parosteal mass of the upper humerus, with two main components: bone at the base and fat at the periphery. Microscopically, these two components were consistent respectively with low grade osteosarcoma and WDLPS. Cells of the two components were labeled with anti-CDK4 antibody. No labeling with anti-MDM2 antibody and no signal detected with MDM2 FISH analysis were likely due overdecalcification. No frozen tumor tissue was available for FISH analysis nor array-CGH. Discussion: Differential diagnoses of this new entity would be a well-differentiated liposarcoma with a low-grade osteosarcomatous component that originates from the soft tissues, ruled out on imaging, and an ossifying parosteal lipoma, ruled out on immunohistochemistry. Conclusion: This is the first description of a low-grade parosteal sarcoma with two components that morphologically and immunophenotypically demonstrate characteristics of a parosteal osteosarcoma and of a well-differentiated liposarcoma.

  19. Emerging Techniques in Brain Tumor Imaging: What Radiologists Need to Know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minjae; Kim, Ho Sung [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Among the currently available brain tumor imaging, advanced MR imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging and perfusion MR imaging, have been used for solving diagnostic challenges associated with conventional imaging and for monitoring the brain tumor treatment response. Further development of advanced MR imaging techniques and postprocessing methods may contribute to predicting the treatment response to a specific therapeutic regimen, particularly using multi-modality and multiparametric imaging. Over the next few years, new imaging techniques, such as amide proton transfer imaging, will be studied regarding their potential use in quantitative brain tumor imaging. In this review, the pathophysiologic considerations and clinical validations of these promising techniques are discussed in the context of brain tumor characterization and treatment response.

  20. Emerging techniques in brain tumor imaging: What radiologists need to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jae; Kim, Ho Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Among the currently available brain tumor imaging, advanced MR imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging and perfusion MR imaging, have been used for solving diagnostic challenges associated with conventional imaging and for monitoring the brain tumor treatment response. Further development of advanced MR imaging techniques and postprocessing methods may contribute to predicting the treatment response to a specific therapeutic regimen, particularly using multi-modality and multiparametric imaging. Over the next few years, new imaging techniques, such as amide proton transfer imaging, will be studied regarding their potential use in quantitative brain tumor imaging. In this review, the pathophysiologic considerations and clinical validations of these promising techniques are discussed in the context of brain tumor characterization and treatment response.

  1. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging of J-coupled resonances in human brain at 3 and 4 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Bustillo, Juan; Chen, Hongji; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Gasparovic, Charles; Zuo, Chun; Magnotta, Vincent; Mueller, Bryon; Mullins, Paul; Renshaw, Perry; Ugurbil, Kamil; Lim, Kelvin O; Alger, Jeffry R

    2007-08-01

    In this multicenter study, 2D spatial mapping of J-coupled resonances at 3T and 4T was performed using short-TE (15 ms) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI). Water-suppressed (WS) data were acquired in 8.5 min with 1-cm(3) spatial resolution from a supraventricular axial slice. Optimized outer volume suppression (OVS) enabled mapping in close proximity to peripheral scalp regions. Constrained spectral fitting in reference to a non-WS (NWS) scan was performed with LCModel using correction for relaxation attenuation and partial-volume effects. The concentrations of total choline (tCho), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr), glutamate (Glu), glutamate + glutamine (Glu+Gln), myo-inositol (Ins), NAA, NAA+NAAG, and two macromolecular resonances at 0.9 and 2.0 ppm were mapped with mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) between 6% and 18% and approximately 150-cm(3) sensitive volumes. Aspartate, GABA, glutamine (Gln), glutathione (GSH), phosphoethanolamine (PE), and macromolecules (MMs) at 1.2 ppm were also mapped, although with larger mean CRLBs between 30% and 44%. The CRLBs at 4T were 19% lower on average as compared to 3T, consistent with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and increased spectral resolution. Metabolite concentrations were in the ranges reported in previous studies. Glu concentration was significantly higher in gray matter (GM) compared to white matter (WM), as anticipated. The short acquisition time makes this methodology suitable for clinical studies.

  2. Antidepressant-like effects of echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging in mice determined using the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoz, Elif; Aksoz, Tolga; Bilge, S Sirri; Ilkaya, Fatih; Celik, Suleyman; Diren, H Baris

    2008-10-21

    Echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EP-MRI), which is novel variant of MRI, is thought to have antidepressant properties in humans and animal models. Using the forced swimming test (FST), we investigated which monoaminergic system in mice is affected by EP-MRI. The short- and long-term effects of EP-MRI on immobility time in the FST and motor activity within a locomotor activity cage were examined. Two groups of mice underwent 20 min of EP-MRI in an MR scanner (Siemens, 1.5 T Symphony) either 23.5 or 1 h before the start of the second session of the FST. In both groups, the immobility duration in the FST was reduced, similar to effective antidepressant drug treatments. Climbing behavior in the 1-h group and swimming behavior in the 23.5-h group increased significantly, similar to that seen after the administration of desipramine (a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor) and sertraline (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), respectively. The findings support the hypothesis that EP-MRI has an antidepressant-like effect. We suggest that the antidepressant-like effect begins in the early period with noradrenaline systems and is maintained in the late period with serotonin systems.

  3. In vivo cation exchange in quantum dots for tumor-specific imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyou; Braun, Gary B; Qin, Mingde; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Sugahara, Kazuki N

    2017-08-24

    In vivo tumor imaging with nanoprobes suffers from poor tumor specificity. Here, we introduce a nanosystem, which allows selective background quenching to gain exceptionally tumor-specific signals. The system uses near-infrared quantum dots and a membrane-impermeable etchant, which serves as a cation donor. The etchant rapidly quenches the quantum dots through cation exchange (ionic etching), and facilitates renal clearance of metal ions released from the quantum dots. The quantum dots are intravenously delivered into orthotopic breast and pancreas tumors in mice by using the tumor-penetrating iRGD peptide. Subsequent etching quenches excess quantum dots, leaving a highly tumor-specific signal provided by the intact quantum dots remaining in the extravascular tumor cells and fibroblasts. No toxicity is noted. The system also facilitates the detection of peritoneal tumors with high specificity upon intraperitoneal tumor targeting and selective etching of excess untargeted quantum dots. In vivo cation exchange may be a promising strategy to enhance specificity of tumor imaging.The imaging of tumors in vivo using nanoprobes has been challenging due to the lack of sufficient tumor specificity. Here, the authors develop a tumor-specific quantum dot system that permits in vivo cation exchange to achieve selective background quenching and high tumor-specific imaging.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Tumor Metabolic Markers for Cancer Diagnosis, Metabolic Phenotyping, and Characterization of Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhong He

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display heterogeneous genetic characteristics, depending on the tumor dynamic microenvironment. Abnormal tumor vasculature and poor tissue oxygenation generate a fraction of hypoxic tumor cells that have selective advantages in metastasis and invasion and often resist chemo- and radiation therapies. The genetic alterations acquired by tumors modify their biochemical pathways, which results in abnormal tumor metabolism. An elevation in glycolysis known as the “Warburg effect” and changes in lipid synthesis and oxidation occur. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS has been used to study tumor metabolism in preclinical animal models and in clinical research on human breast, brain, and prostate cancers. This technique can identify specific genetic and metabolic changes that occur in malignant tumors. Therefore, the metabolic markers, detectable by MRS, not only provide information on biochemical changes but also define different metabolic tumor phenotypes. When combined with the contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, which has a high sensitivity for cancer diagnosis, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI improves the diagnostic specificity of malignant human cancers and is becoming an important clinical tool for cancer management and care. This article reviews the MRSI techniques as molecular imaging methods to detect and quantify metabolic changes in various tumor tissue types, especially in extracranial tumor tissues that contain high concentrations of fat. MRI/MRSI methods have been used to characterize tumor microenvironments in terms of blood volume and vessel permeability. Measurements of tissue oxygenation and glycolytic rates by MRS also are described to illustrate the capability of the MR technology in probing molecular information non-invasively in tumor tissues and its important potential for studying molecular mechanisms of human cancers in physiological conditions.

  5. In vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) : [3,4-(CH2)-C-13] glutamate/glutamine tomography in rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyder, F; Renken, R; Rothman, DL

    1999-01-01

    A method for in vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) is described. This method is composed of an echo-planar based acquisition implemented with C-13-H-1 J editing spectroscopy and is intended for high temporal and spatial resolution in vivo spectros

  6. In vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) : [3,4-(CH2)-C-13] glutamate/glutamine tomography in rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyder, F; Renken, R; Rothman, DL

    1999-01-01

    A method for in vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) is described. This method is composed of an echo-planar based acquisition implemented with C-13-H-1 J editing spectroscopy and is intended for high temporal and spatial resolution in vivo spectros

  7. In vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) : [3,4-(CH2)-C-13] glutamate/glutamine tomography in rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyder, F; Renken, R; Rothman, DL

    1999-01-01

    A method for in vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) is described. This method is composed of an echo-planar based acquisition implemented with C-13-H-1 J editing spectroscopy and is intended for high temporal and spatial resolution in vivo

  8. Pharmacokinetic Monitoring of Indocyanine Green for Tumor Detection Using Photoacoustic Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Si-Hua; YIN Guang-Zhi; XING Da

    2010-01-01

    @@ We report tumor detection using a photoacoustic technique for the imaging of angiogenesis and monitoring of agent pharmacokinetics on an animal model.We take 532-nm laser pulses to excite photoacoustic signals of blood vessels with acquisition by a broadband hydrophone,and the morphological characteristics of tumor angiogenesis are successfully image depicted.Furthermore,tumor pharmacokinetics is preformed and analyzed with fast multielement photoacoustic imaging of the intravenous-injected indocyanine green (ICG).

  9. Combining parallel detection of proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) measurements with a data-consistency constraint improves SNR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Chu, Ying-Hua; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2015-12-01

    One major challenge of MRSI is the poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which can be improved by using a surface coil array. Here we propose to exploit the spatial sensitivity of different channels of a coil array to enforce the k-space data consistency (DC) in order to suppress noise and consequently to improve MRSI SNR. MRSI data were collected using a proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) sequence at 3 T using a 32-channel coil array and were averaged with one, two and eight measurements (avg-1, avg-2 and avg-8). The DC constraint was applied using a regularization parameter λ of 1, 2, 3, 5 or 10. Metabolite concentrations were quantified using LCModel. Our results show that the suppression of noise by applying the DC constraint to PEPSI reconstruction yields up to 32% and 27% SNR gain for avg-1 and avg-2 data with λ = 5, respectively. According to the reported Cramer-Rao lower bounds, the improvement in metabolic fitting was significant (p < 0.01) when the DC constraint was applied with λ ≥ 2. Using the DC constraint with λ = 3 or 5 can minimize both root-mean-square errors and spatial variation for all subjects using the avg-8 data set as reference values. Our results suggest that MRSI reconstructed with a DC constraint can save around 70% of scanning time to obtain images and spectra with similar SNRs using λ = 5.

  10. Cardiac tumors: CT and MR imaging features; Tumeurs cardiaques: aspects en scanner et en IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskovitch, G.; Chabbert, V.; Escourrou, G.; Desloques, L.; Otal, P.; Glock, Y.; Rousseau, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Rangueil, Service de Radiologie Generale, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2010-09-15

    The CT and MR imaging features of the main cardiac tumors will be reviewed. Cross-sectional imaging features may help differentiate between cardiac tumors and pseudo-tumoral lesions and identify malignant features. Based on clinical features, imaging findings are helpful to further characterize the nature of the lesion. CT and MR imaging can demonstrate the relationship of the tumor with adjacent anatomical structures and are invaluable in the pre-surgical work-up and post-surgical follow-up. (authors)

  11. Multiscale imaging and computational modeling of blood flow in the tumor vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Stamatelos, Spyros; Cebulla, Jana; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Popel, Aleksander S; Pathak, Arvind P

    2012-11-01

    The evolution in our understanding of tumor angiogenesis has been the result of pioneering imaging and computational modeling studies spanning the endothelial cell, microvasculature and tissue levels. Many of these primary data on the tumor vasculature are in the form of images from pre-clinical tumor models that provide a wealth of qualitative and quantitative information in many dimensions and across different spatial scales. However, until recently, the visualization of changes in the tumor vasculature across spatial scales remained a challenge due to a lack of techniques for integrating micro- and macroscopic imaging data. Furthermore, the paucity of three-dimensional (3-D) tumor vascular data in conjunction with the challenges in obtaining such data from patients presents a serious hurdle for the development and validation of predictive, multiscale computational models of tumor angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss the development of multiscale models of tumor angiogenesis, new imaging techniques capable of reproducing the 3-D tumor vascular architecture with high fidelity, and the emergence of "image-based models" of tumor blood flow and molecular transport. Collectively, these developments are helping us gain a fundamental understanding of the cellular and molecular regulation of tumor angiogenesis that will benefit the development of new cancer therapies. Eventually, we expect this exciting integration of multiscale imaging and mathematical modeling to have widespread application beyond the tumor vasculature to other diseases involving a pathological vasculature, such as stroke and spinal cord injury.

  12. CT and MR imaging findings of palatal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroki, E-mail: hkato@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Kanematsu, Masayuki, E-mail: masa_gif@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Makita, Hiroki, E-mail: makitah@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Kato, Keizo, E-mail: keizo@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Hatakeyama, Daijiro, E-mail: hatakeya@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Shibata, Toshiyuki, E-mail: shibat@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Mizuta, Keisuke, E-mail: kmizuta@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Aoki, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: aoki@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Palatal tumors commonly arise from the minor salivary glands, and benign tumors account for approximately half of all minor salivary gland tumors. Minor salivary gland tumors have an affinity for the posterior hard palate and soft palate and virtually never arise in the midline, probably because of the distribution of palatal salivary glands. The majority of benign salivary gland tumors of the palate are pleomorphic adenomas, while the most common malignant salivary gland tumor is adenoid cystic carcinoma, followed by mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma. Epithelial tumors frequently arise from the soft palate. The majority of benign epithelial tumors of the palate are papillomas, while most malignant epithelial tumors are squamous cell carcinomas. Various types of mesenchymal tumors, including fibromas, lipomas, schwannomas, neurofibromas, hemangiomas, and lymphangiomas, also involve the palate. This article describes the CT and MR findings of benign and malignant palatal tumors.

  13. Determining tumor blood flow parameters from dynamic image measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libertini, Jessica M.

    2008-11-01

    Many recent cancer treatments focus on preventing angiogenesis, the process by which a tumor promotes the growth of large and efficient capillary beds for the increased nourishment required to support the tumor's rapid growth[l]. To measure the efficacy of these treatments in a timely fashion, there is an interest in using data from dynamic sequences of contrast-enhanced medical imaging, such as MRI and CT, to measure blood flow parameters such as perfusion, permeability-surface-area product, and the relative volumes of the plasma and extracellular-extravascular space. Starting with a two compartment model presented by the radiology community[2], this work challenges the application of a simplification to this problem, which was originally developed to model capillary reuptake[3]. While the primary result of this work is the demonstration of the inaccuracy of this simplification, the remainder of the paper is dedicated to presenting alternative methods for calculating the perfusion and plasma volume coefficients. These methods are applied to model data sets based on real patient data, and preliminary results are presented.

  14. Determining tumor blood flow parameters from dynamic image measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libertini, Jessica M [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02906 (United States)], E-mail: Jessica_Libertini@brown.edu

    2008-11-01

    Many recent cancer treatments focus on preventing angiogenesis, the process by which a tumor promotes the growth of large and efficient capillary beds for the increased nourishment required to support the tumor's rapid growth. To measure the efficacy of these treatments in a timely fashion, there is an interest in using data from dynamic sequences of contrast-enhanced medical imaging, such as MRI and CT, to measure blood flow parameters such as perfusion, permeability-surface-area product, and the relative volumes of the plasma and extracellular-extravascular space. Starting with a two compartment model presented by the radiology community, this work challenges the application of a simplification to this problem, which was originally developed to model capillary reuptake. While the primary result of this work is the demonstration of the inaccuracy of this simplification, the remainder of the paper is dedicated to presenting alternative methods for calculating the perfusion and plasma volume coefficients. These methods are applied to model data sets based on real patient data, and preliminary results are presented.

  15. Research progress in nanographene oxide with tumor imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOU Peihong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanographene oxide,one of graphene oxide derivatives and a novel two-dimensional carbon nanomaterial,has become a popular research topic in nanomedicine due to its unique properties such as ultra-high surface-to-volume ratio and great photo-thermal effect.It contains a large amount of reactive chemical groups,including carboxy group,carbonyl group,hydroxyl group and epoxy group,which enable its easy biological and chemical functionalization and excellent biocompatibility.Therefore,it has potential applications in biomedical field.This paper briefly describes the preparation and functionalization of nanographeme oxide,and then mainly focuses on its application studies in the biomedical field,including in vitro and in vivo toxicity tests and advanced research progress of tumor imaging and treatment.

  16. Development of human serum albumin conjugated with near-infrared dye for photoacoustic tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazaki, Kengo; Sano, Kohei; Makino, Akira; Takahashi, Atsushi; Deguchi, Jun; Ohashi, Manami; Temma, Takashi; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-09-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has emerged as a noninvasive diagnostic method which detects ultrasonic waves thermoelastically induced by optical absorbers irradiated with laser. For tumor diagnosis, PA contrast agent has been proposed to enhance the PA effect for detecting tumors sensitively. Here, we prepared a human serum albumin (HSA) conjugated with indocyanine green (ICG) as a PA contrast agent allowing enhanced permeability and retention effect for sensitive tumor imaging. The feasibility of PA imaging with HSA-ICG to detect allografted tumors was evaluated in tumor-bearing mice. In vivo fluorescence imaging and radiolabeled biodistribution study showed that the biodistribution dramatically changed as the number of ICG bound to HSA increased, and the maximum accumulation of ICG was achieved when around three ICG molecules were loaded on an HSA. In vivo PA imaging demonstrated a tumor-selective and dose-dependent increase of PA signal intensity in mice injected with HSA-ICG (R2=0.88, 387% increase for HSA-ICG, 104 nmol ICG). In conclusion, HSA-ICG clearly visualized the allografted tumors with high tumor-to-background ratios having high quantitative and spatial resolution for the sensitive PA imaging of tumors. HSA-ICG could be useful as a favorable contrast agent for PA tumor imaging for the management of cancer.

  17. Planar micro-optic solar concentration using multiple imaging lenses into a common slab waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Jason H.; Ford, Joseph E.

    2009-08-01

    Conventional CPV systems focus sunlight directly onto a PV cell, usually through a non-imaging optic to avoid hot spots. In practice, many systems use a shared tracking platform to mount multiple smaller aperture lenses, each concentrating light into an associated PV cell. Scaling this approach to the limit would result in a thin sheet-like geometry. This would be ideal in terms of minimizing the tracking system payload, especially since such thin sheets can be arranged into louvered strips to minimize wind-force loading. However, simply miniaturizing results in a large number of individual PV cells, each needed to be packaged, aligned, and electrically connected. Here we describe for the first time a different optical system approach to solar concentrators, where a thin lens array is combined with a shared multimode waveguide. The benefits of a thin optical design can therefore be achieved with an optimum spacing of the PV cells. The guiding structure is geometrically similar to luminescent solar concentrators, however, in micro-optic waveguide concentrators sunlight is coupled directly into the waveguide without absorption or wavelength conversion. This opens a new design space for high-efficiency CPV systems with the potential for cost reduction in both optics and tracking mechanics. In this paper, we provide optical design and preliminary experimental results of one implementation specifically intended to be compatible with large-scale roll processing. Here the waveguide is a uniform glass sheet, held between the lens array and a corresponding array of micro-mirrors self-aligned to each lens focus during fabrication.

  18. Echo-Planar Imaging Based J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging for Improved Metabolite Detection in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    patients, which included a 3D water- and fat -suppressed spectroscopic acquisition. 3D MRSI parameters of the endorectal and external phased array... fat . Artif Cells Blood Substit Immobil Biotechnol. 1994;22(4): 1477–83. 12. Maio A, Rifkin MD. Magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer...axial MRI of the abdomen is shown displaying the VOI covering the prostate localized by the PRESS sequence and the EP-JRESI grids. The split-Bregman

  19. Level set method with automatic selective local statistics for brain tumor segmentation in MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapaliya, Kiran; Pyun, Jae-Young; Park, Chun-Su; Kwon, Goo-Rak

    2013-01-01

    The level set approach is a powerful tool for segmenting images. This paper proposes a method for segmenting brain tumor images from MR images. A new signed pressure function (SPF) that can efficiently stop the contours at weak or blurred edges is introduced. The local statistics of the different objects present in the MR images were calculated. Using local statistics, the tumor objects were identified among different objects. In this level set method, the calculation of the parameters is a challenging task. The calculations of different parameters for different types of images were automatic. The basic thresholding value was updated and adjusted automatically for different MR images. This thresholding value was used to calculate the different parameters in the proposed algorithm. The proposed algorithm was tested on the magnetic resonance images of the brain for tumor segmentation and its performance was evaluated visually and quantitatively. Numerical experiments on some brain tumor images highlighted the efficiency and robustness of this method.

  20. [The actions of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in differentiating breast tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yi; Yu, Jianqun; Chen, Dongdong; Xu, Zhongzi; Zeng, Hanjiang

    2013-12-01

    We studied the actions of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in differentiating breast tumors. From January 2010 to February 2012, we retrospectively analyzed data of 95 cases with breast tumor pathologically confirmed from DWI and DCE-MRI. We compared the ADC value, time-intensity curve (TIC) and DCE-MRI parameters between breast tumors, and calculated the sensitivity and specificity for differentiating breast tumors. The results were as follows: (1) On DWI, mean ADC value of malignant tumor was lower than that of benign tumor (P value of time to peak (Tpeak) and maximal enhancement ratio (SImax) were lower than that of benign tumor (all P < 0.05). As for TIC, type II and III were more frequently seen in malignant tumor than in benign tumor whereas type I was more common in benign tumor than in malignant tumor (all P < 0.05). For differentiating breast malignant tumors from benign neoplasm, DCE-MRI obtained a sensitivity of 89.7% and specificity of 70.3%. (3) For differentiating breast malignant tumors from benign neoplasm, ADC value together with TIC obtained a sensitivity of 79.3% and specificity of 78.4%. Malignant or benign breast tumors could have their own unique characteristics on DWI and DCE-MRI. These characteristics might be helpful for differentiating these tumors.

  1. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.-C. [Cancer Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Jeng-Jong [Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw; Ting, G. [Cancer Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Y.-L. [Taiwan Liposome Company, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Wang, S.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Whang-Peng, J. [Cancer Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China)

    2007-02-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/tk-luc). A good correlation (R {sup 2}=0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm{sup 3} (R {sup 2}=0.907). {gamma} Scintigraphy combined with [{sup 131}I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugs.

  2. Quantification of esophageal tumor motion on cine-magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lever, F.M.; Lips, I.M.; Crijns, S.P.; Reerink, O.; Lier, A.L. van; Moerland, M.A.; Vulpen, M. van; Meijer, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the movement of esophageal tumors noninvasively on cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by use of a semiautomatic method to visualize tumor movement directly throughout multiple breathing cycles. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Thirty-six patients with esophageal tumors underwent MRI.

  3. Identification of the primary motor cortex: value of T2 echo-planar imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient measurement at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dincer, Alp; Erzen, Canan [Acibadem University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Oezyurt, Onur [Bogazici University, Biomedical Engineering Institute, Istanbul (Turkey); Pamir, M.N. [Acibadem University, Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    To investigate the primary motor cortex (PMC) concerning T2 shortening on T2 echo-planar imaging (EPI-T2) and the double-layer sign on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and also to measure its apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). 3-T MR DWI was performed in 134 adult volunteers and 64 patients. T2 shortening was graded as hypointense or isointense compared with the signal of the superior frontal cortex (SFC). The double-layer sign of the PMC was graded as present or absent. Both findings (T2 shortening and double-layer sign) were evaluated independently by two authors. ADC of the PMC and the SFC were calculated using manually selected ROIs. T2 shortening was found in 131 adults and 62 patients by author 1 and in 132 adults and 61 patients by author 2 ({kappa} = 0.96 and 0.91). The double-layer sign was found in 131 adults and 61 patients by author 1 and in 127 adults and 58 patients by author 2 ({kappa} = 0.94 and 0.91). ADC values of the PMC and the SFC were different for all subjects (p < 0.01). T2 shortening and/or the double-layer sign on 3-T MR can be used to locate the PMC. The difference in ADC values between PMC and SFC is a distinguishing feature. (orig.)

  4. Feasibility of noninvasive quantitative measurements of intrarenal R(2) ' in humans using an asymmetric spin echo echo planar imaging sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yudong; Yang, Xuedong; Wang, Xiaoying; An, Hongyu; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of an asymmetric spin echo (ASE) single-shot echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence for the noninvasive quantitative measurement of intrarenal R(2) ' in humans within 20 s. The reproducibility of R(2) ' measurements with the ASE-EPI sequence was assessed in nine healthy young subjects in repeated studies conducted over three consecutive days. Moreover, we also evaluated whether the ASE-EPI sequence-measured R(2) ' reflected the intrarenal oxygenation changes induced by furosemide in another group of normal human subjects (n = 10). Different flow attenuation gradients (b = 0, 40 and 80 s/mm(2) ) were utilized to examine the impact of the intravascular signal contribution on the estimation of intrarenal R(2) '. In the absence of flow dephasing gradients (b = 0 s/mm(2) ), the computed coefficient of variation (CV) of R(2) ' was 21.31 ± 4.52%, and the estimated R(2) ' value decreased slightly, but not statistically significantly (p > 0.05), after the administration of furosemide in the medullary region. However, CV of R(2) ' was much smaller in the presence of flow dephasing gradients (9.68 ± 3.58% with b = 40 s/mm(2) and 10.50 ± 3.62% with b = 80 s/mm(2) ). Moreover, a significant reduction in R(2) ' in the renal medulla was obtained (p R(2) ' measurements did not differ between the b = 40 s/mm(2) and b = 80 s/mm(2) scans, suggesting that small diffusion gradients were sufficient to minimize the intravascular signal contribution. In summary, we have demonstrated that renal R(2) ' can be obtained rapidly using an ASE-EPI sequence. The measurement was highly reproducible and reflected the expected intrarenal oxygenation changes induced by furosemide.

  5. Third harmonic generation imaging for fast, label-free pathology of human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, N V; Wesseling, P; Hamer, P C de Witt; Noske, D P; Galgano, G D; Mansvelder, H D; Baayen, J C; Groot, M L

    2016-05-01

    In brain tumor surgery, recognition of tumor boundaries is key. However, intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries by the neurosurgeon is difficult. Therefore, there is an urgent need for tools that provide the neurosurgeon with pathological information during the operation. We show that third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy provides label-free, real-time images of histopathological quality; increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism, and rarefaction of neuropil in fresh, unstained human brain tissue could be clearly recognized. We further demonstrate THG images taken with a GRIN objective, as a step toward in situ THG microendoscopy of tumor boundaries. THG imaging is thus a promising tool for optical biopsies.

  6. Third harmonic generation imaging for fast, label-free pathology of human brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, N. V.; Wesseling, P.; Hamer, P. C. de Witt; Noske, D. P.; Galgano, G. D.; Mansvelder, H. D.; Baayen, J. C.; Groot, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    In brain tumor surgery, recognition of tumor boundaries is key. However, intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries by the neurosurgeon is difficult. Therefore, there is an urgent need for tools that provide the neurosurgeon with pathological information during the operation. We show that third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy provides label-free, real-time images of histopathological quality; increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism, and rarefaction of neuropil in fresh, unstained human brain tissue could be clearly recognized. We further demonstrate THG images taken with a GRIN objective, as a step toward in situ THG microendoscopy of tumor boundaries. THG imaging is thus a promising tool for optical biopsies. PMID:27231629

  7. Imaging pH and oxygen at the soil-root interface by planar optodes: a challenging technology to study dynamic rhizosphere processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudin, Gabrielle; Oburger, Eva; Schmidt, Hannes; Borisov, Sergey; Pradier, Céline; Jourdan, Christophe; Marsden, Claire; Obermaier, Daniela; Woebken, Dagmar; Richter, Andreas; Wenzel, Walter; Hinsinger, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Roots do not only take up water and nutrients from surrounding soil but they also release a wide range of exudates, such as low molecular weight organic compounds, CO2 or protons. Root-soil interactions trigger heterogeneous rhizosphere processes based on differences in root activity along the root axis and with distance from the root surface. Elucidating their temporal and spatial dynamics is of crucial importance for a better understanding of these interrelated biogeochemical processes in the rhizosphere. Therefore, monitoring key parameters at a fine scale and in a non-invasive way at the root-soil interface is essential. Planar optodes are an emerging technology that allows in situ and non-destructive imaging of mainly pH, CO2 and O2. Originated in limnology, planar optodes have recently been applied to soil-root systems in laboratory conditions. This presentation will highlight advantages and challenges of using planar optodes to image pH and O2 dynamics in the rhizosphere, focusing on two RGB (red-green-blue) approaches: a commercially available system (PreSens) and a custom-made one. Important insights into robustness, accuracy, potentials and limitations of the two systems applied to different laboratory/greenhouse-based experimental conditions (flooded and aerobic rhizobox systems, plant species) will be addressed. Furthermore, challenges of optode measurements in the field, including a first case study with Eucalyptus grandis in Brazil, will be discussed.

  8. Fetal brain tumors: Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hérbene; José; Milani; Edward; Araujo; Júnior; Sérgio; Cavalheiro; Patrícia; Soares; Oliveira; Wagner; Jou; Hisaba; Enoch; Quinderé; Sá; Barreto; Maurício; Mendes; Barbosa; Luciano; Marcondes; Nardozza; Antonio; Fernandes; Moron

    2015-01-01

    Congenital central nervous system tumors diagnosed during pregnancy are rare, and often have a poor prognosis. The most frequent type is the teratoma. Use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance image allows the suspicion of brain tumors during pregnancy. However, the definitive diagnosis is only confirmed after birth by histology. The purpose of this mini-review article is to describe the general clinical aspects of intracranial tumors and describe the main fetal brain tumors.

  9. PET Imaging of Multidrug Resistance in Tumors Using 18F-Fluoropaclitaxel

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The failure of solid tumors to respond to chemotherapy is a complicated and clinically frustrating issue. The ability to predict which tumors will respond to treatment could reduce the human and monetary costs of cancer therapy by allowing pro-active selection of a chemotherapeutic to which the tumor does not express resistance. PET/CT imaging with a radiolabeled form of paclitaxel, F-18 fluoropaclitaxel (FPAC), may be able to predict the uptake of paclitaxel in solid tumors, and as a substra...

  10. Dynamic Multi-Coil Technique (DYNAMITE) Shimming for Echo-Planar Imaging of the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Rudrapatna, S. Umesh; Nixon, Terence W.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2014-01-01

    Gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) is the primary method of choice in functional MRI and other methods relying on fast MRI to image brain activation and connectivity. However, the high susceptibility of EPI towards B0 magnetic field inhomogeneity poses serious challenges. Conventional magnetic field shimming with low-order spherical harmonic (SH) functions is capable of compensating shallow field distortions, but performs poorly for global brain shimming or on specific areas with strong susceptibility-induced B0 distortions such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Excellent B0 homogeneity has been demonstrated recently in the human brain at 7 Tesla with the DYNAmic Multi-coIl TEchnique (DYNAMITE) for magnetic field shimming (Juchem et al., J Magn Reson (2011) 212:280-288). Here, we report the benefits of DYNAMITE shimming for multi-slice EPI and T2* mapping. A standard deviation of 13 Hz was achieved for the residual B0 distribution in the human brain at 7 Tesla with DYNAMITE shimming and was 60% lower compared to conventional shimming that employs static zero through third order SH shapes. The residual field inhomogeneity with SH shimming led to an average 8 mm shift at acquisition parameters commonly used for fMRI and was reduced to 1.5-3 mm with DYNAMITE shimming. T2* values obtained from the prefrontal and temporal cortices with DYNAMITE shimming were 10-50% longer than those measured with SH shimming. The reduction of the confounding macroscopic B0 field gradients with DYNAMITE shimming thereby promises improved access to the relevant microscopic T2* effects. The combination of high spatial resolution and DYNAMITE shimming allows largely artifact-free EPI and T2* mapping throughout the brain, including prefrontal and temporal lobe areas. DYNAMITE shimming is expected to critically benefit a wide range of MRI applications that rely on excellent B0 magnetic field conditions including EPI-based fMRI to study various cognitive processes and assessing large

  11. Short- and long-term quantitation reproducibility of brain metabolites in the medial wall using proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Lin, Yi-Ru; Wang, Woan-Chyi; Niddam, David M

    2012-11-15

    Proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) is a fast magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) technique that allows mapping spatial metabolite distributions in the brain. Although the medial wall of the cortex is involved in a wide range of pathological conditions, previous MRSI studies have not focused on this region. To decide the magnitude of metabolic changes to be considered significant in this region, the reproducibility of the method needs to be established. The study aims were to establish the short- and long-term reproducibility of metabolites in the right medial wall and to compare regional differences using a constant short-echo time (TE30) and TE averaging (TEavg) optimized to yield glutamatergic information. 2D sagittal PEPSI was implemented at 3T using a 32 channel head coil. Acquisitions were repeated immediately and after approximately 2 weeks to assess the coefficients of variation (COV). COVs were obtained from eight regions-of-interest (ROIs) of varying size and location. TE30 resulted in better spectral quality and similar or lower quantitation uncertainty for all metabolites except glutamate (Glu). When Glu and glutamine (Gln) were quantified together (Glx) reduced quantitation uncertainty and increased reproducibility was observed for TE30. TEavg resulted in lowered quantitation uncertainty for Glu but in less reliable quantification of several other metabolites. TEavg did not result in a systematically improved short- or long-term reproducibility for Glu. The ROI volume was a major factor influencing reproducibility. For both short- and long-term repetitions, the Glu COVs obtained with TEavg were 5-8% for the large ROIs, 12-17% for the medium sized ROIs and 16-26% for the smaller cingulate ROIs. COVs obtained with TE30 for the less specific Glx were 3-5%, 8-10% and 10-15%. COVs for N-acetyl aspartate, creatine and choline using TE30 with long-term repetition were between 2-10%. Our results show that the cost of more specific

  12. Vascular Profile Characterization of Liver Tumors by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Hemodynamic Response Imaging in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifat Edrei

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we have demonstrated the feasibility of using hemodynamic response imaging (HRI, a functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI method combined with hypercapnia and hyperoxia, for monitoring vascular changes during liver pathologies without the need of contrast material. In this study, we evaluated HRI ability to assess changes in liver tumor vasculature during tumor establishment, progression, and antiangiogenic therapy. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were injected intrasplenically to model colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM and the Mdr2 knockout mice were used to model primary hepatic tumors. Hepatic perfusion parameters were evaluated using the HRI protocol and were compared with contrast-enhanced (CE MRI. The hypovascularity and the increased arterial blood supply in well-defined CRLM were demonstrated by HRI. In CRLM-bearing mice, the entire liver perfusion was attenuated as the HRI maps were significantly reduced by 35%. This study demonstrates that the HRI method showed enhanced sensitivity for small CRLM (1–2 mm detection compared with CE-MRI (82% versus 38%, respectively. In addition, HRI could demonstrate the vasculature alteration during CRLM progression (arborized vessels, which was further confirmed by histology. Moreover, HRI revealed the vascular changes induced by rapamycin treatment. Finally, HRI facilitates primary hepatic tumor characterization with good correlation to the pathologic differentiation. The HRI method is highly sensitive to subtle hemodynamic changes induced by CRLM and, hence, can function as an imaging tool for understanding the hemodynamic changes occurring during CRLM establishment, progression, and antiangiogenic treatment. In addition, this method facilitated the differentiation between different types of hepatic lesions based on their vascular profile noninvasively.

  13. Double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging: basic concepts and application in brain tumors for the assessment of tumor blood volume and vascular permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Hidemasa [University of Fukui, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui (Japan); Maeda, Masayuki [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mie (Japan)

    2006-01-01

    Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using contrast agents plays a key role in characterizing tumors of the brain. We have shown that double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging (DEPWI) is potentially useful in assessing brain tumors. Quantitative indices, such as tumor blood volume, are obtained using DEPWI, which allows correction of underestimation of tumor blood volume due to leakage of contrast agents from tumor vessels, in addition to simultaneous acquisition of tumor vessel permeability. This article describes basic concepts of DEPWI and demonstrates clinical applications in brain tumors. (orig.)

  14. Accelerated magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging of the median nerve using simultaneous multi-slice echo planar imaging with blipped CAIPIRINHA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filli, Lukas; Kenkel, David; Boss, Andreas; Manoliu, Andrei; Andreisek, Gustav; Runge, Val M.; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital of Zurich, University of Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Piccirelli, Marco [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Bhat, Himanshu [Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc, Charlestown, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate the feasibility of MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the median nerve using simultaneous multi-slice echo planar imaging (EPI) with blipped CAIPIRINHA. After federal ethics board approval, MR imaging of the median nerves of eight healthy volunteers (mean age, 29.4 years; range, 25-32) was performed at 3 T using a 16-channel hand/wrist coil. An EPI sequence (b-value, 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}; 20 gradient directions) was acquired without acceleration as well as with twofold and threefold slice acceleration. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD) and quality of nerve tractography (number of tracks, average track length, track homogeneity, anatomical accuracy) were compared between the acquisitions using multivariate ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Acquisition time was 6:08 min for standard DTI, 3:38 min for twofold and 2:31 min for threefold acceleration. No differences were found regarding FA (standard DTI: 0.620 ± 0.058; twofold acceleration: 0.642 ± 0.058; threefold acceleration: 0.644 ± 0.061; p ≥ 0.217) and MD (standard DTI: 1.076 ± 0.080 mm{sup 2}/s; twofold acceleration: 1.016 ± 0.123 mm{sup 2}/s; threefold acceleration: 0.979 ± 0.153 mm{sup 2}/s; p ≥ 0.074). Twofold acceleration yielded similar tractography quality compared to standard DTI (p > 0.05). With threefold acceleration, however, average track length and track homogeneity decreased (p = 0.004-0.021). Accelerated DTI of the median nerve is feasible. Twofold acceleration yields similar results to standard DTI. (orig.)

  15. Imaging articular cartilage defects with 3D fat-suppressed echo planar imaging: comparison with conventional 3D fat-suppressed gradient echo sequence and correlation with histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattnig, S; Huber, M; Breitenseher, M J; Trnka, H J; Rand, T; Kaider, A; Helbich, T; Imhof, H; Resnick, D

    1998-01-01

    Our goal was to shorten examination time in articular cartilage imaging by use of a recently developed 3D multishot echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence with fat suppression (FS). We performed comparisons with 3D FS GE sequence using histology as the standard of reference. Twenty patients with severe gonarthrosis who were scheduled for total knee replacement underwent MRI prior to surgery. Hyaline cartilage was imaged with a 3D FS EPI and a 3D FS GE sequence. Signal intensities of articular structures were measured, and contrast-to-noise (C/N) ratios were calculated. Each knee was subdivided into 10 cartilage surfaces. From a total of 188 (3D EPI sequence) and 198 (3D GE sequence) cartilage surfaces, 73 and 79 histologic specimens could be obtained and analyzed. MR grading of cartilage lesions on both sequences was based on a five grade classification scheme and compared with histologic grading. The 3D FS EPI sequence provided a high C/N ratio between cartilage and subchondral bone similar to that of the 3D FS GE sequence. The C/N ratio between cartilage and effusion was significantly lower on the 3D EPI sequence due to higher signal intensity of fluid. MR grading of cartilage abnormalities using 3D FS EPI and 3D GE sequence correlated well with histologic grading. 3D FS EPI sequence agreed within one grade in 69 of 73 (94.5%) histologically proven cartilage lesions and 3D FS GE sequence agreed within one grade in 76 of 79 (96.2%) lesions. The gradings were identical in 38 of 73 (52.1%) and in 46 of 79 (58.3%) cases, respectively. The difference between the sensitivities was statistically not significant. The 3D FS EPI sequence is comparable with the 3D FS GE sequence in the noninvasive evaluation of advanced cartilage abnormalities but reduces scan time by a factor of 4.

  16. A computational model for estimating tumor margins in complementary tactile and 3D ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsil, Arefin; Escoto, Abelardo; Naish, Michael D.; Patel, Rajni V.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional surgical methods are effective for treating lung tumors; however, they impose high trauma and pain to patients. Minimally invasive surgery is a safer alternative as smaller incisions are required to reach the lung; however, it is challenging due to inadequate intraoperative tumor localization. To address this issue, a mechatronic palpation device was developed that incorporates tactile and ultrasound sensors capable of acquiring surface and cross-sectional images of palpated tissue. Initial work focused on tactile image segmentation and fusion of position-tracked tactile images, resulting in a reconstruction of the palpated surface to compute the spatial locations of underlying tumors. This paper presents a computational model capable of analyzing orthogonally-paired tactile and ultrasound images to compute the surface circumference and depth margins of a tumor. The framework also integrates an error compensation technique and an algebraic model to align all of the image pairs and to estimate the tumor depths within the tracked thickness of a palpated tissue. For validation, an ex vivo experimental study was conducted involving the complete palpation of 11 porcine liver tissues injected with iodine-agar tumors of varying sizes and shapes. The resulting tactile and ultrasound images were then processed using the proposed model to compute the tumor margins and compare them to fluoroscopy based physical measurements. The results show a good negative correlation (r = -0.783, p = 0.004) between the tumor surface margins and a good positive correlation (r = 0.743, p = 0.009) between the tumor depth margins.

  17. Three-dimensional imaging of the metabolic state of c-MYC-induced mammary tumor with the cryo-imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Qian; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Min Z.; Blessington, Dana M.; Zhou, Lanlan; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Zheng, Gang; Chance, Britton

    2003-07-01

    This study imaged the metabolic state of a growing tumor and the relationship between energy metabolism and the ability of glucose uptake in whole tumor tissue with cryo-imaging at 77° K. A MTB/TOM mouse model, bearing c-MYC-induced mammary tumor, was very rapidly freeze-trapped 2 hrs post Pyro-2DG injection. The fluorescence signals of oxidized flavoprotein (Fp), reduced pyridine nucleotide (PN), pyro-2DG, and the reflection signal of deoxy-hemoglobin were imaged every 100 μm from the top surface to the bottom of the tumor sequentially, 9 sections in total. Each of the four signals was constructed into 3D images with Amira software. Both Fp and PN signals could be detected in the growing tumor regions, and a higher reduction state where was shown in the ratio images. The necrotic tumor regions displayed a very strong Fp signal and weak PN signal. In the bloody extravasation regions, Fp and PN signals were observably diminished. Therefore, the regions of high growth and necrosis in the tumor could be determined according to the Fp and PN signals. The content of deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) in the tumor was positively correlated with the reduced PN signal. Pyro-2DG signal was only evident in the growing condition region in the tumor. Normalized 3D cross-correlation showed that Pyro-2DG signal was similar to the redox ratio. The results indicated that glucose uptake in the tumor was consistent with the redox state of the tumor. And both Pyro-2DG and mitochondrial NADH fluorescence showed bimodal histograms suggesting that the two population of c-MYC induced mammary tumor, one of which could be controlled by c-MYC transgene.

  18. Characterization of tumor microvascular structure and permeability: comparison between magnetic resonance imaging and intravital confocal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitan, Nina Kristine; Thuen, Marte; Goa, Pa˚L. Erik; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2010-05-01

    Solid tumors are characterized by abnormal blood vessel organization, structure, and function. These abnormalities give rise to enhanced vascular permeability and may predict therapeutic responses. The permeability and architecture of the microvasculature in human osteosarcoma tumors growing in dorsal window chambers in athymic mice were measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Dextran (40 kDa) and Gadomer were used as molecular tracers for CLSM and DCE-MRI, respectively. A significant correlation was found between permeability indicators. The extravasation rate Ki as measured by CLSM correlated positively with DCE-MRI parameters, such as the volume transfer constant Ktrans and the initial slope of the contrast agent concentration-time curve. This demonstrates that these two techniques give complementary information. Extravasation was further related to microvascular structure and was found to correlate with the fractal dimension and vascular density. The structural parameter values that were obtained from CLSM images were higher for abnormal tumor vasculature than for normal vessels.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled folate-tripeptide conjugate as a folate receptor-targeeted imaging agent in a tumor-bearing mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Dae Weung [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Hyoung [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    The folate receptor (FR) is an attractive molecular target since it is overexpressed in a variety of human tumors. The purpose of the present study was to synthesize and evaluate the feasibility of a novel {sup 99m}Tc-ECG-EDA (Glu-Cys-Gly-ethylenediamine)-folate as an FR-positive tumor imaging agent in a mouse tumor model. ECG-EDA-folate was synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) and radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc using tripeptide ECG as a chelator. FR-positive KB cells were inoculated in athymic nude mice. Following injection of {sup 99m}Tc-ECG-EDA-folate, serial scintigraphy and micro-SPECT/CT imaging were performed at various time points with and without pre-administration of excess free folate. Mean count densities (MCD) for regions of interest drawn on KB tumors and major normal organs at each time point were measured, and uptake ratios of tumor to normal organs were calculated. ECG-EDA-folate was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc with high radiolabeling efficiency and stability (>96 %). FR-positive tumors were clearly visualized on both scintigraphy and micro-SPECT/CT images and the tumor uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-ECG-EDA-folate was markedly suppressed with faint visualization of tumors by pre-administration of excess free folate on serial planar scintigraphy, indicating FR-specific binding of the agent. Furthermore, semiquantitative analysis of MCD data showed again that both tumor MCD and tumor-to-normal organ ratios decreased considerably by pre-administration of excess free folate, supporting FR-specific tumor uptake. Tumor-to-normal organ ratios approximately increased with time after injection until 4 h. The present study demonstrated that 9{sup 99m}Tc-ECG-EDA-folate can bind specifically to FR with clear visualization of FR-positive tumors in a mouse tumor model.

  20. MR imaging of primary tumors of trigeminal nerve and Meckel's cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, W T; Wright, D C; Barloon, T J; Schultz, D H; Sato, Y; Cervantes, C A

    1988-09-01

    MR imaging features of 11 primary tumors of the trigeminal nerve and Meckel's cave were analyzed. The tumors consisted of two trigeminal schwannomas, five meningiomas, one lipoma, and three epidermoid tumors. The trigeminal schwannomas had homogeneously decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Three of the five meningiomas had signal intensity similar to that of surrounding brain on both T1- and T2-weighted images. One meningioma had decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The other had relatively low signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images owing to heavy calcification demonstrated on CT. The lipoma had homogeneous signal intensity that was isointense with orbital and subcutaneous fat on both T1- and T2-weighted images. The epidermoid tumors had decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images and markedly increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In addition, the epidermoids had an insinuating growth pattern and minimal mass effect. The extent of involvement in the trigeminal nerve distribution was well demonstrated in each case. Because of its multiplanar capability, exquisite anatomic detail, and characteristic tissue signal intensity, we conclude that MR is helpful in the differential diagnosis of primary tumors of the trigeminal nerve and Meckel's cave and in the evaluation of tumor involvement for preoperative planning.

  1. Image-guided tumor motion modeling and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Wu, Y.; Liu, W.; Christensen, J.; Tai, A.; Li, A. X.

    2009-02-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an important procedure in the treatment of cancer in the thorax and abdomen. However, its efficacy can be severely limited by breathing induced tumor motion. Tumor motion causes uncertainty in the tumor's location and consequently limits the radiation dosage (for fear of damaging normal tissue). This paper describes a novel signal model for tumor motion tracking/prediction that can potentially improve RT results. Using CT and breathing sensor data, it provides a more accurate characterization of the breathing and tumor motion than previous work and is non-invasive. The efficacy of our model is demonstrated on patient data.

  2. Analogues of estradiol as potential breast tumor imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, R.E.; Rzeszotarski, W.J.; Ferriera, N.L.; Jagoda, E.M.; Reba, R.C.; Eckelman, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    The radioiodinated analogue of estradiol, 11..beta..-methoxy-17..cap alpha..-(/sup 125/I)iodovinylestradiol (MIVE/sub 2/), has been shown to be a good candidate for the imaging of estrogen dependent breast tumors. Although there has been no extensive study on the sensitivity of radiotracers of this type, the authors have not observed localization of the radiotracer in metastatic lesions containing less than 20 fmole estrogen receptor/mg protein or in bone metasteses. In order to improve the sensitivity, they have examined several structural analogues of moxestrol (the parent structure for MIVE/sub 2/) for affinity to the ER isolated from immature rat uterus. The 11..beta..-ethyl analogue (EEE/sub 2/) of ethynyl estradiol (EE/sub 2/) exhibits the highest affinity with the 11..beta..-methyl analogue second best. Although the lipophilicity is also very high this compound should not be much more lipophilic than 16-iodoestradiol or MIVE/sub 2/ since the introduction of iodine increases the log P by greater than 1. The distribution of the tritiated derivative of EEE/sub 2/ is under study.

  3. In-vivo three-dimensional Doppler variance imaging for tumor angiogenesis on chorioallantoic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenjuan; Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2011-03-01

    Non-invasive tumor microvasculature visualization and characterization play significant roles in the detection of tumors and importantly, for aiding in the development of therapeutic strategies. The feasibility and effectiveness of a Doppler variance standard deviation imaging method for tumor angiogenesis on chorioallantoic membrane were tested in vivo on a rat glioma F98 tumor spheroid. Utilizing a high resolution Doppler Variance Optical Coherence Tomography (DVOCT) system with A-line rate of 20 kHz, three-dimensional mapping of a tumor with a total area of 3×2.5mm2 was completed within 15 seconds. The top-view image clearly visualized the complex vascular perfusion with the detection of capillaries as small as approximately 10μm. The results of the current study demonstrate the capability of the Doppler variance standard deviation imaging method as a non-invasive assessment of tumor angiogenesis, with the potential for its use in clinical settings.

  4. Giant cell tumor of soft tissue: a case report with emphasis on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moon Young; Jee, Won-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Chan Kwon [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ie Ryung [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yang-Guk [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Giant cell tumor of soft tissue is a rare neoplasm, histologically resembling giant cell tumor of bone. In this report, we describe a deep and solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue interpreted as a benign soft tissue tumor based on magnetic resonance (MR) findings with hypointense to intermediate signals on T2-weighted images and impeded diffusivity (water movement) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), which could suggest a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy suggested by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in a 35-year-old male. To our knowledge, this report introduces the first deep, solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue with MR features of a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy-mimicking findings on {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. (orig.)

  5. Intraoperative targeted optical imaging: a guide towards tumor-free margins in cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbay, Hakan; Bean, Jero; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Over the last several decades, development of various imaging techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography greatly facilitated the early detection of cancer. Another important aspect that is closely related to the survival of cancer patients is complete tumor removal during surgical resection. The major obstacle in achieving this goal is to distinguish between tumor tissue and normal tissue during surgery. Currently, tumor margins are typically assessed by visual assessment and palpation of the tumor intraoperatively. However, the possibility of microinvasion to the surrounding tissues makes it difficult to determine an adequate tumor-free excision margin, often forcing the surgeons to perform wide excisions including the healthy tissue that may contain vital structures. It would be ideal to remove the tumor completely, with minimal safety margins, if surgeons could see precise tumor margins during the operation. Molecular imaging with optical techniques can visualize the tumors via fluorophore conjugated probes targeting tumor markers such as proteins and enzymes that are upregulated during malignant transformation. Intraoperative use of this technique may facilitate complete excision of the tumor and tumor micromasses located beyond the visual capacity of the naked eye, ultimately improving the clinical outcome and survival rates of cancer patients.

  6. Imaging diagnosis of nasopharyngeal tumors; Diagnostico por imagem dos tumores da nasofaringe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashiro, Ilka; Souza, Ricardo Pires de [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia. Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: ilkay@terra.com.br

    2007-01-15

    The nasopharynx is located in the upper aero digestive tract. Its roof is formed by the basisphenoid, basiocciput and the anterior aspect of the first two cervical vertebrae, in front of the clivus. The lateral walls are formed by the margins of the superior constrictor muscle and the pharyngobasilar fascia, pharyngeal recess, torus tubarius and pharyngeal opening of auditory tube. The inferior margin of the nasopharynx is a horizontal plane passing through the hard palate and palatopharyngeal muscle. Anteriorly, it is in direct continuity with the nasal cavity through the posterior choanae. It is approximately 2.0 cm in anteroposterior diameter and about 4.0 cm in craniocaudal extent. Squamous cell carcinoma accounts for about 70% to 98% of nasopharyngeal malignant lesions found in adults. This tumor presents a high incidence in Asians, most frequently in men, and is the third most frequent cancer in women. The clinical presentation of this disease depends on the size and site of the lesion, with small-sized lesions being asymptomatic. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging play essential and complementary roles in the staging and treatment of patients with nasopharyngeal cancer. (author)

  7. A Review of Tumor Specific Imaging Methods: A Glance at the Use of Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Oghabian

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: Conventional imaging modalities of CT, MRI, ultrasound, radionuclide, and even metabolic PET are insensitive to reveal tumor and metastasis of less than few millimeters containing not much fewer than 500,000 cells. At this size, a tu-mor has effectively undergone about 20 cell dou-blings, and is sufficiently stuffed with gene defects and likely to metastasize. New techniques generally known as molecular imaging lead to a patient-specific approach based on physiologic, antigenic, molecular, and genetic disease markers. In this article, Current and the near term trends and techniques in early de-tection of cancer using gene specific, cell specific, or even patient specific approaches are summarized. A number of markers are used for cancer imaging. Anatomic markers show cell morphology defects at the sub-10-µm level on CT, MRI, and OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography. These techniques often fail to provide accurate and basic information necessary to manage the patient’s disease such as true metastatic extent. Functional markers use dynamic features, such as capillary leak (using ICG, IndoCyanine Green, lymphatic transport (by colloid, or Tc-Sestamibi, blood oxygenation, and blood flow. The features provide signal by a bulk phenomenon, and hence are still insensitive. More specifically, anti-genic probes, such as targeted antibodies have been demonstrated effectively in vivo for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, such as PSMA in the pros-tate cancer, CEA in colorectal cancer, and HER-2/neu in breast cancer. Metabolic probes accumulate at the site of a specific metabolic activity, and rely on imag-ing agents involving certain enzymatic pathways or transport functions of the cell. Examples are 18FDG (18F-fluoroDeoxyGlucose in PET and 11C-thymidine. Recent spectroscopy techniques do not need such labeled probes. The common method for in-vivo spectroscopy is MRSI (Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy that can

  8. Gold nanoflowers for 3D volumetric molecular imaging of tumors by photoacoustic tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Jiang[1,4; Zijian Deng[2,4; Dan Yang[3; Xin Deng[1; Qi Li[1; Yinlin Sha[3; Changhui Li[2; Dongsheng Xu[1

    2015-01-01

    By binding molecular probes that target tumor cells, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with superior characteristics have shown great potential in tumor molecular imaging studies. The non-invasive, high-resolution, and three-dimensional imaging of the targeted AuNPs within the tumor is desirable for both diagnosis and therapy. In this study, gold nanoflowers (AuNFs) are presented as a novel contrast agent for photoacoustic tomography (PAT). By binding to folic acid, the molecular probe, the tail-vein injected AuNFs concentrated within the tumor site in mice; this was clearly visualized by three-dimensional (3D) PAT imaging. In addition, toxicity assay proved that AuNFs were harmless to living cells and animals. Our results demonstrate that AuNFs have great potential in tumor molecular imaging.

  9. Imaging of peripheral nerve sheath tumors with pathologic correlation Pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilavaki, M.; Chourmouzi, D. E-mail: d.chourmouzi@ips.gr; Kiziridou, A.; Skordalaki, A.; Zarampoukas, T.; Drevelengas, A

    2004-12-01

    Peripheral neurogenic tumors include neurilemoma, neurinoma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. All neurogenic tumors share common imaging features. Although differentiation between them is difficult, neurogenic origin can be suggested from their imaging appearances, including fusiform shape, relation to the nerve, 'split-fat' sign, associated muscle atrophy and intrinsic imaging characteristics including 'target sign' as well as from lesion location along a typical nerve distribution. Our purpose is to make an overview of imaging findings of each type of peripheral nerve sheath tumor with emphasis on characteristic signs and correlate with histologic features. Morton's neuroma and intraneural ganglion are also included as tumors of nerve origin.

  10. Ultrasonic Nakagami imaging: a strategy to visualize the scatterer properties of benign and malignant breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Chang, King-Jen; Chen, Chiung-Nien

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of the Nakagami parameter in characterizing breast tumors by ultrasound. However, physicians or radiologists may need imaging tools in a clinical setting to visually identify the properties of breast tumors. This study proposed the ultrasonic Nakagami image to visualize the scatterer properties of breast tumors and then explored its clinical performance in classifying benign and malignant tumors. Raw data of ultrasonic backscattered signals were collected from 100 patients (50 benign and 50 malignant cases) using a commercial ultrasound scanner with a 7.5 MHz linear array transducer. The backscattered signals were used to form the B-scan and the Nakagami images of breast tumors. For each tumor, the average Nakagami parameter was calculated from the pixel values in the region-of-interest in the Nakagami image. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the clinical performance of the Nakagami image. The results showed that the Nakagami image shadings in benign tumors were different from those in malignant cases. The average Nakagami parameters for benign and malignant tumors were 0.69 +/- 0.12 and 0.55 +/- 0.12, respectively. This means that the backscattered signals received from malignant tumors tend to be more pre-Rayleigh distributed than those from benign tumors, corresponding to a more complex scatterer arrangement or composition. The ROC analysis showed that the area under the ROC curve was 0.81 +/- 0.04 and the diagnostic accuracy was 82%, sensitivity was 92% and specificity was 72%. The results showed that the Nakagami image is useful to distinguishing between benign and malignant breast tumors.

  11. Noninvasive tumor oxygen imaging by photoacoustic lifetime imaging integrated with photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qi; Biel, Merrill A.; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-03-01

    Oxygen plays a major role in cancer biology and tumor progression. In PDT, the reduction in efficacy is directly related to lack of oxygen because its molecular mechanism relies on oxygen as an energy mediator. Measuring tumor oxygenation can provide physicians with better diagnosis and optimization of treatment plans. However, clinical tools for directly assessing tissue oxygenation are limited. The gold standard is oxygen needle electrode, which is invasive and measures oxygen level at a single location. We present our work on developing a combined treatment-imaging modality that integrates PDT and photoacoustic oxygen imaging. We propose a system designed for clinical treatments of cancer of the oral cavity. Tissue oxygen imaging is performed by applying Photoacoustic Lifetime Imaging (PALI). This technology relies on photoacoustic probing of oxygen-dependent excitation lifetime of Methylene Blue. The dye is excited by the same wavelength of illumination source for PDT. Once excited, the population of photosensitizer molecules at triplet state has a lifetime depending on the oxygen level. The transition from excited triplet state to ground state can be probe by another laser, which generate photoacoustic signal that is used to map the lifetime. The lifetime map is then converted to pO2 distribution. We expect that PDT efficacy can be improved by applying PALI imaging feedback in real-time to determine, and individually optimize, O2-enriched gas breathing parameters and PDT light-dose during treatment. Successful implementation of PALI in PDT can also drive its application in guiding other cancer treatments that are affected by hypoxia.

  12. Non-invasive estimation of the metabolic heat production of breast tumors using digital infrared imaging

    CERN Document Server

    González, Francisco Javier

    2011-01-01

    In this work the metabolic heat generated by breast tumors was estimated indirectly and noninvasively from digital infrared images and numerically simulating a simplified breast model and a cancerous tumor, this parameter can be of clinical importance since it has been related to the doubling volume's time and malignancy for that particular tumor. The results indicate that digital infrared imaging has the potential to estimate in a non-invasive way the malignancy of a tumor by calculating its metabolic heat generation from bioheat thermal transfer models.

  13. Evaluation of cardiac tumors with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Antonio [Clinica Las Nieves, MR Unit, Jaen (Spain); Ribes, Ramon [Reina Sofia Hospital, MR Unit, Radiology Department, Cordoba (Spain); Caro, Pilar [MR Unit, Dadisa, Cadiz (Spain); Vida, Jose [San Juan De Dios Hospital, MR Unit, Resalta, Cordoba (Spain); Erasmus, Jeremy J. [University of Texas, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Primary cardiac neoplasms are rare, and are more commonly benign than malignant. However, metastases are by far the most common cardiac neoplasms. MRI allows evaluation of myocardial infiltration, pericardial involvement and/or extracardiac extension. MRI overcomes the usual limitations of echocardiography and assesses more accurately changes in cardiac function. Specific tumoral characterization is only possible in cases of myxoma, lipoma, fibroma and hemangioma. Suggestive features of malignancy are right side location, extracardiac extension, inhomogeneity in signal intensity of the tumor and pericardial effusion. The use of intravenous contrast material improves tumor characterization and depiction of tumor borders. MRI also allows differentiation of tumor from other nontumoral masses such as intracavitary tumors or fibromuscular elements of the posterior wall of the right atrium. (orig.)

  14. Marrow signal mimicking tumor on MRI T1-weighted imaging after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in extremity osteosarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiping Deng

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for extremity osteosarcoma can result in a variety of changes of the MRI appearance of tumor and adjacent bone and marrow. Areas of signal change beyond the tumor that represent marrow conversion and not tumor progression appear on T1 weighted imaging to be lower in signal than subcutaneous fat and higher in signal than muscle. Recognizing the existence of the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the MR appearance of the tumor and surrounding bone and myeloid elements is important so as to plan for oncological sound tumor resections while avoiding resecting more normal bone than necessary.

  15. A Systematic Review of Non-Echo Planar Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Detection of Primary and Postoperative Cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Egmond, Sylvia L; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko; Aarts, Mark C J

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of non-echo planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) for primary and recurrent/residual (postoperative) cholesteatoma in adults (≥18 years) after canal wall up surgery. We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane up to October 22, 2014. All studies investigating non-echo planar DW-MRI for primary and postoperative cholesteatoma were selected and critically appraised for relevance and validity. In total, 779 unique articles were identified, of which 23 articles were included for critical appraisal. Seven articles met our criteria for relevance and validity for postoperative cholesteatoma. Four studies were additionally included for subgroup analysis of primary cases only. Ranges of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value yielded 43%-92%, 58%-100%, 50%-100% and 64%-100%, respectively. Results for primary subgroup analysis were 83%-100%, 50%-100%, 85%-100%, and 50%-100%, respectively. Results for subgroup analysis for only postoperative cases yielded 80%-82%, 90%-100%, 96%-100%, 64%-85%, respectively. Despite a higher prevalence of cholesteatoma in the primary cases, there was no clinical difference in added value of DW-MRI between primary and postoperative cases. We found a high predictive value of non-echo planar DW-MRI for the detection of primary and postoperative cholesteatoma. Given the moderate quality of evidence, we strongly recommend both the use of non-echo planar DW-MRI scans for the follow-up after cholesteatoma surgery, and when the correct diagnosis is questioned in primary preoperative cases. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  16. Metabolic brain imaging correlated with clinical features of brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alavi, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.; Chawluk, J.; Powlis, W.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Nineteen adults with brain tumors have been studied with positron emission tomography utilizing FDG. Fourteen had biopsy proven cerebral malignant glioma, one each had meningioma, hemangiopericytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), two had unbiopsied lesions, and one patient had an area of biopsy proven radiation necrosis. Three different patterns of glucose metabolism are observed: marked increase in metabolism at the site of the known tumor in (10 high grade gliomas and the PNET), lower than normal metabolism at the tumor (in 1 grade II glioma, 3 grade III gliomas, 2 unbiopsied low density nonenhancing lesions, and the meningioma), no abnormality (1 enhancing glioma, the hemangiopericytoma and the radiation necrosis.) The metabolic rate of the tumor or the surrounding brain did not appear to be correlated with the history of previous irradiation or chemotherapy. Decreased metabolism was frequently observed in the rest of the affected hemisphere and in the contralateral cerebellum. Tumors of high grade or with enhancing CT characteristics were more likely to show increased metabolism. Among the patients with proven gliomas, survival after PETT scan tended to be longer for those with low metabolic activity tumors than for those with highly active tumors. The authors conclude that PETT may help to predict the malignant potential of tumors, and may add useful clinical information to the CT scan.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of soft-tissue tumors of the extremities: A practical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wing; P; Chan

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of extremity soft-tissue tumors can be challenging.Characteristics of tumor margins can help precisely identify locally aggressive or non-aggressive behavior for surgical planning,but cannot differentiate benign from malignant lesions.Most malignant tumors can have inhomogeneous signals on T2-weighted images.Although a uniform signal on T2-weighted images can be a reliable indication of a benign lesion,a well-defined mass with homogeneous internal signal intensity does not definitively identify a benign lesion.Some common and distinctive soft-tissue lesions can have specific clinical and imaging features allowing a diagnosis without biopsy.These are known as determinate lesions.This illustrative report presents a diagnostic guide for extremity soft-tissue tumors based on tissue signal and morphological characteristics on magnetic resonance images.It is important for clinicians to be familiar with the imaging characteristics of common determinate lesions.

  18. Detection of Brain Tumor and Extraction of Texture Features using Magnetic Resonance Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Dilip Kumar Gandhi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain Cancer Detection system is designed. Aim of this paper is to locate the tumor and determine the texture features from a Brain Cancer affected MRI. A computer based diagnosis is performed in order to detect the tumors from given Magnetic Resonance Image. Basic image processing techniques are used to locate the tumor region. Basic techniques consist of image enhancement, image bianarization, and image morphological operations. Texture features are computed using the Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix. Texture features consists of five distinct features. Selective features or the combination of selective features will be used in the future to determine the class of the query image. Astrocytoma type of Brain Cancer affected images are used only for simplicity

  19. A Comparison of Imaging Techniques to Monitor Tumor Growth and Cancer Progression in Living Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Puaux

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Purpose. Monitoring solid tumor growth and metastasis in small animals is important for cancer research. Noninvasive techniques make longitudinal studies possible, require fewer animals, and have greater statistical power. Such techniques include FDG positron emission tomography (FDG-PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and optical imaging, comprising bioluminescence imaging (BLI and fluorescence imaging (FLI. This study compared the performance and usability of these methods in the context of mouse tumor studies. Methods. B16 tumor-bearing mice (n=4 for each study were used to compare practicality, performance for small tumor detection and tumor burden measurement. Using RETAAD mice, which develop spontaneous melanomas, we examined the performance of MRI (n=6 mice and FDG-PET (n=10 mice for tumor identification. Results. Overall, BLI and FLI were the most practical techniques tested. Both BLI and FDG-PET identified small nonpalpable tumors, whereas MRI and FLI only detected macroscopic, clinically evident tumors. FDG-PET and MRI performed well in the identification of tumors in terms of specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value. Conclusion. Each of the four methods has different strengths that must be understood before selecting them for use.

  20. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining.

  1. The efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging and color Doppler ultrasonography in diagnosis of salivary gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davachi, Behrooz; Imanimoghaddam, Mahrokh; Majidi, Mohamad Reza; Sahebalam, Ahmad; Johari, Masoomeh; Javadian Langaroodi, Adineh; Shakeri, Mohamad Taghi

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Although salivary gland tumors are not very common, early diagnosis and treatment is crucial because of their proximity to vital organs, and therefore, determining the efficacy of new imaging procedures becomes important. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and color doppler ultrasonography parameters in the diagnosis and differentiation of benign and malignant salivary gland tumors. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional study, color doppler ultrasonography and MRI were performed for 22 patients with salivary gland tumor. Demographic data as well as MRI, color doppler ultrasonography, and surgical parameters including tumor site, signal in MRI images, ultrasound echo, tumor border, lymphadenopathy, invasion, perfusion, vascular resistance index (RI), vascular pulse index (PI) were analyzed using Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and independent t-test. Results. The mean age of patients was 46.59±13.97 years (8 males and 14females). Patients with malignant tumors were older (P color doppler ultrasonography in determining tumor site was 100% and 95%, respectively. No significant difference observed between RI and PI and the diagnosis of tumor. Conclusion. Both MRI and ultrasonography have high accuracy in the localization of tumors. Well-identified border was a sign of benign tumors. Also, invasion to adjacent structures was a predictive factor for malignancy.

  2. MR imaging findings in granular cell tumor of the neurohypophysis: a difficult preoperative diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, A.; Arias, M.; Brasa, J. [Unidad de Resonancia Magnetica (MEDTEC), Hospital Xeral-Cies, Vigo (Spain); Paramo, C. [Servicio de Endocrinologia, Hospital Xeral-Cies, Vigo (Spain); Conde, C. [Servicio de Neurocirugia, Hospital Xeral-Cies, Vigo (Spain); Fernandez, R. [Servicio de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Xeral-Cies, Vigo (Spain)

    2000-12-01

    Granular cell tumor is a rare neoplasm arising within the neurohypophysis. We describe the MR imaging findings in two symptomatic patients. In one patient with history of panhypopituitarism, MR images showed a large sellar and suprasellar mass. The other patient presented with acute loss of vision in her left eye, and MR images showed a suprasellar mass with compression of the optic chiasm. (orig.)

  3. Polyoxazoline multivalently conjugated with indocyanine green for sensitive in vivo photoacoustic imaging of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazaki, Kengo; Sano, Kohei; Makino, Akira; Homma, Tsutomu; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2016-09-26

    Photoacoustic imaging, which enables high-resolution imaging in deep tissues, has lately attracted considerable attention. For tumor imaging, photoacoustic probes have been proposed to enhance the photoacoustic effect to improve detection sensitivity. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of using a biocompatible hydrophilic polymer, polyoxazoline, conjugated with indocyanine green (ICG) as a tumor-targeted photoacoustic probe via enhanced permeability and retention effect. ICG molecules were multivalently conjugated to partially hydrolyzed polyoxazoline, thereby serving as highly sensitive photoacoustic probes. Interestingly, loading multiple ICG molecules to polyoxazoline significantly enhanced photoacoustic signal intensity under the same ICG concentration. In vivo biodistribution studies using tumor bearing mice demonstrated that 5% hydrolyzed polyoxazoline (50 kDa) conjugated with ICG (ICG/polyoxazoline = 7.8), P14-ICG7.8, showed relatively high tumor accumulation (9.4%ID/g), resulting in delivery of the highest dose of ICG among the probes tested. P14-ICG7.8 enabled clear visualization of the tumor regions by photoacoustic imaging 24 h after administration; the photoacoustic signal increased in proportion with the injected dose. In addition, the signal intensity in blood vessels in the photoacoustic images did not show much change, which was attributed to the high tumor-to-blood ratios of P14-ICG7.8. These results suggest that polyoxazoline-ICG would serve as a robust probe for sensitive photoacoustic tumor imaging.

  4. Emphasis on the MR imaging findings of brown tumor: a report of five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Won Sun; Sung, Mi Sook; Chun, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Jee-Young; Lim, Hyun Wook; Lim, Yeon Soo; Yoo, Won Jong; Chung, Myung Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sosa-dong, Bucheon, Kyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun-Won [Seoul National University, College of Medicine, Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dongjak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Haeng [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Sosa-dong, Bucheon, Kyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Brown tumors are focal reactive osteolytic lesions that are encountered in patients with primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism, and these tumors have nonspecific magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings. However, there are only a few reports on MR imaging of brown tumors. The purpose of this study is to describe the spectrum of MR imaging findings of brown tumors. The MR imaging features of five patients with clinical and pathological evidence of brown tumor were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists. The patients had primary hyperparathyroidism, which was confirmed as parathyroid adenoma (n = 2) and parathyroid carcinoma (n = 3). The MR images were evaluated for the presence of solid or cystic portions, the signal intensity of the lesions, the contrast enhancement pattern and the presence of cortex destruction and fluid-fluid levels. Twelve bone lesions were detected on the MR images of five patients; three lesions in two patients, four lesions in one patient, and one lesion in two patients. The tumor was solid in three lesions, mixed solid and cystic in four, and cystic in five. All the solid lesions were accompanied by mixed lesions. Discontinuity of the cortex and adjacent soft-tissue enhancement were seen in all the solid lesions. Fluid-fluid levels were seen in two cases within the cystic component of the mixed lesions and cystic lesions. The five patients with brown tumor demonstrated a wide spectrum of MR imaging findings. There are few lesions that are osteolytic on the radiographs and that show a short T2 on MR imaging, such as brown tumor. Multiple cystic or mixed lesions are the expected findings of brown tumors. (orig.)

  5. Planar quadrature RF transceiver design using common-mode differential-mode (CMDM transmission line method for 7T MR imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Li

    Full Text Available The use of quadrature RF magnetic fields has been demonstrated to be an efficient method to reduce transmit power and to increase the signal-to-noise (SNR in magnetic resonance (MR imaging. The goal of this project was to develop a new method using the common-mode and differential-mode (CMDM technique for compact, planar, distributed-element quadrature transmit/receive resonators for MR signal excitation and detection and to investigate its performance for MR imaging, particularly, at ultrahigh magnetic fields. A prototype resonator based on CMDM method implemented by using microstrip transmission line was designed and fabricated for 7T imaging. Both the common mode (CM and the differential mode (DM of the resonator were tuned and matched at 298MHz independently. Numerical electromagnetic simulation was performed to verify the orthogonal B1 field direction of the two modes of the CMDM resonator. Both workbench tests and MR imaging experiments were carried out to evaluate the performance. The intrinsic decoupling between the two modes of the CMDM resonator was demonstrated by the bench test, showing a better than -36 dB transmission coefficient between the two modes at resonance frequency. The MR images acquired by using each mode and the images combined in quadrature showed that the CM and DM of the proposed resonator provided similar B1 coverage and achieved SNR improvement in the entire region of interest. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed CMDM method with distributed-element transmission line technique is a feasible and efficient technique for planar quadrature RF coil design at ultrahigh fields, providing intrinsic decoupling between two quadrature channels and high frequency capability. Due to its simple and compact geometry and easy implementation of decoupling methods, the CMDM quadrature resonator can possibly be a good candidate for design blocks in multichannel RF coil arrays.

  6. Planar quadrature RF transceiver design using common-mode differential-mode (CMDM) transmission line method for 7T MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Yu, Baiying; Pang, Yong; Vigneron, Daniel B; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2013-01-01

    The use of quadrature RF magnetic fields has been demonstrated to be an efficient method to reduce transmit power and to increase the signal-to-noise (SNR) in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The goal of this project was to develop a new method using the common-mode and differential-mode (CMDM) technique for compact, planar, distributed-element quadrature transmit/receive resonators for MR signal excitation and detection and to investigate its performance for MR imaging, particularly, at ultrahigh magnetic fields. A prototype resonator based on CMDM method implemented by using microstrip transmission line was designed and fabricated for 7T imaging. Both the common mode (CM) and the differential mode (DM) of the resonator were tuned and matched at 298MHz independently. Numerical electromagnetic simulation was performed to verify the orthogonal B1 field direction of the two modes of the CMDM resonator. Both workbench tests and MR imaging experiments were carried out to evaluate the performance. The intrinsic decoupling between the two modes of the CMDM resonator was demonstrated by the bench test, showing a better than -36 dB transmission coefficient between the two modes at resonance frequency. The MR images acquired by using each mode and the images combined in quadrature showed that the CM and DM of the proposed resonator provided similar B1 coverage and achieved SNR improvement in the entire region of interest. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed CMDM method with distributed-element transmission line technique is a feasible and efficient technique for planar quadrature RF coil design at ultrahigh fields, providing intrinsic decoupling between two quadrature channels and high frequency capability. Due to its simple and compact geometry and easy implementation of decoupling methods, the CMDM quadrature resonator can possibly be a good candidate for design blocks in multichannel RF coil arrays.

  7. Localization of tamoxifen in human breast cancer tumors by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Végvári, Ákos; Shavkunov, Alexander S; Fehniger, Thomas E; Grabau, Dorthe; Niméus, Emma; Marko-Varga, György

    2016-03-01

    Tamoxifen is used in endocrine treatment of breast cancer to inhibit estrogen signaling. A set of stratified ER-positive and ER-negative tumor sections was subjected to manual deposition of tamoxifen solution in order to investigate its spatial distribution upon exposure to interaction within thin tissue sections. The localization of tamoxifen in tumor sections was assessed by matrix assisted laser deposition/ionization mass spectrometry imaging. The images of extracted ion maps were analyzed for comparison of signal intensity distributions. The precursor ion of tamoxifen (m/z 372.233) displayed heterogeneous signal intensity distributions in histological compartments of tumor tissue sections. The levels of tamoxifen in tumor cells compared with stroma were higher in ER-positive tissues, whereas ER-negative tissue sections showed lower signal intensities in tumor cells. The experimental model was successfully applied on frozen tumor samples allowing for differentiation between ER groups based on distribution of tamoxifen.

  8. Development of image-processing software for automatic segmentation of brain tumors in MR images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Vijayakumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the commercially available software for brain tumor segmentation have limited functionality and frequently lack the careful validation that is required for clinical studies. We have developed an image-analysis software package called ′Prometheus,′ which performs neural system-based segmentation operations on MR images using pre-trained information. The software also has the capability to improve its segmentation performance by using the training module of the neural system. The aim of this article is to present the design and modules of this software. The segmentation module of Prometheus can be used primarily for image analysis in MR images. Prometheus was validated against manual segmentation by a radiologist and its mean sensitivity and specificity was found to be 85.71±4.89% and 93.2±2.87%, respectively. Similarly, the mean segmentation accuracy and mean correspondence ratio was found to be 92.35±3.37% and 0.78±0.046, respectively.

  9. Development of 68Ga-Glycopeptide as an Imaging Probe for Tumor Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Tsao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was aimed to study tissue distribution and tumor imaging potential of 68Ga-glycopeptide (GP in tumor-bearing rodents by PET. Methods. GP was synthesized by conjugating glutamate peptide and chitosan. GP was labeled with 68Ga chloride for in vitro and in vivo studies. Computer outlined region of interest (counts per pixel of the tumor and muscle (at the symmetric site was used to determine tumor-to-muscle count density ratios. To ascertain the feasibility of 68Ga-GP in tumor imaging in large animals, PET/CT imaging of 68Ga-GP and 18F-FDG were conducted in New Zealand white rabbits bearing VX2 tumors. Standard uptake value of tumors were determined by PET up to 45 min. To determine blood clearance and half-life of 68Ga-GP, blood samples were collected from 10 seconds to 20 min. Results. Radiochemical purity of 68Ga-GP determined by instant thin-layer chromatography was >95%. Tumor uptake values (SUV for 68Ga-GP and 18F-FDG in New Zealand white rabbits bearing VX2 tumors were 3.25 versus 7.04. PET images in tumor-bearing rats and rabbits confirmed that 68Ga-GP could assess tumor uptake. From blood clearance curve, the half-life of 68Ga-GP was 1.84 hr. Conclusion Our data indicate that it is feasible to use 68Ga-GP to assess tumor angiogenesis.

  10. Tumor scintigraphy by the method for subtracting the initial image with technetium-99m labeled antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karube, Yoshiharu; Katsuno, Kentaro; Ito, Sanae; Matsunaga, Kazuhisa; Takata, Jiro [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Kuroki, Masahide; Murakami, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Yuji

    1999-12-01

    The method for subtracting the initial image from the localization image was evaluated for radioimmunoscintigraphy of tumors with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) labeled antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies were parental mouse and mouse-human chimeric antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), designated F11-39 and ChF11-39, respectively, both of which have been found to discriminate CEA in tumor tissues from the CEA-related antigens. After reduction of the intrinsic disulfide bonds, these antibodies were labeled with Tc-99m. In vivo studies were performed on athymic nude mice bearing the human CEA-producing gastric carcinoma xenografts. Though biodistribution results showed selective and progressive accumulation of Tc-99m labeled antibodies at the tumor site, high radioactivity in blood was inappropriate for scintigraphic visualization of the tumors within a few hours. We examined the subtraction of the initial Tc-99m image from the Tc-99m localization image after a few hours. Subtracted images of the same count reflected the in vivo behavior of the Tc-99m radioactivity. The subtracted scintigrams revealed excellent tumor images with no significant extrarenal background. Visualization of the tumor site was dependent on antigen-specific binding and nonspecific exudation. These results demonstrate that a method of subtraction of the initial image may serve as a potentially useful diagnostic method for an abnormal site for agents with a low pharmacokinetic value. (author)

  11. Imaging of whole tumor cut sections using a novel scanning beam confocal fluorescence MACROscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Paul; Vukovic, Vojislav; Haugland, Hans K.; Nicklee, Trudey; Hedley, David W.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2001-07-01

    Hypoxia caused by inadequate structure and function of the tumor vasculature has been found to negatively determine the prognosis of cancer patients. Hence, understanding the biological basis of tumor hypoxia is of significant clinical interest. To study solid tumor microenvironments in sufficient detail, large areas (several mm in diameter) need to be imaged at micrometers resolutions. We have used a novel confocal scanning laser MACROscopeTM (CSLM) capable of acquiring images over fields of view up to 2 cm X 2 cm. To demonstrate its performance, frozen sections from a cervical carcinoma xenograft were triple labeled for tissue hypoxia, blood vessels and hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1 alpha (HIF-1(alpha) ), imaged using the CSLM and compared to images obtained using a standard epifluorescence microscope imaging system. The results indicate that the CSLM is a useful instrument for imaging tissue-based fluorescence at resolutions comparable to standard low-power microscope objectives.

  12. Longitudinal imaging studies of tumor microenvironment in mice treated with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Saito

    Full Text Available Rapamycin is an allosteric inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin, and inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Recent studies suggested a possibility that rapamycin renormalizes aberrant tumor vasculature and improves tumor oxygenation. The longitudinal effects of rapamycin on angiogenesis and tumor oxygenation were evaluated in murine squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII by electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to identify an optimal time after rapamycin treatment for enhanced tumor radioresponse. Rapamycin treatment was initiated on SCCVII solid tumors 8 days after implantation (500-750 mm(3 and measurements of tumor pO(2 and blood volume were conducted from day 8 to 14 by EPRI/MRI. Microvessel density was evaluated over the same time period by immunohistochemical analysis. Tumor blood volume as measured by MRI significantly decreased 2 days after rapamycin treatment. Tumor pO(2 levels modestly but significantly increased 2 days after rapamycin treatment; whereas, it decreased in non-treated control tumors. Furthermore, the fraction of hypoxic area (pixels with pO(2<10 mm Hg in the tumor region decreased 2 days after rapamycin treatments. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor microvessel density and pericyte coverage revealed that microvessel density decreased 2 days after rapamycin treatment, but pericyte coverage did not change, similar to what was seen with anti-angiogenic agents such as sunitinib which cause vascular renormalization. Collectively, EPRI/MRI co-imaging can provide non-invasive evidence of rapamycin-induced vascular renormalization and resultant transient increase in tumor oxygenation. Improved oxygenation by rapamycin treatment provides a temporal window for anti-cancer therapies to realize enhanced response to radiotherapy.

  13. Tracking tumor boundary in MV-EPID images without implanted markers: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyong@ieee.org; Homma, Noriyasu, E-mail: homma@ieee.org [Department of Radiological Imaging and Informatics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Ichiji, Kei, E-mail: ichiji@yoshizawa.ecei.tohoku.ac.jp [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Takai, Yoshihiro, E-mail: y-takai@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki 036-8562 (Japan); Yoshizawa, Makoto, E-mail: yoshizawa@yoshizawa.ecei.tohoku.ac.jp [Research Division on Advanced Information Technology, Cyberscience Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a markerless tracking algorithm to track the tumor boundary in megavoltage (MV)-electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for image-guided radiation therapy. Methods: A level set method (LSM)-based algorithm is developed to track tumor boundary in EPID image sequences. Given an EPID image sequence, an initial curve is manually specified in the first frame. Driven by a region-scalable energy fitting function, the initial curve automatically evolves toward the tumor boundary and stops on the desired boundary while the energy function reaches its minimum. For the subsequent frames, the tracking algorithm updates the initial curve by using the tracking result in the previous frame and reuses the LSM to detect the tumor boundary in the subsequent frame so that the tracking processing can be continued without user intervention. The tracking algorithm is tested on three image datasets, including a 4-D phantom EPID image sequence, four digitally deformable phantom image sequences with different noise levels, and four clinical EPID image sequences acquired in lung cancer treatment. The tracking accuracy is evaluated based on two metrics: centroid localization error (CLE) and volume overlap index (VOI) between the tracking result and the ground truth. Results: For the 4-D phantom image sequence, the CLE is 0.23 ± 0.20 mm, and VOI is 95.6% ± 0.2%. For the digital phantom image sequences, the total CLE and VOI are 0.11 ± 0.08 mm and 96.7% ± 0.7%, respectively. In addition, for the clinical EPID image sequences, the proposed algorithm achieves 0.32 ± 0.77 mm in the CLE and 72.1% ± 5.5% in the VOI. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the authors’ proposed method both in tumor localization and boundary tracking in EPID images. In addition, compared with two existing tracking algorithms, the proposed method achieves a higher accuracy in tumor localization. Conclusions: In this paper, the authors presented a feasibility study of tracking

  14. Three-dimensional segmentation of the tumor in computed tomographic images of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglint, Hanford J; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Ayres, Fábio J; Boag, Graham S; Zuffo, Marcelo K

    2007-09-01

    Segmentation of the tumor in neuroblastoma is complicated by the fact that the mass is almost always heterogeneous in nature; furthermore, viable tumor, necrosis, and normal tissue are often intermixed. Tumor definition and diagnosis require the analysis of the spatial distribution and Hounsfield unit (HU) values of voxels in computed tomography (CT) images, coupled with a knowledge of normal anatomy. Segmentation and analysis of the tissue composition of the tumor can assist in quantitative assessment of the response to therapy and in the planning of the delayed surgery for resection of the tumor. We propose methods to achieve 3-dimensional segmentation of the neuroblastic tumor. In our scheme, some of the normal structures expected in abdominal CT images are delineated and removed from further consideration; the remaining parts of the image volume are then examined for tumor mass. Mathematical morphology, fuzzy connectivity, and other image processing tools are deployed for this purpose. Expert knowledge provided by a radiologist in the form of the expected structures and their shapes, HU values, and radiological characteristics are incorporated into the segmentation algorithm. In this preliminary study, the methods were tested with 10 CT exams of four cases from the Alberta Children's Hospital. False-negative error rates of less than 12% were obtained in eight of 10 exams; however, seven of the exams had false-positive error rates of more than 20% with respect to manual segmentation of the tumor by a radiologist.

  15. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jie; Cozzi, Paul; Hung, Tzong-Tyng; Hao, Jingli; Graham, Peter; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA) imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8). Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r(2) = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively) and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  16. Neuroimaging of pediatric brain tumors: from basic to advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahy, Ashok; Blüml, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    In this review, the basic magnetic resonance concepts used in the imaging approach of a pediatric brain tumor are described with respect to different factors including understanding the significance of the patient's age. Also discussed are other factors directly related to the magnetic resonance scan itself including evaluating the location of the tumor, determining if the lesion is extra-axial or intra-axial, and evaluating the contrast characteristics of the lesion. Of note, there are key imaging features of pediatric brain tumors, which can give information about the cellularity of the lesion, which can then be confirmed with advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. The second part of this review will provide an overview of the major advanced MRI techniques used in pediatric imaging, particularly, magnetic resonance diffusion, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and magnetic resonance perfusion. The last part of the review will provide more specific information about the use of advanced magnetic resonance techniques in the evaluation of pediatric brain tumors.

  17. MR imaging findings of pineal germinoma: focus on differential diagnosis from other germ cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Lee, Ho Kyu; Kim, Jae Kyun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Lee, Myung Jun; Ham, Soo Youn; Lee, Jong Hwa; Suh, Dae Chul [Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    To determine the characteristic MR imaging findings of pineal germinoma, and differential diagnosis from other germ cell tumors. MR images of patients with histopathologically proven pineal germinoma(n=3D14) and other pineal germ cell tumors(n=3D10) were retrospectively analyzed with regard to size, signal intensity and homogeneity, enhancing features, cyst formation, and multiplicity of lesions. Other pineal germ cell tumors were the mixed germ cell tumors (n=3D4), malignant teratomas (n=3D3), choriocarcinoma(n=3D1), embryonal carcinoma(n=3D1), and endodermal sinus tumor(n=3D1). Tumor markers were evaluated. On T1-weighted images, germinomas showed homogeneous(86%) or iso signal intensity (93%), while other germ cell tumors showed inhomogeneous(70%) or iso signal intensity(70%). On T2-weighted images, germinomas showed homogeneous(64%) or iso signal intensity(57%), while other germ cell tumors showed inhomogeneous(70%) or high signal intensity(80%). On Gd-DTPA enhanced images, germinomas showed homogeneous (93%) or strong enhancement (64%), while other germ cell tumors showed homogeneous(60%) or strong enhancement (70%). Cyst formation was noted in ten Patients (71%) with germinoma and in six (60%) with other germ cell tumors. Invasion on surrounding structures was seen in 11 patients (79%) with germinoma and in five (50%) with other germ cell tumors. Lesions were multiple in three patients(21%) with germinoma. Thirteen of 14 patients with germinoma had normal serum {alpha}-FP(tetoprotein) and {beta}-HCG(human chononic gonafotrophin) levels. Two of four patients with mixed germ cell tumors had elevated serum {beta}-FP and {alpha}-HCG levels; in the ther two, elevated serum {alpha}-FP or {beta}-HCG levels were noted. In the malignant teratoma and embryonal carcinoma patients, serum {alpha}-FP and {beta}-HCG levels were normal. The patient with choriocarcinoma had an elevated serum {beta}-HCG level. On T1W1, the only significant differential point (p<0.01) between

  18. Cardiac tumors: optimal cardiac MR sequences and spectrum of imaging appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the optimal cardiac MRI sequences for and the spectrum of imaging appearances of cardiac tumors. CONCLUSION: Recent technologic advances in cardiac MRI have resulted in the rapid acquisition of images of the heart with high spatial and temporal resolution and excellent myocardial tissue characterization. Cardiac MRI provides optimal assessment of the location, functional characteristics, and soft-tissue features of cardiac tumors, allowing accurate differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  19. Fluorescence microscopy studies of a peripheral-benzodiazepine-receptor-targeted molecular probe for brain tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura; Vernier, P. Thomas; Manning, H. Charles; Salemi, Sarah; Li, Aimin; Craft, Cheryl M.; Gundersen, Martin A.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2003-10-01

    This study investigates the potential of a new multi-modal lanthanide chelate complex for specifically targeting brain tumor cells. We report here results from ongoing studies of up-take, sub-cellular localization and binding specificity of this new molecular imaging probe. Fluorescence microscopy investigations in living rat C6 glioma tumor cells demonstrate that the new imaging agent has affinity for glioma cells and binds to mitochondria.

  20. Sonographic classification of testicular tumors by tissue harmonic imaging: experience of 58 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Atsuo; Hatano, Tadashi; Saito, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Rie; Nagao, Toshitaka; Sanada, Shigeru

    2017-03-20

    To evaluate the relationship between our proposed sonographic classification of testicular tumors by tissue harmonic imaging and histological type. We retrospectively analyzed 58 testicular tumors and tumor-like lesions [seminomatous germ cell tumor (SGCT): 28; non-seminomatous germ cell tumor (NSGCT): 16; lymphoid and hematopoietic tumor (LHT): 7; Leydig cell tumor: 1; epidermal cyst: 2; and tumor of paratesticular structure (TPS): 4]. We divided a sonographic image into six types for morphological criteria and three types for color Doppler criteria. We examined the relationship between the sonographic classification and histological type. For morphological criteria, there were 21 cases of Type I (36%), 15 Type II (26%), 9 Type III (15%), five Type IV (9%), five Type V (9%), and three Type VI (5%). For color Doppler criteria, there were 47 cases classified as hypervascular (81%), eight as hypovascular (14%), and three as avascular (5%). Most of the SGCTs were divided into types I and II; the NSGCTs into types III, IV, and V; the LHTs into only type II; and the TPSs into type VI. We established a sonographic classification of testicular tumors with various histological types. This sonographic classification is potentially useful for estimating the histological type of testicular tumors.

  1. Imaging and surgical outcomes of spinal tumors in 18 dogs and one cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliskan, Murat; Can, Pinar; Vural, Sevil Atalay; Algin, Oktay; Ahlat, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, histological appearances and surgical outcomes of 18 dogs and one cat with spinal tumors are presented. Medical records of the cases admitted for spinal disorders were reviewed, and cases of spinal tumors that were diagnosed by MRI and confirmed by histological examination were included in this study. T1 weighted, T2 weighted and contrast enhanced T1 weighted images were taken and interpreted to evaluate the spinal tumors. The tumors were diagnosed as: meningioma (n = 6), ependymoma (n = 1), nerve sheath tumor (n = 4), metastatic spinal tumor (n = 3), osteosarcoma (n = 2), osteoma (n = 1), rhabdomyosarcoma (n = 1), and nephroblastoma (n = 1). Thirteen cases underwent surgical operation and the remaining six cases were euthanized at the request of the owners. The neurological status of the surgical cases did not deteriorate, except for one dog that showed ependymoma in the early period after the operation. These results indicate the potential for surgical gross total tumor removal of vertebral tumors to provide better quality of life and surgical collection of histological specimens for definitive diagnosis. For effective case management, dedicated MRI examination is important to accurate evaluation of the spinal tumors, and surgical treatment is useful for extradural and intradural-extramedullary spinal tumors. PMID:26645333

  2. Ultrasmall near-infrared gold nanoclusters for tumor fluorescence imaging in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xie, Can; Zhou, Bing; Qing, Zhihe

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we explore the possibility of using ultrasmall near-infrared (NIR) gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) as novel contrast imaging agents for tumor fluorescence imaging in vivo. The fluorescence imaging signal of the tail vein administrated AuNCs in living organisms can spectrally be well distinguished from the background with maximum emission wavelength at about 710 nm, and the high photostability of AuNCs promises continuous imaging in vivo. The uptake of AuNCs by the reticuloendothelial system is relatively low in comparison with other nanoparticle-based contrast imaging agents due to their ultrasmall hydrodynamic size (~2.7 nm). Through the body weight change analysis, the results show that the body weight of the mice administrated with AuNCs has not been changed obviously in comparison with that of the control mice injected with PBS. Furthermore, using MDA-MB-45 and Hela tumor xenograft models, in vivo and ex vivo imaging studies show that the ultrasmall NIR AuNCs are able to be highly accumulated in the tumor areas, thanks to the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effects. And the tumor-to-background ratio is about 15 for 6 h postinjection. The results indicate that the ultrasmall NIR AuNCs appear as very promising contrast imaging agents for in vivo fluorescence tumor imaging.

  3. In vivo tomographic imaging with fluorescence and MRI using tumor-targeted dual-labeled nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yue Zhang,1 Bin Zhang,1 Fei Liu,1,2 Jianwen Luo,1,3 Jing Bai1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, 2Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, 3Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Dual-modality imaging combines the complementary advantages of different modalities, and offers the prospect of improved preclinical research. The combination of fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides cross-validated information and direct comparison between these modalities. Here, we report on the application of a novel tumor-targeted, dual-labeled nanoparticle (NP, utilizing iron oxide as the MRI contrast agent and near infrared (NIR dye Cy5.5 as the fluorescent agent. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the NP to tumor cells. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the NPs in a mouse model were visualized by fluorescence and MR imaging collected at different time points. Quantitative analysis was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of MRI contrast enhancement. Furthermore, tomographic images were also acquired using both imaging modalities and cross-validated information of tumor location and size between these two modalities was revealed. The results demonstrate that the use of dual-labeled NPs can facilitate the dual-modal detection of tumors, information cross-validation, and direct comparison by combing fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT and MRI. Keywords: dual-modality, fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, nanoparticle

  4. A preliminary study of imaging paclitaxel-induced tumor apoptosis with 99Tcm-His10-Annexin V

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yu-min; WANG Feng; FANG Wei; HUA Zi-chun; WANG Zi-zheng; MENG Qing-le; YAN Jue

    2013-01-01

    Backgroud In tumors the process of apoptosis occurs over an interval of time after chemotherapy.It is important to determine the best time for detecting apoptosis by in vivo imaging.In this study,we evaluated the dynamics and feasibility of imaging non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) apoptosis induced by paclitaxel treatment using a 99Tcm-labeled Annexin V recombinant with ten consecutive histidines (His10-Annexin V) in a mouse model.Methods 99Tcm-His10-Annexin V was prepared by one step direct labeling; radio-chemical purity (RCP) and radio-stability was tested.The binding of 99Tcm-His10-Annexin V to apoptotic cells was validated in vitro using camptothecin-induced Jurkat cells.In vivo bio-distribution was determined in mice by dissection.The human H460 NSCLC tumor cell line (H460) tumor-bearing mice were treated with intravenous paclitaxel 24,48 and 72 hours later.99Tcm-His10-Annexin V was injected intravenously,and planar images were acquired at 2,4 and 6 hours post-injection on a dual-head gamma camera fitted with a pinhole collimator.Tumor-to-normal tissue ratios (T/NT) were calculated by ROI analysis and they reflected specific binding of 99Tcm-His10-Annexin V.Mice were sacrificed after imaging.Caspase-3,as the apoptosis detector,was determined by flow cytometry,and DNA fragmentation was analyzed by the terminal deoxynucleotidytransferase mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay.Nonspecific accumulation of protein was estimated using bovine serum albumin (BSA).The imaging data were correlated with TUNEL-positive nuclei and caspase-3 activity.Results 99Tcm-His10-Annexin V had a RCP >98% and high stability 2 hours after radio-labeling,and it could bind to apoptotic cells with high affinity.Bio-distribution of 99Tcm-His10-Annexin V showed predominant uptake in kidney,relatively low uptake in myocardium,liver and gastrointestinal tract,and rapid clearance from blood and kidney was observed.The T/NT was significantly increased after paclitaxel treatment

  5. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  6. NI-78LABEL-FREE MULTIPHOTON MICROSCOPY: A NOVEL TOOL FOR THE IMAGING OF BRAIN TUMORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uckermann, Ortrud; Galli, Roberta; Geiger, Kathrin; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Changes in tissue composition caused by brain tumor growth involve a series of complex biochemical alterations which can be imaged on unstained native tissue using multiphoton microscopy: We used coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging that resonantly excites the symmetric stretching vibration of CH2 groups at 2850 cm−1 and visualizes lipid content in combination with imaging of endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) to discern different types of tumors from normal tissue in unstained, native brain samples. Experimental brain tumors were induced in nude mice NMRI nu/nu (n = 25) by stereotactic implantation of glioblastoma (U87), melanoma (A375) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cell lines. Label-free multiphoton microscopy of brain cryosections provided exhaustive information of the tumor morphochemistry. The tumor border was defined with cellular resolution by a strong reduction of CARS signal intensity to 61% (glioblastoma), 71% (melanoma) and 68% (breast cancer). This reduction of lipid content within the tumor was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. Micrometastases infiltrating normal tissue (size 50 - 200 µm) were identified in glioblastoma and melanoma. Additionally, multiphoton microscopy proved a reduction of CARS signal intensity in all human glioblastoma samples analyzed (to 72%, n = 6). Additionally, relevant SHG and TPEF signals were detected in human primary and secondary brain tumor samples and enabled to image variations in tumor associated vasculature, fibrosis, necrosis and nuclear size and density. All primary or secondary brain tumors investigated were characterized by a lower intensity of the CARS signal, therefore offering a simple tool for objective tumor detection and delineation. The combination of techniques allows retrieving a quantity of information on native unstained tissue which is comparable to H&E staining. Therefore, label-free multiphoton microscopy has the potential to become a

  7. CT-MR image data fusion for computer-assisted navigated surgery of orbital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Stefan Franz [Department of Radiology/Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at; Peloschek, Philipp; Schmook, Maria Theresa; Krestan, Christian Robert [Department of Radiology/Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hauff, Wolfgang [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Matula, Christian [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Czerny, Christian [Department of Radiology/Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the value of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative assessment of orbital tumors, and to present, particularly, CT and MR image data fusion for surgical planning and performance in computer-assisted navigated surgery of orbital tumors. Materials and methods: In this retrospective case series, 10 patients with orbital tumors and associated complaints underwent MDCT and MRI of the orbit. MDCT was performed at high resolution, with a bone window level setting in the axial plane. MRI was performed with an axial 3D T1-weighted (w) gradient-echo (GE) contrast-enhanced sequence, in addition to a standard MRI protocol. First, MDCT and MR images were used to diagnose tumorous lesions compared to histology as a standard of reference. Then, the image data sets from CT and 3D T1-w GE sequences were merged on a workstation to create CT-MR fusion images that were used for interventional planning and intraoperative image guidance. The intraoperative accuracy of the navigation unit was measured, defined as the deviation between the same landmark in the navigation image and the patient. Furthermore, the clinical preoperative status was compared to the patients' postoperative outcome. Results: Radiological and histological diagnosis, which revealed 7 benign and 3 malignant tumors, were concordant in 7 of 10 cases (70%). The CT-MR fusion images supported the surgeon in the preoperative planning and improved the surgical performance. The mean intraoperative accuracy of the navigation unit was 1.35 mm. Postoperatively, orbital complaints showed complete regression in 6 cases, were ameliorated notably in 3 cases, and remained unchanged in 1 case. Conclusion: CT and MRI are essential for the preoperative assessment of orbital tumors. CT-MR image data fusion is an accurate tool for planning the correct surgical procedure, and can improve surgical results in computer-assisted navigated surgery of

  8. Solitary fibrous tumors of the central nervous system: clinical features and imaging findings in 22 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Qiang; Zhou, Qing; Li, Shi-Ting; Liao, Chen-Long; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Bi-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm originating in the central nervous system (CNS), with imaging features currently not well known. The purposes were to describe and characterize clinical features and imaging findings of CNS SFT. We retrospectively reviewed computed tomographic (CT; n = 10) and magnetic resonance (MR) images (n = 18) of 22 patients with SFT (13 males and 9 females; mean, 47.6 years) with associated clinical records. Each lesion was found as a solitary, well-defined mass, ranging in size from 12 to 70 mm (mean, 38 mm). The tumor shape was roundlike in 16 cases (72.7%) and irregular in 6 cases (27.2%). The cerebellopontine angle zone was the most affected area (n = 6). On precontrast CT scans, 10 cases showed predominantly hyperattenuation (n = 9) and isoattenuation (n = 1). No lesion contained calcification, and 2 cases showed bone invasions. All 18 tumors examined by MR imaging showed homogeneous hypointensive (n = 5) or isointensive (n = 7) signal intensity and heterogeneous mixed isointense and hypointense signal intensity (n = 6) on T1-weighted images, whereas most tumors were predominantly isointense (n = 13) and hypointense (n = 4) to the cortex on T2-weighted images; on postcontrast CT and MR images, enhancement was marked homogeneous (n = 10) or heterogeneous (n = 12). Fourteen tumors had thickening of the meninges adjacent to the tumor. Although SFT is a rare neoplasm in the CNS, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis. The most affected area is the cerebellopontine angle zone. Solitary fibrous tumor tends to have some imaging features, such as high attenuation on CT, isointense to hypointense signal intensity on MR images, and marked enhancement.

  9. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  10. Assessment and Monitoring Tumor Vascularity With Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Maximum Intensity Persistence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Foygel, Kira; Panje, Cedric M.; Needles, Andrew; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging is increasingly being used in the clinic for assessment of tissue vascularity. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of different contrast administration parameters on the in vivo ultrasound imaging signal in tumor-bearing mice using a maximum intensity persistence (MIP) algorithm and to evaluate the reliability of in vivo MIP imaging in assessing tumor vascularity. The potential of in vivo MIP imaging for monitoring tumor vascularity during antiangiogenic cancer treatment was further evaluated. Materials and Methods In intraindividual experiments, varying contrast microbubble concentrations (5 × 105, 5 × 106, 5 × 107, 5 × 108 microbubbles in 100 µL saline) and contrast injection rates (0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mL/min) in subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice were applied and their effects on in vivo contrast-enhanced ultrasound MIP imaging plateau values were obtained using a dedicated small animal ultrasound imaging system (40 MHz). Reliability of MIP ultrasound imaging was tested following 2 injections of the same micro-bubble concentration (5 × 107 microbubbles at 1.2 mL/min) in the same tumors. In mice with subcutaneous human colon cancer xenografts, longitudinal contrast-enhanced ultrasound MIP imaging plateau values (baseline and at 48 hours) were compared between mice with and without antiangiogenic treatment (anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody). Ex vivo CD31 immunostaining of tumor tissue was used to correlate in vivo MIP imaging plateau values with microvessel density analysis. Results In vivo MIP imaging plateau values correlated significantly (P = 0.001) with contrast microbubble doses. At 3 different injection rates of 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mL/min, MIP imaging plateau values did not change significantly (P = 0.61). Following 2 injections with the same microbubble dose and injection rate, MIP imaging plateau values were obtained with high reliability with an intraclass correlation

  11. The clinical utility of reduced-distortion readout-segmented echo-planar imaging in the head and neck region: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyasu, Sho; Iima, Mami; Umeoka, Shigeaki; Morisawa, Nobuko; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto (Japan); Porter, David A. [Siemens AG, MED MR PLM AW Neurology, Allee am Roethelheimpark 2, Erlangen (Germany); Ito, Juichi [Kyoto University, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto (Japan); Le Bihan, Denis [Kyoto University, Human Brain Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto (Japan); Neurospin, CEA-Saclay Center, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate whether readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RS-EPI) diffusion weighted image (DWI) can diminish image distortion in the head and neck area, compared with single-shot (SS)-EPI DWI. We conducted phantom and patient studies using 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 16-channel coil. For the phantom study, we evaluated distortion and signal homogeneity in gel phantoms. For the patient study, 29 consecutive patients with clinically suspicious parotid lesions were prospectively enrolled. RS-EPI and SS-EPI DWI were evaluated by two independent readers for identification of organ/lesion and distortion, using semiquantitative scales and quantitative scores. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and contrast-noise ratios of parotid tumours (if present; n = 15) were also compared. The phantom experiments showed that RS-EPI provided less distorted and more homogeneous ADC maps than SS-EPI. In the patient study, RS-EPI was found to provide significantly less distortion in almost all organs/lesions (p < 0.05), according to both semiquantitative scales and quantitative scores. There was no significant difference in ADC values and contrast-noise ratios between the two DWI techniques. The distortion in DWI was significantly reduced with RS-EPI in both phantom and patient studies. The RS-EPI technique provided more homogenous images than SS-EPI, and can potentially offer higher image quality in the head and neck area. (orig.)

  12. Dielectric Covered Planar Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llombart Juan, Nuria (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Skalare, Anders J. (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An antenna element suitable for integrated arrays at terahertz frequencies is disclosed. The antenna element comprises an extended spherical (e.g. hemispherical) semiconductor lens, e.g. silicon, antenna fed by a leaky wave waveguide feed. The extended spherical lens comprises a substantially spherical lens adjacent a substantially planar lens extension. A couple of TE/TM leaky wave modes are excited in a resonant cavity formed between a ground plane and the substantially planar lens extension by a waveguide block coupled to the ground plane. Due to these modes, the primary feed radiates inside the lens with a directive pattern that illuminates a small sector of the lens. The antenna structure is compatible with known semiconductor fabrication technology and enables production of large format imaging arrays.

  13. Soft-tissue tumors update: MR imaging features according to the WHO classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilanova, Joan C.; Barcelo, Joaquim; Villalon, Miguel [Clinica Girona, Department of Magnetic Resonance, Girona (Spain); Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Narvaez, Jose A. [Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Martinez, Salutario J. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Miro, Josefina [Clinica Girona, Department of Pathology, Girona (Spain)

    2007-01-15

    Soft-tissue tumors are a large and heterogeneous group of neoplasms. Hence, classification is often difficult. The most effective management decisions are made when a working group participates in the same diagnostic standard criteria in the evaluation of soft-tissue tumors. The purpose of this pictorial review is to highlight the new and the less well-known features on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of soft-tissue tumors according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification established in 2002. The article depicts the major changes of the WHO classification since it was established in 2002 and the most significant findings on MR imaging, thereby providing an update. (orig.)

  14. In vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI): [3,4-(13)CH(2)]glutamate/glutamine tomography in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, F; Renken, R; Rothman, D L

    1999-12-01

    A method for in vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) is described. This method is composed of an echo-planar based acquisition implemented with (13)C-(1)H J editing spectroscopy and is intended for high temporal and spatial resolution in vivo spectroscopic imaging of (13)C turnover, from D-[1,6-(13)C]glucose to glutamate and glutamine, in the brain. At a static magnetic field strength of 7 T, both in vitro and in vivo chemical shift imaging data are presented with a spatial resolution of 8 microL (i.e., 1.25 x 1.25 x 5.00 mm(3)) and a maximum spectral bandwidth of 5.2 ppm in (1)H. Chemical shift imaging data acquired every 11 minutes allowed detection of regional [4-(13)CH(2)]glutamate turnover in rat brain. The [4-(13)CH(2)]glutamate turnover curves, which can be converted to tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes, showed that the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux (V(TCA)) in pure gray and white matter can range from 1.2 +/- 0.2 to 0.5 +/- 0.1 micromol/g/min, respectively, for morphine-anesthetized rats. The mean cortical V(TCA) from 32 voxels of 1.0 +/- 0.3 micromol/g/min (N = 3) is in excellent agreement with previous localized measurements that have demonstrated that V(TCA) can range from 0.9-1.1 micromol/g/min under identical anesthetized conditions. Magn Reson Med 42:997-1003, 1999.

  15. In Vivo Follow-up of Brain Tumor Growth via Bioluminescence Imaging and Fluorescence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Genevois

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Reporter gene-based strategies are widely used in experimental oncology. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI using the firefly luciferase (Fluc as a reporter gene and d-luciferin as a substrate is currently the most widely employed technique. The present paper compares the performances of BLI imaging with fluorescence imaging using the near infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP to monitor brain tumor growth in mice. Fluorescence imaging includes fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI, fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT, and fluorescence molecular Imaging (FMT®. A U87 cell line was genetically modified for constitutive expression of both the encoding Fluc and iRFP reporter genes and assayed for cell, subcutaneous tumor and brain tumor imaging. On cultured cells, BLI was more sensitive than FRI; in vivo, tumors were first detected by BLI. Fluorescence of iRFP provided convenient tools such as flux cytometry, direct detection of the fluorescent protein on histological slices, and fluorescent tomography that allowed for 3D localization and absolute quantification of the fluorescent signal in brain tumors.

  16. Segmentation of Brain Tumors in MRI Images Using Three-Dimensional Active Contour without Edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. Hasan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumor segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is considered a complex procedure because of the variability of tumor shapes and the complexity of determining the tumor location, size, and texture. Manual tumor segmentation is a time-consuming task highly prone to human error. Hence, this study proposes an automated method that can identify tumor slices and segment the tumor across all image slices in volumetric MRI brain scans. First, a set of algorithms in the pre-processing stage is used to clean and standardize the collected data. A modified gray-level co-occurrence matrix and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA are employed for feature extraction and feature selection, respectively. A multi-layer perceptron neural network is adopted as a classifier, and a bounding 3D-box-based genetic algorithm is used to identify the location of pathological tissues in the MRI slices. Finally, the 3D active contour without edge is applied to segment the brain tumors in volumetric MRI scans. The experimental dataset consists of 165 patient images collected from the MRI Unit of Al-Kadhimiya Teaching Hospital in Iraq. Results of the tumor segmentation achieved an accuracy of 89% ± 4.7% compared with manual processes.

  17. Prognostication and response assessment in liver and pancreatic tumors: The new imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Demozzi, Emanuele; Puntel, Gino; Ortolani, Silvia; Cingarlini, Sara; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bassi, Claudio; Pederzoli, Paolo; D’Onofrio, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and perfusion computed tomography (CT) are technical improvements of morphologic imaging that can evaluate functional properties of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors during conventional MRI or CT examinations. Nevertheless, the term “functional imaging” is commonly used to describe molecular imaging techniques, as positron emission tomography (PET) CT/MRI, which still represent the most widely used methods for the evaluation of functional properties of solid neoplasms; unlike PET or single photon emission computed tomography, functional imaging techniques applied to conventional MRI/CT examinations do not require the administration of radiolabeled drugs or specific equipments. Moreover, DWI and DCE-MRI can be performed during the same session, thus providing a comprehensive “one-step” morphological and functional evaluation of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors. Literature data reveal that functional imaging techniques could be proposed for the evaluation of these tumors before treatment, given that they may improve staging and predict prognosis or clinical outcome. Microscopic changes within neoplastic tissues induced by treatments can be detected and quantified with functional imaging, therefore these techniques could be used also for post-treatment assessment, even at an early stage. The aim of this editorial is to describe possible applications of new functional imaging techniques apart from molecular imaging to hepatic and pancreatic tumors through a review of up-to-date literature data, with a particular emphasis on pathological correlations, prognostic stratification and post-treatment monitoring. PMID:26078555

  18. Background rejection capabilities of a Compton imaging telescope setup with a DSSD Ge planar detector and AGATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doncel, M., E-mail: doncel@usal.es [Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain); Quintana, B. [Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain); Gadea, A. [IFIC Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Recchia, F.; Farnea, E. [INFN sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2011-08-21

    In this work, we show the first Monte Carlo results about the performance of the Ge array which we propose for the DESPEC experiment at FAIR, when the background algorithm developed for AGATA is applied. The main objective of our study is to characterize the capabilities of the {gamma}-spectroscopy system, made up of AGATA detectors in a semi-spherical distribution covering a 1{pi} solid angle and a set of planar Ge detectors in a daisy configuration, to discriminate between {gamma} sources placed at different locations.

  19. Implementation of Biography Based Neural Clustering (BBNC with Genetic Processing for tumor detection from medical images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Chandanpreet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation is a best method to divide the required region from the medical images. This research is based on segmentation of medical images (MRI, CT scans based on the previous method known as pre-operative and post-recurrence tumor registration (PORTR and proposed method biography based neural clustering (BBNC with genetic processing for tumor segmentation. By using the new technique the extracted part can be view in 3D model and also can get the actual segmented tumor region. This new method will be helpful for diagnostics to find the tumor area as well as pixel difference in segmented part to define the tumor area accurately. While in the previous approach all the parameters have been used likewise, in which the registration method is used to transform the different sets of data into one coordinate system for segmentation of medical images. Registration basically is used to improve the signals to reduce the noise from the images. These techniques are better to find the tumor area from the MRI and CT scans, but after comparing them better results have been obtained in proposed technique. The proposed technique (BBNC reduces the extracted region again into required and actual region of tumor with accuracy of area, time and pixel difference.

  20. A primary inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the scapula in a child: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inarejos Clemente, Emilio J.; Riaza Martin, Lucia [University of Barcelona, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona (Spain); Esplugues de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [University of Girona, Clinica Girona, Hospital Sta. Caterina, Girona (Spain); Guirao-Marin, Sara [CETIR Clinica Girona-ERESA, Girona (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is an uncommon tumor characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration and differentiated myofibroblastic spindle cells. IMT was first described in the lung and retroperitoneum. Occurrence in bone has been well described in the maxilla and occasionally in the long bones in the adult population. We present a unique case of IMT arising primarily from the scapula in an 8-year-old patient, not described previously in the pediatric or adult literature. Imaging demonstrated an ill-defined and aggressive osteolytic lesion with cortical bone destruction associated with an important soft tissue component that extended into the adjacent muscles. Histologically, the tumor was composed of spindle and polygonal cells distributed in an inflammatory background with different proportions of plasma cells, lymphocytes, eosinophils and neutrophils. The absence of cellular atypia helped to differentiate this entity from malignant spindle cell tumors, and imaging could differentiate the tumor from the nontumoral inflammatory reaction. (orig.)

  1. Tumor tissue characterization evaluating the luciferase activity under the control of a hsp70 promoter and MR imaging in three tumor cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundt, Walter [Department of Radiology, Lucas MRS Research Center, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Munich (Germany)], E-mail: walter.hundt@web.de; Steinbach, Silke [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Technical University of Munich (Germany); O' Connell-Rodwell, Caitlin E. [Department of Pediatrics, Microbiology and Immunology and Radiology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Mayer, Dirk; Bednarski, Mark D.; Guccione, Samira [Department of Radiology, Lucas MRS Research Center, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    We investigated the luciferase activity under the control of a hsp70 promoter and MR imaging for three tumor cell lines. Three tumor cell lines, SCCVII, NIH3T3 and M21 were transfected with a plasmid containing the hsp70 promoter fragment and the luciferase reporter gene and grown in mice. Bioluminescence imaging of the tumors was performed every other day. MR imaging, pre- and post-contrast T1-wt SE, T2-wt FSE, Diffusion-wt STEAM-sequence, T2-time determination were obtained on a 1.5-T GE MRI scanner at a tumor size of 600-800 mm{sup 3} and 1400-1600 mm{sup 3}. Comparing the different tumor sizes the luciferase activity of the M21 tumors increased about 149.3%, for the NIH3T3 tumors about 47.4% and for the SCCVII tumors about 155.8%. Luciferase activity of the M21 tumors (r = 0.82, p < 0.01) and the SCCVII tumors (r = 0.62, p = 0.03) correlated significant with the diffusion coefficient. In the NIH3T3 tumors the best correlation between the luciferase activity and the MRI parameter was seen for the SNR (T2) values (r = 0.78, p < 0.01). The luciferase activity per mm{sup 3} tumor tissue correlated moderate with the contrast medium uptake (r = 0.55, p = 0.01) in the M21 tumors. In the NIH3T3 and SCCVII tumors a negative correlation (r = -0.78, p < 0.01, respectively, r = -0.49, p = 0.02) was found with the T2 time. Different tissue types have different luciferase activity under the control of the same hsp70 promoter. The combination of MR imaging with bioluminescence imaging improves the characterization of tumor tissue giving better information of this tissue on the molecular level.

  2. Functional Imaging of Proteolysis: Stromal and Inflammatory Cells Increase Tumor Proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Sameni

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The underlying basement membrane is degraded during progression of breast and colon carcinoma. Thus, we imaged degradation of a quenched fluorescent derivative of basement membrane type IV collagen (DQ-collagen IV by living human breast and colon tumor spheroids. Proteolysis of DQ-collagen IV by HCT 116 and HKh-2 human colon tumor spheroids was both intracellular and pericellular. In contrast, proteolysis of DQ-collagen IV by BT20 human breast tumor spheroids was pericellular. As stromal elements can contribute to proteolytic activities associated with tumors, we also examined degradation of DQ-collagen IV by human monocytes/macrophages and colon and breast fibroblasts. Fibroblasts themselves exhibited a modest amount of pericellular degradation. Degradation was increased 4–17-fold in cocultures of fibroblasts and tumor cells as compared to either cell type alone. Inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases, plasmin, and the cysteine protease, cathepsin B, all reduced degradation in the cocultures. Monocytes did not degrade DQ-collagen IV; however, macrophages degraded DQ-collagen IV intracellularly. In coculture of tumor cells, fibroblasts, and macrophages, degradation of DQ-collagen IV was further increased. Imaging of living tumor and stromal cells has, thus, allowed us to establish that tumor proteolysis occurs pericellularly and intracellularly and that tumor, stromal, and inflammatory cells all contribute to degradative processes.

  3. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Dual-Modality Glyco-Nanoparticles for Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available d-Glucosamine (DG was conjugated to a core-cross linked polymeric micelle (CCPM system equipped with both a near-infrared fluorophore (NIRF and a gamma emitter (111In. The resultant nano-scale tumor-targeting imaging tracer, 111In-DG-NIRF-CCPM, selectively accumulated in a human epithelial carcinoma A-431 xenograft model in mice. At 24 hrs post injection, the tumor uptake was 2.62 ± 0.80 % of the injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g. Tumors were clearly delineated in both single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and optical imaging. The results suggest that the prepared imaging tracer is a promising agent for tumor diagnosis.

  4. 3D Brain Tumors and Internal Brain Structures Segmentation in MR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.NARENDRAN

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of this paper is to segment brain tumors, their components (edema and necrosis and internal structures of the brain in 3D MR images. For tumor segmentation we propose a framework that is a combination of region-based and boundary-based paradigms. In this framework, segment the brain using a method adapted for pathological cases and extract some global information on the tumor by symmetry based histogram analysis. We propose a new and original method that combines region and boundary information in two phases: initialization and refinement. The method relies on symmetry-based histogram analysis. The initial segmentation of the tumor is refined relying on boundary information of the image. We use a deformable model which is again constrained by the fused spatial relations of the structure. The method was also evaluated on 10 contrast enhanced T1-weighted images to segment the ventricles, caudate nucleus and thalamus.

  5. Application of near-infrared dyes for tumor imaging, photothermal, and photodynamic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ahu; Wu, Jinhui; Tang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Lili; Xu, Feng; Hu, Yiqiao

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes, small organic molecules that function in the NIR region, have received increasing attention in recent years as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in the field of tumor research. They have been demonstrated great successes in imaging and treating tumors both in vitro and in vivo. And their different applications in clinical practices have made rapid gains. This review primarily focuses on the progress of the application of NIR dyes in tumor imaging and therapy. In particular, advances in the use of different NIR dyes in tumor-specific imaging, photothermal, and photodynamic therapies are discussed. Limitations and prospects associated with NIR dyes in diagnostic and therapeutic application are also reviewed.

  6. Application of Benchtop-magnetic resonance imaging in a nude mouse tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäder Karsten

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MRI plays a key role in the preclinical development of new drugs, diagnostics and their delivery systems. However, very high installation and running costs of existing superconducting MRI machines limit the spread of MRI. The new method of Benchtop-MRI (BT-MRI has the potential to overcome this limitation due to much lower installation and almost no running costs. However, due to the low field strength and decreased magnet homogeneity it is questionable, whether BT-MRI can achieve sufficient image quality to provide useful information for preclinical in vivo studies. It was the aim of the current study to explore the potential of BT-MRI on tumor models in mice. Methods We used a prototype of an in vivo BT-MRI apparatus to visualise organs and tumors and to analyse tumor progression in nude mouse xenograft models of human testicular germ cell tumor and colon carcinoma. Results Subcutaneous xenografts were easily identified as relative hypointense areas in transaxial slices of NMR images. Monitoring of tumor progression evaluated by pixel extension analyses based on NMR images correlated with increasing tumor volume calculated by calliper measurement. Gd-BOPTA contrast agent injection resulted in a better differentiation between parts of the urinary tissues and organs due to fast elimination of the agent via kidneys. In addition, interior structuring of tumors could be observed. A strong contrast enhancement within a tumor was associated with a central necrotic/fibrotic area. Conclusions BT-MRI provides satisfactory image quality to visualize organs and tumors and to monitor tumor progression and structure in mouse models.

  7. Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measured Lung Tumor Motion Consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Danny; Greer, Peter B; Ludbrook, Joanna; Arm, Jameen; Hunter, Perry; Pollock, Sean; Makhija, Kuldeep; O'brien, Ricky T; Kim, Taeho; Keall, Paul

    2016-03-01

    To assess the impact of an audiovisual (AV) biofeedback on intra- and interfraction tumor motion for lung cancer patients. Lung tumor motion was investigated in 9 lung cancer patients who underwent a breathing training session with AV biofeedback before 2 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sessions. The breathing training session was performed to allow patients to become familiar with AV biofeedback, which uses a guiding wave customized for each patient according to a reference breathing pattern. In the first MRI session (pretreatment), 2-dimensional cine-MR images with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback were obtained, and the second MRI session was repeated within 3-6 weeks (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were directly measured from cine-MR images using an auto-segmentation technique; the centroid and outlier motions of the lung tumors were measured from the segmented tumors. Free breathing and AV biofeedback were compared using several metrics: intra- and interfraction tumor motion consistency in displacement and period, and the outlier motion ratio. Compared with FB, AV biofeedback improved intrafraction tumor motion consistency by 34% in displacement (P=.019) and by 73% in period (P<.001). Compared with FB, AV biofeedback improved interfraction tumor motion consistency by 42% in displacement (P<.046) and by 74% in period (P=.005). Compared with FB, AV biofeedback reduced the outlier motion ratio by 21% (P<.001). These results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved intra- and interfraction lung tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results demonstrate that AV biofeedback can facilitate consistent tumor motion, which is advantageous toward achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In vivo preclinical photoacoustic imaging of tumor vasculature development and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Jan; Johnson, Peter; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Pedley, Barbara; Beard, Paul

    2012-05-01

    The use of a novel all-optical photoacoustic scanner for imaging the development of tumor vasculature and its response to a therapeutic vascular disrupting agent is described. The scanner employs a Fabry-Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor for mapping the photoacoustic waves and an image reconstruction algorithm based upon attenuation-compensated acoustic time reversal. The system was used to noninvasively image human colorectal tumor xenografts implanted subcutaneously in mice. Label-free three-dimensional in vivo images of whole tumors to depths of almost 10 mm with sub-100-micron spatial resolution were acquired in a longitudinal manner. This enabled the development of tumor-related vascular features, such as vessel tortuosity, feeding vessel recruitment, and necrosis to be visualized over time. The system was also used to study the temporal evolution of the response of the tumor vasculature following the administration of a therapeutic vascular disrupting agent (OXi4503). This revealed the well-known destruction and recovery phases associated with this agent. These studies illustrate the broader potential of this technology as an imaging tool for the preclinical and clinical study of tumors and other pathologies characterized by changes in the vasculature.

  9. Development and application of a high-speed planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging system to evaluate liquid and vapor phases of sprays from a multi-hole diesel fuel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, S. E.; Zink, R. J.

    2013-02-01

    A high-speed imaging system capable of acquiring elastic scattering images and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) images in a near-simultaneous fashion has been developed. Acquiring both elastic scattering and PLIF images enables the liquid phase to be discriminated from the vapor phase. High-speed imaging allows the temporal evolution of flow structures to be evaluated. Images of sprays from a multi-hole diesel fuel injector operating under engine-like conditions were acquired. The vapor phase images reveal intricate fluid dynamic structures that exhibit a high degree of variability, indicative of a turbulent gas jet.

  10. Fluorescence and Bioluminescence Imaging of Orthotopic Brain Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Emilie; Moore, Alfred; Dixit, Suraj; Zhu, Yun; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Optical imaging strategies, such as fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging, are non-invasive, in vivo whole body imaging techniques utilized to study cancer. Optical imaging is widely used in preclinical work because of its ease of use and cost-friendliness. It also provides the opportunity to study animals and biological responses longitudinally over time. Important considerations include depth of tissue penetration, photon scattering, absorption and the choice of light emitting probe, all of which affect the resolution (image quality and data information) and the signal to noise ratio of the image. We describe how to use bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging to track a chemotherapeutic delivery nanocarrier conjugated with a fluorophore to determine its localization in vivo.

  11. PET imaging of multidrug resistance in tumors using 18F-fluoropaclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdziel, Karen A; Kiesewetter, D O

    2010-01-01

    The failure of solid tumors to respond to chemotherapy is a complicated and clinically frustrating issue. The ability to predict which tumors will respond to treatment could reduce the human and monetary costs of cancer therapy by allowing pro-active selection of a chemotherapeutic to which the tumor does not express resistance. PET/CT imaging with a radiolabeled form of paclitaxel, F-18 fluoropaclitaxel (FPAC), may be able to predict the uptake of paclitaxel in solid tumors, and as a substrate of P-glycoprotein, it may also predict which tumors exhibit multidrug resistance (MDR), a phenotype in which tumors fail to respond to a wide variety of chemically unrelated chemotherapeutic agents. This article reviews the synthetic, preclinical and early human data obtained during the development phase of this promising new radiopharmaceutical.

  12. In vivo macroscopic HPD fluorescence reflectance imaging on small animals bearing surface ARO/NPA tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autiero, Maddalena; Celentano, Luigi; Laccetti, Paolo; Marotta, Marcello; Mettivier, Giovanni; Montesi, Maria C.; Riccio, Patrizia; Russo, Paolo; Roberti, Giuseppe

    2005-08-01

    Recently multimodal imaging systems have been devised because the combination of different imaging modalities results in the complementarity and integration of the techniques and in a consequent improvement of the diagnostic capabilities of the multimodal system with respect to each separate imaging modality. We developed a simple and reliable HematoPorphyrin (HP) mediated Fluorescence Reflectance Imaging (FRI) system that allows for in vivo real time imaging of surface tumors with a large field of view. The tumor cells are anaplastic human thyroid carcinoma-derived ARO cells, or human papillary thyroid carcinoma-derived NPA cells. Our measurements show that the optical contrast of the tumor region image is increased by a simple digital subtraction of the background fluorescence and that HP fluorescence emissivity of ARO tumors is about 2 times greater than that of NPA tumors, and about 4 times greater than that of healthy tissues. This is also confirmed by spectroscopic measurements on histological sections of tumor and healthy tissues. It was shown also the capability of this system to distinguish the tumor type on the basis of the different intensity of the fluorescence emission, probably related to the malignancy degree. The features of this system are complementary with those ones of a pixel radionuclide detection system, which allows for relatively time expensive, narrow field of view measurements, and applicability to tumors also deeply imbedded in tissues. The fluorescence detection could be used as a large scale and quick analysis tool and could be followed by narrow field, higher resolution radionuclide measurements on previously determined highly fluorescent regions.

  13. MR imaging of musculoskeletal tumors and tumor mimickers with intravenous gadolinium: experience with 242 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, D.A. [Department of Radiology, Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)]|[WHMC/PSRD, Lackland AFB, TX (United States); Good, R.B. [Department of Radiology, Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Smith, D.K. [Department of Radiology, Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Parsons, T.W. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. This pictorial essay reviews our experience with MR scans with gadolinium in patients with musculoskeletal tumors and tumor mimickers. Design. Review of 242 MR scans obtained in the initial evaluation of a possible primary musculoskeletal neoplasm. All scans included a T1-weighted, fat-suppressed sequence following intravenous administration of gadolinium. Results. MR scans with gadolinium did not contribute to differential diagnosis or patient management in 89% of the patients in this series. However, intravenous gadolinium did assist in guiding the biopsy of bulky lesions and evaluating treated tumor beds for possible recurrence. MR scans with gadolinium were sometimes helpful when the differential diagnosis included synovitis, Morton`s neuroma or intramuscular myxoma, and when it was important to differentiate cystic from solid lesions. Conclusions. Routine use of gadolinium in every initial MR examination of a possible musculoskeletal mass is not warranted. However, there are appropriate selected indications for gadolinium administration as outlined above. (orig.). With 19 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Distinction between amorphous and healed planar deformation features in shocked quartz using composite color scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Maartje F.; Pennock, Gill M.; Herwegh, Marco; Drury, Martyn R.

    2016-10-01

    Planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz are one of the most reliable and most widely used forms of evidence for hypervelocity impact. PDFs can be identified in scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images, but not all PDFs show the same CL behavior: there are nonluminescent and red luminescent PDFs. This study aims to explain the origin of the different CL emissions in PDFs. Focused ion beam (FIB) thin foils were prepared of specific sample locations selected in composite color SEM-CL images and were analyzed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The FIB preparation technique allowed a direct, often one-to-one correlation between the CL images and the defect structure observed in TEM. This correlation shows that composite color SEM-CL imaging allows distinction between amorphous PDFs on one hand and healed PDFs and basal Brazil twins on the other: nonluminescent PDFs are amorphous, while healed PDFs and basal Brazil twins are red luminescent, with a dominant emission peak at 650 nm. We suggest that the red luminescence is the result of preferential beam damage along dislocations, fluid inclusions, and twin boundaries. Furthermore, a high-pressure phase (possibly stishovite) in PDFs can be detected in color SEM-CL images by its blue luminescence.

  15. MR imaging of solitary fibrous tumors in the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong [The Catholic University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Jeong Hyun [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jeong Jin [Chonnam National University Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Jim [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ae Kyung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a very rare tumor. The purpose of this study is to determine the MR imaging features of SFT in the intracranial and extracranial head and neck regions. We retrospectively reviewed six MR images and two CT images of six histologically proven cases of SFT that occurred in four men and two women, and their ages ranged from 46 to 59 years. These imaging findings were correlated with the microscopic findings of their surgical specimens. Six SFTs arose in the meninges (the petrous ridge and the pituitary fossa), the parotid gland, the parapharyngeal space, the buccal space and the maxillary sinus. On the MR images, SFTs in the intracranial and extracranial head and neck regions were mostly isointense to the muscle on the T1-weighted images, they were hyperintense on the T2-weighted images and they all had intense enhancement. On the T1- and T2-weighted images, hypointense lines were observed within in five SFTs. On the CT images, the SFTs were hypodense to the muscle on the unenhanced images and they were heterogeneously enhanced on the contrast-enhanced images. An exceptional case of pituitary SFT was hypointense on the T2-weighted images and it was hyperdense on the unenhanced CT images, which correlated with the increased collagenous component and the cellular compactness. The imaging features of SFT are nonspecific; however, SFT should be included in the differential diagnosis of masses involving the intracranial and extracranial head and neck regions.

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging for tumor delineation in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korporaal, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging is frequently used for the detection and localization of prostate tumors. After injection of a bolus of contrast agent into the blood circulation, the behavior of the contrast agent in the prostate can be measured by repetitive imaging of the prostate. Pros

  17. Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    have been using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) (7) to examine Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and Flavin adenine...an optical imaging window into the skin of these mice above the tumor. We will then collect SHG from collagen and FLIM data for NADH using an MPM

  18. In vivo imaging of nanoparticle delivery and tumor microvasculature with multimodal optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Beavers, Kelsey R.; Sit, Wesley W.; Shah, Amy T.; Duvall, Craig L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Current imaging techniques capable of tracking nanoparticles in vivo supply either a large field of view or cellular resolution, but not both. Here, we demonstrate a multimodality imaging platform of optical coherence tomography (OCT) techniques for high resolution, wide field of view in vivo imaging of nanoparticles. This platform includes the first in vivo images of nanoparticle pharmacokinetics acquired with photothermal OCT (PTOCT), along with overlaying images of microvascular and tissue morphology. Gold nanorods (51.8 ± 8.1 nm by 15.2 ± 3.3 nm) were intravenously injected into mice, and their accumulation into mammary tumors was non-invasively imaged in vivo in three dimensions over 24 hours using PTOCT. Spatial frequency analysis of PTOCT images indicated that gold nanorods reached peak distribution throughout the tumors by 16 hours, and remained well-dispersed up to 24 hours post-injection. In contrast, the overall accumulation of gold nanorods within the tumors peaked around 16 hours post-injection. The accumulation of gold nanorods within the tumors was validated post-mortem with multiphoton microscopy. This shows the utility of PTOCT as part of a powerful multimodality imaging platform for the development of nanomedicines and drug delivery technologies. PMID:24940536

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging for tumor delineation in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korporaal, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging is frequently used for the detection and localization of prostate tumors. After injection of a bolus of contrast agent into the blood circulation, the behavior of the contrast agent in the prostate can be measured by repetitive imaging of the prostate. Pros

  20. Automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images using fuzzy Markov random field model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Wang; Sa, Yu; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF) model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum.

  1. Automatic Lung Tumor Segmentation on PET/CT Images Using Fuzzy Markov Random Field Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of positron emission tomography (PET and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum.

  2. Enhancing in vivo tumor boundary delineation with structured illumination fluorescence molecular imaging and spatial gradient mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jessica; Miller, Jessica P.; Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Achilefu, Samuel; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence imaging, in combination with tumor-avid near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecular probes, provides high specificity and sensitivity for cancer detection in preclinical animal models, and more recently, assistance during oncologic surgery. However, conventional camera-based fluorescence imaging techniques are heavily surface-weighted such that surface reflection from skin or other nontumor tissue and nonspecific fluorescence signals dominate, obscuring true cancer-specific signals and blurring tumor boundaries. To address this challenge, we applied structured illumination fluorescence molecular imaging (SIFMI) in live animals for automated subtraction of nonspecific surface signals to better delineate accumulation of an NIR fluorescent probe targeting α4β1 integrin in mice bearing subcutaneous plasma cell xenografts. SIFMI demonstrated a fivefold improvement in tumor-to-background contrast when compared with other full-field fluorescence imaging methods and required significantly reduced scanning time compared with diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging. Furthermore, the spatial gradient mapping enhanced highlighting of tumor boundaries. Through the relatively simple hardware and software modifications described, SIFMI can be integrated with clinical fluorescence imaging systems, enhancing intraoperative tumor boundary delineation from the uninvolved tissue.

  3. Methods and measurement variance for field estimations of coral colony planar area using underwater photographs and semi-automated image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Benjamin P; Lin, Tsung-Han; Winter, Rivah N; Treibitz, Tali; Beijbom, Oscar; Kriegman, David; Kline, David I; Greg Mitchell, B

    2015-08-01

    Size and growth rates for individual colonies are some of the most essential descriptive parameters for understanding coral communities, which are currently experiencing worldwide declines in health and extent. Accurately measuring coral colony size and changes over multiple years can reveal demographic, growth, or mortality patterns often not apparent from short-term observations and can expose environmental stress responses that may take years to manifest. Describing community size structure can reveal population dynamics patterns, such as periods of failed recruitment or patterns of colony fission, which have implications for the future sustainability of these ecosystems. However, rapidly and non-invasively measuring coral colony sizes in situ remains a difficult task, as three-dimensional underwater digital reconstruction methods are currently not practical for large numbers of colonies. Two-dimensional (2D) planar area measurements from projection of underwater photographs are a practical size proxy, although this method presents operational difficulties in obtaining well-controlled photographs in the highly rugose environment of the coral reef, and requires extensive time for image processing. Here, we present and test the measurement variance for a method of making rapid planar area estimates of small to medium-sized coral colonies using a lightweight monopod image-framing system and a custom semi-automated image segmentation analysis program. This method demonstrated a coefficient of variation of 2.26% for repeated measurements in realistic ocean conditions, a level of error appropriate for rapid, inexpensive field studies of coral size structure, inferring change in colony size over time, or measuring bleaching or disease extent of large numbers of individual colonies.

  4. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using a fast dictionary learning based processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shi, Luyao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-08-01

    In abdomen computed tomography (CT), repeated radiation exposures are often inevitable for cancer patients who receive surgery or radiotherapy guided by CT images. Low-dose scans should thus be considered in order to avoid the harm of accumulative x-ray radiation. This work is aimed at improving abdomen tumor CT images from low-dose scans by using a fast dictionary learning (DL) based processing. Stemming from sparse representation theory, the proposed patch-based DL approach allows effective suppression of both mottled noise and streak artifacts. The experiments carried out on clinical data show that the proposed method brings encouraging improvements in abdomen low-dose CT images with tumors.

  5. 'Image and treat': an individualized approach to urological tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Capala, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    The current treatment options for advanced urologic cancers demonstrate limited efficacy. To obtain optimal clinical results, there is a need for new, individualized, therapeutic strategies, which have only recently been applied to these malignancies. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in e...... in establishing imaging biomarkers necessary for personalized medicine. This review focuses on the current status of the 'image and treat' approach combining molecular imaging with targeted radionuclide therapy of urological malignancies...

  6. Intraoperative Molecular Imaging for Rapid Assessment of Tumor Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    administration , mice were imaged for an hour at approximately two minutes per frame using an MR-coupled FMT system. The imaging system is a spectrometer...approach in animal models using a the MRI- FMT imaging system (Task 5). A description of the primary accomplishments and ongoing efforts follows...amount of fluorescence signal originating from bound vs. unbound targeted drug in the tissue will depending on the elapsed time from administration

  7. Optimizing brain tumor resection. High-field interventional MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, R P; Chu, R M; Liu, H; Truwit, C L; Hall, W A

    2001-11-01

    High-field strength iMRI guidance is an effective tool for brain tumor resection. Although its use lengthens the average time for a craniotomy, the reward is a more extensive tumor excision compared with conventional neurosurgery without an increased risk to the patient (Table 4). Although intraoperative patient transfer into and out of the magnet is cumbersome, the possibility for complete resection, especially for a low-grade glioma, makes the effort worthwhile. The cost and technical support required for this system presently limits its use to only a few sites worldwide. As with any technology, further refinements will make this system less expensive and more attainable. Practical consideration aside, high-field strength iMRI is presently [table: see text] the most effective tool available for brain tumor resection. Because of its novelty, future studies are necessary to determine if this technology lowers the incidence of and extends the duration to tumor recurrence as the preliminary data in children suggests. These are the ultimate measures of efficacy for any brain tumor treatment. Based on the rapid advancement of technology, will today's high-field strength interventional magnet become tomorrow's low-field system? Very high-field strength designs may improve diagnostic capabilities through higher resolution, but their interventional applications may be hindered by increased sensitivity for clinically insignificant abnormalities and decreased specificity for clinically relevant lesions. As new technology is developed, clinicians must continue to explore and refine the existing high-field strength iMRI to make it cost-effective and widely applicable.

  8. Physiological Imaging-Defined, Response-Driven Subvolumes of a Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farjam, Reza [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Tsien, Christina I.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Gomez-Hassan, Diana [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cao, Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To develop an image analysis framework to delineate the physiological imaging-defined subvolumes of a tumor in relating to treatment response and outcome. Methods and Materials: Our proposed approach delineates the subvolumes of a tumor based on its heterogeneous distributions of physiological imaging parameters. The method assigns each voxel a probabilistic membership function belonging to the physiological parameter classes defined in a sample of tumors, and then calculates the related subvolumes in each tumor. We applied our approach to regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and Gd-DTPA transfer constant (K{sup trans}) images of patients who had brain metastases and were treated by whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). A total of 45 lesions were included in the analysis. Changes in the rCBV (or K{sup trans})–defined subvolumes of the tumors from pre-RT to 2 weeks after the start of WBRT (2W) were evaluated for differentiation of responsive, stable, and progressive tumors using the Mann-Whitney U test. Performance of the newly developed metrics for predicting tumor response to WBRT was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The percentage decrease in the high-CBV-defined subvolumes of the tumors from pre-RT to 2W was significantly greater in the group of responsive tumors than in the group of stable and progressive tumors (P<.007). The change in the high-CBV-defined subvolumes of the tumors from pre-RT to 2W was a predictor for post-RT response significantly better than change in the gross tumor volume observed during the same time interval (P=.012), suggesting that the physiological change occurs before the volumetric change. Also, K{sup trans} did not add significant discriminatory information for assessing response with respect to rCBV. Conclusion: The physiological imaging-defined subvolumes of the tumors delineated by our method could be candidates for boost target, for which further development and evaluation

  9. An innovative pre-targeting strategy for tumor cell specific imaging and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Peng, Meng-Yun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Cheng, Si-Xue; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-08-01

    A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the ``biotin-avidin'' interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging and therapeutic agents for tumor treatments.A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the ``biotin-avidin'' interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging

  10. Cranial nerve assessment in posterior fossa tumors with fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Takeshi; Minamida, Yoshihiro; Yamaki, Toshiaki; Koyanagi, Izumi; Nonaka, Tadashi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2005-10-01

    Steady-state free precession is widely used for ultra-fast cardiac or abdominal imaging. The purpose of this work was to assess fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and to evaluate its efficacy for depiction of the cranial nerve affected by the tumor. Twenty-three consecutive patients with posterior fossa tumors underwent FIESTA sequence after contrast agent administration, and then displacement of the cranial nerve was evaluated. The 23 patients with posterior fossa tumor consisted of 12 schwannomas, eight meningiomas, and three cases of epidermoid. Except in the cases of epidermoid, intensity of all tumors increased on FIESTA imaging of the contrast enhancement. In the schwannoma cases, visualization of the nerve became poorer as the tumor increased in size. In cases of encapsulated meningioma, all the cranial nerves of the posterior fossa were depicted regardless of location. The ability to depict the nerves was also significantly higher in meningioma patients than in schwannoma patients (PFIESTA sequence offers similar contrast to other heavily T2-weighted sequences, it facilitated a superior assessment of the effect of tumors on cranial nerve anatomy. FIESTA sequence was useful for preoperative simulations of posterior fossa tumors.

  11. Enzyme-activatable imaging probe reveals enhanced neutrophil elastase activity in tumors following photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Soumya; Modi, Kshitij D; Foster, Thomas H

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate the use of an enzyme-activatable fluorogenic probe, Neutrophil Elastase 680 FAST (NE680), for in vivo imaging of neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in tumors subjected to photodynamic therapy (PDT). NE protease activity was assayed in SCC VII and EMT6 tumors established in C3H and BALB/c mice, respectively. Four nanomoles of NE680 was injected intravenously immediately following PDT irradiation. 5 h following administration of NE680, whole-mouse fluorescence imaging was performed. At this time point, levels of NE680 fluorescence were at least threefold greater in irradiated versus unirradiated SCC VII and EMT6 tumors sensitized with Photofrin. To compare possible photosensitizer-specific differences in therapy-induced elastase activity, EMT6 tumors were also subjected to 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH)-PDT. NE levels measured in HPPH-PDT-treated tumors were twofold higher than in unirradiated controls. Ex vivo labeling of host cells using fluorophore-conjugated antibodies and confocal imaging were used to visualize Gr1+ cells in Photofrin-PDT-treated EMT6 tumors. These data were compared with recently reported analysis of Gr1+ cell accumulation in EMT6 tumors subjected to HPPH-PDT. The population density of infiltrating Gr1+ cells in treated versus unirradiated drug-only control tumors suggests that the differential in NE680 fold enhancement observed in Photofrin versus HPPH treatment may be attributed to the significantly increased inflammatory response induced by Photofrin-PDT. The in vivo imaging of NE680, which is a fluorescent reporter of NE extracellular release caused by neutrophil activation, demonstrates that PDT results in increased NE levels in treated tumors, and the accumulation of the cleaved probe tracks qualitatively with the intratumor Gr1+ cell population.

  12. Predicting Ki67% expression from DCE-MR images of breast tumors using textural kinetic features in tumor habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Baishali; Zhou, Mu; Farhidzadeh, Hamidreza; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Gillies, Robert J.; Weinfurtner, Robert J.; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2016-03-01

    The use of Ki67% expression, a cell proliferation marker, as a predictive and prognostic factor has been widely studied in the literature. Yet its usefulness is limited due to inconsistent cut off scores for Ki67% expression, subjective differences in its assessment in various studies, and spatial variation in expression, which makes it difficult to reproduce as a reliable independent prognostic factor. Previous studies have shown that there are significant spatial variations in Ki67% expression, which may limit its clinical prognostic utility after core biopsy. These variations are most evident when examining the periphery of the tumor vs. the core. To date, prediction of Ki67% expression from quantitative image analysis of DCE-MRI is very limited. This work presents a novel computer aided diagnosis framework to use textural kinetics to (i) predict the ratio of periphery Ki67% expression to core Ki67% expression, and (ii) predict Ki67% expression from individual tumor habitats. The pilot cohort consists of T1 weighted fat saturated DCE-MR images from 17 patients. Support vector regression with a radial basis function was used for predicting the Ki67% expression and ratios. The initial results show that texture features from individual tumor habitats are more predictive of the Ki67% expression ratio and spatial Ki67% expression than features from the whole tumor. The Ki67% expression ratio could be predicted with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 1.67%. Quantitative image analysis of DCE-MRI using textural kinetic habitats, has the potential to be used as a non-invasive method for predicting Ki67 percentage and ratio, thus more accurately reporting high KI-67 expression for patient prognosis.

  13. Feasibility of poly(ethylene glycol) derivatives as diagnostic drug carriers for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazaki, Kengo; Sano, Kohei; Makino, Akira; Yamauchi, Fumio; Takahashi, Atsushi; Homma, Tsutomu; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2016-03-28

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is an artificial but biocompatible hydrophilic polymer that has been widely used in clinical products. To evaluate the feasibility of using PEG derivative itself as a tumor imaging carrier via an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, we prepared indium-111-labeled PEG ((111)In-DTPA-PEG) and indocyanine green (ICG)-labeled PEG (ICG-PEG) with PEG molecular weights of 5-40kDa and investigated their in vivo biodistribution in colon26 tumor-bearing mice. Thereafter, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging studies were performed. The in vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated increased tumor uptake and a prolongation of circulation half-life as the molecular weight of PEG increased. Although the observed differences in in vivo biodistribution were dependent on the labeling method ((111)In or ICG), the tumor-to-normal tissue ratios were comparable. Because PEG-based probes with a molecular weight of 20kDa (PEG20) showed a preferable biodistribution (highest accumulation among tissues excised and relatively high tumor-to-blood ratios), an imaging study using (111)In-DTPA-PEG20 and ICG-PEG20 was performed. Colon26 tumors inoculated in the right shoulder were clearly visualized by SPECT 24h after administration. Furthermore, PA imaging using ICG-PEG20 also detected tumor regions, and the detected PA signals increased in proportion with the injected dose. These results suggest that PEG derivatives (20kDa) serve as robust diagnostic drug carriers for tumor imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of Multimodality Imaging Fusion Technology in Diagnosis and Treatment of Malignant Tumors under the Precision Medicine Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shun-Yi; Chen, Xian-Xia; Li, Yi; Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2016-12-20

    The arrival of precision medicine plan brings new opportunities and challenges for patients undergoing precision diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors. With the development of medical imaging, information on different modality imaging can be integrated and comprehensively analyzed by imaging fusion system. This review aimed to update the application of multimodality imaging fusion technology in the precise diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors under the precision medicine plan. We introduced several multimodality imaging fusion technologies and their application to the diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors in clinical practice. The data cited in this review were obtained mainly from the PubMed database from 1996 to 2016, using the keywords of "precision medicine", "fusion imaging", "multimodality", and "tumor diagnosis and treatment". Original articles, clinical practice, reviews, and other relevant literatures published in English were reviewed. Papers focusing on precision medicine, fusion imaging, multimodality, and tumor diagnosis and treatment were selected. Duplicated papers were excluded. Multimodality imaging fusion technology plays an important role in tumor diagnosis and treatment under the precision medicine plan, such as accurate location, qualitative diagnosis, tumor staging, treatment plan design, and real-time intraoperative monitoring. Multimodality imaging fusion systems could provide more imaging information of tumors from different dimensions and angles, thereby offing strong technical support for the implementation of precision oncology. Under the precision medicine plan, personalized treatment of tumors is a distinct possibility. We believe that multimodality imaging fusion technology will find an increasingly wide application in clinical practice.

  15. Perturbations of planar algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Paramita; Gupta, Ved Prakash

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the concept of {\\em weight} of a planar algebra $P$ and construct a new planar algebra referred as the {\\em perturbation of $P$} by the weight. We establish a one-to-one correspondence between pivotal structures on 2-categories and perturbations of planar algebras by weights. To each bifinite bimodule over $II_1$-factors, we associate a {\\em bimodule planar algebra} bimodule corresponds naturally with sphericality of the bimodule planar algebra. As a consequence of this, we reproduce an extension of Jones' theorem (of associating 'subfactor planar algebras' to extremal subfactors). Conversely, given a bimodule planar algebra, we construct a bifinite bimodule whose associated bimodule planar algebra is the one which we start with using perturbations and Jones-Walker-Shlyakhtenko-Kodiyalam-Sunder method of reconstructing an extremal subfactor from a subfactor planar algebra. We show that the perturbation class of a bimodule planar algebra contains a unique spherical unimodular bimodule planar algeb...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of treatment response of gamma knife for brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xiao; ZHANG Xue-ning; ZHANG Yun-ting; YU Chun-shui; XU De-sheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in assessing treatment response to gamma knife radiosurgery for brain tumors.Data sources Published articles about assessing treatment response to gamma knife radiosurgery for brain tumors were selected using PubMed. The search terms were "MRI", "gamma knife" and "brain tumors".Study selection Articles regarding the MRI techniques using for early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife were selected.Results MRI techniques, especially diffusion weighted imaging, perfusion weighted imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, are useful for early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife by detecting the hemodynamic, metabolic, and cellular alterations. Moreover, they can also provide important information on prognosis.Conclusions Diffusion weighted imaging, perfusion weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can provide early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife for brain tumors, and also information of tumor progression or recurrence earlier than conventional MRI. But there are still many questions to be answered which should be based on the development and advancement of MRI and related disciplines.

  17. Medical image of the week: tumor-induced hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parashar P

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 39 year-old man with a history of widely metastatic (brain, liver and lung nonseminomatous germ cell tumor was admitted to the hospital with severe abdominal pain and altered mental status. A CT of the abdomen and pelvis with IV contrast revealed a marked increase in the size of the liver metastases, portal vein tumor thrombus and changes of pseudocirrhosis. There were numerous large heterogeneously enhancing masses within the liver parenchyma with central necrosis (Figure 1. The patient had significant and sustained hypoglycemia, with the lowest glucose recorded of 30 mg/dl. He required multiple IV doses of 50% dextrose and an infusion of 10% dextrose to maintain a serum glucose level greater than 55 mg/dl. His mental status improved with treatment of the hypoglycemia. The patient decided to pursue a palliative approach to care and was discharged with home hospice services. Tumor-induced hypoglycemia (TIH is a paraneoplastic syndrome that is ...

  18. Molecular Cancer Imaging with Polymeric Nanoassemblies: From Tumor Detection to Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Peng; Wang, Fang; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Cabral, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    Several imaging modalities have been widely applied for the detection of cancer and its pathological activity in combination with probes capable of improving the contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues. Biocompatible polymeric nanoassemblies have been developed for precise detection of malignant tumors by enhancing the selectivity and sensitivity of the imaging. Exploiting the compartmentalized structure of the nanoassemblies advantageously allows delivering both imaging and therapeutic agents for cancer multifunctional imaging and theranostics, i.e., the combination of therapy and diagnosis tool on a single platform. Thus, nanoassemblies have high potential not only for cancer molecular imaging but also for tracing nanoparticles in biological systems, studying their biological pathways, gathering pathological information, monitoring therapeutic effects, and guiding pinpoint therapies. In this review, polymeric nanoassemblies for optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, multifunctional imaging, and image-guided therapy, emphasizing their role in cancer diagnosis and theranostics are highlighted.

  19. In vivo tumor detection with combined MR–Photoacoustic-Thermoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a new method using combined magnetic resonance (MR–Photoacoustic (PA–Thermoacoustic (TA imaging techniques, and demonstrate its unique ability for in vivo cancer detection using tumor-bearing mice. Circular scanning TA and PA imaging systems were used to recover the dielectric and optical property distributions of three colon carcinoma bearing mice While a 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI unit with a mouse body volume coil was utilized for high resolution structural imaging of the same mice. Three plastic tubes filled with soybean sauce were used as fiducial markers for the co-registration of MR, PA and TA images. The resulting fused images provided both enhanced tumor margin and contrast relative to the surrounding normal tissues. In particular, some finger-like protrusions extending into the surrounding tissues were revealed in the MR/TA infused images. These results show that the tissue functional optical and dielectric properties provided by PA and TA images along with the anatomical structure by MRI in one picture make accurate tumor identification easier. This combined MR–PA–TA-imaging strategy has the potential to offer a clinically useful triple-modality tool for accurate cancer detection and for intraoperative surgical navigation.

  20. Four dimensional optoacoustic imaging of perfusion in preclinical breast tumor model in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís.; Ermolayev, Vladimir; Mandal, Subhamoy; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Imaging plays an increasingly important role in clinical management and preclinical studies of cancer. Application of optical molecular imaging technologies, in combination with highly specific contrast agent approaches, eminently contributed to understanding of functional and histological properties of tumors and anticancer therapies. Yet, optical imaging exhibits deterioration in spatial resolution and other performance metrics due to light scattering in deep living tissues. High resolution molecular imaging at the whole-organ or whole-body scale may therefore bring additional understanding of vascular networks, blood perfusion and microenvironment gradients of malignancies. In this work, we constructed a volumetric multispectral optoacoustic tomography (vMSOT) scanner for cancer imaging in preclinical models and explored its capacity for real-time 3D intravital imaging of whole breast cancer allografts in mice. Intrinsic tissue properties, such as blood oxygenation gradients, along with the distribution of externally administered liposomes carrying clinically-approved indocyanine green dye (lipo-ICG) were visualized in order to study vascularization, probe penetration and extravasation kinetics in different regions of interest within solid tumors. The use of v-MSOT along with the application of volumetric image analysis and perfusion tracking tools for studies of pathophysiological processes within microenvironment gradients of solid tumors demonstrated superior volumetric imaging system performance with sustained competitive resolution and imaging depth suitable for investigations in preclinical cancer models.

  1. Cell Cycle Regulating Kinase Cdk4 as a Potential Target for Tumor Cell Treatment and Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Graf

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk-cyclin D/retinoblastoma (pRb/E2F cascade, which controls the G1/S transition of cell cycle, has been found to be altered in many neoplasias. Inhibition of this pathway by using, for example, selective Cdk4 inhibitors has been suggested to be a promising approach for cancer therapy. We hypothesized that appropriately radiolabeled Cdk4 inhibitors are suitable probes for tumor imaging and may be helpful studying cell proliferation processes in vivo by positron emission tomography. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological, biochemical, and radiopharmacological characterizations of two I124-labeled small molecule Cdk4 inhibitors (8-cyclopentyl-6-iodo-5-methyl-2-(4-piperazin-1-yl-phenylamino-8H-pyrido[2,3-d]-pyrimidin-7-one (CKIA and 8-cyclopentyl-6-iodo-5-methyl-2-(5-(piperazin-1-yl-pyridin-2-yl-amino-8H-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one (CKIB. Our data demonstrate a defined and specific inhibition of tumor cell proliferation through CKIA and CKIB by inhibition of the Cdk4/pRb/E2F pathway emphasizing potential therapeutic benefit of CKIA and CKIB. Furthermore, radiopharmacological properties of [I124]CKIA and [I124]CKIB observed in human tumor cells are promising prerequisites for in vivo biodistribution and imaging studies.

  2. CT-MR image data fusion for computer assisted navigated neurosurgery of temporal bone tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Stefan Franz [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at; Donat, Markus Alexander [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mehrain, Sheida [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Friedrich, Klaus [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Krestan, Christian [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Matula, Christian [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Imhof, Herwig [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Czerny, Christian [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the value of multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative work up of temporal bone tumors and to present, especially, CT and MR image fusion for surgical planning and performance in computer assisted navigated neurosurgery of temporal bone tumors. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with temporal bone tumors underwent MDCT and MRI. MDCT was performed in high-resolution bone window level setting in axial plane. The reconstructed MDCT slice thickness was 0.8 mm. MRI was performed in axial and coronal plane with T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences, un-enhanced and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) sequences, and coronal T1-weighted SE sequences with fat suppression and with 3D T1-weighted gradient-echo (GE) contrast-enhanced sequences in axial plane. The 3D T1-weighted GE sequence had a slice thickness of 1 mm. Image data sets of CT and 3D T1-weighted GE sequences were merged utilizing a workstation to create CT-MR fusion images. MDCT and MR images were separately used to depict and characterize lesions. The fusion images were utilized for interventional planning and intraoperative image guidance. The intraoperative accuracy of the navigation unit was measured, defined as the deviation between the same landmark in the navigation image and the patient. Results: Tumorous lesions of bone and soft tissue were well delineated and characterized by CT and MR images. The images played a crucial role in the differentiation of benign and malignant pathologies, which consisted of 13 benign and 2 malignant tumors. The CT-MR fusion images supported the surgeon in preoperative planning and improved surgical performance. The mean intraoperative accuracy of the navigation system was 1.25 mm. Conclusion: CT and MRI are essential in the preoperative work up of temporal bone tumors. CT-MR image data fusion presents an accurate tool for planning the correct surgical procedure and is a

  3. Molecular imaging of brain tumors personal experience and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Bernhard J; Cornelius, Jan F; Sandu, Nora; Buchfelder, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Non-invasive energy metabolism measurements in brain tumors in vivo are now performed widely as molecular imaging by positron emission tomography. This capability has developed from a large number of basic and clinical science investigations that have cross fertilized one another. Apart from precise anatomical localization and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Most importantly, molecular imaging represents a key-technology in translational research, helping to develop experimental protocols that may later be applied to human patients. Common clinical indications for molecular imaging of primary brain tumors therefore contain (i) primary brain tumor diagnosis, (ii) identification of the metabolically most active brain tumor reactions (differentiation of viable tumor tissue from necrosis), and (iii) prediction of treatment response by measurement of tumor perfusion, or ischemia. The key-question remains whether the magnitude of biochemical alterations demonstrated by molecular imaging reveals prognostic value with respect to survival. Molecular imaging may identify early disease and differentiate benign from malignant lesions. Moreover, an early identification of treatment effectiveness could influence patient management by providing objective criteria for evaluation of therapeutic strategies for primary brain tumors. Specially, its novel potential to visualize metabolism and signal transduction to gene expression is used in reporter gene assays to trace the location and temporal level of expression of therapeutic and endogenous genes. The authors present here illustrative data of PET imaging: the thymidine kinase gene expression in experimentally transplanted F98 gliomas in cat brain indicates, that [(18)F]FHBG visualizes cells expressing TK-GFP gene in transduced gliomas as well as quantities and localizes transduced

  4. Content-based image retrieval using spatial layout information in brain tumor T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyan Huang

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop content-based image retrieval (CBIR system for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR (CE-MR images of brain tumors. When a tumor region is fed to the CBIR system as a query, the system attempts to retrieve tumors of the same pathological category. The bag-of-visual-words (BoVW model with partition learning is incorporated into the system to extract informative features for representing the image contents. Furthermore, a distance metric learning algorithm called the Rank Error-based Metric Learning (REML is proposed to reduce the semantic gap between low-level visual features and high-level semantic concepts. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain T1-weighted CE-MR dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor. Using the BoVW model with partition learning, the mean average precision (mAP of retrieval increases beyond 4.6% with the learned distance metrics compared with the spatial pyramid BoVW method. The distance metric learned by REML significantly outperforms three other existing distance metric learning methods in terms of mAP. The mAP of the CBIR system is as high as 91.8% using the proposed method, and the precision can reach 93.1% when the top 10 images are returned by the system. These preliminary results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and feasible for the retrieval of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MR Images.

  5. Content-based image retrieval using spatial layout information in brain tumor T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Wu, Yao; Jiang, Jun; Gao, Yang; Chen, Yang; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Lu, Zhentai

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to develop content-based image retrieval (CBIR) system for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR (CE-MR) images of brain tumors. When a tumor region is fed to the CBIR system as a query, the system attempts to retrieve tumors of the same pathological category. The bag-of-visual-words (BoVW) model with partition learning is incorporated into the system to extract informative features for representing the image contents. Furthermore, a distance metric learning algorithm called the Rank Error-based Metric Learning (REML) is proposed to reduce the semantic gap between low-level visual features and high-level semantic concepts. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain T1-weighted CE-MR dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor). Using the BoVW model with partition learning, the mean average precision (mAP) of retrieval increases beyond 4.6% with the learned distance metrics compared with the spatial pyramid BoVW method. The distance metric learned by REML significantly outperforms three other existing distance metric learning methods in terms of mAP. The mAP of the CBIR system is as high as 91.8% using the proposed method, and the precision can reach 93.1% when the top 10 images are returned by the system. These preliminary results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and feasible for the retrieval of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MR Images.

  6. Imaging a moving lung tumor with megavoltage cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayou, Olivier, E-mail: ogayou@wpahs.org; Colonias, Athanasios [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 and Allegheny Campus, Temple University School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Respiratory motion may affect the accuracy of image guidance of radiation treatment of lung cancer. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image spans several breathing cycles, resulting in a blurred object with a theoretical size equal to the sum of tumor size and breathing motion. However, several factors may affect this theoretical relationship. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of tumor motion on megavoltage (MV)-CBCT images, by comparing target sizes on simulation and pretreatment images of a large cohort of lung cancer patients. Methods: Ninety-three MV-CBCT images from 17 patients were analyzed. Internal target volumes were contoured on each MV-CBCT dataset [internal target volume (ITV{sub CB})]. Their extent in each dimension was compared to that of two volumes contoured on simulation 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) images: the combination of the tumor contours of each phase of the 4D-CT (ITV{sub 4D}) and the volume contoured on the average CT calculated from the 4D-CT phases (ITV{sub ave}). Tumor size and breathing amplitude were assessed by contouring the tumor on each CBCT raw projection where it could be unambiguously identified. The effect of breathing amplitude on the quality of the MV-CBCT image reconstruction was analyzed. Results: The mean differences between the sizes of ITV{sub CB} and ITV{sub 4D} were −1.6 ± 3.3 mm (p < 0.001), −2.4 ± 3.1 mm (p < 0.001), and −7.2 ± 5.3 mm (p < 0.001) in the anterior/posterior (AP), left/right (LR), and superior/inferior (SI) directions, respectively, showing that MV-CBCT underestimates the full target size. The corresponding mean differences between ITV{sub CB} and ITV{sub ave} were 0.3 ± 2.6 mm (p = 0.307), 0.0 ± 2.4 mm (p = 0.86), and −4.0 ± 4.3 mm (p < 0.001), indicating that the average CT image is more representative of what is visible on MV-CBCT in the AP and LR directions. In the SI directions, differences between ITV{sub CB} and ITV{sub ave} could be

  7. Optimizing brain tumor resection. Midfield interventional MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, E

    2001-11-01

    The development of the intraoperative MR imager represents an important example of creative vision and interdisciplinary teamwork. The result is a remarkable tool for neurosurgical applications. MRT allows surgical manipulation under direct visualization of the intracranial contents through the eye of the surgeon and through the volumetric images of the MR imaging system. This technology can be applied to cranial and spinal cases, and forseeably can encompass application to the entire gamut of neurosurgical efforts. The author's experience has been that this device is easy and comfortable for the surgeon to use. Image acquisition, giving views in the plane of choice, lasts no more than 2 to 60 seconds (depending on the imaging method), and does not increase the duration of a given procedure substantially. The author believes that the information received through intraoperative MR imaging scanning ultimately will contribute to decreasing the duration of surgery. Future possibilities include combining the intraoperative MR imager with other technologies, such as the endoscope, focused ultrasound, robotics, and the evaluation of brain function intraoperatively. The development of the intraoperative MR imager marks a significant advance in neurosurgery, an advance that will revolutionize intraoperative visualization as fully as the operating microscope. The combination of intraoperative visualization and precise surgical navigation is unparalleled, and its enhancement of surgical applications will be widespread. Considering the remarkable potential of the intraoperative MR imager for neurosurgical applications, optimal magnet design, image quality, and navigational methods are necessary to capitalize on the advantages of this revolutionary tool. The intraoperative MR imaging system that the author's team has developed and used has combined these features, and allows the performance of open surgical procedures without the need of patient or magnet repositioning. By

  8. Ultrasound molecular imaging of VEGFR2 in a rat prostate tumor model using BR55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Isabelle; Pochon, Sibylle; Theraulaz, Martine; Emmel, Patricia; Passantino, Lisa; Tranquart, François; Schneider, Michel

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate BR55, a new VEGFR2-specific ultrasound contrast agent, for imaging prostate tumors in an orthotopic model in the rat. Rat prostate adenocarcinoma were established by injection of G Dunning R-3327 tumor cells in one lobe of the prostate of Copenhagen rats. Imaging experiments were performed with BR55, SonoVue, and streptavidin-functionalized microbubbles coupled with an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) antibody using a clinical ultrasound scanner. Contrast enhancement in the tumor and healthy prostate was followed over time by intermittent imaging at low acoustic power. Signal quantification and statistical analysis were performed in the tumor and healthy tissue to compare the behavior of the 3 contrast agents. Immunohistochemistry was performed on the prostate and tumor specimen to determine the expression of VEGFR2. Comparable contrast enhancement was observed in tumors at peak intensity for BR55 and SonoVue. Then, once unbound microbubbles had cleared from the circulation, a strong enhancement of the tumor was obtained with BR55, whereas no significant microbubble accumulation was detected in the healthy prostate tissue. SonoVue microbubbles were rapidly eliminated, and no significant binding was observed in the tumor. The tumor to prostate ratio calculated after signal quantification was about 20 for the 3 doses of BR55 tested. The enhancement obtained with BR55 in the tumor was not significantly different from the one observed with antibody-coupled streptavidin microbubbles. Intense staining for VEGFR2 was detected in the tumor vessels by immunohistochemistry. This study showed that BR55 binding to prostate tumors resulted in a strong enhancement of the lesions as early as a few minutes after contrast injection, whereas minimal nonspecific accumulation occurred in the healthy part of the gland. BR55, like SonoVue, provide information on tissue perfusion during the early vascular phase, but BR55 binding to the tumoral

  9. The role of imaging for the surgeon in primary malignant bone tumors of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, M., E-mail: michele.rocca@ior.it [General and Thoracic Surgery, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Salone, M. [General and Thoracic Surgery, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Galletti, S. [Ultrasound Unit, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Balladelli, A. [Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D. [Research in Imaging Musculo Skeletal Tumors, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Briccoli, A. [General and Thoracic Surgery, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Primary malignant chest wall tumors are rare. The most frequent primary malignant tumor of the chest wall is chondrosarcoma, less common are primary bone tumors belonging to the Ewing Family Bone Tumors (EFBT), or even rarer are osteosarcomas. They represent a challenging clinical entities for surgeons as the treatment of choice for these neoplasms is surgical resection, excluding EFBT which are normally treated by a multidisciplinary approach. Positive margins after surgical procedure are the principal risk factor of local recurrence, therefore to perform adequate surgery a correct preoperative staging is mandatory. Imaging techniques are used for diagnosis, to determine anatomic site and extension, to perform a guided biopsy, for local and general staging, to evaluate chemotherapy response, to detect the presence of a recurrence. This article will focus on the role of imaging in guiding this often difficult surgery and the different technical possibilities adopted in our department to restore the mechanics of the thoracic cage after wide resections.

  10. Accelerated echo planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging in prostate cancer: a pilot validation of non-linear reconstruction using total variation and maximum entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Iqbal, Zohaib; Burns, Brian; Wilson, Neil E; Sarma, Manoj K; Margolis, Daniel A; Reiter, Robert E; Raman, Steven S; Thomas, M Albert

    2015-11-01

    The overlap of metabolites is a major limitation in one-dimensional (1D) spectral-based single-voxel MRS and multivoxel-based MRSI. By combining echo planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) with a two-dimensional (2D) J-resolved spectroscopic (JPRESS) sequence, 2D spectra can be recorded in multiple locations in a single slice of prostate using four-dimensional (4D) echo planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging (EP-JRESI). The goal of the present work was to validate two different non-linear reconstruction methods independently using compressed sensing-based 4D EP-JRESI in prostate cancer (PCa): maximum entropy (MaxEnt) and total variation (TV). Twenty-two patients with PCa with a mean age of 63.8 years (range, 46-79 years) were investigated in this study. A 4D non-uniformly undersampled (NUS) EP-JRESI sequence was implemented on a Siemens 3-T MRI scanner. The NUS data were reconstructed using two non-linear reconstruction methods, namely MaxEnt and TV. Using both TV and MaxEnt reconstruction methods, the following observations were made in cancerous compared with non-cancerous locations: (i) higher mean (choline + creatine)/citrate metabolite ratios; (ii) increased levels of (choline + creatine)/spermine and (choline + creatine)/myo-inositol; and (iii) decreased levels of (choline + creatine)/(glutamine + glutamate). We have shown that it is possible to accelerate the 4D EP-JRESI sequence by four times and that the data can be reliably reconstructed using the TV and MaxEnt methods. The total acquisition duration was less than 13 min and we were able to detect and quantify several metabolites.

  11. [Adrenal tumors: principles of imaging and differential diagnostics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenhart, C

    2014-10-01

    Adrenal masses are very common and are usually detected incidentally. Less frequently, imaging is performed for the localization of the underlying lesion in the case of endocrine disease. The differentiation between adenomas and non-adenomas is fundamental. Adenomas show a low density on unenhanced computed tomography (CT) and a rapid washout of contrast agents. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) adenomas are characterized by a low signal in opposed phase imaging as compared to in phase imaging. According to the literature a density of less than 10 HU in an adrenal mass has a specificity of 98% and a sensitivity of 71% for the presence of an adenoma and MRI is slightly more sensitive. Some adrenal lesions, e.g. cysts or myelolipomas can be diagnosed with high accuracy due to pathognomonic findings. In the majority of cases the synopsis of imaging along with clinical and laboratory findings is necessary for a reliable diagnosis. For the evaluation of an adrenal mass the CT examination should begin with an unenhanced scan, if necessary followed by a washout examination. In the case of MRI in phase and opposed phase imaging are essential components of the examination.

  12. Classifying Cyst and Tumor Lesion Using Support Vector Machine Based on Dental Panoramic Images Texture Features

    OpenAIRE

    Nurtanio, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Dental radiographs are essential in diagnosing the pathology of the jaw. However, similar radiographic appearance of jaw lesions causes difficulties in differentiating cyst from tumor. Therefore, we conducted a development of computer-aided classification system for cyst and tumor lesions in dental panoramic images. The proposed system consists of feature extraction based on texture using the first-order statistics texture (FO), Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and Gray Level Run ...

  13. Molecular imaging using Cu-ATSM and FDG in solid canine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Elias

    glycolysis and blood perfu- sion. 3) To compare tumor uptake of 64 Cu-ATSM and [ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose ( 18 FDG) (glycolytic activity) to pimonidazole (immunological hypoxia marker) immunohistochemistry. 4) To investigate 18 FDG PET as a diagnostic modality in canine cancer patients. The thesis contains....... Identification of hypoxic tumor and intratumoral hypoxic regions therefore hold the potential to serve as a basis for individualized treatment protocols, including image guided radiation therapy. The current PhD project was undertaken to study tumor hypoxia in cancer bearing dogs, with the aims of 1) identifying...... the potential of implementing canine cancer patients in translational research on tumor hypoxia. 2) Non- invasively evaluate the hypoxia positron emission tomography (PET) tracer 64 Copper(II)diacetyl-bis(N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazone) ( 64 Cu-ATSM), including the comparison to non-invasive measures of tumor...

  14. Long-Lasting and Efficient Tumor Imaging Using a High Relaxivity Polysaccharide Nanogel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Minnie; Lux, Jacques; Nishimura, Tomoki; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Almutairi, Adah

    2015-09-14

    Clinically approved small-molecule magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents are all rapidly cleared from the body and offer weak signal enhancement. To avoid repeated administration of contrast agent and improve signal-to-noise ratios, agents with stronger signal enhancement and better retention in tumors are needed. Therefore, we focused on hydrogels because of their excellent water accessibility and biodegradability. Gadolinium (Gd)-chelating cross-linkers were incorporated into self-assembled pullulan nanogels to both impart magnetic properties and to stabilize this material that has been extensively studied for medical applications. We show that these Gd-chelating pullulan nanogels (Gd-CHPOA) have the highest reported relaxivity for any hydrogel-based particles and accumulate in the 4T1 tumors in mice at high levels 4 h after injection. This combination offers high signal enhancement and lasts up to 7 days to delineate the tumor clearly for longer imaging time scales. Importantly, this long-term accumulation does not cause any damage or toxicity in major organs up to three months after injection. Our work highlights the clinical potential of Gd-CHPOA as a tumor-imaging MRI contrast agent, permitting tumor identification and assessment with a high signal-to-background ratio.

  15. Novel cryo-imaging of the glioma tumor microenvironment reveals migration and dispersal pathways in vivid three-dimensional detail

    OpenAIRE

    Burden-Gulley, Susan M.; Qutaish, Mohammed Q.; Sullivant, Kristin E.; Lu, Hong; Wang, Jing; Craig, Sonya E. L.; Basilion, James P.; Wilson, David L.; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2011-01-01

    Traditional methods of imaging cell migration in the tumor microenvironment include serial sections of xenografts and standard histological stains. Current molecular imaging techniques suffer from low resolution and difficulty in imaging through the skull. Here we show how computer algorithms can be used to reconstruct images from tissue sections obtained from mouse xenograft models of human glioma and can be rendered into 3-D images offering exquisite anatomic detail of tumor cell dispersal....

  16. The clinical application of monoclonal antibody to the tumor-imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Jun; Sugita, Kenichirou (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Ohshima, Norio

    1992-10-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of a [sup 111]In-labeled F(ab')[sub 2] fragment of the monoclonal antibody G-22, an IgG2a reactive with the primitive neuroectodermal antigen of gliomas, in revealing the fine imaging of athymic mice transplanted subcutaneously with U-251-MG or SP human glioma xenografts. Tumor-bearing mice received 50[mu]Ci of [sup 111]In coupled with G-22 and then underwent imaging with a gamma camera. The uptake of [sup 111]In in the tumor was specifically high and continued at that level for 72 hours. In a preliminary study involving a few patients with malignant gliomas, the distribution of the G-22 labeled with [sup 111]In has been examined by means of a gamma camera from 1 hour until 144 hours after injection. A clear tumor image could be obtained beginning 6 hours after injection, and this image could be viewed until 144 hours after the injection. The image scan of the highest quality was shown 48 hours after the injection. These results suggest that a G-22 monoclonal antibody labeled with [sup 111]In would be a useful marker for the tumor imaging of malignant gliomas. (author).

  17. Multimodal imaging enables early detection and characterization of changes in tumor permeability of brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Frits; Fite, Brett; Mahakian, Lisa M; Seo, Jai W; Qin, Shengping; Harrison, Victoria; Johnson, Sarah; Ingham, Elizabeth; Caskey, Charles; Sundstrøm, Terje; Meade, Thomas J; Harter, Patrick N; Skaftnesmo, Kai Ove; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2013-12-28

    Our goal was to develop strategies to quantify the accumulation of model therapeutics in small brain metastases using multimodal imaging, in order to enhance the potential for successful treatment. Human melanoma cells were injected into the left cardiac ventricle of immunodeficient mice. Bioluminescent, MR and PET imaging were applied to evaluate the limits of detection and potential for contrast agent extravasation in small brain metastases. A pharmacokinetic model was applied to estimate vascular permeability. Bioluminescent imaging after injecting d-luciferin (molecular weight (MW) 320 D) suggested that tumor cell extravasation had already occurred at week 1, which was confirmed by histology. 7T T1w MRI at week 4 was able to detect non-leaky 100 μm sized lesions and leaky tumors with diameters down to 200 μm after contrast injection at week 5. PET imaging showed that (18)F-FLT (MW 244 Da) accumulated in the brain at week 4. Gadolinium-based MRI tracers (MW 559 Da and 2.066 kDa) extravasated after 5 weeks (tumor diameter 600 μm), and the lower MW agent cleared more rapidly from the tumor (mean apparent permeabilities 2.27 × 10(-5)cm/s versus 1.12 × 10(-5)cm/s). PET imaging further demonstrated tumor permeability to (64)Cu-BSA (MW 65.55 kDa) at week 6 (tumor diameter 700 μm). In conclusion, high field T1w MRI without contrast may improve the detection limit of small brain metastases, allowing for earlier diagnosis of patients, although the smallest lesions detected with T1w MRI were permeable only to d-luciferin and the amphipathic small molecule (18)F-FLT. Different-sized MR and PET contrast agents demonstrated the gradual increase in leakiness of the blood tumor barrier during metastatic progression, which could guide clinicians in choosing tailored treatment strategies.

  18. Imaging the pharmacokinetics of [F-18]FAU in patients with tumors: PET studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haihao; Collins, Jerry M; Mangner, Thomas J; Muzik, Otto; Shields, Anthony F

    2006-02-01

    FAU (1-(2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-beta-D: -arabinofuranosyl) uracil) can be phosphorylated by thymidine kinase, methylated by thymidylate synthase, followed by DNA incorporation and thus functions as a DNA synthesis inhibitor. This first-in-human study of [F-18]FAU was conducted in cancer patients to determine its suitability for imaging and also to understand its pharmacokinetics as a potential antineoplastic agent. Six patients with colorectal (n = 3) or breast cancer (n = 3) were imaged with [F-18]FAU. Serial blood and urine samples were analyzed using HPLC to determine the clearance and metabolites. Imaging showed that [F-18]FAU was concentrated in breast tumors and a lymph node metastasis (tumor-to-normal-breast-tissue-ratio 3.7-4.7). FAU retention in breast tumors was significantly higher than in normal breast tissues at 60 min and retained in tumor over 2.5 h post-injection. FAU was not retained above background in colorectal tumors. Increased activity was seen in the kidney and urinary bladder due to excretion. Decreased activity was seen in the bone marrow with a mean SUV 0.6. Over 95% of activity in the blood and urine was present as intact [F-18]FAU at the end of the study. Increased [F-18]FAU retention was shown in the breast tumors but not in colorectal tumors. The increased retention of FAU in the breast compared to bone marrow indicates that FAU may be useful as an unlabeled antineoplastic agent. The low retention in the marrow indicates that unlabeled FAU might lead to little marrow toxicity; however, the images were not of high contrast to consider FAU for diagnostic clinical imaging.

  19. How to measure breast cancer tumoral size at MR imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassin-Naggara, I., E-mail: isabelle.thomassin@tnn.aphp.fr [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Institut Universitaire de Cancérologie (IUC) Pierre et Marie Curie, Cancer Est, Paris (France); Siles, Pascale [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Institut Universitaire de Cancérologie (IUC) Pierre et Marie Curie, Cancer Est, Paris (France); Trop, I. [Department of Radiology, Centre de recherche et d’investigation des maladies du sein (CRID), Hôtel Dieu, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Montréal (CHUM) (Canada); Chopier, J. [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Institut Universitaire de Cancérologie (IUC) Pierre et Marie Curie, Cancer Est, Paris (France); Darai, E. [Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Institut Universitaire de Cancérologie (IUC) Pierre et Marie Curie, Cancer Est, Paris (France); Bazot, M. [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Institut Universitaire de Cancérologie (IUC) Pierre et Marie Curie, Cancer Est, Paris (France); and others

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of different MR sequences to measure tumor size. Methods: Eighty-six women (mean age: 53 years (30–78)) who underwent preoperative MRI for breast cancer were included. Maximal diameters of the index tumor (IT) and of the whole extent of the tumor (WET) were measured on T2-weighted (T2W) sequences, on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) T1-weighted (T1W) sequences and on Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP) reconstructions. Agreements with pathological size were evaluated using concordance correlation coefficient (k). Results: Median pathological size of IT was 20 mm (13–25 mm, interquartile range). Median pathological size of the WET was 29 mm (16–50 mm, interquartile range). Measurement of IT showed a good concordance with pathological size, with best results using T2W (k = 0.690) compared to MIP (k = 0.667), early-subtracted DCE frame (k = 0.630) and early-native DCE frame (k = 0.588). IT was visible on T2W in 83.7% and accurately measured within 5 mm in 69.9%. Measurement of WET was superior using early-subtracted DCE frame (k = 0.642) compared to late-native frame (k = 0.635), early-native frame (k = 0.631), late-subtracted frame (k = 0.620) and MIP (k = 0.565). However, even using early-subtracted frame, WET was accurately measured within 5 mm only 39.3%. Conclusion: If visible, IT size is best measured on T2W with a good accuracy (69%) whereas WET is best estimated on early-subtracted DCE frame. However, when adjacent additional sites exist around IT, suspected surrounding disease components need to be proved by pathological analysis.

  20. Backward-mode multiwavelength photoacoustic scanner using a planar Fabry-Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor for high-resolution three-dimensional imaging of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan; Beard, Paul

    2008-02-01

    A multiwavelength backward-mode planar photoacoustic scanner for 3D imaging of soft tissues to depths of several millimeters with a spatial resolution in the tens to hundreds of micrometers range is described. The system comprises a tunable optical parametric oscillator laser system that provides nanosecond laser pulses between 600 and 1200 nm for generating the photoacoustic signals and an optical ultrasound mapping system based upon a Fabry-Perot polymer film sensor for detecting them. The system enables photoacoustic signals to be mapped in 2D over a 50 mm diameter aperture in steps of 10 microm with an optically defined element size of 64 microm. Two sensors were used, one with a 22 microm thick polymer film spacer and the other with a 38 mum thick spacer providing -3 dB acoustic bandwidths of 39 and 22 MHz, respectively. The measured noise equivalent pressure of the 38 microm sensor was 0.21 kPa over a 20 MHz measurement bandwidth. The instrument line-spread function (LSF) was measured as a function of position and the minimum lateral and vertical LSFs found to be 38 and 15 microm, respectively. To demonstrate the ability of the system to provide high-resolution 3D images, a range of absorbing objects were imaged. Among these was a blood vessel phantom that comprised a network of blood filled tubes of diameters ranging from 62 to 300 microm immersed in an optically scattering liquid. In addition, to demonstrate the applicability of the system to spectroscopic imaging, a phantom comprising tubes filled with dyes of different spectral characteristics was imaged at a range of wavelengths. It is considered that this type of instrument may provide a practicable alternative to piezoelectric-based photoacoustic systems for high-resolution structural and functional imaging of the skin microvasculature and other superficial structures.

  1. Passive tumor targeting and imaging by using mercaptosuccinic acid-coated near-infrared quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin G

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guimiao Lin,1 Xiaomei Wang,1 Feng Yin,2 Ken-Tye Yong2 1The Engineering Lab of Synthetic Biology and Research Institute of Uropoiesis and Reproduction, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore Abstract: In this paper, we demonstrate the preparation of monodispersed quantum dots (QDs as near-infrared (NIR optical probes for in vivo pancreatic cancer targeting and imaging. The design of these luminescent probes involves functionalizing NIR QDs with ligand mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA, which targets the tumor site by enhanced permeability and retention effect. The colloidal and optical stability of the QDs can be maintained for >1 week. In vivo optical imaging studies in nude mice bearing pancreatic tumor show that the probes accumulate at tumor sites for >2.5 hours following intravenous injection of the functionalized NIR QDs. Tumor-labeling studies showed no evidence of harmful effects on the treated animals, even at a dose as high as ~50 mg/kg. These results demonstrate that the engineered MSA-functionalized QDs can serve as a diagnostic platform for early detection of cancer, as well as in image-guided precise surgical resection of tumors. Keywords: QDs, near-infrared, mercaptosuccinic acid, pancreatic cancer, tumor targeting

  2. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor.

  3. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-12-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor.

  4. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF FEASIBILITY OF WHOLE BODY DIFFUSION WEIGHTED IMAGING IN DIAGNOSIS OF METASTASIS OF TUMOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-he Yang; Jian-zhong Lin; Xin Wang; Jian-hua Lu; Zhong Chen

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of whole body diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of metastatic tumor.Methods Fifty-six patients (40 males and 16 females, age ranging from 29 to 84 years with a mean age of 57 years) with a variety of primary tumors were investigated by whole body DWI combined with computed tomography (CT) and/or conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Twelve patients underwent positron emission tomography. The final diagnosis was made on the basis of CT or high resolution CT result for lung lesion and MRI or CT result for skull, abdomen and other parts. All tumors were classified into four groups by their diameter: below 1.0 cm, 1.0-1.9 cm, 2.0-2.9 cm, and above 3.0 cm. The sensitivity and specificity of whole body DWI in the detection of metastatic tumor were analyzed.Results The sensitivities of whole body DWI for screening metastasis oftlie four groups were 38%, 75%, 97%, and 100%, respectively. Whole body DWI showed the highest sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastasis of the skeletal system. It was difficult to find metastatic tumor whose diameter was below 1.0 cm, or lymph nodes located in the pelvis with diameter below 2.0 cm. Conclusions Whole body DWI is a promising method in the diagnosis ofmetastastic tumors. With the perfection of scanning parameter, whole body DWI should be a new effective whole body technique for tumor detection.

  5. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of a plexiform angiomyxoid myofibroblastic tumor: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Hiroyuki; Kiryu, Shigeru; Shinozaki, Masaru; Ohta, Yasunori; Nakano, Yoshiyasu; Yasaka, Koichiro; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2017-01-19

    Plexiform angiomyxoid myofibroblastic tumor (PAMT) is a very rare mesenchymal tumor of the stomach. Here we report a case of pathologically confirmed PAMT with an unique cyst formation. A 55-year-old male with a 10-year history of a gastric subepithelial tumor underwent computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two cysts were observed in the tumor, and the cyst wall showed moderately high intensity on T2-weighted images compared with the gastric wall. On dynamic study, the cyst wall showed a gradual enhancement pattern, and prominent enhancement was observed in the delayed phase. Laparoscopic partial gastric resection was performed, and a pathological diagnosis of PAMT was rendered. We present a rare case of gastric PAMT, which was uniquely presented as cysts. One of the cysts in the tumor had an epithelial wall lining, which had never been reported before in gastric mesenchymal tumor, in addition to partial glandular structure. We reviewed our case, focusing on radiologic-pathologic correlation, and suggested hypothesis of cyst formation. According to our findings, PAMT with cyst formation would be included of differential diagnosis of gastric subepithelial tumors.

  6. Optical imaging of breast tumor through temporal log-slope difference mappings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhixiong; Kan Wan, Siew; August, David A; Ying, Jinpin; Dunn, Stanley M; Semmlow, John L

    2006-02-01

    A novel optical temporal log-slope difference mapping approach is proposed for cancerous breast tumor detection. In this method, target tissues are illuminated by near-infrared (700-1000 nm) ultrashort laser pulses from various surface source points, and backscattered time-resolved light signals are collected at the same surface points. By analyzing the log-slopes of decaying signals over all points on the source-detection grid, a log-slope distribution on the surface is obtained. After administration of absorption contrast agents, the presence of cancerous tumors increases the decaying steepness of the transient signals. The mapping of log-slope difference between native tissue and absorption-enhanced cancerous tissue indicates the location and projection of tumors on the detection surface. In this paper, we examine this method in the detection of breast tumors in two model tissue phantoms through computer simulation. The first model has a spherical tumor of 6mm in diameter embedded at the tissue center. The second model is a large tissue phantom embedded with a non-centered spherical tumor 8mm in diameter. Monte Carlo methods were employed to simulate the light transport and signal measurement. It is shown that the tumor in both the tissue models will be accurately projected on the detection surface by the proposed log-slope difference mapping method. The image processing is very fast and does not require any inverse optimization in image reconstruction.

  7. Positron Emission Mammotomography with Dual Planar Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Smith; Raymond Raylman; Stanislaw Majewski

    2003-06-29

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) is usually performed with two stationary planar detectors above and below a compressed breast. There is image blurring normal to the detectors due to the limited angular range of the lines of response. Positron emission mammotomography (PEM-T) with dual planar detectors rotating about the breast can obtain complete angular sampling and has the potential to improve activity estimation.

  8. Diffusion-weighted imaging and fluid attenuated inversion recovery imaging in the evaluation of primitive neuroectodermal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, E.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Haselgrove, J.C.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hunter, J.V. [Hospital of the Univ. of Pennsylvania (HUP), Philadelphia (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2001-11-01

    The aim of our study was to determine whether fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) would be helpful in characterizing primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) from other pediatric brain tumors. We expected that the compact cellular nature and the relatively small extracellular space of this tumor would affect the signal intensity on both pulse sequences relative to the more sparsely cellular glial tumors that have larger extracellular spaces. Eighteen pediatric patients with PNET were examined on a 1.5 T MRI with routine imaging plus FLAIR and compared with 28 patients with non-PNET. DWI was also performed in 7 PNET and 18 non-PNET. Seventy-eight percent of PNET were isointense to gray matter on FLAIR while 82 % of non-PNET were hyperintense and only one was isointense (3 %). Diffusion was abnormally restricted in all 7 PNET examined (100 %) but was restricted in non-PNET in only 1 out of 18 (6 %) patients who had DWI. The differences in the histologic architecture between PNET and non-PNET are reflected in both FLAIR imaging and in DWI. (orig.)

  9. Using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging for the investigation of nude mouse hepatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qiang; Li, Dongyue; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Shuqian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the noninvasive imaging of hepatic tumors without contrast agents. Both normal tissues and tumor tissues can be detected, and tumor tissues in different stages can be classified quantitatively. We implanted BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the livers of nude mice and then imaged the livers using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI). The projection images' texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and dual-tree complex wavelet transforms (DTCWT) were extracted to discriminate normal tissues and tumor tissues. Different stages of hepatic tumors were classified using support vector machines (SVM). Images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 6 days after inoculation with cancer cells show diffuse distribution of the tumor tissue, but images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 9, 12, or 15 days after inoculation with cancer cells show necrotic lumps in the tumor tissue. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) of the texture features based on GLCM of normal regions were positive, but those of tumor regions were negative. The results of PCA of the texture features based on DTCWT of normal regions were greater than those of tumor regions. The values of the texture features in low-frequency coefficient images increased monotonically with the growth of the tumors. Different stages of liver tumors can be classified using SVM, and the accuracy is 83.33%. Noninvasive and micron-scale imaging can be achieved by X-ray ILPCI. We can observe hepatic tumors and small vessels from the phase-contrast images. This new imaging approach for hepatic cancer is effective and has potential use in the early detection and classification of hepatic tumors.

  10. Using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging for the investigation of nude mouse hepatic tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Tao

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to report the noninvasive imaging of hepatic tumors without contrast agents. Both normal tissues and tumor tissues can be detected, and tumor tissues in different stages can be classified quantitatively. We implanted BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the livers of nude mice and then imaged the livers using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI. The projection images' texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM and dual-tree complex wavelet transforms (DTCWT were extracted to discriminate normal tissues and tumor tissues. Different stages of hepatic tumors were classified using support vector machines (SVM. Images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 6 days after inoculation with cancer cells show diffuse distribution of the tumor tissue, but images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 9, 12, or 15 days after inoculation with cancer cells show necrotic lumps in the tumor tissue. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA of the texture features based on GLCM of normal regions were positive, but those of tumor regions were negative. The results of PCA of the texture features based on DTCWT of normal regions were greater than those of tumor regions. The values of the texture features in low-frequency coefficient images increased monotonically with the growth of the tumors. Different stages of liver tumors can be classified using SVM, and the accuracy is 83.33%. Noninvasive and micron-scale imaging can be achieved by X-ray ILPCI. We can observe hepatic tumors and small vessels from the phase-contrast images. This new imaging approach for hepatic cancer is effective and has potential use in the early detection and classification of hepatic tumors.

  11. Intracranial yolk sac tumor in an adult patient: MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging and 1H MR spectroscopy features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mačvanski Marija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Yolk sac tumors represent only 5%-7% of intracranial germ cell tumors, which comprise about 1% of all primary brain tumors in adults. Literature data about nonspecific imaging characteristics of these tumors are scant. We presented magnetic resonance imaging findings with diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of this rare type of tumor in an adult patient. Case report. A 55-year-old man with progressive left side weakness, headache, dizziness and ataxia, underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. After surgical resection and histological analysis, the final diagnosis of yolk sac tumor was established. Retrospective imaging analysis were performed in order to determine imaging and biochemical parameters that could be useful in the diagnostic evaluation of this tumor type. Conclusion. Though the imaging features of yolk sac tumor are not specific, morphoanatomical and metabolic imaging could offer the information that provides new insights into this tumor that may facilitate further therapeutic decision process and potentially provides better information regarding the disease prognosis.

  12. Accelerated short-TE 3D proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging using 2D-SENSE with a 32-channel array coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otazo, Ricardo; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Posse, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with whole brain coverage in clinically feasible acquisition times still remains a major challenge. A combination of MRSI with parallel imaging has shown promise to reduce the long encoding times and 2D acceleration with a large array coil is expected to provide high acceleration capability. In this work a very high-speed method for 3D-MRSI based on the combination of proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) with regularized 2D-SENSE reconstruction is developed. Regularization was performed by constraining the singular value decomposition of the encoding matrix to reduce the effect of low-value and overlapped coil sensitivities. The effects of spectral heterogeneity and discontinuities in coil sensitivity across the spectroscopic voxels were minimized by unaliasing the point spread function. As a result the contamination from extracranial lipids was reduced 1.6-fold on average compared to standard SENSE. We show that the acquisition of short-TE (15 ms) 3D-PEPSI at 3 T with a 32 x 32 x 8 spatial matrix using a 32-channel array coil can be accelerated 8-fold (R = 4 x 2) along y-z to achieve a minimum acquisition time of 1 min. Maps of the concentrations of N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, and glutamate were obtained with moderate reduction in spatial-spectral quality. The short acquisition time makes the method suitable for volumetric metabolite mapping in clinical studies.

  13. Application of the low-loss scanning electron microscope image to integrated circuit technology part II--chemically-mechanically planarized samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, O C; McGlashan-Powell, M; Vladár, A E; Postek, M T

    2001-01-01

    Chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) is a process that gives a flat surface on a silicon wafer by removing material from above a chosen level. This flat surface must then be reviewed (typically using a laser) and inspected for scratches and other topographic defects. This inspection has been done using both the atomic force microscope (AFM) and the scanning electron microscope (SEM), each of which has its own advantages and disadvantages. In this study, the low-loss electron (LLE) method in the SEM was applied to CMP samples at close to a right angle to the beam. The LLEs show shallower topographic defects more clearly than it is possible with the secondary electron (SE) imaging method. These images were then calibrated and compared with those obtained using the AFM, showing the value of both methods. It is believed that the next step is to examine such samples at a right angle to the beam in the SEM using the magnetically filtered LLE imaging method.

  14. Molecular Imaging of Gene Expression and Efficacy following Adenoviral-Mediated Brain Tumor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy is an active area of research relying upon the transfer and subsequent expression of a therapeutic transgene into tumor cells in order to provide for therapeutic selectivity. Noninvasive assessment of therapeutic response and correlation of the location, magnitude, and duration of transgene expression in vivo would be particularly useful in the development of cancer gene therapy protocols by facilitating optimization of gene transfer protocols, vector development, and prodrug dosing schedules. In this study, we developed an adenoviral vector containing both the therapeutic transgene yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD along with an optical reporter gene (luciferase. Following intratumoral injection of the vector into orthotopic 9L gliomas, anatomical and diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained over time in order to provide for quantitative assessment of overall therapeutic efficacy and spatial heterogeneity of cell kill, respectively. In addition, bioluminescence images were acquired to assess the duration and magnitude of gene expression. MR images revealed significant reduction in tumor growth rates associated with yCD/5-fluorocytosine (5FC gene therapy. Significant increases in mean tumor diffusion values were also observed during treatment with 5FC. Moreover, spatial heterogeneity in tumor diffusion changes were also observed revealing that diffusion magnetic resonance imaging could detect regional therapeutic effects due to the nonuniform delivery and/or expression of the therapeutic yCD transgene within the tumor mass. In addition, in vivo bioluminescence imaging detected luciferase gene expression, which was found to decrease over time during administration of the prodrug providing a noninvasive surrogate marker for monitoring gene expression. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the yCD/5FC strategy for the treatment of brain tumors and reveal the feasibility of using multimodality molecular and functional imaging

  15. Iodinated hyaluronic acid oligomer-based nanoassemblies for tumor-targeted drug delivery and cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Young; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2016-04-01

    Nano-sized self-assemblies based on amphiphilic iodinated hyaluronic acid (HA) were developed for use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) was conjugated to an HA oligomer as a computed tomography (CT) imaging modality and a hydrophobic residue. Nanoassembly based on HA-TIBA was fabricated for tumor-targeted delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). Cellular uptake of DOX from nanoassembly, compared to a DOX solution group, was enhanced via an HA-CD44 receptor interaction, and subsequently, the in vitro antitumor efficacy of DOX-loaded nanoassembly was improved in SCC7 (CD44 receptor positive squamous cell carcinoma) cells. Cy5.5, a near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye, was attached to the HA-TIBA conjugate and the in vivo tumor<