WorldWideScience

Sample records for planar laser-induced fluorescence

  1. Planar laser-induced fluorescence fuel imaging during gas-turbine relight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Read, Robert; Rogerson, J.W.; Hochgreb, S.

    2013-01-01

    This experimental study investigates the influence of fuel distribution on ignition outcome during high-altitude relight of a gas turbine. Planar laser-induced fluorescence is used to image fuel inside a lean direct-injection combustor under realistic conditions. A novel apparatus is developed...... to permit planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging, in which large quantities of poorly atomized fuel impinges on the internal surfaces of the combustor. Results reveal high variability in atomization quality. In the absence of flame, small droplets are confined to areas of recirculating flow, whereas...... of ignition when the airflow rate is high. In the presence of flame, medium-sized burning droplets are observed close to the injector centerline. Flame interference resulting from fluorescence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is apparent, but small, suggesting that kerosene planar laser...

  2. Stereoscopic Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging at 500 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medford, Taylor L.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Jiang, N.; Webster, M.; Lempert, Walter; Miller, J.; Meyer, T.

    2011-01-01

    A new measurement technique for obtaining time- and spatially-resolved image sequences in hypersonic flows is developed. Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) has previously been used to investigate transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hypersonic boundary layers using both planar and volumetric imaging capabilities. Low flow rates of NO were typically seeded into the flow, minimally perturbing the flow. The volumetric imaging was performed at a measurement rate of 10 Hz using a thick planar laser sheet that excited NO fluorescence. The fluorescence was captured by a pair of cameras having slightly different views of the flow. Subsequent stereoscopic reconstruction of these images allowed the three-dimensional flow structures to be viewed. In the current paper, this approach has been extended to 50,000 times higher repetition rates. A laser operating at 500 kHz excites the seeded NO molecules, and a camera, synchronized with the laser and fitted with a beam-splitting assembly, acquires two separate images of the flow. The resulting stereoscopic images provide three-dimensional flow visualizations at 500 kHz for the first time. The 200 ns exposure time in each frame is fast enough to freeze the flow while the 500 kHz repetition rate is fast enough to time-resolve changes in the flow being studied. This method is applied to visualize the evolving hypersonic flow structures that propagate downstream of a discrete protuberance attached to a flat plate. The technique was demonstrated in the NASA Langley Research Center s 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Different tunnel Reynolds number conditions, NO flow rates and two different cylindrical protuberance heights were investigated. The location of the onset of flow unsteadiness, an indicator of transition, was observed to move downstream during the tunnel runs, coinciding with an increase in the model temperature.

  3. Measurement of fuel corrosion products using planar laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wantuck, Paul J.; Sappey, Andrew D.; Butt, Darryl P.

    1993-01-01

    Characterizing the corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel material in a high-temperature hydrogen environment is critical for ascertaining the operational performance of proposed nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) concepts. In this paper, we describe an experimental study undertaken to develop and test non-intrusive, laser-based diagnostics for ultimately measuring the distribution of key gas-phase corrosion products expected to evolve during the exposure of NTP fuel to hydrogen. A laser ablation technique is used to produce high temperature, vapor plumes from uranium-free zirconium carbide (ZrC) and niobium carbide (NbC) forms for probing by various optical diagnostics including planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF). We discuss the laser ablation technique, results of plume emission measurements, and we describe both the actual and proposed planar LIF schemes for imaging constituents of the ablated ZrC and NbC plumes. Envisioned testing of the laser technique in rf-heated, high temperature gas streams is also discussed.

  4. Investigation of Gas Seeding for Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisman, C. J.; Johansen, C. T.; Bathel, B. F.; Danehy, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the gas-seeding strategies required for planar laser-induced fluorescence in a Mach 10 (approximately Mach 8.2 postshock) airflow were performed. The work was performed to understand and quantify the adverse effects associated with gas seeding and to assess various types of seed gas that could potentially be used in future experiments. In prior experiments, NO and NO2 were injected through a slot near the leading edge of a flatplate wedge model used in NASA Langley Research Center's 31 in. Mach 10 air tunnel facility. In this paper, nitric oxide, krypton, and iodine gases were simulated at various injection rates. Simulations showing the deflection of the velocity boundary layer for each of the cases are presented. Streamwise distributions of velocity and concentration boundary-layer thicknesses, as well as vertical distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass distributions, are presented for each of the cases. A comparison between simulated streamwise velocity profiles and experimentally obtained molecular tagging velocimetry profiles using a nitric oxide seeding strategy is performed to verify the influence of such a strategy on the boundary layer. The relative merits of the different seeding strategies are discussed. The results from a custom solver based on OpenFOAM version 2.2.1 are compared against results obtained from ANSYS® Fluent version 6.3.

  5. Stereoscopic Imaging in Hypersonics Boundary Layers using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.; Jones, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    Stereoscopic time-resolved visualization of three-dimensional structures in a hypersonic flow has been performed for the first time. Nitric Oxide (NO) was seeded into hypersonic boundary layer flows that were designed to transition from laminar to turbulent. A thick laser sheet illuminated and excited the NO, causing spatially-varying fluorescence. Two cameras in a stereoscopic configuration were used to image the fluorescence. The images were processed in a computer visualization environment to provide stereoscopic image pairs. Two methods were used to display these image pairs: a cross-eyed viewing method which can be viewed by naked eyes, and red/blue anaglyphs, which require viewing through red/blue glasses. The images visualized three-dimensional information that would be lost if conventional planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging had been used. Two model configurations were studied in NASA Langley Research Center's 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Wind tunnel. One model was a 10 degree half-angle wedge containing a small protuberance to force the flow to transition. The other model was a 1/3-scale, truncated Hyper-X forebody model with blowing through a series of holes to force the boundary layer flow to transition to turbulence. In the former case, low flowrates of pure NO seeded and marked the boundary layer fluid. In the latter, a trace concentration of NO was seeded into the injected N2 gas. The three-dimensional visualizations have an effective time resolution of about 500 ns, which is fast enough to freeze this hypersonic flow. The 512x512 resolution of the resulting images is much higher than high-speed laser-sheet scanning systems with similar time response, which typically measure 10-20 planes.

  6. MHz-rate nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging in a Mach 10 hypersonic wind tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Naibo; Webster, Matthew; Lempert, Walter R; Miller, Joseph D; Meyer, Terrence R; Ivey, Christopher B; Danehy, Paul M

    2011-02-01

    Nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) imaging at repetition rates as high as 1 MHz is demonstrated in the NASA Langley 31 in. Mach 10 hypersonic wind tunnel. Approximately 200 time-correlated image sequences of between 10 and 20 individual frames were obtained over eight days of wind tunnel testing spanning two entries in March and September of 2009. The image sequences presented were obtained from the boundary layer of a 20° flat plate model, in which transition was induced using a variety of different shaped protuberances, including a cylinder and a triangle. The high-speed image sequences captured a variety of laminar and transitional flow phenomena, ranging from mostly laminar flow, typically at a lower Reynolds number and/or in the near wall region of the model, to highly transitional flow in which the temporal evolution and progression of characteristic streak instabilities and/or corkscrew-shaped vortices could be clearly identified.

  7. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH in the exhaust of a bi-propellant thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Phillip H.; Clemens, N. T.; Makel, D. B.

    1992-09-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of the hydroxyl radical has been performed on the flow produced by the exhaust of a subscale H2/O2 fueled bi-propellant rocket engine. Measurements were made to test the feasibility of OH (0,0) and (3,0) excitation strategies by using injection seeded XeCl and KrF excimer lasers, respectively. The flow is produced with hydrogen and oxygen reacting at a combustor chamber pressure of 5 atm which then exhausts to the ambient. The hydroxyl concentration in the exhaust flow is approximately 8 percent. Fluorescence images obtained by pumping the Q1(3) transition in the (0,0) band exhibited very high signals but also showed the effect of laser beam absorption. To obtain images when pumping the P1(8) transition in the (3,0) band it was necessary to use exceptionally fast imaging optics and unacceptably high intensifier gains. The result was single-shot images which displayed a signal-to-noise ratio of order unity or less when measured on a per pixel basis.

  8. Fiber-coupled, 10 kHz simultaneous OH planar laser-induced fluorescence/particle-image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Paul S; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2013-01-15

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle-image velocimetry (PIV) techniques that employ free-standing optics face severe challenges when implemented in harsh environments associated with practical combustion facilities because of limited optical access and restrictions on operation of sensitive laser systems. To circumvent this problem, we have developed and implemented a fiber-coupled, high-speed ultraviolet (UV) PLIF/PIV system for measuring hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration and velocity in a realistic 4 MW combustion rig. This system permits delivery of high-power, 10 kHz, nanosecond-duration OH-PLIF excitation pulses (283 nm) and PIV pulses (532 nm) through a common 6 m long, 600 μm core, deep-UV-enhanced multimode fiber. Simultaneous OH-PLIF and PIV imaging at a data-acquisition rate of 10 kHz is demonstrated in turbulent premixed flames behind a bluff body. The effects of delivering high-repetition-rate, intense UV and visible beams through a long optical fiber are investigated, and potential system improvements are discussed.

  9. Investigation of Heat Transfer in Mini Channels using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgild, Morten Ryge; Poulsen, Jonas Lundsted; Rath, Emil Zacho

    2012-01-01

    In this paper an experimental investigation of the heat transfer in mini channels with a hydraulic diameter of 889 m is conducted. The method used is planar laser induceduorescence (PLIF), which uses the principle of laser excitation of rhodamine B in water. The goal of this study is to validate...... the applicability of PLIF to determine the convective heat transfer coecient in mini channels against conventional correlations of the convective heat transfer coecient. The applicability of the conventional theory in micro and mini channels has been discussed by several researchers, but to the authors knowledge...

  10. Miscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using planar laser induced fluorescence visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, Matthew; Roberts, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2011-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified miscible liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Experiments are presented with and without forced initial perturbations produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. The interface is visualized using a 445nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids. The resulting fluorescent images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera. The laser beam is synchronously swept across the fluorescent fluid, at the frame rate of the camera, exposing a single plane of the interface allowing for the measurement of spike and bubble mixing layer growth rates.

  11. Miscible and immiscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using planar laser induced fluorescence visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, Matthew; Roberts, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear induction motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Forced and unforced experiments are conducted using both immiscible and miscible liquid combinations. Forced initial perturbations are produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. The interface is visualized using a 445 nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids. The resulting fluorescent images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera. The laser beam is synchronously swept across the fluorescent fluid, at the frame rate of the camera, exposing a single plane of the interface allowing for the measurement of spike and bubble growth. Comparisons between miscible and immiscible mixing layer distributions are made from the resulting interface concentration profiles.

  12. Proposal of quantitative measurement of OH radical using planar laser induced fluorescence calibrated by cavity ring-down spectroscopy in turbulent premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Tu, Xiaobo; Su, Tie; Mu, Jinhe; Yang, Furong

    2017-05-01

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) has been a very important species analysis approach in combustion research, but is most often presented qualitatively. Therefore, another supplementary techniques are needed for quantitative PLIF measurement. In this paper, we propose a quantitative OH concentration measurement method using PLIF calibrated by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). The CRDS measurement is firstly applied to a methane-air atmospheric pressure flame on a McKenna burner and determine the OH absolute density. Then the PLIF signal is calibrated by the determined OH concentration on the same flame under the same condition. The calibrated PLIF setup is fixed, and another PLIF setup is added to form a two-line OHPLIF thermometry to measure the 2D temperature distribution. Finally, a quantitative OH-PLIF measurement method is provided for the turbulent premixed flame on a Bunsen burner based on this setup.

  13. Planar Sauter Mean Diameter measurements in liquid centered swirl coaxial injector using Laser Induced Fluorescence, Mie scattering and laser diffraction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannaiyan, Kamalakannan; Banda, Manoj Venkata Krishna; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2016-06-01

    An experimental technique is carried out to demonstrate the measurement of planar Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD or D32) distribution in a liquid centered swirl coaxial injector (LCSC) using simultaneous measurements of Mie scattering, Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and Laser diffraction technique (LDT). Here water is used as the test fluid with addition of optimized quantities of the organic dye (Rhodamine 6 g) for PLIF measurements. Experiments are carried out at three experimental conditions with momentum flux ratios of 6.25, 12.14, and 19.95 respectively. Experiments are carried out to study the effect of dye concentration in LDT. LDT (line of sight) is corrected for multiple scattering effects. The SMD distribution obtained from Liquid Sheet Drop Sizing (LSDS) technique is calibrated using LDT (Malvern particle analyzer) that utilizes the principle of diffraction; the results obtained from both the methods are compared and analyzed using the respective histograms. The variations in the distribution of droplet diameter along the axial and radial locations in the spray field are also studied in detail.

  14. Characterization of a two-dimensional temperature field within a rapid compression machine using a toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozzi, Camille; Sotton, Julien; Mura, Arnaud; Bellenoue, Marc

    2009-12-01

    The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process is an advanced operating mode for automotive engines. The self-ignition mechanisms that occur within the combustion chamber exhibit extreme temperature dependence. Therefore, the thorough understanding of corresponding phenomena requires the use of diagnostic methods featuring a sufficient thermal sensitivity, applicable in severe conditions similar to those encountered within engines. In this respect, toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is applied to the inert compression flow generated within an optical rapid compression machine (RCM). A relatively simple diagnostic system is retained: a single wavelength excitation device (266 nm) and a single (filtered) collection system. This diagnostic system is associated with an image processing strategy specifically adapted to RCM devices. Despite the severe conditions under consideration (40 bar, 700-950 K), the method allows us to obtain relatively large two-dimensional temperature fields that display a level of description seldom achieved in such devices. In particular the temperature gradients, which play a crucial role in HCCI combustion processes, can be estimated. The present experimental results confirm the good reliability and accuracy of the method. The information gathered with this toluene PLIF method puts in evidence its high potentialities for the study of aero-thermal-reactive processes as they take place in real engine conditions. The retained strategy also brings new possibilities of non-intrusive analysis for flows practically encountered within industrial devices.

  15. Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence at 10 kHz in a seeded flow, a plasma discharge, and a flame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammack, Stephen D; Carter, Campbell D; Gord, James R; Lee, Tonghun

    2012-12-20

    This study demonstrates high-repetition-rate planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of both cold (~300 K) and hot (~2400 K) nitric oxide (NO) at a framing rate of 10 kHz. The laser system is composed of a frequency-doubled dye laser pumped by the third harmonic of a 10 kHz Nd:YAG laser to generate continuously pulsed laser radiation at 226 nm for excitation of NO. The laser-induced fluorescence signal is detected using a high-frame rate, intensified CMOS camera, yielding a continuous cinematographic propagation of the NO plume where data acquisition duration is limited only by camera memory. The pulse energy of the beam is ~20 μJ with a spectral width ~0.15 cm(-1), though energies as high as 40 μJ were generated. Hot NO is generated by passing air through a DC transient-arc plasma torch that dissociates air. The plasma torch is also used to ignite and sustain a CH(4)/air premixed flame. Cold NO is imaged from a 1% NO flow (buffered by nitrogen). The estimated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the cold seeded flow and air plasma exceeds 50 with expected NO concentrations of 6000-8000 parts per million (ppm, volume basis). Images show distinct, high-contrast boundaries. The plasma-assisted flame images have an SNR of less than 10 for concentrations reaching 1000 ppm. For many combustion applications, the pulse energy is insufficient for PLIF measurements. However, the equipment and strategies herein could be applied to high-frequency line imaging of NO at concentrations of 10-100 ppm. Generation of 226 nm radiation was also performed using sum-frequency mixing of the 532 nm pumped dye laser and 355 nm Nd:YAG third harmonic but was limited in energy to 14 μJ. Frequency tripling a 532 nm pumped dye laser produced 226 nm radiation at energies comparable to the 355 nm pumping scheme.

  16. Immiscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using simultaneous particle image velocimetry and planar laser induced fluorescence concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, Matthew; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear induction motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Forced and unforced experiments are conducted using an immiscible liquid combination. Forced initial perturbations are produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. The interface is visualized using a 445 nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids and aluminum oxide particles dispersed in both fluids. The laser beam is synchronously swept across the fluorescent fluid, at the frame rate of the camera, exposing a single plane of the interface. The resulting images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera. Time dependent velocity and density fields are obtained from the recorded images allowing for 2D full field measurements of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent mass transport.

  17. Miscible and immiscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using simultaneous planar laser induced fluorescence and backlight visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, Matthew; Roberts, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2012-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Experiments are presented with and without forced initial perturbations produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. Half of the experimental tank is visualized using a 445nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids. The other half is illuminated with a white backlight. The resulting images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera allowing for the measurement of spike and bubble mixing layer growth rates for both visualization techniques in a single experiment.

  18. 2D and 3D imaging of the gas phase close to an operating model catalyst by planar laser induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Sara; Zhou, Jianfeng; Gustafson, Johan; Zetterberg, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin

    2016-11-16

    In recent years, efforts have been made in catalysis related surface science studies to explore the possibilities to perform experiments at conditions closer to those of a technical catalyst, in particular at increased pressures. Techniques such as high pressure scanning tunneling/atomic force microscopy (HPSTM/AFM), near ambient pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (NAPXPS), surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) and polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) at semi-realistic conditions have been used to study the surface structure of model catalysts under reaction conditions, combined with simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS). These studies have provided an increased understanding of the surface dynamics and the structure of the active phase of surfaces and nano particles as a reaction occurs, providing novel information on the structure/activity relationship. However, the surface structure detected during the reaction is sensitive to the composition of the gas phase close to the catalyst surface. Therefore, the catalytic activity of the sample itself will act as a gas-source or gas-sink, and will affect the surface structure, which in turn may complicate the assignment of the active phase. For this reason, we have applied planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to the gas phase in the vicinity of an active model catalysts. Our measurements demonstrate that the gas composition differs significantly close to the catalyst and at the position of the MS, which indeed should have a profound effect on the surface structure. However, PLIF applied to catalytic reactions presents several beneficial properties in addition to investigate the effect of the catalyst on the effective gas composition close to the model catalyst. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PLIF provides a unique tool to visualize the on-set of catalytic reactions and to compare different model catalysts in the same reactive environment. The technique can be

  19. 2D and 3D imaging of the gas phase close to an operating model catalyst by planar laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Sara; Zhou, Jianfeng; Gustafson, Johan; Zetterberg, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, efforts have been made in catalysis related surface science studies to explore the possibilities to perform experiments at conditions closer to those of a technical catalyst, in particular at increased pressures. Techniques such as high pressure scanning tunneling/atomic force microscopy (HPSTM/AFM), near ambient pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (NAPXPS), surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) and polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) at semi-realistic conditions have been used to study the surface structure of model catalysts under reaction conditions, combined with simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS). These studies have provided an increased understanding of the surface dynamics and the structure of the active phase of surfaces and nano particles as a reaction occurs, providing novel information on the structure/activity relationship. However, the surface structure detected during the reaction is sensitive to the composition of the gas phase close to the catalyst surface. Therefore, the catalytic activity of the sample itself will act as a gas-source or gas-sink, and will affect the surface structure, which in turn may complicate the assignment of the active phase. For this reason, we have applied planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to the gas phase in the vicinity of an active model catalysts. Our measurements demonstrate that the gas composition differs significantly close to the catalyst and at the position of the MS, which indeed should have a profound effect on the surface structure. However, PLIF applied to catalytic reactions presents several beneficial properties in addition to investigate the effect of the catalyst on the effective gas composition close to the model catalyst. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PLIF provides a unique tool to visualize the on-set of catalytic reactions and to compare different model catalysts in the same reactive environment. The technique can be

  20. Development and application of a high-speed planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging system to evaluate liquid and vapor phases of sprays from a multi-hole diesel fuel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, S. E.; Zink, R. J.

    2013-02-01

    A high-speed imaging system capable of acquiring elastic scattering images and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) images in a near-simultaneous fashion has been developed. Acquiring both elastic scattering and PLIF images enables the liquid phase to be discriminated from the vapor phase. High-speed imaging allows the temporal evolution of flow structures to be evaluated. Images of sprays from a multi-hole diesel fuel injector operating under engine-like conditions were acquired. The vapor phase images reveal intricate fluid dynamic structures that exhibit a high degree of variability, indicative of a turbulent gas jet.

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  2. Laser induced fluorescence technique for environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Felizardo, Rui; Gameiro, Carla; Matos, Ana R.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the development of laser induced fluorescence sensors and their application in the evaluation of water pollution and physiological status of higher plants and algae. The sensors were built on the basis of reliable and robust solid-state Nd:YAG lasers. They demonstrated good efficiency in: i) detecting and characterizing oil spills and dissolved organic matter; ii) evaluating the impact of stress on higher plants (cork oak, maritime pine, and genetically modified Arabidopsis); iii) tracking biomass changes in intertidal microphytobenthos; and iv) mapping macroalgal communities in the Tagus Estuary.

  3. Laser induced fluorescence of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, S.; Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Significant differences between the optical spectra taken from sound regions of teeth and carious regions have been observed. These differences appear both in absorption and in laser induced fluorescence spectra. Excitation by the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser beam showed a peak in the emission intensity around 553 nm for the sound dental material while the emission peak from the carious region was red-shifted by approximately 40 nm. The relative absorption of carious region was significantly higher at 488 nm; however its fluorescence intensity peak was lower by an order of magnitude compared to the sound tooth. Implications of these results for a safe, reliable and early detection of dental caries are discussed.

  4. Laser induced fluorescence of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, S.; Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Significant differences between the optical spectra taken from sound regions of teeth and carious regions have been observed. These differences appear both in absorption and in laser induced fluorescence spectra. Excitation by the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser beam showed a peak in the emission intensity around 553 nm for the sound dental material while the emission peak from the carious region was red-shifted by approximately 40 nm. The relative absorption of carious region was significantly higher at 488 nm; however its fluorescence intensity peak was lower by an order of magnitude compared to the sound tooth. Implications of these results for a safe, reliable and early detection of dental caries are discussed.

  5. Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames Stabilized on Double-Slit Curved Wall-Jet Burner with Simultaneous OH-Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence and Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Morkous S.

    2015-04-29

    A double-slit curved wall-jet (CWJ) burner utilizing a Coanda effect by supplying fuel and air as annular-inward jets over a curved surface was employed to investigate the stabilization characteristics and structure of propane/air turbulent non-premixed flames with varying global equivalence ratio and Reynolds number. Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals were conducted. The burner showed a potential of stable and non-sooting operation for relatively large fuel loading and overall rich conditions. Mixing characteristics in cold flow were first examined using an acetone fluorescence technique, indicating substantial transport between the fuel and air by exhibiting appreciable premixing conditions. PIV measurements revealed that the flow field consisted of a wall-jet region leading to a recirculation zone through flow separation, an interaction jet region resulting from the collision of annular-inward jets, followed by a merged-jet region. The flames were stabilized in the recirculation zone and, in extreme cases, only a small flame seed remained in the recirculation zone. Together with the collision of the slit jets in the interaction jet region, the velocity gradients in the shear layers at the boundaries of the annular jets generate the turbulence. Turbulent mean and rms velocities were influenced by the presence of the flame, particularly in the recirculation zone. Flames with a high equivalence ratio were found to be more resistant to local extinction and exhibited a more corrugated and folded nature, particularly at high Reynolds numbers. For flames with a low equivalence ratio, local quenching and re-ignition processes maintained flames in the merged jet region, revealing a strong intermittency, which was substantiated by the increased principal strain rates for these flames. © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence of oral mucosa cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaliashvili, Z. V.; Medoidze, T. D.; Melikishvili, Z. G.; Gogilashvili, K. T.

    2017-10-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra have been measured for cancer-infused and control mice mucosa tissues. It was established that there is quite a difference between their LIF spectral shapes. These spectral shapes are used to express the diagnostic of different states of tissues: from normal to cancer.

  7. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of IrN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. F. Pang; A. S. C. Cheung

    2009-01-01

    High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra of IrN in the spectral region between 394and 520 nm were recorded using laser vaporization/reaction free jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Seven new vibronic transition bands were observed and analyzed. TwoΩ=1 and five Ω=0 new states were identified. Least squares fit of rotationally resolved transition lines yielded accurate molecular constants for the upper states. Spectra of isotopic molecules were observed, which provided confirmation for the vibrational assignment. Comparison of the observed electronic states of IrB, IrC, and IrN provides a good understanding of the chemical bonding of this group of molecules.

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of stomach cancer using hypericin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dets, Sergiy M.; Buryi, Alexander N.; Melnik, Ivan S.; Joffe, Alexander Y.; Rusina, Tatyana V.

    1996-12-01

    Natural photodynamic pigment hypericin having intrinsic antitumor properties was applied for fluorescence detection of cancer. Clinical investigation of hypericin was performed to ensure high tumor/normal fluorescence contrast in digestion organs. Laser-induced autofluorescence and exogenous fluorescence analysis of normal tissue and stomach adenocarcinoma was performed using helium-cadmium laser (8 mW, 442 nm). Twenty-one patients have undergone procedure of fluorescence detection of tumors before and after photosensitization. For sensitization of patients we used five or seven capsules containing hypericin in amount of 1 mg which have been administered orally. Strong yellow-red fluorescence of hypericin in tissue with maximum at 603 nm and autofluorescence peak at 535 nm gives an intensity ratio I(603 nm)/I(535 nm) of 2 - 2.5 from cancerous tissue and provides 85% specificity. Preliminary in vivo results of auto- and fluorescence analysis using hypericin photosensitization from one patient with esophageal cancer and eleven patients with stomach cancer proven histologically are encouraging and indicate the high reliability of laser-induced fluorescence technique with hypericin in detection of early stage malignant lesions.

  9. Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence: environmental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, Lee; Brumley, William C

    2008-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE), especially free-zone CE, offers a relatively simple separation with moderate selectivity based on the mobility of ions in solution. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection, an extremely sensitive technique, can be coupled with a variety of separation conditions to achieve sensitive and quantitative results. When these techniques are combined, CE/LIF provides the sensitivity and increased selectivity that makes trace level environmental analysis of fluorescent compounds possible at or below levels typical for gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS). We offer a panoramic review of the role of these tools in solving environmental and related analytical problems before providing a detailed experimental protocol.

  10. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  11. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffin, V. L.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from 1 Sep. 1989 to 28 Feb. 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe in supercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence in high pressure solid propellant flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, T; Weaver, D P; Campbell, D H

    1987-09-01

    The application of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to the study of high pressure solid propellant flames is described. The distribution of the OH and CN radicals was determined in several solid propellant flames at pressures up to 3.5 MPa. The greatest difficulty in these measurements was the separation of the desired LIF signals from the large scattering at the laser wavelength from the very optically thick propellant flames. Raman experiments using 308-nm excitation were also attempted in the propellant flames but were unsuccessful due to LIF interferences from OH and NH.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence in diagnosis of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, Eleni A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan; Serafetinides, Alexandros A.

    2003-09-01

    laser induces better discrimination in deep caries diagnosis.

  14. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Gaseous [I[subscript]2] Excited with a Green Laser Pointer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A green laser pointer could be used in a flashy demonstration of laser-induced fluorescence in the gas phase by directing the beam of the laser through a cell containing [I[subscript]2] at its room temperature vapor pressure. The experiment could be used to provide valuable insight into the requirements for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and the…

  15. Containerless study of metal evaporation by laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of atomic vapors was used to study evaporation from electromagnetically levitated and CW CO2 laser-heated molybdenum spheres and resistively-heated tungsten filaments. Electromagnetic (EM) levitation in combination with laser heating of tungsten, zirconium, and aluminum specimens was also investigated. LIF intensity vs temperature data were obtained for molybdenum atoms and six electronic states of atomic tungsten, at temperatures up to the melting point of each metal. The detected fraction of the emitted radiation was reduced by self-absorption effects at the higher experimental temperatures. Vaporization enthalpies derived from data for which less than half the LIF intensity was self-absorbed were -636 + or - 24 kJ/g-mol for Mo and 831 + or - 32 kJ/g-mol for W. Space-based applications of EM levitation in combination with radiative heating are discussed.

  16. Characterisation of estuarine intertidal macroalgae by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Carla; Utkin, Andrei B.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2015-12-01

    The article reports the application of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for the assessment of macroalgae communities of estuarine intertidal areas. The method was applied for the characterisation of fifteen intertidal macroalgae species of the Tagus estuary, Portugal, and adjacent coastal area. Three bands characterised the LIF spectra of red macroalgae with emission maxima in the ranges 577-583 nm, 621-642 nm and 705-731 nm. Green and brown macroalgae showed one emission maximum in the red region (687-690 nm) and/or one in the far-red region (726-732 nm). Characteristics of LIF emission spectra were determined by differences in the main fluorescing pigments: phycoerythrin, phycocyanin and chlorophyll a (Chl a). In the green and brown macroalgae groups, the relative significance of the two emission maxima seems to be related to the thickness of the photosynthetic layer. In thick macroalgae, like Codium tomentosum or Fucus vesiculosus, the contribution of the far-red emission fluorescence peak was more significant, most probably due to re-absorption of the emitted red Chl a fluorescence within the dense photosynthetic layer. Similarly, an increase in the number of layers of the thin-blade green macroalgae Ulva rigida caused a shift to longer wavelengths of the red emission maximum and the development of a fluorescence peak at the far-red region. Water loss from Ulva's algal tissue also led to a decrease in the red/far-red Chl fluorescence ratio (F685/F735), indicating an increase in the density of chloroplasts in the shrinking macroalgal tissue during low tide exposure.

  17. Evaluation of immunoglobulins in bovine colostrum using laser induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Z; Abdel Ghany, Sh; Harith, M A

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to exploit laser induced fluorescence (LIF) as a spectrochemical analytical technique for evaluation of immunoglobulin (IgG) in bovine colostrum. Colostrum samples were collected from different American Holstein cows at different times after calving. Four samples were gathered from each cow; the first three samples were obtained from the first three milkings (colostrum) and the fourth sample (milk) was obtained a week after calving. It has been demonstrated that LIF can be used as a simple, fast, sensitive and less costly spectrochemical analytical technique for qualitative estimation of IgG in colostrum. LIF results have been confirmed via the quantitative evaluation of IgG in the same samples adopting the single radial immunodiffusion conventional technique and a very good agreement has been obtained. Through LIF it was possible to evaluate bovine colostrum after different milking times and to differentiate qualitatively between colostrum from different animals which may reflect their general health status. A fluorescence linear calibration curve for IgG concentrations from 0 up to 120 g L(-1) has been obtained. In addition, it is feasible to adopt this technique for in situ measurements, i.e. in dairy cattle farms as a simple and fast method for evaluation of IgG in bovine colostrum instead of using lengthy and complicated conventional techniques in laboratories.

  18. Determination of flame temperature using laser induced fluorescence (LIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Lina Augusta Martins Ramos da [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Barreta, Gilberto; Carinhana Junior, Dermeval; Toledo, Antonio Osny de [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Laser Induced Fluorescence, LIF, is one of the most used techniques in combustion diagnostics. The excitation method is based on the spontaneous spectrum from atoms or molecules that were excited by laser radiation. In general, intermediated combustion species, as OH and CH radicals, are used as temperature probes. Usually, several rotational levels are used by tuning the laser afterwards across the corresponding absorption transitions. The emission spectrum is detected in a convenient spectral range. The accuracy of measurements depends on the laser linewidth, the delay between the laser excitation and spectra detection and, mainly, the spectral interval of laser excitation. In this work, OH LIF spectra from stoichiometric LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) flames were obtained using a tuned laser with a spectral range set from 282 nm up to 283 nm. This corresponds to the rotation levels of the 0-1 vibration band of OH radical. The laser energy was ca. 0.2 mJ. The emission spectrum was collected in the spectral range of the 305-310 nm, which corresponds to the region of the 0-0 band. The temperature was determined by the Boltzmann method. This is based on the measurement of the relative peak intensities of the emission spectrum. A plot of natural logarithm of line intensities versus energy level returns a straight line, whose slope is the inverse of the rotational temperature. The flame temperature was ca. 2300 K. This value is consistent with previous results obtained in our laboratory. (author)

  19. Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence for bioaerosols standoff detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Stadnyk, Laurie; Rowsell, Susan; Simard, Jean-Robert; Ho, Jim; Déry, Bernard; McFee, John

    2007-09-01

    An efficient standoff biological warfare detection capability could become an important asset for both defence and security communities based on the increasing biological threat and the limits of the presently existing protection systems. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This LIDAR system named SINBAHD monitors the spectrally resolved LIF originating from inelastic interactions with bioaerosols present in atmospheric cells customizable in size and in range. SINBAHD has demonstrated the capability of near real-time detection and classification of bioaerosolized threats at multi-kilometre ranges. In spring 2005, DRDC has initiated the BioSense demonstration project, which combines the SINBAHD technology with a geo-referenced Near InfraRed (NIR) LIDAR cloud mapper. SINBAHD is now being used to acquire more signatures to add in the spectral library and also to optimize and test the new BioSense algorithm strategy. In September 2006, SINBAHD has participated in a two-week trial held at DRDC-Suffield where different open-air wet releases of live and killed bioagent simulants, growth media and obscurants were performed. An autoclave killing procedure was performed on two biological materials (Bacillus subtilis var globigii or BG, and Bacillus thuringiensis or Bt) before being aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized with SINBAHD. The obtained results showed no significant impact of this killing process on their normalised spectral signature in comparison with their live counterparts. Correlation between the detection signals from SINBAHD, an array of slit samplers and a FLuorescent Aerosol Particle Sensor (C-FLAPS) was obtained and SINBAHD's sensitivity could then be estimated. At the 2006 trial, a detection limit of a few tens of Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air (ACPLA) was obtained

  20. Clinical detection studies of Barrett's metaplasia and oesophageal adenocarcinoma by means of laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Annika M.; von Holstein, Christer S.; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Willen, Roger; Walther, Bruno; Svanberg, Katarina

    1995-12-01

    Five patients with Barrett's metaplastic epithelium were investigated by means of laser- induced fluorescence after low-dose i.v. injection (0.35 mg/kg b.w.) of PhotofrinR in connection with endoscopy procedures. The excitation wavelength was 405 nm. Recorded fluorescence spectra were evaluated by forming ratios with the photosensitizer fluorescence as numerator and the autofluorescence as denominator. Two patients had no evidence of malignancy and their fluorescence ratios were consequently rather small, whereas the other three patients had adenocarcinoma and showed considerably higher ratios. The results indicate that laser-induced fluorescence can be used as an aid in detecting malignant transformations in Barrett's metaplasia.

  1. Quantitative laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbiezen, K.; Klein-Douwel, R. J. H.; van Viet, A. P.; Donkerbroek, A. J.; Meerts, W. L.; Dam, N. J.; ter Meulen, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    We present quantitative, in-cylinder, UV-laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine. Processing of the raw fluorescence signals includes a detailed correction, based on additional measurements, for the effect of laser beam and fluorescence attenuation, and

  2. A convenient setup for laser-induced fluorescence imaging of both CO and CO2 during catalytic CO oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Pfaff, S.; Lundgren, E.; Zetterberg, J.

    2017-03-01

    In-situ knowledge of the gas composition close to a catalyst is essential for a better understanding of the gas-surface interaction. With planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), the gas distribution around an operating catalyst can be visualized with high spatial and temporal resolution, in a non-intrusive manner. We report on a convenient setup using a nanosecond YAG-Dye laser system together with a broadband mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) for imaging both CO and CO2 over a Pd(100) catalyst during catalytic CO oxidation, compare it to previously used systems, and show examples of its capabilities.

  3. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the mixing of fuel oil with air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, A.; Bombach, R.; Hubschmid, W.; Kaeppeli, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    We report on measurements of the mixing of fuel oil with air at atmospheric pressure in an industrial premixed gas turbine burner. The concentration of the vaporized fuel oil was measured with laser induced fluorescence. We reason that the fuel oil concentration can be considered with good accuracy as proportional to the fluorescence intensity. (author) 6 fig., 3 refs.

  4. Recognition of edible oil by using BP neural network and laser induced fluorescence spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Tao-tao; Chen, Si-ying; Zhang, Yin-chao; Guo, Pan; Chen, He; Zhang, Hong-yan; Liu, Xiao-hua; Wang, Yuan; Bu, Zhi-chao

    2013-09-01

    In order to accomplish recognition of the different edible oil we set up a laser induced fluorescence spectrum system in the laboratory based on Laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology, and then collect the fluorescence spectrum of different edible oil by using that system. Based on this, we set up a fluorescence spectrum database of different cooking oil. It is clear that there are three main peak position of different edible oil from fluorescence spectrum chart. Although the peak positions of all cooking oil were almost the same, the relative intensity of different edible oils was totally different. So it could easily accomplish that oil recognition could take advantage of the difference of relative intensity. Feature invariants were extracted from the spectrum data, which were chosen from the fluorescence spectrum database randomly, before distinguishing different cooking oil. Then back propagation (BP) neural network was established and trained by the chosen data from the spectrum database. On that basis real experiment data was identified by BP neural network. It was found that the overall recognition rate could reach as high as 83.2%. Experiments showed that the laser induced fluorescence spectrum of different cooking oil was very different from each other, which could be used to accomplish the oil recognition. Laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology, combined BP neural network,was fast, high sensitivity, non-contact, and high recognition rate. It could become a new technique to accomplish the edible oil recognition and quality detection.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence and optical reflection spectra of Japanese natural dyes on silk

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi, Tadaki; Matsuda, Yasunori

    1987-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra under nitrogen-laser excitation were measured for silk cloth dyed with Japanese natural dyes. An identification of the dyes on silk was carried out using a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique since dyed cloth has a characteristic fluorescence spectra. Moreover, it is possible to identify dyes on faded cloth and on cloth prepared by a combination dyeing using two kinds of dyes. The LIF technique can identify dyes on cloth which is difficult to identify using the ref...

  6. The application of time decay characteristics of laser-induced fluorescence in the classification of vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wei; Yang, Jian; Shi, Shuo; Du, Lin; Sun, Jia; Song, Shalei

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the time decay of the chlorophyll fluorescence intensity (TDCFI) of vegetation was measured based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology with a 355 nm laser serving as the excitation light source. The pseudo-color diagram of the TDCFI (PDTDCFIs) was proposed for use as a characteristic fingerprint for the analysis of various plant species based on variations in the fluorescence intensity over time. Compared with the steady-state fluorescence spectra, two-dimensional PDTDCFIs contained more spectral information, including variations in both the shape of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra and the relative intensity. The experimental results demonstrated that the PDTDCFIs of various plant species show distinct differences, and this was successfully applied in the classification of plant species. Therefore, the PDTDCFIs of plants could provide researchers with a more reliable and useful tool for the characterization of vegetation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Development of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopic technique for the analysis of biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Our developments of the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF detection system for biomolecules are presented. This system is based on the tunable (320 nm to 475 nm Nd:YAG laser pulses used to excite various biomolecules. The detection part is the Streak System for Fluorescence Lifetime Spectroscopy (Hamamatsu, Japan. The system consists of a C4334-01 streakscope, as a detector, DG 535 digital pulse/delay generator, C5094-S Spectrograph and HPD-TA System, as a temporal analyzer. The TR-LIF spectrometer is designed primarily to study the temperature and pressure effects on fluorescence behavior of biomolecules upon excitation with a single nanosecond pulse. The design of this system has capability to combine laser-induced breakdown (LIB with fluorescence, as well to study optodynamic behavior of fluorescence biomolecules.

  8. [Laser induced fluorescence spectrum characteristics of common edible oil and fried cooking oil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Tao-tao; Chen, Si-ying; Zhang, Yin-chao; Chen, He; Guo, Pan; Ge, Xian-ying; Gao, Li-lei

    2013-09-01

    In order to detect the trench oil the authors built a trench oil rapid detection system based on laser induced fluorescence detection technology. This system used 355 nm laser as excitation light source. The authors collected the fluorescence spectrum of a variety of edible oil and fried cooking oil (a kind of trench oil) and then set up a fluorescence spectrum database by taking advantage of the trench oil detection system It was found that the fluorescence characteristics of fried cooking oil and common edible oil were obviously different. Then it could easily realize the oil recognition and trench oil rapid detection by using principal component analysis and BP neural network, and the overall recognition rate could reach as high as 97.5%. Experiments showed that laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology was fast, non-contact, and highly sensitive. Combined with BP neural network, it would become a new technique to detect the trench oil.

  9. A Spectral Analysis of Laser Induced Fluorescence of Iodine

    CERN Document Server

    Bayram, S B

    2015-01-01

    When optically excited, iodine absorbs in the 490- to 650-nm visible region of the spectrum and, after radiative relaxation, it displays an emission spectrum of discrete vibrational bands at moderate resolution. This makes laser-induced fuorescence spectrum of molecular iodine especially suitable to study the energy structure of homonuclear diatomic molecules at room temperature. In this spirit, we present a rather straightforward and inexpensive experimental setup and the associated spectral analysis which provides an excellent exercise of applied quantum mechanics fit for advanced laboratory courses. The students would be required to assign spectral lines, fill a Deslandres table, process the data to estimate the harmonic and anharmonic characteristics of the ground vibronic state involved in the radiative transitions, and thenceforth calculate a set of molecular constants and discuss a model of molecular vibrator.

  10. Formation of nitric oxide in an industrial burner measured by 2-D laser induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, A.; Bombach, R.; Kaeppeli, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    We have performed two-dimensional Laser Induced Fluorescence (2-D LIF) measurements of nitric oxide and hydroxyl radical distributions in an industrial burner at atmospheric pressure. The relative 2-D LIF data of NO were set to an absolute scale by calibration with probe sampling combined with gas analysis. (author) 3 figs., 7 refs.

  11. Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection for fast and reliable apolipoprotein E genotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somsen, GW; Welten, HTME; Mulder, FP; Swart, CW; Kema, IP; de Jong, GJ

    2002-01-01

    The use of capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection for the rapid determination of apolipoprotein E (apoE) genotypes was studied. High resolution and sensitive detection of the concerned DNA restriction fragments was achieved using CE buffers with hydroxypropylm

  12. Capillary Electrophoretic Immunoassay with Laser-induced Fluorescence Detection for Interferon-gamma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua ZHANG; Hai Ming WEI; Wen Rui JIN

    2004-01-01

    Capillary electrophoretic immunoassay with laser-induced fluorescence detection for recombinant human interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) was established. The limits of detection for three forms of IFN-γare 6.9 ng/L, 5.7 ng/L and 5.0 ng/L, respectively.

  13. Laser induced fluorescence applied to studies of particle behaviour in high-temperature plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, K.; Uchino, K.; Kajiwara, T.; Maeda, M.; Okada, T. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, we first review the principle of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), then give an overview of tunable laser sources, the crucial hardware for the experiment, and describe methods of calibration to obtain necessary information from the observed fluorescence, followed by the plasma measurements which have already been conducted. Comments are made for the future perspective of LIF for high-temperature plasma diagnostics. (J.P.N.).

  14. Analysis of laser-induced fluorescence spectra of in vitro plant tissue cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Ana Celia; Gutiérrez-Pulido, Humberto; Rodríguez-Domínguez, José Manuel; Gutiérrez-Mora, Antonia; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamín; Cervantes-Martínez, Jesús

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for monitoring the development and stress detection of in vitro tissue cultures in a nondestructive and noninvasive way. The changes in LIF spectra caused by the induction of organogenesis, the increase of the F690/F740 ratio as a result of the stress originated in the organogenic explants due to shoot emergence, and the relationship between fluorescence spectra and shoot development were detected by LIF through closed containers of Saintpaulia ionantha.

  15. Laser induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer for microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G R

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a novel, non-intrusive fluid velocity measurement method based on photobleaching of a fluorescent dye for microfluidic devices. The residence time of the fluorescent dye in a laser beam depends on the flow velocity and approximately corresponds to the decaying time of the photobleaching of the dye in the laser beam. The residence time is inversely proportional to the flow velocity. The fluorescence intensity increases with the flow velocity due to the decrease of the residence time. A calibration curve between fluorescence intensity and known flow velocity should be obtained first. The calibration relationship is then used to calculate the flow velocity directly from the measured fluorescence intensity signal. The new method can measure the velocity very quickly and is easy to use. It is demonstrated for both pressure driven flow and electroosmotic flow.

  16. Characterisation of estuarine intertidal macroalgae by laser-induced fluorescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gameiro, Carla; Utkin, Andrei B.; Sousa Dias Cartaxana, Paulo Jorge

    2015-01-01

    spectra were determined by differences in the main fluorescing pigments: phycoerythrin, phycocyanin and chlorophyll a (Chl a). In the green and brown macroalgae groups, the relative significance of the two emission maxima seems to be related to the thickness of the photosynthetic layer. In thick...... macroalgae, like Codium tomentosum or Fucus vesiculosus, the contribution of the far-red emission fluorescence peak was more significant, most probably due to re-absorption of the emitted red Chl a fluorescence within the dense photosynthetic layer. Similarly, an increase in the number of layers of the thin...

  17. Experimental Research of Reliability of Plant Stress State Detection by Laser-Induced Fluorescence Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Fedotov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental laboratory investigations of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of watercress and lawn grass were conducted. The fluorescence spectra were excited by YAG:Nd laser emitting at 532 nm. It was established that the influence of stress caused by mechanical damage, overwatering, and soil pollution is manifested in changes of the spectra shapes. The mean values and confidence intervals for the ratio of two fluorescence maxima near 685 and 740 nm were estimated. It is presented that the fluorescence ratio could be considered a reliable characteristic of plant stress state.

  18. Teaching laser-induced fluorescence of plant leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Sándor; Gádoros, Patrik; Kocsányi, László; Barócsi, Attila

    2016-11-01

    Plants convert carbon dioxide into sugars using the energy of sunlight. Absorbed light unused for conversion is dissipated primarily as heat with a small fraction re-emitted as fluorescence at longer wavelengths. One can use the latter to estimate photosynthetic activity. The illumination of intact leaves with strong light after keeping them in dark for tens of minutes results in a rapid increase followed by a slow decay of fluorescence emission from the fluorophore chlorophyll-a, called the Kautsky effect. This paper describes a laboratory practice that introduces students of physics or engineering into this research field. It begins with the spectral measurement of the fluorescence emitted by a plant leaf upon UV excitation. Then it focuses on the red and far-red components of the fluorescence emission spectrum characteristic to the chlorophyll-a molecule and presents an inexpensive demonstration of the Kautsky effect. As researchers use more complex measurement techniques and tools, the practice ends up with the demonstration of an intelligent fluorosensor, a compact tool developed for plant physiological research and horticulture applications together with a brief interpretation of some important fluorescence parameters.

  19. Two dye combinations suitable for two-color/two-dye laser-induced fluorescence thermography for ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Andreas; Stephan, Peter

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents two dye combinations suitable for two-color/two-dye laser-induced fluorescence thermography for ethanol. Besides the temperature dependency of the fluorescence, the influences of laser fluence, dye concentration, pressure, dissolved air, and photobleaching are also discussed. The experimental data are compared with models and data available in literature. Based on this, parameter ranges for two-color/two-dye laser-induced fluorescence thermography applications can be determined.

  20. Detecting pad-wafer contact in CMP using dual emission laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Caprice

    Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP) is a technique used for planarizing a wide range of surfaces, including metal and dielectric materials, during the manufacturing of integrated circuits (ICs). Material removal in CMP occurs with the combind chemical and mechanical action of the slurry and polishing pad. For inter-layer dielectric (ILD) polishing, particle-wafer contact is believed responsible for planarization. The particles sit atop the polishing pad asperities, meaning removal rate should correlate with pad-wafer contact area. In this thesis, we presents in-situ measurements of slurry layer thickness and pad-wafer contact using Dual Emission Laser Induced Fluorescence (DELIF). The DELIF technique for measuring the thickness of thin fluid films has been adapted to make instantaneous measurements of slurry thickness in CMP at high spatial resolution (2.9 mum per pixel). Modeling and calibration experiments confirm that there is a linear relationship between CMP DELIF image intensity and fluid layer thickness over a range of 0 to 133 mum. The slurry thickness in the contacting portions of a Cabot Microelectronics D100 polishing pad is 0-60 mum for polishing speeds ≤ 0.62 m/s and applied wafer load ≤ 1.7 psi. As the polishing pad becomes fully conditioned, the slurry layer thickness approaches a saturation point. The time to saturation is approximately 1 hour. DELIF images of the slurry thickness can be analyzed for contact by plotting the image intensity histogram. This histogram is representative of the pad asperity height distribution. When the pad is in contact with the wafer, the asperity peaks flatten and give rise to a secondary peak in the low intensity extreme of the distribution representative of contact. Data simulations show that the secondary peak is sharp at low noise:signal ratio (<10% noise), and is gradually smoothed as more noise is added increasing measurement errors. Even though DELIF is a high noise measurement technique (≥ 15

  1. Serum Protein Profile Study of Clinical Samples Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Laser Induced Fluorescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Ukendt, Sujatha; Rai, Lavanya

    2009-01-01

    The serum protein profiles of normal subjects, patients diagnosed with cervical cancer, and oral cancer were recorded using High Performance Liquid Chromatography combined with Laser Induced Fluorescence detection (HPLC-LIF). Serum protein profiles of the above three classes were tested for estab......The serum protein profiles of normal subjects, patients diagnosed with cervical cancer, and oral cancer were recorded using High Performance Liquid Chromatography combined with Laser Induced Fluorescence detection (HPLC-LIF). Serum protein profiles of the above three classes were tested...... for establishing the ability of HPLC-LIF protein profiling technique for discrimination, using hard clustering and Fuzzy clustering methods. The clustering algorithms have quite successfully classified the profiles as belonging to normal, cancer of cervix, and oral cancer conditions....

  2. Clinical diagnosis of fissure caries with conventional and laser-induced fluorescence techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, C. H.; Lo, E. C. M.; You, D. S. H.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the in vivo validity of dentinal fissure caries diagnosis by visual examination, bitewing radiography, and use of a laser-induced fluorescence device (DIAGNOdent). A total of 144 and second molars with macroscopically intact occlusal surfaces in 41 Chinese young adults were examined visually, by bitewing radiography, and by DIAGNOdent. Visual examination after pit and fissure opening was used as the reference standard. The sensitivity and specificity of detecting caries that had ex...

  3. Measurement of radiative lifetime in atomic samarium using simultaneous detection of laser-induced fluorescence and photoionization signals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A C Sahoo; M L Shah; P K Mandal; A K Pulhani; G P Gupta; Vas Dev; B M Suri

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we report the investigations of lifetime measurement of odd-parity energy level 19009.52 cm-1 of Sm I using simultaneous detection of laser-induced fluorescence and laserinduced photoionization signals employing pump–probe technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is for the first time that the results obtained using laser-induced fluorescence and photoionization techniques have been compared with each other. The obtained results match well with those reported in the literature.

  4. Laser-induced fluorescence reader with a turbidimetric system for sandwich-type immunoassay using nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.H.; Lim, H.B., E-mail: plasma@dankook.ac.kr

    2015-07-09

    Graphical abstract: Laser-induced fluorescence reader with ratiometric correction for sandwich-type immunoassay using nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Laser-induced fluorescence system with ratiometric correction was developed. • The system reduced experimental error caused by particle loss and aggregation. • The detection limit of about 39 pg mL{sup −1} for salinomycin was obtained. • Calibration linearity and sensitivity were also significantly improved. • The system has the potential for bioanalysis using various nanoparticles. - Abstract: A unique laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) reader equipped with a turbidimetric system was developed for a sandwich-type immunoassay using nanoparticles. The system was specifically designed to reduce experimental error caused by particle loss, aggregation and sinking, and to improve analytical performance through ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence with respect to the turbidimetric absorbance. For application to determine the concentration of salinomycin, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and FITC-doped silica nanoparticles (colored balls) immobilized with antibody were synthesized for magnetic extraction and for tagging as a fluorescence probe, respectively. The detection limit of about 39 pg mL{sup −1} was obtained, which was an improvement of about 2-fold compared to that obtained without employment of the turbidimetric system. Calibration linearity and sensitivity were also improved, with increase from 0.8601 to 0.9905 in the R{sup 2}-coefficient and by 1.92-fold for the curve slope, respectively. The developed LIF reader has the potential to be used for fluorescence measurements using various nanomaterials, such as quantum dots.

  5. Laser-induced absorption and fluorescence studies of photochromic Schiff bases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kownacki, K.; Mordzinski, A.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1994-01-01

    Three photochromic Schiff bases: N-salicylideneaniline (SA), N-salicylidene-1-naphthylamine (SN), and N,N-bis-(salicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (Bsp), were studied in acetonitrile by means of steady-state and time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as semiempirical quantum...... chemical calculations. In all these molecules, the transient absorption and two-step laser-induced fluorescence spectra of long-lived transients are remarkably similar. The photochromic species is tentatively assigned to the non-hydrogen bonded form of the proton transfer reaction product...

  6. Novel xenon calibration scheme for two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Drew; Scime, Earl; Short, Zachary

    2016-11-01

    Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) measurements of neutral hydrogen and its isotopes are typically calibrated by performing TALIF measurements on krypton with the same diagnostic system and using the known ratio of the absorption cross sections [K. Niemi et al., J. Phys. D 34, 2330 (2001)]. Here we present the measurements of a new calibration method based on a ground state xenon scheme for which the fluorescent emission wavelength is nearly identical to that of hydrogen, thereby eliminating chromatic effects in the collection optics and simplifying detector calibration. We determine that the ratio of the TALIF cross sections of xenon and hydrogen is 0.024 ± 0.001.

  7. Blood perfusion and pH monitoring in organs by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Papazoglou, Theodore G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Stavridi, Marigo; Snyder, Wendy J.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Thomas, Reem; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) in detecting a change in tissue pH, and blood perfusion was determined. Rabbits were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. The arterial and venous blood supplies of the kidney were isolated and ligated to alter the perfusion. The femoral artery was cannulated to extract samples for blood gas analysis. A 308-nm XeCl was used as an excitation source. A 600 micrometers core diameter fiber was used for fluorescence acquisition, and the spectra analyzed by an optical multichannel analyzer (EG & G, OMA III). the corresponding intensity ratio R equals INADH / ICOLL was used as an index for respiratory acidosis. Blood perfusion was assessed using the following algorithm: (IELAS minus ICOLL) divided by (INADH minus ICOLL). The intensity ratio linearly decreased with the reduction of blood perfusion. When we totally occluded the artery the ratio decreased tenfold when compared to the ratio of a fully perfused kidney. Results of monitoring blood acidosis by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy shows a significant trend between pH and intensity ratio. Since all the slopes were negative, there is an obvious significant correlation between the pH and NADH.COLLAGEN RATIO. Blue-light-induced fluorescence measurements and ratio fluorometry is a sensitive method for monitoring blood perfusion and acidity or alkalinity of an organ.

  8. [Discrimination of Crude Oil Samples Using Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-shuang; Liu, De-qing; Luan, Xiao-ning; Guo, Jin-jia; Liu, Yong-xin; Zheng, Rong-er

    2016-02-01

    The Laser-induced fluorescence spectra combined with pattern recognition method has been widely applied in discrimination of different spilled oil, such as diesel, gasoline, and crude oil. However, traditional three-dimension fluorescence analysis method, which is not adapted to requirement of field detection, is limited to laboratory investigatio ns. The development of oil identification method for field detection is significant to quick response and operation of oil spill. In this paper, a new method based on laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence combined with support vector machine (SVM) model was introduced to discriminate crude oil samples. In this method, time-resolved spectra data was descended into two dimensions with selecting appropriate range in time and wavelength domains respectively to form a SVM data base. It is found that the classification accurate rate increased with an appropriate selection. With a selected range from 54 to 74 ns in time domain, the classification accurate rate has been increased from 83.3% (without selection) to 88.1%. With a selected wavelength range of 387.00~608.87 nm, the classification accurate rate of suspect oil was improved from 84% (without selection) to 100%. Since the detection delay of fluorescence lidar fluctuates due to wave and platform swing, the identification method with optimizing in both time and wavelength domains could offer a better flexibility for field applications. It is hoped that the developed method could provide some useful reference with data reduction for classification of suspect crude oil in the future development.

  9. Kerosene detection using laser induced fluorescence imaging for aeronautical engines application; Detection du kerozene par imagerie de fluorescence induite par laser, pour application sur foyer aeronautique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranger, Ph.

    2004-10-15

    The new concepts of aeronautical engines, developed to follow the evolution of the European standards of pollution, are generally based on an improvement of the processes of liquid fuel injection and mixture in the combustion chamber. There is currently no model mature enough to work without experimental validation. The purpose of this thesis is to assess the possibility of measuring the kerosene (Jet A1) vapour distribution by PLIF (Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence). That measurement technique must quantitatively image the instantaneous concentrations fields of the vaporized fuel in a spray. The implementation of such a technique needs an experimental spectroscopic study, which was realized on the vapour of fuel. First of all, this study allowed us to determine the properties of the kerosene fluorescence spectrum versus physical parameters such as temperature, pressure or gas mixture composition, especially in presence of oxygen molecules. Then, it was shown that the fluorescence spectrum of the fuel could be reproduce in all physical conditions by a single mixture of four aromatics. Their photophysical properties were also analyzed. Following this spectroscopic study, a phenomenological model for the fluorescence of the gaseous fuel was set up. This model led us to a protocol for an optical diagnostic on this fuel vapour. An experiment was set up to test the implementation and the limits of this technique in simple laboratory conditions. This experiment confirmed that this is indeed a promising technique for the diagnostic of the fuel vapour in aeronautical engine. (author)

  10. Field Observations with Laser-Induced Fluorescence Transient (LIFT Method in Barley and Sugar Beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R. Raesch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The laser-induced fluorescence transient (LIFT method is a non-invasive remote sensing technique for measurement of photosynthetic performance of plants under laboratory and field conditions. We report here a long-term comparative study to monitor the performance of different cultivars of barley and sugar beet during the growth season of these crops. The LIFT measurements provided useful results about photosynthetic light use efficiency on selected leaves in the canopy of the studied crops. The different canopy architectures, with different optical properties, influenced the LIFT measurements.

  11. Trace Detection of Metastable Helium Molecules in Superfluid Helium by Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    McKinsey, D N; Nikkel, J A; Rellergert, W

    2005-01-01

    We describe an approach to detecting ionizing radiation that combines the special properties of superfluid helium with the sensitivity of quantum optics techniques. Ionization in liquid helium results in the copious production of metastable helium molecules, which can be detected by laser-induced fluorescence. Each molecule can be probed many times using a cycling transition, resulting in the detection of individual molecules with high signal to noise. This technique could be used to detect neutrinos, weakly interacting massive particles, and ultracold neutrons, and to image superfluid flow in liquid He-4.

  12. Theoretical study of determining orientation and alignment of symmetric top molecule using laser-induced fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    General expressions used for extracting the orientation and alignment parameters of a symmetric top molecule from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) intensity are derived by employing the density matrix approach. The molecular orientation and alignment are described by molecular state multipoles. Excitation and detection are circularly and linearly polarized lights, respectively. In general cases, the LIF intensity is a complex function of the initial molecular state multipoles, the dynamic factors and the excitation-detection geometrical factors. It contains a population, ten orientation and fourteen alignment multipoles. The problem of how to extract the initial molecular state multipoles from the resolved LIF intensity is discussed.

  13. Acetone, a laser-induced fluorescence study with rotational resolution at 320 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckermann, Hanna; Haas, Yehuda; Drabbels, Marcel; Heinze, Johannes; Meerts, W. Leo; Reuss, Joerg; van Bladel, John

    1992-06-01

    The forbidden S 1←S 0 transition of acetone has been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence measurements with a resolution of 270 MHz. The rotational structure demonstrates, that (i) one deals with a-type transitions and (ii) there is a strong coupling between the torsional motion of the two CH 3 groups and the tunneling, out-of-plane wagging motion ( v23) of acetone. The interpretation of torsion-vibrational combination bands is less conclusive and thus the discussion still has a preliminary character.

  14. Improving Resolution of Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence in Argon Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderholm, Mark; Vandervort, Robert; Scime, Earl; McKee, John; McCarren, Dustin

    2014-10-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature and when absolutely calibrated, density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, laser induced fluorescence requires two ports on a plasma device. One port is used for laser injection and the other is used for fluorescence emission collection. Traditional LIF is tedious and time consuming to align. These difficulties motivate the development of an optical configuration that requires a single port and remains fully aligned at all times; confocal LIF. Our confocal optical design employs a single two inch diameter lens to both inject the laser light and collect the stimulated emission from an argon plasma. A dichroic mirror is used to separate the injected laser light from the collected emission. The measurement location is scanned radially by manually adjusting the final focusing lens position. In the initial version of the confocal optical system, measurements were poorly resolved radially because they were integrated over a fairly large path length (~4 cm) centered at the focal point. Here we present collected data from a modified configuration that significantly improves the special resolution of confocal measurements. The confocal measurements are compared to traditional, two-port, LIF measurements over the same radial range.

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence from N2(+) ions generated by a corona discharge in ambient air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konthasinghe, Kumarasiri; Fitzmorris, Kristin; Peiris, Manoj; Hopkins, Adam J; Petrak, Benjamin; Killinger, Dennis K; Muller, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we present the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence from N2(+) ions via the B(2)Σu(+)-X(2)Σg(+) band system in the near-ultraviolet. The ions were generated continuously by a plasma glow discharge in low pressure N2 and by a corona discharge in ambient air. The fluorescence decay time was found to rapidly decrease with increasing pressure leading to an extrapolated decay rate of ≍10(10) s(-1) at atmospheric pressure. In spite of this quenching, we were able to observe laser induced fluorescence in ambient air by means of a time-gated spectral measurement. In the process of comparing the emission signal with that of N2 spontaneous Raman scattering, ion concentrations in ambient air of order 10(8-)10(10) cm(-3) were determined. With moderate increases in laser power and collection efficiency, ion concentrations of less than 10(6) cm(-3) may be measurable, potentially enabling applications in atmospheric standoff detection of ionizing radiation from hazardous radioactive sources.

  16. Transient isotachophoretic-electrophoretic separations of lanthanides with indirect laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, M N; Spear, J D; Russo, R E; Klunder, G L; Grant, P M; Andresen, B D

    1998-07-01

    Indirect laser-induced fluorescence was used for the detection of several lanthanide species separated by capillary electrophoresis. Quinine sulfate was the fluorescent component of the background electrolyte, and α-hydroxyisobutyric acid was added as a complexing agent to enable the separation of analyte ions that have similar mobilities. The UV lines (333-364 nm) of an argon ion laser were used as the excitation source with a diode array detector for monitoring the fluorescent emission at 442 nm. Electrokinetic injections and transient isotachophoresis were implemented to stack the analyte ions into more concentrated zones. On-line preconcentration factors were determined to be ∼700 and resulted in limits of detection for La(3+), Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Nd(3+), Sm(3+), and Eu(3+) in the low-ppb range (6-11 nM).

  17. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Bronchoscopy for Detection and Localization of Early Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Shusen; LI Buhong; LI Hui; ZHENG Wei; LU Zukang

    2001-01-01

    Experimenatal results on the development of a Laser-Induced Fluorescence Bronchoscopy(LIFB) for the detection and localization of early lung cancer are reported in this paper. The system utilizes fluorescence of photosensitizer drug to provide real time video imaging for the examined lung tissue. Color filters are used to differentiate signal from background and a computer image processing technique is also applied to subtract the background. Moreover, a pseudocolor contrast enhancement method was developed to enhance the fluorescence image displayed on the vidio monitor. Suspicious areas are identified by pseudocolor image to guide biopsy, and several clinical trials show that sensitivity and contrast capability of the system should permit the detection and localization of early lung cancer.

  18. Composition measurement of bicomponent droplets using laser-induced fluorescence of acetone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqua, C.; Depredurand, V.; Castanet, G.; Wolff, M.; Lemoine, F.

    2007-12-01

    Commercial fuels are complex mixtures, the evaporation of which remains particularly difficult to model. Experimental characterization of the differential vaporization of the components is a problem that is seldom addressed. In this paper, the evaporation of binary droplets made of ethyl-alcohol and acetone is investigated using a technique of measurement of the droplet composition developed in purpose. This technique exploits the laser induced fluorescence of acetone which acts as a fluorescent tracer as well as the more volatile component of the fuel associated with an accurate measurement of the droplet diameter by forward scattering interferometry. A model of the fluorescence intensity of the binary mixture, taking into account the absorption of the acetone molecules, is proposed and validated. The sensitivity of the technique is discussed. Finally, the reliability of the technique is demonstrated on binary combusting droplets in linear stream.

  19. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of chemo-drugs as biocompatible fluorophores: irinotecan, gemcitabine and navelbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, N. S. Hosseini; Parvin, P.; Ghasemi, F.; Atyabi, F.; Jelvani, S.; Abolhosseini, S.

    2016-07-01

    The fluorescence nature of chemo-drugs is useful for simultaneous cancer diagnosis and therapy. Here, the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) properties of irinotecan, gemcitabine and navelbine are extensively investigated. The UV photons provoke the desired transitions of the several chemo-drugs by virtue of the XeCl laser at 308 nm. It is shown that LIF spectra are strongly dependent on the fluorophore concentration, while no spectral shift is measured for irinotecan, gemcitabine and navelbine because of a large Stokes shift. On the other hand, doxorubicin is characterized by a large overlapping between absorption and emission spectra giving rise to a sensible red shift. The fluorescence extinction α and self-quenching k coefficients as well as the quantum yield η f of those chemo-drugs are determined accordingly. In fact, irinotecan shows the highest quantum efficiency among the chemo-drugs of interest.

  20. Temperature measurements of micro-droplets using pulsed 2-color laser-induced fluorescence with MDR-enhanced energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Johannes; Reddemann, Manuel A.; Kirsch, Valeri; Kneer, Reinhold

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a new measurement system is presented for studying temperature of micro-droplets by pulsed 2-color laser-induced fluorescence. Pulsed fluorescence excitation allows motion blur suppression and thus simultaneous measurements of droplet size, velocity and temperature. However, high excitation intensities of pulsed lasers lead to morphology-dependent resonances inside micro-droplets, which are accompanied by disruptive stimulated emission. Investigations showed that stimulated emission can be avoided by enhanced energy transfer via an additional dye. The suitability and accuracy of the new pulsed method are verified on the basis of a spectroscopic analysis and comparison to continuously excited 2-color laser-induced fluorescence.

  1. Detection of fecal residue on poultry carcasses by laser-induced fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, B; Kim, M S; Chao, K; Lawrence, K; Park, B; Kim, K

    2009-04-01

    Feasibility of fluorescence imaging technique for the detection of diluted fecal matters from various parts of the digestive tract, including colon, ceca, small intestine, and duodenum, on poultry carcasses was investigated. One of the challenges for using fluorescence imaging for inspection of agricultural material is the low fluorescence yield in that fluorescence can be masked by ambient light. A laser-induced fluorescence imaging system (LIFIS) developed by our group allowed acquisition of fluorescence from feces-contaminated poultry carcasses in ambient light. Fluorescence emission images at 630 nm were captured with 415-nm laser excitation. Image processing algorithms including threshold and image erosion were used to identify fecal spots diluted up to 1: 10 by weight with double distilled water. Feces spots on the carcasses, without dilution and up to 1: 5 dilutions, could be detected with 100% accuracy regardless of feces type. Detection accuracy for fecal matters diluted up to 1: 10 was 96.6%. The results demonstrated good potential of the LIFIS for detection of diluted poultry fecal matter, which can harbor pathogens, on poultry carcasses.

  2. Violet diode laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence: a tool for assessing mosaic disease severity in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Eghan, Moses J; Asare-Bediako, Elvis; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K

    2012-01-01

    Violet diode laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence was used in agronomical assessment (disease severity and average yield per plant). Because cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is of economic importance, improved cultivars with various levels of affinity for cassava mosaic disease were investigated. Fluorescence data correlated with cassava mosaic disease severity levels and with the average yield per plant.

  3. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry in the diagnostics of alopecia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomorokha, Diana P.; Pigoreva, Yulia N.; Salmin, Vladimir V.

    2016-04-01

    Development of optical biopsy methods has a great interest for medical diagnostics. In clinical and experimental studies it is very important to analyze blood circulation quickly and accurately, thereby laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is widely used. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (UV LIFS) is express highly sensitive and widely-spread method with no destructive impact, high excitation selectivity and the possibility to use in highly scattering media. The goal of this work was to assess a correlation of UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry parameters, and a possibility to identify or to differentiate various types of pathological changes in tissues according to their autofluorescence spectra. Three groups of patients with diffuse (symptomatic) alopecia, androgenic alopecia, and focal alopecia have been tested. Each groups consisted of not less than 20 persons. The measurements have been done in the parietal and occipital regions of the sculls. We used the original automated spectrofluorimeter to record autofluorescence spectra, and standard laser Doppler flowmeter BLF-21 (Transonic Systems, Inc., USA) to analyze the basal levels of blood circulation. Our results show that UV LIFS accurately distinguishes the zones with different types of alopecia. We found high correlation of the basal levels of blood circulation and the integrated intensity of autofluorescence in the affected tissue.

  4. Laser-induced fluorescence: quantitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaque chemical content in human aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Erbin; Wishart, David; Khoury, Samir; Kay, Cyril M.; Jugdutt, Bodh I.; Tulip, John; Lucas, Alexandra

    1996-05-01

    We have been studying laser-induced fluorescence as a technique for identification of selected changes in the chemical composition of atherosclerotic plaque. Formulae for quantification of chemical changes have been developed based upon analysis of fluorescence emission spectra using multiple regression analysis and the principal of least squares. The intima of human aortic necropsy specimens was injected with chemical compounds present in atherosclerotic plaque. Spectra recorded after injection of selected chemical components found in plaque (collagen I, III, IV, elastin and cholesterol) at varying concentrations (0.01 - 1.0 mg) were compared with saline injection. A single fiber system was used for both fluorescence excitation (XeCl excimer laser, 308 nm, 1.5 - 2.0 mJ/ pulse, 5 Hz) and fluorescence emission detection. Average spectra for each chemical have been developed and the wavelengths of peak emission intensity identified. Curve fitting analysis as well as multiple regression analysis were used to develop formulae for assessment of chemical content. Distinctive identifying average curves were established for each chemical. Excellent correlations were identified for collagen I, III, and IV, elastin, and cholesterol (R2 equals 0.92 6- 0.997). Conclusions: (1) Fluorescence spectra of human aortas were significantly altered by collagen I, collagen III, elastin and cholesterol. (2) Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis may allow quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic plaque chemical content in situ.

  5. Bioaerosol detection and classification using dual excitation wavelength laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Per; Wästerby, Pär.; Gradmark, Per-Åke; Hedborg, Julia; Larsson, Anders; Landström, Lars

    2015-05-01

    We present results obtained by a detection system designed to measure laser-induced fluorescence from individual aerosol particles using dual excitation wavelengths. The aerosol is sampled from ambient air and via a 1 mm diameter nozzle, surrounded by a sheath air flow, confined into a particle beam. A continuous wave blue laser at 404 nm is focused on the aerosol beam and two photomultiplier tubes monitor the presence of individual particles by simultaneous measuring the scattered light and any induced fluorescence. When a particle is present in the detection volume, a laser pulse is triggered from an ultraviolet laser at 263 nm and the corresponding fluorescence spectrum is acquired with a spectrometer based on a diffraction grating and a 32 channel photomultiplier tube array with single-photon sensitivity. The spectrometer measures the fluorescence spectra in the wavelength region from 250 to 800 nm. In the present report, data were measured on different monodisperse reference aerosols, simulants of biological warfare agents, and different interference aerosol particles, e.g. pollen. In the analysis of the experimental data, i.e., the time-resolved scattered and fluorescence signals from 404 nm c.w. light excitation and the fluorescence spectra obtained by a pulsed 263 nm laser source, we use multivariate data analysis methods to classify each individual aerosol particle.

  6. Chemometric treatment of multimode laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) data of fuel-spiked soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Benthem, Mark H.; Mitchell, Ben C.; Gillispie, Gregory D.; St. Germain, Randy W.

    1996-11-01

    Field screening of fuel-contaminated soils using laser- induced fluorescence is a cost effective and timely method of characterizing contaminated sites. Data collected with laser-based screening tools are often extensive and difficult to interpret. Pattern recognition algorithms can be utilized to enable less highly trained personnel to identify contaminants. In this work, fluorescence intensity of various hydrocarbon fuels deposited on various soil types was measured as a function of emission wavelength and decay time, generating wavelength-time matrices. The data were arranged into a three mode array and subjected to trilinear decomposition (TLD). The results of the TLD were then utilized in pattern recognition schemes, specifically, linear discrimination and classification and hierarchical cluster analysis. Classification rates and clustering results indicate that these techniques can be very valuable tools in site characterization.

  7. Diagnostics of Susabi-nori (Porphyra Yezoensis) by Laser-Induced Fluorescence Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Yuki; Takahashi, Kunio; Kaneko, Shohei; Shimada, Yuji

    Susabi-nori (Porphyra yezoensis) was diagnosed by means of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method. Fluorescence peaks located at approximately 580, 660, 685 and 720 nm were observed in the LIF spectra of Susabi-nori. In the spectrum of the sample infected with the red rot disease, the intensity of 580 nm peak was relatively high as compared with that of the control sample. On the other hand, the intensities of 580 nm and 660 nm peaks drastically decreased by the influence of the chytrid disease. Furthermore, the intensity of the 580 nm peak increased by dipping into fresh water. These results indicate that LIF spectra of Susabi-nori are affected by the diseases and the stress of fresh water and that the diseases and the stress of Susabi-nori can be diagnosed by the LIF method.

  8. Compact low-cost detector for in vivo assessment of microphytobenthos using laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, A. B.; Vieira, S.; Marques da Silva, J.; Lavrov, A.; Leite, E.; Cartaxana, P.

    2013-03-01

    The development of a compact low-cost detector for non-destructive assessment of microphytobenthos using laser induced fluorescence was described. The detector was built from a specially modified commercial miniature fiber optic spectrometer (Ocean Optics USB4000). Its usefulness is experimentally verified by the study of diatom-dominated biofilms inhabiting the upper layers of intertidal sediments of the Tagus Estuary, Portugal. It is demonstrated that, operating with a laser emitter producing 30 mJ pulses at the wavelength of 532 nm, the detector is capable to record fluorescence signals with sufficient intensity for the quantitative biomass characterization of the motile epipelic microphytobenthic communities and to monitor their migratory activity. This paves the way for building an entire emitter-detector LIF system for microphytobenthos monitoring, which will enable microalgae communities occupying hardly accessible intertidal flats to be monitored in vivo at affordable cost.

  9. A LabVIEW-Based Virtual Instrument System for Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qijun; Wang, Lufei; Zu, Lily

    2011-01-01

    We report the design and operation of a Virtual Instrument (VI) system based on LabVIEW 2009 for laser-induced fluorescence experiments. This system achieves synchronous control of equipment and acquisition of real-time fluorescence data communicating with a single computer via GPIB, USB, RS232, and parallel ports. The reported VI system can also accomplish data display, saving, and analysis, and printing the results. The VI system performs sequences of operations automatically, and this system has been successfully applied to obtain the excitation and dispersion spectra of α-methylnaphthalene. The reported VI system opens up new possibilities for researchers and increases the efficiency and precision of experiments. The design and operation of the VI system are described in detail in this paper, and the advantages that this system can provide are highlighted.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements on CdSe quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Győri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report on photoluminescence decay measurements on CdSe quantum dots (QDs as a function of size in the diameter range of 2.1 to 3.5 nm. The nanoparticles were synthesized by the kinetic growth method from CdO and elemental Se precursors. We studied the effects of growth time on the diameter, emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime of the synthesized QDs. The decay time measurements were performed using single shot time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence techniques using a Nd:YAG laser system. Two different decay times were measured on each CdSe sample, a fast one and a relatively slow one. The slow decay was found to be size dependent whereas the fast one was independent of the QD diameter.

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence as a method of early caries diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielczarek, Agnieszka; Wiewior, Piotr

    2001-07-01

    Use of lasers in dentistry dates back 20 years but is still not fully exploited, especially when concerning the hard dental tissues. Over the past many efforts and actions have been involved in testing and developing new methods for caries diagnosis. The implementation of these methods in general dental practice is unfortunately still limited because too little scientific evidence exists to support them. One of the age-old concerns for dentists is that decay is often discovered too late. Dentists commonly use x-ray imaging for early caries detection, but this method cannot reveal decay at a sufficiently early stage to avoid restorative methods. Generally, if a caries lesion si detected by x-ray, the mineral loss within the tooth is normally very high and will need invasive treatment. Several laser based techniques, as also other optical methods of detecting caries lesions at an early stage seem to be very promising. Fluorescence of tooth structure is observed when hard tissues are illuminated using laser light. Decayed areas appear dark and provide a contrast against the healthy background surrounding them, so discriminating sound and carious tissues. The aim of this study was to present the possibilities of using laser induced fluorescence in the diagnosis of early caries lesions. The current state-of-the-art is presented, as well as results of our investigations. In our studies an argon ion laser was used to illuminate the teeth and the fluorescence pictures were captured with a CCD camera and then analyzed. Results confirmed that laser induced fluorescence can be used as a sensitive method of caries diagnosis.

  12. Detection of bacterial infection of agave plants by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Martinez, Jesus; Flores-Hernandez, Ricardo; Rodriguez-Garay, Benjamin; Santacruz-Ruvalcaba, Fernando

    2002-05-01

    Greenhouse-grown plants of Agave tequilana Weber var. azul were inoculated with Erwinia carotovora, the causal agent of stem soft rot. We investigated the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of agave plants to determine whether LIF can be used as a noninvasive sensing tool for pathological studies. The LIF technique was also investigated as a means of detecting the effect of the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor beta-hydroxyethylhydrazine as a bactericide against the pathogenic bacterium Erwinia carotovora. A He-Ne laser at 632.8 nm was used as the excitation source, and in vivo fluorescence emission spectra were recorded in the 660-790-range. Fluorescence maxima were at 690 and 740 nm. The infected plants that were untreated with the bactericide showed a definite increase in fluorescence intensity at both maxima within the first three days after infection. Beginning on the fifth day, a steady decrease in fluorescence intensity was observed, with a greater effect at 740 than at 690 nm. After 30 days there was no fluorescence. The infected plants that had been treated with the bactericide showed no significant change in fluorescence compared with that of the uninfected plants. The ratio of fluorescence intensities was determined to be F 690 nm/F 740 nm for all treatments. These studies indicate that LIF measurements of agave plants may be used for the early detection of certain types of disease and for determining the effect of a bactericide on bacteria. The results also showed that fluorescence intensity ratios can be used as a reliable indicator of the progress of disease.

  13. A laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for obtaining neutral hydrogen densities in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, X.Z.; Yang, T.F.; Chang-Diaz, F.R. [Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The resonance fluorescence of neutral hydrogen illuminated by {ital H}{sub {alpha}} radiation has been used as a technique for the spatially and temporally resolved density measurements of neutral hydrogen in high temperature plasmas, such as in the tokamak and magnetic mirror plasma fusion devices. The fluorescence signal, usually very weak and buried in the background of stray laser light and {ital H}{sub {alpha}} emission, is very difficult to extract and its measurements are inaccurate. This paper discusses the improvement of the signal extraction using two optical path laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) methods. One optical path carries the fluorescence signal and the background (the stray laser light and {ital H}{sub {alpha}} emission), whereas the other path carries only the background signal. By combining these two signals, a clean fluorescence signal can be isolated by subtracting out the background using a differential amplifier. The measurement is obtained instantaneously from these two signals which are taken simultaneously in one pulse rather than being extracted from two separate spectra taken in two sequential pulses (double pulses). This method, therefore, makes a significant improvement on the double pulse technique in terms of the accuracy of the measurement and the time resolution. Using this LIF technique the measurement of the neutral density profile in the exhaust of a tandem mirror plasma propulsion device is obtained and presented. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  14. Quantitative Temperature Imaging in Gas-Phase Turbulent Thermal Convection by Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Acetone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KEARNEY,SEAN P.; REYES,FELIPE V.

    2000-12-13

    In this paper, an acetone planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for nonintrusive, temperature imaging is demonstrated in gas-phase (Pr = 0.72) turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection at Rayleigh number, Ra = 1.3 x 10{sup 5}. The PLIF technique provides quantitative, spatially correlated temperature data without the flow intrusion or time lag associated with physical probes and without the significant path averaging that plagues most optical heat-transfer diagnostic tools, such as the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, thus making PLIF an attractive choice for quantitative thermal imaging in easily perturbed, complex three-dimensional flow fields. The instantaneous (20-ns integration time) thermal images presented have a spatial resolution of 176 x 176 x 500 {micro}m and a single-pulse temperature measurement precision of {+-}5.5 K, or 5.4 % of the total temperature difference. These images represent a 2-D slice through a complex, 3-D flow allowing for the thermal structure of the turbulence to be quantified. Statistics such as the horizontally averaged temperature profile, rms temperature fluctuation, two-point spatial correlations, and conditionally averaged plume structures are computed from an ensemble of 100 temperature images. The profiles of the mean temperature and rms temperature fluctuation are in good agreement with previously published data, and the results obtained from the two-point spatial correlations and conditionally averaged temperature fields show the importance of large-scale coherent structures in this turbulent flow.

  15. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopic Analysis of Aromatics from One Ring to Four Rings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hai-feng; Yue, Zong-yu; Chen, Bei-ling; Yao, Ming-fa

    2015-06-01

    In order to distinguish small aromatics preferably, a Nd : YAG Laser was used to supply an excitation laser, which was adjusted to 0.085 J x cm(-2) at 266 nm. Benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene and chrysene were used as the representative of different rings aromatics. The fluorescence emission spectra were researched for each aromatic hydrocarbon and mixtures by Laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Results showed that the rings number determined the fluorescence emission spectra, and the structure with same rings number did not affect the emission fluorescence spectrum ranges. This was due to the fact that the absorption efficiency difference at 266 nm resulted in that the fluorescence intensities of each aromatic hydrocarbon with same rings number were different and the fluorescence intensities difference were more apparently with aromatic ring number increasing. When the absorption efficiency was similar at 266 nm and the concentrations of each aromatic hydrocarbon were same, the fluorescence intensities were increased with aromatic ring number increasing. With aromatic ring number increasing, the fluorescence spectrum and emission peak wavelength were all red-shifted from ultraviolet to visible and the fluorescence spectrum range was also wider as the absorption efficiency was similar. The fluorescence emission spectra from one to four rings could be discriminated in the following wavelengths, 275 to 320 nm, 320 to 375 nm, 375 to 425 nm, 425 to 556 nm, respectively. It can be used for distinguish the type of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as it exists in single type. As PAHs are usually exist in a variety of different rings number at the same time, the results for each aromatic hydrocarbon may not apply to the aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures. For the aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures, results showed that the one- or two-ring PAHs in mixtures could not be detected by fluorescence as three- or four-ring PAHs existed in mixture

  16. In vivo Diagnosis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Using 337-nm- Excited Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, N.; Mitchell, M. F.; Mahadevan, A.; Warren, S.; Thomsen, S.; Silva, E.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1994-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence at 337-nm excitation was used in vivo to differentiate neoplastic [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)], nonneoplastic abnormal (inflammation and human papilloma viral infection), and normal cervical tissues. A colposcope (low-magnification microscope used to view the cervix with reflected light) was used to identify 66 normal and 49 abnormal (5 inflammation, 21 human papilloma virus infection, and 23 CIN) sites on the cervix in 28 patients. These sites were then interrogated spectroscopically. A two-stage algorithm was developed to diagnose CIN. The first stage differentiated histologically abnormal tissues from colposcopically normal tissues with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 92%, 90%, and 88%, respectively. The second stage differentiated preneoplastic and neoplastic tissues from nonneoplastic abnormal tissues with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 87%, 73%, and 74%, respectively. Spectroscopic differences were consistent with a decrease in the absolute contribution of collagen fluorescence, an increase in the absolute contribution of oxyhemoglobin attenuation, and an increase in the relative contribution of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] fluorescence as tissue progresses from normal to abnormal in the same patient. These results suggest that in vivo fluorescence spectroscopy of the cervix can be used to diagnose CIN at colposcopy.

  17. Tunable KrF laser-induced fluorescence of C2 in a sooting flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhinke, A.; Hartlieb, A. T.; Kohse-Höinghaus, K.; Crosley, D. R.

    1998-11-01

    We have observed laser-induced fluorescence of two different band systems of C2 in a flame, excited by a tunable KrF laser near 248 nm. The first comprises several P and R lines of the (1,0) band of the e 3@g-a 3@u Fox-Herzberg system, with fluorescence bands extending past 350 nm. The second is the band head region of the (7,1) band of the D 1Du+LB' 1Dg+ system, with fluorescence at 232 nm from D to the X 1Dg+ ground state. Neither band has been previously observed in any environment. The flame in these experiments is highly sooting, and the C2 seen here is likely produced by laser vaporization of the soot with subsequent laser photolysis of a C2 precursor. In a rich flame, this fluorescence could cause interferences in other studies such as KrF laser Raman scattering. Moreover, signal level calculations suggest native C2 near 10 ppm could be readily observed using the Fox-Herzberg excitation. Raman measurements of major species (X̾.01) in the same flame, using the KrF laser, are in good agreement with a model prediction.

  18. Near-field measurements of vegetation by laser-induced fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowinska, Malgorzata; Cunin, Bernard; Deruyver, Aline; Heisel, Francine; Miehe, Joseph-Albert; Langsdorf, Gabriele; Lichtenthaler, Hartmut K.

    1999-12-01

    In this paper, a validation of a new UV-A laser-induced fluorescence imaging system implemented in an all-road car for near-field remote sensing of vegetation will be presented. It has been developed as a part of a European Community Program INTERREG II and is consisting of three main parts: excitation, detection and control units. The excitation source is a frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser and the laser spot size is adjusted via a variable beam expander. Fluorescence images are recorded at four characteristic fluorescence bands: 440, 520, 690 and 740 nm with a gated intensified digital CCD camera. The laser head and camera are situated on a directed in site and azimuth platform which can be high up to 6 meters. The platform positioning, localization and distance detection, spot size determination and adjustment, focus, sharpness, selection of the filter, laser and camera synchronization, gain of the intensifier, real time visualization of images, acquisition time are controlled by a newly developed software which allows also image storage, analysis and treatment. Examples of remote sensing fluorescence images from several plant species recorded at a distance of 10 - 30 m will be given and discussed further in this paper.

  19. Oxygen plasma flow properties deduced from laser-induced fluorescence and probe measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhle, Stefan; Eichhorn, Christoph; Steinbeck, Andreas; Lein, Sebastian; Herdrich, Georg; Röser, Hans-Peter; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika

    2008-04-01

    Estimation of the local dissociation degree and the local mass-specific enthalpy of a pure oxygen plasma flow determined mainly from laser-induced fluorescence measurements are reported. Measurements have been conducted for several generator parameters in an inductively heated plasma wind tunnel. Additional probe measurements of total pressure together with the deduced translational temperature are used to estimate the local mass-specific enthalpy. For a reference condition, full dissociation has been measured. The measured translational temperature of atomic oxygen for this condition is T = 3500 K. Subsequently, the local mass-specific enthalpy has been derived using these local density and temperature measurements. For the reference condition the estimated value of h = 27 MJ/kg is in good agreement with the probe measurements and results from diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

  20. High resolution isotope shifts and hyperfine structure measurements of tungsten by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jeongwon; Leanhardt, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of tungsten were studied in the near UV range. We have used laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy on a pulsed supersonic beam to probe the 5D0 -> 5F1 transition at 384.9 nm, 7S3 -> 7P4 transition at 400.9 nm, and 7S3 -> 7P3 transition at 407.4 nm. Three new magnetic hyperfine constants are reported for 7P3,7P4, and 5F1 states. The isotope shifts of the 384.9 nm transition are presented for the first time, and the isotope shifts of 400.9 nm and 407.4 nm transition are measured with an order of magnitude higher precision compared to the previous measurements. As a result, the nuclear parameters lambda and lambda_{rel} are extracted from the isotope shifts with an improved precision.

  1. Fundamentals and practice for ultrasensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection in microanalytical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mitchell E; Landers, James P

    2004-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is an extremely sensitive method for detection in chemical separations. In addition, it is well-suited to detection in small volumes, and as such is widely used for capillary electrophoresis and microchip-based separations. This review explores the detailed instrumental conditions required for sub-zeptomole, sub-picomolar detection limits. The key to achieving the best sensitivity is to use an excitation and emission volume that is matched to the separation system and that, simultaneously, will keep scattering and luminescence background to a minimum. We discuss how this is accomplished with confocal detection, 90 degrees on-capillary detection, and sheath-flow detection. It is shown that each of these methods have their advantages and disadvantages, but that all can be used to produce extremely sensitive detectors for capillary- or microchip-based separations. Analysis of these capabilities allows prediction of the optimal means of achieving ultrasensitive detection on microchips.

  2. Indirect determination of the electric field in plasma discharges using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudolon, J., E-mail: julien.vaudolon@cnrs-orleans.fr; Mazouffre, S., E-mail: stephane.mazouffre@cnrs-orleans.fr [CNRS - ICARE (Institut de Combustion Aérothermique Réactivité et Environnement), 1 C Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France)

    2014-09-15

    The evaluation of electric fields is of prime interest for the description of plasma characteristics. In this work, different methods for determining the electric field profile in low-pressure discharges using one- and two-dimensional Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurements are presented and discussed. The energy conservation, fluid, and kinetic approaches appear to be well-suited for the electric field evaluation in this region of the plasma flow. However, the numerical complexity of a two-dimensional kinetic model is penalizing due to the limited signal-to-noise ratio that can be achieved, making the computation of the electric field subject to large error bars. The ionization contribution which appears in the fluid model makes it unattractive on an experimental viewpoint. The energy conservation and 1D1V kinetic approaches should therefore be preferred for the determination of the electric field when LIF data are used.

  3. A Lagrangian Interpretation of Laser Induced Fluorescence Signals in a Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Feng; Skiff, Fred; Berumen, Jorge; Mattingly, Sean; Hood, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is a nonintrusive diagnostic technique that has found applications in the study of a wide range of fundamental and applied problems. Thus it is important to make a correct interpretation of LIF signals. We adopt a Lagrangian approach to model LIF signals by introducing a non-linear conditional probability function P(x,v,tx',v',t'). A simulation is performed to compute the LIF signals and the results are presented. We investigate how mean-field waves affect these signals and metastable state birth rates. The ultimate goal is to construct the complete model for LIF signals by combining optical pumping, mean-field wave effect and metastable state birth rate modulation. This research is supported by the Department of Energy under grant No. DOE DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  4. Average OH density in alternating current dielectric barrier discharge by laser-induced fluorescence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongliang; Feng, Chunlei; Gao, Liang; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-10-01

    The average OH density in atmospheric He-H2O(0.4%) needle-plate dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was measured by the asynchronous laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and the fluctuation of OH radical density was measured simultaneously to prove that the average OH density can be obtained by the asynchronous LIF technique. The evolution of the average OH density in four different discharge patterns, namely, negative barrier corona discharge, glow discharge, multi glow discharge, and streamer discharge, was studied, and it was found that the average OH density has an observable increase from corona discharge to streamer discharge. The main mechanism of OH production in the four different discharge patterns was analyzed. It was shown that the main mechanism of OH production in negative barrier corona discharge is electron direct collision dissociation, whereas in the other three discharge patterns the He metastable Penning ionization is the main process.

  5. Pyrene measurements in sooting low pressure methane flames by jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartel, M; Pauwels, J-F; Desgroux, P; Mercier, X

    2011-12-15

    This paper presents in detail the study we carried out concerning the pyrene measurement by jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence (JCLIF) in different sooting low pressure methane flames. The aim of this paper is both to demonstrate the potentialities of this technique for the measurement of such moderately sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under sooting flame conditions and to provide new experimental data for the understanding and the development of chemical models of the soot formation processes. Several concentration profiles of pyrene measured in different sooting flame (various pressure and equivalence ratio) are presented. The validation of the JCLIF method for pyrene measurements is explained in detail as well as the calibration procedure, based on the standard addition method, which has been implemented for the quantification of the concentration profiles. Sensitivity lower than 1 ppb was obtained for the measurement of this species under sooting flame conditions.

  6. Containerless laser-induced fluorescence study of vaporization and optical properties for sapphire and alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordine, P.C.; Schiffman, R.A. (Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, MO (USA) Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA))

    1988-09-01

    Evaporation of aluminum oxide was studied from 1,800 to 2,327 K by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of Al atom vapor over sapphire and alumina spheres that were levitated in an argon gas jet and heated with a continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser. Optical properties were determined from apparent specimen temperatures measured with an optical pyrometer and true temperatures deduced from the LIF intensity versus temperature measurements using the known temperature dependence of the Al atom vapor concentration in equilibrium with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The effects of impurities and dissolved oxygen on the high-temperature optical properties of aluminum oxide were discussed.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements on plasma science experiments at PPPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, Mark

    2011-12-20

    Collaborative research between WVU and PPPL was carried out at WVU for the purpose of incorporating the sophisticated diagnostic technique known as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in the Paul-Trap Simulation Experiment (PTSX) at PPPL. WVU assembled a LIF system at WVU, transported it to PPPL, helped make LIF experiments on the PTSX device, participated in PTSX science, and trained PPPL staff in LIF techniques. In summary, WVU refurbished a non-operational LIF system being loaned from University of Maryland to PPPL and, by doing so, provided PPPL with additional diagnostic capability for its PTSX device and other General Plasma Science experiments. WVU students, staff, and faculty will visit PPPL to collaborate on PTSX experiments in the future.

  8. Determination of metoprolol in rabbit blood using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yun Chen; Wei Ping Yang; Zhu Jun Zhang

    2011-01-01

    This work described a sensitive method for determination of metoprolol in rabbit plasma. The method involved purification by ultrafiltration, derivatization with fluorescein isothiocyanate, determination by capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector. Other components in plasma including a variety of amino acids and proteins did not interfere with the determination of metoprolol in experimental condition. The assay had a wide range (2.0-500 ng/mL) of linearity and a detection limit of 0.8 ng/mL. The intra-and inter-day precisions were satisfactory with relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 10.0% and accuracy within 10.0%. This method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetic study of metoprolol in rabbit blood. (c) 2010 Yu Yun Chen. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel laser-induced fluorescence scheme for Ar-I in a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, Zachary D., E-mail: zdshort@mix.wvu.edu; Siddiqui, M. Umair; Henriquez, Miguel F.; McKee, John S.; Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Here we describe a novel infrared laser-induced fluorescence scheme for the 1s{sub 2} state of Ar-I using an 841.052 nm (vacuum) Sacher tunable diode laser oscillator and compare it to an established 667.913 nm (vacuum) 1s{sub 4}-pumping Ar-I LIF scheme using a master oscillator power amplifier laser [A. M. Keesee et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 4091 (2004)]. The novel scheme exhibits a significantly greater signal-to-noise ratio for a given injected laser power than the established scheme. We argue that this is caused by less intense spontaneous Ar-I radiation near the LIF emission wavelength for the 1s{sub 2} scheme as compared to the 1s{sub 4} scheme. In addition we present an updated iodine cell spectrum around the 1s{sub 4} LIF scheme pump wavelength.

  10. Detection and mapping of oil-contaminated soils by remote sensing of laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedeker, Wilhelm; Guenther, Kurt P.; Dahn, Hans-Guenter

    1995-10-01

    The contamination of soil by aromatic mineral hydrocarbons (MHC) (e.g., gasoline, oil, etc.) has become a severe environmental problem because not only men, animals, and plants are threatened but also the water and air. With the unification of Germany a great number of suspected contaminated sites in the new countries were registered. An estimation of the German Federal Ministry of Environment (BMU) counts 180,000 areas contaminated with different pollutants, 55,000 are situated in the former GDR. On military settlements for example more than fifty percent of the chemicals are MHCs. Hence one can get an idea of the importance of soil pollution by hydrocarbons. Other zones contaminated due to carelessness or accidents are civil petrolstations, airports, refineries, pipelines, and traffic disasters. At the present time for most of these areas the contamination is assumed due to recent use. Due to the large extension of the problem an estimation and evaluation of the potential hazard for the environment is difficult and expensive to perform. In the case of an actual endangering the total area must be mapped in detail resulting in increasing costs for the owner. Nevertheless it is necessary to find reliable timesaving areal mapping and monitoring methods. One opportunity presented in this paper is the application of remote sensing by laser induced fluorescence from an airborne platform. It promises to fulfill these requirements in a sufficiently fast manner with very high spatial resolution. The access to the pollutant detection is the specific laser induced fluorescence emitted by the MHC (finger print). The present work shows the requirements for a helicopterborne lidar system for MHC mapping and how the detected signals are to be evaluated and interpreted.

  11. ARTICLES: Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectrum of CoS Between 15200 and 19000 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jun-feng; Wang, Li; Qin, Cheng-bing; Zhang, Qun; Chen, Yang

    2010-06-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled CoS molecules have been recorded in the energy range of 15200-19000 cm-1. Five transition progressions have been reported for the first time, the assignments of these progressions have been derived from a rotational analysis of vibronic bands and they are determined to be [15.58]4Δ7/2-X4Δ7/2, [16.02]4Δ7/2-X4Δ7/2, [16.50]4Δ7/2-X4Δ7/2, [17.80]4Π5/2-X4Δ7/2, and [18.00]4Δ7/2-X4Δ7/2 transitions. In addition, under the supersonic jet condition the fluorescent lifetimes of these vibronic states were measured by exponentially fitting the fluorescence decay. Based on the observed spectra and the measured lifetimes of the vibronic states, the newly identified electronic states are discussed.

  12. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates a plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examined.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence detection platform for point-of-care testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Marcel; Hilbig, Urs; Schubert, Markus B.; Gauglitz, Günter

    2017-08-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) devices for continuous low-cost monitoring of critical patient parameters require miniaturized and integrated setups for performing quick high-sensitivity analyses, away from central clinical laboratories. This work presents a novel and promising laser-induced fluorescence platform for measurements in direct optical test formats that leads towards such powerful POCT devices based on fluorescence-labeled immunoassays. Ultimate sensitivity of thin film photodetectors, integrated with microfluidics, and a comprehensive optimization of all system components aim at low-level signal detection in the targeted biosensor application. The setup acquires fluorescence signals from the volume of a microfluidic channel. An innovative sandwiching process forms a flow channel in the microfluidic chips by embedding laser-cut double-sided adhesive tapes. The custom fit of amorphous silicon based photodiode arrays to the geometry of the flow channel enables miniaturization, fully adequate for POCT devices. A free-beam laser excitation with line focus provides excellent alignment stability, allows for easy and reliable swapping of the disposable microfluidic chips, and therewith greatly improves the ease of use of the resulting integrated device. As a proof-of-concept of this novel in-volume measurement approach, the limit of detection for the dye DY636-COOH in pure water as a model fluorophore is examined and found to be 26 nmol l-1 .

  14. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyu, M.K. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:EU{sup 3+}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  15. Mechanism of laser induced fluorescence signal generation in InCl3-ethanol mixture flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bolang; Hu, Zhiyun; Zhang, Zhenrong; Li, Guohua; Shao, Jun; Feng, Guobin

    2017-05-01

    Nonlinear regime Two-line Atomic Fluorescence (NTLAF) is a promising technique for two-dimensional thermometry. A key challenge is seeding of indium atoms into flame. This work aims at investigating the mechanism of Indium LIF signal generation in a fuel-rich InCl3-ethanol premixed flame. Several types of images including natural emission of the flame itself, natural emission of CH, natural emission of OH, natural emission at 410 nm/451 nm of indium atom, and laser induced fluorescence at 410 nm/451 nm were obtained. The indium atom was generated in the flame front, and could survive in the post-flame zone for a while which is benefit for making NTLAF measurements. Further detail mechanism of fluorescence signals generation in InCl3-ethanol solution burning was investigated. The conclusion which probable to be drew is that to gain high NTLAF signals, the size of liquid droplets should be well controlled, neither to be too large nor to be gasified.

  16. Laser ablation laser induced fluorescence for sensitive detection of heavy metals in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwal, Yogesh

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy LIBS is a fast non-contact technique for the analysis of the elemental composition using spectral information of the emission from a laser-induced plasma. For the LIBS studies in this thesis the focus has been in using very low energy, microjoule pulses in order to give high spatial resolution and minimize the laser system requirements. This is a regime that we refer to as microLIBS. Under such conditions it is important to maximize the signal detected to give the lowest limit of detection LOD possible. One technique to improve the signal to noise ratios is by coupling LIBS with Laser Induced Fluorescence. This is a technique where the first pulse creates a vapor plume and the second pulse tuned to a resonant absorption line of the species of interest re-excites the plume. We term this technique as Laser ablation Laser Induced Fluorescence LA-LIF. We have been investigating the performance of LA-LIF at low pulse energies (≤ 1 mJ for both pulses) for the detection of elemental contaminants in water. This technique allows reasonable performance compared to high energy single-pulse LIBS, but at a much reduced total energy expenditure. This allows LODs in the parts per billion range ppb range which typically cannot be obtained with low energy single pulse probing of the systems. This approach or exceeds the sensitivities which can be obtained with many shots using much larger energy systems. In this thesis we investigated the performance of LIBS at low pulse energies for the detection of Pb as a contaminant in water. An LOD of 70 ppb was obtained for an accumulation of 100 shots with the ablation laser pulse energy of 250 muJ and an excitation laser pulse energy of 8 muJ. A systematic study of the detector conditions was made for the system for the detection of Pb. Scaling laws for the LOD in terms of the pump and probe energies were measured and also the effect of detector gain, the gate delay and the gate width were studied. In

  17. Development of laser-induced fluorescence for precombustion diagnostics in spark-ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neij, H.

    1998-11-01

    Motivated by a desire to understand and optimize combustion in spark-ignition (SI) engines, laser techniques have been developed for measurement of fuel and residual gas, respectively, in the precombustion mixture of an operating SI engine. The primary objective was to obtain two-dimensional, quantitative data in the vicinity of the spark gap at the time of ignition. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique was developed for fuel visualization in engine environments. Since the fluorescence signal from any commercial gasoline fuel would be unknown to its origin, with an unpredictable dependence on collisional partners, pressure and temperature, a non-fluorescent base fuel - isooctane - was used. For LIF detection, a fluorescent species was added to the fuel. An additive not commonly used in this context - 3-pentanone - was chosen based on its suitable vaporization characteristics and fluorescent properties. The LIF technique was applied to an optically accessible research engine. By calibration, the fluorescence signal from the additive was converted to fuel-to-air equivalence ratio ({phi}). The accuracy and precision of the acquired data were assessed. A statistical evaluation revealed that the spatially averaged equivalence ratio around the spark plug had a significant impact on the combustion event. The strong correlation between these two quantities suggested that the early combustion was sensitive to large-scale inhomogeneities in the precombustion mixture. A similar LIF technique, using acetone as a fluorescent additive in methane, was applied to a combustion cell for ion current evaluation. The local equivalence ratio around the spark gap at the time of ignition was extracted from LIF data. Useful relations were identified between different ion current parameters and the local equivalence ratio, although the impact of the flow field, the fuel type, and the electrode geometry were identified as areas for future research. A novel fuel - dimethyl ether (DME

  18. Development of laser-induced fluorescence for precombustion diagnostics in spark-ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neij, H.

    1998-11-01

    Motivated by a desire to understand and optimize combustion in spark-ignition (SI) engines, laser techniques have been developed for measurement of fuel and residual gas, respectively, in the precombustion mixture of an operating SI engine. The primary objective was to obtain two-dimensional, quantitative data in the vicinity of the spark gap at the time of ignition. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique was developed for fuel visualization in engine environments. Since the fluorescence signal from any commercial gasoline fuel would be unknown to its origin, with an unpredictable dependence on collisional partners, pressure and temperature, a non-fluorescent base fuel - isooctane - was used. For LIF detection, a fluorescent species was added to the fuel. An additive not commonly used in this context - 3-pentanone - was chosen based on its suitable vaporization characteristics and fluorescent properties. The LIF technique was applied to an optically accessible research engine. By calibration, the fluorescence signal from the additive was converted to fuel-to-air equivalence ratio ({phi}). The accuracy and precision of the acquired data were assessed. A statistical evaluation revealed that the spatially averaged equivalence ratio around the spark plug had a significant impact on the combustion event. The strong correlation between these two quantities suggested that the early combustion was sensitive to large-scale inhomogeneities in the precombustion mixture. A similar LIF technique, using acetone as a fluorescent additive in methane, was applied to a combustion cell for ion current evaluation. The local equivalence ratio around the spark gap at the time of ignition was extracted from LIF data. Useful relations were identified between different ion current parameters and the local equivalence ratio, although the impact of the flow field, the fuel type, and the electrode geometry were identified as areas for future research. A novel fuel - dimethyl ether (DME

  19. Determination of phycobiliproteins by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskari, P J; Kinkade, C S; Colyer, C L

    2001-07-01

    Phycobiliproteins are derived from the photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae. They are composed of a protein backbone to which linear tetrapyrrole chromophores are covalently bound. Furthermore, they are water-soluble highly fluorescent, and relatively stable at room temperature and neutral pH. For this reason, capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) seems the idea method for determination of these important proteins. The effects of buffer additives such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)and putrescine on the separation of the three major phycobiliprotein types, namely allophycocyanin, phycocyanin, and phycoerythrin, with excitation and emission maxima at 652/660, 615/647, and 565(494)/575 nm, respectively, are considered. Detection limits for these proteins by CE-LIF are some 60-500 times better than by absorbance detection. The development of a fast and sensitive CE-LIF assay such as this is of potential significance to our understand ing of chemical and biological oceanographic processes.

  20. Application of Laser Induced Fluorescence in experimental analysis of convection phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczur, M.; Pyrda, L.

    2016-09-01

    One of the most promising technique for temperature measurement is the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) which utilize basic concept of optical, non-intrusive measurements and give possibility to visualize the temperature distribution in the whole two-dimensional plane at once. A major problem of a LIF is it still unsatisfactory accuracy for temperature gradient and heat transfer measurement. The LIF fluorescent re-emission is a function of temperature but, in all measurements a lot of imperfection follow the image recording: background noises, light intensity variation, non uniformity and shadowgraph effect near the non-isothermal walls. In the present paper the influence of all key effect on the temperature measurement will be verified in order to obtain the method uncertainty. To evaluate that experimental measurement of convection phenomenon using LIF and thermocouples focussing on heat transfer measurement will be presented. Results show that all processing steps (pre-processing, processing and post-processing) are crucial for reducing the error related to the temperature measurement.

  1. A new post-column reactor-laser induced fluorescence detector for capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liling, Zhang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1996-01-02

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), a powerful separation method based on the differential migration of charged species under the influence of an electric field, has been widely used for separations covering from small ions to big biomolecules. Chapter 1 describes the method, then discusses detection of the separated analytes by laser induced fluorescence and by chemical derivatization, and the use of O-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) as a post-column reagent. Chapter 2 describes a post-column reactor which uses two narrow bore capillaries connected coaxially. This reactor differs from other coaxial reactors in terms of capillary dimensions, reagent flow control, ease of construction and most importantly, better limits of detection. The derivatization reagent is electroosmotically driven into the reaction capillary and the reagent flow rate is independently controlled by a high voltage power supply. Amino acids, amines and proteins, derivatized by OPA/2-mercaptoethanol using this post-column reactor coupled with LIF detection, show low attomole mass limits of detection, and for the first time, the authors demonstrate single cell capability with a post-column derivatization scheme. The single cell capability shows that this reactor could find applications in assaying non-fluorescent or electrochemically inactive components in individual biological cells in the future.

  2. Portable detection system of vegetable oils based on laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Chen, He; Guo, Pan; Mu, Taotao

    2015-11-01

    Food safety, especially edible oils, has attracted more and more attention recently. Many methods and instruments have emerged to detect the edible oils, which include oils classification and adulteration. It is well known than the adulteration is based on classification. Then, in this paper, a portable detection system, based on laser induced fluorescence, is proposed and designed to classify the various edible oils, including (olive, rapeseed, walnut, peanut, linseed, sunflower, corn oils). 532 nm laser modules are used in this equipment. Then, all the components are assembled into a module (100*100*25mm). A total of 700 sets of fluorescence data (100 sets of each type oil) are collected. In order to classify different edible oils, principle components analysis and support vector machine have been employed in the data analysis. The training set consisted of 560 sets of data (80 sets of each oil) and the test set consisted of 140 sets of data (20 sets of each oil). The recognition rate is up to 99%, which demonstrates the reliability of this potable system. With nonintrusive and no sample preparation characteristic, the potable system can be effectively applied for food detection.

  3. A simple dental caries detection system using full spectrum of laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Cabral, Renata Maciel; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Maldonado, Edison Puig; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2015-06-01

    Objectives: to develop an apparatus for the detection of early caries lesions in enamel using the full extent of the tooth fluorescence spectrum, through the integration of a laser diode, fiber optics, filters and one portable spectrometer connected to a computer, all commercially available; to evaluate the developed device in clinical and laboratory tests, and compare its performance with commercial equipment. Methods: clinical examinations were performed in patients with indication for exodontics of premolars. After examinations, the patients underwent surgery and the teeth were stored individually. The optical measurements were repeated approximately two months after extraction, on the same sites previously examined, then histological analysis was carried out. Results: the spectral detector has presented high specificity and moderate sensitivity when applied to differentiate between healthy and damaged tissues, with no significant differences from the performance of the commercial equipment. The developed device is able to detect initial damages in enamel, with depth of approximately 300 μm. Conclusions: we successfully demonstrated the development of a simple and portable system based in laser-induced fluorescence for caries detection, assembled from common commercial parts. As the spectral detector acquires a complete recording of the spectrum from each tissue, it is possible to use it for monitoring developments of caries lesions.

  4. Laser Induced Dual Fluorescence Ratiometric Technique for Mixing Characterization in Microfluidic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedding, David; Hidrovo, Carlso

    2016-11-01

    Increasing the rate of mixing within microfluidic systems is vitally important in understanding biological and chemical reaction kinetics and mechanisms. The small length scales characteristic of these systems which translate into highly viscous, Stokes flows result in mixing that is primarily dominated by diffusion. In order to counteract this, an approach that utilizes inertial droplet collisions to promote chaotic advection between two mixing species has been developed. A Laser-Induced Dual Fluorescence (LIDF) system in conjunction with a high-speed camera and appropriate optics are used to capture two intensity fields providing information about the mixing process as well as the excitation intensity field over the volume of interest. The rate of mixing for the coalescing droplets was quantified by taking the standard deviation of the first intensity field over time, while the second intensity field provides information about the intensity field. A ratiometric imaging approach allows removal of mixing fluorescence signal noise in the form of variation in excitation intensity, primarily from the lasing patterns and lensing effects within the interrogation volume. NSF CAREER Award Grant CBET - 1151091.

  5. Absolute absorption and fluorescence measurements over a dynamic range of 10$^6$ with cavity-enhanced laser-induced fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Scott E; Nahler, N Hendrik; Wrede, Eckart

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel experimental setup that combines the advantages of both laser-induced fluorescence and cavity ring-down techniques. The simultaneous measurement of the ring-down and fluorescence signals from the same sample in a single laser beam delivers the calibration of the fluorescence measurement to gain absolute quantities: absorption cross section, sample density and fluorescence quantum yield. At the same time, the fluorescence measurement extends the dynamic range of a stand-alone cavity ring-down setup from typically three to at least six orders of magnitude. The methodology of this combined cavity-enhanced laser-induced fluorescence (CELIF) technique is developed and rigorously tested against the spectroscopy of 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene in a molecular beam and density measurements in a cell.

  6. Laser-induced Native Fluorescence Detection of Organic Molecules in Hydrothermal Vent Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harju, E.; Kidd, R. D.; Bhartia, R.; Conrad, P. G.

    2004-12-01

    We have developed a Multi-channel Deep Ultraviolet Excitation (McDuve) fluorescence detector that has been deployed at several Pacific hydrothermal vent sites [1]. The in situ McDuve detector was able to detect organic molecules at the vent site on rock surfaces and in the water, the signatures being distinguishable one from the other. The McDuve fluorescence detector uses a 224.3 nm helium-silver hollow cathode laser to induce native fluorescence from a sample. Spectral separation is achieved with optical band-pass filters which are coupled to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for detection. Samples were recovered at the vent sites and returned from the expedition for bench-top analysis for correlation of the McDuve observations with standard analytical tools-GCMS and X-ray diffraction (for mineralogical ID), as well as with a bench-top version of the McDuve fluorescence detector. Here we report the corroborative results of the laboratory studies. Several preserved samples were subjected to 224.3 nm ultraviolet excitation under wet and dry conditions. Organic molecules were detected on the wet samples analyzed in the lab, corroborating the in situ McDuve data. The fluorescence emission wavelengths associated with the detected organic molecules suggest they are 3-5 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [2,3]. The samples were also pyrolized at 500 ºC to decompose any organic molecules present and subsequently reanalyzed. This McDuve analysis revealed a significant decrease in laser induced native fluorescence, a result consistent with the pyrolytic decomposition of the organic content of the rock samples. [1] Conrad, P.G., A.L. Lane, R. Bhartia, W. Hug, (March 2004) Optical Detection of Organic Chemical Biosignatures at Hydrothermal Vents 35th Lunar Plan. Sci. XXXV, 2055. [2] Karcher, W. (1985), Spectral Atlas of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds, vol. I, Kluwer Academic Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Holland. [3] Bhartia, R., McDonald, G.D., Salas, E.C., Hug, W., Reid, R

  7. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Su

    2001-05-25

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, the author introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, they demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sup 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection. In the second part of this dissertation, the author used laser-induced native fluorescence coupled with capillary electrophoresis (LINF-CE) and microscope imaging to study the single cell degranulation. On the basis of good temporal correlation with events observed through an optical microscope, they have identified individual peaks in the fluorescence electropherograms as serotonin released from the granular core on contact with the surrounding fluid.

  8. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hui [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, the author introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, they demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm2 for 40-μm wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection. In the second part of this dissertation, the author used laser-induced native fluorescence coupled with capillary electrophoresis (LINF-CE) and microscope imaging to study the single cell degranulation. On the basis of good temporal correlation with events observed through an optical microscope, they have identified individual peaks in the fluorescence electropherograms as serotonin released from the granular core on contact with the surrounding fluid.

  9. Study of Sugar Cane Management Systems in Brazil Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Jader; Villas-Boas, Paulino; Carvalho, Camila; Corá, José Eduardo; Milori, Débora

    2014-05-01

    Brazil is the largest producer of cane sugar, consequently, is a leader in the production of bio-ethanol, a clean and renewable energy that fits the model of sustainable economy as discussed and pursued by our society. Our state of São Paulo concentrates 60% of national production, representing a sizeable share in the range of world production. All this economic potential is closely monitored by the scientific community, which develops numerous studies seeking an improvement in production efficiency and reduced environmental impacts caused by the planting. However, the study of soil samples, in plantation areas, demands results about the content and structural forms of organic matter (OM). Also, the soil carbon stocks depend on the type of management. Our goal is to study OM of soil samples from four sugar cane management systems: (i) unburned cane harvest, (ii) preharvest burned, (iii) addition of sugarcane bagasse ash and (iv) addition of residue from the extraction of sucrose, using Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of solid state. All the emission spectra were acquired using the system called LIFS-405, which consists of a diode laser Coherent, model cube with excitation at 405 nm, maximum output power of 50mJ and a mini-spectrometer, Ocean Optics USB2000-high sensitivity, with range of 194-894 nm and a fiber-optic bundle design (six excitation fibers in a circular path and one central fiber the collect the fluorescence). In this work, we will present the preliminary results evolving the humification index (HLIFS) of soil OM and total carbon amount (TC) for the different types of management. HLIFS shows a close correlation with the humification index of humic acid in solution obtained by means 2D conventional fluorescence spectroscopy.

  10. Study of Organic Matter in Soils of the Amazon Region Employing Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadini, Amanda Maria; Nicolodelli, Gustavo; Mounier, Stéphane; Montes, Célia Regina; Marcondes Bastos Pereira Milori, Débora

    2014-05-01

    In the face of climate change and increasing CO2 levels in the atmosphere, the global carbon cycle, soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration, and the role of different world biomes as potential sources and sinks of carbon are receiving increasing attention. Carbon quantification is an important environmental indicator, but the structure of organic matter is also important because is related to carbon stability. The synthesis of soil organic matter (SOM), as presented in soils of forest vegetation, can be originated from condensation polymeric polyphenols and quinones that are responsible for controlling the main physical-chemical properties of soils. These systems are present in humic substances, representing the major fluorophore of SOM[1-3]. Abiotic factors, such as soil texture, use and occupation of soil, can influence on the process of SOM formation, molecular structure and in its humification index[4]. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIFS) have become a promising technique for assessing humification index of SOM (HLIFS). In this context, the aim of this study was to analyze the humification index of the SOM in the region of Barcelos (Amazon) employing LIFS. The study area was the region of Barcelos, close the river Demeni. The whose vegetation distribution in this area, is two biomes the Dense Ombrophylous Forest (DPQD) and Campinarana (DPQT), with areas of edaphic contacts between these two phytophysiognomies, which ranged from Open field (FDE) to closed Depression (DPQ). Preliminary results showed that the area closed Depression (DPQ) there was a continuous gradient of humification with increasing soil depth. A similar behavior was verified for area Forest (DPQD), where the highest values of HLIFS were obtained between the four points analyzed, indicating the magnitude of the molecular recalcitrance this organic matter in this area. The results obtained for area Campinarana (DPQT) and Open field (FDE) showed an opposite behavior. These points there

  11. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Su

    2001-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sub 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  12. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hui [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm2 for 40-μm wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  13. The diagnostic capability of laser induced fluorescence in the characterization of excised breast tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmed, A. H.; Elshemey, Wael M.

    2017-08-01

    Differentiating between normal, benign and malignant excised breast tissues is one of the major worldwide challenges that need a quantitative, fast and reliable technique in order to avoid personal errors in diagnosis. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is a promising technique that has been applied for the characterization of biological tissues including breast tissue. Unfortunately, only few studies have adopted a quantitative approach that can be directly applied for breast tissue characterization. This work provides a quantitative means for such characterization via introduction of several LIF characterization parameters and determining the diagnostic accuracy of each parameter in the differentiation between normal, benign and malignant excised breast tissues. Extensive analysis on 41 lyophilized breast samples using scatter diagrams, cut-off values, diagnostic indices and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, shows that some spectral parameters (peak height and area under the peak) are superior for characterization of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues with high sensitivity (up to 0.91), specificity (up to 0.91) and accuracy ranking (highly accurate).

  14. X-Ray Fluorescence and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy analysis of Roman silver denarii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardini, L. [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); El Hassan, A. [National Institute for Laser- Enhanced Sciences (NILES), Cairo University Giza (Egypt); Ferretti, M. [Istituto per le Tecnologie Applicate ai Beni Culturali, Area della Ricerca del CNR di Montelibretti Roma (Italy); Foresta, A.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G. [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Nebbia, E. [Universita degli Studi di Torino (Italy); Catalli, F. [Monetiere di Firenze, Museo Archeologico Nazionale Firenze (Italy); Harith, M.A. [National Institute for Laser- Enhanced Sciences (NILES), Cairo University Giza (Egypt); Diaz Pace, D. [Institute of Physics ' Arroyo Seco' , Faculty of Science, Tandil (Argentina); Anabitarte Garcia, F. [Photonics Engineering Group, University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Scuotto, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Archeologiche, Via Galvani 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Palleschi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.palleschi@cnr.it [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Archeologiche, Via Galvani 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    In this paper we present the results of a study performed on a large collection of silver Roman republican denarii, encompassing about two centuries of history. The joint use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy allowed for an accurate determination of the coins' elemental composition; the measurements, performed mostly in situ at the 'Monetiere' in Florence, revealed a striking connection between the 'quality' of the silver alloy and some crucial contemporary events. This finding was used to classify a group of denarii whose dating was otherwise impossible. The comparison with other contemporary denarii disproves a recent theory on the origin of the so called 'serrated' denarii (denarii showing notched chisel marks on the edge of the coin). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied a large collection of Roman republican silver denarii. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRF and LIBS allowed to determine the precious metal content of the coins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A correlation of the 'quality' of the alloy with some contemporary events was found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study allowed to controvert a recent theory on the so called 'serrated' denarii.

  15. A two-photon laser induced fluorescence diagnostic with improved sensitivity, localization, and measurement rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Drew; Scime, Earl; Short, Zachary

    2016-10-01

    A two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence diagnostic has been developed for measuring neutrals in fusion plasmas. Implementation of this diagnostic on the HIT-SI3 spheromak has demonstrated the sensitivity of the diagnostic and shown that measurements taken over several plasma pulses are possible. These measurements yielded an unexpected loss of signal when complex collection optics were utilized. Simulations show that this loss of signal can be explained by chromatic aberrations caused by the disparate Kr and D emission. This loss of signal has been addressed with the development of a new calibration scheme involving xenon gas. The Xe calibration scheme emission occurs at 656.00 nm while the deuterium emission is 656.09 nm. This nearly identical emission allows for advanced optical techniques such as confocal collection/injection and spatial filtering to be employed without loss of signal. Spatial filtering has been demonstrated to decrease noise while improving measurement localization, while confocal collection/injection allows for probing and measuring to occur through one viewport. The Xe scheme also allows for a Doppler-free hydrogen measurement. Doppler-free measurements eliminate the need to scan the laser spectrally thus greatly increasing the rate of measurement.

  16. Chiral separation of benzoporphyrin derivative mono- and diacids by laser induced fluorescence-capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xuejun; Sternberg, Ethan; Dolphin, David

    2002-01-01

    A method for the separation of benzoporphyrin derivative mono- and diacid (BPDMA, BPDDA) enantiomers by laser induced fluorescence-capillary electrophoresis (LIF-CE) has been developed. By using 300 mM borate buffer, pH 9.2, 25 mM sodium cholate and 10% acetronitrile as electrolyte, +10 kV electrokinetic sampling injection of 2 s and an applied +20 kV voltage across the ends of a 37 cm capillary (30 cm to the detector, 50 microm ID), all six BPD stereoisomers were baseline-separated within 20 min. Formation constants, free electrophoretic and complexation mobilities with borate and cholate were determined based on dynamic complexation capillary electrophoresis theory. The BPD enantiomers can be quantitatively determined in the range of 10(-2)-10(-5) mg mL(-1). The correlation coefficients (r2) of the least-squares linear regression analysis of the BPD enantiomers are in the range of 0.9914-0.9997. Their limits of detection are 2.18-3.5 x 10(-3) mg mL(-1). The relative standard deviations for the separation were 2.90-4.64% (n = 10). In comparison with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), CE has better resolution and efficiency. This separation method was successfully applied to the BPD enantiomers obtained from a matrix of bovine serum and from liposomally formulated material as well as from studies with rat, dog and human microsomes.

  17. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper will document the latest improvements of the LIF system design and demonstrations of the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems.

  18. Flow Property Measurement Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay Henderson; Porter, Barry J.; Carballo, Julio Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species has been applied to single-point measurements of velocity and static temperature in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jet. Excitation spectra of atomic oxygen and nitrogen were recorded while scanning a tunable dye laser over the absorption feature. Thirty excitation spectra were acquired during 8 arc jet runs at two facility operating conditions; the number of scans per run varied between 2 and 6. Curve fits to the spectra were analyzed to recover their Doppler shifts and widths, from which the flow velocities and static temperatures, respectively, were determined. An increase in the number of independent flow property pairs from each as-measured scan was obtained by extracting multiple lower-resolution scans. The larger population sample size enabled the mean property values and their uncertainties for each run to be characterized with greater confidence. The average plus or minus 2 sigma uncertainties in the mean velocities and temperatures for all 8 runs were plus or minus 1.4% and plus or minus 11%, respectively.

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence and FT-Raman spectroscopy for characterizing patinas on stone substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oujja, M; Vázquez-Calvo, C; Sanz, M; Álvarez de Buergo, M; Fort, R; Castillejo, M

    2012-02-01

    This article reports on a compositional investigation of stone patinas: thin colored layers applied for protective and/or aesthetic purposes on architectural or sculptural substrates of cultural heritage. The analysis and classification of patinas provide important information of historic and artistic interest, as their composition reflects local practices, the availabilities of different materials, and the development of technological knowledge during specific historical periods. Model patinas fabricated according to traditional procedures and applied onto limestone, and a historic patina sample from the main façade of the San Blas Monastery in Lerma (a village in the province of Burgos, Spain), were analyzed by laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained demonstrate the ability of these two analytical techniques to identify the key components of each formulation and those of the reaction products which result from the chemical and mineralogical transformations that occur during aging, as well as to provide information that can aid the classification of different types of patinas.

  20. Restriction Enzyme Pattern Analysis of Mycobacteria DNA by Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser-induced Fluorescence Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yuanqian; Wang Guoqing; Mi Jianping; Zhou Ying; Zeng Hongyan; Zhang Chaowu

    2006-01-01

    A new method for rapidly detecting restriction enzyme patterns of Mycobacterium DNA using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD)was developed.Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify a 439-bp fragment of a 65,000-kDa(Mr)heat shock protein gene(hsp65)of Mycobacterium.After digesting amplification products by BstEII and HaeIII,patterns of enzyme cleavage products were detected by both CE-LIFD and agarose gel electrophoresis(AGE),respectively.Experimental parameters of CE were optimized.Restriction enzyme patterns of Mycobacterium DNA were detected in optimum electrophoresis conditions:a coated capillary column with a length of 50 cm and an internal diameter of 100 μm,an electrophoresis buffer of 45 mmol/1 Tris-boric acid-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid,and a running voltage of 11 kV.The restriction enzyme patterns for eight species of mycobacteria were studied.Relative standard deviations of the relative migration times of DNA segments were<3.6%.Compared with AGE,CE is more outstanding in resolution and detection time,and it can be applied as a more effective means to DNA restriction enzyme pattern analysis.

  1. Hot-wire accuracy in supersonic turbulence from comparisons with laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Pamela; Bershader, Daniel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A hot-wire anemometer and a new, nonintrusive, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique are used to survey a turbulent boundary layer in a supersonic channel flow at Mach no. 2.06. The purpose is to test the accuracy of using the hot wire to measure the fluctuation amplitudes of static temperature and density in a compressible turbulent flow by comparing the results with independent and direct LIF measurements. Several methods of hot-wire calibration and analysis are applied. With each method, the hot-wire response can be related primarily to fluctuations of mass flux and total temperature, from which fluctuations of static temperature and density are calculated. However, these calculations are shown to be valid only if the fluctuations in static pressure are negligible. The acquisition and the analysis of the hot-wire data are often simplified further by neglecting the effects of fluctuations in total temperature. Comparisons of the fluctuation amplitudes of temperature and density obtained by hot-wire and LIF measurements demonstrate that such assumptions might not always be warranted, even in apparently simple flows.

  2. Intercomparison of Hantzsch and fiber-laser-induced-fluorescence formaldehyde measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, J.; Li, X.; Tillmann, R.; Acir, I.; Holland, F.; Rohrer, F.; Wegener, R.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2014-06-01

    Two gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO) measurement techniques, a modified commercial wet-chemical instrument based on Hantzsch fluorimetry and a custom-built instrument based on fiber laser-induced fluorescence (FILIF), were deployed at the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) to compare the instruments' performances under a range of conditions. Thermolysis of para-HCHO and ozonolysis of 1-butene were used as HCHO sources, allowing for calculations of theoretical HCHO mixing ratios. Calculated HCHO mixing ratios are compared to measurements, and the two measurements are also compared. Experiments were repeated under dry and humid conditions (RH 60%) to investigate the possibility of a water artifact in the FILIF measurements. The ozonolysis of 1-butene also allowed for the investigation of an ozone artifact seen in some Hantzsch measurements in previous intercomparisons. Results show that under all conditions the two techniques are well correlated (R2 ≥ 0.997), and linear regression statistics show measurements agree with within stated uncertainty (15% FILIF + 5% Hantzsch). No water or ozone artifacts are identified. While a slight curvature is observed in some Hantzsch vs. FILIF regressions, the potential for variable instrument sensitivity cannot be attributed to a single instrument at this time. Measurements at low concentrations highlight the need for a secondary method for testing the purity of air used in instrument zeroing and the need for further FILIF White cell outgassing experiments.

  3. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry; Brown, Jeff; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Steve; Brubaker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnsons arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  4. Multi-Site N-glycan mapping study 1: Capillary electrophoresis - laser induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekrényes, Ákos; Park, SungAe Suhr; Santos, Marcia; Lew, Clarence; Jones, Aled; Haxo, Ted; Kimzey, Michael; Pourkaveh, Shiva; Szabó, Zoltán; Sosic, Zoran; Feng, Peng; Váradi, Csaba; de l'Escaille, François; Falmagne, Jean-Bernard; Sejwal, Preeti; Niedringhaus, Thomas; Michels, David; Freckleton, Gordon; Hamm, Melissa; Manuilov, Anastasiya; Schwartz, Melissa; Luo, Jiann-Kae; van Dyck, Jonathan; Leung, Pui-King; Olajos, Marcell; Gu, Yingmei; Gao, Kai; Wang, Wenbo; Wegstein, Jo; Tep, Samnang; Guttman, András

    2016-01-01

    An international team that included 20 independent laboratories from biopharmaceutical companies, universities, analytical contract laboratories and national authorities in the United States, Europe and Asia was formed to evaluate the reproducibility of sample preparation and analysis of N-glycans using capillary electrophoresis of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS)-labeled glycans with laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection (16 sites) and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC, 12 sites; results to be reported in a subsequent publication). All participants used the same lot of chemicals, samples, reagents, and columns/capillaries to run their assays. Migration time, peak area and peak area percent values were determined for all peaks with >0.1% peak area. Our results demonstrated low variability and high reproducibility, both, within any given site as well across all sites, which indicates that a standard N-glycan analysis platform appropriate for general use (clone selection, process development, lot release, etc.) within the industry can be established.

  5. Multi-Site N-glycan mapping study 1: Capillary electrophoresis – laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekrényes, Ákos; Park, SungAe Suhr; Santos, Marcia; Lew, Clarence; Jones, Aled; Haxo, Ted; Kimzey, Michael; Pourkaveh, Shiva; Szabó, Zoltán; Sosic, Zoran; Feng, Peng; Váradi, Csaba; de l'Escaille, François; Falmagne, Jean-Bernard; Sejwal, Preeti; Niedringhaus, Thomas; Michels, David; Freckleton, Gordon; Hamm, Melissa; Manuilov, Anastasiya; Schwartz, Melissa; Luo, Jiann-Kae; van Dyck, Jonathan; Leung, Pui-King; Olajos, Marcell; Gu, Yingmei; Gao, Kai; Wang, Wenbo; Wegstein, Jo; Tep, Samnang; Guttman, András

    2016-01-01

    An international team that included 20 independent laboratories from biopharmaceutical companies, universities, analytical contract laboratories and national authorities in the United States, Europe and Asia was formed to evaluate the reproducibility of sample preparation and analysis of N-glycans using capillary electrophoresis of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS)-labeled glycans with laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection (16 sites) and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC, 12 sites; results to be reported in a subsequent publication). All participants used the same lot of chemicals, samples, reagents, and columns/capillaries to run their assays. Migration time, peak area and peak area percent values were determined for all peaks with >0.1% peak area. Our results demonstrated low variability and high reproducibility, both, within any given site as well across all sites, which indicates that a standard N-glycan analysis platform appropriate for general use (clone selection, process development, lot release, etc.) within the industry can be established. PMID:26466659

  6. Remote measurement of photosynthetic efficiency using laser induced fluorescence transient (LIFT) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieruschka, R.; Rascher, U.; Klimov, D.; Kolber, Z. S.; Berry, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    An understanding of spatial and temporal diversity of photosynthetic processes, water and energy exchange of complex plant canopies is essential for carbon and climate models. Remote sensing from space or aircraft platforms provides the only practical way to characterize the vast extent of plant canopies around the globe, but the basis for relating physiological processes to remote sensing is still largely theoretical. Experiments that bridge this gap are needed. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements have been widely applied to quantify photosynthetic efficiency and non- photochemical energy dissipation non-destructively in photosynthetically active organisms. The most commonly used Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) technique provides a saturating light pulse and is not practical at the canopy scale. We report here on a recently developed technique, Laser Induced Fluorescence Transient (LIFT), capable of remote measurement of photosynthetic efficiency of selected leaves at a distance of up to 50 m and we present here continuous studies on plans growing under natural conditions during the beginning of the winter season and the onset of summer drought in this Mediterranean climate. i) Lichens showed a strong diurnal variation in photosynthetic efficiency which correlated with relative humidity; ii) Photosynthetic efficiency of annual grass decreased with progressing drought stress; iii) An oak canopy showed very little variation of quantum yield from leaf out in spring to summer; iv) The combined effect of low temperature and high light intensity during an early winter strongly reduced the photosynthetic efficiency of four different species in response to chilling stress. These measures with the LIFT correlated well with (more limited) sampling by PAM fluoromentry and gas exchange. The ability to make continuous, automatic and remote measurements of photosynthetic efficiency of leaves with the LIFT provides a new approach for studying the heterogeneity of

  7. Multispectral imaging system based on laser-induced fluorescence for security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneve, L.; Colao, F.; Del Franco, M.; Palucci, A.; Pistilli, M.; Spizzichino, V.

    2016-10-01

    The development of portable sensors for fast screening of crime scenes is required to reduce the number of evidences useful to be collected, optimizing time and resources. Laser based spectroscopic techniques are good candidates to this scope due to their capability to operate in field, in remote and rapid way. In this work, the prototype of a multispectral imaging LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) system able to detect evidence of different materials on large very crowded and confusing areas at distances up to some tens of meters will be presented. Data collected as both 2D fluorescence images and LIF spectra are suitable to the identification and the localization of the materials of interest. A reduced scan time, preserving at the same time the accuracy of the results, has been taken into account as a main requirement in the system design. An excimer laser with high energy and repetition rate coupled to a gated high sensitivity ICCD assures very good performances for this purpose. Effort has been devoted to speed up the data processing. The system has been tested in outdoor and indoor real scenarios and some results will be reported. Evidence of the plastics polypropylene (PP) and polyethilene (PE) and polyester have been identified and their localization on the examined scenes has been highlighted through the data processing. By suitable emission bands, the instrument can be used for the rapid detection of other material classes (i.e. textiles, woods, varnishes). The activities of this work have been supported by the EU-FP7 FORLAB project (Forensic Laboratory for in-situ evidence analysis in a post blast scenario).

  8. Ablation plume structure and dynamics in ambient gas observed by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Khumaeni, A.; Kato, M.; Wakaida, I.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamic behavior of an ablation plume in ambient gas has been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. The second harmonic beam from an Nd:YAG laser (0.5–6 J/cm{sup 2}) was focused on a sintered oxide pellet or a metal chip of gadolinium. The produced plume was subsequently intersected with a sheet-shaped UV beam from a dye laser so that time-resolved fluorescence images were acquired with an intensified CCD camera at various delay times. The obtained cross-sectional images of the plume indicate that the ablated ground state atoms and ions of gadolinium accumulate in a hemispherical contact layer between the plume and the ambient gas, and a cavity containing a smaller density of ablated species is formed near the center of the plume. At earlier expansion stage, another luminous component also expands in the cavity so that it coalesces into the hemispherical layer. The splitting and coalescence for atomic plume occur later than those for ionic plume. Furthermore, the hemispherical layer of neutral atoms appears later than that of ions; however, the locations of the layers are nearly identical. This coincidence of the appearance locations of the layers strongly suggests that the neutral atoms in the hemispherical layer are produced as a consequence of three-body recombination of ions through collisions with gas atoms. The obtained knowledge regarding plume expansion dynamics and detailed plume structure is useful for optimizing the experimental conditions for ablation-based spectroscopic analysis. - Highlights: • Ablated ground-state species accumulated in a thin hemispherical boundary layer • Inside the layer, a cavity containing a small density of ablated species was formed. • The hemispherical layers of atoms and ions appeared at a nearly identical location. • The measured intensity peak variation was in good agreement with a model prediction. • We ascribed the dominant process for forming the layer to a three

  9. A new airborne laser-induced fluorescence instrument for in situ detection of formaldehyde throughout the troposphere and lower stratosphere

    OpenAIRE

    M. Cazorla; Wolfe, G. M.; S. A. Bailey; Swanson, A. K.; H. L. Arkinson; Hanisco, T. F.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA In Situ Airborne Formaldehyde (ISAF) instrument is a high-performance laser-based detector for gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO). ISAF uses rotational-state specific laser excitation at 353 nm for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of HCHO. A number of features make ISAF ideal for airborne deployment, including (1) a compact, low-maintenance fiber laser, (2) a single-pass design for stable signal response, (3) a straightforward inlet design, and (4) a stand-alon...

  10. Application of HPLC Combined with Laser Induced Fluorescence for Protein Profile Analysis of Tissue Homogenates in Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sujatha Bhat; Ajeetkumar Patil; Lavanya Rai; Kartha, V. B.; Santhosh Chidangil

    2012-01-01

    A highly objective method, High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Laser Induced Fluorescence (HPLC-LIF) technique was used to study the protein profiles of normal and cervical cancer tissue homogenates. A total of 44 samples including normal cervical biopsy samples from the hysterectomy patients and the patients suffering from different stages of the cervical cancer were recorded by HPLC-LIF and analysed by Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to get statistical information on different t...

  11. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs [1, 2]. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions [see 3 for a review]. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique [4] and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examinedReferences[1] F. Salama, E. Bakes, L.J. Allamandola, A.G.G.M. Tielens, Astrophys. J., 458 (1996) p.621[2] F. Salama, The ISO Revolution, EDP Sciences, Les Ulis, France (1999) p.65[3] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press,4, S251,(2008), p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[4

  12. Measurement of OH reactivity by laser flash photolysis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Daniel; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Edwards, Peter M.; Cryer, Danny R.; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Seakins, Paul W.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-07-01

    OH reactivity (k'OH) is the total pseudo-first-order loss rate coefficient describing the removal of OH radicals to all sinks in the atmosphere, and is the inverse of the chemical lifetime of OH. Measurements of ambient OH reactivity can be used to discover the extent to which measured OH sinks contribute to the total OH loss rate. Thus, OH reactivity measurements enable determination of the comprehensiveness of measurements used in models to predict air quality and ozone production, and, in conjunction with measurements of OH radical concentrations, to assess our understanding of OH production rates. In this work, we describe the design and characterisation of an instrument to measure OH reactivity using laser flash photolysis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (LFP-LIF) spectroscopy. The LFP-LIF technique produces OH radicals in isolation, and thus minimises potential interferences in OH reactivity measurements owing to the reaction of HO2 with NO which can occur if HO2 is co-produced with OH in the instrument. Capabilities of the instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements are illustrated by data collected during field campaigns in London, UK, and York, UK. The instrumental limit of detection for k'OH was determined to be 1.0 s-1 for the campaign in London and 0.4 s-1 for the campaign in York. The precision, determined by laboratory experiment, is typically < 1 s-1 for most ambient measurements of OH reactivity. Total uncertainty in ambient measurements of OH reactivity is ˜ 6 %. We also present the coupling and characterisation of the LFP-LIF instrument to an atmospheric chamber for measurements of OH reactivity during simulated experiments, and provide suggestions for future improvements to OH reactivity LFP-LIF instruments.

  13. Pressure broadening of atomic oxygen two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Daniil; Drag, Cyril; Blondel, Christophe; Guaitella, Olivier; Golda, Judith; Klarenaar, Bart; Engeln, Richard; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2016-12-01

    Atomic oxygen, considered to be a determining reactant in plasma applications at ambient pressure, is routinely detected by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Here, pressure broadening of the (2p 4 3 P 2  →  3p 3 P J=0,1,2) two-photon transition in oxygen atoms was investigated using a high-resolution TALIF technique in normal and Doppler-free configurations. The pressure broadening coefficients determined were {γ{{\\text{O}2}}}   =  0.40  ±  0.08  cm-1/bar for oxygen molecules and {γ\\text{He}}   =  0.46  ±  0.03 cm-1/bar for helium atoms. These correspond to pressure broadening rate constants k\\text{PB}{{\\text{O}2}}   =  9 · 10-9 cm3 s-1 and k\\text{PB}\\text{He}   =  4 · 10-9 cm3 s-1, respectively. The well-known quenching rate constants of O(3p 3 P J ) by O2 and He are at least one order of magnitude smaller, which signifies that non-quenching collisions constitute the main line-broadening mechanism. In addition to providing new insights into collisional processes of oxygen atoms in electronically excited 3p 3 P J state, reported pressure broadening parameters are important for quantification of oxygen TALIF line profiles when both collisional and Doppler broadening mechanisms are important. Thus, the Doppler component (and hence the temperature of oxygen atoms) can be accurately determined from high resolution TALIF measurements in a broad range of conditions.

  14. Standoff laser-induced fluorescence of suspensions from different bacterial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duschek, Frank; Walter, Arne; Fellner, Lea; Grünewald, Karin; Pargmann, Carsten; Handke, Jürgen; Tomaso, Herbert

    2016-10-01

    Biological hazardous substances like certain fungi and bacteria represent a high risk for the broad public if fallen into wrong hands. Incidents based on bio agents are commonly considered to have incalculable and complex consequences for first responders and people. The impact of such an event can be minimized by a combination of different sensor technologies that have been developed to detect bio-threats and to gather information after an incident. Sensors for bio-agents can be grouped into two categories. Sampling devices collect material from locations supposed to be contaminated, and they are able to identify biological material with high sensitivity and selectivity. However, these point sensors need to be positioned correctly in advance of an attack, and moving sources of biological material cannot be tracked. A different approach is based on optical standoff detection. For biological samples laser induced florescence (LIF) has been proven to get real time data on location and type of hazards without being in contact with the suspicious substance. This work is based on a bio-detector developed at the DLR Lampoldshausen. The LIF detection has been designed for outdoor operation at standoff distances from 20 m up to more than 100 m. The detector acquires LIF spectral data for two different excitation wavelengths (280 and 355 nm) as well as time resolved information for the fluorescence decay which can be used to classify suspicious samples. While the classification device had been trained on uncritical samples (like amino acids, NADH, yeast, chemicals, oils), this work presents the progress to more relevant, living bacteria of different strains. The low risk and non-pathogenic bacteria Bacillus thuringensis, Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus subtilis, Brevibacillus brevis, Micrococcus luteus, Oligella urethralis, Paenibacillus polymyxa and Escherichia coli (K12) have been investigated with the above set-up at both excitation wavelengths

  15. Ex vivo optical coherence tomography and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy imaging of murine gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Lida; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Wade, Norman; Besselsen, David; Utzinger, Urs; Gerner, Eugene; Barton, Jennifer

    2005-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) have separately been found to have clinical potential in identifying human gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, yet their diagnostic capability in mouse models of human disease is unknown. We combine the two modalities to survey the GI tract of a variety of mouse strains and sample dysplasias and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) of the small and large intestine. Segments of duodenum and lower colon 2.5 cm in length and the entire esophagus from 10 mice each of two colon cancer models (ApcMin and AOM treated A/J) and two IBD models (Il-2 and Il-10) and 5 mice each of their respective controls were excised. OCT images and LIF spectra were obtained simultaneously from each tissue sample within 1 hour of extraction. Histology was used to classify tissue regions as normal, Peyer"s patch, dysplasia, adenoma, or IBD. Features in corresponding regions of OCT images were analyzed. Spectra from each of these categories were averaged and compared via the student's t-test. Features in OCT images correlated to histology in both normal and diseased tissue samples. In the diseased samples, OCT was able to identify early stages of mild colitis and dysplasia. In the sample of IBD, the LIF spectra displayed unique peaks at 635nm and 670nm, which were attributed to increased porphyrin production in the proliferating bacteria of the disease. These peaks have the potential to act as a diagnostic for IBD. OCT and LIF appear to be useful and complementary modalities for imaging mouse models.

  16. Observation of hydrocarbon generation and migration of highly-matured carbonates by means of laser-induced fluorescence microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Some important information on hydrocarbon generation, inclusion and migration in highly-matured carbonates of lower Palaeozoic age from the Ordos Basin and Tarim Basin hasbeen analyzed by a newly-combined laser-induced fluorescence microscope (LFM) designed by our laboratory. The following information has been obtained from the lower Ordovician lamellar carbonates with equivalent vitrinite reflectance (Ro) as high as 1.6%-1.7% and residual TOC of 0.14%-0.35% from the Ordos Basin: wide occurrences of oil and source macerals with strong fluorescence, including G. Prisca alginite, lamalginite, telalginite and algae-detrinite; fluorescing asphalt among mineral crystals; some groundmass and spheroid-like reservoir bitumen with high maturation levels in the pores of dolomites. Various kinds of fluorescing organic inclusions and asphalt have been found in the carbonates, calcareous shales and silt-shales with high maturation levels from the Cambrian-Ordovician strata in the Tarim Basin. All this helps us find and evaluate significant and excellent source rocks for large-and middle-scale gas fields. The net and micro-net systems for hydrocarbon generation, expulsion and migration in carbonates have been revealed by the highly-powered laser-induced fluorescence microscopy.

  17. Two Photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence for Neutral Hydrogen Profile Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scime, Earl E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2016-09-23

    The magnitude and spatial dependence of neutral density in magnetic confinement fusion experiments is a key physical parameter, particularly in the plasma edge. Modeling codes require precise measurements of the neutral density to calculate charge-exchange power losses and drag forces on rotating plasmas. However, direct measurements of the neutral density are problematic. In this work, we proposed to construct a laser-based diagnostic capable of providing spatially resolved measurements of the neutral density in the edge of plasma in the DIII-D tokamak. The diagnostic concept is based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). By injecting two beams of 205 nm light (co or counter propagating), ground state hydrogen (or deuterium or tritium) can be excited from the n = 1 level to the n = 3 level at the location where the two beams intersect. Individually, the beams experience no absorption, and therefore have no difficulty penetrating even dense plasmas. After excitation, a fraction of the hydrogen atoms decay from the n = 3 level to the n = 2 level and emit photons at 656 nm (the Hα line). Calculations based on the results of previous TALIF experiments in magnetic fusion devices indicated that a laser pulse energy of approximately 3 mJ delivered in 5 ns would provide sufficient signal-to-noise for detection of the fluorescence. In collaboration with the DIII-D engineering staff and experts in plasma edge diagnostics for DIII-D from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), WVU researchers designed a TALIF system capable of providing spatially resolved measurements of neutral deuterium densities in the DIII-D edge plasma. The laser systems were specified, purchased, and assembled at WVU. The TALIF system was tested on a low-power hydrogen discharge at WVU and the plan was to move the instrument to DIII-D for installation in collaboration with ORNL researchers. After budget cuts at DIII-D, the DIII-D facility declined to support

  18. Development of a UV laser-induced fluorescence lidar for monitoring blue-green algae in Lake Suwa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yasunori; Takano, Kengo; Kobayashi, Fumitoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Park, Ho-Dong

    2014-10-20

    We developed a UV (355 nm) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) lidar for monitoring the real-time status of blue-green algae. Since the fluorescence spectrum of blue-green algae excited by 355 nm showed the specific fluorescence at 650 nm, the lidar was designed to be able to detect the 650 nm fluorescence as a surveillance method for the algae. The usefulness was confirmed by observation at Lake Suwa over four years (2005-2008). The detection limit of the LIF lidar was 16.65 mg/L for the blue-green algae, which is the range of concentrations in the safe level set by the World Health Organization.

  19. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence. Technical progress report, September 1, 1989--February 28, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  20. Laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy in capillary electrophoresis as an possible instrument for extraterrestrial life signs detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Gorlenko; Cheptcov, Vladimir; Anton, Maydykovskiy; Eugeniy, Vasilev

    The one of a significant aims in extraterrestrial exploration is a seeking for a life traces in a open space and planetary objects. Complex composition and unknown origin of suspected signs of life required у new analytical approaches and technical solutions. The promising assai here can be Laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy methods. The combined instrument developed by our team reveal the advantage of capillary electrophoresis assays in a junction with laser induced fluorescence detection technology. We optimized excitation configuration of fluorescence in capillary electrophoresis to reduce pumping laser power up to 1 mW and decrease background scattering. The improvement of the device sensitivity at poor sample concentration we achieved by incorporating fluorescence flow-through cuvette into spectrometer. That allows to simplify setup, to minimize weight and increase reproducibility of measurements. The device has been tasted in complex organic chemical mixes and microbial strains differentiation tasks. 3d multinational spectra allow us to increase the spectra information loads in comparison with ordinary capillary electrophoresis approaches. Possible updating the device with Raman approach can even furthermore multiple the differentiation power of the instrument. The analytical module developed using this approach can be potentially effectively used in extraterrestrial researches as a payload of the future spacecraft.

  1. Ns-scale time-resolved laser induced fluorescence imaging for detection of fecal contamination on apples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2004-11-01

    Our laboratory has been utilizing fluorescence techniques as a potential means for detection of quality and wholesomeness of food products. A system with a short pulse light source such as a laser coupled with a gated detector can be used to harvest fluorescence in ambient light conditions from biological samples with relatively low fluorescence yields. We present a versatile multispectral laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system capable of ns-scale time resolved fluorescence. The system is equipped with a tunable pulse laser system that emits in the visible range from 410 nm to 690 nm. Ns-scale, time-dependent multispectral fluorescence emissions of apples contaminated with a range of diluted cow feces were acquired. Four spectral bands, F670, F680, F685 and F730, centered near the emission peak wavelengths of the major constituents responsible for the red fluorescence emissions from apples artificially contaminated with cow feces were examined to determine a suitable single red fluorescence band and optimal ns-gate window for detection of fecal contamination on apples. The results based on the ns decay curves showed that 670 nm with 10 nm full width at half maximum (FWHM) at a gate-delay of 4 ns from the laser excitation peak provided the greatest differences in time-dependent fluorescence responses between feces contaminated spots and apples surfaces.

  2. Human neutrophil elastase inhibition studied by capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection and microscale thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syntia, Fayad; Nehmé, Reine; Claude, Bérengère; Morin, Philippe

    2016-01-29

    Capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence (CZE-LIF) and microscale thermophoresis (MST) were used for the first time to study the inhibition of human neutrophil elastase (HNE). We recently studied HNE kinetics (Km and Vmax) by developing an in-capillary CZE-LIF assay based on transverse diffusion of laminar flow profiles (TDLFP) for reactant mixing. In this work, the former assay was adapted to monitor HNE inhibition. Two natural well known HNE inhibitors from the triterpene family, ursolic acid and oleanolic acid, were tested to validate the developed assay. Since the solubility of pentacyclic triterpenes in aqueous media where the enzymatic reaction will take place is limited, the effect of DMSO and ethanol on HNE was studied using microscale thermophoresis (MST). An agglomeration of the enzyme was revealed when preparing the inhibitor in 5% (v/v) DMSO. This phenomenon did not occur in the presence of ethanol. Therefore, ethanol was used as inhibitor solvent, at a limited percentage of 20% (v/v). In these conditions and after optimization of the TDLFP approach, the repeatability (RSD on migration times and peak-areas inferior to 2.2%) of the CZE-LIF assay and the sensitivity (LOQ of few nM) were found to be satisfactory for conducting inhibition assays. IC50 values for ursolic and oleanolic acid were successfully determined. They were respectively equal to 5.62±0.10μM (r(2)=0.9807; n=3) and to 8.21±0.23μM (r(2)=0.9887; n=3). Excellent agreement was found between the results obtained by CE and those reported in literature which validates the developed method. Particularly, the CE-based assay is able to rank HNE inhibitors relative to each other. Furthermore, MST technique was used for evaluating HNE interaction with the ursolic acid. Up to 16 capillaries were automatically processed to obtain in one titration experiment the dissociation constant for the HNE-ursolic acid complex. Ki was found to be 2.72±0.66μM (n=3) which is in excellent agreement

  3. In Situ Airborne Measurement of Formaldehyde with a New Laser Induced Fluorescence Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkinson, H.; Hanisco, T. F.; Cazorla, M.; Fried, A.; Walega, J.

    2012-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a highly reactive and ubiquitous compound in the atmosphere that originates from primary emissions and secondary formation by photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds. HCHO is an important precursor to the formation of ozone and an ideal tracer for the transport of boundary layer pollutants to higher altitudes. In situ measurements of HCHO are needed to improve understanding of convective transport mechanisms and the effects of lofted pollutants on ozone production and cloud microphysics in the upper troposphere. The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) field campaign addressed the effects of deep, midlatitude continental convective clouds on the upper troposphere by examining vertical transport of fresh emissions and water aloft and by characterizing subsequent changes in composition and chemistry. Observations targeting convective storms were conducted over Colorado, Alabama, and Texas and Oklahoma. We present measurements of the In Situ Airborne Formaldehyde instrument (ISAF), which uses laser induced fluorescence to achieve the high sensitivity and fast time response required to detect low concentrations in the upper troposphere and capture the fine structure characteristic of convective storm outflow. Preliminary results from DC3 indicate that the ISAF is able to resolve concentrations ranging from under 35 ppt to over 35 ppb, spanning three orders of magnitude, in less than a few minutes. Frequent, abrupt changes in HCHO captured by the ISAF are corroborated by similar patterns observed by simultaneous trace gas and aerosol measurements. Primary HCHO emissions are apparent in cases when the DC-8 flew over combustion sources or biomass burning, and secondary HCHO formation is suggested by observations of enhanced HCHO concurrent with other elevated hydrocarbons. Vertical transport of HCHO is indicated by measurements of over 6 ppb from outflow in the upper troposphere. The DC-8 payload also included the

  4. In-situ laser induced fluorescence detection and modeling of formaldehyde above a forest canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottle, John Robert

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is ubiquitous throughout the atmosphere. Its main source within the troposphere is the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The photolysis and oxidation of HCHO leads to elevated levels of ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which play critical roles in human health and climate change. The design, development and implementation of an in-situ laser induced fluorescence (LIF) based instrument for atmospheric detection of HCHO is described. To the best of the author's knowledge, the first published reports using LIF for the measurement of atmospheric HCHO are presented. The instrument was field tested during the PROPHET, 2008 field intensive, at the University of Michigan Biological Station, where it continuously measured HCHO for one week with a detection limit (3sigma) of 0.120 ppbv/min. HCHO levels ranged from ˜0.5-4.5 ppbv at a height of ˜10 m above the forest canopy from August 1-8, 2008, in good agreement with previously reported values at the site. Two photochemical box models were constructed to evaluate the understanding of the photochemistry controlling HCHO in a forested region dominated by isoprene emissions. An explicit photochemical box model, as defined by the Master Chemical Mechanism ver3.1, was compared to an implicit chemical model previously developed in the literature. These two models were evaluated to determine the accuracy of the assumptions within the implicit model, in addition to further examining our understanding of HCHO chemistry within an isoprene dominated forest. These two models were found to agree within ˜5% throughout the daytime (1000-1800 h, EST) and both calculations over-predict HCHO levels by a factor of ˜2.8. In an effort to estimate the influence of vertical advection, a vertical dilution term was added to both models and it was found to reduce the over-prediction of both from a factor of ˜2.8 to ˜1.6. These results imply that the photochemistry occurring within an isoprene

  5. Remote monitoring of 129I and 127I isotopes in the atmosphere using the laser-induced fluorescence method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.; Suganeev, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the experimental and calculation research of the development of the remote laser-induced fluorescence method for the detection of 129I and 127I molecular iodine isotopologues in atmospheric air in real time. As an excitation source we used a frequency-doubled neodymium laser (~532 nm). We estimated the sensitivity of 127I129I and 129I2 detection in the atmosphere. Detection sensitivity of molecular iodine is 4 · 1013 cm-3 for a sensing distance of 6 km.

  6. Simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and pressure in a supersonic turbulent flow using laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Gross, K. P.; Logan, P.

    1985-01-01

    A pulsed laser-induced fluorescence technique is described that provides simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and pressure in low-temperature, turbulent flows. The measurements are made with spatial and temporal resolution comparable to that obtained with modern laser anemometer techniques used for turbulent boundary layer research. The capabilities of the method are briefly described and its demonstration in a simple two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at Mach 2 is reported. The results are compared with conventional hot-wire anemometer data obtained in the same flow.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of the ion-energy-distribution function in a collisionless reconnection experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, A; Fox, W; Egedal, J; Grulke, O; Klinger, T

    2005-12-02

    Observations in space and laboratory plasmas suggest magnetic reconnection as a mechanism for ion heating and formation of non-Maxwellian ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF). Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the IVDF parallel to the X line of a periodically driven reconnection experiment are presented. A time-resolved analysis yields the evolution of the IVDF within a reconnection cycle. It is shown that reconnection causes a strong increase of the ion temperature, where the strongest increase is found at the maximum reconnection rate. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that ion heating is a consequence of the in-plane electric field that forms around the X line in response to reconnection.

  8. A method for the measurement of in line pistachio aflatoxin concentration based on the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paghaleh, Soodeh Jamali [Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan, Rafsanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Askari, Hassan Ranjbar; Marashi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan, Rafsanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, Mojtaba, E-mail: m_rahimi@vru.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan, Rafsanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahrampour, Ali Reza [Physics Department of Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Contamination of pistachio nuts with aflatoxin is one of the most significant issues related to pistachio health and expert. A fast pistachio aflatoxin concentration measurement method based on the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) is proposed. The proposed method from theoretical and experimental points of view is analyzed. In our experiments XeCl Excimer laser is employed as an Ultra Violet (UV) source (λ=308 nm) and a UV–visible (UV–vis) spectrometer is used for fluorescent emission detection. Our setup is employed to measure the concentration of different type of Aflatoxins in pistachio nuts. Measurements results obtained by the LIFS method are compared with those are measured by the standard HPLC method. Aflatoxins concentrations are in good agreement with those are obtained by the HPLC method. The proposed laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy can be used as an in line aflatoxins concentrations measurement instrument for industrial applications. - Highlights: • XeCl Excimer laser is employed as an UV source for measurement of AFs in pistachio nuts. • Results are compared with those are measured by the standard HPLC method. • LIFS is an online AFs concentration measurement method for industrial applications.

  9. Direct visualization of secretion from single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, W.; Yeung, E.S. [Ames Laboratory---USDOE and Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved with laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy. By monitoring the native fluorescence of catecholamines excited by the 275 nm laser line with an intensified charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera, we obtained good temporal and spatial resolution simultaneously without using additional fluorescent probes. Large variations were found among individual cells in terms of the amounts of catecholamines secreted and the rates of secretion. Different regions of a cell also behave differently during the secretion process. However, the degree of this local heterogeneity is smaller than in neurons and neuralgia. The influence of deep-ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation on cells is also discussed. This quantitative imaging technique provides a useful noninvasive approach for the study of dynamic cellular changes and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of secretory processes. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  10. Application of magnetic and core-shell nanoparticles to determine enrofloxacin and its metabolite using laser induced fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suji; Ko, Junga; Lim, H B

    2013-04-10

    A unique analytical method using nanoparticles and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy (LIFM) was developed to determine enrofloxacin in this work. For sample pretreatment, two different kinds of particles, i.e., synthesized dye-doped core-shell silica nanoparticles and magnetic micro-particles (MPs), were used for fluorescent tagging and concentrating the enrofloxacin, respectively. The antibody of enrofloxacin was immobilized on the synthesized FITC-doped core-shell nanoparticles, and the enrofloxacin target was extracted by the MPs. At this moment, the average number of antibodies on each core-shell silica nanoparticle was ~0.9, which was determined by the fluorescence ratiometric method. The described method was demonstrated for a meat sample to determine enrofloxacin using LIFM, and the result was compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The developed technique allowed the simplified analytical procedure, improved the detection limit about 54-fold compared to ELISA.

  11. Photodissociation dynamics of 2-chloro-6-nitrotoluene and nitrocyclopentane in gas phase: Laser-induced fluorescence detection of OH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawade, Monali N.; Saha, Ankur; Upadhyaya, Hari P.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, Prakash D., E-mail: pdnaik@barc.gov.in

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • Photodissociation studies on chloronitrotoluene (ClNT) and nitrocyclopentane (NCP). • Nascent OH product detected state selectively using laser induced fluorescence. • OH formation takes place from the ground electronic state with an exit barrier. • UV photodissociation dynamics of ClNT and NCP is different. - Abstract: Photodissociation of 2-chloro-6-nitrotoluene (ClNT) at 193, 248 and 266 nm and nitrocyclopentane (NCP) at 193 nm leads to the formation of OH, as detected by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The nascent OH produced from the photolysis of ClNT at all the wavelengths is vibrationally cold, with the Boltzmann type rotational state distributions. However, the nascent OH product from NCP is in the ground and vibrationally excited states with the measured average relative population in ν{sup ″}=1 to that in ν{sup ″}=0 of 0.12 ± 0.03, and these levels are characterized by rotational temperatures of 650 ± 180 K and 1570 ± 90 K, respectively. The translational energy partitioned in the OH fragment has been measured for photodissociation of both ClNT and NCP. On the basis of both the experimental results and the ground state molecular orbital (MO) calculations, a plausible mechanism for the OH formation has been proposed.

  12. Microalgae amino acid extraction and analysis at nanomolar level using electroporation and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehmé, Reine; Atieh, Carla; Fayad, Syntia; Claude, Bérengère; Chartier, Agnès; Tannoury, Mona; Elleuch, Fatma; Abdelkafi, Slim; Pichon, Chantal; Morin, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Amino acids play a key role in food analysis, clinical diagnostics, and biochemical research. Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection was used for the analysis of several amino acids. Amino acid labeling with fluorescein isothiocyanate was conducted using microwave-assisted derivatization at 80°C (680 W) during only 150 s. Good electrophoretic resolution was obtained using a background electrolyte composed of sodium tetraborate buffer (100 mM; pH 9.4) and β-cyclodextrin (10 mM), and the limits of quantification were 3-30 nM. The developed capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence method was used to analyze amino acids in Dunaliella salina green algae grown under different conditions. A simple extraction technique based on electroporation of the cell membrane was introduced. A home-made apparatus allowed the application of direct and alternating voltages across the electrochemical compartment containing a suspension of microalgae in distilled water at 2.5 g/L. A direct voltage of 12 V applied for 4 min gave the optimum extraction yield. Results were comparable to those obtained with accelerated-solvent extraction. The efficiency of electroporation in destroying microalgae membranes was shown by examining the algae surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy. Stress conditions were found to induce the production of amino acids in Dunaliella salina cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Diode-Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of an Optically Thick Plasma in Combination with Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nomura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortion of laser-induced fluorescence profiles attributable to optical absorption and saturation broadening was corrected in combination with laser absorption spectroscopy in argon plasma flow. At high probe-laser intensity, saturated absorption profiles were measured to correct probe-laser absorption. At low laser intensity, nonsaturated absorption profiles were measured to correct fluorescence reabsorption. Saturation broadening at the measurement point was corrected using a ratio of saturated to non-saturated broadening. Observed LIF broadening and corresponding translational temperature without correction were, respectively, 2.20±0.05 GHz and 2510±100 K and corrected broadening and temperature were, respectively, 1.96±0.07 GHz and 1990±150 K. Although this correction is applicable only at the center of symmetry, the deduced temperature agreed well with that obtained by LAS with Abel inversion.

  14. Laser-induced atomic fragment fluorescence spectroscopy: a facile technique for molecular spectroscopy of spin-forbidden states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Chen, Yang; Keil, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Spectra of spin-forbidden and spin-allowed transitions in the mixed b (3)Pi(u) approximately A (1)Sigma(u)(+) state of Na(2) are measured separately by two-photon excitation using a single tunable dye laser. The two-photon excitation produces Na(*)(3p) by photodissociation, which is easily and sensitively detected by atomic fluorescence. At low laser power, only the A (1)Sigma(u)(+) state is excited, completely free of triplet excitation. At high laser power, photodissociation via the intermediate b (3)Pi(u) triplet state becomes much more likely, effectively "switching" the observations from singlet spectroscopy to triplet spectroscopy with only minor apparatus changes. This technique of perturbation-assisted laser-induced atomic fragment fluorescence may therefore be especially useful as a general vehicle for investigating perturbation-related physics pertinent to the spin-forbidden states, as well as for studying allowed and forbidden states of other molecules.

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of jet-cooled TiC: Observation of low-lying 1Σ+ states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhate, S. G.; Mukund, Sheo; Bhattacharyya, Soumen

    2017-07-01

    The TiC has been investigated using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The a1Σ+, b1Σ+, and c1Σ+ states are found to lie respectively at T0 = 319.3, 786.0, and 1407.2 cm-1 and have internuclear distances respectively of r0 = 1.6607, 1.6906, and 1.6927 Å. Similar r0 values of the b1Σ+ and c1Σ+ states with that of the X3Σ+ state (1.6953 Å) indicate that either of these states could be isocofigurational to the ground state. Dispersed fluorescence suggests reassignment of the 3Π1 state to a mixed state with dominant 1Π character. Higher spectral resolution of the 1Π-X3Σ+ band provided improved molecular constants.

  16. Characterization of type I, II, III, IV, and V collagens by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura; Cohen, David; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2000-04-01

    The relative proportions of genetically distinct collagen types in connective tissues vary with tissue type and change during disease progression, development, wound healing, aging. This study aims to 1) characterize the spectro- temporal fluorescence emission of fiber different types of collagen and 2) assess the ability of time-resolved laser- induced fluorescence spectroscopy to distinguish between collagen types. Fluorescence emission of commercially available purified samples was induced with nitrogen laser excitation pulses and detected with a MCP-PMT connected to a digital storage oscilloscope. The recorded time-resolved emission spectra displayed distinct fluorescence emission characteristics for each collagen type. The time domain information complemented the spectral domain intensity data for improved discrimination between different collagen types. Our results reveal that analysis of the fluorescence emission can be used to characterize different species of collagen. Also, the results suggest that time-resolved spectroscopy can be used for monitoring of connective tissue matrix composition changes due to various pathological and non-pathological conditions.

  17. Time-resolved detection of aromatic compounds on planetary surfaces by ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshelman, E.; Daly, M. G.; Slater, G.; Cloutis, E.

    2015-12-01

    Raman spectroscopic instruments are highly capable in the search for organics on Mars due to the potential to perform rapid and nondestructive measurements on unprepared samples. Upcoming and future Raman instruments are likely to also incorporate laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) capabilities, which can be added for modest cost and complexity. We demonstrate that it is possible to obtain sub-ns fluorescence lifetime measurements of Mars-relevant organics and minerals if a fast time-gating capability is used with an intensified detector and a short ultraviolet laser pulse. This serves a primary purpose of discriminating mineral from short-lived (less than 10 ns) organic fluorescence, considered a potential biosignature. Additionally, lifetime measurements may assist in determining if more than one fluorescing species is present and provide information concerning the molecular structure as well as the local environment. Fast time-gating is also useful at longer visible or near-IR wavelengths, as this approach increases the sensitivity of the instrument to organic material by removing the majority of the fluorescence background from the Raman signal and reducing the effect of ambient light.

  18. Spatial Dosimetry with Violet Diode Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Water-Equivalent Radio-Fluorogenic Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwall, Peter A., II

    The following work describes investigations of spatial dosimetry using laser-induced fluorescence of a radio-fluorogenic detector embedded within water-equivalent media. The chemical composition of a gelatin-based coumarin-3-carboxylic acid detector was investigated and dose response characterized. Violet diode (405nm) excitation sources were explored and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) employed to obtain the pattern of fluorescent emission yielding images of the integrated spatial dose distribution. The design of a three-dimensional reader is proposed to provide a foundation for future work. Radio-fluorogenic processes create fluorescent products in response to ionizing radiation. Water radiolysis produced by ionizing radiation yields hydroxyl free radicals that readily hydroxylate coumarin-3-carboxylic acid to 7-hydroxy-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, a derivative of umbelliferone. Umbelliferone is a known fluorophore, exhibiting peak excitation in the UV to near UV range of 365-405nm with a visible 445nm blue emission. Coumarin-3-carboxlyic acid has been studied in an aqueous gelatin matrix. The radio-fluorogenic coumarin-gelatin detector has been shown to respond to an absorbed dose of ionizing radiation in a measureable manner. The detector was studied with respect to concentration of gelatin and coumarin in the presence of pH buffers. Dose response of the detector was investigated with regard to ionizing radiation type, energy, and rate of irradiation. Results demonstrate a functional detector. Patterns of energy deposition were formed in response to ionizing radiation produced by a sealed-source of radioactive Ir-192 embedded in the gelatin matrix of the detector. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose were recorded and analyzed as a function of fluorescent emission. The distribution of energy deposition was imaged with LIF excitation by a divergent beam of 405nm light and determined by analysis of digital image pixel intensity values displaying the 445nm

  19. Amine Analysis Using AlexaFluor 488 Succinimidyl Ester and Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian G. Kendall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent probes enable detection of otherwise nonfluorescent species via highly sensitive laser-induced fluorescence. Organic amines are predominantly nonfluorescent and are of analytical interest in agricultural and food science, biomedical applications, and biowarfare detection. Alexa Fluor 488 N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (AF488 NHS-ester is an amine-specific fluorescent probe. Here, we demonstrate low limit of detection of long-chain (C9 to C18 primary amines and optimize AF488 derivatization of long-chain primary amines. The reaction was found to be equally efficient in all solvents studied (dimethylsulfoxide, ethanol, and N,N-dimethylformamide. While an organic base (N,N-diisopropylethylamine is required to achieve efficient reaction between AF488 NHS-ester and organic amines with longer hydrophobic chains, high concentrations (>5 mM result in increased levels of ethylamine and propylamine in the blank. Optimal incubation times were found to be >12 hrs at room temperature. We present an initial capillary electrophoresis separation for analysis using a simple micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC buffer consisting of 12 mM sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS and 5 mM carbonate, pH 10. Limits of detection using the optimized labeling conditions and these separation conditions were 5–17 nM. The method presented here represents a novel addition to the arsenal of fluorescent probes available for highly sensitive analysis of small organic molecules.

  20. Using violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra for crop yield assessment of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Tetteh, Jonathan P.

    2004-07-01

    The use of violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) emission spectra to monitor the growth of five varieties of cowpea in the University of Cape Coast Botanical Garden is presented. Radiation from a continuous-wave violet laser diode emitting at 396 nm through a fibre is closely incident on in vivo leaves of cowpea to excite chlorophyll fluorescence, which is detected by an integrated spectrometer with CCD readout. The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra with peaks at 683 and 731 nm were used for growth monitoring of the cowpea plants over three weeks and analysed using Gaussian spectral functions with curve fitted parameters to determine the peak positions, area under the spectral curve and the intensity ratio F683/F731. The variation in the intensity ratio of the chlorophyll bands showed sensitive changes indicating the photosynthetic activity of the cowpea varieties. A discussion of the fluorescence result as compared to conventional assessment is presented with regard to discrimination between the cowpea varieties in terms of crop yield performance.

  1. Planar Fluorescence Imaging and Three-Dimensional Reconstructions of Capsule RCS Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Buck, Gregory M.; Mccrea, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flowfield visualization has been used to investigate reaction control system (RCS) jet flows in the wake of hypersonic capsule reentry vehicles. Pitch, roll, and yaw RCS jets were all studied. PLIF was used to obtain off-body flow images at planar slices in these flowfields, which are not easily visualized by other techniques owing to characteristically low gas density. When viewed individually, these slices are shown to provide spatially and temporally resolved information, including the locations and characteristics of turbulent flow structures and the location of the jet flow relative to the vehicle. In addition, ensembles of slices, acquired at multiple locations throughout the flowfield, are combined using computer visualization techniques to reconstruct the three-dimensional shape of the flow. Collectively, the off-body flow visualization data set acquired in these tests represents a valuable compliment to surface measurements, especially as a basis for explaining otherwise perplexing discrepancies between such measurements and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results. The tests described herein were conducted in the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center.

  2. Studies of Landé gJ-factors of singly ionized lanthanum by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbowy, S.; Güney, C.; Windholz, L.

    2016-08-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, using a cooled hollow cathode discharge lamp as source of ions, was used to observe the Zeeman splitting of 18 lines of La II in the wavelength range 629.6-680.9 nm, in external intermediate magnetic fields up to 800 G. The recorded hyperfine-Zeeman patterns were analyzed in detail using already known accurate hyperfine structure A- and B-constants. From the recordings the Landé gJ-factors for some levels belonging to the 5d2, 5d6s, 5d6p, 4f5d, 4f6s and 4f6p configurations of La II were determined. The obtained experimental gJ-factors are compared with earlier measurements and theoretical calculations.

  3. Monitoring subcellular biotransformation of N-L-leucyldoxorubicin by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography coupled to laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satori, Chad P; Meyer, Brandon; Arriaga, Edgar A

    2014-04-01

    Development of prodrugs is a promising alternative to address cytotoxicity and nonspecificity of common anticancer agents. N-L-leucyldoxorubicin (LeuDox) is a prodrug that is biotransformed to the anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) in the extracellular space; however, its biotransformation may also occur intracellularly in endocytic organelles. Such organelle-specific biotransformation is yet to be determined. In this study, magnetically enriched endocytic organelle fractions from human uterine sarcoma cells were treated with LeuDox. Micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection (MEKC-LIF) was used to determine that 10% of LeuDox was biotransformed to Dox, accounting for ~43% of the biotransformation occurring in the post-nuclear fraction. This finding suggests that endocytic organelles also participate in the intracellular biotransformation of LeuDox to Dox.

  4. Measurements with magnetic field in the National Spherical Torus Experiment using the motional Stark effect with laser induced fluorescence diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The motional Stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic (MSE-LIF) has been installed and tested on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. The MSE-LIF diagnostic will be capable of measuring radially resolved profiles of magnetic field magnitude or pitch angle in NSTX plasmas. The system includes a diagnostic neutral hydrogen beam and a laser which excites the n = 2 to n = 3 transition. A viewing system has been implemented which will support up to 38 channels from the plasma edge to past the magnetic axis. First measurements of MSE-LIF signals in the presence of small applied magnetic fields in neutral gas are reported.

  5. Serum protein profile study of normal and cervical cancer subjects by high performance liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha; Rai, Lavanya; Kumar, Pratap; Mahato, Krishna K; Kartha, Vasudevan B; Santhosh, Chidangil

    2008-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography with high sensitivity laser-induced fluorescence detection is used to study the protein profiles of serum samples from healthy volunteers and cervical cancer subjects. The protein profiles are subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). PCA shows that the large number of chromatograms of a given class of serum samples--say normal/malignant--can be expressed in terms of a small number of factors (principal components). Three parameters--scores of the factors, squared residuals, and Mahalanobis distance--are derived from PCA. The parameters are observed to have a narrow range for protein profiles of standard calibration sets formed from groups of clinically confirmed normal/malignant classes. Limit tests using match/no match of the parameters of any test sample with parameters derived for the standard calibration sets give very good discrimination between malignant and normal samples with high sensitivity (approximately 100%) aand specificity (approximately 94%).

  6. A flow-tube based laser-induced fluorescence instrument to measure OH reactivity in the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, T.; Goddard, A.; Whalley, L. K.; Furneaux, K. L.; Edwards, P. M.; Seal, C. P.; Self, D. E.; Johnson, G. P.; Read, K. A.; Lee, J. D.; Heard, D. E.

    2009-08-01

    A field instrument utilising the artificial generation of OH radicals in a sliding injector flow-tube reactor with detection by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been developed to measure the rate of decay of OH by reaction with its atmospheric sinks. The OH reactivity instrument has been calibrated using known concentrations of CO, NO2 and single hydrocarbons in a flow of zero air, and the impact of recycling of OH via the reaction HO2+NO→OH+NO2 on the measured OH reactivity has been quantified. As well as a detailed description of the apparatus, the capabilities of the new instrument are illustrated using representative results from deployment in the semi-polluted marine boundary layer at the Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory, UK, and in a tropical rainforest at the Bukit Atur Global Atmospheric Watch station, Danum Valley, Borneo.

  7. Uncertainties in hot-wire measurements of compressible turbulent flows implied by comparisons with laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Logan, P.

    1986-01-01

    A hot-wire anemometer and a new nonintrusive laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique are used to survey a Mach 2 turbulent boundary layer. The hot-wire anemometer's ability to accurately measure mass flux, temperature, and density fluctuations in a compressible flow is examined by comparing its results with those obtained using LIF. Several methods of hot-wire calibration are used, and the uncertainties in their measurements of various fluctuating flow parameters are determined. The results show that although a hot-wire operated at high overheat can measure mass flux fluctuations, temperature and density fluctuations are not determined accurately from such measurements. However, a hot-wire operated at multiple overheats can be used to measure static and total temperature fluctuations. The presence of pressure fluctuations and their correlation with density can prevent the use of hot-wire data to determine density fluctuations.

  8. Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection for studying amino acid uptake by yeast during beer fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkia, Heidi; Sirén, Heli; Penttilä, Merja; Pitkänen, Juha-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid composition of cultivation broth is known to affect the biomass accumulation, productivity, and vitality of yeast during cultivation. A separation method based on capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection was developed for the determination of amino acid consumption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during beer fermentation. Intraday relative standard deviations were less than 2.1% for migration times and between 2.9% and 9.9% for peak areas. Interday relative standard deviations were less than 2.5% for migration times and between 4.4% and 18.9% for peak areas. The quantification limit was even as low as 62.5 pM which equals to below attomole level detection. The method was applied to study the rate of amino acid utilization during beer fermentation.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of the oil film thickness in an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroski, Greg M.; Ghandhi, Jaal B.

    1997-11-01

    The use of a fluorescent dopant molecule to enhance the natural fluorescence of motor oils, and allow quantitative determination of temperature and film thickens in internal combustion engines has been investigated. Measurement of the fluorescence as a function of temperature were made with neat Mobil 1, and solutions of the dopant BTBP in mineral oil and Mobil 1. The fluorescence yield of neat Mobil 1 was found to vary by 30 percent over the temperature range explored, but the spectral characteristics, as measured with bandpass filters, were unaffected by temperature. The BTBP fluorescence was found to increase significantly with temperature, and it was found the narrower regions in the spectrum increased proportionally more than the fluorescence collected over the entire spectrum, allowing a determination of temperature to be made which can then be used to correct for the change in fluorescence yield. Solutions in Mobil 1 showed a smaller increase than that observed in mineral oil.

  10. Measurement of total angular momentum values of high-lying even-parity atomic states of samarium by spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Pulhani; M L Shah; G P Gupta; B M Suri

    2010-12-01

    Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique was used to uniquely assign total angular momentum () values to high-lying even-parity energy levels of atomic samarium. Unique value assignment was done for seven energy levels in the energy region 34,800–36,200 cm-1 , recently observed and reported in the literature.

  11. Carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin for Chiral Separation of Amino Acids Derivatized with Fluorescene-5-isothiocyanate by Capillary Electrophoresis and Laser-induced Fluorescence Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yun CHEN; Wei WANG; Wei Ping YANG; Zhu Jun ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    A method using carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin(CM-β-CD) as selector for chiral separation of amino acids by capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence detection was studied. Resolution was better than that obtained byβ-CD or HP-β-CD.

  12. Determination of Amino Acids in an Individual Erythrocyteby Capillary Electrophoresis with Intracellular FITC-derivatization and Laser-induced Fluorescence Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua ZHANG; Wen Rui JIN

    2003-01-01

    A novel approach for analysis of amino acids in individual erythrocytes was established.In this method, the derivatization reagent was introduced into the living cells by electroporation.After derivatization, the amino acids in a single cell were determined by capillary electrophoresiswith laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  13. Production and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (L.I.F.S.) of different Hypericum perforatum L. extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalkos, Dimitris; Filippidis, George; Kapsokalyvas, Dimitris; Meyer, Heiko; Papazoglou, Theodore; Karentzou, Eleni; Dimitriou, Heleni; Kalmanti, M.

    2005-04-01

    We are reporting elsewhere, the promising photodynamic effect of Hypericum perforatum L. extract (PMF) against T24, NBT-II tumor bladder cells, and HL-60 leukemic cells (using 630nm, and 530nm laser light respectively). The main advantages of the extract as a photosensitizer are its low cost, extensive availability, adequate solubility, minimal toxicity, and use with a range of wavelengths. Extraction of dry herb with methanol yields the methanolic extract (ME) in 11%, which is then fractionated using liquid / liquid extraction, yielding the polar methanolic fraction (PMF) in 9,9% overall yield. Hypericin, a photosensitizing ingredient of the herb, was found in these extracts in concentrations as low as 0,51%, and 0,57% respectively. Laser induced fluorescence spectra from the ME and PMF were recorded in order to evaluate their photodiagnostic capacity. An Argon-ion laser was employed for the excitation of the samples. It was shown that the extracts resulted in different fluorescence spectra related both to their intensity, and shape. The intensities of these spectra were only 8 times less compared to the fluorescence of pure hypericin. The dependence of the signal on the pH of the medium of pure hypericin and of PMF was also investigated in order to determine specific spectra variations. According to the results hypericin fluorescence signal fades smoothly in highly acidic medium, while it decreases sharply in highly basic environment. On the contrary PMF gives a slow decrease of fluorescence in both acidic and basic medium. These data suggest that PMF-induced fluorescence is highly sensitive in basic and acidic environment.

  14. Applicability of UV laser-induced solid-state fluorescence spectroscopy for characterization of solid dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woltmann, Eva; Meyer, Hans; Weigel, Diana; Pritzke, Heinz; Posch, Tjorben N; Kler, Pablo A; Schürmann, Klaus; Roscher, Jörg; Huhn, Carolin

    2014-10-01

    High production output of solid pharmaceutical formulations requires fast methods to ensure their quality. Likewise, fast analytical procedures are required in forensic sciences, for example at customs, to substantiate an initial suspicion. We here present the design and the optimization of an instrumental setup for rapid and non-invasive characterization of tablets by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (with a UV-laser (λ ex = 266 nm) as excitation source) in reflection geometry. The setup was first validated with regard to repeatability, bleaching phenomena, and sensitivity. The effect on the spectra by the physical and chemical properties of the samples, e.g. their hardness, homogeneity, chemical composition, and granule grain size of the uncompressed material, using a series of tablets, manufactured in accordance with design of experiments, was investigated. Investigation of tablets with regard to homogeneity, especially, is extremely important in pharmaceutical production processes. We demonstrate that multiplicative scatter correction is an appropriate tool for data preprocessing of fluorescence spectra. Tablets with different physical and chemical characteristics can be discriminated well from their fluorescence spectra by subjecting the results to principal component analysis.

  15. Simultaneous Laser-induced Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide and Atomic Oxygen in the Hypersonic Materials Environment Test System Arcjet Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Craig; Lincoln, Daniel; Bathel, Brett; Inman, Jennifer; Danehy, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous nitric oxide (NO) and atomic oxygen (O) laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed in the Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The data serves as an experimental database for validation for chemical and thermal nonequilibrium models used in hypersonic flows. Measurements were taken over a wide range of stagnation enthalpies (6.7 - 18.5 MJ/kg) using an Earth atmosphere simulant with a composition of 75% N2, 20% O2, and 5% Ar (by volume). These are the first simultaneous measurements of NO and O LIF to be reported in literature for the HYMETS facility. The maximum O LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of approximately 12 MJ/kg while the maximum NO LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of 6.7 MJ/kg. Experimental results were compared to simple fluorescence model that assumes equilibrium conditions in the plenum and frozen chemistry in the isentropic nozzle expansion (Mach 5). The equilibrium calculations were performed using CANTERA v2.1.1 with 16 species. The fluorescence model captured the correlation in mean O and NO LIF signal intensities over the entire range of stagnation enthalpies tested. Very weak correlations between single-shot O and NO LIF intensities were observed in the experiments at all of the stagnation enthalpy conditions.

  16. Investigation of Laser Induced Fluorescence for Concentration Measurements of Diatomic Sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    Once the spectrum was obtained, it was calibrated with N2 laser scatter and a mercury reference run. Fluorescence peaks were identified by com... Freddie , Jr. The Measurement of Quenching Rate Constants Using Fluorescence Emission. MS Thesis. Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio: Air Force Institute

  17. Studies of the laser-induced fluorescence of explosives and explosive compositions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Philip Joseph, Jr. (,; .); Thorne, Lawrence R.; Phifer, Carol Celeste; Parmeter, John Ethan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2006-10-01

    Continuing use of explosives by terrorists throughout the world has led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially in technologies that have potential for standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken in order to investigate the possible detection of explosive particulates at safe standoff distances in an attempt to identify vehicles that might contain large vehicle bombs (LVBs). The explosives investigated have included the common homogeneous or molecular explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclonite or hexogen (RDX), octogen (HMX), and the heterogeneous explosive, ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), and its components. We have investigated standard excited/dispersed fluorescence, laser-excited prompt and delayed dispersed fluorescence using excitation wavelengths of 266 and 355 nm, the effects of polarization of the laser excitation light, and fluorescence imaging microscopy using 365- and 470-nm excitation. The four nitro-based, homogeneous explosives (TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX) exhibit virtually no native fluorescence, but do exhibit quenching effects of varying magnitude when adsorbed on fluorescing surfaces. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixtures fluoresce primarily due to the fuel oil, and, in some cases, due to the presence of hydrophobic coatings on ammonium nitrate prill or impurities in the ammonium nitrate itself. Pure ammonium nitrate shows no detectable fluorescence. These results are of scientific interest, but they provide little hope for the use of UV-excited fluorescence as a technique to perform safe standoff detection of adsorbed explosive particulates under real-world conditions with a useful degree of reliability.

  18. Identification of cholesterol gallstones using in vitro low-fluence laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, R.; Niay, P.; Bernage, P.; Blondeau, J. M.; Ledee, J. J.; Brunetaud, J. M.

    1990-12-01

    Identifying the chemical composition of gallstones may be important in certain cases of calculus biliary disease when planning a dissolution therapy or a fragmentation of the calculi using pulsed lasers. The present study was conducted in vitro to evaluate the feasibility of distinguishing cholesterol gallstones from pigment stones. We propose an identification method in which the stone fluorescence spectrum, induced by a low fluence laser, is recorded using an optical multichannel analyser. Fluorescence spectra of twenty-two stones were recorded together with the fluorescence spectra of various pure compounds likely to compose the gallstones, using successively four different pump lasers (λp=308 nm, 337 nm, 423 nm, 469 nm). The fluorescence spectra of cholesterol gallstones are quite different from the pigment ones. Ratios of fluorescence intensities taken at three different wavelengths enable one to distinguish easily between cholesterol and pigment stones.

  19. Experimental study of elliptical jet from supercritical to subcritical conditions using planar laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2015-03-01

    The study of fluid jet dynamics at supercritical conditions involves strong coupling between fluid dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena. Beyond the critical point, the liquid-vapor coexistence ceases to exist, and the fluid exists as a single phase known as supercritical fluid with its properties that are entirely different from liquids and gases. At the critical point, the liquids do not possess surface tension and latent heat of evaporation. Around the critical point, the fluid undergoes large changes in density and possesses thermodynamic anomaly like enhancement in thermal conductivity and specific heat. In the present work, the transition of the supercritical and near-critical elliptical jet into subcritical as well as supercritical environment is investigated experimentally with nitrogen and helium as the surrounding environment. Under atmospheric condition, a liquid jet injected from the elliptical orifice exhibits axis switching phenomena. As the injection temperature increases, the axis switching length also increases. Beyond the critical temperature, the axis switching is not observed. The investigation also revealed that pressure plays a major role in determining the thermodynamic transition of the elliptical jet only for the case of supercritical jet injected into subcritical chamber conditions. At larger pressures, the supercritical jet undergoes disintegration and formation of droplets in the subcritical environment is observed. However, for supercritical jet injection into supercritical environment, the gas-gas like mixing behavior is observed.

  20. Experimental study of elliptical jet from supercritical to subcritical conditions using planar laser induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind, E-mail: aravind7@iist.ac.in [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala 695547 (India)

    2015-03-15

    The study of fluid jet dynamics at supercritical conditions involves strong coupling between fluid dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena. Beyond the critical point, the liquid-vapor coexistence ceases to exist, and the fluid exists as a single phase known as supercritical fluid with its properties that are entirely different from liquids and gases. At the critical point, the liquids do not possess surface tension and latent heat of evaporation. Around the critical point, the fluid undergoes large changes in density and possesses thermodynamic anomaly like enhancement in thermal conductivity and specific heat. In the present work, the transition of the supercritical and near-critical elliptical jet into subcritical as well as supercritical environment is investigated experimentally with nitrogen and helium as the surrounding environment. Under atmospheric condition, a liquid jet injected from the elliptical orifice exhibits axis switching phenomena. As the injection temperature increases, the axis switching length also increases. Beyond the critical temperature, the axis switching is not observed. The investigation also revealed that pressure plays a major role in determining the thermodynamic transition of the elliptical jet only for the case of supercritical jet injected into subcritical chamber conditions. At larger pressures, the supercritical jet undergoes disintegration and formation of droplets in the subcritical environment is observed. However, for supercritical jet injection into supercritical environment, the gas-gas like mixing behavior is observed.

  1. Optimization of Dual Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (DPLIF) Instrumentation for Characterization of Liquid Mixing in Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Hannah Erin

    A study has been taken to evaluate the utility of two Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic sampling methods in calculating the degree of cure in an industrial fiberglass-reinforced composite material. Methodologies examined include: attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and diffuse reflectance (DRIFTs), both which utilize the Agilent 4100 ExoScan FTIR platform. As the formulation of the unsaturated polyester resin used in the fabrication of the industrial composite is proprietary a cure model based on the plasticizer, styrene, is proposed. Results of the infrared tests show that neither the resolution of ATR FTIR or DRIFTs is sufficient to monitor cure of the polyester resin in real time. With a 95% confidence interval, cure states between 24 and 120 hours after resin infusion cannot be differentiated. Statistical significance can be noted, however; between pre- and post-processed samples which have been cured for an addition 14 hours at 60ºC. The methodology for calculating degree of cure, subsequent results and statistical analysis are presented.

  2. Atomic Emission, Absorption and Fluorescence in the Laser-induced Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winefordner, J. D.

    2009-01-22

    The main result of our efforts is the development and successful application of the theoretical model of laser induced plasma (LIP) that allows a back-calculation of the composition of the plasma (and the condensed phase) based on the observable plasma spectrum. The model has an immediate experimental input in the form of LIP spectra and a few other experimentally determined parameters. The model is also sufficiently simple and, therefore, practical. It is conveniently interfaced in a graphical user-friendly form for using by students and any laboratory personnel with only minimal training. In our view, the model opens up the possibility for absolute analysis, i.e. the analysis which requires no standards and tedious calibration. The other parts of this proposal (including plasma diagnostics) were somewhat subordinate to this main goal. Plasma diagnostics provided the model with the necessary experimental input and led to better understanding of plasma processes. Another fruitful direction we pursued was the use of the correlation analysis for material identification and plasma diagnostics. Through a number of computer simulations we achieved a clear understanding of how, where and why this approach works being applied to emission spectra from a laser plasma. This understanding will certainly improve the quality of forensic and industrial analyses where fast and reliable material identification and sorting are required.

  3. The study of laser induced fluorescence of tooth hard tissues with aluminum phthalocyanine nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrakhova, D. S.; Kuznetsova, J. O.; Loschenov, V. B.

    2016-08-01

    This work is about the possibility of fluorescence diagnosis application with the use of aluminum phthalocyanine nanoparticles (nAlPc) in order to detect enamel microdamage. For the investigation, five human teeth samples of various age groups were removed for various reasons. The autofluorescence spectrums of these samples hard tissues and fluorescence spectrums of nAlPc mixed with enamel powder were obtained during the experiment. The research shows that sample pathogenic microflora causes nAlPc fluorescence. This fact will allow detecting enamel microdamage in future studies.

  4. Separation and quantitation of phycobiliproteins using phytic acid in capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskari, Pertti J; Colyer, Christa L

    2002-10-01

    The similar electrophoretic mobilities and sizes of several of the phycobiliproteins, which are derived from the photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae, render their separation and quantitation a challenging problem. However, we have developed a suitable capillary electrophoresis (CE) method that employs a phytic acid-boric acid buffer and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection with a single 594 nm He-Ne laser. This method takes advantage of the remarkably high quantum yields of these naturally fluorescent proteins, which can be attributed to their linear tetrapyrrole chromophores covalently bound to cysteinyl residues. As such, limits of detection of 1.18 x 10(-14), 5.26 x 10(-15), and 2.38 x 10(-15) mol/l were obtained for R-phycoerythrin, C-phycocyanin, and allophycocyanin proteins, respectively, with a linear dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude in each case. Unlike previously published CE-LIF methods, this work describes the separation of all three major classes of phycobiliproteins in under 5 min. Very good recoveries, ranging from 93.2 to 105.5%, were obtained for a standard mixture of the phycobiliproteins, based on seven-point calibration curves for both peak height and peak area. It is believed that this development will prove useful for the determination of phycobiliprotein content in naturally occurring cyanobacteria populations, thus providing a useful tool for understanding biological and chemical oceanographic processes.

  5. Photolytic-interference-free, femtosecond, two-photon laser-induced fluorescence imaging of atomic oxygen in flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Roy, Sukesh; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R.

    2016-02-01

    Ultrashort-pulse lasers are well suited for nonlinear diagnostic techniques such as two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF) because the signals generated scale as the laser intensity squared. Furthermore, the broad spectral bandwidths associated with nearly Fourier-transform-limited ultrashort pulses effectively contribute to efficient nonlinear excitation by coupling through a large number of in-phase photon pairs, thereby producing strong fluorescence signals. Additionally, femtosecond (fs)-duration amplified laser systems typically operate at 1-10 kHz repetition rates, enabling high-repetition-rate imaging in dynamic environments. In previous experiments, we have demonstrated utilization of fs pulses for kilohertz (kHz)-rate, interference-free imaging of atomic hydrogen (H) in flames. In the present study, we investigate the utilization of fs-duration pulses to photolytic-interference-free TPLIF imaging of atomic oxygen (O). In TPLIF of O, photodissociation of vibrationally excited carbon dioxide (CO2) is known to be the prominent interference that produces additional O atoms in the medium. We have found that through the use of fs excitation, such interferences can be virtually eliminated in premixed laminar methane flames, which paves the way for two-dimensional imaging of O at kHz data rates. Such measurements can provide critical data for validating complex, multidimensional turbulent-combustion models as well as for investigating flame dynamics in practical combustion devices.

  6. Dissociation energies of six NO2 isotopologues by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy and zero point energy of some triatomic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, G; Jost, R; Sugny, D; Joyeux, M; Thiemens, M

    2004-10-15

    We have measured the rotationless photodissociation threshold of six isotopologues of NO2 containing 14N, 15N, 16O, and 18O isotopes using laser induced fluorescence detection and jet cooled NO2 (to avoid rotational congestion). For each isotopologue, the spectrum is very dense below the dissociation energy while fluorescence disappears abruptly above it. The six dissociation energies ranged from 25 128.56 cm(-1) for 14N16O2 to 25 171.80 cm(-1) for 15N18O2. The zero point energy for the NO2 isotopologues was determined from experimental vibrational energies, application of the Dunham expansion, and from canonical perturbation theory using several potential energy surfaces. Using the experimentally determined dissociation energies and the calculated zero point energies of the parent NO2 isotopologue and of the NO product(s) we determined that there is a common De = 26 051.17+/-0.70 cm(-1) using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The canonical perturbation theory was then used to calculate the zero point energy of all stable isotopologues of SO2, CO2, and O3, which are compared with previous determinations.

  7. Comparison of light-induced and laser-induced fluorescence methods for the detection and quantification of enamel demineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masatoshi; Analoui, Mostafa; Schemehorn, Bruce R.; Stookey, George K.

    1999-05-01

    The Quantitative Laser-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) technique has been sued for diagnosis of early caries in permanent teeth (PT). The objective of this study was to determine the caries quantification ability of QLF in deciduous teeth (DT). Sixty sound teeth, thirty DT and thirty PT, were used. All teeth were cleaned to remove debris and equally divided into three groups. Lesions were created in small windows (0.8x2.0 mm2) on buccal or labial surface for 48, 72, and 96 hr. Lesion images were made with a 488 nm argon laser (QLF I) and then with a 370 +/- 80 nm violet-blue light (QLF II). Both images were analyzed to determine the mean percent change in fluorescence radiance (ΔF). A center section from the lesions was taken for analysis with microradiography. The lesion depth and loss of mineral content were determined. The correlations between ΔF and lesion depth as well as ΔZ in DT were 0.76 and 0.84 with QLF I, 0.81 and 0.88 with QLF II, respectively. It can be concluded the ability of QLF to quantify white-spots in DT is better than in PT.

  8. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Data for Neutral Argon (ArI) in a Large Scale Helicon Plasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ralph; Gilmore, Mark; Meany, Kevin; Zhang, Yue; Desjardins, Tiffany

    2016-10-01

    When neutral and ion densities are spatially non-uniform, neutral-ion collisions can exert a torque on a magnetized plasma column via the FxB force, where F is the force exerted on ions by neutrals. This FxB force may have a significant effect on the dynamics of plasma instabilities and flows. In order to investigate the role of neutral dynamics in helicon discharges in the HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) plasma device at U. New Mexico, an Ar I Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed. The LIF system is based on a >250 mW, tunable solid state laser. The laser will pumps the metastable (2P3/2 0) 4s level to the (2P1/2 0) 4p level using 696. 7352 nm light, and fluorescence radiation from decay to the (2P1/2 0) 4s level at 772. 6333 nm is observed. The system design and initial data will be presented.

  9. Silica nanoparticle-based microfluidic immunosensor with laser-induced fluorescence detection for the quantification of immunoreactive trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seia, Marco A; Stege, Patricia W; Pereira, Sirley V; De Vito, Irma E; Raba, Julio; Messina, Germán A

    2014-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a silica nanoparticle-based immunosensor with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) as a detection system. The proposed device was applied to quantify the immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) in cystic fibrosis (CF) newborn screening. A new ultrasonic procedure was used to extract the IRT from blood spot samples collected on filter papers. After extraction, the IRT reacted immunologically with anti-IRT monoclonal antibodies immobilized on a microfluidic glass chip modified with 3-aminopropyl functionalized silica nanoparticles (APSN-APTES-modified glass chips). The bounded IRT was quantified by horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-IRT antibody (anti-IRT-Ab) using 10-acetyl-3,7-dihydroxyphenoxazine (ADHP) as enzymatic mediator. The HRP catalyzed the oxidation of nonfluorescent ADHP to highly fluorescent resorufin, which was measured by LIF detector, using excitation lambda at 561nm and emission at 585nm. The detection limits (LODs) calculated for LIF detection and for a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test kit were 0.87 and 4.2ngml(-1), respectively. The within- and between-assay variation coefficients for the LIF detection procedure were below 6.5%. The blood spot samples collected on filter papers were analyzed with the proposed method, and the results were compared with those of the reference ELISA method, demonstrating a potential usefulness for the clinical assessment of IRT during the early neonatal period.

  10. Capillary electrophoresis of FITC labeled amino acids with laser-induced fluorescence detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党福全; 陈义

    1999-01-01

    FITC labeled amino acids have been separated using a home-huilt capillary electrophoresis with a laserinduced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) system. Seventeen peaks can now be generated from the twenty common amino acids. The key conditions lie in the optimization of pH, buffer electrolytes and buffer additives.

  11. The analysis of fountain pen inks by capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet/visible absorbance and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, E; Vogt, C; Heineman, W R

    1998-01-01

    Information on the identity of inks adds to the circumstantial evidence in legal cases involving fraudulent documents. In combination with optical methods, multiple thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is currently the analytical tool used by forensic chemists to separate, compare and distinguish inks based on their dye composition. In our studies, capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used for the analysis of water-soluble fountain pen inks. Inks are complex mixtures of synthetic organic and inorganic dyes, surfactants, resins and other components. The investigations included the development of an electrophoretic separation method, the optimization of an extraction procedure for inks from paper as well as the evaluation of ultraviolet/visible (UV/VIS) absorbance and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection for the analysis of inks by CE. Good results for the separation of 17 blue and black inks of different manufacturers and countries of origin were obtained with 100 mM borate buffer, pH 8.0, containing 20% methanol. The electropherograms of the inks and their extracts from paper showed patterns that were in most cases distinctly different from each other. Ultraviolet/visible scans can be used to compare spectra of the separated main and trace components of inks. Fluorescence detection at different excitation and emission wavelengths was more sensitive, but added to the complexity of the electropherograms due to the excitation of coextracted fluorescing paper components. The resolution power of CE combined with the information content provided by the detection modes investigated prove CE to be a powerful tool for the identification of water-soluble inks used on paper documents.

  12. SiO multi-line laser-induced fluorescence for quantitative temperature imaging in flame-synthesis of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrystie, Robin S. M.; Feroughi, Omid M.; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2017-04-01

    Silicon monoxide (SiO) is an intermediate in the gas-phase synthesis of SiO2 nanoparticles and coatings. We demonstrate a method for in situ imaging the gas-phase temperature via multi-line laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) using excitation in the A 1Π- X 1Σ+(0,0) band near 235 nm. A low-pressure lean (3 kPa, φ = 0.39) premixed hydrogen/oxygen flame was seeded with 210 ppm hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) to produce SiO2 nanoparticles. Spectral regions with no interference from other species in the flame were located, and the excitation-spectral range that provides the best temperature sensitivity was determined from numerical experiments. Quenching rates of the selected transitions were also determined from fluorescence lifetime measurements, and found to be independent of the excited rotational state. Upon laser light-sheet excitation, images of fluorescence were recorded for a sequence of excitation wavelengths and pixel-wise multi-line fitting of the spectra yields temperature images. The results were compared against multi-line NO-LIF temperature imaging measurements using the A 2Σ+- X 2Π(0,0) band near 225 nm from 500 ppm NO added to the gas flow as a thermometry target. Both methods show good qualitative agreement with each other and demonstrate that temperature can be evaluated from the zone in the reactor where SiO is naturally present without adding tracers. SiO LIF exhibited high signal-to-noise ratios of the order of ten times that of NO LIF.

  13. Characterisation of an inlet pre-injector laser induced fluorescence instrument for the measurement of ambient hydroxyl radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Novelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambient measurements of hydroxyl radicals (OH are challenging due to a high reactivity and consequently low concentration. The importance of OH as an atmospheric oxidant has resulted in a sustained effort leading to the development of a number of analytical techniques. Recent work has indicated that the laser-induced fluorescence of the OH molecules method based on the fluorescence assay by gas expansion technique (LIF-FAGE for the measurement of atmospheric OH in some environments may be influenced by artificial OH generated within the instrument, and a chemical method to remove this interference was implemented in a LIF-FAGE system by Mao et al. (2012. We have applied this method to our LIF-FAGE HORUS (HydrOxyl Radical Measurement Unit based on fluorescence Spectroscopy system, and developed and deployed an inlet pre-injector (IPI to determine the chemical zero level in the instrument via scavenging the ambient OH radical. We describe and characterise this technique in addition to its application at field sites in forested locations in Finland, Spain, and Germany. Ambient measurements show that OH generated within the HORUS instrument is a non-negligible fraction of the total OH signal, which can comprise 30% to 80% during the day and 60% to 100% during the night. The contribution of the background OH varied greatly between measurement sites and was likely related to the type and concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs present at each particular location. Two inter-comparisons in contrasting environments between the HORUS instrument and two different chemical ionisation mass spectrometers (CIMS are described to demonstrate the efficacy of the inlet-pre-injector and the necessity of the chemical zeroing method in such environments.

  14. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Velocity Measurements in Supersonic Underexpanded Impinging Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Barthel, Brett; Alderfer, David W.; Novak, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on an application of nitric oxide (NO) flow-tagging velocimetry to impinging underexpanded jet flows issuing from a Mach 2.6 nozzle. The technique reported herein utilizes a single laser, single camera system to obtain planar maps of the streamwise component of velocity. Whereas typical applications of this technique involve comparing two images acquired at different time delays, this application uses a single image and time delay. The technique extracts velocity by assuming that particular regions outside the jet flowfield have negligible velocity and may therefore serve as a stationary reference against which to measure motion of the jet flowfield. By taking the average of measurements made in 100 single-shot images for each flow condition, streamwise velocities of between -200 and +1,000 m/s with accuracies of between 15 and 50 m/s are reported within the jets. Velocity measurements are shown to explain otherwise seemingly anomalous impingement surface pressure measurements.

  15. Early detection of the carious conditions by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Ekaterina G.; Uzunov, Tzonko T.; Gisbreht, Alexander I.; Avramov, Lachezar A.

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the natural intrinsic fluorescence in sound and diseased human teeth and the correspondence of such autofluorescence to the stages of the dental lesions. Direct visual examination was used for comparison. Different stages of caries lesions are detected, by using a nitrogen laser (337 nm), light-emitting diode (LED) (440 nm) and argon laser (488 nm). Besides caries, there were investigated samples of the fluorosa dentis and odontolithiasis, for better determination of the influence of other teeth pathologies over the teeth autofluorescence spectra. There was observed a significant decrease in the intensity of the autofluorescence signal in the case of caries. The carious lesions revealed characteristic emission of endogenous fluorophores with fluorescence band in the red spectral region. Healthy hard dental tissue exhibited no emission bands in the red. An algorithm for early diagnosis is created on the basis of collected significant statistical material.

  16. Imaging magnetic scalar potentials by laser-induced fluorescence from bright and dark atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Fescenko, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic method for mapping two-dimensional distributions of magnetic field strengths (magnetic scalar potential lines) using CCD recordings of the fluorescence patterns emitted by spin-polarized Cs vapor in a buffer gas exposed to inhomogeneous magnetic fields. The method relies on the position-selective destruction of spin polarization by magnetic resonances induced by multi-component oscillating magnetic fields, such that magnetic potential lines can directly be detected by the CCD camera. We also present a generic algebraic model allowing the calculation of the fluorescence patterns and find excellent agreement with the experimental observations for three distinct inhomogeneous field topologies. The spatial resolution obtained with these proof-of-principle experiments is on the order of 1 mm. A substantial increase of spatial and magnetic field resolution is expected by deploying the method in a magnetically shielded environment.

  17. Concentration Measurements in a Cold Flow Model Annular Combustor Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Douglas C.

    1996-01-01

    A nonintrusive concentration measurement method is developed for determining the concentration distribution in a complex flow field. The measurement method consists of marking a liquid flow with a water soluble fluorescent dye. The dye is excited by a two dimensional sheet of laser light. The fluorescent intensity is shown to be proportional to the relative concentration level. The fluorescent field is recorded on a video cassette recorder through a video camera. The recorded images are analyzed with image processing hardware and software to obtain intensity levels. Mean and root mean square (rms) values are calculated from these intensity levels. The method is tested on a single round turbulent jet because previous concentration measurements have been made on this configuration by other investigators. The previous results were used to comparison to qualify the current method. These comparisons showed that this method provides satisfactory results. 'Me concentration measurement system was used to measure the concentrations in the complex flow field of a model gas turbine annular combustor. The model annular combustor consists of opposing primary jets and an annular jet which discharges perpendicular to the primary jets. The mixing between the different jet flows can be visualized from the calculated mean and rms profiles. Concentration field visualization images obtained from the processing provide further qualitative information about the flow field.

  18. Optical imaging of breast tumors and of gastrointestinal cancer by laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Bernd; Grosenick, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Optical imaging offers a high potential for noninvasive detection of cancer in humans. Recent advances in instrumentation for diffuse optical imaging have led to new capabilities for the detection of cancer in highly scattering tissue such as the female breast. We review recent developments in the detection of breast cancer in humans by fluorescent contrast agents. So far, the unspecific contrast agents indocyanine green (ICG) and omocyanine have been applied, whereas molecular probes for direct targeted imaging of this disease are still in preclinical research. We discuss recent improvements in the differentiation of malignant and benign lesions with ICG based on its enhanced extravasation in breast cancer. Whereas fluorescence imaging in thick tissue layers is hampered by strong light scattering, tissue surfaces can be investigated with high spatial resolution. As an example for superficial tumors, lesions of the gastrointestinal tract (GI) are discussed. In these investigations, protoporphyrin IX is used as a tumor-specific (due to its strong enhancement in tumor cells) target for spectroscopic identification and imaging. We present a time-gated method for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy with strong suppression of tissue autofluorescence and show results on patients with Barrett's esophagus and with colitis ulcerosa.

  19. Multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy in planar membrane systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Wagner, Kerstin; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2010-07-01

    The feasibility of applying multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-related techniques in planar membrane systems, such as lipid monolayers at the air-water interface (named Langmuir films), is presented and discussed in this paper. The non-linear fluorescence microscopy approach, allows obtaining spatially and temporally resolved information by exploiting the fluorescent properties of particular fluorescence probes. For instance, the use of environmental sensitive probes, such as LAURDAN, allows performing measurements using the LAURDAN generalized polarization function that in turn is sensitive to the local lipid packing in the membrane. The fact that LAURDAN exhibit homogeneous distribution in monolayers, particularly in systems displaying domain coexistence, overcomes a general problem observed when "classical" fluorescence probes are used to label Langmuir films, i.e. the inability to obtain simultaneous information from the two coexisting membrane regions. Also, the well described photoselection effect caused by excitation light on LAURDAN allows: (i) to qualitative infer tilting information of the monolayer when liquid condensed phases are present and (ii) to provide high contrast to visualize 3D membranous structures at the film's collapse pressure. In the last case, computation of the LAURDAN GP function provides information about lipid packing in these 3D structures. Additionally, LAURDAN GP values upon compression in monolayers were compared with those obtained in compositionally similar planar bilayer systems. At similar GP values we found, for both DOPC and DPPC, a correspondence between the molecular areas reported in monolayers and bilayers. This correspondence occurs when the lateral pressure of the monolayer is 26+/-2 mN/m and 28+/-3 mN/m for DOPC and DPPC, respectively.

  20. Instantaneous velocity measurement of AC electroosmotic flows by laser induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer with high temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Fang; Qiao, Rui; Wang, Guiren; Rui Qiao Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the instantaneous response of flows to applied AC electric fields may help understand some unsolved issues in induced-charge electrokinetics and enhance performance of microfluidic devices. Since currently available velocimeters have difficulty in measuring velocity fluctuations with frequency higher than 1 kHz, most experimental studies so far focus only on the average velocity measurement in AC electrokinetic flows. Here, we present measurements of AC electroosmotic flow (AC-EOF) response time in microchannels by a novel velocimeter with submicrometer spatial resolution and microsecond temporal resolution, i.e. laser-induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer (LIFPA). Several parameters affecting the AC-EOF response time to the applied electric signal were investigated, i.e. channel length, transverse position and solution conductivity. The experimental results show that the EOF response time under a pulsed electric field decreases with the reduction of the microchannel length, distance between the detection position to the wall and the conductivity of the solution. This work could provide a new powerful tool to measure AC electrokinetics and enhance our understanding of AC electrokinetic flows.

  1. Validation of the calibration of a laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the measurement of OH radicals in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Bloss

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An assessment of the accuracy of OH concentrations measured in a smog chamber by a calibrated laser-induced fluorescence (LIF instrument has been made, in the course of 9 experiments performed to study the photo-oxidation of benzene, toluene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, para-xylene, ortho-cresol and ethene at the European Photoreactor facility (EUPHORE. The LIF system was calibrated via the water photolysis / ozone actinometry approach. OH concentrations were inferred from the instantaneous rate of removal of each hydrocarbon species (measured by FTIR or HPLC via the appropriate rate coefficient for their reaction with OH, and compared with those obtained from the LIF system. Good agreement between the two approaches was found for all species with the exception of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, for which OH concentrations inferred from hydrocarbon removal were a factor of 3 lower than those measured by the LIF system. From the remaining 8 experiments, an overall value of 1.15±0.13 (±1σ was obtained for [OH]LIF / [OH]Hydrocarbon Decay, compared with the estimated uncertainty in the accuracy of the water photolysis / ozone actinometry OH calibration technique of 26% (1σ.

  2. Determination of intracellular levels of 6-mercaptopurine metabolites in erythrocytes utilizing capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabel, S R; Stobaugh, J F; Trueworthy, R

    1995-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis proved to be a useful technique for the analysis of intracellular levels of 6-thioguanosine mono-, di-, and triphosphate with analysis times of 20 min. Conditions required for baseline separation of the thioguanine nucleotides consisted of a 25 mM KH2PO4 (pH 8.0) buffer and a separation voltage of +28 kV. Laser-induced fluorescence detection (lambda ex = 325 nm, lambda em = 410 nm) of the thioguanine nucleotide metabolites of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) was possible following oxidation of the thiol functionality. Tedious extraction procedures involving mercury cellulose resins or phenyl mercury adduct formation, which had been required previously for the selective extraction of thiopurines from erythrocytes, were unnecessary due to the overall specificity of the approach. However, the inclusion of 50 mM EDTA in the sample preparation was required to inhibit the anabolic/catabolic enzymatic activity, which was responsible for the degradation of the analytes. The method demonstrated linearity from 5 to 1700 pmol/100 microliters red blood cells for the three analytes (RSDs < or = 8%). The feasibility of the method was demonstrated for the quantitation of 6-thioguanine nucleotides in patients receiving either oral or intravenous 6-MP therapy.

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence applied to laser welding of austenitic stainless steel for dilute alloying element detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Brian J.; Sowards, Jeffrey W.; Williams, Paul A.

    2017-08-01

    Optical spectral analysis of the laser weld plume is a common technique for non-contact, in situ weld plume analysis. However, the low sensitivity of optical emission spectroscopy limits the available information during 1070 nm wavelength laser welding, which is becoming the standard in many industrial operations. Here we demonstrate an improved sensitivity of optical spectroscopy by applying laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for probing the hot gas plume induced during fiber laser welding of 304L austenitic stainless steel. As a proof-of-principle, we show that LIF is capable of resolving a spectral signal from silicon being emitted during welding. Optical detection of such a low concentration alloying element has not previously been reported and shows the capability of LIF for increased sensitivity. Silicon atoms in the weld plume were excited in the ultraviolet at 221.09 nm and detected at 221.64 nm. We demonstrate the detection of silicon LIF down to laser welding powers of 600 W (210 kW cm-2) making this technique applicable even in low-power laser welding or additive manufacturing scenarios.

  4. Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography with Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection for Separation of Red and Yellow Historical Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokoufeh Ahmadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the separation parameters in micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC-laser-induced fluorescence (LIF were optimized for the separation of red and yellow historical dyes in 20 mM borate buffer with 20 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. Separation conditions were optimized by changing pH, organic modifier (methanol and acetonitrile concentrations and applied voltage. The mixtures of dyes used in this study included four anthraquinone dyes (alizarin, purpurin, emodin and carmine and six flavonoid dyes (luteolin, apigenin, kaempferol, quercetin, morin and myricetin. For this work, dyes were introduced electro-kinetically (10 kV for 5 s into a 50 cm capillary (10 µm id and separated using a running potential of 18, 20, 22 and 25 kV. Absolute limits of detection for most of these dyes was less than 1 pg. For dyes such as alizarin, improved detection limits were achieved at pH = 9.24; however dyes such as purpurin had significantly improved detection limits at pH = 8.0. The successful extraction and identification of a number of dyes in plants and textiles samples is also described.

  5. Simultaneous determination of amino acids in tea leaves by micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jin; Cai, Yuanli; Wang, Yufei; Lin, Xia; Li, Hui

    2014-01-15

    A rapid and effective method of micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of amino acids in tea leaves. Pre-column derivatization of the analytes used 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan (NDB-Cl). Optimal separation was achieved at +20kV using an uncoated fused silica capillary (40.0cm effective length, 50.2cm total length, 75μm internal diameter), as well as 20mM sodium borate (pH 8.5), 20mM Brij 35, and acetonitrile 10% (v/v) as running buffers. Within 11min, 15 amino acids were separated completely. The optimized method demonstrated good linearity (r(2)⩾0.9990), precision (⩽6.65%), accuracy (85.50-112.74%), and sensitivity (0.1ng/mL-100ng/mL). The method successfully determined the quantity of amino acids in five different tea leaves; furthermore, theanine was identified as the most abundant amino acid in teas. The proposed method showed great potential in further investigations on the biofunctions of different tea samples.

  6. Simultaneous measurements of velocity, temperature, and pressure using rapid CW wavelength-modulation laser-induced fluorescence of OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, A. Y.; Battles, B. E.; Hanson, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    In high speed flows, laser induced fluorescence (LIF) on Doppler shifted transitions is an attractive technique for velocity measurement. LIF velocimetry was applied to combined single-point measurements of velocity, temperature, and pressure and 2-D imaging of velocity and pressure. Prior to recent research using NO, LIF velocimetry in combustion related flows relied largely on the use of seed molecules. Simultaneous, single-point LIF measurements is reported of velocity, temperature, and pressure using the naturally occurring combustion species OH. This experiment is an extension of earlier research in which a modified ring dye laser was used to make time resolved temperature measurements behind reflected shock waves by using OH absorption an in postflame gases by using OH LIF. A pair of fused-silica rhombs mounted on a single galvanonmeter in an intracavity-doubled Spectra-Physics 380 ring laser permit the UV output to be swept continuously over a few wave numbers at an effective frequency of 3kHz.

  7. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Two Ruthenium-Bearing Molecules: RuF and RuCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarringhalam, Hanif; Adam, Allan G.; Linton, Colan; Tokaryk, Dennis W.

    2017-06-01

    This work extends the electronic spectroscopy of RuF, and reports on what we believe is the first observation of RuCl. Both molecules have been created in a laser-ablation molecular beam apparatus at UNB, and their spectra have been detected by laser-induced fluorescence. In the low-resolution survey of RuF from 400 to 770 nm, five bands were detected in the blue, green and infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Four of them were rotationally analyzed from high-resolution data. The three bands in the green region are associated with the ^4Γ_{11/2}-X^4Φ_{9/2} system first observed by Steimle et al. A new ^4Δ_{7/2}-X^4Φ_{9/2} transition in the blue region was also detected. Two high-resolution bands of RuCl were rotationally analyzed, and the ground state was also found to be X^4Φ_{9/2}. The data provide detailed structural information about the molecules, such as bond lengths, vibrational frequencies, isotopic structure, spin-orbit interactions and hyperfine interactions. T. C. Steimle, W. Virgo and T. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 124 024309 (2006).

  8. Measurement and interpretation of the velocity space correlation of a laboratory plasma fluctuation with laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, S. W.; Berumen, J.; Chu, F.; Hood, R.; Skiff, F.

    2013-11-01

    A technique for probing velocity space correlations has been developed using laser-induced fluorescence. In this paper, a description of the experimental setup is given, with results to follow in a later publication. The experiment consists of a cylindrical plasma column 3 m long and radius ~ 0.25 cm, holding singly-charged argon ions (Ar II) with density n ~ 109 cm-3, Te ~ 5 eV, Ti,|| ~ .06 eV, and a 1 kG axial magnetic field. Two separate metastable lines are excited by single frequency lasers at 611 nm and 668 nm. These lasers may tune with a precision of .01 pm. The separate lasers are used to measure independent slices of the velocity distribution function. To confirm the velocity distribution and magnetic field, the Doppler-broadened, sigma-polarized Zeeman line for each transition is measured. With this, the absolute parallel component of ion velocity subject to LIF can be determined. The two separate lasers then give us a signal as a function of two separate parallel ion velocities. Two point correlation is used to reduce the noise floor on the plasma fluctuation. This fluctuation is then investigated as a function of the difference in velocity.

  9. Simultaneous determination of vigabatrin and amino acid neurotransmitters in brain microdialysates by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benturquia, Nadia; Parrot, Sandrine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2004-07-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) coupled to in vivo microdialysis sampling was used in order to monitor simultaneously a drug and several neurotransmitters in the brain extracellular fluid. Determination of the antiepileptic drug vigabatrin and the amino acid neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu), l-aspartate (l-Asp) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was performed on low-concentration samples which were derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) and separated using a pH 9.2 75 mM sodium borate running buffer containing 60 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and 5mM hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD). Glu, l-Asp and vigabatrin derivatized at a concentration of 1.0 x 10(-9) M, and GABA derivatized at a concentration of 5.0 x 10(-9) M, produced peaks with signal-to-noise ratios of 8:1, 8:1, 4:1 and 5:1, respectively. The nature of the neurotransmitter peaks found in rat brain microdialysates was confirmed by both electrophoretic and pharmacological validations. This method was used for monitoring vigabatrin and amino acid neurotransmitters in microdialysates from the rat striatum during intracerebral infusion of the drug and revealed rapid vigabatrin-induced changes in GABA and Glu levels. This original application of CE-LIFD coupled to microdialysis represents a powerful tool for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic investigations.

  10. Visualization of Structured Packing with Laser Induced Fluorescence Technique:Two-Dimensional Measurement of Liquid Concentration Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伯潭; 申言同; 张会书; 刘春江; 唐忠利; 袁希钢

    2016-01-01

    A method of using laser induced fluorescence(LIF)technique was applied to two-dimensional meas-urement of the liquid concentration distribution in the 250Y structured packing sheet. The experimental structured packing sheet was made of perspex so that the laser could pass through it. The visualization of the distribution of the liquid concentration in the structured packing sheet was realized. The calibration of the thickness and liquid concentration was carried out firstly and the regression formulaI=kcd was acquired, in which concentrationc and the liquid film thicknessd were both considered. Then the liquid feed of uniform tracer(rhodamine)concentration entered the perspex structured packing from the top under different spraying densities. The corresponding thickness of liquid film on the packing was calculated. Finally, tracer(rhodamine)with a high concentration was injected only at one fixed point of the structured packing under different spraying densities of the liquid. With the known liquid film thickness, the concentration distribution of the tracer can be calculated inside the structured packing sheet.

  11. Preparatory study for detection of nickel in industrial flue gas by excimer laser-induced fragmentation fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, U; Monkhouse, P

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to survey possibilities for detecting molecular nickel species in industrial flue gas using excimer laser-induced fragmentation fluorescence (ELIF), in particular to establish suitable detection schemes and to obtain a sensitivity estimate for Ni detection. Investigations were conducted in a heated laboratory cell under defined conditions of temperature and pressure, using NiCl2 as the precursor molecule. An ArF excimer laser (193 nm) was used for excitation and Ni atomic emission spectra were recorded in the range 300 to 550 nm. The dependence of ELIF signal on laser fluence was quadratic in the range of laser intensities investigated, as expected for a two-photon excitation process. The temporal behavior of the ELIF signals gave lifetimes significantly longer than the known natural lifetimes. This result and the energetics of the system suggest a Ni* production mechanism involving the formation of Ni+ and subsequent ion-electron recombination. The temperature dependence of the ELIF signal, determined in the range 773 to 1223 K, was found to follow the vapor-pressure curve (Antoine equation) known from the literature. Finally, quenching effects were investigated by measuring ELIF signals and lifetimes in nitrogen or air up to 1 atm. On the basis of the results so far, detection limits for Ni in practical combustion applications in the range of tens of ppb should be achievable, which will be sufficient for regulatory measurements in incinerators and power plants.

  12. Simultaneous Determination of Levodopa and Its Metabolite in Human Blood by Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser-induced Fluorescence Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying-Xue; ZHANG Zhu-Jun; YANG Feng

    2008-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive and reproducible method is described for the analysis of levodopa and its metabolite dopamine (DA) in human blood. The influence of carbidopa as the inhibitor againist the decarboxylase activity on the metabolism has been also studied. After derivatization in a dark pulsator for 12 h at room temperature, the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) derivative of levodopa and other components were separated by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) within 13 min and detected with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Under the optimum analysis conditions, the linear range is 3.0×10-8-4.0×10-6 mol/L and 1.0×10-8-2.0×10-6 mol/L for levodopa and DA,respectively. The detection limits of levodopa and DA were 7.8×10-9 mol/L (39.0 amol) and 3.1×10-9 mol/L(15.5 amol), respectively. The method was successfully applied to monitoring the levodopa and DA in human blood after one took tablets orally.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer for analysis of the quality of a DNA double helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregadze, V. G.; Melikishvili, Z. G.; Giorgadze, T. G.; Khutsishvili, I. G.; Khuskivadze, T. B.; Jaliashvili, Z. V.; Sigua, K. I.

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this work is to use the method of the laser-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of electronic excitation in a donor-acceptor pair of intercalators, (acridine orange (AO) as a donor and ethidium bromide (EB) as an acceptor), for the quantitative analysis of the quality of a DNA double helix. This approach obtains a visual picture of the defects of the genetic apparatus of tissue cells, particularly those of skin cells in real time and it can be used for the diagnosis of skin diseases and also in cosmetology. Transition metal (TM) ions such as Cu(II), Cu(I), Ag(I), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), photo- and thermo effects were used to cause double helix defects in DNA. The concentration of DNA sites after exposure to Cu(II), Cu(I), Ag(I) ions, AgNPs impact, as well as laser irradiation (λ  =  457 nm) and temperature, which are applicable for intercalation, were estimated in relative units. The nanoscale FRET method enables the estimation of the concentration of double helix areas with high stability, applicable for intercalation in DNA after it was subjected to stress effect. It provides the opportunity to compare DNA-s of (1) different origin; (2) with various degrees of damage; (3) being in various functional states.

  14. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jim; Gogna, Gurusharan; Daniels, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure atomic oxygen number density [O] in an air Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ). A novel technique based on photolysis of O2 is used to calibrate the TALIF system ensuring the same species (O) is probed during calibration and measurement. As a result, laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power region without affecting calibration reliability as any high intensity saturation effects will be identical for calibration and experiment. Higher laser intensity gives stronger TALIF signals helping overcome weak TALIF signals often experienced at atmospheric pressure due to collisional quenching. O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting [O] are both achieved within the same laser pulse. The photolysis [O] is spatially non-uniform and time varying. To allow valid comparison with [O] in a plasma, spatial and temporal correction factors are required. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I0(t), and wavelength allows correction factors to be found using a rate equation model. The air flow into the jet was fixed and the RF power coupled into the system varied. The resulting [O] was found to increase with RF power.

  15. Development of a measurement technique for ion distribution in an extended nanochannel by super-resolution-laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazoe, Yutaka; Mawatari, Kazuma; Sugii, Yasuhiko; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2011-11-01

    Ion behavior confined in extended nanospace (10(1)-10(3) nm) is important for nanofluidics and nanochemistry with dominant surface effects. In this paper, we developed a new measurement technique of ion distribution in the nanochannel by super-resolution-laser-induced fluorescence. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy was used to achieve a spatial resolution of 87 nm higher than the diffraction limit. Fluorescein was used for ratiometric measurement of pH with two excitation wavelengths. The pH profile in a 2D nanochannel of 410 nm width and 405 nm depth was successfully measured at an uncertainty of 0.05. The excess protons, showing lower pH than the bulk, nonuniformly distributed in the nanochannel to cancel the negative charge of glass wall, especially when the electric double layer is thick compared to the channel size. The present study first revealed the ion distribution near the surface or in the nanochannel, which is directly related to the electric double layer. In addition, the obtained proton distribution is important to understand the nanoscale water structure between single molecules and continuum phase. This technique will greatly contribute to understanding the basic science in nanoscale and interfacial dynamics, which are strongly required to develop novel miniaturized systems for biochemical analysis and further applications.

  16. Application of HPLC combined with laser induced fluorescence for protein profile analysis of tissue homogenates in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Sujatha; Patil, Ajeetkumar; Rai, Lavanya; Kartha, V B; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2012-01-01

    A highly objective method, High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Laser Induced Fluorescence (HPLC-LIF) technique was used to study the protein profiles of normal and cervical cancer tissue homogenates. A total of 44 samples including normal cervical biopsy samples from the hysterectomy patients and the patients suffering from different stages of the cervical cancer were recorded by HPLC-LIF and analysed by Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to get statistical information on different tissue components. Discrimination of different stages of the samples was carried out by considering three parameters--scores of factor, spectral residual, and Mahalanobis Distance. Diagnostic accuracy of the method was evaluated using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis, and Youden's index (J) plots. The PCA results showed high sensitivity and specificity (~100) for cervical cancer diagnosis. ROC and Youden's index curves for both normal and malignant standard sets show good diagnostic accuracy with high AUC values. The statistical analysis has shown that the differences in protein profiles can be used to diagnose biochemical changes in the tissue, and thus can be readily applied for the detection of cervical cancer, even in situations where a histopathology examination is not easy because of nonavailability of experienced pathologists.

  17. Application of HPLC Combined with Laser Induced Fluorescence for Protein Profile Analysis of Tissue Homogenates in Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Bhat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly objective method, High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Laser Induced Fluorescence (HPLC-LIF technique was used to study the protein profiles of normal and cervical cancer tissue homogenates. A total of 44 samples including normal cervical biopsy samples from the hysterectomy patients and the patients suffering from different stages of the cervical cancer were recorded by HPLC-LIF and analysed by Principle Component Analysis (PCA to get statistical information on different tissue components. Discrimination of different stages of the samples was carried out by considering three parameters—scores of factor, spectral residual, and Mahalanobis Distance. Diagnostic accuracy of the method was evaluated using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC analysis, and Youden's index (J plots. The PCA results showed high sensitivity and specificity (∼100 for cervical cancer diagnosis. ROC and Youden's index curves for both normal and malignant standard sets show good diagnostic accuracy with high AUC values. The statistical analysis has shown that the differences in protein profiles can be used to diagnose biochemical changes in the tissue, and thus can be readily applied for the detection of cervical cancer, even in situations where a histopathology examination is not easy because of nonavailability of experienced pathologists.

  18. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Atomic Oxygen Measurements in Short Pulse Discharges by Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, Walter; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Mintusov, Eugene; Jiang, Naibo; Adamovich, Igor

    2007-10-01

    Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure time-dependent absolute oxygen atom concentrations in O2/He, O2/N2, and CH4/air plasmas produced with a 20 nanosecond duration, 20 kV pulsed discharge at 10 Hz repetition rate. Xenon calibrated spectra show that a single discharge pulse creates initial oxygen dissociation fraction of ˜0.0005 for air like mixtures at 40-60 torr total pressure. Peak O atom concentration is a factor of approximately two lower in fuel lean (φ=0.5) methane/air mixtures. In helium buffer, the initially formed atomic oxygen decays monotonically, with decay time consistent with formation of ozone. In all nitrogen containing mixtures, atomic oxygen concentrations are found to initially increase, for time scales on the order of 10-100 microseconds, due presumably to additional O2 dissociation caused by collisions with electronically excited nitrogen. Further evidence of the role of metastable N2 is demonstrated from time-dependent N2 2^nd Positive and NO Gamma band emission spectroscopy. Comparisons with modeling predictions show qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence analysis of plasmas for epitaxial growth of YBiO3 films with pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsel, Kasper; Groenen, Rik; Bastiaens, Bert; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Guus; Boller, Klaus-J.

    2016-12-01

    We record the two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) on multiple plasma constituents in a YBiO3 plasma. This allows us to directly link the influence of oxygen present in the background gas during pulsed laser deposition to the oxidation of plasma species as well as the formation of epitaxial YBiO3 films. With spatiotemporal LIF mapping of the plasma species (Y, YO, Bi, and BiO) in different background gas compositions, we find that little direct chemical interaction takes place between the plasma plume constituents and the background gas. However, a strong influence of the background gas composition can be seen on the YBO film growth, as well as a strong correlation between the oxygen fraction in the background gas and the amount of YO in the plasma plume. We assign this correlation to a direct interaction between the background gas and the target in between ablation pulses. In an O2 background, an oxygen-rich surface layer forms in between ablation pulses, which provides additional oxygen for the plasma plume during target ablation. This differs from our previous observations in STO and LAO plasmas, where species oxidation primarily takes place during propagation of the plasma plume towards the substrate.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence analysis of plasmas for epitaxial growth of YBiO3 films with pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Orsel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We record the two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF on multiple plasma constituents in a YBiO3 plasma. This allows us to directly link the influence of oxygen present in the background gas during pulsed laser deposition to the oxidation of plasma species as well as the formation of epitaxial YBiO3 films. With spatiotemporal LIF mapping of the plasma species (Y, YO, Bi, and BiO in different background gas compositions, we find that little direct chemical interaction takes place between the plasma plume constituents and the background gas. However, a strong influence of the background gas composition can be seen on the YBO film growth, as well as a strong correlation between the oxygen fraction in the background gas and the amount of YO in the plasma plume. We assign this correlation to a direct interaction between the background gas and the target in between ablation pulses. In an O2 background, an oxygen-rich surface layer forms in between ablation pulses, which provides additional oxygen for the plasma plume during target ablation. This differs from our previous observations in STO and LAO plasmas, where species oxidation primarily takes place during propagation of the plasma plume towards the substrate.

  1. Analysis of the anti-Parkinson drug pramipexole in human urine by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musenga, Alessandro; Kenndler, Ernst; Morganti, Emanuele; Rasi, Fabrizio; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2008-09-19

    A sensitive method based on capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection has been developed for the analysis of the non-ergoline dopamine agonist pramipexole in human urine. Separation was carried out in uncoated fused silica capillaries (75microm internal diameter, 75.0 and 60.0cm total and effective length, respectively), with a background electrolyte composed of borate buffer (50mM, pH 10.3), tetrabutylammonium bromide (30mM), and acetone (15%, v/v). Applying a 20kV voltage, the electrophoretic run is completed within 12min. A sample pre-treatment procedure based on liquid/liquid extraction with ethyl acetate, followed by derivatisation of pramipexole with fluorescein isothiocyanate at pH 9, allows the complete removal of biological interferences, with extraction yields always higher than 94.5%. Method validation gave good linearity (r(2)=0.9992) in the 25.0-1000ngmL(-1) range; limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 10.0 and 25.0ngmL(-1), respectively; precision was 90.0. The method was applied to the analysis of urine samples from patients undergoing therapy with pramipexole.

  2. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Laser Ablation Plumes Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2017-02-06

    We used a CW laser as a narrow-band (~50kHz) tunable LIF excitation source to probe absorption from selected atomic transitions (Al, U etc. ) in a ns laser ablation plume. A comparison of fluorescence signal with respect to emission spectroscopy show significant increase in the magnitude and persistence from selected Al and U transitions in a LIBS plume. The high spectral resolution provided by the LIF measurement allows peaks to be easily separated even if they overlap in the emission spectra.

  3. Quantitative measurement of hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration in premixed flat flame by combining laser-induced fluorescence and direct absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Su, Tie; Li, Zhong-Shan; Bai, Han-Chen; Yan, Bo; Yang, Fu-Rong

    2016-10-01

    An accurate and reasonable technique combining direct absorption spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) methods is developed to quantitatively measure the concentrations of hydroxyl in CH4/air flat laminar flame. In our approach, particular attention is paid to the linear laser-induced fluorescence and absorption processes, and experimental details as well. Through measuring the temperature, LIF signal distribution and integrated absorption, spatially absolute OH concentrations profiles are successfully resolved. These experimental results are then compared with the numerical simulation. It is proved that the good quality of the results implies that this method is suitable for calibrating the OH-PLIF measurement in a practical combustor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272338), the Science and Technology on Scramjet Key Laboratory Funding, China (Grant No. STSKFKT 2013004), and the China Scholarship Council.

  4. Plant-Stress Measurements Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Excitation: Poland Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gene Capelle; Steve Jones

    1999-05-01

    Bechtel Nevada's Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) has been involved in remote sensing for many years, and in April 1995 STL began to study the use of active remote sensing for detecting plant stress. This work was motivated by the need to detect subsurface contamination, with the supposition that this could be accomplished by remote measurement of optical signatures from the overgrowing vegetation. The project has been a cooperative DOE/Disney effort, in which basic optical signature measurements (primarily fluorescence) were done at the Disney greenhouse facilities at Epcot Center in Florida, using instrumentation developed by STL on DOE funding. The primary instrument is a LIFI system, which had originally been developed for detection of surface uranium contamination at DOE sites. To deal specifically with the plant stress measurements, a LIFS system was built that utilizes the same laser, but captures the complete fluorescence spectrum from blue to red wavelengths. This system had continued to evolve, and the version in existence in September 1997 was sent to Poland, accompanied by two people from STL, for the purpose of making the measurements described in this report.

  5. Indirect detection of superoxide in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells using microchip electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Richard P S; Siegel, Joseph M; Fresta, Claudia G; Caruso, Giuseppe; da Silva, José A F; Lunte, Susan M

    2015-09-01

    Superoxide, a naturally produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the human body, is involved in many pathological and physiological signaling processes. However, if superoxide formation is left unregulated, overproduction can lead to oxidative damage to important biomolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Superoxide can also lead to the formation of peroxynitrite, an extremely hazardous substance, through its reaction with endogenously produced nitric oxide. Despite its importance, quantitative information regarding superoxide production is difficult to obtain due to its high reactivity and low concentrations in vivo. MitoHE, a fluorescent probe that specifically reacts with superoxide, was used in conjunction with microchip electrophoresis (ME) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection to investigate changes in superoxide production by RAW 264.7 macrophage cells following stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Stimulation was performed in the presence and absence of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitors, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) and 2-metoxyestradiol (2-ME). The addition of these inhibitors resulted in an increase in the amount of superoxide specific product (2-OH-MitoE(+)) from 0.08 ± 0.01 fmol (0.17 ± 0.03 mM) in native cells to 1.26 ± 0.06 fmol (2.5 ± 0.1 mM) after PMA treatment. This corresponds to an approximately 15-fold increase in intracellular concentration per cell. Furthermore, the addition of 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) to the cells during incubation resulted in the production of 0.061 ± 0.006 fmol (0.12 ± 0.01 mM) of 2-OH-MitoE(+) per cell on average. These results demonstrate that indirect superoxide detection coupled with the use of SOD inhibitors and a separation method is a viable method to discriminate the 2-OH-MitoE(+) signal from possible interferences.

  6. A Remote Raman and Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectrometer and its Application for Lidar Remote Sensing of Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S.; Sharma, S. K.; Angel, S. M.; Lucey, P. G.; McKay, C. P.; Misra, A. K.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Newsom, H.; Scott, E. R.; Singh, U. N.; Taylor, J. G.; Porter, J. N.

    2005-05-01

    A combined remote Raman and Laser Induced Fluorescence (RLIF) spectrometer was proposed as a mast-mounted instrument for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). This remote RLIF system is capable of conducting reconnaissance of fluorescence materials and minerals with high sensitivity (e.g., carbonates, sulfates, phosphates, quartz, etc.) that can be recorded with a single 532 nm (35 mJ) laser pulse of 8 ns half-width. The RLIF system is also capable of identification of mineral, organic, and biogenic materials and is sitable for atmospheric studies of Mars. This instrument design is based on a prototypes that was developed with partial support from NASA's Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) at the University of Hawaii. This prototype instrument has been modified to operate in the lidar mode to obtain Mie-Rayleigh scattering profiles in the atmosphere for studying meteorological processes in the marine atmosphere. Application of RLIF to obtain range-resolved atmospheric backscattering profiles using the AOTF technique are capable of providing atmospheric backscatter profiles. Data from RLIF can be used to retrieve optical properties of dust aerosols and clouds, including the profiling of scattering intensity, location of cloud base and thickness, atmospheric extinction, and de-polarization. These measurements can be made at high vertical resolution up to altitudes >5 km. Simultaneous measurements can be made of atmospheric CO2 and its variations; surface CO2-ice and water-ice; and surface and subsurface hydrated methane on Mars. Capability of RLIF and examples of atmospheric measurements applicable to RLIF will be presented in this paper.

  7. Serum protein profile study of clinical samples using high performance liquid chromatography-laser induced fluorescence: case of cervical and oral cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karemore, Gopal; Sujatha, .; Rai, Lavanya; Pai, Keerthilatha M.; Kartha, V. B.; Santhosh C., .

    2009-02-01

    The serum protein profiles of normal subjects, patients diagnosed with cervical cancer, and oral cancer were recorded using High Performance Liquid Chromatography combined with Laser Induced Fluorescence detection (HPLC-LIF). Serum protein profiles of the above three classes were tested for establishing the ability of HPLC-LIF protein profiling technique for discrimination, using hard clustering and Fuzzy clustering methods. The clustering algorithms have quite successfully classified the profiles as belonging to normal, cancer of cervix, and oral cancer conditions.

  8. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown.

  9. Influence of the gaseous mixture composition on accuracy of molecular iodine on-line detection by laser-induced fluorescence method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.

    2016-07-01

    This paper informs on research into the influence of the composition of gaseous mixtures analyzed on the accuracy of on-line molecular iodine detection by laser-induced fluorescence in various gaseous media—in atmospheric air and in technological mixtures formed during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The paper shows that by considering the composition of buffer media and parts of its components, the accuracy of iodine content measurement may be increased in several times.

  10. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of axial velocity, velocity shear, and parallel ion temperature profiles during the route to plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Adriany, K.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental measurements of the axial plasma flow and the parallel ion temperature in a magnetized linear plasma device. We used laser induced fluorescence to measure Doppler resolved ion velocity distribution functions in argon plasma to obtain spatially resolved axial velocities and parallel ion temperatures. We also show changes in the parallel velocity profiles during the transition from resistive drift wave dominated plasma to a state of weak turbulence driven by multiple plasma instabilities.

  11. Fluorescence particle detection using microfluidics and planar optoelectronic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettlitz, Siegfried W.; Moosmann, Carola; Valouch, Sebastian; Lemmer, Uli

    2014-05-01

    Detection of fluorescent particles is an integral part of flow cytometry for analysis of selectively stained cells. Established flow cytometer designs achieve great sensitivity and throughput but require bulky and expensive components which prohibit mass production of small single-use point-of-care devices. The use of a combination of innovative technologies such as roll-to-roll printed microuidics with integrated optoelectronic components such as printed organic light emitting diodes and printed organic photodiodes enables tremendous opportunities in cost reduction, miniaturization and new application areas. In order to harvest these benefits, the optical setup requires a redesign to eliminate the need for lenses, dichroic mirrors and lasers. We investigate the influence of geometric parameters on the performance of a thin planar design which uses a high power LED as planar light source and a PIN-photodiode as planar detector. Due to the lack of focusing optics and inferior optical filters, the device sensitivity is not yet on par with commercial state of the art flow cytometer setups. From noise measurements, electronic and optical considerations we deduce possible pathways of improving the device performance. We identify that the sensitivity is either limited by dark noise for very short apertures or by noise from background light for long apertures. We calculate the corresponding crossover length. For the device design we conclude that a low device thickness, low particle velocity and short aperture length are necessary to obtain optimal sensitivity.

  12. Laser diagnostics in combustion. Elastic scattering and picosecond laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossler, Frederik

    1999-05-01

    Elastic scattering and the Lorenz-Mie (LM) theory in particular is used for the characterization of sub-micron- and micron-sized droplets of organic fuels in sprays and aerosols. Calculations on the Lorenz-Mie theory show that backward-sideward scattered visible radiation can be used for unambiguous detection of ensembles of homogeneous droplets of organic substances with diameters around 1 micrometer (size parameter between 2 and 6). A backward feature in the polarization ratio appears with a value considerably higher than one, on the opposite to the case of the rainbow observed for larger droplets. A comparison between measurements and LM calculations showed that a large amount of droplets in aerosols and well-atomized sprays were smaller than one micrometer in diameter. The LM theory was also used to characterize different size groups in a burning spray. A 3 - D technique based on a picosecond laser and a streak camera was demonstrated for measurements of fast and turbulent biphase flows. The entire 3 - D information was obtained within a time-span of less than 15 nanoseconds. A 2 - D technique for lifetime measurements based on a picosecond laser and a streak camera has been demonstrated on static objects. An analysis indicates that the technique may be applied to measurements of lifetimes around or below one picosecond employing femtosecond lasers and femtosecond streak-cameras. The technique may in principle be used to study dynamic systems when two detectors are used. Fluorescence lifetime measurements on hydrogen and oxygen atoms in flames at atmospheric pressure demonstrate the need of lasers with suiting spectral properties such as jitter and linewidth and the need of detectors with high sensitivity in the near IR in the case of oxygen atoms. The fluorescence lifetimes of gas phase acetone and 3-pentanone at 266 nm excitation wavelength have been measured for mixtures with nitrogen and air at temperatures between 323 and 723 K and pressures between 0

  13. Laser diagnostics in combustion: Elastic scattering and picosecond laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossler, Frederik E.

    Elastic scattering and the Lorenz-Mie (LM) theory in particular is used for the characterization of submicron- and micron-sized droplets of organic fuels in sprays and aerosols. Calculations on the Lorenz-Mie theory show that backward-sideward scattered visible radiation can be used for unambiguous detection of ensembles of homogeneous droplets of organic substances with diameters around 1 micrometer (size parameter between 2 and 6). A backward feature in the polarization ratio appears with a value considerably higher than one, on the opposite to the case of the rainbow observed for larger droplets. A comparison between measurements and LM calculations showed that a large amount of droplets in aerosols and well-atomized sprays were smaller than one micrometer in diameter. The LM theory was also used to characterize different size groups in a burning spray. A 3-D technique based on a picosecond laser and a streak camera was demonstrated for measurements of fast and turbulent biphase flows. The entire 3-D information was obtained within a time-span of less than 15 nanoseconds. A 2-D technique for lifetime measurements based on a picosecond laser and a streak camera has been demonstrated on static objects. An analysis indicates that the technique may be applied to measurements of lifetimes around or below one picosecond employing femtosecond lasers and femtosecond streak-cameras. The technique may in principle be used to study dynamic systems when two detectors are used. Fluorescence lifetime measurements on hydrogen and oxygen atoms in flames at atmospheric pressure demonstrate the need of lasers with suiting spectral properties such as jitter and linewidth and the need of detectors with high sensitivity in the near IR in the case of oxygen atoms. The fluorescence lifetimes of gas phase acetone and 3- pentanone at 266 nm excitation wavelength have been measured for mixtures with nitrogen and air at temperatures between 323 and 723 K and pressures between 0.01 and 10

  14. Analysis of serotonin in brain microdialysates using capillary electrophoresis and native laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benturquia, Nadia; Couderc, François; Sauvinet, Valérie; Orset, Cyrille; Parrot, Sandrine; Bayle, Christophe; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2005-03-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. In this work, a method for analyzing 5-HT in brain microdialysis samples using a commercially available capillary electrophoresis (CE) system has been developed. A pH-mediated in-capillary preconcentration of samples was performed, and after separation by capillary zone electrophoresis, native fluorescence of 5-HT was detected by a 266 nm solid-state laser. The separation conditions for the analysis of 5-HT in standard solutions and microdialysates have been optimized, and this method has been validated on both pharmacological and analytical bases. Separation of 5-HT was performed using a 80 mmol/L citrate buffer, pH 2.5, containing 20 mmol/L hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD) and +30 kV voltage. The detection limit was 2.5 x 10(-10) mol/L. This method allows the in vivo brain monitoring of 5-HT using a simple, accurate CE measurement in underivatized microdialysis samples.

  15. Biochemical Detection and Identification False Alarm Rate Dependence on Wavelength Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartia, R.; Hug, W. F.; Sala, E. C.; Sijapati, K.; Lane, A. L.; Reid, R. D.; Conrad, P. G.

    2006-01-01

    Most organic and many inorganic materials absorb strongly in specific wavelength ranges in the deep UV between about 220nm and 300nm. Excitation within these absorption bands results in native fluorescence emission. Each compound or composite material, such as a bacterial spore, has a unique excitation-emission fingerprint that can be used to provide information about the material. The sensitivity and specificity with which these materials can be detected and identified depends on the excitation wavelength and the number and location of observation wavelengths.We will present data on our deep ultraviolet Targeted Ultraviolet Chemical Sensors that demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the sensors. In particular, we will demonstrate the ability to quantitatively differentiate a wide range of biochemical agent targets against a wide range of background materials. We will describe the relationship between spectral resolution and specificity in target identification, as well as simple, fast, algorithms to identify materials.Hand-held, battery operated instruments using a deep UV laser and multi-band detection have been developed and deployed on missions to the Antarctic, the Arctic, and the deep ocean with the capability of detecting a single bacterial spore and to differentiate a wide range of organic and biological compounds.

  16. Applications of capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence detection to the analysis of trace species: From single cells to single molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Qifeng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-09-26

    This Ph.D. Thesis describes several separation and detection schemes for the analysis of small volume and amount of samples, such as intracellular components and single enzymes developed during research. Indirect Laser-induced fluorescence detection and capillary electrophoresis were used to quantify lactate and pyruvate in single red blood cells. The assay of specific enzyme activities was achieved by monitoring the highly fluorescent enzymatic reaction product, NADH. LDH activity was found not to be a unique marker for diagnosis of leukemia. Reactions of single LDH-1 molecules were investigated by monitoring the reaction product with LIF detection.

  17. Applications of capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence detection to the analysis of trace species: From single cells to single molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qifeng, X.

    1995-11-01

    This Ph.D. Thesis describes several separation and detection schemes for the analysis of small volume and amount of samples, such as intracellular components and single enzymes developed during research. Indirect Laser-induced fluorescence detection and capillary electrophoresis were used to quantify lactate and pyruvate in single red blood cells. The assay of specific enzyme activities was achieved by monitoring the highly fluorescent enzymatic reaction product, NADH. LDH activity was found not to be a unique marker for diagnosis of leukemia. Reactions of single LDH-1 molecules were investigated by monitoring the reaction product with LIF detection.

  18. Quantitative two-dimensional measurement of oil-film thickness by laser-induced fluorescence in a piston-ring model experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigger, Stefan; Füßer, Hans-Jürgen; Fuhrmann, Daniel; Schulz, Christof; Kaiser, Sebastian A

    2016-01-10

    This paper describes advances in using laser-induced fluorescence of dyes for imaging the thickness of oil films in a rotating ring tribometer with optical access, an experiment representing a sliding piston ring in an internal combustion engine. A method for quantitative imaging of the oil-film thickness is developed that overcomes the main challenge, the accurate calibration of the detected fluorescence signal for film thicknesses in the micrometer range. The influence of the background material and its surface roughness is examined, and a method for flat-field correction is introduced. Experiments in the tribometer show that the method yields quantitative, physically plausible results, visualizing features with submicrometer thickness.

  19. Strategies of fluorescence staining for trace total ribonucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis with argon ion laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yi-An; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Chang, Po-Ling

    2015-08-01

    In this work, five fluorescent dyes (SYTO-9, SYBR Green I, SYBR Green II, SYBR Safe, and SYBR Gold) were used as both on-column and precolumn stains for total RNA analysis by CE-LIF with Ar ion laser excitation. In the on-column RNA stain, the SYTO-9 provided the highest fluorescence intensity and the lowest detectable concentration, as low as 10 pg/μL, while the SYBR Green II and SYBR Gold were adsorbed on the poly(ethylene oxide) thus affected the separation efficiency. As a precolumn stain, SYBR Gold was the most sensitive among the five dyes due to the strong affinity between the dye and RNA molecules. As a result, a single-cell quantity of RNA (10-30 pg per cell) could be detected by CE-LIF with precolumn staining by SYBR Gold. Because of the great savings of fluorescent dye using precolumn stain (one button dye may use for one million stain), this method is the best strategy for RNA staining in terms of cost-effectiveness and sensitivity.

  20. Differential Laser-Induced Perturbation Spectroscopy for Analysis of Mixtures of the Fluorophores l-Phenylalanine, l-Tyrosine and l-Tryptophan Using a Fluorescence Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztekin, Erman K; Hahn, David W

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative detection of common endogenous fluorophores is accomplished using differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS) with a 193-nm UV fluorescence probe and various UV perturbation wavelengths. In this study, DLIPS is explored as an alternative to traditional fluorescence spectroscopy alone, with a goal of exploring natural fluorophores pursuant to biological samples and tissue analysis. To this end, aromatic amino acids, namely, l-phenylalanine, l-tyrosine and l-tryptophan are mixed with differing mass ratios and then classified with various DLIPS schemes. Classification with a traditional fluorescence probe is used as a benchmark. The results show a 20% improvement in classification performance of the DLIPS method over the traditional fluorescence method using partial least squares (PLS) analysis. Additional multivariate analyses are explored, and the relevant photochemistry is elucidated in the context of perturbation wavelengths. We conclude that DLIPS is a promising biosensing approach with potential for in vivo analysis given the current findings with fluorophores relevant to biological tissues.

  1. Investigation of potential interferences in the detection of atmospheric ROx radicals by laser-induced fluorescence under dark conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Tan, Zhaofeng; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Broch, Sebastian; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Holland, Frank; Künstler, Christopher; Gomm, Sebastian; Rohrer, Franz; Schrade, Stephanie; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Direct detection of highly reactive, atmospheric hydroxyl radicals (OH) is widely accomplished by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instruments. The technique is also suitable for the indirect measurement of HO2 and RO2 peroxy radicals by chemical conversion to OH. It requires sampling of ambient air into a low-pressure cell, where OH fluorescence is detected after excitation by 308 nm laser radiation. Although the residence time of air inside the fluorescence cell is typically only on the order of milliseconds, there is potential that additional OH is internally produced, which would artificially increase the measured OH concentration. Here, we present experimental studies investigating potential interferences in the detection of OH and peroxy radicals for the LIF instruments of Forschungszentrum Jülich for nighttime conditions. For laboratory experiments, the inlet of the instrument was over flowed by excess synthetic air containing one or more reactants. In order to distinguish between OH produced by reactions upstream of the inlet and artificial signals produced inside the instrument, a chemical titration for OH was applied. Additional experiments were performed in the simulation chamber SAPHIR where simultaneous measurements by an open-path differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) served as reference for OH to quantify potential artifacts in the LIF instrument. Experiments included the investigation of potential interferences related to the nitrate radical (NO3, N2O5), related to the ozonolysis of alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene, α-pinene, limonene, isoprene), and the laser photolysis of acetone. Experiments studying the laser photolysis of acetone yield OH signals in the fluorescence cell, which are equivalent to 0.05 × 106 cm-3 OH for a mixing ratio of 5 ppbv acetone. Under most atmospheric conditions, this interference is negligible. No significant interferences were found for atmospheric concentrations of reactants

  2. Experimental Study of Laser-induced Fluorescence of Anthracene in Soil%土壤中蒽的激光诱导荧光实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何俊; 邓琥; 武志翔; 马有良

    2011-01-01

    It is complicated to detect Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) contamination soil by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with the conventional method, the Laser-induced Fluorescence (LIF) is used to on-site detect anthracene, one of the PAHs in soil, and it is shown that the Laser-induced Fluorescence can facilitate the monitoring of the soil pollution. According to the fluorescence properties of anthracene, the optical path and sample holder are designed to directly excite the fluorescence of the mixture of anthracene and the soil sample by using Nd: YAG laser at 355 nm, and the fluorescence spectra are recorded by the fiber spectrometer. It is shown that there are obvious emission fluorescence peaks at 375 nm, 391 nm, 419 nm and 445 nm, and different mass firactions exhibit good linearity to the fluorescence intensities with the correlation coefficients up to 0.999. The effects of the changes in experimental conditions on the fluorescence properties of anthracene are studied, and it is demonstrated by experiment that it is feasible to on-site quantitatively detect anthracene in the soil by using Laser-induced Fluorescence.%常规利用液相色谱法检测土壤中的多环芳烃污染需要复杂的萃取过程,采用激光诱导荧光法直接检测土壤中的多环芳烃,有利于实现对土壤污染的监控.文章以多环芳烃中的蒽为研究对象,根据蒽的荧光特性,设计了实验光路和样品台,采用Nd:YAG激光器355 nm波长直接激发蒽和土壤混合样本的荧光,利用光纤光谱仪记录荧光光谱,实验发现在375nm、391nm、419nm和445nm出现了明显的发射荧光峰,不同质量分数和其荧光强度呈现出良好的线性,相关系数达到0.999;通过实验研究了实验条件的改变对土壤中蒽的荧光特性的影响.实验结果表明,利用激光诱导荧光的方法对土壤中蒽进行直接定量检测是可行的.

  3. Airborne intercomparison of HOx measurements using laser-induced fluorescence and chemical ionization mass spectrometry during ARCTAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Crawford

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl (OH and hydroperoxyl (HO2 radicals, collectively called HOx, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. Accurate measurements of OH and HO2 are critical to examine our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Intercomparisons of different techniques for detecting OH and HO2 are vital to evaluate their measurement capabilities. Three instruments that measured OH and/or HO2 radicals were deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft throughout Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS in the spring and summer of 2008. One instrument was the Penn State Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS for OH and HO2 measurements based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF spectroscopy. A second instrument was the NCAR Selected-Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SI-CIMS for OH measurement. A third instrument was the NCAR Peroxy Radical Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PeRCIMS for HO2 measurement. Formal intercomparison of LIF and CIMS was conducted for the first time on a same aircraft platform. The three instruments were calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor by ultraviolet (UV light at 184.9 nm with three different calibration systems. The absolute accuracies were ±32% (2σ for the LIF instrument, ±65% (2σ for the SI-CIMS instrument, and ±50% (2σ for the PeRCIMS instrument. In general, good agreement was obtained between the CIMS and LIF measurements of both OH and HO2 measurements. Linear regression of the entire data set yields [OH]CIMS = 0.89 × [OH]LIF + 2.8 × 104 cm−3 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for OH, and [HO2]CIMS = 0.86 × [HO2]LIF + 3.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, equivalent to pmol mol−1 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for HO2. In general, the difference between CIMS and LIF instruments for OH and HO2 measurements can be explained by their combined measurement uncertainties. Comparison with box model results shows some

  4. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  5. Intercomparison of peroxy radical measurements obtained at atmospheric conditions by laser-induced fluorescence and electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hofzumahaus

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of hydroperoxy radical (HO2 and organic peroxy radical (RO2 concentrations were performed by two different techniques in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany. The first technique was the well-established Matrix Isolation Electron Spin Resonance (MIESR, which provides absolute measurements with a time resolution of 30 min and high accuracy (10%, 2 σ. The other technique, ROxLIF, has been newly developed. It is based on the selective chemical conversion of ROx radicals (HO2 and RO2 to OH, which is detected with high sensitivity by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF. ROxLIF is calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor at 185 nm and provides ambient measurements at a temporal resolution of 1 min and accuracy of 20% (2 σ. The measurements of HO2 and RO2 obtained by the two techniques were compared for two types of atmospheric simulation experiments. In one experiment, HO2 and CH3O2 radicals were produced by photooxidation of methane in air at tropospheric conditions. In the second experiment, HO2 and C2H5O2 were produced by ozonolysis of 1-butene in air at dark conditions. The radical concentrations were within the range of 16 to 100 pptv for HO2 and 12 to 45 pptv for RO2. Good agreement was found in the comparison of the ROxLIF and MIESR measurements within their combined experimental uncertainties. Linear regressions to the combined data set yield slopes of 1.02±0.13 (1 σ for RO2 and 0.98±0.08 (1 σ for HO2 without significant offsets. The results confirm the calibration of the ROxLIF instrument and demonstrate that it can be applied with good accuracy for measurements of atmospheric peroxy radical concentrations.

  6. Investigation of capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence as a tool in the characterization of sewage effluent for fluorescent acids: determination of salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Sean; Wark, Shelly; Street, Ginger; Farley, John W; Brumley, William C

    2002-07-01

    The investigation of emerging contaminant issues is a proactive effort in environmental analysis. As a part of this effort, sewage effluent is of current analytical interest because of the presence of pharmaceuticals and their metabolites and personal care products. The environmental impact of these components is still under investigation but their constant perfusion into receiving waters and their potential effect on biota is of concern. This paper examines a tool for the characterization of sewage effluent using capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) with a frequency-doubled laser operated in the ultraviolet (UV). Fluorescent acidic analytes are targeted because they present special problems for techniques such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) but are readily accessible to CE-LIF. As an example of the application of this tool, salicylic acid is determined near the 100 ng/L (7 x 10(-10) M) level in sewage effluent. Salicylic acid is a metabolite of various analgesics. Relatively stable in the environment, it is a common contaminant of municipal sewage systems. Salicylic acid was recovered from freshly collected samples of the effluent by liquid-liquid extraction. Confirmation of identity was by electron ionization GC-MS after conversion of the salicylic acid to the methyl ester by means of trimethylsilyldiazomethane. CE-LIF in the UV has revealed more than 50 individual peaks in the extract and a background response that suggests a large and indeterminate number of additional compounds are present. These data together with complementary techniques provide information on the complexity and components in these effluent streams.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of TaN in free-jet: Observation of high-lying excited electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhate, S. G.; Mukund, Sheo; Bhattacharyya, Soumen

    2017-02-01

    Rotationally resolved excitation spectra of TaN molecules, produced in a free-jet, have been studied using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Thirteen excited electronic states in the energy region, 23,500-30,000 cm-1 have been observed. The molecular constants, Ω-quantum numbers and radiative lifetimes have been determined for these states. Because of the case (c) behavior and absence of the regular energy spacing, the assignments of the excited electronic states of TaN become difficult. The number of observed excited electronic states is significantly larger than currently predicted, indicated a need for additional ab initio calculations.

  8. Jet-cooled laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy of NiC: Observation of low-lying Ω = 0+ state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, Sheo; Yarlagadda, Suresh; Bhattacharyya, Soumen; Nakhate, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectra of 58Ni12C molecules, produced in a free-jet apparatus, have been studied. A new low-lying Ω = 0+ state has been observed at Te = 5178 (6) cm-1. Based on previous ab initio calculations this state is plausibly assigned as 0+ spin-orbit component of the first excited 3 Π state. The term energies of vibrational levels up to v = 10 for X1Σ+ ground and v = 3 for Ω = 0+ states have been determined. The harmonic and anharmonic wavenumbers respectively equal to 833 (4) and 6.7 (13) cm-1 for Ω = 0+ state have been measured.

  9. Dielectric barrier discharges with steep voltage rise: mapping of atomic nitrogen in single filaments measured by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, C.; Spaan, M.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Thomson, M.; Wegst, R.; Döbele, H. F.; Neiger, M.

    2001-08-01

    Space and time resolved relative atomic density distributions of nitrogen have been measured for the first time at a single filament within a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with submillimetre radial dimensions. Two-photon-Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) spectroscopy of atomic nitrogen using radiation at λ = 206.7 nm is applied to a DBD with fast rising voltage amplitudes. The decay time of the atomic nitrogen density depends strongly on the position within the discharge and the distance from the dielectric where the lifetime is maximum. Admixed oxygen leads to an increase of the N density decay by an order of magnitude even at small fractions.

  10. Influence of the oxidation state of SrTiO3 plasmas for stoichiometric growth of pulsed laser deposition films identified by laser induced fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Orsel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available By applying two-dimensional laser induced fluorescence (LIF on multiple plasma constituents, we are able to directly link the oxidation of plasma species in a SrTiO3 plasma for pulsed laser deposition to the stoichiometry and quality of the thin films grown. With spatiotemporal LIF mapping of the plasma species in different background gas compositions, we find that Ti and Sr have to be fully oxidized for a stoichiometric growth of crystalline thin films, which gives new input for modeling surface growth, as well as provides additional control over the exact degree of stoichiometry of thin films.

  11. Laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence: a technique for detection of dimethoate effect on chlorophyll content and photosynthetic activity of wheat plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Jitendra Kumar; Gopal, R

    2011-03-01

    Laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) spectra and fluorescence induction kinetics (FIK) curves of wheat plant leaves treated with different concentrations (50, 100 and 200 ppm) of dimethoate are recorded. LICF spectra are recorded in the region of 650-780 nm using violet diode laser (405 nm) and FIK curve at 685 and 730 nm with red diode laser (635 nm) for excitation. The fluorescence intensity ratios (FIR) are determined from LICF spectra and vitality index (R(fd)) from FIK curves. These parameters along with photosynthetic pigment contents and growth parameters are used to analyze the effect of dimethoate on wheat plants. The result indicates that lower concentration of 50 ppm shows stimulatory response while higher concentrations of dimethoate are hazardous for growth, photosynthetic pigments and activity of wheat plants.

  12. Study the effect of insecticide dimethoate on photosynthetic pigments and photosynthetic activity of pigeon pea: Laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Jitendra Kumar; Dubey, Gunjan; Gopal, R

    2015-10-01

    Pigeon pea is one of the most important legume crops in India and dimethoate is a widely used insecticide in various crop plants. We studied the effect of dimethoate on growth and photosynthetic activity of pigeon pea plants over a short and long term exposure. Plant growth parameters, photosynthetic pigment content and chlorophyll fluorescence response of pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.) plants treated with various concentrations of the insecticide dimethoate (10, 20, 40 and 80 ppm) have been compared for 30 days at regular intervals of 10 days each. Laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence spectra and fluorescence-induction kinetics (FIK) curve of dimethoate treated pigeon pea plants were recorded after 10, 20 and 30 days of treatment. Fluorescence intensity ratio at the two fluorescence maxima (F685/F730) was calculated by evaluating curve-fitted parameters. The variable chlorophyll fluorescence decrease ratio (Rfd) was determined from the FIK curves. Our study revealed that after 10 days of treatment, 10 ppm of dimethoate showed stimulatory response whereas 20, 40 and 80 ppm of dimethoate showed inhibitory response for growth and photosynthetic activity of pigeon pea plants, but after 20 and 30 days of treatment all the tested concentrations of dimethoate became inhibitory. This study clearly shows that dimethoate is highly toxic to the pigeon pea plant, even at very low concentration (10 ppm), if used for a prolonged duration. Our study may thus be helpful in determining the optimal dose of dimethoate in agricultural practices.

  13. Structure and intermolecular vibrations of 7-azaindole-water 2:1 complex in a supersonic jet expansion: Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Montu K Hazra; Moitrayee Mukherjee; V Ramanathan; Tapas Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectra of a 2:1 complex between 7-azaindole and water, known as `non-reactive dimer’ of the molecule, have been measured in a supersonic jet expansion. The dispersed fluorescence spectrum of the electronic origin band of the complex shows a very large number of low-frequency vibrational features corresponding to different intermolecular modes of the complex in the ground electronic state. Geometries of several possible isomeric structures of the complex and their vibrational frequencies at harmonic approximation were calculated by electronic structure theory method at MP2/6-31G∗∗ level. An excellent agreement is observed between the measured and calculated intermolecular vibrational mode frequencies for the energetically most favoured structure of the complex, where the water molecule is inserted within one of the two N$\\cdots$H-N hydrogen bonds of the 7AI dimer.

  14. Nine orders of magnitude dynamic range: picomolar to millimolar concentration measurement in capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection employing cascaded avalanche photodiode photon counters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Oluwatosin O; Essaka, David C; Hindsgaul, Ole; Palcic, Monica M; Prendergast, Jillian; Schnaar, Ronald L; Dovichi, Norman J

    2011-04-01

    The dynamic range of capillary electrophoresis analysis is ultimately limited by molecular shot noise at low concentrations and by concentration-induced band broadening at high concentrations. We report a system that approaches these fundamental limits. A laser-induced fluorescence detector is reported that employs a cascade of four fiber-optic beam splitters connected in series to generate a primary signal and four attenuated signals, each monitored by a single-photon counting avalanche photodiode. Appropriate scaling of the signals from the five photodiodes produces a linear optical calibration curve for 5-carboxyl-tetramethylrhodamine from the concentration detection limit of 1 pM to the upper limit of 1 mM. Mass detection limits are 120 yoctomoles (70 molecules) injected into the instrument. The very-wide dynamic range instrument was used to study the metabolic products of the fluorescently labeled glycosphingolipid tetramethylrhodamine labeled GM1 (GM1-TMR) produced by single cells isolated from the rat cerebellum.

  15. High-Throughput Analysis With 96-Capillary Array Electrophoresis and Integrated Sample Preparation for DNA Sequencing Based on Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang Xue

    2001-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to improve the fluorescence detection for the multiplexed capillary array electrophoresis, extend its use beyond the genomic analysis, and to develop an integrated micro-sample preparation system for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The authors first demonstrated multiplexed capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) separations in a 96-capillary array system with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Migration times of four kinds of fluoresceins and six polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are normalized to one of the capillaries using two internal standards. The relative standard deviations (RSD) after normalization are 0.6-1.4% for the fluoresceins and 0.1-1.5% for the PAHs. Quantitative calibration of the separations based on peak areas is also performed, again with substantial improvement over the raw data. This opens up the possibility of performing massively parallel separations for high-throughput chemical analysis for process monitoring, combinatorial synthesis, and clinical diagnosis. The authors further improved the fluorescence detection by step laser scanning. A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluorescein is 3 x 10{sup -11} M (S/N = 3) for 5-mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  16. High-Throughput Analysis With 96-Capillary Array Electrophoresis and Integrated Sample Preparation for DNA Sequencing Based on Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Gang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to improve the fluorescence detection for the multiplexed capillary array electrophoresis, extend its use beyond the genomic analysis, and to develop an integrated micro-sample preparation system for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The authors first demonstrated multiplexed capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) separations in a 96-capillary array system with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Migration times of four kinds of fluoresceins and six polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are normalized to one of the capillaries using two internal standards. The relative standard deviations (RSD) after normalization are 0.6-1.4% for the fluoresceins and 0.1-1.5% for the PAHs. Quantitative calibration of the separations based on peak areas is also performed, again with substantial improvement over the raw data. This opens up the possibility of performing massively parallel separations for high-throughput chemical analysis for process monitoring, combinatorial synthesis, and clinical diagnosis. The authors further improved the fluorescence detection by step laser scanning. A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluorescein is 3 x 10-11 M (S/N = 3) for 5-mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  17. Observation of Aqueous Cm(III)/Eu(III) and UO22+ Nanoparticulates at Concentrations Approaching Solubility Limit by Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.; Xia, Yuanxian; Buck, Edgar C.

    2006-07-20

    Eu(III), Cm(III) and the uranyl ion display intense fluorescence spectra in the visible range and the spectroscopic characteristics are dependent on the composition and structure of the individual metal complexes. In this work, we demonstrate the application of laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in identification of nanoparticles of (1) Eu(III) and Cm(III) in basic solutions (pH > 10) in the presence of organic chelates including EDTA, HEDTA, NTA and oxalate and (2) sodium uranyl phosphate after equilibration with synthetic sodium uranyl phosphate suspensions. Fluorescence spectral and SEM results indicate that Eu(III) and Cm(III) can exist as colloidal nanoparticles in filtered 0.1 M NaOH solutions. Such nanoparticles, which display largely red-shifted fluorescence spectra as compared with the aqueous complexes and unusually short fluorescence lifetimes, contribute to the measured concentrations of Eu(III)/Cm(III) in the aqueous solutions. Similarly, uranyl spectroscopic signatures indicate that the determination of the solubility of uranium phosphate minerals is prone to the presence of uranyl phosphate nanoparticles. Due to the presence of such nanoparticles, the common solubility measurements may only indicate an upper limit of the ''true'' solubility.

  18. Observation of aqueous Cm(III)/Eu(III) and UO{sub 2} {sup 2+} nanoparticulates at concentrations approaching solubility limit by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zheming [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)]. E-mail: Zheming.wang@pnl.gov; Felmy, Andrew R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Xia Yuanxian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2006-07-20

    Eu(III), Cm(III) and the uranyl ion display intense fluorescence spectra in the visible range and the spectroscopic characteristics are dependent on the composition and structure of the individual metal complexes. In this work, we demonstrate the application of laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in identification of nanoparticles of (i) Eu(III) and Cm(III) in basic solutions (pH > 10) in the presence of organic chelates including EDTA, HEDTA, NTA and oxalate and (ii) sodium uranyl phosphate after equilibration with synthetic sodium uranyl phosphate suspensions. Fluorescence spectral and SEM results indicate that Eu(III) and Cm(III) can exist as colloidal nanoparticles in filtered 0.1 M NaOH solutions. Such nanoparticles, which display largely red-shifted fluorescence spectra as compared with the aqueous complexes and unusually short fluorescence lifetimes, contribute to the measured concentrations of Eu(III)/Cm(III) in the aqueous solutions. Similarly, uranyl spectroscopic signatures indicate that the determination of the solubility of uranium phosphate minerals is prone to the presence of uranyl phosphate nanoparticles. Due to the presence of such nanoparticles, the common solubility measurements may only indicate an upper limit of the 'true' solubility.

  19. Development of a trans-rotational temperature diagnostic for vibrationally-excited carbon monoxide using single- photon laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiweke, Robert John

    2004-09-01

    A new trans-rotational temperature diagnostic with ±50K accuracy has been developed for use in nonequilibrium, low temperature, monatomic gases seeded with carbon monoxide (CO). The scheme utilizes single- photon laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of CO under vibrationally-excited conditions in which single-photon transitions from the CO X1Σ + ground electronic state to upper electronic A1Π or D'1Σ+ states become accessible to a tunable, narrowband ArF excimer laser at 193 nm. Two vibrationally excited environments in which the chemistry is well understood were used as a testbed; an optically-pumped 3% CO/Ar plasma at 100 torr and a 4% CO/He d.c. glow discharge at 8 torr. The LIF saturation limit was experimentally investigated and diagnostic advantages of either regime discussed. For the optically-pumped CO/Ar plasma, a spatially-averaged LIF temperature of 536 ± 103 K (2σ) was obtained from rotationally resolved X 1Σ+ (v' = 20) → D '1Σ+ (v' = 2) LIF excitation spectra. Temperature measurements pumping the X 1Σ+ (v' = 7) → A 1Π (v' = 1) 4th Positive (528 ± 51 K) were also found to compare well with line-of-sight Fourier Transform-InfraRed (FT-IR) emission measurements (536 ± 10 K). Spatially averaged FT- IR spectroscopy of the CO 1st overtone was used to verify that an adequate vibrational population (˜0.1%) existed within the positive column of the CO/He d.c. glow discharge. The A-X (7,1) transition was pumped and subsequent (8,1) emission at 200.8 nm collected. The resulting rotational spectral peaks were assigned and a subset used to determine a spatially averaged rotational temperature of 432 ± 44 K on the discharge centerline. This was found to be in good agreement with FT-IR spectroscopy measurements (395 ± 10 K). As a prelude to Planar-LIF (PLIF) temperature measurements, vibrationally-resolved emission from laser excitation of various rotational lines within the A-X and D'-X bands were used to investigate spectral interferences. This

  20. Direct characterization of planar waveguide modes by Fourier plane fluorescence leakage radiation microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Douguo; Wang, Xiangxian; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai

    2011-01-01

    In this letter, the leakage radiation microscopy (LRM) is extended into characterization of planar waveguide modes (WMs) rather than surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) taking advantages of the coupling between WMs and fluorescence emission. Propagation constants of different WMs allowed in the same planar waveguide can be simultaneously and rapidly derived from the Fourier plane image of fluorescence based LRM. Numerical simulations are also carried out to calculate propagation constants of these modes, which are consistent with experimental results. Our experiments provide a simple but high efficient method to characterize planar waveguides.

  1. Interpretation of In-Situ Measurements of Iodine Monoxide in Coastal Regions Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furneaux, K. L.; Whalley, L. K.; Heard, D. E.

    2009-04-01

    Iodine species are present in coastal and open ocean regions due to the release of I2 and iodocarbons from macro and micro algae. The photolysis of these molecules yields iodine atoms, which react with ozone to produce iodine monoxide (IO). IO is involved in ozone depletion cycles, the partitioning of HOx and NOx, and the formation and growth of new particles. A novel point source Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) instrument was deployed to measure IO in September 2006 at Roscoff, France as part of the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) programme (1 instrument uncertainty = 23%)1. The maximum IO mixing ratio was 30 ± 7.1 pptV (10 s integration period, limit of detection = 1.4 pptV) at this semi-polluted coastal site (NOx levels = 1 - 5 ppbV). The closest macroalgae beds known to strongly emit I2 (laminaria) were ~ 300 m from the LIF instrument. IO displayed a strong anti-correlation with tidal height which is consistent with previous studies. IO was also dependent on solar irradiation and meteorological conditions. The dominant source of IO at this site was the photolysis of I2. The measurements provided by this instrument aim to address the main uncertainties associated with iodine chemistry. Co-ordinated measurement of IO by point source (LIF) and spatially averaged (Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instruments confirm the presence of IO hotspots due to non-uniform macroalgae distribution at this location (resulting in a spatially variable I2 source). The ratio of point source/spatially averaged IO is determined by meteorological conditions and distance of the instrument from macroalgae beds. Co-located point source I2 (Broadband Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy) and IO (LIF) measurements correlated on some days but cannot be explained by our current knowledge of iodine chemistry. The influence of NOx on IO has been investigated. The detection of IO by LIF at the Roscoff site shows that IO can survive in a high NOx

  2. Design and daytime performance of laser-induced fluorescence spectrum lidar for simultaneous detection of multiple components, dissolved organic matter, phycocyanin, and chlorophyll in river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yasunori; Kakuda, Kei; Yokoyama, Mizuho; Kubota, Tomoki; Tomida, Takayuki; Park, Ho-Dong

    2016-08-20

    In this work, we developed mobile laser-induced fluorescence spectrum (LIFS) lidar based on preliminary experiments on the excitation emission matrix of a water sample and a method for reducing solar background light using the synchronous detection technique. The combination of a UV short-pulse laser (355 nm, 6 ns) for fluorescence excitation with a 10-100 ns short-time synchronous detection using a gated image-intensified multi-channel CCD of the fluorescence made the LIFS lidar operation possible even in daytime. The LIFS lidar with this construction demonstrated the potential of natural river/lake water quality monitoring at the Tenryu River/Lake Suwa. Three main components in the fluorescence data of the water, dissolved organic matter, phycocyanin, and chlorophyll, were extracted by spectral analysis using the standard spectral functions of these components. Their concentrations were estimated by adapting experimentally calibrated data. Results of long-term field observations using our LIFS lidar from 2010 to 2012 show the necessity of simultaneous multi-component detection to understand the natural water environment.

  3. Detection of adenosine triphosphate in HeLa cell using capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence detection based on aptamer and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bi-Yun; Yao, Ming-Hao; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Wang, Chao-Yang; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Chen, Fang

    2016-04-01

    A method for ATP quantification based on dye-labeled aptamer/graphene oxide (aptamer/GO) using capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detecting technique has been established. In this method, the carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-labelled ATP aptamers were adsorbed onto the surface of GO, leading to the fluorescence quenching of FAM; after the incubation with a limited amount of ATP, stronger affinity between ATP aptamer and ATP resulted in the desorption of aptamers and the fluorescence restoration of FAM. Then, aptamer-ATP complex and excess of aptamer/GO and GO were separated and quantified by CE-LIF detection. It was shown that a linear relation was existing in the CE-LIF peak intensity of aptamer-ATP and ATP concentration in range of 10-700 μM, the regression equation was F=1.50+0.0470C(ATP) (R(2)=0.990), and the limit of detection was 1.28 μM (3S/N, n=5), which was one order magnitude lower than that of detection in solution by fluorescence method. The approach with excellent specificity and reproducibility has been successfully applied to detecting concentration of ATP in HeLa cell.

  4. Laser induced fluorescence and optogalvanic spectroscopy applied to find previously unknown energy levels of La I and studies of their Zeeman structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewski, Ł. M.; Binder, T.; Güney, C.; Gamper, B.; Kwela, J.; Windholz, L.

    2017-10-01

    After the excitation of the La-Ar plasma in a hollow cathode lamp we observed in optogalvanic spectra a number of atomic lines that could not be interpreted as transitions between already known La energy levels. Using the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method and computer simulations of the hyperfine structure patterns, we derived 14 unknown La levels, all with even parity, in the energy range between 40 877 cm-1 and 43 485 cm-1. The existence of these levels was then confirmed by excitations from other known lower levels. We performed also investigations of the Zeeman structure of some of these lines in order to verify the J values of newly found levels and to determine their gJ factors.

  5. Detection of genetically modified maize by the polymerase chain reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis with UV detection and laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañas, Virginia; González, Ramón; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2002-02-27

    In this paper, the possibilities of capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) to detect transgenic maize in flours are shown. The method is based on the extraction and amplification by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of a specific DNA fragment from transgenic maize and its subsequent analysis by CGE with UV detection or laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Some useful considerations regarding the optimization of DNA extraction and amplification conditions are given. Also, a comparison is established between the two CGE protocols for DNA detection based on ultraviolet absorption (CGE-UV) and LIF (CGE-LIF). The requirements, advantages, and limitations of both CGE methods are discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first paper on the use of CGE-LIF to detect transgenic food.

  6. In situ detection of tropospheric OH, HO2, NO2, and NO by laser-induced fluorescence in detection chambers at reduced pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, William H.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a brief summary of the status of work on the grant entitled 'In situ detection of tropospheric OH, HO2, NO2, and NO by laser induced fluorescence in detection chambers at low pressures.' The basic instrument characteristics have been established, and have been reported in a manuscript, included as an appendix to this report, that has been accepted by the Journal of Geophysical Research. Currently, two efforts are under way. First, instrument tests and calibrations are continuing. These efforts include field measurements and an informal inter comparison in Colorado last August and September. Second, new technologies in lasers and detectors are being implemented to make the instrument smaller, lighter, and more energy efficient. Such instrument modifications are essential for measurements from aircraft, high scaffolding in forests, and ships.

  7. Direct methods for dynamic monitoring of secretions from single cells by capillary electrophoresis and microscopy with laser-induced native fluorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, W.

    1997-10-08

    Microscale separation and detection methods for real-time monitoring of dynamic cellular processes (e.g., secretion) by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microscopic imaging were developed. Ultraviolet laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) provides simple, sensitive and direct detection of neurotransmitters and proteins without any derivatization. An on-column CE-LINF protocol for quantification of the release from single cell was demonstrated. Quantitative measurements of both the amount of insulin released from and the amount remaining in the cell ({beta}TC3) were achieved simultaneously. Secretion of catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E)) from individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was determined using the on-column CE-LINF. Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved by LINF imaging microscopy with high temporal and spatial resolution. The secretion of serotonin from individual leech Retzius neurons was directly characterized by LINF microscopy with high spatial resolution.

  8. Direct methods for dynamic monitoring of secretions from single cells by capillary electrophoresis and microscopy with laser-induced native fluorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    Microscale separation and detection methods for real-time monitoring of dynamic cellular processes (e.g., secretion) by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microscopic imaging were developed. Ultraviolet laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) provides simple, sensitive and direct detection of neurotransmitters and proteins without any derivatization. An on-column CE-LINF protocol for quantification of the release from single cell was demonstrated. Quantitative measurements of both the amount of insulin released from and the amount remaining in the cell (βTC3) were achieved simultaneously. Secretion of catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E)) from individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was determined using the on-column CE-LINF. Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved by LINF imaging microscopy with high temporal and spatial resolution. The secretion of serotonin from individual leech Retzius neurons was directly characterized by LINF microscopy with high spatial resolution.

  9. Complexation of europium(III) with the zwitterionic form of amino acids studied with ultraviolet-visible and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Anne; Rönitz, Olivia; Barkleit, Astrid; Bernhard, Gert; Ackermann, Jörg-Uwe

    2010-08-01

    The complex formation of europium(III) with the zwitterionic form of amino acids (alanine, phenylalanine, and threonine) has been studied in aqueous solution. Measurements were performed at I = 0.1 M (NaCl/NaClO(4)), room temperature, and trace metal concentrations in the range of pH 2 to 8 using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). While complexation leads to a significant luminescence enhancement in the emission spectrum of the metal ion, absorption in the UV-Vis spectrum of the amino acid (AA) decreases. As zwitterionic species (AAH), all three ligands form weak complexes with 1:1 stoichiometry and a general formula of EuAAH(3+) with the metal. The complex stability constants were determined to be log K approximately 1 for all complexes, indicating the negligible contribution of the amino acid side chain to the complex formation reaction.

  10. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoev, K.; Grozeva, M.; Malcheva, G.; Neykova, S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893-972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts.

  11. Kinetics of gas phase OH radical reaction with thiophene in the 272-353 K temperature range: A laser induced fluorescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawade, Monali N.; Srinivas, D.; Upadhyaya, Hari P.

    2017-08-01

    Absolute rate coefficient for the gas phase reaction of OH radical with thiophene has been measured using the laser photolysis (LP) - laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. The kinetics measurements were done over the temperature range of 272-353 K and pressure range of 20-30 Torr. The bimolecular rate coefficients obtained were pressure independent in the above pressure range and showed Arrhenius type behaviour which were fitted to the expression k(T) = (4.53 ± 0.55) × 10-12 exp[(250 ± 30)/T] cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The reaction shows weak negative temperature dependence. These results were discussed with available literature and the tropospheric lifetime of thiophene was calculated.

  12. High sensitive and high temporal and spatial resolved image of reactive species in atmospheric pressure surface discharge reactor by laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Feng, Chun-Lei; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Ding, Hongbin

    2017-05-01

    The current paucity of spatial and temporal characterization of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) concentration has been a major hurdle to the advancement and clinical translation of low temperature atmospheric plasmas. In this study, an advanced laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed to be an effective antibacterial surface discharge reactor for the diagnosis of RONS, where the highest spatial and temporal resolution of the LIF system has been achieved to ˜100 μm scale and ˜20 ns scale, respectively. Measurements on an oxidative OH radical have been carried out as typical RONS for the benchmark of the whole LIF system, where absolute number density calibration has been performed on the basis of the laser Rayleigh scattering method. Requirements for pixel resolved spatial distribution and outer plasma region detection become challenging tasks due to the low RONS concentration (˜ppb level) and strong interference, especially the discharge induced emission and pulsed laser induced stray light. In order to design the highly sensitive LIF system, a self-developed fluorescence telescope, the optimization of high precision synchronization among a tunable pulsed laser, a surface discharge generator, intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD) camera, and an oscilloscope have been performed. Moreover, an image BOXCAR approach has been developed to remarkably improve the sensitivity of the whole LIF system by optimizing spatial and temporal gating functions via both hardware and software, which has been integrated into our automatic control and data acquisition system on the LabVIEW platform. In addition, a reciprocation averaging measurement has been applied to verify the accuracy of the whole LIF detecting system, indicating the relative standard deviation of ˜3%.

  13. Reaction rates at 297 {plus_minus} 3 K of four benzyl type radicals with O{sub 2}, NO, and NO{sub 2} by discharge flow/laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goumri, A.; Elmaimouni, L.; Sawerysyn, J.P.; Devolder, P. [Universite des Sciences et Techniques, Villeneuve D`Ascq (France)

    1992-06-25

    The rate constants of 4 benzyl type radicals with O{sub 2}, NO, and NO{sub 2} are measured by discharge flow/laser-induced fluorescence. The ratio of these rate constants with NO and O{sub 2} indicates that tropospheric o- and m-methylbenzyl radicals are scavenged by O{sub 2}. 50 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Designing the method for optical in vitro monitoring of the cell-mediated scaffold technology for bone regeneration based on laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, P. M.; Maslov, N. A.; Papaeva, E. O.; Tereshchenko, V. P.; Khlestkin, V. K.; Bogachev, S. S.; Proskurina, A. S.; Titov, A. T.; Filipenko, M. L.; Pavlov, V. V.; Kudrov, G. A.; Orishich, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    One of the main unsolved problems in traumatology and orthopedics is reconstruction of critical-sized segmental bone defects. We believe that implementation of noninvasive monitoring of the bioengineering stages for cell-mediated bone scaffold by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) can become a positive aspect in mastering this technique. An electrospun scaffold model (parameters: 10 wt. % polycaprolactone; 5% wt type A gelatin; mean fiber diameter 877.1 ± 169.1, and contact angle 45.3°) seeded with BHK IR cell culture (182 ± 38 cells/mm2) was used to show the principal possibility of differentiating between the scaffold seeded and unseeded with cells. First of all, the fluorescence spectra of the cell-seeded scaffold contain a peak at 305 nm for the excitation range of 230-290 nm, which can be used to differentiate between the samples. An increase in fluorescence intensity of the cell-seeded scaffold in the range of 400- 580 nm upon excitation at 230-340 nm is also noticeable. The wavelength of 250 nm is characterized by high signal intensity and is most suitable for differentiation between the samples.

  15. New UV-A laser-induced fluorescence imaging system for near-field remote sensing of vegetation: characteristics and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowinska, Malgorzata; Cunin, Bernard; Heisel, Francine; Miehe, Joseph-Albert

    1999-05-01

    In this paper, a compact, new UV-A laser induced fluorescence imaging system implemented in an all-road car for near-field remote sensing of vegetation will be described. It has been developed as a part of a European Community Program INTERREG II* and is consisting of three main parts: excitation, detection and control units. The excitation light pulses (10 ns) are produced by a frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser emitting at 355 nm with a variable repetition rate up to approximately equals 22 kHz and a pulse energy typically of 40 (mu) J. The laser spot size is adjusted by means of a variable beam expander. Fluorescence images are recorded via entrance lenses and 10 nm bandpass filters with a gated intensified digital CCD camera operating at 50 frames per second. The 'head of the system' (laser and camera) can be directed in site and azimuth, and can be high until a 6 meters height. All the functions like the system positioning, localization and distance detection, spot size adjustment, focus, sharpness, selection of the filter, laser and camera synchronization, gain of the intensifier, real time visualization of images, acquisition time are controlled by a newly developed software which also allows image storage, analysis and treatment. Examples of remote sensing fluorescence images recorded at a distance between 10 and 30 m are presented.

  16. Development of the spectrometric imaging apparatus of laser induced fluorescence from plants and estimation of chlorophyll contents of rice leaves; Laser reiki keiko sokutei sochi no kaihatsu to inehanai no chlorophyll ganryo no suitei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaya, K.; Shoji, K.; Hanyu, H.

    1999-05-01

    Photosynthetic activity of plants is an important factor to assess the micrometeorological effect of plant canopy or to estimate the influence of circumstances such as water stress. Light illumination induces fluorescence from a leaf or suspension of chloroplasts. The red chlorophyll fluorescence had been used to determine the process of the electron transportation in photosynthetic reaction. The fluorescence source other than chlorophyll is not announced sufficiently, but is supposed to be useful to determine the contents of the substance corresponding to physiological response of plants. We developed a fluorescence imaging apparatus to observe spectrum and distribution of laser induced fluorescence from a leaf. Pulsed UV-laser (Nd:YAG) induced blue-green fluorescence and red chlorophyll fluorescence from a green leaf. The pulse modulated measuring light and CCD with image-intensifier (ICCD) enable to detect the fluorescence from plants under illumination. The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra were investigated to estimate the chlorophyll contents in leaves of rice. During the greening course of dark grown etiolated rice leaves, chlorophyll contents were determined using the extraction of leaves and steady state LIF spectra were measured. As a result, the ratio of fluorescent intensity between blue-green and red peaks (F460/F740 and F510/F740) decreased in proportion to alteration of chlorophyll contents respectively. These fluorescence intensity ratios perform more precise estimation of higher chlorophyll contents of leaves than reported red chlorophyll fluorescence intensity ratio (F690/E740). (author)

  17. Mid-infrared Laser-Induced Fluorescence with Nanosecond Time Resolution Using a Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detector: New Technology for Molecular Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Schwarzer, Dirk; Verma, Varun B; Stevens, Martin J; Marsili, Francesco; Mirin, Richard P; Nam, Sae Woo; Wodtke, Alec M

    2017-06-20

    In contrast to UV photomultiplier tubes that are widely used in physical chemistry, mid-infrared detectors are notorious for poor sensitivity and slow time response. This helps explain why, despite the importance of infrared spectroscopy in molecular science, mid-infrared fluorescence is not more widely used. In recent years, several new technologies have been developed that open new experimental possibilities for research in the mid-infrared. In this Account, we present one of the more promising technologies, superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) by sharing our experience with its use in a typical experiment carried out by physical chemists (laser-induced fluorescence) and comparing the SNSPD to a detector commonly used by physical chemists (InSb at LN Temperature). SNSPDs are fabricated from a thin film of superconducting metal, patterned into a meandering nanowire. The nanowire is cooled below its superconducting temperature, Tc, and held in a constant current circuit below the critical current necessary to destroy superconductivity, Ic. Upon absorption of a photon, the resulting heat is sufficient to destroy superconductivity across the entire width of the nanowire, an event that can be detected as a voltage pulse. In contrast to semiconductor-based detectors, which have a long wavelength cutoff determined by the band gap, the SNSPD exhibits single-photon sensitivity across the entire mid-IR spectrum. As these devices have not been used extensively outside the field of light detection technology research, one important goal of this Account is to provide practical details for the implementation of these devices in a physical chemistry laboratory. We provide extensive Supporting Information describing what is needed. This includes information on a liquid nitrogen cooled monochromator, the optical collection system including mid-infrared fibers, as well as a closed-cycle cryogenic cooler that reaches 0.3 K. We demonstrate the advantages of

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously.

  19. Detection of tropospheric OH and HO2 by laser-induced fluorescence at low pressure using the 308nm excitation of OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method for the direct in situ measurement of hydroxyl concentrations in the atmosphere. Its sensitivity and selectivity relies on the intense discrete UV-absorption lines of OH which are strongest around 282nm and 308nm. We have developed a LIF-instrument based on the low-pressure experiment (FAGE). However, we use 308nm instead of 282nm as excitation wavelength for OH, a concept that is also pursued by other groups. One advantage of the longer excitation wavelength is the higher detection sensitivity due to the about 6 times larger effective OH-fluorescence cross-section. Moreover, the O3/H2O-interference (OH self-generation by the laser) is about a factor of 200 smaller at 308nm than at 282nm. This keeps the interference level well below the projected detection limit of 10(exp 5) OH/cm(exp 3). Atmospheric HO2-radicals are detected by chemical conversion of HO2 into OH with NO.

  20. 基于激光诱导荧光技术的蒽检测系统%Anthracene detection system based on laser induced fluorescence technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽新; 尚丽平; 何俊; 邓琥

    2011-01-01

    介绍了一种用Nd:YAG的三倍频(波长355nm)作为激发光,CCD作为探测单元,加上其他光学元件构成的激光诱导荧光检测系统,并测量了蒽的乙醇溶液的荧光光谱.分析了荧光强度与蒽溶液浓度的关系.实验结果表明,蒽溶液浓度在0.003~0.700mg/L,范围内与荧光强度有良好的线性关系,相关系数为0.9987,检出限为1.3ng/mL,蒽的回收率在98%~106%范围内.系统适合用于蒽的激光诱导荧光检测.%A laser induced fluorescence detection system for the determination of anthracene is described. The system is comprised of a third harmonic Nd:YAG laser (as light source), a CCD (as probing element),and other optical elements. The fluorescence spectrum of anthracene in ethanol solution was measured.The relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of anthracene solution was studied. The results show that in the range of 0. 003~0. 700mg/L, the concentration and the fluorescence intensity has a good linear relationship. The correlation coefficient is 0. 9987, the detection limit is 1.3ng/mL, and the spiked recoveries are in the range of 98%~106%. The method is suitable for the detection of anthracene.

  1. Investigation of four carbon monoxide isotopomers in natural abundance by laser-induced fluorescence in a supersonic jet

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available –155 nm vacuum ultraviolet wavelength region for excitation and recording the total fluorescence. In the present paper we report on the spectroscopic results obtained, including transition wavelengths of three forbidden rovibronic bands (e3R sigma - X1...

  2. Measurements of OH and HO2 concentrations during the MCMA-2006 field campaign – Part 1: Deployment of the Indiana University laser-induced fluorescence instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Molina

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of tropospheric hydroxyl (OH and hydroperoxy (HO2 radicals were made during the MCMA (Mexico City Metropolitan Area field campaign as part of the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations project during March 2006. These radicals were measured using a laser-induced fluorescence instrument developed at Indiana University. This new instrument takes advantage of the Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion technique (FAGE together with direct excitation and detection of OH at 308 nm. HO2 is indirectly measured as OH by titration with NO inside the fluorescence cell. At this stage of development, IU-FAGE is capable of detecting 3.9×105molec cm−3 of both OH and HO2, with a signal to noise ratio of 1, an averaged laser power of 10 mW and an averaging time of 5 min. The calibration accuracies (1σ are ±17% for OH and ±18% for HO2 using the water-vapor photolysis/O2 actinometry calibration technique. OH and HO2 concentrations were successfully measured at an urban site in Mexico City, with observed concentrations comparable to those measured in other polluted environments. Enhanced levels of OH and HO2 radicals were observed on several days between 09:30–11 a.m. and suggest an intense photochemistry during morning hours that may be due to elevated sources of HOx (OH+HO2 and a fast cycling between the radicals under the high NOx conditions of the MCMA. A comparison with other urban and sub-urban field measurements suggests that OH concentrations are highly buffered under these conditions. In contrast, HO2 concentrations are highly variable between different urban sites.

  3. Measurements of OH and HO2 concentrations during the MCMA-2006 field campaign – Part 1: Deployment of the Indiana University laser-induced fluorescence instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Molina

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of tropospheric hydroxyl (OH and hydroperoxy (HO2 radicals were made during the MCMA (Mexico City Metropolitan Area field campaign as part of the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations project during March 2006. These radicals were measured using a laser-induced fluorescence instrument developed at Indiana University. This new instrument takes advantage of the Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion technique (FAGE together with direct excitation and detection of OH at 308 nm. HO2 is indirectly measured as OH by titration with NO inside the fluorescence cell. At this stage of development, IU-FAGE is capable of detecting 3.9×105 molecule/cm3 of both OH and HO2, with a signal to noise ratio of 1, an averaged laser power of 10-mW and an averaging time of 5-min. The calibration accuracies (1σ are ±17% for OH and ±18% for HO2 using the water-vapor photolysis/O2 actinometry calibration technique. OH and HO2 concentrations were successfully measured at an urban site in Mexico City, with observed concentrations comparable to those measured in other polluted environments. Enhanced levels of OH and HO2 radicals were observed on several days between 09:30–11:00 a.m. and suggest an intense photochemistry during morning hours that may be due to elevated sources of HOx (OH+HO2 and a fast cycling between the radicals under the high NOx (NO+NO2 conditions of the MCMA.

  4. Simultaneous detection of ultraviolet B-induced DNA damage using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, Jeffrey W., E-mail: jeff.guthrie@emich.edu; Limmer, Robert T.; Brooks, Eric A.; Wisnewski, Chelsea C.; Loggins-Davis, Nnekia D.; Bouzid, Abderraouf

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CE–LIF was developed for simultaneous detection of UV-induced DNA photoproducts. • Fluorescent quantum dot reporters enabled detection of small amounts of photoproducts. • Photoproducts were detected after 65 J m{sup −2} of fluence from a UVB lamp in ∼6 ng of DNA. • Natural sunlight induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers after only 15 min of exposure. - Abstract: An immunoassay based on CE–LIF was developed for the simultaneous detection of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine 6-4 pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs) in genomic DNA irradiated with UVB or natural sunlight. Human cells were first exposed to varying amounts of UVB or natural sunlight to induce DNA damage. Genomic DNA was extracted and incubated with anti-CPD and anti-6-4PP primary antibodies attached to secondary antibodies with a fluorescent quantum dot (QD) reporter that emitted either red or yellow fluorescence. CE was used to separate the unbound antibodies from those bound to the photoproducts, and LIF with appropriate optical filters was used to separate the fluorescence signals from each QD to individual photomultiplier tubes for simultaneous photoproduct detection. Using this strategy, photoproducts were detected from ∼6 ng (200 ng μL{sup −1}) of DNA under a low UVB fluence of 65 J m{sup −2} for CPDs or 195 J m{sup −2} for 6-4PPs. This assay was also the first to demonstrate the detection of CPDs in human cells after only 15 min of irradiation under natural sunlight.

  5. Development and initial calibration of a portable laser-induced fluorescence system used for in situ measurements of trace plastics and dissolved organic compounds in seawater and the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Shannon, Robert F; Luo, Caiyan; Coble, Paula G; Boehme, Jennifer R; Killinger, Dennis K

    2003-11-20

    A portable UV laser-induced fluorescence system that uses a high pulsed repetition frequency (8-kHz) microchip laser at 266 nm, 13 switchable optical filters, and a gated photomultiplier tube detector has been developed and tested successfully for the detection of leached plastics (possibly bisphenol-A) and trace dissolved organic compounds in seawater. The instrument is 100 times more sensitive than commercial portable spectrofluorometers and measures a complete fluorescence spectrum in a moderate time period of 1-2 min. The system was tested in the Gulf of Mexico over varying water masses. In addition, fluorescence lifetime, bleaching, and temporal flow characteristics were studied.

  6. Study of the electric field and wall voltage in a high pressure ac-PDP cell by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yan; K. W. Whang; J. H. Yang; D. C. Jeong; C.H.Ha; Y.W. Choi

    2004-01-01

    The electric field in a surface discharge type ac-PDP cell with He or He/Xe(0.1%) mixture has been measured over a wide range of pressure (5 50kP1 using laser induced fluorescence detection. The wall voltage was estimated from the measured electric field. The Stark manifolds of triplet atomic helium Rydberg state (2s3S) with principal quantum numbers (n=8 and 9) have been used to measure the electric field, as the lifetime of 2s3S is longer than the single atomic helium Rydberg state (2s1S) in high pressure discharge. Comparison of the Stark manifolds between the n=9 and n=8shows that the measurement accuracy of electric field can be increased by 10%. The maximum electric field strength during discharge and the wall voltage at the end of pulse decreases with the increase of pressure. The comparison of He and He/Xe(0.1%) discharge at 13kPa showed that He/Xe gas mixture discharge can accumulate more wall charge on MgO surface and the electric field was somewhat higher than those of pure helium discharge during pulse off period under the same discharge conditions.

  7. Evaluation of high-performance liquid chromatography laser-induced fluorescence for serum protein profiling for early diagnosis of oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Prabhu, Vijendra; Choudhari, K. S.; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; George, Sajan D.; Ongole, Ravikiran; Pai, Keerthilatha M.; Shetty, Jayarama K.; Bhat, Sujatha; Kartha, Vasudevan Bhaskaran; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2010-11-01

    The present work deals with the evaluation of a high-performance liquid chromatography laser-induced fluorescence (HPLC-LIF) technique developed in our laboratory for early detection of oral cancer from protein profiles of body fluids. The results show that protein profiles of serum samples from a given class of samples, say, normal, premalignant, or malignant, are statistically very close to each other, while profiles of members of any class are significantly different from other classes. The performance of the technique is evaluated by the use of sensitivity and specificity pairs, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and Youden's Index. The technique uses protein profile differences in serum samples, registered by the HPLC-LIF technique. The study is carried out using serum samples from volunteers diagnosed as normal or premalignant clinically, and as malignant by histopathology. The specificities and sensitivities of the HPLC-LIF method at an ideal threshold (M-distance = 2) for normal, malignant, and premalignant classes are 100, 69.5, and 61.5%, and 86.5, 87.5, and 87.5% respectively.

  8. Laser-induced Fluorescence and Optical Emission Spectroscopy for the Determination of Reactive Species in the Effluent of Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xuekai; Razavi, Hamid; Lu, Xinpei; Laroussi, Mounir

    2014-10-01

    OH radicals and O atoms are important active species in various applications of room temperature atmospheric pressure plasma jet (RT-APPJ). So the determination of absolute density of OH radicals and O atoms in RT-APPJs is necessary. In this work, the time and spatially resolved OH radicals density of a RT-APPJ are measured using the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology. In addition, the spatial distribution of the emitting species along the axial direction of the jet is of interest and is measured using optical emission spectroscopy. The absolute OH density of the RT-APPJ is about 2.0 × 1013 cm-3 at 5 mm away from the plasma jet nozzle and 1 μs after the discharge. The OH density reaches a maximum when H2O concentration in helium gas flow is about 130ppm. In order to control the OH density, the effect of voltage polarity, applied voltage magnitude, pulse frequency, pulse width on the OH density are also investigated and discussed. O atoms are investigated by TA-LIF. It is demonstrated that the O atoms density reaches a maximum when O2 percent is about 0.3% in pure He and the lifetime of O atoms in RT-APPJ is much longer (up to dozens of ms) than OH radicals.

  9. Fast capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence analysis of ligase chain reaction products: human mitochondrial DNA point mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, J; Williams, P M; Williams, S J; Brown, M D; Wallace, D C; Karger, B L

    1996-12-01

    High speed capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) has been used to separate and detect point mutations using the ligase chain reaction (LCR). The method utilizes short capillary columns (7.5 cm effective length) and fields of 400 V/cm to analyze DNA-ethidium bromide complexes using an He/Ne laser. The method was first demonstrated with a commercially available kit for LCR based on a lacI gene fragment inserted in a Bluescript II phagemid. LCR-CE-LIF was then applied to detect point mutations in human mitochondrial DNA, resulting in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Three severe mutations were analyzed in which the original base is substituted by a thymidine base at positions 3460, 11778 and 14459. Appropriate primers were designed with polyT tails for length discrimination of pooled samples. Successful detection of mutated samples was achieved, with appropriate correction for small amounts of nonspecific ligated product. The method is rapid, easy to implement, and automatable.

  10. Analysis of heterogeneous gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaswal, Brij Bir S; Kumar, Vinay; Sharma, Jitendra; Rai, Pradeep K; Gondal, Mohammed A; Gondal, Bilal; Singh, Vivek K

    2016-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique with numerous advantages such as rapidity, multi-elemental analysis, no specific sample preparation requirements, non-destructiveness, and versatility. It has been proven to be a robust elemental analysis tool attracting interest because of being applied to a wide range of materials including biomaterials. In this paper, we have performed spectroscopic studies on gallstones which are heterogeneous in nature using LIBS and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) techniques. It has been observed that the presence and relative concentrations of trace elements in different kind of gallstones (cholesterol and pigment gallstones) can easily be determined using LIBS technique. From the experiments carried out on gallstones for trace elemental mapping and detection, it was found that LIBS is a robust tool for such biomedical applications. The stone samples studied in the present paper were classified using the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. WD-XRF spectroscopy has been applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of major and trace elements present in the gallstone which was compared with the LIBS data. The results obtained in the present paper show interesting prospects for LIBS and WD-XRF to study cholelithiasis better.

  11. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  12. Measurement of magic-wavelength optical dipole trap by using the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of trapped single cesium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bei; Jin, Gang; Sun, Rui; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2017-07-01

    Based on the multi-level model, we have calculated light shifts for Zeeman states of hyperfine levels of cesium (Cs) 6S1/2 ground state and 6P3/2 excited state.The magic-wavelength linearly-polarized optical dipole trap (ODT) for Cs 6S1/2 F=4, mF=+4 - 6P3/2 F'=5, mF=+5 transition is experimentally constructed and characterized by using the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of trapped single Cs atoms. The magic wavelength is 937.7 nm which produces almost the same light shift for 6S1/2 F=4, mF=+4 ground state and 6P3/2 F'=5, mF=+5 excited state with linearly-polarized ODT laser beam. Compared to undisturbed Cs 6S1/2 F=4, mF=+4 - 6P3/2 F'=5, mF=+5 transition frequency in free space, the differential light shift is less than 0.7 MHz in a linearly-polarized 937.7 nm ODT, which is less than 1.2% of the trap depth. We also discussed influence of the trap depth and the bias magnetic field on the measurement results.

  13. Production mechanism of atomic nitrogen in atmospheric pressure pulsed corona discharge measured using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teramoto, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Ryo [Department of Advanced Energy, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 227-8568 (Japan); Oda, Tetsuji [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    To study the production mechanism of atomic nitrogen, the temporal profile and spatial distribution of atomic nitrogen are measured in atmospheric pressure pulsed positive corona discharge using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. The absolute atomic nitrogen density in the streamer filaments is estimated from decay rate of atomic nitrogen in N{sub 2} discharge. The results indicate that the absolute atomic nitrogen density is approximately constant against discharge energy. When the discharge voltage is 21.5 kV, production yield of atomic nitrogen produced by an N{sub 2} discharge pulse is estimated to be 2.9 - 9.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} atoms and the energy efficiency of atomic nitrogen production is estimated to be about 1.8 - 6.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} atoms/J. The energy efficiency of atomic nitrogen production in N{sub 2} discharge is constant against the discharge energy, while that in N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} discharge increases with discharge energy. In the N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} discharge, two-step process of N{sub 2} dissociation plays significant role for atomic nitrogen production.

  14. Measurement of OH (X2Σ) in immediate vicinity of dielectric surface under pulsed dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure using two geometries of laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Yoshiyuki; Kim, Hyun-Ha; Ogata, Atsushi; Negishi, Nobuaki

    2014-04-01

    The behavior of the ground state OH radical was studied in humid air using pulsed surface dielectric barrier discharge. The validity of OH measurement in immediate vicinity of the dielectric surface was discussed using two geometries of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurement, and surface distribution and temporal profiles of OH were examined. A comparison of parallel- and perpendicular-LIF techniques for OH measurement revealed that OH was mostly produced in a region several tens of μm above the dielectric surface. The surface distribution profile of OH agreed well with that of N2(C), and in both cases, the total production generated by a discharge pulse was proportional to the discharge energy. The OH local density in surface streamer channels was estimated to be 1.3 × 1015 cm-3 according to the decay rate of OH, which was similar to that in corona discharge. Additionally, the local density of OH remained constant regardless of discharge energies. These results indicate that the yield of OH increased with the discharge energy owing to expansion of the surface streamer region, increase in streamer radius or thickness or the number of branches, whereas the local density of OH in the streamer channel remained constant regardless of discharge energy.

  15. Quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid in the heads of houseflies (Musca domestica) and diamondback moths (Plutella xylostella (L.)), using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xueyan; Liang, Pei; Song, Dunlun; Yang, Wenling; Gao, Xiwu

    2012-02-01

    A novel method was developed for quantifying the levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the heads of houseflies (Musca domestica) and diamondback moths (Plutella xylostella (L.)), using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF). The GABA in sample was derivatized with 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl) prior to CE-LIF analysis. In total, 32 mmol/L borate buffer, at pH 9.2 and containing 5.3 mmol/L β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and 10.4 mmol/L sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), was determined to be the optimum CE background electrolyte (BGE) for GABA analysis. The detection limit of GABA was 0.016 μmol/L. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the migration time and peak area of GABA were 1.78 and 4.93%, respectively. The average recoveries of 0.97, 3.88, and 5.83 μmol/L of GABA, each added to the head sample of housefly, ranged from 88.9 to 110.5%. This method is simple and applicable to GABA assays of the heads of insects. With this newly developed CE-LIF method, the amounts of GABA in the heads of houseflies (M. domestica) and diamondback moths (P. xylostella (L.)) were measured. The results are relevant to the understandings of some insecticides and insecticide-resistance mechanisms in pests.

  16. High-resolution multiphoton laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of zinc atoms ejected from laser-irradiated ZnS crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, H. F.; Calaway, W. F.; Young, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Chase, L. L.

    1989-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements employing high-resolution multiphoton laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LFS) have been used as a probe to determine the yield and velocity distributions of Zn atoms ejected from a ZnS single crystal under irradiation by 308-nm photons. For fluences between 20 and 80 mJ/cm2 (irradiated area 2 mm2), the velocity distributions could be fitted by Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions where the characteristic temperature increased from 2000 to 9000 K, respectively. The absolute neutral Zn yield also increased from 108 to 1012 atoms per pulse over this same fluence range. Plots of temperature (T) as a function of fluence (F) and yield as a function of 1/T and 1/F suggest thermal evaporation as the mechanism for the Zn emission.The results indicate that with increasing fluence a critical combination of particle density and laser intensity is reached for formation of a plasma which interacts with the surface to cause catastrophic failure. For consecutive laser shots at constant ablation laser fluences, a nearly exponential increase of the Zn particle density was observed, although the measured kinetic temperature remains approximately constant even beyond the onset of visible damage to the ZnS surface. Doppler-shift techniques have been combined with TOF measurements for the first time in order to separate prompt from delayed emission of ablated atoms as well as to probe possible molecular or cluster ejection and fragmentation. Evidence for the latter phenomena was obtained.

  17. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagoev, K., E-mail: kblagoev@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Grozeva, M., E-mail: margo@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Malcheva, G., E-mail: bobcheva@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Neykova, S., E-mail: sevdalinaneikova@abv.bg [National Institute of Archaeology with Museum, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 2 Saborna, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893–972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts. - Highlights: ► LIBS, XRF and XRD analyses of medieval white-clay ceramic tiles fragments are done. ► Different elements and phases, presented in the ceramics fragments were determined. ► Differences in the tiles' raw material mineral composition are found. ► Information of the tiles' production process and the raw clay deposits is obtained.

  18. Comparison of different sample treatments for the analysis of ochratoxin A in wine by capillary HPLC with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Manzanares, Natalia; García-Campaña, Ana M; Gámiz-Gracia, Laura

    2011-11-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin naturally found in various foods, including wine. As OTA is considered as a possible human carcinogen, the maximum concentration for this compound has been established at 2 μg kg(-1) in wine by the EU (Directive (CE) No 1881/2006). Typically, immunoaffinity columns have been used for its extraction. However, simpler, more efficient and less contaminant extraction systems are demanding. In this work, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction using ionic liquid as extractant solvent (IL-DLLME) and the QuEChERS procedure, have been evaluated and compared for extraction of OTA in wine samples. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF, He-Cd Laser excitation at 325 nm) coupled with capillary HPLC has been used for the determination of OTA, using a sodium dodecyl sulfate micellar solution in the mobile phase to increase the fluorescence intensity. Matrix-matched calibration curves were established for both methods, obtaining LODs (3× S/N) of 5.2 ng·L(-1) and 85.7 ng·L(-1) for IL-DLLME and QuEChERS, respectively. Clean extracts were obtained for white, rose and red wines with both methods, with recoveries between 88.7-94.2% for IL-DLLME and between 82.6-86.2% for QuEChERS. The precision was evaluated in terms of repeatability (n = 9) and intermediate precision (n = 15), being ≤ 8.5% for IL-DLLME and ≤ 5.4% for QuEChERS.

  19. Recent Developments in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for Diffusion Measurements in Planar Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hof

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS is a single molecule technique used mainly for determination of mobility and local concentration of molecules. This review describes the specific problems of FCS in planar systems and reviews the state of the art experimental approaches such as 2-focus, Z-scan or scanning FCS, which overcome most of the artefacts and limitations of standard FCS. We focus on diffusion measurements of lipids and proteins in planar lipid membranes and review the contributions of FCS to elucidating membrane dynamics and the factors influencing it, such as membrane composition, ionic strength, presence of membrane proteins or frictional coupling with solid support.

  20. Spatial dynamics of laser-induced fluorescence in an intense laser beam: experiment and theory in alkali metal atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Ferber, Ruvin; Gahbauer, Florian; Kalnins, Uldis

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that it is possible to model accurately optical phenomena in intense laser fields by taking into account the intensity distribution over the laser beam. We developed a theoretical model that divided an intense laser beam into concentric regions, each with a Rabi frequency that corresponds to the intensity in that region, and solved a set of coupled optical Bloch equations for the density matrix in each region. Experimentally obtained magneto-optical resonance curves for the $F_g=2\\longrightarrow F_e=1$ transition of the $D_1$ line of $^{87}$Rb agreed very well with the theoretical model up to a laser intensity of around 200 mW/cm$^2$ for a transition whose saturation intensity is around 4.5 mW/cm$^2$. We have studied the spatial dependence of the fluorescence intensity in an intense laser beam experimentally and theoretically. An experiment was conducted whereby a broad, intense pump laser excited the $F_g=4\\longrightarrow F_e=3$ transition of the $D_2$ line of cesium while a weak, narrow probe ...

  1. A laser-induced fluorescence dual-fiber optic array detector applied to the rapid HPLC separation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Sean J.; Hall, Gregory J.; Kenny, Jonathan E. [Tufts University, Chemistry Department, Medford, MA, (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A multi-channel detection system utilizing fiber optics has been developed for the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) analysis of chromatographic eluents. It has been applied to the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in a chromatographically overlapped standard mixture and to a complex soil sample extract obtained during fieldwork. The instrument utilizes dual-fiber optic arrays, one to deliver multiple excitation wavelengths (258-342 nm) generated by a Raman shifter, and the other to collect fluorescence generated by the sample at each excitation wavelength; the collected fluorescence is dispersed and detected with a spectrograph/CCD combination. The resulting data were arranged into excitation emission matrices (EEM) for visualization and data analysis. Rapid characterization of PAH mixtures was achieved under isocratic chromatographic conditions (1.5 mL min{sup -1} and 80% acetonitrile in water), with mid {mu}g L{sup -1} detection limits, in less than 4 minutes. The ability of the instrument to identify co-eluting compounds was demonstrated by identifying and quantifying analytes in the rapid analysis of a 17 component laboratory-prepared PAH mixture and a soil extracted sample. Identification and quantification were accomplished using rank annihilation factor analysis (RAFA) using pure component standards and the EEMs of mixtures measured during the rapid high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method as the unknowns. The percentage errors of the retention times (RTs) determined using RAFA compared to the known RTs measured with a standard absorbance detector were between 0 and 11%. For the standard PAH mixture, all 17 components were identified correctly and for the soil extracted sample, all 8 analytes present were correctly identified with only one false positive. Overall, the system achieved excellent qualitative performance with semi-quantitative results in the concentration predictions of both the standard mixture and the real

  2. Dynamics of N-OH bond dissociation in cyclopentanone and cyclohexanone oxime at 193 nm: laser-induced fluorescence detection of nascent OH (v'', J'').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawade, Monali N; Saha, Ankur; Upadhyaya, Hari P; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, Prakash D

    2010-12-01

    Cyclohexanone oxime (CHO) and cyclopentanone oxime (CPO) in the vapor phase undergo N-OH bond scission upon excitation at 193 nm to produce OH, which was detected state selectively employing laser-induced fluorescence. The measured energy distribution between fragments for both oximes suggests that in CHO the OH produced is mostly vibrationally cold, with moderate rotational excitation, whereas in CPO the OH fragment is also formed in v'' = 1 (~2%). The rotational population of OH (v'' = 0, J'') from CHO is characterized by a rotational temperature of 1440 ± 80 K, whereas the rotational populations of OH (v'' = 0, J'') and OH (v'' = 1, J'') from CPO are characterized by temperatures of 1360 ± 90 K and 930 ± 170 K, respectively. A high fraction of the available energy is partitioned to the relative translation of the fragments with f(T) values of 0.25 and 0.22 for CHO and CPO, respectively. In the case of CHO, the Λ-doublet states of the nascent OH radical are populated almost equally in lower rotational quantum levels N'', with a preference for Π(+) (A') states for higher N''. However, there is no preference for either of the two spin orbit states Π(3/2) and Π(1/2) of OH. The nascent OH product in CPO is equally distributed in both Λ-doublet states of Π(+) (A') and Π(-) (A'') for all N'', but has a preference for the Π(3/2) spin orbit state. Experimental work in combination with theoretical calculations suggests that both CHO and CPO molecules at 193 nm are excited to the S(2) state, which undergoes nonradiative relaxation to the T(2) state. Subsequently, molecules undergo the N-OH bond dissociation from the T(2) state with an exit barrier to produce OH (v'', J'').

  3. High temporal resolution for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitters in awake epileptic rats using brain microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, Sandrine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Riban, Véronique; Depaulis, Antoine; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2004-12-30

    A method for high temporal resolution monitoring of five neurotransmitters, dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), l-aspartate (L-Asp), in freely-moving rats using microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) was developed. An on-line device, including microdialysis and derivatization with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde, mixes the dialysate with derivatization reagents directly in the collection tube, i.e. with no reactor. Thereafter, collected derivatized samples are analyzed off-line with an automated CE system coupled to a LIFD using a 442 nm excitation. The sampling time was limited by the minimal volume required for the analysis by the automated CE system used: neurotransmitters could be determined in 667 nl dialysates (940 nl after derivatization), i.e. in samples collected every 20 s with a flow rate of 2 microl/min. The detection limits at the dialysis probe were 3 x 10(-9), 1 x 10(-9), 1.9 x 10(-8), 4.2 x 10(-7), 2.1 x 10(-7) mol/l for DA, NA, GABA, Glu and L-Asp, respectively. The protocol was validated using in vitro/in vivo tests and the performances--repeatability, linearity, characteristics of the probes--were determined. Finally, the high temporal resolution allowed the simultaneous monitoring of these neurotransmitters in rats with genetic absence epilepsy and revealed, for the first time, increases in GABA concentrations concomitantly with the seizures, detected when our new microdialysis method was combined to electroencephalographic recordings.

  4. Enantioseparation of N-derivatized amino acids by micro-liquid chromatography/laser induced fluorescence detection using quinidine-based monolithic columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huihui; Wang, Qiqin; Ruan, Meng; Peng, Kun; Zhu, Peijie; Crommen, Jacques; Han, Hai; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2016-03-20

    A novel carbamoylated quinidine based monolith, namely poly(O-9-[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethylcarbamoyl]-10,11-dihydroquinidine-co-ethylene dimethacrylate (poly(MQD-co-EDMA)), was prepared for the micro-LC enantioseparation of N-derivatized amino acids. The influence of the mobile phase composition, including the organic modifier proportion, the apparent pH and the buffer concentration, on the enantioresolution of N-derivatized amino acids was systematically investigated. Satisfactory column performance in terms of permeability, efficiency and reproducibility was obtained in most cases. The majority of the enantiomers of the tested N-protected amino acids, including 3,5-DNB, 3,5-DClB, FMOC, 3,5-DMB, p-NB, m-ClB, p-ClB and B derivatives, could be baseline separated on the poly(MQD-co-EDMA) monolithic column within 25min. A self-assembled laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detector was employed to improve sensitivity when analyzing 7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD) derivatives of amino acids. Ten NBD-derivatized amino acids, including arginine and histidine whose enantioseparation on quinidine carbamate based CSPs has not been reported so far, were enantioresolved on the poly(MQD-co-EDMA) monolith column. It is worth noting that the d-enantiomers of NBD-derivatized amino acids eluted first, except in the case of glutamic acid. The LOD values obtained with the LIF detector were comparable to those reported using conventional LC-FL methods. The prepared poly(MQD-co-EDMA) monolithic column coupled with the LIF detector opens up interesting perspectives to the determination of trace D-amino acids in biological samples.

  5. Comparison of nanosecond and picosecond excitation for interference-free two-photon laser-induced fluorescence detection of atomic hydrogen in flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D; Patterson, Brian D; Frank, Jonathan H; Settersten, Thomas B

    2008-09-10

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TP-LIF) line imaging of atomic hydrogen was investigated in a series of premixed CH4/O2/N2, H2/O2, and H2/O2/N2 flames using excitation with either picosecond or nanosecond pulsed lasers operating at 205 nm. Radial TP-LIF profiles were measured for a range of pulse fluences to determine the maximum interference-free signal levels and the corresponding picosecond and nanosecond laser fluences in each of 12 flames. For an interference-free measurement, the shape of the TP-LIF profile is independent of laser fluence. For larger fluences, distortions in the profile are attributed to photodissociation of H2O, CH3, and/or other combustion intermediates, and stimulated emission. In comparison with the nanosecond laser, excitation with the picosecond laser can effectively reduce the photolytic interference and produces approximately an order of magnitude larger interference-free signal in CH4/O2/N2 flames with equivalence ratios in the range of 0.5laser fluence in all flames, stimulated emission, occurring between the laser-excited level, H(n=3), and H(n=2), is the limiting factor for picosecond excitation in the flames with the highest H atom concentration. Nanosecond excitation is advantageous in the richest (Phi=1.64) CH4/O2/N2 flame and in H2/O2/N2 flames. The optimal excitation pulse width for interference-free H atom detection depends on the relative concentrations of hydrogen atoms and photolytic precursors, the flame temperature, and the laser path length within the flame.

  6. Flux of OH and O radicals onto a surface by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet measured by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemori, Seiya; Ono, Ryo

    2014-03-01

    The atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet is of emerging interest as a cutting-edge biomedical device for cancer treatment, wound healing and sterilization. Reactive oxygen species such as OH and O radicals are considered to be major factors in the application of biological plasma. In this study, density distribution, temporal behaviour and flux of OH and O radicals on a surface are measured using laser-induced fluorescence. A helium plasma jet is generated by applying pulsed high voltage of 8 kV with 10 kHz using a quartz tube with an inner diameter of 4 mm. To evaluate the relation between the surface condition and active species production, three surfaces are used: dry, wet and rat skin. When the helium flow rate is 1.5 l min-1, radial distribution of OH density on the rat skin surface shows a maximum density of 1.2 × 1013 cm-3 at the centre of the plasma-mediated area, while O atom density shows a maximum of 1.0 × 1015 cm-3 at 2.0 mm radius from the centre of the plasma-mediated area. Their densities in the effluent of the plasma jet are almost constant during the intervals of the discharge pulses because their lifetimes are longer than the pulse interval. Their density distribution depends on the helium flow rate and the surface humidity. With these results, OH and O production mechanisms in the plasma jet and their flux onto the surface are discussed.

  7. Femtosecond, two-photon-absorption, laser-induced-fluorescence (fs-TALIF) imaging of atomic hydrogen and oxygen in non-equilibrium plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jacob B.; Roy, Sukesh; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.; Gord, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Femtosecond, two-photon-absorption laser-induced fluorescence (fs-TALIF) is employed to measure space- and time-resolved distributions of atomic hydrogen and oxygen in moderate-pressure, non-equilibrium, nanosecond-duration pulsed-discharge plasmas. Temporally and spatially resolved hydrogen and oxygen TALIF images are obtained over a range of low-temperature plasmas in mixtures of helium and argon at 100 Torr total pressure. The high-peak-intensity, low-average-energy fs pulses combined with the increased spectral bandwidth compared to traditional ns-duration laser pulses provide a large number of photon pairs that are responsible for the two-photon excitation, which results in an enhanced TALIF signal. Krypton and xenon TALIF are used for quantitative calibration of the hydrogen and oxygen concentrations, respectively, with similar excitation schemes being employed. This enables 2D collection of atomic-hydrogen and -oxygen TALIF signals with absolute number densities ranging from 2  ×  1012 cm-3 to 6  ×  1015 cm-3 and 1  ×  1013 cm-3 to 3  ×  1016 cm-3, respectively. These 2D images are the first application of TALIF imaging in moderate-pressure plasma discharges. 1D self-consistent modeling predictions show agreement with experimental results within the estimated experimental error of 25%. The present results can be used to further the development of higher fidelity kinetic models while quantifying plasma-source characteristics.

  8. BH2 revisited: New, extensive measurements of laser-induced fluorescence transitions and ab initio calculations of near-spectroscopic accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Gharaibeh, Mohammed; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Tarroni, Riccardo

    2015-05-01

    The spectroscopy of gas phase BH2 has not been explored experimentally since the pioneering study of Herzberg and Johns in 1967. In the present work, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of the A ˜ 2 B 1 ( Π u ) - X ˜ 2A1 band system of 11BH2, 10BH2, 11BD2, and 10BD2 have been observed for the first time. The free radicals were "synthesized" by an electric discharge through a precursor mixture of 0.5% diborane (B2H6 or B2D6) in high pressure argon at the exit of a pulsed valve. A total of 67 LIF bands have been measured and rotationally analyzed, 62 of them previously unobserved. These include transitions to a wide variety of excited state bending levels, to several stretch-bend combination levels, and to three ground state levels which gain intensity through Renner-Teller coupling to nearby excited state levels. As an aid to vibronic assignment of the spectra, very high level hybrid ab initio potential energy surfaces were built starting from the coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples (CCSD(T))/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory for this seven-electron system. In an effort to obtain the highest possible accuracy, the potentials were corrected for core correlation, extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, electron correlation beyond CCSD(T), and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer effects. The spin-rovibronic states of the various isotopologues of BH2 were calculated for energies up to 22 000 cm-1 above the X ˜ (000) level without any empirical adjustment of the potentials or fitting to experimental data. The agreement with the new LIF data is excellent, approaching near-spectroscopic accuracy (a few cm-1) and has allowed us to understand the complicated spin-rovibronic energy level structure even in the region of strong Renner-Teller resonances.

  9. Comparison of field portable measurements of ultrafine TiO2: X-ray fluorescence, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBouf, Ryan F; Miller, Arthur L; Stipe, Christopher; Brown, Jonathan; Murphy, Nate; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B

    2013-06-01

    Laboratory measurements of ultrafine titanium dioxide (TiO2) particulate matter loaded on filters were made using three field portable methods (X-ray fluorescence (XRF), laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy) to assess their potential for determining end-of-shift exposure. Ultrafine TiO2 particles were aerosolized and collected onto 37 mm polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) filters in the range of 3 to 578 μg titanium (Ti). Limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), and calibration fit were determined for each measurement method. The LOD's were 11.8, 0.032, and 108 μg Ti per filter, for XRF, LIBS, and FTIR, respectively and the LOQ's were 39.2, 0.11, and 361 μg Ti per filter, respectively. The XRF calibration curve was linear over the widest dynamic range, up to the maximum loading tested (578 μg Ti per filter). LIBS was more sensitive but, due to the sample preparation method, the highest loaded filter measurable was 252 μg Ti per filter. XRF and LIBS had good predictability measured by regressing the predicted mass to the gravimetric mass on the filter. XRF and LIBS produced overestimations of 4% and 2%, respectively, with coefficients of determination (R(2)) of 0.995 and 0.998. FTIR measurements were less dependable due to interference from the PCTE filter media and overestimated mass by 2% with an R(2) of 0.831.

  10. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J.

    2015-12-01

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X 4Σ-) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B 4Σ--X 4Σ- and E 4Π-X 4Σ- band systems of both 11BC and 10BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E-X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B 4Σ- excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E 4Π-X 4Σ- 0-0 and 1-0 bands of 11BC. The E-X 0-0 band of 10BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ24σ25σ11π22π0 and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  11. Laser Induced Fluorescence Emission (L.I.F.E.): In Situ Non-Destructive Detection of Microbial Life on Supraglacial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, B.; Tilg, M.; Storrie-Lombardi, M.; Remias, D.; Psenner, R.

    2012-04-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.) is an in situ laser scanning technique to detect photoautotrophic pigments such as phycoerythrin of an ice ecosystem such as supraglacial environments without contamination. The sensitivity of many psychrophiles to even moderate changes in temperature, and the logistical difficulties associated with either in situ analysis or sampling makes it difficult to study microbial metabolism in ice ecosystems in a high resolution. Surface communities of cold ecosystems are highly autotrophic and therefor ideal systems for L.I.F.E examinations. 532nm green lasers excite photopigments in cyanobacteria and produce multiple fluorescence signatures between 550nm and 750nm including carotenoids, phycobiliproteins which would enable a non-invasive in-situ measurement. The sensitivity of many psychrophiles to even moderate changes in temperature, and the logistical difficulties associated with either in situ analysis or sampling makes it difficult to study these cryosphere ecosystems. In general, the ice habitat has to be disrupted using techniques that usually include coring, sawing, and melting. Samples are also often chosen blindly, with little indication of probable biomass. The need for an in situ non-invasive, non-destructive technique to detect, localize, and sample cryosphere biomass in the field is therefore of considerable importance. L.I.F.E has already been tested in remote ecosystems like Antarctica (Lake Untersee, Lake Fryxell), supraglacial environments in the Kongsfjord region in the High Arctic and High Alpine glaciers but until now no calibration was set to convert the L.I.F.E. signal into pigment concentration. Here we describe the standardization for detection of Phycobiliproteins (Phycoerythrine) which are found in red algae, cyanobacteria, and cryptomonads. Similar methods are already used for detection of phytoplankton in liquid systems like oceans and lakes by NASÁs Airborne Oceanographic LIDAR since 1979. The

  12. Analysis of Gums by Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser Induced Fluorescence%毛细管电泳分离和激光检测分析多糖胶

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭加瑜; SANDRA Pat

    2004-01-01

    将多糖胶的混合物与荧光剂9-氨基芘-1,4,6-三磺酸(APTS)派生后再进行微量离心过滤分离.所得到的高分子部分采用毛细管电泳(CE)分离和激光诱导荧光(LIF)检测技术进行分析.缓冲溶液pH的调节和聚丙烯酰胺(PAA)涂层毛细管的使用有效地改善了多糖胶的分离效率和峰形.在优化条件下,iota、kappa角叉菜胶、藻胶、xanthan、carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)等5种组分的混合物和阿拉伯树胶、刺梧桐树胶、CMC等3种组分的混合物分别在pH 3.2和7.8的缓冲溶液下得到了完整组分的分离.这被认为是一种分析多糖胶的既简单快速又有效的方法.%Gums were derivatised with the fluorescence reagent, 9-aminopyrene-1,4,6-trisulfonic acid followed by microcentrifuge filtration. The resulting high mass fractions were analysed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) on a polyacrylamide coated capillary with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. A wide pH range of electrolytes was used to study the influences on the electrophoretic mobilities and on the peak shapes of the gums. In this way, the separation of a mixture of five commercial gums, namely iota carrageenan, kappa carrageenan, alginic acid, xanthan and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), could be achieved at pH 3.2 with a 25 mmol/L trisodium citrate buffer. It is also shown that a mixture of Arabic gum, Karaya gum and CMC could be separated at pH 7.8 in a similar buffer.

  13. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunahori, Fumie X. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Franklin College, Franklin, Indiana 46131 (United States); Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J., E-mail: dclaser@uky.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X {sup 4}Σ{sup −}) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B {sup 4}Σ{sup −}–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} and E {sup 4}Π–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} band systems of both {sup 11}BC and {sup 10}BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E–X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B {sup 4}Σ{sup −} excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E {sup 4}Π–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} 0-0 and 1-0 bands of {sup 11}BC. The E–X 0-0 band of {sup 10}BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ{sup 2}4σ{sup 2}5σ{sup 1}1π{sup 2}2π{sup 0} and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  14. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunahori, Fumie X; Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J

    2015-12-14

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X (4)Σ(-)) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B (4)Σ(-)-X (4)Σ(-) and E (4)Π-X (4)Σ(-) band systems of both (11)BC and (10)BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E-X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B (4)Σ(-) excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E (4)Π-X (4)Σ(-) 0-0 and 1-0 bands of (11)BC. The E-X 0-0 band of (10)BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ(2)4σ(2)5σ(1)1π(2)2π(0) and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  15. In situ and denuder-based measurements of elemental and reactive gaseous mercury with analysis by laser-induced fluorescence - results from the Reno Atmospheric Mercury Intercomparison Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Anthony J.; Everhart, Stephanie; Bauer, Dieter; Remeika, James; Tatum Ernest, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    The University of Miami (UM) deployed a sequential two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (2P-LIF) instrument for the in situ measurement of gaseous elemental mercury, Hg(0), during the Reno Atmospheric Mercury Intercomparison Experiment (RAMIX) campaign. A number of extended sampling experiments, typically lasting 6-8 h but on one occasion extending to ˜ 24 h, were conducted, allowing the 2P-LIF measurements of Hg(0) concentrations to be compared with two independently operated instruments using gold amalgamation sampling coupled with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopic (CVAFS) analysis. At the highest temporal resolution, ˜ 5 min samples, the three instruments measured concentrations that agreed to within 10-25 %. Measurements of total mercury (TM) were made by using pyrolysis to convert total oxidized mercury (TOM) to Hg(0). TOM was then obtained by difference. Variability in the ambient Hg(0) concentration limited our sensitivity for measurement of ambient TOM using this approach. In addition, manually sampled KCl-coated annular denuders were deployed and analyzed using thermal dissociation coupled with single-photon LIF detection of Hg(0). The TOM measurements obtained were normally consistent with KCl denuder measurements obtained with two Tekran speciation systems and with the manual KCl denuder measurements but with very large uncertainty. They were typically lower than measurements reported by the University of Washington (UW) Detector for Oxidized Hg Species (DOHGS) system. The ability of the 2P-LIF pyrolysis system to measure TM was demonstrated during one of the manifold HgBr2 spikes but the results did not agree well with those reported by the DOHGS system. The limitations of the RAMIX experiment and potential improvements that should be implemented in any future mercury instrument intercomparison are discussed. We suggest that instrumental artifacts make a substantial contribution to the discrepancies in the reported measurements over the

  16. Effect of fluorescence characteristics and different algorithms on the estimation of leaf nitrogen content based on laser-induced fluorescence lidar in paddy rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Sun, Jia; Du, Lin; Chen, Biwu; Zhang, Zhenbing; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei

    2017-02-20

    Paddy rice is one of the most significant food sources and an important part of the ecosystem. Thus, accurate monitoring of paddy rice growth is highly necessary. Leaf nitrogen content (LNC) serves as a crucial indicator of growth status of paddy rice and determines the dose of nitrogen (N) fertilizer to be used. This study aims to compare the predictive ability of the fluorescence spectra excited by different excitation wavelengths (EWs) combined with traditional multivariate analysis algorithms, such as principal component analysis (PCA), back-propagation neural network (BPNN), and support vector machine (SVM), for estimating paddy rice LNC from the leaf level with three different fluorescence characteristics as input variables. Then, six estimation models were proposed. Compared with the five other models, PCA-BPNN was the most suitable model for the estimation of LNC by improving R2 and reducing RMSE and RE. For 355, 460 and 556 nm EWs, R2 was 0.89, 0.80 and 0.88, respectively. Experimental results demonstrated that the fluorescence spectra excited by 355 and 556 nm EWs were superior to those excited by 460 nm for the estimation of LNC with different models. BPNN algorithm combined with PCA may provide a helpful exploratory and predictive tool for fluorescence spectra excited by appropriate EW based on practical application requirements for monitoring the N status of crops.

  17. Sensitive and simultaneous analysis of five transgenic maizes using multiplex polymerase chain reaction, capillary gel electrophoresis, and laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañas, Virginia; González, Ramón; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2004-07-01

    The benefits of using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (CGE-LIF) for the simultaneous detection of five transgenic maizes (Bt11, T25, MON810, GA21, and Bt176) are demonstrated. The method uses a hexaplex PCR protocol to amplify the five mentioned transgenic amplicons plus the zein gene used as reference, followed by a CGE-LIF method to analyze the six DNA fragments. CGE-LIF was demonstrated very useful and informative for optimizing multiplex PCR parameters such as time extension, PCR buffer concentration and primers concentration. The method developed is highly sensitive and allows the simultaneous detection in a single run of percentages of transgenic maize as low as 0.054% of Bt11, 0.057% of T25, 0.036% of MON810, 0.064% of GA21, and 0.018% of Bt176 in flour obtaining signals still far from the detection limit (namely, the signal/noise ratios for the corresponding DNA peaks were 41, 124, 98, 250, 252, and 473, respectively). These percentages are well below the minimum threshold marked by the European Regulation for transgenic food labeling (i.e., 0.5-0.9%). A study on the reproducibility of the multiplex PCR-CGE-LIF procedure was also performed. Thus, values of RSD lower than 0.67 and 6.80% were obtained for migration times and corrected peak areas, respectively, for the same sample and three different days (n = 12). On the other hand, the reproducibility of the whole procedure, including four different multiplex PCR amplifications, was determined to be better than 0.66 and 23.3% for migration times and corrected peak areas, respectively. Agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) and CGE-LIF were compared in terms of resolution and sensitivity for detecting PCR products, demonstrating that CGE-LIF can solve false positives induced by artifacts from the multiplex PCR reaction that could not be addressed by AGE. Moreover, CGE-LIF provides better resolution and sensitivity. To our knowledge

  18. Aircraft based four-channel thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence instrument for simultaneous measurements of NO2, total peroxy nitrate, total alkyl nitrate, and HNO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Reeves

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A four-channel thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF instrument has been developed for simultaneous measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2, total peroxy nitrate (∑PNs, total alkyl nitrate (∑ANs and nitric acid (HNO3. NO2 is measured directly by LIF at 532 nm, whereas organic nitrates and nitric acid are thermally dissociated at distinct temperatures in the inlet to form NO2, which is then measured by LIF. The concentrations of each dissociated species are derived by the differences in measured NO2 relative to the reference colder inlet channel. The TD-LIF was adapted to fly on board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM BAe 146-301 atmospheric research aircraft in summer 2010, and to date has successfully flown in five field campaigns. This paper reports novel improvements in the TD-LIF instrumentations including: (1 the use of a single wavelength laser, which makes the system compact and relatively cheap; (2 the use of a single beam laser that allows easy alignment and optical stability against the vibrational aircraft environment and (3 the optical assembly of four detection cells that allow simultaneous and fast (time resolution up to 0.1 s measurements of NO2, ∑PNs, ∑ANs and HNO3. Laboratory-generated mixtures of PNs, ANs and HNO3 in zero air are converted into NO2 and used to fix the dissociation temperatures of each heated inlet, to test the selectivity of the instrument and potential interferences due to recombination reactions of the dissociated products. The effectiveness of the TD-LIF was demonstrated during the RONOCO aircraft campaign (summer 2010. A chemiluminescence system that was measuring NO2 and a broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer (BBCEAS that was measuring one of the PNs (N2O5 were installed on the same aircraft during the campaign. The in-flight intercomparison of the new TD-LIF with the chemiluminescence system for NO2 measurements and the intercomparison between

  19. Aircraft based four-channel thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence instrument for simultaneous measurements of NO2, total peroxy nitrate, total alkyl nitrate, and HNO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Di Carlo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A four-channel thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF instrument has been developed for simultaneous measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2, total peroxy nitrate (∑PNs, total alkyl nitrate (∑ANs and nitric acid (HNO3. NO2 is measured directly by LIF at 532 nm, whereas organic nitrates and nitric acid are thermally dissociated at distinct temperatures in the inlet to form NO2, which is then measured by LIF. The concentrations of each dissociated species are derived by the differences in measured NO2 relative to the reference colder inlet channel. The TD-LIF was adapted to fly on board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM BAe 146-301 atmospheric research aircraft in summer 2010, and to date has successfully flown in five field campaigns. This paper reports novel improvements in the TD-LIF instrumentations, including (1 the use of a single wavelength laser, which makes the system compact and relatively cheap; (2 the use of a single beam laser that allows easy alignment and optical stability against the vibrational aircraft environment; and (3 the optical assembly of four detection cells that allow simultaneous and fast (time resolution up to 0.1 s measurements of NO2, ∑PNs, ∑ANs and HNO3. Laboratory-generated mixtures of PNs, ANs and HNO3 in zero air are converted into NO2 and used to fix the dissociation temperatures of each heated inlet to test the selectivity of the instrument and potential interferences due to recombination reactions of the dissociated products. The effectiveness of the TD-LIF was demonstrated during the RONOCO aircraft campaign (summer 2010. A chemiluminescence system that was measuring NO2 and a broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer (BBCEAS that was measuring one of the PNs (N2O5 were installed on the same aircraft during the campaign. The in-flight intercomparison of the new TD-LIF with the chemiluminescence system for NO2 measurements and the intercomparison between

  20. Laser Induced Fluorescence Imaging: Searching for Organics from the Dry Valleys of Queen Maud Land Antarctica to the Regolith and Ices of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Sattler, B.; Muller, J.-P.; Fisk, M.; Cousins, C.; Dartnell, L.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence imaging using excitation in ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths has been proposed as a nondestructive astrobiological rapid survey tool to search for amino and nucleic acids [1], microbial life [2], and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) deep in the Mars regolith [3, 4]. However, the technique is easily adapted to search for complex biomolecular targets using longer wavelength sources [5]. Of particular interest is the ability of excitation at 532 nm to detect photosynthetic pigments in cyanobacteria-dominated microbial communities populating the ice of alpine, Arctic, and Antarctic lakes, glaciers, and ice sheets [6-8]. During the months of November and December 2008 we tested the technique as part of an extended international, interdisciplinary field campaign in the Dry Valleys of Schirmacher Oasis and Lake Untersee, Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. In this paper we review our recent laboratory experiments on the use of UV excitation for detection of PAHs doped on Mars analogue soils [9] and chasmo- and epilithic lichen communities within basaltic Iceland lavas. We present for the first time the results of our field experiments conducted during the Tawani 2008 International Antarctic Expedition for in situ detection and quantification of photosynthetic biomass in the ice caps of annual and perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes. We discuss the advantages of using a nondestructive rapid survey photonic tools such as laser induced fluorescence imaging that can be easily implemented from lander, rover, airborne, or orbital platforms. The techniques presented can be utilized to monitor the microbial potential of large, critical ecosystems on Earth, or to facilitate the remote or manned search for organics and photosynthetic life on any terrestrial planet. References 1. Storrie-Lombardi, M.C., Hug, W.F., McDonald, G.D., Tsapin, A.I., and Nealson, K.H. 2001. Hollow cathode ion lasers for deep ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging

  1. Oxygen imaging at the sediment-water interface using lifetime-based laser induced fluorescence (tau LIF) of nano-sized particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murniati, E.; Gross, D.; Herlina, H.

    2016-01-01

    Most applications of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) for dissolved oxygen (DO) imaging in flowing water are based on luminescence intensity measurements of a dissolved indicator. A major limitation for applying the technique in the bottom boundary layer (BBL) is the sorption of the luminescent dye...

  2. Microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for the rapid detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ruan; Chengjun, Sun; Heng, Chen; Chen, Zhou; Yuanqian, Li; Yongxin, Li

    2015-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 are the main pathogens causing hand-foot-mouth disease. In this paper, microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction has been developed for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens. The specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplicons labeled with SYBR Orange were separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis and detected by laser induced fluorescence detector within 7 min. The intraday and interday relative standard deviation of migration time for DNA Marker was in the range of 1.36-2.94 and 2.78-3.96%, respectively. The detection limits were as low as 2.06 × 10(3) copies/mL for Enterovirus 71 and 5 × 10(3) copies/mL for Coxsackievirus A16. No cross-reactivity was observed with rotavirus, astrovirus, norovirus, and adenovirus, which showed good specificity of the method. This assay was validated using 100 throat swab specimens that were detected by real-time reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction in parallel and the two methods produced the same results. This study provided a rapid, sensitive and specific method for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16, which make a contribution to significant time and cost saving for the identification and treatment of patients.

  3. Z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as a tool for diffusion measurements in planar lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Tomáš; Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Studies of lateral diffusion are used for the characterization of the dynamics of biological membranes. One of the techniques that can be used for this purpose is fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which belongs to the single-molecule techniques. Unfortunately, FCS measurements, when performed in planar lipid systems, are associated with a few sources of inaccuracy in the determination of the lateral diffusion coefficient. The main problems are related to the imperfect positioning of the laser focus relative to the plane of the sample. Another source of inaccuracy is the requirement for external calibration of the detection volume size. This protocol introduces a calibration-free method called Z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (Z-scan FCS), which is based on the determination of the diffusion time and particle number in steps along the optical (z-) axis by sequential FCS measurements. Z-scan FCS could be employed for diffusion measurements in planar membrane model systems-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) and giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and also in biological membranes. A result from measurements in SPBs is also presented in the protocol as a principle example of the Z-scan technique.

  4. Application of the laser induced fluorescence to the investigation of highly magnetized plasmas, heated by ion cyclotron resonance; Fluorescence induite par laser sur des plasmas fortement magnetises, chauffes par resonnance cyclotron ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pailloux, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Procedes d`Enrichissement]|[Universite Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1997-12-31

    This work has been achieved in the frame of isotopic separation studies by in cyclotron resonance. For this purpose, in a highly magnetized (2 to 3 Tesla) and non-collisional (10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 3}) plasma, composed of metallic ions, a wave near the ion cyclotron frequency is thrown in order to heat selectively a given species. A laser induced fluorescence (LIP) has been developed on barium and gadolinium plasmas. The Larmor gyration of ions greatly modifies the interaction, which has been modelled through the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The obtained excitation probably has been integrated over all the ions excited in the measurement volume in order to check that the LIF still leads to the distribution function of ion velocities. The influence of the Larmor motion of ions on the spectral distribution of LIF has been derived both theoretically and experimentally. The LIF diagnostics has been achieved with a dye O`ring laser. The barium ion has been excited on the transition 6142 angstrom, using rhodamine 6G dye, and the gadolinium ion on the pseudo-triplet 3861 angstrom, using exalite dye. Data treatment has been developed taking into account the Zeeman effect and the different heating of isotopes. The ionic temperature (from 1 eV to some hundreds eV) has been measured as a function of radiofrequency heating. Our experimental results are in good agreement with the selective heating theory. Also, the ion velocity distribution function has been found locally Maxwellian. And the behaviour of the plasma has been studied as a function of control parameters of the plasma source. (author) 62 refs.

  5. Fluorescent Organic Planar pn Heterojunction Light-Emitting Diodes with Simplified Structure, Extremely Low Driving Voltage, and High Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongcheng; Xie, Gaozhan; Cai, Xinyi; Liu, Ming; Cao, Yong; Su, Shi-Jian

    2016-01-13

    Fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes capable of radiative utilization of both singlet and triplet excitons are achieved via a simple double-layer planar pn hetero-junction configuration without a conventional emission layer, leading to high external quantum efficiency above 10% and extremely low driving voltages close to the theoretical minima.

  6. Application of thermal-dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF to measurement of HNO3, Σalkyl nitrates, Σperoxy nitrates, and NO2 fluxes using eddy covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Farmer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen exchange between the atmosphere and biosphere directly influences atmospheric composition. While much is known about mechanisms of NO and N2O emissions, instrumentation for the study of mechanisms contributing to exchange of other major nitrogen species is quite limited. Here we describe the application of a new technique, thermal dissociation-laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF, to eddy covariance measurements of the fluxes of NO2, total peroxy acyl and peroxy nitrates, total alkyl and multifunctional alkyl nitrates, and nitric acid. The technique offers the potential for investigating mechanisms of exchange of these species at the canopy scale over timescales from days to years. Examples of flux measurements at a ponderosa pine plantation in the mid-elevation Sierra Nevada Mountains in California are reported and used to evaluate instrument performance.

  7. Setting-up of the Laser Induced Fluorescence diagnostic. Measurements of Cr density in a neon glow discharge; Puesta a punto del diagnstico de fluorescencia inducida por laser. Medidas de densidad de Cr en Glow discharg de Neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tafalla, D.; Cal, E. de la; Tabares, F. L.

    1994-07-01

    A plasma diagnostic based on the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique has been set up in the Fusion Division at the CIEMAT. In a preliminary experiment, the density of sputtered chromium atoms produced in a neon glow discharge was measured. Firstly, the laser beam was characterized by calibration of its wavelength, bandwidth and energy profile and Rayleigh scattering in N2 was used for the optical system calibration. An absolute density of Cr atoms of n {approx} 5x10 cm was obtained in discharges at 100 mA and pressure of 15 mTorr and a linear dependence of the LIF signal us. current was found. These values are in agreement with those expected from the tabulated sputtering yields and the thermalization and diffusion of the sputtered atoms into the Ne plasma. (Author) 19 refs.

  8. Accessing a low-lying bound electronic state of the alkali oxides, LiO and NaO, using laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, J. V.; Shen, K. K.; Winstead, C. B.; Gole, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    The first laser based probe for the sodium and lithium monoxides is established. The Li(Na)+N 2O reactions studied in a multiple collision entrainment mode produce the LiO and NaO ground X 2Π and low-lying monoxide excited states. In contrast to the alkali halides, laser induced excitation spectroscopy confirms that the LiO and NaO B 2Π states, counter to recent predictions, are located at energies well below the ground state dissociation asymptote and, as predicted, possess significant binding energies. An assignment of the laser induced excitation spectra (LIF) for the B 2Π-X 2Π transitions of LiO in the region 3940-4300 Å is based on a direct correlation with the observed chemiluminescence (CL) from the lowest level of the LiO B 2Π state ( ˜4000-7000 Å) and high quality ab initio calculations for the ground state. The self-consistent assignment of the observed LIF and CL spectra makes use of the complimentary extended progressions in the X 2Π (CL) and B 2Π (LIF) vibrational level structure which results from the significant shift of the B 2Π excited state potential relative to that of the ground state. The experimental data are consistent with an excited state vibrational frequency separation of order 130 cm -1, and T e( B2Π) ≈ 26078 ± 800 cm-1. The latter value, in correlation with the ground state dissociation energy of LiO, suggests a B 2Π excited state dissociation energy well in excess of 2000 cm -1. The radiative lifetimes of the lowest levels of the LiO B 2Π state, isoergic with the highest levels of the LiO ground state, are determined to be in excess of 600 ns. The corresponding NaO excitation spectra in the range 6680-7250 Å also correlate well with ab initio calculations for the ground electronic state of NaO. Within this study, we provide optical signatures which one might consider to monitor LiO or NaO in process streams. In correlation with the observed chemiluminescence from B 2Π states of the higher alkali oxides KO, RbO, and

  9. Europium Uptake and Partitioning in Oat (Avena sativa) Roots as studied By Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Confocal Microscopy Profiling Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, Robert J.; Wang, Zheming; Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2003-11-15

    The uptake of Eu3+ by elongating oat plant roots was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence lifetime measurement, as well as laser excitation time-resolved confocal fluorescence profiling technique. The results of this work indicated that the initial uptake of Eu(III) by oat root was most evident within the apical meristem of the root just proximal to the root cap. Distribution of assimilated Eu(III) within the roots differentiation and elongation zone was non-uniform. Higher concentrations were observed within the vascular cylinder, specifically in the phloem and developing xylem parenchyma. Elevated levels of the metal were also observed in the root hairs of the mature root. The concentration of assimilated Eu3+ dropped sharply from the apical meristem to the differentiation and elongation zone and then gradually decreased as the distance from the root cap increased. Fluorescence spectroscopic characteristics of the assimilated Eu3+ suggested that the Eu3+ exists a s inner-sphere mononuclear complexes inside the root. This work has also demonstrated the effectiveness of a time-resolved Eu3+ fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal fluorescence profiling techniques for the in vivo, real-time study of metal[Eu3+] accumulation by a functioning intact plant root. This approach can prove valuable for basic and applied studies in plant nutrition and environmental uptake of actinide radionuclides.

  10. Estimating Chlorophyll Fluorescence Parameters Using the Joint Fraunhofer Line Depth and Laser-Induced Saturation Pulse (FLD-LISP Method in Different Plant Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinaz Rahimzadeh-Bajgiran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive evaluation of the recently developed Fraunhofer line depth (FLD and laser-induced saturation pulse (FLD-LISP method was conducted to measure chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF parameters of the quantum yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ, and the photosystem II-based electron transport rate (ETR in three plant species including paprika (C3 plant, maize (C4 plant, and pachira (C3 plant. First, the relationships between photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD and ChlF parameters retrieved using FLD-LISP and the pulse amplitude-modulated (PAM methods were analyzed for all three species. Then the relationships between ChlF parameters measured using FLD-LISP and PAM were evaluated for the plants in different growth stages of leaves from mature to aging conditions. The relationships of ChlF parameters/PPFD were similar in both FLD-LISP and PAM methods in all plant species. ΦPSII showed a linear relationship with PPFD in all three species whereas NPQ was found to be linearly related to PPFD in paprika and maize, but not for pachira. The ETR/PPFD relationship was nonlinear with increasing values observed for PPFDs lower than about 800 μmol m−2 s−1 for paprika, lower than about 1200 μmol m−2 s−1 for maize, and lower than about 800 μmol m−2 s−1 for pachira. The ΦPSII, NPQ, and ETR of both the FLD-LISP and PAM methods were very well correlated (R2 = 0.89, RMSE = 0.05, (R2 = 0.86, RMSE = 0.44, and (R2 = 0.88, RMSE = 24.69, respectively, for all plants. Therefore, the FLD-LISP method can be recommended as a robust technique for the estimation of ChlF parameters.

  11. Two-dimensional imaging of molecular hydrogen in H2-air diffusion flames using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, W.; Kumar, V.; Glesk, I.; Miles, R.; Diskin, G.

    1991-01-01

    The use of a tunable ArF laser at 193.26 nm to record simultaneous single-laser-shot, planar images of molecular hydrogen and hot oxygen in a turbulent H2-air diffusion flame. Excitation spectra of fuel and oxidant-rich flame zones confirm a partial overlap of the two-photon H2 and single-photon O2 Schumann-Runge absorption bands. UV Rayleigh scattering images of flame structure and estimated detection limits for the H2 two-photon imaging are also presented.

  12. Spatially resolved analyses of uranium species using a coupled system made up of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS); Ortsaufgeloeste Analyse von Uranspezies mittels einem Gekoppelten System aus Konfokaler Laser-Scanning Mikroskopie (CLSM) und Laser Induzierter Fluoreszenzspektroskopie (LIFS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, S. [Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany); Grossmann, K.; Arnold, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany). Inst. fuer Ressourcenoekologie

    2014-01-15

    The fluorescent properties of uranium when excited by UV light are used increasingly for spectroscope analyses of uranium species within watery samples. Here, alongside the fluorescent properties of the hexavalent oxidation phases, the tetra and pentavalent oxidation phases also play an increasingly important role. The detection of fluorescent emission spectrums on solid and biological samples using (time-resolved) laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS or LIFS respectively) has, however, the disadvantage that no statements regarding the spatial localisation of the uranium can be made. However, particularly in complex, biological samples, such statements on the localisation of the uranium enrichment in the sample are desired, in order to e.g. be able to distinguish between intra and extra-cellular uranium bonds. The fluorescent properties of uranium (VI) compounds and minerals can also be used to detect their localisation within complex samples. So the application of fluorescent microscopic methods represents one possibility to localise and visualise uranium precipitates and enrichments in biological samples, such as biofilms or cells. The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) is especially well suited to this purpose. Coupling confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) makes it possible to localise and visualise fluorescent signals spatially and three-dimensionally, while at the same time being able to detect spatially resolved, fluorescent-spectroscopic data. This technology is characterised by relatively low detection limits from up to 1.10{sup -6} M for uranium (VI) compounds within the confocal volume. (orig.)

  13. Standards for Analysis of Ce, La, Pb, Rb, Se, Sr, Y, AND Zr in Rock Samples Using Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and X-ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Jason; Dyar, M. Darby; Ytsma, Caroline; Lepore, Kate; Fassett, Caleb I.; Hanlon, Avery; Wagoner, Carlie; Treiman, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Analytical geochemistry has long depended on the availability of robust suites of rock standards with well-characterized compositions. Standard rock powders for wet chemistry and x-ray fluorescence were initially characterized and supplied to the community by the U.S. Geological Survey, which continues to distribute a few dozen standards. Many other rock standards have subsequently been developed by organizations such as the Centre de Recherches Pétrographiques et Géochimiques (CRPG) and Brammer Standard Company, Inc.

  14. In vivo simultaneous monitoring of gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and L-aspartate using brain microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection: Analytical developments and in vitro/in vivo validations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvinet, Valérie; Parrot, Sandrine; Benturquia, Nadia; Bravo-Moratón, Eva; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2003-09-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and L-aspartate (L-Asp) are three major amino acid neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. In this work, a method for the separation of these three neurotransmitters in brain microdialysis samples using a commercially available capillary electrophoresis (CE) system has been developed. Molecules were tagged on their primary amine function with the fluorogene agent naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA), and, after separation by micellar electrokinetic chromatography, were detected by laser-induced fluorescence using a 442 nm helium-cadmium laser. The separation conditions for the analysis of derivatized neurotransmitters in standard solutions and microdialysates have been optimized, and this method has been validated on both pharmacological and analytical basis. The separation of GABA, Glu, and L-Asp takes less than 10 min by using a 75 mmol/L borate buffer, pH 9.2, containing 70 mmol/L SDS and 10 mmol/L hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin and + 25 kV voltage. The detection limits were 3, 15 nmol/L and, 5 nmol/L for GABA, Glu, and L-Asp, respectively. Moreover, submicroliter samples can be analyzed. This method allows a simple, rapid and accurate measurement of the three amino acid neurotransmitters for the in vivo brain monitoring using microdialysis sampling.

  15. Microdialysis monitoring of catecholamines and excitatory amino acids in the rat and mouse brain: recent developments based on capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection--a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, Sandrine; Bert, Lionel; Mouly-Badina, Laurence; Sauvinet, Valérie; Colussi-Mas, Joyce; Lambás-Señas, Laura; Robert, Frédéric; Bouilloux, Jean-Pierre; Suaud-Chagny, Marie-Françoise; Denoroy, Luc; Renaud, Bernard

    2003-10-01

    1. Although microdialysis is a widely used approach for in vivo monitoring extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations, it has been previously limited in many cases by its poor temporal resolution. It is clear that when 10-30-min sampling is performed, short-lasting changes in extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations can be overlooked. Such a low sampling rate is necessary when combining microdialysis with the conventional analytical methods like high performance liquid chromatography. 2. Since capillary electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) allows the detection of attomoles of neurotransmitters, the temporal resolution of microdialysis may be significantly improved: high sampling rates, in the range of 5 s to 1 min, have been already reported by our group and others using CE-LIFD for simultaneously analyzing catecholamines and amino acids in microdialysates. 3. The power of combining microdialyis and CE-LIFD is shown, using examples of physiological and pharmacological studies dealing with the dynamics of in vivo efflux processes and/or interactions between neurotransmitters.

  16. Early caries detection by laser induced fluorescence spectrum%早期龋齿的激光感生荧光光谱探测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莉; 唐静; 李颂战

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive method adapted for optical diagnosis of early caries by using low-power He-Ne laser (λ=632.8 nm, 2.0±0.1 mW) was represented, and the comparison with the dental explorer, Photon undulatory Non-linear Conversion (PNC) method and DIAGNodent was given. This method without light filter, differed from the DIAGNodent and PNC method in its ability for registering fluorescence spectrum. The characteristic spectrum of dental tissue contained rich information such as dental components, structure, spatial conformation. The research was conducted in vitro. Three parts of characteristic spectrum including backscattering, reflection and auto-fluorescence were analyzed. It enables not only to evaluate chemical changes in tooth by analyzing characteristic frequencies of auto-fluorescence spectrum, but also to estimate structure and morphological changes in tissue by means of anti -stoke's fluorescence spectrum. Preliminary results show that this method has a potential application in the quantitive diagnosis of various stages of dental caries and is more sensitive for detecting early caries and the surface damage of health enamel.%提出了一种利用低功率He.Ne laser(λ=632.8mm,2.0±0.1 mW)光学无损诊断早期龋齿的方法,并与探诊方法、光子波动非线性转换方法(PNC)以及DIAGNodent龋齿诊断仪进行了比较.这种探测方法不使用滤光片,采集荧光光谱的能力与PNC方法和DIAGNodent龋齿诊断仪不同,所获得的牙齿特征光谱含有大量的关于牙齿成分、结构、空间构象等的信息.该项研究在离体牙齿上进行.牙齿的特征光谱由后向散射光、反射光、自体荧光3个部分组成,对自体荧光光谱的特征频率进行分析可以确定牙齿化学成分的改变,而对反斯托克斯荧光光谱进行分析则可以评价牙齿组织结构和形态学的变化.初步研究结果表明:文中方法在定量诊断各种龋齿方面极具应用潜力,对于探测早期龋齿、

  17. Modulation of Exciton Generation in Organic Active Planar pn Heterojunction: Toward Low Driving Voltage and High-Efficiency OLEDs Employing Conventional and Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongcheng; Liu, Kunkun; Gan, Lin; Liu, Ming; Gao, Kuo; Xie, Gaozhan; Ma, Yuguang; Cao, Yong; Su, Shi-Jian

    2016-08-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) combining low driving voltage and high efficiency are designed by employing conventional and thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters through modulation of excitons generated at the planar p-n heterojunction region. To date, this approach enables the highest power efficiency for yellow-green emitting fluorescent OLEDs with a simplified structure.

  18. Multicapillary electrophoresis of unlabeled DNA fragments with high-sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection by counter-current migration of intercalation dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benesova-Minarikova, Lucie; Fantova, Lucie; Minarik, Marek

    2005-11-01

    Analysis of PCR fragments for applications, such as screening of nucleotide polymorphisms, detection of somatic mutations, or quantification of reverse-transcription PCR products, becomes central in clinical research as well as preventive testing, diagnostic screening, and pharmacogenomic genotyping. A variety of CE techniques, utilizing great potential of multicapillary-array sequencers, is now commonly applied in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of a wide range of genetic diseases (cancer, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases, etc.). Costs of fluorescently labeled primers is often a major factor in large-scale projects requiring mutation analysis in hundreds or thousands of samples. In the present paper we introduce a simple approach of detecting unlabeled DNA fragments through intercalation without a need for adding intercalator to the separation polymer matrix. The dye is only added to the anode reservoir, and mixing with the separated DNA fragments takes place upon its migration opposite to the direction of the CE separation. Using two common intercalating dyes (ethidium bromide and SYBR Green II) we present this method as a tool for routine PCR detection and quantification.

  19. 原油样品激光诱导荧光的时间分辨光谱特性研究%Characterization of Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence from Crude Oil Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘德庆; 栾晓宁; 韩晓爽; 郭金家; 安居白; 郑荣儿

    2015-01-01

    为探索激光诱导时间分辨荧光光谱技术应用于海洋悬浮溢油原位探测的可行性,对来自胜利油田六个不同井区不同密度的原油样品的时间分辨荧光光谱进行了探测分析。结果发现,各原油样品荧光发射的持续时间基本相同,从ICCD中数字延时发生器(DDG )的输入延时52 ns开始,到输入延时82 ns左右结束,各原油样品的荧光峰强度随时间变化曲线的半高宽约10 ns;不同原油样品的最强荧光峰位及其衰减寿命不尽相同,并且与样品密度有一定相关性,密度相近的原油具有相近的最强荧光峰位和相似的荧光寿命。对比六种原油样品的时间分辨荧光光谱发现,在荧光增强时,原油荧光光谱峰位不变,当荧光从最大强度开始衰减时,六种原油样品的荧光光谱峰位均出现了不同程度(17~30 nm )的红移现象,这一定程度上反映出原油中各荧光组分的荧光衰减速率存在差异,或者存在荧光组分之间的能量传递。所观测到的原油密度相关的时间分辨光谱信息和荧光峰红移现象可望成为水下悬浮溢油识别的有效特征之一。%To evaluate the feasibility of laser induced time‐resolved fluorescence technique for in‐situ detection of underwater sus‐pended oil spill ,extensive investigations have been carried out with different densities of crude oil samples from six different wells of Shengli Oilfield in this work .It was found that the fluorescence emission durations of these crude oil samples were al‐most the same ,the Gate Pulse Delay of DDG (Digital Delay Generator ) in the ICCD started at 52ns and ended at 82ns with a width (FWHM ) of 10 ns .It appears that the peak location and lifetime of fluorescence for different crude oil samples varied with their densities ,and those with similar densities shared a similar lifespan with the closer peak locations of fluorescence .It is also observed that

  20. Speciation of europium (III) surface species on monocrystalline alumina using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence-scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaleb, K.A.; Viala, F.; Miserque, F.; Salmon, L. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCP, Lab Reactivite Surface et Interface, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Reiller, P. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR, Lab Speciat Radionucleides et Mol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Moutiers, G. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC, Serv Chim Phys, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work was to perform highly localized spectroscopic surface measurements by combining time-resolved laser spectroscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy. The final purpose of that was to study surface sorption at the molecular level of trivalent ions in the framework of nuclear waste disposal assessment. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy presents the advantages of being selective, sensitive, and noninvasive and scanning near-field optical microscopy is a promising technique for high resolution surface speciation. Investigation of the interaction between trivalent europium and a monocrystalline alumina (11-bar02) surface was made using different conditions of concentration and pH. We found that the distribution of sorbed europium was always homogeneous with a decay time of europium (III) equal to 350 {mu}s {+-} 15 {mu}s. On the other hand, carbonate species with a decay time of 210 {mu}s {+-} 10 {mu}s or other hydroxide species with a decay time of 180 {mu}s {+-} 10 {mu}s were detected on the surface when a higher concentration or a higher pH solution, respectively, were used. Distribution of these species was heterogeneous and their associated fluorescence signal was relatively high, evoking a precipitated form. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was also used on the same samples as a complementary technique. A binding energy of 1135.1 eV was obtained for the sorbed europium and another binding energy of 1134.4 eV was obtained for the hydroxide species, thus confirming the presence of two kinds of species on the surface. (authors)

  1. 毛细管电泳分离-激光诱导荧光检测巴氯芬和加巴喷丁%Determination of baclofen and gabapentin by capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹丽伟; 李聪; 任东

    2011-01-01

    采用新合成的6-氧-(N-琥珀酰亚胺乙酸酯)-9-(2’-甲氧羰基)荧光素(SAMF)作为柱前衍生试剂,用甘氨酸做内标,毛细管电泳分离-激光诱导荧光检测血清中的巴氯芬(baclofen)和加巴喷丁(gabapentin).研究表明,在磷酸盐缓冲溶液(pH=8)介质中,25℃下15 min即可完成衍生反应.以pH =5的30 mmol/L的磷酸盐缓冲溶液作为电泳介质,衍生产物在16 min内达到电泳基线分离,检出限为4×10-10 mol/L.将新建立的方法用于血清中巴氯芬、加巴喷丁的分析测定,回收率为95.5% ~ 102.01%,结果令人满意.%A sensitive and efficient analysis method for determination of baclofen and gabapentin in human serum based on capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been established. 6-Oxy-( N-succinimidylacetate)- 9-(2'-Meth-oxycarbonyl) fluorescein (SAMF), a new synthesized fluorescence reagent, was used for pre-column derivatization of the "non-fluorescent drug in serum. Glycin was used as an internal standard. The best derivation condition was obtained in phosphate buffer (pH =8) at 25℃ for 15 min. Optimal separation and detection were obtained with an background electrolyte of 30 mmol/L phosphate buffer ( pH = 5 ) and LJF was excited at 473 nm. The detection limit of baclofen was 4 x 10-10 mol/L. This sensitive method was effectively used to determine baclofen and gabapentin in human serum with recoveries ranging from 95.5% to 102.01%.

  2. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Chlorophyll a Flourescence Transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Jens

    of a sufficient quality; something that remains a problem for many in-situ methods. In my PhD, I present my work with two such in-situ methods, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and OJIP transients, the rising part of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients from dark-adapted leaves....

  3. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Chlorophyll a Flourescence Transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Jens

    of a sufficient quality; something that remains a problem for many in-situ methods. In my PhD, I present my work with two such in-situ methods, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and OJIP transients, the rising part of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients from dark-adapted leaves....

  4. The study of laser induced dispersive fluorescence spectra of SO2 by time tomographic scanning%SO2气体激光诱导色散荧光时间断层扫描研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张连水; 陈思远; 李明; 党伟; 赵魁芳

    2011-01-01

    The paper presented one study on the complicated de-excitation process of the first-excited band of SO2 molecule, including fluorescence radiation and collision relaxation, using gated enhanced optical multi-channel spectrum analyzer (OMA) and the quadruple harmonic output (266 nm) of a nanosecond pulsed Nd: YAG laser as excitation source.The time tomographic scanning results showed that the fluorescence spectrum envelopes centered in 305.6 nm and 337.2 nm and the regular fluorescence lines centered in 424.7 nm in the laser induced dispersive fluorescence spectra (LIDFS) were attributed to transitions to the different vibrational levels of ground electronic state X1A1 from low vibrational levels of B1B1, A1A2 and the ground vibrational level a3B1 respectively.The sensitive detection wavelength (425 nm) of SO2 gas was confirmed by the experiment.The harmonic frequencies of the symmetry stretch vibration (ω1 =1151.8 cm-1 ±0.6cm-1) and the bend vibration (ω2=517.8 cm-1 ±0.6 cm-1) of X1A1 state were also calculated from the experimental data.The anharmonic constants of stretch vibration mode and the bend vibration mode arex11 = 8±0.6 cm-1 andx22 = 9.2±0.6 cm-1 respectively.%以纳秒Nd:YAG激光器的四倍频(266 nm)为激发源,利用门选通增强光学多通道光谱分析仪(OMA),研究了SO2分子第一激发带粒子的荧光辐射与碰撞弛豫相结合的复杂退激发过程.通过对SO2分子第一激发带的激发及碰撞弛豫过程的时间断层扫描分析,可以将激光诱导色散荧光谱中以305.6 rnm、337.2 nm为中心的荧光包络和以424.7 nm为中心的规则序列分别归属于B1B1、A1A2低振动能级和a3B1基振动能级到基电子态X1A1不同振动能级的荧光跃迁,由此可以确定大气污染气体SO2的诱导荧光的灵敏检测波长为425 nm由规则序列的实验数据可以计算出SO2分子基电子态X1A1的对称振动和弯曲振动模式的基振动角频率分别为ω1=1151.8士0.6 cm-1和ω2=517.8

  5. Discrimination of Crude Oil Samples Using Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy%基于激光诱导时间分辨荧光的原油识别方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩晓爽; 刘德庆; 栾晓宁; 郭金家; 刘永信; 郑荣儿

    2016-01-01

    在柴油、汽油、重质燃料油等成品油和原油等溢油油源的区分方面 ,荧光光谱结合模式识别手段得到了广泛的应用.传统的三维荧光光谱分析方法虽然能够获得溢油样品丰富的成分信息 ,但难以适应现场应用的要求 ,目前还停留在实验室检测的阶段.发展适用于现场应用的原油识别方法 ,对于海洋溢油污染的快速响应与处理意义重大.面向激光雷达的需要 ,发展了一种基于激光诱导时间分辨荧光手段、结合支持向量机(SVM )模型的原油识别方法 ,从时间和波长两个不同维度出发 ,通过对时间窗口和波长范围的选取进行优化 ,获得了理想的油种识别准确率.实验结果表明通过选取ICCD探测延时为54~74 ns可以将分类正确率从全谱线数据的83. 3% 提高到88. 1% .通过选取波长范围为387. 00~608. 87 nm的谱线数据 ,可将疑似油种的分类正确率从全谱线数据的84% 提高到100% .激光荧光雷达在实际工作中 ,受波浪、运载平台晃动等因素的影响 ,探测延时会出现一定的波动.本文介绍的分类识别方法通过时间和波长两个维度的筛选 ,更加适用于现场探测数据的识别 ,并进一步凸显了原油时间分辨荧光光谱特征 ,为疑似油种分类识别过程中数据量的压缩提供了重要依据.%The Laser-induced fluorescence spectra combined with pattern recognition method has been widely applied in discrimi-nation of different spilled oil ,such as diesel ,gasoline ,and crude oil .However ,traditional three-dimension fluorescence analysis method ,which is not adapted to requirement of field detection ,is limited to laboratory investigatio ns .The development of oil identification method for field detection is significant to quick response and operation of oil spill .In this paper ,a new method based on laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence combined with support vector machine (SVM ) model was introduced to dis

  6. Laser Induced Fluorescence of the Iodine Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Xe I 2 3 Szabo et al 2011 JPC DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for Public Release; Distribution unlimited Comparison of Alternative Propellants 200 W HET...Hillier AFIT thesis – Szabo, et al ( JPC 2011, JPP 2012) – Successful operation on 200 W HET • Iodine HET performance – Meets or exceeds Xe performance

  7. Environmental screening of acidic compounds based on capillary zone electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence detection with identification by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, W C; Grange, A H; Kelliher, V; Patterson, D B; Montcalm, A; Glassman, J; Farley, J W

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the application of capillary zone electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence detection (CZE/LIF) to the discovery of acidic compounds in environmental matrixes or the screening of extracts for acidic components. Published studies indicate that coal-derived materials contain a significant fraction of acidic compounds relative to materials derived from petroleum and shales. Such compounds may be useful as marker compounds for site assessment and source apportionment issues, and their identification may be important in toxicological and other health issues. We used deep-UV light from the frequency-doubled Ar ion laser at 244 and 257 nm to study extracts of samples. The CZE/LIF technique possesses good sensitivity and therefore overcomes one of the limitations of CZE with UV detection. The present work depends on high pressure/temperature solvent extraction of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PNA)-contaminated soil, followed by separation using CZE. The anionic analytes were separated by using borate or phosphate buffer (pH 9.2-12.3) after a chemical class separation. Samples were also characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using full scans at low resolution, and elemental compositions were determined unequivocally by GC/high-resolution MS (GC/HRMS) using mass peak profiling (MPP). The similarity of low-resolution electron ionization mass spectra for a standard, 1-hydroxypyrene, and for a series of compounds in a contaminated-soil extract suggested that several types of phenolic and hydroxy-PNAs were present, including hydroxylated derivatives of fluorenes, fluoranthenes, and pyrenes. GC/HRMS using MPP confirmed the elemental compositions of the hydroxyfluorenes and hydroxypyrenes (and presumably hydroxyfluoranthenes) as [C13H10O] and [C16H10O], respectively. A new version of the MPP software was written for the Finnigan-MAT 900S-Trap and was similar to that developed previously for the VG 250SE. Inclusion of a calibration

  8. Assembly and function test of capillary electrotrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence%毛细管电泳-激光诱导荧光分析仪组装与性能测试

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余长柱; 姜同翠; 马云鹏; 吴婷妮; 李俊

    2012-01-01

    Aim To assemble a simple capillary electrotrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) analyzer. Methods A 473-nm MBL-10 diode pumped solid-state laser was employed as an excitation source. The analytical system was based on the collinear optic configuration arrangement. VB2 was used as model compound to evaluate the analytical characteristics. Results The concentration detection limit (CLOD) and mass detection limit ( MLOD) of VB2 was 2.0 × 10-9 mol · L-1 (7.5 × 107g·L-1) and4.0 × 10-18mol(l. 5 × 10-15 g) , respectively. The linear calibration range was from 1.0 × 10-8 to 1.0 × 10-6 mol · L-1. Conlusion The home-made CE-LIF analyzer is simple to assemble and convenient to carry out,which has a very high detection sensitivity.%目的 组装一台毛细管电泳-激光诱导荧光分析仪.方法以473 nm半导体泵浦固体激光器为激发光源,自制的激光诱导荧光检测器采用共线型光学结构,用VB2为模型化合物进行该分析仪的性能评价.结果 VB2的浓度检出限为2.0×10-9 mol·L-1(7.5×10-7 g·L-1),质量检出限为4.0×10-18 mol(1.5×10-15 g),在1.0× 10-8 ~ 1.0×10-6 mol·L-1浓度范围内呈线性相关.结论 自组装毛细管电泳-激光诱导荧光分析仪具有结构简单,操作方便,灵敏度高等优点.

  9. Laser-Induced Fluorescence of 1-Methylnaphthalene in a Supersonic Jet Expansion%1-甲基萘的振动分辨激光诱导荧光光谱研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王录飞; 吴其俊; 祖莉莉

    2011-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum of So→S1 transition of 1-methylnaphthalene was obtained in supersonic jet condition. Theoretical calculations were conducted to study the geometry and energy of 1-methylnaphthalene at the ground and first excited state. Geometry optimization for the ground state was performed by DFT/B3LYP methods using 6-311 ++G

  10. Laser-induced incandescence calibration via gravimetric sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M. Y.; Vander Wal, R. L.; Zhou, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Absolute calibration of laser-induced incandescence (LII) is demonstrated via comparison of LII signal intensities with gravimetrically determined soot volume fractions. This calibration technique does not rely upon calculated or measured optical characteristics of soot. The variation of the LII signal with gravimetrically measured soot volume fractions ranging from 0.078 to 1.1 ppm established the linearly of the calibration. With the high spatial and temporal resolution capabilities of laser-induced incandescence (LII), the spatial and temporal fluctuations of the soot field within a gravimetric chimney were characterized. Radial uniformity of the soot volume fraction, f(sub v) was demonstrated with sufficient averaging of the single laser-shot LII images of the soot field thus confirming the validity of the calibration method for imaging applications. As illustration, instantaneous soot volume fractions within a Re = 5000 ethylene/air diffusion flame measured via planar LII were established quantitatively with this calibration.

  11. Development and validation of an ultrasensitive fluorescence planar waveguide biosensor for the detection of paralytic shellfish toxins in marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneely, Julie P; Campbell, Katrina; Greef, Charles; Lochhead, Michael J; Elliott, Christopher T

    2013-03-15

    Marine dinoflagellates of the genera Alexandrium are well known producers of the potent neurotoxic paralytic shellfish toxins that can enter the food web and ultimately present a serious risk to public health in addition to causing huge economic losses. Direct coastal monitoring of Alexandrium spp. can provide early warning of potential shellfish contamination and risks to consumers and so a rapid, sensitive, portable and easy-to-use assay has been developed for this purpose using an innovative planar waveguide device. The disposable planar waveguide is comprised of a transparent substrate onto which an array of toxin-protein conjugates is deposited, assembled in a cartridge allowing the introduction of sample, and detection reagents. The competitive assay format uses a high affinity antibody to paralytic shellfish toxins with a detection signal generated via a fluorescently labelled secondary antibody. The waveguide cartridge is analysed by a simple reader device and results are displayed on a laptop computer. Assay speed has been optimised to enable measurement within 15 min. A rapid, portable sample preparation technique was developed for Alexandrium spp. in seawater to ensure analysis was completed within a short period of time. The assay was validated and the LOD and CCβ were determined as 12 pg/mL and 20 pg/mL respectively with an intra-assay CV of 11.3% at the CCβ and an average recovery of 106%. The highly innovative assay was proven to accurately detect toxin presence in algae sampled from the US and European waters at an unprecedented cell density of 10 cells/L. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Introduction of an electron push-pull system yields a planar Red Kaede fluorescence protein chromophore analogue stabilized by a C = O… interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashish Singh; Basanta Kumar Rajbongshi; Gurunath Ramanathan

    2015-05-01

    Crystal structures of four red kaede fluorescence protein chromophore analogues are reported here. Molecules I-III adopt a non-planar geometry stabilized by … stacking and hydrogen bonding. Introduction of an electron push-pull system induces molecule IV to be planar and a C = O… supramolecular interaction is observed as well. Strong electron withdrawing and donating groups also ensure formation of a higher order two and three dimensional supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonds in molecules I and IV. All the analogues exhibit good photoluminescence properties and emit in the red region with excellent quantum yields.

  13. 胶束电动色谱-激光诱导荧光检测法测定肌松弛药巴氯芬%Determination of baclofen using micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser induced fluorescence detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宇飞; 杨甲甲; 蔡元丽; 林夏; 李晖

    2011-01-01

    A novel micellar electrokinetic chromatographic method with laser induced fluorescence detection after derivatization with 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-l ,3-diazole( NBD-C1) was developed for the determination of muscle relaxant drug baclofen ( BAL). After optimization, baseline separation of the derivatives of BAL and gabapentin (internal standard) was obtained within 7 min in a running buffer (pH 9. 75) composed of 15 mmol/L sodium borate, 20 mmol/L sodium dodecyl sulfate and 10% (v/v) acetonitrile. The separation voltage was 17. 5 kV. The column temperature was 25 ℃. The samples were injected by a pressure of 3. 45 kPa(0. 5 psi) for 3 s. The method has a linear range of 0. 025 - 25 mg/L for BAL with the correlation coefficient of 0. 999 9. The limit of detection ( LOD, S/N = 3) and the limit of quantification (LOQ, S/Af = 10) were 0.90 |xg/L and 6.25 μg/L, respectively. The developed method was used for the analysis of BAL pharmaceutical preparation and urine samples spiked with BAL standard. The ranges of recovery were 101. 6% - 107. 9% for BAL preparation and 107. 0% - 109. 6% for urine samples. This method can be applied to the quality assessment of baclofen drug products, and provide supplementary means for the drug metabolism research of baclofen.%以4-氯-7-硝基苯并-2-氧杂-1,3-二唑(NBD-CIl)为柱前衍生试剂,建立了胶束电动色谱-激光诱导荧光检测法测定肌松弛药巴氯芬( BAL)的新方法.经过实验条件的优化,采用15 mmol/L硼砂、20 mmol/L十二烷基硫酸钠、10%(v/v)乙腈、pH 9.75的缓冲体系,在分离电压为17.5 kV、柱温为25℃的条件下,压力进样3.45 kPa(0.5 psi)×3s,巴氯芬及其内标物的衍生产物在7 min内实现较好的基线分离,线性范围为0.025 ~25 mg/L,相关系数为0 999 9,检出限(S/N=3)和定量限(S/N=10)分别为0.90 μg/L和6.25 μg/L.该方法被应用于巴氯芬制剂及加入巴氯芬对照品的尿液样品分析,回收率范围分别为101.6%~107.9

  14. Treatment of Laser-Induced Retinal Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-29

    Distribution List (enclosed) bI’TF rruIoN STATEMEN A Approved for publi reljaso Disatbunon Unlimited TREATMENT OF LASER-INDUCED RETINAL INJURIES FINAL...suprathreshold retinal laser lesions II. Subthreshold retinal laser lesions III. Effect of steroid treatment on laser-induced retinal injury Discussion and...In the present study we investigated the effect of corticosteroid treatment of argon laser-induced retinal injury on vitreal accumulation of both

  15. Combustion characteristics of stratified mixture. 1st Report. Measurement of mixture distribution in a constant-volume combustion chamber using laser-induced NO2 fluorescence; Sojo kongoki no nensho tokusei ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. Laser reiki NO2 keikoho ni yoru teiyo nenshokinai kongoki bunpu no keisoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, M.; Nishida, K.; Hiroyasu, H. [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Tabata, M. [Mazda Motor Corp., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1996-06-25

    Laser-induced fluorescence from nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as gas fuel tracer was applied to determine mixture stratification in a pancake-type constant-volume combustion chamber using propane and hydrogen fuels. The second-harmonic output of a pulsed Nd: YAG laser was used as a light source for fluorescence excitation. The fluorescence images were corrected by a gated image-intensified CCD camera. The quantitative analysis of fuel concentration was made possible by the application of linearity between fluorescence intensity and NO2 concentration at a low trace level. The stratified mixture (center-rich or center-lean) was concentrically formed in the central region of the chamber by a jet flow from a tangentially oriented port. The concentration difference in the radial direction of the chamber decreased with time from the start of injection. The rate of decrease was faster for hydrogen than for propane. After 300 ms from start of injection, however, the time histories of the concentration difference were nearly constant for both fuels regardless of overall concentration. 10 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Laser-Induced Energy Transfer in Solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, J.B.W.; Rullmann, Johan; Wiersma, Douwe

    1981-01-01

    Laser-induced energy transfer was observed and studied in the system pentacene doped into naphthalene. The transfer spectrum shows a remarkable correspondence with the host density of states function. The rate for laser-induced energy transfer is given and it is concluded that most likely, intermole

  17. DNA deposition through laser induced forward transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colina, M; Serra, P; Fernández-Pradas, J M; Sevilla, L; Morenza, J L

    2005-02-15

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a laser direct write technique that appears to be specially adequate for the production of biosensors, since it permits to deposit patterns of biomolecules with high spatial resolution. In the LIFT technique, a laser pulse is focused on a thin film of the material to be transferred through a transparent support, and under the action of the laser pulse, a small fraction of the film is transferred to a receptor substrate that is placed parallel to the film-support system. In the case of biomolecules transfer, the thin film consists in a liquid solution containing the biomolecules. In this work, microarrays of two different cDNAs have been both spotted by LIFT and pin microspotting onto a poly-L-lysine treated glass slide. Once transferred, all the microarrays have been submitted to hybridization with the complementary strands of the spotted cDNAs, each one tagged with a different fluorochrome. Comparative fluorescence scanner analyses have revealed that the microarrays transferred through LIFT are equivalent to those transferred through pin microspotting in terms of signal intensity and gene discrimination capacity, and that the action of the laser pulse does not result in significant damage of the transferred DNA.

  18. Laser-induced damage in optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ristau, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated to users and developers of high-powered systems, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials focuses on the research field of laser-induced damage and explores the significant and steady growth of applications for high-power lasers in the academic, industrial, and military arenas. Written by renowned experts in the field, this book concentrates on the major topics of laser-induced damage in optical materials and most specifically addresses research in laser damage that occurs in the bulk and on the surface or the coating of optical components. It considers key issues in the field of hi

  19. A new method for measuring concentration of a fluorescent tracer in bubbly gas-liquid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddas, J. S.; Trägårdh, C.; Kovacs, T.; Östergren, K.

    2002-06-01

    A new experimental model, the two-tracer method (TTM), based on the planar laser-induced fluorescence technique (PLIF), is presented for the measurement of the local concentration of a fluorescent tracer in the liquid phase of a bubbly two-phase system. Light scattering and shading effects due to the bubbles were compensated for using the new model. The TTM results were found to give more accurate predictions of the local concentration than the normal PLIF method in a bubbly two-phase system.

  20. Surgical Treatment of Laser Induced Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-05

    AD-A234 849 CONTRACT NO.: DAMD17-89-C-9026 TITLE: SURGICAL TREATMENT OF LASER INDUCED EYE INJURIES AUTHORS: Leonard M. Hjelmeland, Maurice B. Landers...62787A 62787A878 BA JDA318205 11. TITLE (Include Secirity Classification) (U) Surgical Treatment of Laser Induced Eye Injuries 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP RA 3; Lasers; Eye injury ; Surgery 09 03 06 04 19. ABSTRACT

  1. Perturbation of planarity as the possible mechanism of solvent-dependent variations of fluorescence quantum yield in 2-aryl-3-hydroxychromones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchenko, Andrey S.; Pivovarenko, Vasyl G.; Demchenko, Alexander P.

    2003-03-01

    In order to understand the unexpectedly low quantum yields of 3-hydroxyflavones (3-HFs) in certain solvents, such as acetonitrile or ethyl acetate, the comparative study of solvent-dependent properties of parent 3-HF, 2-furyl-3-hydroxychromone and 2-benzofuryl-3-hydroxychromone derivatives have been performed. The results suggest that the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bond of 3-hydroxy group with the solvent favors non-planar conformations of phenyl group with respect to chromone system. This steric hindrance is not observed in the case of furan- and benzofuran-substituted 3-hydroxychromones (3-HCs). These results suggesting a new strategy for dramatic improvement of fluorescence properties of 3-HCs as two-wavelength ratiometric fluorescence probes.

  2. Raman and Luminescence Investigation of Rare Earth Doped Laser-Induced Crystals-in-Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Brian; Stone, Adam; Jain, Himanshu; Dierolf, Volkmar

    2015-03-01

    Laser induced crystallization of glasses is a highly spatially selective process which has the potential to produce compact, integrated optics within a glass matrix. In LaBGeO5 low temperature Combined Excitation Emission Spectroscopy (CEES) revealed that erbium incorporates into both glass-ceramics and laser-induced crystals-in-glass in predominantly one type of environment (site). The energy levels of this site were quantified. The fluorescence characteristics of the erbium ions in any site in the laser-induced crystals were found to be only weakly influenced by the irradiation conditions during growth. On the other hand, a hidden parameter, potentially boron deficiency-related defects, resulted in a significant change in the incorporation behavior of the erbium ions. Scanning confocal Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the energies of the Raman modes are shifted and the erbium fluorescence intensity is inhomgeneously distributed, despite the host glass being homogeneously doped, across the cross-sections of laser-induced crystals in glass. These fluctuations within the Raman and fluorescence are spatially correlated, implying that different erbium sites form preferentially at different locations in the crystal cross-section.

  3. Optical and fluorescent properties of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} sol-gel planar waveguides containing Tb{sup 3+} doped nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.C.; Garapon, C.; Bazzi, R.; Pillonnet, A.; Tillement, O.; Mugnier, J. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents, Villeurbanne (France)

    2007-06-15

    Terbium doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} planar waveguides were fabricated by sol-gel process and dip-coating using yttrium acetate as precursor. Two different doping modes were compared, i.e. introduction in the sol of dispersed Tb{sup 3+}ions from dissolved Tb(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, or of nanoparticles of Tb{sub 2}O{sub 3} or [Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:50% Tb] from an alcoholic suspension. The chemical and nanostructural properties were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The Tb{sup 3+} fluorescence properties were studied as a function of temperature and atmosphere of the thermal treatments, and of the Tb{sup 3+} concentration. The fluorescence properties are discussed in relation to the quenching mechanisms induced by Tb{sup 4+} transformation, residual OH groups, and crystallites size and structure. Optical propagation losses of the Tb doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} planar waveguides related to the doping modes and Tb{sup 3+} concentration are presented. Doping sol-gel films by nanoparticles is shown to be a valuable alternative to the conventional doping from dissolved terbium salt. (orig.)

  4. Hyperspectral laser-induced flourescence imaging for assessing internal quality of kiwi fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Muhua; Liao, Yifeng; Zhou, Xiaomei

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes an experimental study on non-destructive methods for predicting quality of kiwifruits using fluorescence imaging. The method is based on hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging in the region between 700 and 1110 nm, and estimates the kiwifruits quality in terms of internal sugar content and firmness. A station for acquiring hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging has been designed and carefully choosing each component. The fluorescence imaging acquired by the station has been pre-processed by selecting regions of interest (ROIs) of 50 100 × pixels. A line regressing prediction method estimates the quality of kiwifruit samples. The results obtained in classification show that the station and prediction model enables the correct discrimination of kiwifruits internal sugar content and firmness with a percentage of r= 98.5%, SEP=0.4 and r=99.9%, SEP=0.62.

  5. Rapid topology probing using fluorescence spectroscopy in planar lipid bilayer: the pore-forming mechanism of the toxin Cry1Aa of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groulx, Nicolas; Juteau, Marc; Blunck, Rikard

    2010-11-01

    Pore-forming toxins, many of which are pathogenic to humans, are highly dynamic proteins that adopt a different conformation in aqueous solution than in the lipid environment of the host membrane. Consequently, their crystal structures obtained in aqueous environment do not reflect the active conformation in the membrane, making it difficult to deduce the molecular determinants responsible for pore formation. To obtain structural information directly in the membrane, we introduce a fluorescence technique to probe the native topology of pore-forming toxins in planar lipid bilayers and follow their movement during pore formation. Using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) approach between site-directedly labeled proteins and an absorbing compound (dipicrylamine) in the membrane, we simultaneously recorded the electrical current and fluorescence emission in horizontal planar lipid bilayers formed in plastic chips. With this system, we mapped the topology of the pore-forming domain of Cry1Aa, a biological pesticide from Bacillus thuringiensis, by determining the location of the loops between its seven α helices. We found that the majority of the toxins initially traverse from the cis to the trans leaflet of the membrane. Comparing the topologies of Cry1Aa in the active and inactive state in order to identify the pore-forming mechanism, we established that only the α3-α4 hairpin translocates through the membrane from the trans to the cis leaflet, whereas all other positions remained constant. As toxins are highly dynamic proteins, populations that differ in conformation might be present simultaneously. To test the presence of different populations, we designed double-FRET experiments, where a single donor interacts with two acceptors with very different kinetics (dipicrylamine and oxonol). Due to the nonlinear response of FRET and the dynamic change of the acceptor distribution, we can deduce the distribution of the acceptors in the membrane from the time

  6. Treatment of Laser Induced Retinal Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-02

    END 1.0 1.18 Yl(-ROCOPY Ri yjTuION If ’,! (HART !. UIH; iLruud @ N TREATMENT OF LASER INDUCED RETINAL INJURIES (ANNUAL REPORT 00 DTIC Michael Belkin...NO. CCESSION NO _______________________________61102A I102BS1O0 CF 1i. 446 TITLE (Indude S*.curny Claifkaion) TREATMENT OF LASER INDUCED RETINAL... INJURIES PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) M. BELKIN N. NAVEH a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Mont. D y) S. PAGE COUNT FROM Xaj& TO l 2Ann

  7. Effect of hydrogen peroxide with different pH values on the color, translucency and laser-induced fluorescence of human dentin%不同pH值过氧化氢对人牙本质颜色、透明度和激光诱导荧光的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁珊珊; 蒋滔; 王贻宁

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of 30% hydrogen peroxide(HP) with different pH values on color,translucency and laser-induced fluorescence of human dentin.Methods Sixty dentin specimens from crown of mandibular third molars were randomly assigned into four groups (n =15) and treated with acidic 30% HP,neutral 30% HP,alkaline 30% HP and deionized water (control group),respectively.The bleaching process was 0.5 h × 4 times,and time points for measuring were baseline (0),0.5,1 and 2 h.A colorimeter was employed to measure the L *,a *,b * coordinates of dentin against white,black and yellow background.Then the parameters of translucency,masking effects,chroma and whiteness were calculated.The dentinal laser-induced Raman/fluorescence spectra was recorded by a Raman spectrometer and the fluorescence intensity (FI) and FI% were calculated.Results △FI of acidic,neutral,alkaline 30% HP at 2 h were 9960.03 ±2037.74,8502.09 ± 1413.86,8554.29 ± 1986.19.And △FI% were 84.60 ± 3.43,84.89 ± 5.19,86.72 ± 2.65,respectively.Repeated measure of ANOVA revealed that all parameters in the bleaching groups were significantly influenced by time (P < 0.001).Compared with control group,bleaching resulted significant change of △TP,△chroma,△ whiteness,△L*,△a*,△b*,△E,△FI and △FI% (P <0.001).There was no significant difference between three bleaching groups on △TP,△masking effects,△chroma,△whiteness,△L*,△b*,△E,△FI and △FI%.Correlation analysis demonstrated that FI was associated with chroma,a*,b* and whiteness,respectively,and △FI was associated with △TP,△masking effects,△whiteness,△chroma,△b* and △ E.Conclusions 30% HP with different pH values could result in the same change of the color,translucency and laser-induced fluorescence of human dentin.Laser-induced fluorescence was associated with dentinal color and translucency,which might be a novel way to investigate the bleaching mechanism of dentin

  8. Estimation of protein concentration at high sensitivity using SDS-capillary gel electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence detection with 3-(2-furoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde protein labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrell, Miriam S; Kálmán, Franka

    2016-11-01

    3-(2-furoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde (FQ) is a sensitive fluorogenic dye, used for derivatization of proteins for SDS-CGE with LIF detection (SDS-CGE-LIF) at silver staining sensitivity (ng/mL). FQ labels proteins at primary amines, found at lysines and N-termini, which vary in number and accessibility for different proteins. This work investigates the accuracy of estimation of protein concentration with SDS-CGE-LIF in real biological samples, where a different protein must be used as a standard. Sixteen purified proteins varying in molecular weight, structure, and sequence were labeled with FQ at constant mass concentration applying a commonly used procedure for SDS-CGE-LIF. The fluorescence of these proteins was measured using a spectrofluorometer and found to vary with a RSD of 36%. This compares favorably with other less sensitive methods for estimation of protein concentration such as SDS-CGE-UV and SDS-PAGE-Coomassie and is vastly superior to the equivalently sensitive silver stain. Investigation into the number of labels bound with UHPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS revealed large variations in the labeling efficiency (percentage of labels to the number of labeling sites given by the sequence) for different proteins (from 3 to 30%). This explains the observation that fluorescence per mole of protein was not proportional to the number of lysines in the sequence. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Laser induced white lighting of graphene foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Tomala, Robert; Lukaszewicz, Mikolaj; Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gerasymchuk, Yuriy; Gluchowski, Pawel; Marciniak, Lukasz; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Hreniak, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Laser induced white light emission was observed from porous graphene foam irradiated with a focused continuous wave beam of the infrared laser diode. It was found that the intensity of the emission increases exponentially with increasing laser power density, having a saturation level at ca. 1.5 W and being characterized by stable emission conditions. It was also observed that the white light emission is spatially confined to the focal point dimensions of the illuminating laser light. Several other features of the laser induced white light emission were also discussed. It was observed that the white light emission is highly dependent on the electric field intensity, allowing one to modulate the emission intensity. The electric field intensity ca. 0.5 V/μm was able to decrease the white light intensity by half. Origins of the laser-induced white light emission along with its characteristic features were discussed in terms of avalanche multiphoton ionization, inter-valence charge transfer and possible plasma build-up processes. It is shown that the laser-induced white light emission may be well utilized in new types of white light sources.

  10. Laser induced white lighting of graphene foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Tomala, Robert; Lukaszewicz, Mikolaj; Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gerasymchuk, Yuriy; Gluchowski, Pawel; Marciniak, Lukasz; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Hreniak, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Laser induced white light emission was observed from porous graphene foam irradiated with a focused continuous wave beam of the infrared laser diode. It was found that the intensity of the emission increases exponentially with increasing laser power density, having a saturation level at ca. 1.5 W and being characterized by stable emission conditions. It was also observed that the white light emission is spatially confined to the focal point dimensions of the illuminating laser light. Several other features of the laser induced white light emission were also discussed. It was observed that the white light emission is highly dependent on the electric field intensity, allowing one to modulate the emission intensity. The electric field intensity ca. 0.5 V/μm was able to decrease the white light intensity by half. Origins of the laser-induced white light emission along with its characteristic features were discussed in terms of avalanche multiphoton ionization, inter-valence charge transfer and possible plasma build-up processes. It is shown that the laser-induced white light emission may be well utilized in new types of white light sources. PMID:28112254

  11. Laser-induced tobacco protoplast fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李银妹; 关力劼; 楼立人; 崔国强; 姚湲; 王浩威; 操传顺; 鲁润龙; 陈曦

    1999-01-01

    Laser tweezers can manipulate small particles, such as cells and organdies. When coupling them with laser microbeam selective fusion of two tobacco protoplasts containing some chloroplast was achieved. Physical and biological variables that affect laser trapping and laser-induced fusion were also discussed. The results show that the effect of chloroplast content and distribution on the yield of cell fusion is remarkable.

  12. Modeling of laser induced periodic surface structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skolski, J.Z.P.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.; Mitko, V.S.; Obona, J.V.; Ocelik, V.; Hosson, J.T.M. de

    2010-01-01

    In surfaces irradiated by short laser pulses, Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) have been observed on all kind of materials for over forty years. These LIPSS, also referred to as ripples, consist of wavy surfaces with periodicity equal or smaller than the wavelength of the laser radi

  13. Printing biological solutions through laser-induced forward transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duocastella, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Domínguez, J.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique adequate for the high-resolution printing of a wide range of materials, including biological molecules. In this article, the preparation through LIFT of microarrays of droplets from a solution containing rabbit antibody immunoglobulin G (IgG) is presented. The microarrays were prepared at different laser pulse energy conditions, obtaining microdroplets with a circular and well-defined contour. The transfer process has a double threshold: a minimum energy density required to generate an impulsion on the liquid film, and a minimum pulse energy, which corresponds to the onset for material ejection. In addition, it was demonstrated that the transfer process can be correctly described through a simple model which relates the energy density threshold with the amount of released material. Finally, a fluorescence assay was carried out in which the preservation of the activity of the transferred biomolecules was demonstrated.

  14. Simultaneous separation of five major ribonucleic acids by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence in the presence of electroosmotic flow: application to the rapid screening of 5S rRNA from ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ya-Chu; Liao, Ching-Ru; Chung, I-Che; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chang, Po-Ling

    2014-10-17

    RNA integrity is important in RNA studies because poor RNA quality may impact downstream methodologies. This study proposes a rapid and cost-effective method for the determination of RNA integrity based on CE-LIF in the presence of electroosmotic flow. The proposed method uses poly(ethylene) oxide (Mavg=4,000,000 Da) as a sieving matrix for total RNA separation. Ethidium bromide (μg mL(-1)) was dissolved in a polymer solution as an interchelating dye for on-column fluorescent labeling. The 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA, 5S rRNA and tRNA from the total human RNA extracted from the cells were fully separated using the proposed method. The lowest detectable concentration of total RNA achieved was 100 pg μL(-1) with a 6 min sample injection followed by on-column concentration. In addition, the temperature-induced degradation of total RNA was observed by CE-LIF. The electropherograms revealed more fragmentation of 28S and 18S rRNAs by temperature-induced hydrolysis compared with the 5.8S rRNA, 5S rRNA and tRNA. Therefore, the results indicated that RNA degradation should be considered for long-term, high-temperature incubations in RNA-related experiments involving RNA hybridization. The proposed method is furthermore, applied to the determination of 5S rRNA overexpressed in ovarian cancer cells as compared to the cervical cancer cells. Overall, CE-LIF is highly promising for rapid screening of ovarian cancers without tedious pre-amplification steps. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. NO2分子519~524 nm区的激光诱导荧光激发谱%Laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum of NO2 in the region519~524 nm at room temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔执凤; 凤尔银; 陈东; 季学韩; 周士康

    2001-01-01

    实验测定了室温下NO2分子在519~524 nm区域的高分辨激光诱导荧光激发谱,标识了25个振动带,并作了转动分析,确定了这些带的带源、转动常数以及旋-转偶合常数等分子常数,其中有8个振动带是新发现的,对振动带的转动结构分析表明,所有得到转动标识的谱线均属于平行跃迁2B2-AX~U62A1,其中上振动能级具有B2对称类是由于电子激发态AA~U62B2与电子基态的振动能级之间的强烈相互作用所致。%The high-resolution fluorescence excitation spectrum was measured in the region 519~524 nm at room temperature. Though the spectrum is rather congested, we determined the molecular constants such as band origins and rotational and spin-rotation constants for 25 vibronic bands in the this region. Among the vibronic bands assigned there were 8 new bands reported firstly. All rotational structures analyzed are of the parallel type. It was shown from the experiment that the high lying vibration levels of ground state AX~U62A1 heavily perturbed the electronic excited state AA~U62B2.

  16. Study of plant fluorescence prop erties based on laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging technology%基于激光诱导叶绿素荧光寿命成像技术的植物荧光特性研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万文博; 华灯鑫; 乐静; 闫哲; 周春艳

    2015-01-01

    Plant fluorescence is a susceptible signal in plant fluorescence remote sensing detection. In order to solve this problem, a technique for plant chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging is presented to evaluate living status for plant growth and environmental monitoring. A concave lens is used to expand laser beam at a wavelength of 355 nm, and the living plant is exposed in this laser light source to excite chlorophyll fluorescence. And the chlorophyll fluorescence signals are detected by an intensification charge coupled device. Time resolved measurement method is used in this article, so that every time the same fluorescence signals can be excited by the same laser pulse. Meanwhile, the delay time needed for triggering intensification charge coupled device should be changed consecutively, and the whole discrete fluorescence signal can be obtained. The discrete fluorescence signals from the particular location points of the plant are fitted. An improved method of forward iterative deconvolution is used to retrieve the corresponding fluorescence lifetime, and the high-precision fluorescence lifetime can be obtained. Furthermore, the fluorescence lifetime values at all the location points are retrieved to obtain the distribution map of chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime. This method can give the chlorophyll fluorescence image efficiently. The distribution map of fluorescence lifetime can more effectively reflect the plant chlorophyll concentration than the fluorescence intensity image does. The physical property of chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime from living plants has been studied preliminarily, indicating that the plant physiological status is related to its fluorescence lifetime to a certain extent; and the chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime and plant environment have a subtle and complex correlation. In the future, the relationship between chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime and plant environment will be expected to study with the cooperation of biophysicist.

  17. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kasem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS, known also as laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS, is a well-known spectrochemical elemental analysis technique. The field of LIBS has been rapidly matured as a consequence of growing interest in real-time analysis across a broad spectrum of applied sciences and recent development of commercial LIBS analytical systems. In this brief review, we introduce the contributions of the research groups in the African continent in the field of the fundamentals and applications of LIBS. As it will be shown, the fast development of LIBS in Africa during the last decade was mainly due to the broad environmental, industrial, archaeological, and biomedical applications of this technique.

  18. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy on meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giacomo, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari (Italy); MIP-CNR sec Bari (Italy)], E-mail: alessandro.degiacomo@ba.imip.cnr.it; Dell' Aglio, M.; De Pascale, O. [MIP-CNR sec Bari (Italy); Longo, S.; Capitelli, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari (Italy); MIP-CNR sec Bari (Italy)

    2007-12-15

    The classification of meteorites when geological analysis is unfeasible is generally made by the spectral line emission ratio of some characteristic elements. Indeed when a meteorite impacts Earth's atmosphere, hot plasma is generated, as a consequence of the braking effect of air, with the consequent ablation of the falling body. Usually, by the plasma emission spectrum, the meteorite composition is determined, assuming the Boltzmann equilibrium. The plasma generated during Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) experiment shows similar characteristics and allows one to verify the mentioned method with higher accuracy. On the other hand the study of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy on meteorite can be useful for both improving meteorite classification methods and developing on-flight techniques for asteroid investigation. In this paper certified meteorites belonging to different typologies have been investigated by LIBS: Dofhar 461 (lunar meteorite), Chondrite L6 (stony meteorite), Dofhar 019 (Mars meteorite) and Sikhote Alin (irony meteorite)

  19. Planar chromatography mediated screening of tetracycline and fluoroquinolone antibiotics in milk by fluorescence and mass selective detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yisheng; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2013-10-18

    A rapid and efficient method for preliminary screening of four tetracyclines (tetracycline, chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline, doxycline) and three fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, marbofloxacin), mostly detected in milk, by high-performance thin-layer chromatography-fluorescence detection and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPTLC-FLD-ESI/MS) is highlighted. The optimized separation of the target antibiotics on ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid modified silica gel plates showed marked benefits for screening purposes. Besides, selective and sensitive densitometry in fluorescence mode was established with excitation at 366nm for the tetracyclines, 300nm for enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin, and 280nm for marbofloxacin. Limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) with 95% confidence were in the range of 12-25 and 45-95μg/kg, respectively, in milk samples. Recoveries of target antibiotics from milk samples spiked at three critical levels (50, 100 and 150μg/kg) ranged from 76% to 105%. More importantly, a mass selective detection (MSD) was established as additional tool for confirmatory purposes. Using the elution-head based TLC-MS interface, the optimized elution flow consisting of acetonitrile/ammonium formate buffer (9/1, v/v) at a rate of 0.3mL/min enabled time-dependent resolution of analytes from the major interfering compounds, thus circumventing serious ion suppression effects. The established MSD assay also offered high sensitivity (25μg/kg) for confirmation, meeting Commission Regulation (EU) No. 37/2010. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Rapid and cost-effective determination of acrylamide in coffee by planar chromatography and fluorescence detection after derivatization with dansulfinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpmann, Alexander; Morlock, Gertrud

    2009-01-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of acrylamide in ground coffee by planar chromatography using prechromatographic in situ derivatization with dansulfinic acid. After pressurized fluid extraction of acrylamide from the coffee samples, the extracts were passed through activated carbon and concentrated. These extracts were applied onto a silica gel 60 HPTLC plate and oversprayed with dansulfinic acid. By heating the plate, acrylamide was derivatized into the fluorescent product dansylpropanamide. The chromatographic separation with ethyl acetate-tert.-butyl methyl ether (8 + 2, v/v) mobile phase was followed by densitometric quantification at 254/>400 nm using a 4 point calibration via the standard addition method over the whole system for which acrylamide was added at different concentrations at the beginning of the extraction process. The method was validated for commercial coffee. The linearity over the whole procedure showed determination coefficients between 0.9995 and 0.9825 (n = 6). Limit of quantitation at a signal-to-noise ratio of 10 was determined to be 48 microg/kg. The within-run precision (relative standard deviation, n = 6) of the chromatographic method was 3%. Commercial coffee samples analyzed showed acrylamide contents between 52 and 191 microg/kg, which was in correlation with amounts reported in previous publications.

  1. 100 kHz thousand-frame burst-mode planar imaging in turbulent flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, James B; Venkateswaran, Prabhakar; Miller, Joseph D; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh; Meyer, Terrence R

    2014-02-15

    High-repetition-rate, burst-mode lasers can achieve higher energies per pulse compared with continuously pulsed systems, but the relatively few number of laser pulses in each burst has limited the temporal dynamic range of measurements in unsteady flames. A fivefold increase in the range of timescales that can be resolved by burst-mode laser-based imaging systems is reported in this work by extending a hybrid diode- and flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG-based amplifier system to nearly 1000 pulses at 100 kHz during a 10 ms burst. This enables an unprecedented burst-mode temporal dynamic range to capture turbulent fluctuations from 0.1 to 50 kHz in flames of practical interest. High pulse intensity enables efficient conversion to the ultraviolet for planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nascent formaldehyde and other potential flame radicals.

  2. Harvard ER-2 OH laser-induced fluorescence instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennberg, Paul O.; Anderson, James G.

    1994-01-01

    The Harvard ER-2 OH instrument is scheduled to be integrated into the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft ozone payload in August 1992. Design and fabrication is presently underway. This experiment is a descendant of a balloon borne instrument designed and built in the mid-1980s. The ER-2 instrument is being designed to measure OH and HO2 as part of the NASA ozone payload for the investigation of processes controlling the concentration of stratospheric ozone. Although not specifically designed to do so, it is hoped that valid measurements of OH and HO2 can be made in the remote free troposphere with this instrument.

  3. Formaldehyde Profiler Using Laser Induced Fluorescence Technique Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Formaldehyde (HCHO) is of great interest to atmospheric scientists in NASA and other research institutions. In this SBIR project, we propose to build an airborne or...

  4. Laser Induced Millimeter Wave Fluorescence From Bio-Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    have on identifying and developing effective sensor countermeasures against bio-warfare agent threats - in particular an effective bio-threat early ...IR Intensityf’fewmal IR htensjty 850 900 950 1000 1050 Vibrational Frequency (cm1) (a) (LAMP Transition Probability IR hta -i3tyMa;urral IR

  5. Formaldehyde Profiler Using Laser Induced Fluorescence Technique Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a key trace species that is of great interest to atmospheric scientists in NASA and other research institutions. In this SBIR project, we...

  6. Laser induced forward transfer of soft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Dinca, V.; Luculescu, C.; Shaw-Stewart, J.; Nagel, M.; Lippert, T.; Dinescu, M.

    2010-12-01

    A strong research effort is presently aimed at patterning methodologies for obtaining controlled defined micrometric polymeric structures for a wide range of applications, including electronics, optoelectronics, sensors, medicine etc. Lasers have been identified as appropriate tools for processing of different materials, such as ceramics and metals, but also for soft, easily damageable materials (biological compounds and polymers). In this work we study the dynamics of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) with a gap between the donor and the receiver substrates, which is the basis for possible applications that require multilayer depositions with high spatial resolution.

  7. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Zhe; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Jun-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical detection technique based on atomic emission spectroscopy to measure the elemental composition. LIBS has been extensively studied and developed due to the non-contact, fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and multi-elemental detection features. The development and applications of LIBS technique in Asia are summarized and discussed in this review paper. The researchers in Asia work on different aspects of the LIBS study in fundamentals, data processing and modeling, applications and instrumentations. According to the current research status, the challenges, opportunities and further development of LIBS technique in Asia are also evaluated to promote LIBS research and its applications.

  8. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Capabilities and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    sample preparation. 14 6. References 1. Cremers D.A.; Radziemski, L. J. Handbook of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy; West Sussex, England...30 (21), 2882–2884. 17. Salle, B.; Lacour, J. L.; Vors, E.; Fichet, P.; Maurice, S.; Cremers , D. A.; et al. Laser- Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy...90. Martin , M. Z.; Labbe, N.; Andre, N.; Harris, R.; Ebinger, M.; Wullschleger, S. D.; et al. High Resolution Applications of Laser-Induced

  9. [Research Progress on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Resonance Excitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-zhao; Hao, Zhong-qi; Guo, Lian-bo; Li, Xiang-you; Lu, Yong-feng; Zeng, Xiao-yan

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), a new kind of atomic spectrum analysis technology, has attracted much atterition of the researchers due to its characteristics of real-time, simultaneous multi-element analysis, and no sample preparation. However, the poor analytical sensitivity has been an important factor that restricts the development of this technology. LIBS based on resonance excitation combines atomic fluorescence spectroscopy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and selectively excites the target elements. In this way, the analytical sensitivity of LIBS can be improved substantially and its application for trace elements detection is greatly expanded. In this paper, the research development of LIBS based on resonance excitation is summarized. The generation of atomic, fluorescence spectrum in laser-induced plasma, the typical classification and the basic principle of LIBS based on resonance. excitation are introduced. The influence of ablation laser energy, resonant laser energy and wavelength, delay between the ablation laser and the resonant laser, and the gate width on spectral enhancement are analyzed in detail. The application status and deficiencies of LIBS based on resonance excitation in the fields of metallurgy, environmental monitoring and isotope detection are elaborated. Future prospects of LIBS based on resonance excitation are also described.

  10. Laser-induced torques in metallic ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Frank; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We study laser-induced torques in bcc Fe, hcp Co, and L 10 FePt based on first-principles electronic structure calculations and the Keldysh nonequilibrium formalism. We find that the torques have two contributions, one from the inverse Faraday effect (IFE) and one from the optical spin-transfer torque (OSTT). Depending on the ferromagnet at hand and on the quasiparticle broadening the two contributions may be of similar magnitude, or one contribution may dominate over the other. Additionally, we determine the nonequilibrium spin polarization in order to investigate its relation to the torque. We find the torques and the perpendicular component of the nonequilibrium spin polarization to be odd in the helicity of the laser light, while the spin polarization that is induced parallel to the magnetization is helicity independent. The parallel component of the nonequilibrium spin polarization is orders of magnitude larger than the perpendicular component. In the case of hcp Co we find good agreement between the calculated laser-induced torque and a recent experiment.

  11. Laser induced phase locking of hydrogen plasma striations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glab, W.; Nayfeh, M.H.

    1982-04-01

    Laser induced transient striations of a hydrogen discharge plasma are studied as a function of the ''detuning'' of the discharge parameters from the steady-state oscillatory response conditions. We observed laser induced phase locking of the steady-state striations.

  12. Laser Induced Selective Activation For Subsequent Autocatalytic Electroless Plating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang

    The subject of this PhD thesis is “Laser induced selective activation for subsequent autocatalytic electroless plating.” The objective of the project is to investigate the process chains for micro structuring of polymer surfaces for selective micro metallization. Laser induced selective activation...

  13. Determination of Five Preservatives in Food by Capillary Electrophoresis with Quantum Dot Indirect Laser Induced Fluorescence%毛细管电泳-量子点间接激光诱导荧光检测5种食品防腐剂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭东山; 陈冠华; 童明珠; 武传芹; 方柔; 伊聆晓

    2012-01-01

    以碲化镉量子点为荧光背景物质,建立了毛细管电泳-间接激光诱导荧光检测食品中对羟基苯甲酸丙酯、脱氢乙酸钠、山梨酸、苯甲酸和丙酸钠含量的方法,紫外吸收很弱的丙酸钠在本方法中显示为正峰,可被有效检出.研究了碲化镉量子点浓度、背景电解质浓度、pH值、分离电压对分析物峰高和迁移时间的影响.在最佳条件下,对羟基苯甲酸丙酯、脱氢乙酸钠、山梨酸、苯甲酸和丙酸钠在8.5 min内得到分离,检出限分别为0.21,0.32,0.50,0.30和0.36 mg/L,相对标准偏差分别为3.9%,2.1%,2.5%,1.9%和2.3%,平均加标回收率分别为96.8%,93.4%,96.3%,98.1%和99.1%.本方法的检出限及线性范围均优于文献报道结果,对食品中这5种防腐剂检测的结果与高效液相色谱法结果一致.%A new assay has been developed by use of capillary electrophoresis with indirect laser induced fluorescence using cadmium telluride quantum dots as fluorescent background substance to determine propylpareben, sodium dehydroacetate, sorbic acid, benzoic acid and sodium propionate in food, in which the sodium propionate with weak UV absorption can be shown as positive peak and effectively detected. The effect of the parameters such as cadmium telluride quantum dot concentration, background electrolyte concentration, pH and separating voltage on the peak height and migration time of analytes have been studied. Under the optimum conditions, propylpareben, sodium dehydroacetate, sorbic acid, benzoic acid and sodium propionate can be separated within 8.5 min. Their detection limits were 0. 21, 0. 32, 0. 50, 0. 30 and 0. 36 mg/L, relative standard deviations 3. 9% , 2. 1%, 2. 5%, 1.9% and 2. 3%, and average recoveries of spiked samples 96. 8% , 93. 4%, 96. 3%, 98. 1% and 99. 1%, respectively. The detection limits and linear dynamic ranges were better than those reported in the references, and the measurement results for the five

  14. Novel estimation of the humification degree of soil organic matter by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Edilene Cristina, E-mail: edilene@iq.unesp.br [Embrapa Instrumentation, Rua XV de Novembro, 1452, CEP 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); São Paulo State University—UNESP, Analytical Chemistry Department, P.O. Box 355, 14801-970 Rua Prof. Francisco Degni, 55, CEP 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Ferreira, Ednaldo José, E-mail: ednaldo.ferreira@embrapa.br [Embrapa Instrumentation, Rua XV de Novembro, 1452, CEP 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Villas-Boas, Paulino Ribeiro, E-mail: paulino.villas-boas@embrapa.br [Embrapa Instrumentation, Rua XV de Novembro, 1452, CEP 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Senesi, Giorgio Saverio, E-mail: giorgio.senesi@ba.imip.cnr.it [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas, CNR, Bari 70126 (Italy); Carvalho, Camila Miranda, E-mail: camilamc@gmail.com [Embrapa Instrumentation, Rua XV de Novembro, 1452, CEP 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Physics Institute of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, IFSC-USP, Av. Trabalhador são-carlense, 400 Pq. Arnold Schimid, 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Romano, Renan Arnon, E-mail: renan.romano@gmail.com [Embrapa Instrumentation, Rua XV de Novembro, 1452, CEP 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Physics Institute of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, IFSC-USP, Av. Trabalhador são-carlense, 400 Pq. Arnold Schimid, 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Martin-Neto, Ladislau, E-mail: ladislau.martin@embrapa.br [Embrapa Instrumentation, Rua XV de Novembro, 1452, CEP 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); and others

    2014-09-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) constitutes an important reservoir of terrestrial carbon and can be considered an alternative for atmospheric carbon storage, contributing to global warming mitigation. Soil management can favor atmospheric carbon incorporation into SOM or its release from SOM to atmosphere. Thus, the evaluation of the humification degree (HD), which is an indication of the recalcitrance of SOM, can provide an estimation of the capacity of carbon sequestration by soils under various managements. The HD of SOM can be estimated by using various analytical techniques including fluorescence spectroscopy. In the present work, the potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to estimate the HD of SOM was evaluated for the first time. Intensities of emission lines of Al, Mg and Ca from LIBS spectra showing correlation with fluorescence emissions determined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) reference technique were used to obtain a multivaried calibration model based on the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) method. The values predicted by the proposed model (A-LIBS) showed strong correlation with LIFS results with a Pearson's coefficient of 0.87. The HD of SOM obtained after normalizing A-LIBS by total carbon in the sample showed a strong correlation to that determined by LIFS (0.94), thus suggesting the great potential of LIBS for this novel application. - Highlights: • Humification degree of soil organic matter (HD) • Importance of soil organic matter HD in keeping carbon in soil • Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) for HD estimation (reference method) • New LIBS application to predict HD.

  15. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jwad, Tahseen, E-mail: taj355@bham.ac.uk; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • A new high resolution laser induced oxidation (colouring) method is proposed (single spot oxidation). • The method is applied to control oxide films thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates in micro-scale. • The method enable imprinting high resolution coloured image on Ti substrate. • Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots using the proposed method. • Colour coding of two colours into one field is presented. - Abstract: Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels’ colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  16. Hyperspectral laser-induced autofluorescence imaging of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is a disease characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals leading to the penetration of bacteria into the dentine and pulp. Early detection of enamel demineralization resulting in increased enamel porosity, commonly known as white spots, is a difficult diagnostic task. Laser induced autofluorescence was shown to be a useful method for early detection of demineralization. The existing studies involved either a single point spectroscopic measurements or imaging at a single spectral band. In the case of spectroscopic measurements, very little or no spatial information is acquired and the measured autofluorescence signal strongly depends on the position and orientation of the probe. On the other hand, single-band spectral imaging can be substantially affected by local spectral artefacts. Such effects can significantly interfere with automated methods for detection of early caries lesions. In contrast, hyperspectral imaging effectively combines the spatial information of imaging methods with the spectral information of spectroscopic methods providing excellent basis for development of robust and reliable algorithms for automated classification and analysis of hard dental tissues. In this paper, we employ 405 nm laser excitation of natural caries lesions. The fluorescence signal is acquired by a state-of-the-art hyperspectral imaging system consisting of a high-resolution acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and a highly sensitive Scientific CMOS camera in the spectral range from 550 nm to 800 nm. The results are compared to the contrast obtained by near-infrared hyperspectral imaging technique employed in the existing studies on early detection of dental caries.

  17. Inhibitor screening and selectivity assessment against multiple cellular protein kinases by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection%毛细管电泳-激光诱导荧光检测用于多个胞内蛋白激酶的抑制剂筛选和选择性评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张倩倩; 张雪佩; 张含智; 康经武

    2013-01-01

    A method that can be used for screening protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) and simultaneously assessing their selectivity is described.The method is based on simultaneously assaying multiple cellular protein kinases by performing capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation and measuring the peak areas of the phosphorylated substrate peptides.The powerful separation capability of CE combined with the highly sensitive and selective laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector enables the direct screening of PKIs against cell lysates,which are used as an inexpensive source of enzymes.Four cell lines,three specific substrate peptides labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein (5-FAM),two relative specific PKIs (TBB and H-89) and one non-specific PKI (staurosporine) were utilized to prove the methodology.With this method,the inhibitory activity of the tested compounds against multiple protein kinases was identified in parallel by comparing the peak areas of the phosphorylated substrates with those obtained in the absence of any inhibitors.The reduced peak area of the phosphorylated substrate definitively represents a positive screening result.Simultaneously,assaying the inhibition of one inhibitor against mutiple cellular protein kinases enables the assessment of its selectivity.Compared to the conventional,single-target screening format,the cell lysate-based multi-target method is more informative,more straightforward and more cost effective.%发展了一种基于毛细管电泳(CE)-激光诱导荧光(LIF)检测的多个细胞内源激酶的抑制剂平行筛选及选择性评价方法.CE高效的分离能力和LIF检测器的高选择性,使得同时测试多个胞内激酶的活性成为可能.共4种细胞系、3种特异性蛋白激酶底物肽、2种选择性蛋白激酶抑制剂和1种非选择性蛋白激酶抑制剂用于方法的建立.特异性底物肽与细胞裂解液混合后孵育,被其相应的激酶选择性地磷酸化,利用CE-LIF分离检测磷酸化产物和底

  18. Laser-Induced Incandescence in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge of soot concentration is important due to its presence and impact upon a wide range of combustion processes ranging from diffusion to premixed flames, laminar to turbulent processes and homogeneous to heterogeneous combustion. Measurement of soot volume fraction (f(sub v)) is essential to discerning its formation and growth. The presence of soot also affects other physical and chemical properties of combustion thereby affecting studies not directly concerned with either its formation or growth, such as radiative heat transfer, CO oxidation and fuel vaporization or pyrolysis rates. Microgravity offers unique opportunities for studying both soot growth and the effect of soot radiation upon flame structure and spread. Spatial scales and residence time scales are greatly extended in 0-g facilitating soot growth studies. With the varied geometries, short duration microgravity test times and time-varying processes there is a demand for measurement of f(sub v) with high spatial and temporal resolution. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) has advanced f(sub v) measurements in many 1-g combustion processes. To create laser-induced incandescence, a pulsed high intensity laser heats soot to incandescence temperatures. Using appropriate spectral and temporal detection conditions, the resulting incandescence can be selectively detected apart from the non-laser-heated soot and flame gases. Theoretical modelling and experiments have shown that the resulting incandescence is representative of f(sub v). Using an intensified array camera and a laser sheet for excitation, one- and two-dimensionally resolved LII images of f(sub v) have been obtained in 1-g. LII has been characterized and developed at NASA-Lewis for soot volume fraction determination in a wide range of 1-g combustion applications. Broadly grouped, the characterization work has included studies of excitation intensity, excitation wavelength and the optimum temporal and spectral detection conditions to enable an

  19. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shuxun; Wang Xiaolin; Sun Dong [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Cheng Jinping; Han Cheng, Shuk [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Kong, Chi-Wing [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Li, Ronald A. [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Center of Cardiovascular Research, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  20. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuxun; Cheng, Jinping; Kong, Chi-Wing; Wang, Xiaolin; Han Cheng, Shuk; Li, Ronald A.; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  1. Laser-induced lipolysis on adipose cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solarte, Efrain; Gutierrez, O.; Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, J.; Isaza, Carolina; Ramirez, Hugo; Rebolledo, Aldo F.; Criollo, Willian; Ortiz, C.

    2004-10-01

    Recently, a new liposuction technique, using a low-level laser (LLL) device and Ultrawet solution prior to the procedure, demonstrated the movement of fat from the inside to the outside of the adipocyte (Neira et al., 2002). To determine the mechanisms involved, we have performed Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy studies; Light transmittance measurements on adipocyte dilutions; and a study of laser light propagation in adipose tissue. This studies show: 1. Cellular membrane alterations. 2. LLL is capable to reach the deep adipose tissue layer, and 3. The tumescence solution enhances the light propagation by clearing the tissue. MRI studies demonstrated the appearance of fat on laser treated abdominal tissue. Besides, adipocytes were cultivated and irradiated to observe the effects on isolated cells. These last studies show: 1. 635 nm-laser alone is capable of mobilizing cholesterol from the cell membrane; this action is enhanced by the presence of adrenaline and lidocaine. 2. Intracellular fat is released from adipocytes by co joint action of adrenaline, aminophyline and 635 nm-laser. Results are consistent with a laser induced cellular process, which causes fat release from the adipocytes into the intercellular space, besides the modification of the cellular membranes.

  2. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  3. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels' colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  4. Compact High Sensitive Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Instrument Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a versatile tool for in situ substance characterization. Existing LIBS instruments are not compact enough for space...

  5. Pulsed laser-induced formation of silica nanogrids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ihlemann, Jürgen; Weichenhain-Schriever, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    ... ) coating through the transparent substrate. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) superstrate (cover layer) coated on top of the SiO x film prior to laser exposure serves as confinement for controlled laser-induced structure formation...

  6. Laser-Induced Incandescence: Excitation Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Wal, Randall L.; Jensen, Kirk A.

    1998-03-01

    Assumptions of theoretical laser-induced incandescence (LII) models along with possible effects of high-intensity laser light on soot aggregates and the constituent primary particles are discussed in relation to selection of excitation laser fluence. Ex situ visualization of laser-heated soot by use of transmission electron microscopy reveals significant morphological changes (graphitization) induced by pulsed laser heating. Pulsed laser transmission measurements within a premixed laminar sooting flame suggest that soot vaporization occurs for laser fluences greater than 0.5 J cm 2 at 1064 nm. Radial LII intensity profiles at different axial heights in a laminar ethylene gas jet diffusion flame reveal a wide range of signal levels depending on the laser fluence that is varied over an eight fold range. Results of double-pulse excitation experiments in which a second laser pulse heats in situ the same soot that was heated by a prior laser pulse are detailed. These two-pulse measurements suggest varying degrees of soot structural change for fluences below and above a vaporization threshold of 0.5 J cm 2 at 1064 nm. Normalization of the radial-resolved LII signals based on integrated intensities, however, yields self-similar profiles. The self-similarity suggests robustness of LII for accurate relative measurement of soot volume fraction despite the morphological changes induced in the soot, variations in soot aggregate and primary particle size, and local gas temperature. Comparison of LII intensity profiles with soot volume fractions ( f v ) derived by light extinction validates LII for quantitative determination of f v upon calibration for laser fluences ranging from 0.09 to 0.73 J cm 2 .

  7. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  8. Effect of native defects and laser-induced defects on multi-shot laser-induced damage in multilayer mirrors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wang; Yuanan Zhao; Tanda Shao; Zhengxiu Fan

    2011-01-01

    The roles of laser-induced defects and native defects in multilayer mirrors under multi-shot irradiation condition are investigated. The HfO2/SiO2 dielectric mirrors are deposited by electron beam evaporation (EBE). Laser damage testing is carried out on both the 1-on-l and S-on-1 regimes using 355-nm pulsed laser at a duration of 8 ns. It is found that the single-shot laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) is much higher than the multi-shot LIDT. In the multi-shot mode, the main factor influencing LIDT is the accumulation of irreversible laser-induced defects and native defects. The surface morphologies of the samples are observed by optical microscopy. Moreover, the number of laser-induced defects affects the damage probability of the samples. A correlative model based on critical conduction band (CB) electron density (ED) is presented to simulate the multi-shot damage behavior.%@@ The roles of laser-induced defects and native defects in multilayer mirrors under multi-shot irradiation condition are investigated.The Hf02/SiO2 dielectric mirrors are deposited by electron beam evaporation (EBE).Laser damage testing is carried out on both the 1-on-1 and S-on-1 regimes using 355-nn pulsed laser at a duration of 8 us.It is found that the single-shot laser-induced damage threshold(LIDT)is much higher than the multi-shot LIDT.In the multi-shot mode,the main factor influencing LIDT is the accumulation of irreversible laser-induced defects and native defects.The surface morphologies of the samples are observed by optical microscopy.Moreover,the number of laser-induced defects affects the damage probability of the samples.A correlative model based on critical conduction band(CB)electron density(ED)is presented to simulate the multi-shot damage behavior.

  9. Lanthanide-based laser-induced phosphorescence for spray diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voort, D. D. van der, E-mail: d.d.v.d.voort@tue.nl; Water, W. van de; Kunnen, R. P. J.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Heijst, G. J. F. van [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Maes, N. C. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Dam, N. J. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lamberts, T. [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) is a relatively recent and versatile development for studying flow dynamics. This work investigates certain lanthanide-based molecular complexes for their use in LIP for high-speed sprays. Lanthanide complexes in solutions have been shown to possess long phosphorescence lifetimes (∼1-2 ms) and to emit light in the visible wavelength range. In particular, europium and terbium complexes are investigated using fluorescence/phosphorescence spectrometry, showing that europium-thenoyltrifluoracetone-trioctylphosphineoxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) can be easily and efficiently excited using a standard frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser. The emitted spectrum, with maximum intensity at a wavelength of 614 nm, is shown not to vary strongly with temperature (293-383 K). The decay constant of the phosphorescence, while independent of ambient pressure, decreases by approximately 12 μs/K between 323 and 373 K, with the base level of the decay constant dependent on the used solvent. The complex does not luminesce in the gas or solid state, meaning only the liquid phase is visualized, even in an evaporating spray. By using an internally excited spray containing the phosphorescent complex, the effect of vaporization is shown through the decrease in measured intensity over the length of the spray, together with droplet size measurements using interferometric particle imaging. This study shows that LIP, using the Eu-TTA-TOPO complex, can be used with different solvents, including diesel surrogates. Furthermore, it can be easily handled and used in sprays to investigate spray breakup and evaporation.

  10. Studies of Helicity Injection in a Spheromak Formed by a Large Area Planar Coaxial Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Scott; Bellan, Paul; Pracko, Steven

    2000-10-01

    A new planar coaxial gun has been constructed in order to study the process of helicity injection during spheromak formation. Improvements in helicity injection, a key method for poloidal field sustainment in spheromaks, would increase the attractiveness of the spheromak configuration as a fusion energy scheme. The goal of this research is to create simple, well-defined experiments allowing the details of helicity injection to be resolved and better understood. The design of the new gun, which was motivated by insights gained from ongoing solar prominence experiments [Bellan and Hansen, Phys. Plasmas 5, 1991 (1998)], involves large planar electrodes with a low field solenoid, in contrast to smaller cylindrical guns with high field solenoids commonly in existence. More efficient spheromak formation and better ``λ-matching'' should be possible in the new setup. The formation and dynamical evolution of twisted flux tubes will be studied using a variety of optical and probe diagnostics, including (1) visible light photography using a pair of fast, gated intensified CCD cameras, (2) local magnetic field measurements using an array of small pickup coils, (3) density and electron temperature measurements using a triple Langmuir probe, and (4) measurements of local ion distribution functions using laser-induced fluorescence. Details of the new gun design and initial experimental results will be presented.

  11. Research on laser induced acoustic source based underwater communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lihua; Zhou, Ju; Zhang, Lei; Wan, Xiaoyun

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic transducers are traditionally used to generate underwater acoustical energy with the device physically immersed in water. Novel methods are required for communicating from an in-air platform or surface vessel to a submerged vessel. One possible noncontact downlink communication system involves the use of laser induced acoustic source. The most common mechanisms of opto-acoustic energy conversion are, by order of increasing laser energy density and efficiency, thermal expansion, surface evaporation and optical breakdown. The laser induced acoustic source inherently bears the obvious advantage of not requiring any physical transducer in the medium. At the same time, acoustic energy propagation is efficient in water, whereas optical energy propagate well in air, leading to a more efficiency opto-acoustic communication method. In this paper, an opto-acoustic underwater Communication system is described, aiming to study and analysis whether laser induced sound could achieve good performance for effective communication in practical application.

  12. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy application to control of the process of precious metal recovery and recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pardini, L.; Palleschi, V.; Pace, D. M. Diaz; Garcia, F. Anabitarte; Grassi, R.; Sorrentino, F.; Carelli, G.; Francesconi, M.; Francesconi, F.; Borgogni, R.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to precious metal alloys used for the control of the process of recovery and recycling of scraps and waste of industrial processes. In particular, the possibility to obtain sensitivity and trueness comparable to the current systems used in industrial environment in the quantitative determination of the elements of interest was explored. The present study demonstrates that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy can be considered as a viable alternative to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of recovered precious metals. The limits of detection obtained are of the order of 0.2 mg/g for all the elements considered. The maximum deviation with respect to the nominal concentrations is around 1 mg/g at concentrations around 20 mg/g (gold) corresponding to a relative error slightly higher than ± 5%.

  13. Containerless Atomic-Fluorescence Property Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, P.; Schiffman, R.; Walker, C.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes studies conducted to establish and verify use of laser-induced fluorescence in monitoring and controlling high-temperature containerless processes. Specimens levitated by gas jets or electromagnetic fields and heated by laser beams or electromagnetic induction while being irradiated and detected by fluorescence technique. Makes quantitative and qualitative comparisons among three new methods of temperature measurement; all rely on laser-induced fluorescence. One method gas-density thermometry with seed gas. Other two methods involve measurements of velocities of evaporating atoms or of population ratios of different electronic states.

  14. Ultrafast Molecular Imaging by Laser Induced Electron Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Michel; Cornaggia, Christian; Saugout, Sébastien; Charron, Eric; Keller, Arne; Atabek, Osman

    2010-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structure of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time-scale using the Laser Induced Electron Diffraction, LIED, technique [T. Zuo \\textit{et al.}, Chem. Phys. Lett. \\textbf{259}, 313 (1996)]. We present numerical results obtained for the CO$_2$ molecule using a single active electron model. The molecular geometry (bond-lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  15. Absorption tomography of laser induced plasmas with a large aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Shabanov, Sergei V

    2010-01-01

    An emission tomography of laser-induced plasmas employed in the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) requires long signal integration times during which the plasma cannot be considered stationary. To reduce the integration time, it is proposed to measure a plasma absorption in parallel rays with an aperture that collects light coming from large fractions of the plasma plume at each aperture position. The needed spatial resolution is achieved by a special numerical data processing. Another advantage of the proposed procedure is that inexpensive linear CCD or non-discrete (PMT, photodiode) detectors can be used instead of costly 2-dimensional detectors.

  16. Laser-induced grating in ZnO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Jesper N.

    1992-01-01

    A simple approach for the calculation of self-diffraction in a thin combined phase and amplitude grating is presented. The third order nonlinearity, the electron-hole recombination time, and the ambipolar diffusion coefficient in a ZnO crystal are measured by means of laser-induced self-diffracti......A simple approach for the calculation of self-diffraction in a thin combined phase and amplitude grating is presented. The third order nonlinearity, the electron-hole recombination time, and the ambipolar diffusion coefficient in a ZnO crystal are measured by means of laser-induced self...

  17. Laser-induced dental caries and plaque diagnosis on patients by sensitive autofluorescence spectroscopy and time-gated video imaging: preliminary studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    1994-09-01

    The laser-induced in vivo autofluorescence of human teeth was investigated by means of time- resolved/time-gated fluorescence techniques. The aim of these studies was non-contact caries and plaque detection. Carious lesions and dental plaque fluoresce in the red spectral region. This autofluorescence seems to be based on porphyrin-producing bacteria. We report on preliminary studies on patients using a novel method of autofluorescence imaging. A special device was constructed for time-gated video imaging. Nanosecond laser pulses for fluorescence excitation were provided by a frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Autofluorescence was detected in an appropriate nanosecond time window using a video camera with a time-gated image intensifier (minimal time gate: 5 ns). Laser-induced autofluorescence based on porphyrin-producing bacteria seems to be an appropriate tool for detecting dental lesions and for creating `caries-images' and `dental plaque' images.

  18. Laser induced autofluorescence for diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, E.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Merlemis, N.; Kalatzis, I.; Sianoudis, I. A.; Batsi, O.; Christofidou, E.; Stratigos, A. J.; Katsambas, A. D.; Antoniou, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Non melanoma skin cancer is one of the most frequent malignant tumors among humans. A non-invasive technique, with high sensitivity and high specificity, would be the most suitable method for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or other malignancies diagnostics, instead of the well established biopsy and histopathology examination. In the last decades, a non-invasive, spectroscopic diagnostic method was introduced, the laser induced fluorescence (LIF), which could generate an image contrast between different states of skin tissue. The noninvasiveness consists in that this biophotonic method do not require tissue sample excision, what is necessary in histopathology characterization and biochemical analysis of the skin tissue samples, which is worldwide used as an evaluation gold standard. The object of this study is to establish the possibilities of a relatively portable system for laser induced skin autofluorescence to differentiate malignant from nonmalignant skin lesions. Unstained human skin samples, excised from humans undergoing biopsy examination, were irradiated with a Nd:YAG-3ω laser (λ=355 nm, 6 ns), used as an excitation source for the autofluorescence measurements. A portable fiber-based spectrometer was used to record fluorescence spectra of the sites of interest. The ex vivo results, obtained with this spectroscopic technique, were correlated with the histopathology results. After the analysis of the fluorescence spectra of almost 60 skin tissue areas, we developed an algorithm to distinguish different types of malignant lesions, including inflammatory areas. Optimization of the data analysis and potential use of LIF spectroscopy with 355 nm Nd:YAG laser excitation of tissue autofluorescence for clinical applications are discussed.

  19. Model system for investigating laser-induced subcellular microeffects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettmann, Gereon; Serbin, Jesper; Radt, Benno; Lange, Bjoern I.; Birngruber, Reginald

    2001-07-01

    Background: Laser induced protein denaturation is of fundamental interest for understanding the mechanisms of laser tissue interaction. Conjugates of nanoabsorbers coupled to proteins are presented as a model system for investigating ultrafast protein denaturation. Irradiation of the conjugates using repetitive picosecond laser pulses, which are only absorbed by the nanoabsorbers, could result in effects with a spatial confinement of less than 100 nm. Materials and Methods: Experiments were done with bovine intestinal alkaline phosphates (aP) coupled to 15 nm colloidal gold. This complex was irradiated at 527 nm wavelength and 35 ps pulse width with a varying number of pulses ranging form one up to 104. The radiant exposure per pulse was varied form 2 mJ/cm2 to 50 mJ/cm2. Denaturation was detected as a loss of protein function with the help of the fluorescence substrate 4MUP. Results and discussion: Irradiation did result in a steady decrease of the aP activity with increasing radiant exposures and increasing number of pulses. A maximal inactivation of 80% was reached with 104 pulses and 50 mJ/cm2 per pulse. The temperature in the particles and the surrounding water was calculated using Mie's formulas for the absorption of the nanometer gold particles and ana analytical solution of the equations for heat diffusion. With 50 mJ/cm2, the particles are heated above the melting point of gold. Since the temperature calculations strongly depend on changes in the state of matter of the particles and water, a very sophisticated thermal model is necessary to calculate exact temperatures. It is difficult to identify one of the possible mechanisms, thermal denaturation, photochemical denaturation or formation of micro bubbles from the dependance of the inactivation on pulse energy and number of applied pulses. Therefore, experiments are needed to further elucidate the damage mechanisms. In conclusion, denaturing proteins irreversibly via nanoabsorbers using picosecond laser

  20. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in archeometry: A review of its application and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spizzichino, Valeria, E-mail: valeria.spizzichino@enea.it; Fantoni, Roberta

    2014-09-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in the last decades has been more and more applied to the field of Cultural Heritage with great results obtained either alone or in combination with complementary laser techniques. Its ability to analyze, with a minimal loss, different kinds of materials in laboratory, in situ and even in hostile environments has been highly appreciated. The main aim of this paper is to present a review of LIBS applications in the interdisciplinary field of archeometry. The LIBS technique is shortly described both from a theoretical and practical point of view, discussing the instrumental setup, also in comparison with typical features of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman spectroscopy apparata. The complementary with multivariate analysis, a method that can help in reducing data set dimensions and in pulling out effective information, is stressed. In particular the role of LIBS in Cultural Heritage material characterization, recognition of fakes and indirect dating is described, reporting general considerations and case studies on metal alloys, mural paintings, decorated ceramics, glasses, stones and gems. - Highlights: • Applications of LIBS to archeometry are reviewed. • Complementary among LIBS, LIF, Raman and multivariate analysis is highlighted. • Three major areas of successful LIBS application in archeometry are identified. • Significant results have been presented for several different materials.

  1. Prospects for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for biomedical applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek Kumar; Rai, Awadhesh Kumar

    2011-09-01

    We review the different spectroscopic techniques including the most recent laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the characterization of materials in any phase (solid, liquid or gas) including biological materials. A brief history of the laser and its application in bioscience is presented. The development of LIBS, its working principle and its instrumentation (different parts of the experimental set up) are briefly summarized. The generation of laser-induced plasma and detection of light emitted from this plasma are also discussed. The merit and demerits of LIBS are discussed in comparison with other conventional analytical techniques. The work done using the laser in the biomedical field is also summarized. The analysis of different tissues, mineral analysis in different organs of the human body, characterization of different types of stone formed in the human body, analysis of biological aerosols using the LIBS technique are also summarized. The unique abilities of LIBS including detection of molecular species and calibration-free LIBS are compared with those of other conventional techniques including atomic absorption spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence.

  2. Laser optics in space failure risk due to laser induced contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, D.; Schroeder, H.; Fleury-Frenette, K.; Georges, M. P.; Riede, W.; Tzeremes, G.; Rochus, P.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a study of the evolution and morphology of UV laser-induced contamination (LIC) on optical surfaces due to hydrocarbons will be presented. LIC is a major hazard for lasers that operate in vacuum conditions. Recent studies have shown that the manufacturing method and cleaning of optical components can significantly mitigate LIC growth but never stop it completely. To better understand and model the evolution of LIC the deposition rate and transmission decay were observed via a CCD camera that measured laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and energy detectors, respectively. The affected sites were observed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Phase Shift Interferometry (PSI). The LIC affected area diameters obtained by different experimental conditions were then compared with the theoretical prediction derived by the model. Very good agreement between this empirical model and the experimental results was found for the relevant parameter regimes under investigation. A novel methodology to determine the possibility of permanent optical damage due to LIC produced thermal effects is also discussed.

  3. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in archeometry: A review of its application and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spizzichino, Valeria; Fantoni, Roberta

    2014-09-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in the last decades has been more and more applied to the field of Cultural Heritage with great results obtained either alone or in combination with complementary laser techniques. Its ability to analyze, with a minimal loss, different kinds of materials in laboratory, in situ and even in hostile environments has been highly appreciated. The main aim of this paper is to present a review of LIBS applications in the interdisciplinary field of archeometry. The LIBS technique is shortly described both from a theoretical and practical point of view, discussing the instrumental setup, also in comparison with typical features of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman spectroscopy apparata. The complementary with multivariate analysis, a method that can help in reducing data set dimensions and in pulling out effective information, is stressed. In particular the role of LIBS in Cultural Heritage material characterization, recognition of fakes and indirect dating is described, reporting general considerations and case studies on metal alloys, mural paintings, decorated ceramics, glasses, stones and gems.

  4. Dynamics of laser-induced electroconvection pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebink, N C; Johnson, E R; Saucedo, S R; Miles, E W; Vardanyan, K K; Spiegel, D R; Allen, C C

    2004-06-01

    We first report that, for planar nematic 4-methoxy-benzilidene-4-butylaniline (MBBA), the electroconvection threshold voltage has a nonmonotonic temperature dependence, with a well-defined minimum, and a slope of about -0.12 V/degrees C near room temperature at 70 Hz. Motivated by this observation, we have designed an experiment in which a weak continuous-wave absorbed laser beam with a diameter comparable to the pattern wavelength generates a locally supercritical region, or pulse, in dye-doped MBBA. Working 10-20 % below the laser-free threshold voltage, we observe a steady-state pulse shaped as an ellipse with the semimajor axis oriented parallel to the nematic director, with a typical size of several wavelengths. The pulse is robust, persisting even when spatially extended rolls develop in the surrounding region, and displays rolls that counterpropagate along the director at frequencies of tenths of Hz, with the rolls on the left (right) side of the ellipse moving to the right (left). Systematic measurements of the sample-voltage dependence of the pulse amplitude, spatial extent, and frequency show a saturation or decrease when the control parameter (evaluated at the center of the pulse) approaches approximately 0.3. We propose that the model for these pulses should be based on the theory of control-parameter ramps, supplemented with new terms to account for the advection of heat away from the pulse when the surrounding state becomes linearly unstable. The advection creates a negative feedback between the pulse size and the efficiency of heat transport, which we argue is responsible for the attenuation of the pulse at larger control-parameter values.

  5. Measurement of gas flow velocities by laser-induced gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmerling, B.; Stampanoni-Panariello, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Kozlov, A.D.N. [General Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-08-01

    Time resolved light scattering from laser-induced electrostrictive gratings was used for the determination of flow velocities in air at room temperature. By measuring the velocity profile across the width of a slit nozzle we demonstrated the high spatial resolution (about 200 mm) of this novel technique. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref.

  6. Gas permeation and temperature effects in laser-induced delamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorov, Alexander; Vellinga, Willem-Pier; De Hosson, Jeff

    Laser-induced delamination (LID) is a technique aimed at measuring the work of adhesion of thin polymer coatings on metal substrates. A laser Pulse is used to create a blister that initiates delamination of the film under pressure. The stress fields in the blister wall and the work of adhesion of

  7. Adhesion of polymer coatings studied by laser-induced delamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorov, A; De Hosson, JTM

    2005-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the laser-induced delamination technique, aimed at measuring the practical work of adhesion of thin polymer coatings on metal substrates. In this technique an infrared laser-pulsed beam is used to create an initial blister. Upon increasing the pulse intensity, the size of

  8. Laser-Induced Rotation of Iodine Molecules in Helium Nanodroplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepperson, Benjamin; Sondergaard, Anders A.; Christiansen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Rotation of molecules embedded in helium nanodroplets is explored by a combination of fs laser-induced alignment experiments and angulon quasiparticle theory. We demonstrate that at low fluence of the fs alignment pulse, the molecule and its solvation shell can be set into coherent collective...... its helium shell. Our results open novel opportunities for studying nonequilibrium solute-solvent dynamics and quantum thermalization....

  9. Laser-induced incandescence : recent trends and current questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, C.; Kock, B.F.; Hofmann, M.; Michelsen, H.; Will, S.; Bougie, B.; Suntz, R.; Smallwood, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of a workshop focused on fundamental experimental and theoretical aspects of soot measurements by laser-induced incandescence (LII). This workshop was held in Duisburg, Germany in September 2005. The goal of the workshop was to review the current understanding of the

  10. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  11. Laser-induced incandescence : recent trends and current questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, C.; Kock, B.F.; Hofmann, M.; Michelsen, H.; Will, S.; Bougie, B.; Suntz, R.; Smallwood, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of a workshop focused on fundamental experimental and theoretical aspects of soot measurements by laser-induced incandescence (LII). This workshop was held in Duisburg, Germany in September 2005. The goal of the workshop was to review the current understanding of the

  12. Additive interconnect fabrication by picosecond Laser Induced Forward Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, G.; Veld, B.H. in 't; Ebberink, G.; Del Cerro, D.A.; Eijnden, E. van den; Chall, P.; Zon, B. van der

    2010-01-01

    Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is a single step, dry deposition process which shows great potential for interconnect fabrication. TNO, in cooperation with ALSI and University of Twente have studied the feature size and resistivity of copper structures deposited using picosecond (ps) LIFT. Sma

  13. Additive interconnect fabrication by picosecond Laser Induced Forward Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, G.; Veld, B.H. in 't; Ebberink, G.; Del Cerro, D.A.; Eijnden, E. van den; Chall, P.; Zon, B. van der

    2010-01-01

    Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is a single step, dry deposition process which shows great potential for interconnect fabrication. TNO, in cooperation with ALSI and University of Twente have studied the feature size and resistivity of copper structures deposited using picosecond (ps) LIFT. Sma

  14. Laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, R

    1995-01-15

    An experiment that involves laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms is proposed and the spectral line shape of the cross section is calculated on the basis of data available in the literature. The feasibility of the experiment both in oven cells and in a crossed-atomic-beam geometry is discussed.

  15. Towards Friction Control using laser-induced periodic Surface Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichstädt, J.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to the study of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the description of their tribological properties in order to facilitate the knowledge for contact mechanical applications. To obtain laser parameters for LIPSS formation, we propose to execute two D

  16. Quantitative analysis of Cu and Co adsorbed on fish bones via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezk, R. A.; Galmed, A. H.; Abdelkreem, M.; Ghany, N. A. Abdel; Harith, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of heavy metals adsorbed by fish bones. Fish bones were used as a natural and low cost heavy metal sorbent (mainly Cu and Co) from synthetic wastewater. The removal efficiency of the adsorbent was studied as a function of initial metal concentration and pH value. Optimal experimental conditions were evaluated for improving the sensitivity of LIBS technique through parametric dependence studies. Furthermore, calibration curves were constructed based on X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis technique, whereas, the limits of detection (LOD) for Cu and Co were calculated. The results were validated by comparing LIBS data with those obtained by XRF spectrometry. The results of the two techniques are strongly correlated which verified the feasibility of using LIBS to detect traces of heavy metals adsorbed from wastewater by fish bones. This study reflects the potential of using LIBS in environmental applications.

  17. Laser Induced Forward Transfer: a study on the enhancement of sensitivity for multianalyte sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekenis, George; Theodorakos, Ioannis; Massaouti, Maria; Zergioti, Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    In this article novel approaches for the improvement of the recorded signal coupled with the feasibility of multiple analyte detection, irrespective of the biosensor platform are being presented. The techniques that have been developed address commonly encountered issues that have traditionally hindered the commercialization of biosensors, such as cost, reproducibility and sensitivity and most importantly multianalyte detection. The fluorescence-based detection of copper is being described as an example of the use of Laser Induced Forward Transfer technique (LIFT) for the immobilization of biomolecules with high spatial resolution, in addition to a technique that involves the displacement of a short complementary strand to the immobilized probe molecule for the quantification of analyte binding and the enhancement of the recorded signal.

  18. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlfing, E.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  19. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenou, M. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel); Sa' ar, A. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Kotler, Z. [Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel)

    2015-05-04

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  20. Compositional Analysis of Drugs by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldjilali, S. A.; Axente, E.; Belasri, A.; Baba-Hamed, T.; Hermann, J.

    2017-07-01

    The feasibility of the compositional analysis of drugs by calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was investigated using multivitamin tablets as a sample material. The plasma was produced by a frequencyquadrupled Nd:YAG laser delivering UV pulses with a duration of 5 ns and an energy of 12 mJ, operated at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The relative fractions of the elements composing the multivitamin drug were determined by comparing the emission spectrum of the laser-produced plume with the spectral radiance computed for a plasma in a local thermodynamic equilibrium. Fair agreement of the measured fractions with those given by the manufacturer was observed for all elements mentioned in the leafl et of the drug. Additional elements such as Ca, Na, Sr, Al, Li, K, and Si were detected and quantifi ed. The present investigations demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a viable technique for the quality control of drugs.

  1. Laser-induced periodic surface structuring of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Susana; Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Martín, Margarita; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-03-01

    We report here on a systematic study about the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on biopolymers. Self-standing films of the biopolymers chitosan, starch and the blend of chitosan with the synthetic polymer poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP, were irradiated in air with linearly polarized laser beams at 193, 213 and 266 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 6-17 ns. The laser-induced periodic surface structures were topographically characterized by atomic force microscopy and the chemical modifications induced by laser irradiation were inspected via Raman spectroscopy. Formation of LIPSS parallel to the laser polarization direction, with periods similar to the laser wavelength, was observed at efficiently absorbed wavelengths in the case of the amorphous biopolymer chitosan and its blend with PVP, while formation of LIPSS is prevented in the crystalline starch biopolymer.

  2. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  3. High-resolution Imaging of pH in Alkaline Sediments and Water Based on a New Rapid Response Fluorescent Planar Optode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chao; Yao, Lei; Xu, Di; Xie, Xianchuan; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-05-20

    A new dual-lumophore optical sensor combined with a robust RGB referencing method was developed for two-dimensional (2D) pH imaging in alkaline sediments and water. The pH sensor film consisted of a proton-permeable polymer (PVC) in which two dyes with different pH sensitivities and emission colors: (1) chloro phenyl imino propenyl aniline (CPIPA) and (2) the coumarin dye Macrolex(®) fluorescence yellow 10 GN (MFY-10 GN) were entrapped. Calibration experiments revealed the typical sigmoid function and temperature dependencies. This sensor featured high sensitivity and fast response over the alkaline working ranges from pH 7.5 to pH 10.5. Cross-sensitivity towards ionic strength (IS) was found to be negligible for freshwater when IS water associated with the photosynthesis of Vallisneria spiral species was also presented, suggesting that the sensor held great promise for the field applications.

  4. Time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xian-yun; ZHANG Wei-jun; WANG Zhen-ya; HAO Li-qing; HUANG Ming-qiang; ZHAO Wen-wu; LONG Bo; Zhao Wei

    2008-01-01

    We develop a system to measure the elemental composition of unprepared samples using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in our laboratory, which can be used for the determination of elements in solids, liquids and aerosols. A description of the instrumentation, including laser, sample chamber and detection, is followed by a brief discussion. The time-resolved LIBS of aluminum at atmospheric pressure is presented. At the end, the possibilities and later uses of this technique are briefly discussed.

  5. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Fundamentals, Applications, and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Anabitarte, F.; Cobo, A.; J. M. Lopez-Higuera

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique that provides an accurate in situ quantitative chemical analysis and, thanks to the developments in new spectral processing algorithms in the last decade, has achieved a promising performance as a quantitative chemical analyzer at the atomic level. These possibilities along with the fact that little or no sample preparation is necessary have expanded the application fields of LIBS. In this paper, we review the state of the ar...

  6. Towards Friction Control using laser-induced periodic Surface Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Eichstädt, J.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to the study of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the description of their tribological properties in order to facilitate the knowledge for contact mechanical applications. To obtain laser parameters for LIPSS formation, we propose to execute two D2-Experiments. For the transfer of results from static experiments to areas of LIPSS we propose the discrete accumulation of fluences. Areas covered by homogeneously distributed LIPSS were machined...

  7. A Mouse Model for Laser-induced Choroidal Neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ronil S; Soetikno, Brian T; Lajko, Michelle; Fawzi, Amani A

    2015-12-27

    The mouse laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) model has been a crucial mainstay model for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) research. By administering targeted laser injury to the RPE and Bruch's membrane, the procedure induces angiogenesis, modeling the hallmark pathology observed in neovascular AMD. First developed in non-human primates, the laser-induced CNV model has come to be implemented into many other species, the most recent of which being the mouse. Mouse experiments are advantageously more cost-effective, experiments can be executed on a much faster timeline, and they allow the use of various transgenic models. The miniature size of the mouse eye, however, poses a particular challenge when performing the procedure. Manipulation of the eye to visualize the retina requires practice of fine dexterity skills as well as simultaneous hand-eye-foot coordination to operate the laser. However, once mastered, the model can be applied to study many aspects of neovascular AMD such as molecular mechanisms, the effect of genetic manipulations, and drug treatment effects. The laser-induced CNV model, though useful, is not a perfect model of the disease. The wild-type mouse eye is otherwise healthy, and the chorio-retinal environment does not mimic the pathologic changes in human AMD. Furthermore, injury-induced angiogenesis does not reflect the same pathways as angiogenesis occurring in an age-related and chronic disease state as in AMD. Despite its shortcomings, the laser-induced CNV model is one of the best methods currently available to study the debilitating pathology of neovascular AMD. Its implementation has led to a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AMD, as well as contributing to the development of many of the AMD therapies currently available.

  8. Perturbations of planar algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Paramita; Gupta, Ved Prakash

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the concept of {\\em weight} of a planar algebra $P$ and construct a new planar algebra referred as the {\\em perturbation of $P$} by the weight. We establish a one-to-one correspondence between pivotal structures on 2-categories and perturbations of planar algebras by weights. To each bifinite bimodule over $II_1$-factors, we associate a {\\em bimodule planar algebra} bimodule corresponds naturally with sphericality of the bimodule planar algebra. As a consequence of this, we reproduce an extension of Jones' theorem (of associating 'subfactor planar algebras' to extremal subfactors). Conversely, given a bimodule planar algebra, we construct a bifinite bimodule whose associated bimodule planar algebra is the one which we start with using perturbations and Jones-Walker-Shlyakhtenko-Kodiyalam-Sunder method of reconstructing an extremal subfactor from a subfactor planar algebra. We show that the perturbation class of a bimodule planar algebra contains a unique spherical unimodular bimodule planar algeb...

  9. All-SPEEK flexible supercapacitor exploiting laser-induced graphenization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, A.; Serrapede, M.; Ferraro, G.; Fontana, M.; Perrucci, F.; Bianco, S.; Chiolerio, A.; Bocchini, S.

    2017-09-01

    Flexible supercapacitors have emerged as one of the more promising and efficient space-saving energy storage system for portable and wearable electronics. Laser-induced graphenization has been recently proposed as a powerful and scalable method to directly convert a polymeric substrate into a 3D network of few layer graphene as high-performance supercapacitor electrode. Unfortunately this outstanding process has been reported to be feasible only for few thermoplastic polymers, strongly limiting its future developments. Here we show that laser induced graphenization of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) can be obtained and the mechanism of this novel process is proposed. The resulting material can act at the same time as binder-free electrode and current collector. Moreover SPEEK is also used both as separator and polymeric electrolyte allowing the assembling of an all-SPEEK flexible supercapacitor. Chemico-physical characterization provides deep understanding of the laser-induced graphenization process, reported on this polymer for the first time, while the device performance studied by cyclic voltammetry, charging-discharging, and impedance spectroscopy prove the enormous potential of the proposed approach.

  10. An adaptive sampling algorithm for Doppler-shift fluorescence velocimetry in high-speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Page, Laurent M.; O'Byrne, Sean

    2017-03-01

    We present an approach to improving the efficiency of obtaining samples over a given domain for the peak location of Gaussian line-shapes. The method uses parameter estimates obtained from previous measurements to determine subsequent sampling locations. The method may be applied to determine the location of a spectral peak, where the monetary or time cost is too high to allow a less efficient search method, such as sampling at uniformly distributed domain locations, to be used. We demonstrate the algorithm using linear least-squares fitting of log-scaled planar laser-induced fluorescence data combined with Monte-Carlo simulation of measurements, to accurately determine the Doppler-shifted fluorescence peak frequency for each pixel of a fluorescence image. A simulated comparison between this approach and a uniformly spaced sampling approach is carried out using fits both for a single pixel and for a collection of pixels representing the fluorescence images that would be obtained in a hypersonic flow facility. In all cases, the peak location of Doppler-shifted line-shapes were determined to a similar precision with fewer samples than could be achieved using the more typical uniformly distributed sampling approach.

  11. Identification of protein secondary structures by laser induced autofluorescence: A study of urea and GnHCl induced protein denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddaramaiah, Manjunath; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Roy, Suparna; Chandra, Subhash; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2017-03-01

    In the present study an attempt has been made to interrogate the bulk secondary structures of some selected proteins (BSA, HSA, lysozyme, trypsin and ribonuclease A) under urea and GnHCl denaturation using laser induced autofluorescence. The proteins were treated with different concentrations of urea (3 M, 6 M, 9 M) and GnHCl (2 M, 4 M, 6 M) and the corresponding steady state autofluorescence spectra were recorded at 281 nm pulsed laser excitations. The recorded fluorescence spectra of proteins were then interpreted based on the existing PDB structures of the proteins and the Trp solvent accessibility (calculated using "Scratch protein predictor" at 30% threshold). Further, the influence of rigidity and conformation of the indole ring (caused by protein secondary structures) on the intrinsic fluorescence properties of proteins were also evaluated using fluorescence of ANS-HSA complexes, CD spectroscopy as well as with trypsin digestion experiments. The outcomes obtained clearly demonstrated GnHCl preferably disrupt helix as compared to the beta β-sheets whereas, urea found was more effective in disrupting β-sheets as compared to the helices. The other way round the proteins which have shown detectable change in the intrinsic fluorescence at lower concentrations of GnHCl were rich in helices whereas, the proteins which showed detectable change in the intrinsic fluorescence at lower concentrations of urea were rich in β-sheets. Since high salt concentrations like GnHCl and urea interfere in the secondary structure analysis by circular dichroism Spectrometry, the present method of analyzing secondary structures using laser induced autofluorescence will be highly advantageous over existing tools for the same.

  12. Laser cutting sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yecheng; Wang, Maolu; Zhang, Hongzhi; Yang, Lijun; Fu, Xihong; Wang, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Silicon-glass devices are widely used in IC industry, MEMS and solar energy system because of their reliability and simplicity of the manufacturing process. With the trend toward the wafer level chip scale package (WLCSP) technology, the suitable dicing method of silicon-glass bonded structure wafer has become necessary. In this paper, a combined experimental and computational approach is undertaken to investigate the feasibility of cutting the sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass (SGS) wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) method. A 1064 nm semiconductor laser cutting system with double laser beams which could simultaneously irradiate on the top and bottom of the sandwich structure wafer has been designed. A mathematical model for describing the physical process of the interaction between laser and SGS wafer, which consists of two surface heating sources and two volumetric heating sources, has been established. The temperature stress distribution are simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The crack propagation process is analyzed by using the J-integral method. In the FEM model, a stationary planar crack is embedded in the wafer and the J-integral values around the crack front edge are determined using the FEM. A verification experiment under typical parameters is conducted and the crack propagation profile on the fracture surface is examined by the optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and J-integral value.

  13. In situ MoS2 Decoration of Laser-Induced Graphene as Flexible Supercapacitor Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, Francesca; Fontana, Marco; Bianco, Stefano; Serrapede, Mara; Perrucci, Francesco; Ferrero, Sergio; Tresso, Elena; Lamberti, Andrea

    2016-04-27

    Herein, we are reporting a rapid one-pot synthesis of MoS2-decorated laser-induced graphene (MoS2-LIG) by direct writing of polyimide foils. By covering the polymer surface with a layer of MoS2 dispersion before processing, it is possible to obtain an in situ decoration of a porous graphene network during laser writing. The resulting material is a three-dimensional arrangement of agglomerated and wrinkled graphene flakes decorated by MoS2 nanosheets with good electrical properties and high surface area, suitable to be employed as electrodes for supercapacitors, enabling both electric double-layer and pseudo-capacitance behaviors. A deep investigation of the material properties has been performed to understand the chemical and physical characteristics of the hybrid MoS2-graphene-like material. Symmetric supercapacitors have been assembled in planar configuration exploiting the polymeric electrolyte; the resulting performances of the here-proposed material allow the prediction of the enormous potentialities of these flexible energy-storage devices for industrial-scale production.

  14. Pico- and femtosecond laser-induced crosslinking of protein microstructures: evaluation of processability and bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, S; Käpylä, E; Terzaki, K; Viitanen, J; Fotakis, C; Kellomäki, M; Farsari, M

    2011-12-01

    This study reports the pico- and femtosecond laser-induced photocrosslinking of protein microstructures. The capabilities of a picosecond Nd:YAG laser to promote multiphoton excited crosslinking of proteins were evaluated by fabricating 2D and 3D microstructures of avidin, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and biotinylated bovine serum albumin (bBSA). The multiphoton absorption-induced photocrosslinking of proteins was demonstrated here for the first time with a non-toxic biomolecule flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as the photosensitizer. Sub-micrometer and micrometer scale structures were fabricated from several different compositions of protein and photosensitizer by varying the average laser power and scanning speed in order to determine the optimal process parameters for efficient photocrosslinking. In addition, the retention of ligand-binding ability of the crosslinked protein structures was shown by fluorescence imaging of immobilized biotin or streptavidin conjugated fluorescence labels. The surface topography and the resolution of the protein patterns fabricated with the Nd:YAG laser were compared to the results obtained with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. Quite similar grain characteristics and comparable feature sizes were achieved with both laser sources, which demonstrates the utility of the low-cost Nd:YAG microlaser for direct laser writing of protein microstructures.

  15. Pico- and femtosecond laser-induced crosslinking of protein microstructures: evaluation of processability and bioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turunen, S; Kaepylae, E; Kellomaeki, M [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, PO Box 692, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Terzaki, K; Fotakis, C; Farsari, M [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH), N. Plastira 100, 70013, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Viitanen, J, E-mail: elli.kapyla@tut.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1300, 33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2011-12-15

    This study reports the pico- and femtosecond laser-induced photocrosslinking of protein microstructures. The capabilities of a picosecond Nd:YAG laser to promote multiphoton excited crosslinking of proteins were evaluated by fabricating 2D and 3D microstructures of avidin, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and biotinylated bovine serum albumin (bBSA). The multiphoton absorption-induced photocrosslinking of proteins was demonstrated here for the first time with a non-toxic biomolecule flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as the photosensitizer. Sub-micrometer and micrometer scale structures were fabricated from several different compositions of protein and photosensitizer by varying the average laser power and scanning speed in order to determine the optimal process parameters for efficient photocrosslinking. In addition, the retention of ligand-binding ability of the crosslinked protein structures was shown by fluorescence imaging of immobilized biotin or streptavidin conjugated fluorescence labels. The surface topography and the resolution of the protein patterns fabricated with the Nd:YAG laser were compared to the results obtained with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. Quite similar grain characteristics and comparable feature sizes were achieved with both laser sources, which demonstrates the utility of the low-cost Nd:YAG microlaser for direct laser writing of protein microstructures.

  16. Multiple structure of a laser-induced underwater shock wave

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Hayasaka, Keisuke; Kameda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    The structure of a laser-induced underwater shock wave is examined. Plasma formation, shock-wave expansion, and temporal evolution of shock pressure are observed simultaneously using a combined measurement system that obtains high-resolution nanosecond-order image sequences. In contrast to a well-known spherical-shock model, these detailed measurements reveal a non-spherically-symmteric distribution of pressure peak for a wide range of experimental parameters. The structure is determined to be a collection of multiple spherical shocks originated from elongated plasmas.

  17. Biomedical and environmental applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Unnikrishnan; K S Choudhari; Suresh D Kulkarni; Rajesh Nayak; V B Kartha; C Santhosh; B M Suri

    2014-02-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique with numerous advantages such as rapidity, multi-elemental analysis, minimal sample preparation, minimal destruction, low cost and versatility of being applied to a wide range of materials. In this paper, we report the preliminary observations we obtained using LIBS for clinical and environmental samples. Elemental analysis has been done qualitatively in human teeth samples which show encouraging results. It has also been demonstrated in this paper that LIBS can be very well utilized in field applications such as plastic waste sorting and recycling.

  18. Tissue tearing caused by pulsed laser-induced ablation pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, J P; Walsh, J T

    1993-02-01

    Pressure induced by ablative pulses of laser radiation is shown to correlate with the mechanical disruption of tissue. The ablation pressure induced during Er:YSGG laser irradiation of skin, liver, and aorta was calculated from a ballistic pendulum-based measurement of recoil momentum. The ejected material and ablation crater were examined grossly and microscopically after ablation. A gas-dynamic model of laser-induced vaporization was used to understand the measured pressures. The results show that mechanical disruption of tissue occurs when the ablation pressure exceeds the strength of the irradiated tissue at sites of intrinsic weakness.

  19. Trace metal mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Jozef [ORNL; Novotny, Dr. Karel [Masaryk University; Hrdlicka, A [Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic; Malina, R [Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic; Hartl, M [Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic; Kizek, R [Mendel University of Brno; Adam, V [Mendel University of Brno

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique capable of fast multi-elemental analysis of solid, gaseous and liquid samples. The potential applications of lasers for spectrochemical analysis were developed shortly after its invention; however the massive development of LIBS is connected with the availability of powerful pulsed laser sources. Since the late 80s of 20th century LIBS dominated the analytical atomic spectroscopy scene and its application are developed continuously. Here we review the utilization of LIBS for trace elements mapping in different matrices. The main emphasis is on trace metal mapping in biological samples.

  20. Computer simulations of laser-induced melting of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Bai, Mingze; Dou, Yusheng; Ran, Qi; Lo, Glenn V.

    2013-04-01

    Laser-induced solid-to-liquid phase transitions in 100 nm aluminum film were simulated using a hybrid model that combines molecular dynamics (MD) with a continuum description of the laser excitation and a two-temperature method (TTM) to model the relaxation of conduction band electrons. When the laser fluence provides more energy than needed for a complete melting of the film, the phase transition is characterized by an ultrafast collapse of the crystal structure within 2-3 ps. Otherwise, the transition involves a homogeneous nucleation and growth of liquid zones inside the crystal and a heterogeneous propagation of transition fronts from the external surfaces or nucleated liquid zones.

  1. Controlled calibration method for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Chijian Zhang; Yuan Feng

    2008-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a potential technique for rapid analysis of samples present in solids, gases and liquids. In the last two decades it was an object of extensive studies. Controlled calibration method used to analysis the LIBS spectra is investigated. Compared with the inner calibration and calibration-free (CF) methods, this new method overcomes "matrix effect", and demonstrates a better ability to cope with the spectra. It is used to analyze natural soil, and errors of the concentration are decreased about 5%. The result shows that the new method is feasible and accurate.

  2. Laser-induced incandescence from laser-heated silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menser, Jan; Daun, Kyle; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the application of temporally and spectrally resolved laser-induced incandescence to silicon nanoparticles synthesized in a microwave plasma reactor. Optical properties for bulk silicon presented in the literature were extended for nanostructured particles analyzed in this paper. Uncertainties of parameters in the evaporation submodel, as well as measurement noise, are incorporated into the inference process by Bayesian statistics. The inferred nanoparticle sizes agree with results from transmission electron microscopy, and the determined accommodation coefficient matches the values of the preceding study.

  3. Progress in fieldable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2012-06-01

    In recent years there has been great progress in the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technology field. Significant advances have been made both in fundamental and applied research as well as in data processing/chemometrics. Improvements in components, most notably lasers/optics and spectrometers are enabling the development of new devices that are suitable for field use. These new commercial devices recently released to the marketplace, as well as ones currently under development, are bringing the potential of LIBS for CBRNE threat analysis into real-world applications.

  4. Laser-fluorescence measurement of marine algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in remote sensing of algae by laser-induced fluorescence is subject of comprehensive report. Existing single-wavelength and four-wavelength systems are reviewed, and new expression for power received by airborne sensor is derived. Result differs by as much as factor of 10 from those previously reported. Detailed error analysis evluates factors affecting accuracy of laser-fluorosensor systems.

  5. Laser-Induced Damage Initiation and Growth of Optical Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxia Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lifetime of optical components is determined by the combination of laser-induced damage initiation probability and damage propagation rate during subsequent laser shots. This paper reviews both theoretical and experimental investigations on laser-induced damage initiation and growth at the surface of optics. The damage mechanism is generally considered as thermal absorption and electron avalanche, which play dominant roles for the different laser pulse durations. The typical damage morphology in the surface of components observed in experiments is also closely related to the damage mechanism. The damage crater in thermal absorption process, which can be estimated by thermal diffusion model, is typical distortion, melting, and ablation debris often with an elevated rim caused by melted material flow and resolidification. However, damage initiated by electron avalanche is often accompanied by generation of plasma, crush, and fracture, which can be explained by thermal explosion model. Damage growth at rear surface of components is extremely severe which can be explained by several models, such as fireball growth, impact crater, brittle fracture, and electric field enhancement. All the physical effects are not independent but mutually coupling. Developing theoretical models of multiphysics coupling are an important trend for future theoretical research. Meanwhile, more attention should be paid to integrated analysis both in theory and experiment.

  6. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  7. Analysis of Pulverized Coal by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to detect atomic species in various environments. The quantitative analysis (C, H, O, N and S) of representative coal samples are being carried out with LIBS, and the effects of particle size are analyzed.A powerful pulse Nd:YAG laser is focused on the coal sample at atmosphere pressure, and the emission spectra from laser-induced plasmas are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy, and the intensity of analyzed spectral lines is obtained through observing the laser plasma with a delay time of 0.4μs. The experimental results show that the slope of calibration curve is nearly 1 when the concentration of the analyzed element is relatively low, and the slope of curve is nearly 0.5 when the concentration of C is higher than other elements. In addition, using the calibration-free model without self-absorption effect, the results show that the decreasing of particle size leads to an increase of the plasma temperature.

  8. Dynamical behavior of laser-induced nanoparticles during remote processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Tobias; Dickmann, Klaus; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Laser remote processing is used in a wide field of industrial applications. Among other things, it is characterized by flexible beam guidance in combination with high processing velocities. But in most cases process gas support in the interaction zone is omitted. Consequently, interaction mechanism between the vapor plume and the incident laser radiation can dynamically affect the process stability. Referring to remote welding with high brilliant laser sources having a wavelength around 1 μm, the interaction between the incident laser radiation and formed particles plays an important role. The presented work shows results of the investigation of the laser-induced particle formation during the laser welding of stainless steel with a 2 kW fiber laser under remote conditions. It is therefore concentrated on the dynamical behavior of the laser-induced particle formation and the dependence of the particle formation on the laser beam power. TEM images of formed particles were analyzed. In addition, the radiation of a LED was directed through the vapor plume. On the one hand, the dynamic of the attenuation was considered. On the other hand, the Rayleigh approximation was used in order to evaluate the detected signals.

  9. Laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voumard, Pierre; Zenobi, Renato

    1995-10-01

    A complete study on the energy partitioning upon laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces was undertaken. The measurements include characterization of the aniline-quartz adsorption system using temperature-programmed desorption, the extrapolation of quasiequilibrium desorption temperatures to the regime of laser heating rates on the order of 109-1010 K/s by computational means, measurement of the kinetic energy distributions of desorbing aniline using a pump-probe method, and the determination of internal energies with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. The measurements are compared to calculations of the surface temperature rise and the resulting desorption rates, based on a finite-difference mathematical description of pulsed laser heating. While the surface temperature of laser-heated silica reaches about 600-700 K at the time of desorption, the translational temperature of laser-desorbed aniline was measured to be Tkin=420±60 K, Tvib was 360±60 K, and Trot was 350±100 K. These results are discussed using different models for laser-induced thermal desorption from surfaces.

  10. Comparative evaluation of differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy as a technique to discriminate emerging skin pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozikowski, Raymond T; Smith, Sarah E; Lee, Jennifer A; Castleman, William L; Sorg, Brian S; Hahn, David W

    2012-06-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been widely investigated as a technique for identifying pathological tissue; however, unrelated subject-to-subject variations in spectra complicate data analysis and interpretation. We describe and evaluate a new biosensing technique, differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS), based on deep ultraviolet (UV) photochemical perturbation in combination with difference spectroscopy. This technique combines sequential fluorescence probing (pre- and post-perturbation) with sub-ablative UV perturbation and difference spectroscopy to provide a new spectral dimension, facilitating two improvements over fluorescence spectroscopy. First, the differential technique eliminates significant variations in absolute fluorescence response within subject populations. Second, UV perturbations alter the extracellular matrix (ECM), directly coupling the DLIPS response to the biological structure. Improved biosensing with DLIPS is demonstrated in vivo in a murine model of chemically induced skin lesion development. Component loading analysis of the data indicates that the DLIPS technique couples to structural proteins in the ECM. Analysis of variance shows that DLIPS has a significant response to emerging pathology as opposed to other population differences. An optimal likelihood ratio classifier for the DLIPS dataset shows that this technique holds promise for improved diagnosis of epithelial pathology. Results further indicate that DLIPS may improve diagnosis of tissue by augmenting fluorescence spectra (i.e. orthogonal sensing).

  11. TRACE ANALYSIS OF FLUORESCEIN-DERIVATIZED PHENOXY ACID HERBICIDES BY MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH LASER-INDUCTED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection was used for the trace analysis of phenoxy acid herbicides. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) with LIF detection, which has not previously been used for pesticide analysis, overcomes the po...

  12. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy application to control of the process of precious metal recovery and recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pardini, L. [Institute of Chemistry of Organometallic Compounds, Research Area of CNR, Via G. Moruzzi, 1-56124 Pisa (Italy); Palleschi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.palleschi@cnr.it [Institute of Chemistry of Organometallic Compounds, Research Area of CNR, Via G. Moruzzi, 1-56124 Pisa (Italy); Pace, D.M. Diaz [Instituto de Fisica ' Arroyo Seco' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Paraje Arroyo Seco-(B7000GHG) Tandil (Argentina); Garcia, F. Anabitarte [Photonic Engineering Group, Universidad de Cantabria, Edificio I-D-i Telecomunicacion, Dpto. TEISA-39005 Santander (Spain); Grassi, R.; Sorrentino, F.; Carelli, G.; Francesconi, M.; Francesconi, F. [Marwan Technology, Largo Pontecorvo, 3-56127 Pisa Italy (Italy); Borgogni, R. [CABRO S.p.A.,Via Setteponti, 141-52100 Arezzo (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we discuss the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to precious metal alloys used for the control of the process of recovery and recycling of scraps and waste of industrial processes. In particular, the possibility to obtain sensitivity and trueness comparable to the current systems used in industrial environment in the quantitative determination of the elements of interest was explored. The present study demonstrates that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy can be considered as a viable alternative to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of recovered precious metals. The limits of detection obtained are of the order of 0.2 mg/g for all the elements considered. The maximum deviation with respect to the nominal concentrations is around 1 mg/g at concentrations around 20 mg/g (gold) corresponding to a relative error slightly higher than {+-} 5%. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discuss application of LIBS for the analysis of recovered precious metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The advantages and drawbacks of LIBS vs. XRF are evidenced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A strategy is devised for obtaining by LIBS limits of detection comparable to XRF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The same strategy would provide trueness in analytical results comparable to XRF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The time needed and the complexity of LIBS analysis would not exceed the XRF ones.

  13. Influence of absorption induced thermal initiation pathway on irradiance threshold for laser induced breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Babu; Bonito, Valentina; Jurna, Martin; Palero, Jonathan; Verhagen, Margaret Hortonand Rieko

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of thermal initiation pathway on the irradiance threshold for laser induced breakdown in transparent, absorbing and scattering phantoms. We observed a transition from laser-induced optical breakdown to laser-induced thermal breakdown as the absorption coefficient of the medium is increased. We found that the irradiance threshold after correction for the path length dependent absorption and scattering losses in the medium is lower due to the thermal pathway for the generation of seed electrons compared to the laser-induced optical breakdown. Furthermore, irradiance threshold gradually decreases with the increase in the absorption properties of the medium. Creating breakdown with lower irradiance threshold that is specific at the target chromophore can provide intrinsic target selectivity and improve safety and efficacy of skin treatment methods that use laser induced breakdown. PMID:25909007

  14. Inexpensive laser-induced surface modification in bismuth thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, A. Reyes [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca, Ixtlahuaca Kilómetro 15.5, C.P. 50200 Edo. de México (Mexico); Hautefeuille, M., E-mail: mathieu_h@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 3000, Circuito Exterior S/N, Coyoacán, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510 D.F. Mexico (Mexico); García, A. Esparza [Fotofísica y Películas Delgadas, Departamento de Tecnociencias, CCADET-UNAM, Circuito exterior s/n C.P. 04510 Cd. Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Mejia, O. Olea [Centro Conjunto de Investigación en Química Sustentable UAEM-UNAM, Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, Km 14.5, Unidad El Rosedal, 50200 San Cayetano, Estado de México (Mexico); López, M.A. Camacho [Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colón, Toluca, Estado de México 50110 (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser-induced microbumps were formed on bismuth films using a simple, low-cost, laser setup. • The patterns, similar to those typically obtained with high-power lasers, were characterized. • Control of laser ablation conditions is critical in the fabrication of surface microbumps. - Abstract: In this work, we present results on texturing a 500 nm thick bismuth film, deposited by sputtering onto a glass slide using a low-cost homemade, near-infrared pulsed laser platform. A 785 nm laser diode of a CD–DVD pickup head was precisely focused on the sample mounted on a motorized two-axis translation stage to generate localized surface microbumps on the bismuth films. This simple method successfully transferred desired micropatterns on the films in a computer-numerical control fashion. Irradiated zones were characterized by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that final results are strongly dependent on irradiation parameters.

  15. Laser-induced incandescence: Towards quantitative soot volume fraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzannis, A.P.; Wienbeucker, F.; Beaud, P.; Frey, H.-M.; Gerber, T.; Mischler, B.; Radi, P.P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Laser-Induced Incandescence has recently emerged as a versatile tool for measuring soot volume fraction in a wide range of combustion systems. In this work we investigate the essential features of the method. LII is based on the acquisition of the incandescence of soot when heated through a high power laser pulse. Initial experiments have been performed on a model laboratory flame. The behaviour of the LII signal is studied experimentally. By applying numerical calculations we investigate the possibility to obtain two-dimensional soot volume fraction distributions. For this purpose a combination of LII with other techniques is required. This part is discussed in some extent and the future work is outlined. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  16. Laser-induced vibration of a thin soap film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine

    2014-09-21

    We report on the vibration of a thin soap film based on the optical radiation pressure force. The modulated low power laser induces a counter gravity flow in a vertical free-standing draining film. The thickness of the soap film is then higher in the upper region than in the lower region of the film. Moreover, the lifetime of the film is dramatically increased by a factor of 2. Since the laser beam only acts mechanically on the film interfaces, such a film can be employed in an optofluidic diaphragm pump, the interfaces behaving like a vibrating membrane and the liquid in-between being the fluid to be pumped. Such a pump could then be used in delicate micro-equipment, in chips where temperature variations are detrimental and even in biological systems.

  17. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  18. Femtosecond laser induced phenomena in transparent solid materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, D.Z.; Sharafudeen, K.N.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with transparent materials is a topic that has caused great interest of scientists over the past two decades. It will continue to be a fascinating field in the coming years. This is because many challenging fundamental problems have not been...... solved, especially concerning the interaction of strong, ultra-short electromagnetic pulses with matter, and also because potential advanced technologies will emerge due to the impressive capability of the intense femtosecond laser to create new material structures and hence functionalities. When......–matter interaction, and fabricate various integrated micro-devices. In recent years we have witnessed exciting development in understanding and applying femtosecond laser induced phenomena in transparent materials. The interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with transparent materials relies on non...

  19. Laser-induced micro-jetting from armored droplets

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2015-06-23

    We present findings from an experimental study of laser-induced cavitation within a liquid drop coated with a granular material, commonly referred to as “armored droplets” or “liquid marbles.” The cavitation event follows the formation of plasma after a nanosecond laser pulse. Using ultra-high-speed imaging up to 320,610 fps, we investigate the extremely rapid dynamics following the cavitation, which manifests itself in the form of a plethora of micro-jets emanating simultaneously from the spaces between particles on the surface of the drop. These fine jets break up into droplets with a relatively narrow diameter range, on the order of 10 μm. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  20. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.