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Sample records for plague vaccine efficacy

  1. Field efficacy trials with sylvatic plague vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richgels, Katherine; Russell, Robin E.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2017-01-01

    These data were collected as part of a field trial to test the efficacy of a sylvatic plague vaccine. Treatment and control sites were selected randomly from the available sites at each location. Site pairs were a minimum of 20 acres, (with a few exceptions). Prairie dog trapping took place a minimum of two weeks post-baiting and trapping procedures were approved by the NWHC Animal Care and Use Committee as well as individual states as required.

  2. Flea-borne transmission model to evaluate vaccine efficacy against naturally acquired bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Clayton O; Sebbane, Florent; Adamovicz, Jeffrey J; Andrews, Gerard P; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2004-04-01

    A flea-to-mouse transmission model was developed for use in testing new candidate vaccines for the ability to protect against flea-borne plague. The model was used to evaluate a recombinant fusion protein vaccine consisting of the Yersinia pestis F1 and V antigens. After one to three challenges with Y. pestis-infected fleas, 14 of 15 unvaccinated control mice developed plague, with an average septicemia level of 9.2 x 10(8) Y. pestis CFU/ml. None of 15 vaccinated mice developed the disease after similar challenges, and serological testing indicated that transmitted bacteria were eliminated by the immune system before extensive replication and systemic infection could occur. The transmission and development of disease in control mice correlated with the number of bites by blocked fleas but not with the total number of fleabites. The model provides a means to directly assess the efficacy of new vaccines to prevent naturally acquired bubonic plague and to study events at the vector-host interface that lead to dissemination and disease.

  3. Characterization of a Cynomolgus Macaque Model of Pneumonic Plague for Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, Patricia; Price, Jessica; Martin, Shannon; Metcalfe, Karen; Krile, Robert; Barnewall, Roy; Hart, Mary Kate; Lockman, Hank

    2015-09-01

    The efficacy of a recombinant plague vaccine (rF1V) was evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (CMs) to establish the relationship among vaccine doses, antibody titers, and survival following an aerosol challenge with a lethal dose of Yersinia pestis strain Colorado 92. CMs were vaccinated with a range of rF1V doses on a three-dose schedule (days 0, 56, and 121) to provide a range of survival outcomes. The humoral immune response following vaccination was evaluated with anti-rF1, anti-rV, and anti-rF1V bridge enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Animals were challenged via aerosol exposure on day 149. Vaccine doses and antibody responses were each significantly associated with the probability of CM survival (P plague in a dose-dependent manner. There were statistically significant correlations between the vaccine dose and the time to onset of fever (P < 0.0001), the time from onset of fever to death (P < 0.0001), the time to onset of elevated respiratory rate (P = 0.0003), and the time to onset of decreased activity (P = 0.0251) postinfection in animals exhibiting these clinical signs. Delays in the onset of these clinical signs of disease were associated with larger doses of rF1V. Immunization with ≥ 12 μg of rF1V resulted in 100% CM survival. Since both the vaccine dose and anti-rF1V antibody titers correlate with survival, rF1V bridge ELISA titers can be used as a correlate of protection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Plague Vaccines: Status and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Three major plague pandemics caused by the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis have killed nearly 200 million people in human history. Due to its extreme virulence and the ease of its transmission, Y. pestis has been used purposefully for biowarfare in the past. Currently, plague epidemics are still breaking out sporadically in most of parts of the world, including the United States. Approximately 2000 cases of plague are reported each year to the World Health Organization. However, the potential use of the bacteria in modern times as an agent of bioterrorism and the emergence of a Y. pestis strain resistant to eight antibiotics bring out severe public health concerns. Therefore, prophylactic vaccination against this disease holds the brightest prospect for its long-term prevention. Here, we summarize the progress of the current vaccine development for counteracting plague.

  5. Vaccination against bubonic and pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titball, R W; Williamson, E D

    2001-07-20

    Yersinia pestis is the etiological agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague, diseases which have caused over 200 milllion human deaths in the past. Plague still occurs throughout the world today, though for reasons that are not fully understood pandemics of disease do not develop from these outbreaks. Antibiotic treatment of bubonic plague is usually effective, but pneumonic plague is difficult to treat and even with antibiotic therapy death often results. A killed whole cell plague vaccine has been used in the past, but recent studies in animals have shown that this vaccine offers poor protection against pneumonic disease. A live attenuated vaccine is also available. Whilst this vaccine is effective, it retains some virulence and in most countries it is not considered to be suitable for use in humans. We review here work to develop improved sub-unit and live attenuated vaccines against plague. A sub-unit vaccine based on the F1- and V-antigens is highly effective against both bubonic and pneumonic plague, when tested in animal models of disease. This vaccine has been used to explore the utility of different intranasal and oral delivery systems, based on the microencapsulation or Salmonella delivery of sub-units.

  6. Plague in Guinea pigs and its prevention by subunit vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenee, Lauriane E; Ciletti, Nancy; Berube, Bryan; Krausz, Thomas; Elli, Derek; Hermanas, Timothy; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-04-01

    Human pneumonic plague is a devastating and transmissible disease for which a Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccine is not available. Suitable animal models may be adopted as a surrogate for human plague to fulfill regulatory requirements for vaccine efficacy testing. To develop an alternative to pneumonic plague in nonhuman primates, we explored guinea pigs as a model system. On intranasal instillation of a fully virulent strain, Yersinia pestis CO92, guinea pigs developed lethal lung infections with hemorrhagic necrosis, massive bacterial replication in the respiratory system, and blood-borne dissemination to other organ systems. Expression of the Y. pestis F1 capsule was not required for the development of pulmonary infection; however, the capsule seemed to be important for the establishment of bubonic plague. The mean lethal dose (MLD) for pneumonic plague in guinea pigs was estimated to be 1000 colony-forming units. Immunization of guinea pigs with the recombinant forms of LcrV, a protein that resides at the tip of Yersinia type III secretion needles, or F1 capsule generated robust humoral immune responses. Whereas LcrV immunization resulted in partial protection against pneumonic plague challenge with 250 MLD Y. pestis CO92, immunization with recombinant F1 did not. rV10, a vaccine variant lacking LcrV residues 271-300, elicited protection against pneumonic plague, which seemed to be based on conformational antibodies directed against LcrV. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Plague in Guinea Pigs and Its Prevention by Subunit Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenee, Lauriane E.; Ciletti, Nancy; Berube, Bryan; Krausz, Thomas; Elli, Derek; Hermanas, Timothy; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Human pneumonic plague is a devastating and transmissible disease for which a Food and Drug Administration–approved vaccine is not available. Suitable animal models may be adopted as a surrogate for human plague to fulfill regulatory requirements for vaccine efficacy testing. To develop an alternative to pneumonic plague in nonhuman primates, we explored guinea pigs as a model system. On intranasal instillation of a fully virulent strain, Yersinia pestis CO92, guinea pigs developed lethal lung infections with hemorrhagic necrosis, massive bacterial replication in the respiratory system, and blood-borne dissemination to other organ systems. Expression of the Y. pestis F1 capsule was not required for the development of pulmonary infection; however, the capsule seemed to be important for the establishment of bubonic plague. The mean lethal dose (MLD) for pneumonic plague in guinea pigs was estimated to be 1000 colony-forming units. Immunization of guinea pigs with the recombinant forms of LcrV, a protein that resides at the tip of Yersinia type III secretion needles, or F1 capsule generated robust humoral immune responses. Whereas LcrV immunization resulted in partial protection against pneumonic plague challenge with 250 MLD Y. pestis CO92, immunization with recombinant F1 did not. rV10, a vaccine variant lacking LcrV residues 271-300, elicited protection against pneumonic plague, which seemed to be based on conformational antibodies directed against LcrV. PMID:21406168

  8. Oral vaccination against plague using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeure, Christian E; Derbise, Anne; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2017-04-01

    Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague, is among the deadliest bacterial pathogens affecting humans, and is a potential biological weapon. Because antibiotic resistant strains of Yersinia pestis have been observed or could be engineered for evil use, vaccination against plague might become the only means to reduce mortality. Although plague is re-emerging in many countries, a vaccine with worldwide license is currently lacking. The vaccine strategy described here is based on an oral vaccination with an attenuated strain of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Indeed, this species is genetically almost identical to Y. pestis, but has a much lower pathogenicity and a higher genomic stability. Gradual modifications of the wild-type Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strain IP32953 were performed to generate a safe and immunogenic vaccine. Genes coding for three essential virulence factors were deleted from this strain. To increase cross-species immunogenicity, an F1-encapsulated Y. pseudotuberculosis strain was then generated. For this, the Y. pestis caf operon, which encodes F1, was inserted first on a plasmid, and subsequently into the chromosome. The successive steps achieved to reach maximal vaccine potential are described, and how each step affected bacterial virulence and the development of a protective immune response is discussed. The final version of the vaccine, named VTnF1, provides a highly efficient and long-lasting protection against both bubonic and pneumonic plague after a single oral vaccine dose. Since a Y. pestis strain deprived of F1 exist or could be engineered, we also analyzed the protection conferred by the vaccine against such strain and found that it also confers full protection against the two forms of plague. Thus, the properties of VTnF1 makes it one of the most efficient candidate vaccine for mass vaccination in tropical endemic areas as well as for populations exposed to bioterrorism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sylvatic plague vaccine and management of prairie dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC), in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Wisconsin (UW), have developed a sylvatic plague vaccine that shows great promise in protecting prairie dogs against plague (Mencher and others, 2004; Rocke and others, 2010). Four species of prairie dogs reside in the United States and Canada, and all are highly susceptible to plague and regularly experience outbreaks with devastating losses. Along with habitat loss and poisoning, plague has contributed to a significant historical decline in prairie dog populations. By some estimates, prairie dogs now occupy only 1 to 2 percent of their former range (Proctor and others, 2006), with prairie dog colonies being now much smaller and fragmented than they were historically, making individual colonies more vulnerable to elimination by plague (Antolin and others, 2002). At least one species, the Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens) is listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) as "threatened." Controlling plague is a vital concern for ongoing management and conservation efforts for prairie dogs. Current efforts to halt the spread of plague in prairie dog colonies typically rely on dusting individual prairie dog burrows with pesticides to kill plague-infected fleas. Although flea-control insecticides, such as deltamethrin, are useful in stopping plague outbreaks in these prairie dog colonies, dusting of burrows is labor intensive and time consuming and may affect other insects and arthropods. As an alternative approach, NWHC and UW scientists developed a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) for prairie dogs that can be delivered via oral bait. Laboratory studies have shown that consumption of this vaccine-laden bait by different prairie dog species results in significant protection against plague infection that can last for at least 9 months (Rocke and others, 2010; Rocke, unpublished). Work has now shifted to optimizing baits and distribution methods for

  10. Vaccines for Conservation: Plague, Prairie Dogs & Black-Footed Ferrets as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkeld, Daniel J

    2017-09-06

    The endangered black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) is affected by plague, caused by Yersinia pestis, both directly, as a cause of mortality, and indirectly, because of the impacts of plague on its prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) prey base. Recent developments in vaccines and vaccine delivery have raised the possibility of plague control in prairie dog populations, thereby protecting ferret populations. A large-scale experimental investigation across the western US shows that sylvatic plague vaccine delivered in oral baits can increase prairie dog survival. In northern Colorado, an examination of the efficacy of insecticides to control fleas and plague vaccine shows that timing and method of plague control is important, with different implications for long-term and large-scale management of Y. pestis delivery. In both cases, the studies show that ambitious field-work and cross-sectoral collaboration can provide potential solutions to difficult issues of wildlife management, conservation and disease ecology.

  11. Recombinant raccoon pox vaccine protects mice against lethal plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, J.E.; Powell, T.D.; Frank, R.S.; Moss, K.; Haanes, E.J.; Smith, S.R.; Rocke, T.E.; Stinchcomb, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    Using a raccoon poxvirus (RCN) expression system, we have developed new recombinant vaccines that can protect mice against lethal plague infection. We tested the effects of a translation enhancer (EMCV-IRES) in combination with a secretory (tPA) signal or secretory (tPA) and membrane anchoring (CHV-gG) signals on in vitro antigen expression of F1 antigen in tissue culture and the induction of antibody responses and protection against Yersinia pestis challenge in mice. The RCN vector successfully expressed the F1 protein of Y. pestis in vitro. In addition, the level of expression was increased by the insertion of the EMCV-IRES and combinations of this and the secretory signal or secretory and anchoring signals. These recombinant viruses generated protective immune responses that resulted in survival of 80% of vaccinated mice upon challenge with Y. pestis. Of the RCN-based vaccines we tested, the RCN-IRES-tPA-YpF1 recombinant construct was the most efficacious. Mice vaccinated with this construct withstood challenge with as many as 1.5 million colony forming units of Y. pestis (7.7??104LD50). Interestingly, vaccination with F1 fused to the anchoring signal (RCN-IRES-tPA-YpF1-gG) elicited significant anti-F1 antibody titers, but failed to protect mice from plague challenge. Our studies demonstrate, in vitro and in vivo, the potential importance of the EMCV-IRES and secretory signals in vaccine design. These molecular tools provide a new approach for improving the efficacy of vaccines. In addition, these novel recombinant vaccines could have human, veterinary, and wildlife applications in the prevention of plague. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sylvatic plague vaccine: combating plague in prarie dogs and black-footed ferrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Abbott, Rachel C.

    2012-01-01

    After achieving promising results in laboratory trials, researchers at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) and University of Wisconsin at Madison will soon begin field testing a new oral vaccine for sylvatic plague, a devastating disease affecting prairie dogs and other mammals, particularly the endangered black-footed ferret. Our team has developed and is currently registering a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) that uses raccoon poxvirus (RCN) to express two key antigens of the Yersinia pestis bacterium, the causative agent of plague.

  13. Sylvatic plague vaccine: combating plague in prarie dogs and black-footed ferrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Abbott, Rachel C.

    2012-01-01

    After achieving promising results in laboratory trials, researchers at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) and University of Wisconsin at Madison will soon begin field testing a new oral vaccine for sylvatic plague, a devastating disease affecting prairie dogs and other mammals, particularly the endangered black-footed ferret. Our team has developed and is currently registering a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) that uses raccoon poxvirus (RCN) to express two key antigens of the Yersinia pestis bacterium, the causative agent of plague.

  14. Age at vaccination may influence response to sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) in Gunnison’s prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Tripp, Daniel W.; Lorenzsonn, Faye; Falendysz, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Susan; Williamson, Judy L.; Abbott, Rachel C.

    2015-01-01

    Gunnison’s prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) have been considered at greater risk from Yersinia pestis (plague) infection in the montane portion of their range compared to populations at lower elevations, possibly due to factors related to flea transmission of the bacteria or greater host susceptibility. To test the latter hypothesis and determine whether vaccination against plague with an oral sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) improved survival, we captured prairie dogs from a C. g. gunnisoni or “montane” population and a C. g. zuniensis or “prairie” population for vaccine efficacy and challenge studies. No differences (P = 0.63) were found in plague susceptibility in non-vaccinated animals between these two populations; however, vaccinates from the prairie population survived plague challenge at significantly higher rates (P Vaccinates that were juveniles or young adults survived plague challenge at a much higher rate than adults (P < 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively), but no difference (P = 0.83) was detected in survival rates between control animals of different ages. These results suggest that host susceptibility is probably not related to the assumed greater risk from plague in the C. g. gunnisoni or “montane” populations of Gunnison’s prairie dogs, and that SPV could be a useful plague management tool for this species, particularly if targeted at younger cohorts.

  15. Plague vaccines and the molecular basis of immunity against Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenee, Lauriane E; Schneewind, Olaf

    2009-12-01

    Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague, human diseases with high mortality. Due to the microbe's ability to spread rapidly, plague epidemics present a serious public health threat. A search for prophylactic measures was initially based on historical reports of bubonic plague survivors and their apparent immunity. Due to safety and efficacy concerns, killed whole-cell preparations or live-attenuated plague vaccines are no longer considered in the United States. Vaccine developers have focused on specific subunits of plague bacteria. LcrV, a protein at the tip of type III secretion needles, and F1, the capsular pilus antigen, are both recognized as plague protective antigens. Antibodies against LcrV and F1 interfere with Y. pestis type III injection of host cells. While LcrV is absolutely essential for Y. pestis virulence, expression of F1 is dispensable for plague pathogenesis in small animals, non-human primates and presumably also in humans. Several subunit vaccines, for example rF1+rV (rYP002), rF1V or rV10, are being developed to generate plague protection in humans. Efficacy testing and licensure for human use requires the establishment of correlates for plague immunity.

  16. Burrow Dusting or Oral Vaccination Prevents Plague-Associated Prairie Dog Colony Collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W; Rocke, Tonie E; Runge, Jonathan P; Abbott, Rachel C; Miller, Michael W

    2017-06-22

    Plague impacts prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), the endangered black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) and other sensitive wildlife species. We compared efficacy of prophylactic treatments (burrow dusting with deltamethrin or oral vaccination with recombinant "sylvatic plague vaccine" [RCN-F1/V307]) to placebo treatment in black-tailed prairie dog (C. ludovicianus) colonies. Between 2013 and 2015, we measured prairie dog apparent survival, burrow activity and flea abundance on triplicate plots ("blocks") receiving dust, vaccine or placebo treatment. Epizootic plague affected all three blocks but emerged asynchronously. Dust plots had fewer fleas per burrow (P plague emerged. Patterns in corresponding dust and vaccine plots were less consistent and appeared strongly influenced by timing of treatment applications relative to plague emergence. Deltamethrin or oral vaccination enhanced apparent survival within two blocks. Applying insecticide or vaccine prior to epizootic emergence blunted effects of plague on prairie dog survival and abundance, thereby preventing colony collapse. Successful plague mitigation will likely entail strategic combined uses of burrow dusting and oral vaccination within large colonies or colony complexes.

  17. Age at Vaccination May Influence Response to Sylvatic Plague Vaccine (SPV) in Gunnison's Prairie Dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E; Tripp, Dan; Lorenzsonn, Faye; Falendysz, Elizabeth; Smith, Susan; Williamson, Judy; Abbott, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) have been considered at greater risk from Yersinia pestis (plague) infection in the montane portion of their range compared to populations at lower elevations, possibly due to factors related to flea transmission of the bacteria or greater host susceptibility. To test the latter hypothesis and determine whether vaccination against plague with an oral sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) improved survival, we captured prairie dogs from a C. g. gunnisoni or "montane" population and a C. g. zuniensis or "prairie" population for vaccine efficacy and challenge studies. No differences (P = 0.63) were found in plague susceptibility in non-vaccinated animals between these two populations; however, vaccinates from the prairie population survived plague challenge at significantly higher rates (P plague challenge at a much higher rate than adults (P plague in the C. g. gunnisoni or "montane" populations of Gunnison's prairie dogs, and that SPV could be a useful plague management tool for this species, particularly if targeted at younger cohorts.

  18. Burrow dusting or oral vaccination prevents plague-associated prairie dog colony collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Runge, Jonathan P.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Miller, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    Plague impacts prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), the endangered black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) and other sensitive wildlife species. We compared efficacy of prophylactic treatments (burrow dusting with deltamethrin or oral vaccination with recombinant “sylvatic plague vaccine” [RCN-F1/V307]) to placebo treatment in black-tailed prairie dog (C. ludovicianus) colonies. Between 2013 and 2015, we measured prairie dog apparent survival, burrow activity and flea abundance on triplicate plots (“blocks”) receiving dust, vaccine or placebo treatment. Epizootic plague affected all three blocks but emerged asynchronously. Dust plots had fewer fleas per burrow (P plague emerged. Patterns in corresponding dust and vaccine plots were less consistent and appeared strongly influenced by timing of treatment applications relative to plague emergence. Deltamethrin or oral vaccination enhanced apparent survival within two blocks. Applying insecticide or vaccine prior to epizootic emergence blunted effects of plague on prairie dog survival and abundance, thereby preventing colony collapse. Successful plague mitigation will likely entail strategic combined uses of burrow dusting and oral vaccination within large colonies or colony complexes.

  19. Further development of raccoon poxvirus-vectored vaccines against plague (Yersinia pestis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, T.E.; Iams, Keith P.; Dawe, S.; Smith, S.R.; Williamson, J.L.; Heisey, D.M.; Osorio, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated protection against plague in mice and prairie dogs using a raccoon pox (RCN) virus-vectored vaccine that expressed the F1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis. In order to improve vaccine efficacy, we have now constructed additional RCN-plague vaccines containing two different forms of the lcrV (V) gene, including full-length (Vfull) and a truncated form (V307). Mouse challenge studies with Y. pestis strain CO92 showed that vaccination with a combination of RCN-F1 and the truncated V construct (RCN-V307) provided the greatest improvement (P = 0.01) in protection against plague over vaccination with RCN-F1 alone. This effect was mediated primarily by anti-F1 and anti-V antibodies and both contributed independently to increased survival of vaccinated mice.

  20. Hereditary Hemochromatosis Restores the Virulence of Plague Vaccine Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenee, Lauriane E.; Hermanas, Timothy M.; Ciletti, Nancy; Louvel, Helene; Miller, Nathan C.; Elli, Derek; Blaylock, Bill; Mitchell, Anthony; Schroeder, Jay; Krausz, Thomas; Kanabrocki, Joseph; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Nonpigmented Yersinia pestis (pgm) strains are defective in scavenging host iron and have been used in live-attenuated vaccines to combat plague epidemics. Recently, a Y. pestis pgm strain was isolated from a researcher with hereditary hemochromatosis who died from laboratory-acquired plague. We used hemojuvelin-knockout (Hjv−/−) mice to examine whether iron-storage disease restores the virulence defects of nonpigmented Y. pestis. Unlike wild-type mice, Hjv−/− mice developed lethal plague when challenged with Y. pestis pgm strains. Immunization of Hjv−/− mice with a subunit vaccine that blocks Y. pestis type III secretion generated protection against plague. Thus, individuals with hereditary hemochromatosis may be protected with subunit vaccines but should not be exposed to live-attenuated plague vaccines. PMID:22896664

  1. Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rachel C.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2012-01-01

    Plague offers readers an overview of this highly complex disease caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis. The history of the disease, as well as information about Yersinia pestis and its transmission by fleas, is described. The section Geographic Distribution presents areas of the world and United States where plague occurs most commonly in rodents and humans. Species Susceptibility describes infection and disease rates in rodents, humans, and other animals. Disease Ecology considers the complex relationship among rodents, domestic and wild animals, and humans and explores possible routes of transmission and maintenance of the organism in the environment. The effects of climate change, the potential for Y. pestis to be used as a bioweapon, and the impact of plague on conservation of wildlife are considered in Points to Ponder. Disease Prevention and Control outlines methods of prevention and treatment including vaccination for prairie dogs and black-footed ferrets. A glossary of technical terms is included. Tonie E. Rocke, the senior author and an epizootiologist at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC), is a prominent researcher on oral vaccination of prairie dogs to prevent plague. She is currently working to transfer her success in the laboratory to the field to control plague in prairie dogs. Rachel C. Abbott, a biologist at the NWHC, is assisting Dr. Rocke in this process and will coordinate field trials of the vaccine. Milt Friend, first director of the NWHC, wrote the foreword. Plague is intended for scholars and the general public. The material is presented in a simple, straightforward manner that serves both audiences. Numerous illustrations and tables provide easily understood summaries of key points and information.

  2. Plant-made subunit vaccine against pneumonic and bubonic plague is orally immunogenic in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, M Lucrecia; Pinyerd, Heidi L; Crisantes, Jason D; Rigano, M Manuela; Pinkhasov, Julia; Walmsley, Amanda M; Mason, Hugh S; Cardineau, Guy A

    2006-03-24

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is an extremely virulent bacterium but there are no approved vaccines for protection against it. Our goal was to produce a vaccine that would address: ease of delivery, mucosal efficacy, safety, rapid scalability, and cost. We developed a novel production and delivery system for a plague vaccine of a Y. pestis F1-V antigen fusion protein expressed in tomato. Immunogenicity of the F1-V transgenic tomatoes was confirmed in mice that were primed subcutaneously with bacterially-produced F1-V and boosted orally with transgenic tomato fruit. Expression of the plague antigens in fruit allowed producing an oral vaccine candidate without protein purification and with minimal processing technology.

  3. Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In the Middle Ages in Europe, massive plague epidemics killed millions of people. Plague has not been eliminated. It can still be found in Africa, Asia, and South America. Today, plague is rare in the United States. ...

  4. [The time course of changes in cell immunological parameters during administration of live dry plague vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacheva, N V; Darmov, I V; Borisevich, I V; Kriuchkov, A V; Pechenkin, D V

    2009-08-01

    The study of the time course of changes in cell immunological parameters by a magnetic separation technique in human beings during the administration of plague vaccine in relation to the immunological load revealed the higher blood levels of all T lymphocyte subpopulations on day 14 after vaccination. These changes are most typical of a primary vaccinated cohort. The increased frequency of plague vaccine administration and multiple immunizations with live plague, anthrax, and tularemia vaccines produce the time-course of changes in T lymphocyte populations (subpopulations) in response to the regular administration of plague vaccine. A high immunological load in man also promotes a significant reduction in the level of B lymphocytes.

  5. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides augment the murine immune response to the Yersinia pestis F1-V vaccine in bubonic and pneumonic models of plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Kei; Meyers, Jennifer L; Rogers, Taralyn E; Fast, Randy L; Bassett, Anthony D; Worsham, Patricia L; Powell, Bradford S; Norris, Sarah L; Krieg, Arthur M; Adamovicz, Jeffrey J

    2009-04-06

    The current U.S. Department of Defense candidate plague vaccine is a fusion between two Yersinia pestis proteins: the F1 capsular protein, and the low calcium response (Lcr) V-protein. We hypothesized that an immunomodulator, such as CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN)s, could augment the immune response to the plague F1-V vaccine in a mouse model for plague. CpG ODNs significantly augmented the antibody response and efficacy of a single dose of the plague vaccine in murine bubonic and pneumonic models of plague. In the latter study, we also found an overall significant augmentation the immune response to the individual subunits of the plague vaccine by CpG ODN 2006. In a long-term, prime-boost study, CpG ODN induced a significant early augmentation of the IgG response to the vaccine. The presence of CpG ODN induced a significant increase in the IgG2a subclass response to the vaccine up to 5 months after the boost. Our studies showed that CpG ODNs significantly augmented the IgG antibody response to the plague vaccine, which increased the probability of survival in murine models of plague (P<0.0001).

  6. Histopathological observation of immunized rhesus macaques with plague vaccines after subcutaneous infection of Yersinia pestis.

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    Guang Tian

    Full Text Available In our previous study, complete protection was observed in Chinese-origin rhesus macaques immunized with SV1 (20 µg F1 and 10 µg rV270 and SV2 (200 µg F1 and 100 µg rV270 subunit vaccines and with EV76 live attenuated vaccine against subcutaneous challenge with 6×10(6 CFU of Y. pestis. In the present study, we investigated whether the vaccines can effectively protect immunized animals from any pathologic changes using histological and immunohistochemical techniques. In addition, the glomerular basement membranes (GBMs of the immunized animals and control animals were checked by electron microscopy. The results show no signs of histopathological lesions in the lungs, livers, kidneys, lymph nodes, spleens and hearts of the immunized animals at Day 14 after the challenge, whereas pathological alterations were seen in the corresponding tissues of the control animals. Giemsa staining, ultrastructural examination, and immunohistochemical staining revealed bacteria in some of the organs of the control animals, whereas no bacterium was observed among the immunized animals. Ultrastructural observation revealed that no glomerular immune deposits on the GBM. These observations suggest that the vaccines can effectively protect animals from any pathologic changes and eliminate Y. pestis from the immunized animals. The control animals died from multi-organ lesions specifically caused by the Y. pestis infection. We also found that subcutaneous infection of animals with Y. pestis results in bubonic plague, followed by pneumonic and septicemic plagues. The histopathologic features of plague in rhesus macaques closely resemble those of rodent and human plagues. Thus, Chinese-origin rhesus macaques serve as useful models in studying Y. pestis pathogenesis, host response and the efficacy of new medical countermeasures against plague.

  7. Sylvatic plague vaccine: a new tool for conservation of threatened and endangered species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rachel C; Osorio, Jorge E; Bunck, Christine M; Rocke, Tonie E

    2012-09-01

    Plague, a disease caused by Yersinia pestis introduced into North America about 100 years ago, is devastating to prairie dogs and the highly endangered black-footed ferret. Current attempts to control plague in these species have historically relied on insecticidal dusting of prairie dog burrows to kill the fleas that spread the disease. Although successful in curtailing outbreaks in most instances, this method of plague control has significant limitations. Alternative approaches to plague management are being tested, including vaccination. Currently, all black-footed ferret kits released for reintroduction are vaccinated against plague with an injectable protein vaccine, and even wild-born kits are captured and vaccinated at some locations. In addition, a novel, virally vectored, oral vaccine to prevent plague in wild prairie dogs has been developed and will soon be tested as an alternative, preemptive management tool. If demonstrated to be successful, oral vaccination of selected prairie dog populations could decrease the occurrence of plague epizootics in key locations, thereby reducing the source of bacteria while avoiding the indiscriminate environmental effects of dusting. Just as rabies in wild carnivores has largely been controlled through an active surveillance and oral vaccination program, we believe an integrated plague management strategy would be similarly enhanced with the addition of a cost-effective, bait-delivered, sylvatic plague vaccine for prairie dogs. Control of plague in prairie dogs, and potentially other rodents, would significantly advance prairie dog conservation and black-footed ferret recovery.

  8. Sylvatic plague vaccine: A new tool for conservation of threatened and endangered species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rachel C.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Bunck, Christine M.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2012-01-01

    Plague, a disease caused by Yersinia pestis introduced into North America about 100 years ago, is devastating to prairie dogs and the highly endangered black-footed ferret. Current attempts to control plague in these species have historically relied on insecticidal dusting of prairie dog burrows to kill the fleas that spread the disease. Although successful in curtailing outbreaks in most instances, this method of plague control has significant limitations. Alternative approaches to plague management are being tested, including vaccination. Currently, all black-footed ferret kits released for reintroduction are vaccinated against plague with an injectable protein vaccine, and even wild-born kits are captured and vaccinated at some locations. In addition, a novel, virally vectored, oral vaccine to prevent plague in wild prairie dogs has been developed and will soon be tested as an alternative, preemptive management tool. If demonstrated to be successful, oral vaccination of selected prairie dog populations could decrease the occurrence of plague epizootics in key locations, thereby reducing the source of bacteria while avoiding the indiscriminate environmental effects of dusting. Just as rabies in wild carnivores has largely been controlled through an active surveillance and oral vaccination program, we believe an integrated plague management strategy would be similarly enhanced with the addition of a cost-effective, bait-delivered, sylvatic plague vaccine for prairie dogs. Control of plague in prairie dogs, and potentially other rodents, would significantly advance prairie dog conservation and black-footed ferret recovery.

  9. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and truncated V antigens protects animals against lethal plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Kingstad-Bakke, B; Berlier, W; Osorio, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis.. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.

  10. Mutated and Bacteriophage T4 Nanoparticle Arrayed F1-V Immunogens from Yersinia pestis as Next Generation Plague Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Pan; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Kirtley, Michelle L.; van Lier, Christina J.; Sha, Jian; Yeager, Linsey A.; Chopra, Ashok K.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonic plague is a highly virulent infectious disease with 100% mortality rate, and its causative organism Yersinia pestis poses a serious threat for deliberate use as a bioterror agent. Currently, there is no FDA approved vaccine against plague. The polymeric bacterial capsular protein F1, a key component of the currently tested bivalent subunit vaccine consisting, in addition, of low calcium response V antigen, has high propensity to aggregate, thus affecting its purification and vaccine efficacy. We used two basic approaches, structure-based immunogen design and phage T4 nanoparticle delivery, to construct new plague vaccines that provided complete protection against pneumonic plague. The NH2-terminal β-strand of F1 was transplanted to the COOH-terminus and the sequence flanking the β-strand was duplicated to eliminate polymerization but to retain the T cell epitopes. The mutated F1 was fused to the V antigen, a key virulence factor that forms the tip of the type three secretion system (T3SS). The F1mut-V protein showed a dramatic switch in solubility, producing a completely soluble monomer. The F1mut-V was then arrayed on phage T4 nanoparticle via the small outer capsid protein, Soc. The F1mut-V monomer was robustly immunogenic and the T4-decorated F1mut-V without any adjuvant induced balanced TH1 and TH2 responses in mice. Inclusion of an oligomerization-deficient YscF, another component of the T3SS, showed a slight enhancement in the potency of F1-V vaccine, while deletion of the putative immunomodulatory sequence of the V antigen did not improve the vaccine efficacy. Both the soluble (purified F1mut-V mixed with alhydrogel) and T4 decorated F1mut-V (no adjuvant) provided 100% protection to mice and rats against pneumonic plague evoked by high doses of Y. pestis CO92. These novel platforms might lead to efficacious and easily manufacturable next generation plague vaccines. PMID:23853602

  11. Prevention of bubonic and pneumonic plague using plant-derived vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, M Lucrecia; Cardineau, Guy A

    2010-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague, is an extremely virulent bacterium but there are currently no approved vaccines for protection against this organism. Plants represent an economical and safer alternative to fermentation-based expression systems for the production of therapeutic proteins. The recombinant plague vaccine candidates produced in plants are based on the two most immunogenic antigens of Y. pestis: the fraction-1 capsular antigen (F1) and the low calcium response virulent antigen (V) either in combination or as a fusion protein (F1-V). These antigens have been expressed in plants using all three known possible strategies: nuclear transformation, chloroplast transformation and plant-virus-based expression vectors. These plant-derived plague vaccine candidates were successfully tested in animal models using parenteral, oral, or prime/boost immunization regimens. This review focuses on the recent research accomplishments towards the development of safe and effective pneumonic and bubonic plague vaccines using plants as bioreactors.

  12. Managing prairie dogs by managing plague: a vaccine for the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Terry B.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Gober, Pete; Van Pelt, Bill E.; Miller, Michael W.; Tripp, Daniel W.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Bergman, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The Black-footed Ferret Recovery Implementation Team Executive Committee is conducting a project to develop,and (hopefully) eventually implement, a plague vaccination program for prairie dogs. The project is a component of the WesternAssociation of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Grasslands Conservation Initiative. An effective, field-worthy vaccine against plaguecould be the biggest breakthrough in recovery efforts for the black-footed ferret since the 1981 rediscovery of wild ferrets nearMeeteetse, Wyoming. If proven efficacious, the vaccine could help agencies and stakeholder cooperators maintain specificpopulations of prairie dogs at robust levels, thus enhancing range-wide conservation of those species, as well recovery of the ferret,while enabling control of other prairie dog populations to resolve site-specific agricultural and human health concerns. The resultsof laboratory and field-testing in the early stages of developing this vaccine are preliminary but mostly encouraging. A plan forbroad-scale application is being developed for possible use when testing has been completed and (if warranted) the vaccine isregistered for governmental use. An overview of all aspects of the project is discussed.

  13. Yersinia pestis Yop secretion protein F: purification, characterization, and protective efficacy against bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swietnicki, Wieslaw; Powell, Bradford S; Goodin, Jeremy

    2005-07-01

    Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative human pathogen that uses a type III secretion system to deliver virulence factors into human hosts. The delivery is contact-dependent and it has been proposed that polymerization of Yop secretion protein F (YscF) is used to puncture mammalian cell membranes to facilitate delivery of Yersinia outer protein effectors into host cells. To evaluate the potential immunogenicity and protective efficacy of YscF against Y. pestis, we used a purified recombinant YscF protein as a potential vaccine candidate in a mouse subcutaneous infection model. YscF was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and protein identity was confirmed by ion trap mass spectrometry. The recombinant protein was highly alpha-helical and formed relatively stable aggregates under physiological conditions. The properties were consistent with behavior expected for the native YscF, suggesting that the antigen was properly folded. Ten mice were inoculated subcutaneously, administered booster injections after one month, and challenged with 130 LD(50) of wild type Y. pestis CO92. Six animals in the vaccinated group but none in the control group survived the challenge. The vaccinated animals produced high levels of specific antibodies against YscF as determined by Western blot. The data were statistically significant (P = 0.053 by two-tailed Fisher's test), suggesting that the YscF protein can provide a protective immune response against lethal plague challenge during subcutaneous plague infection.

  14. Use of Rhodamine B as a biomarker for oral plague vaccination of prairie dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Julia Rodriguez-Ramos; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2011-01-01

    Oral vaccination against Yersinia pestis could provide a feasible approach for controlling plague in prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) for conservation and public health purposes. Biomarkers are useful in wildlife vaccination programs to demonstrate exposure to vaccine baits. Rhodamine B (RB) was tested as a potential biomarker for oral plague vaccination because it allows nonlethal sampling of animals through hair, blood, and feces. We found that RB is an appropriate marker for bait uptake studies of C. ludovicianus) when used at concentrations 10 mg RB per kg target animal mass. Whiskers with follicles provided the best sample for RB detection.

  15. Use of rhodamine B as a biomarker for oral plague vaccination of prairie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Julia Rodriguez-Ramos; Rocke, Tonie E

    2011-07-01

    Oral vaccination against Yersinia pestis could provide a feasible approach for controlling plague in prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) for conservation and public health purposes. Biomarkers are useful in wildlife vaccination programs to demonstrate exposure to vaccine baits. Rhodamine B (RB) was tested as a potential biomarker for oral plague vaccination because it allows nonlethal sampling of animals through hair, blood, and feces. We found that RB is an appropriate marker for bait uptake studies of black-tailed prairie dogs (C. ludovicianus) when used at concentrations 10 mg RB per kg target animal mass. Whiskers with follicles provided the best sample for RB detection.

  16. Complete Protection against Pneumonic and Bubonic Plague after a Single Oral Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbise, Anne; Hanada, Yuri; Khalifé, Manal; Carniel, Elisabeth; Demeure, Christian E

    2015-01-01

    No efficient vaccine against plague is currently available. We previously showed that a genetically attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis producing the Yersinia pestis F1 antigen was an efficient live oral vaccine against pneumonic plague. This candidate vaccine however failed to confer full protection against bubonic plague and did not produce F1 stably. The caf operon encoding F1 was inserted into the chromosome of a genetically attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis, yielding the VTnF1 strain, which stably produced the F1 capsule. Given orally to mice, VTnF1 persisted two weeks in the mouse gut and induced a high humoral response targeting both F1 and other Y. pestis antigens. The strong cellular response elicited was directed mostly against targets other than F1, but also against F1. It involved cells with a Th1-Th17 effector profile, producing IFNγ, IL-17, and IL-10. A single oral dose (108 CFU) of VTnF1 conferred 100% protection against pneumonic plague using a high-dose challenge (3,300 LD50) caused by the fully virulent Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, vaccination protected 100% of mice from bubonic plague caused by a challenge with 100 LD50 Y. pestis and 93% against a high-dose infection (10,000 LD50). Protection involved fast-acting mechanisms controlling Y. pestis spread out of the injection site, and the protection provided was long-lasting, with 93% and 50% of mice surviving bubonic and pneumonic plague respectively, six months after vaccination. Vaccinated mice also survived bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by a high-dose of non-encapsulated (F1-) Y. pestis. VTnF1 is an easy-to-produce, genetically stable plague vaccine candidate, providing a highly efficient and long-lasting protection against both bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by wild type or un-encapsulated (F1-negative) Y. pestis. To our knowledge, VTnF1 is the only plague vaccine ever reported that could provide high and durable protection against the two forms of plague after a single oral

  17. Complete Protection against Pneumonic and Bubonic Plague after a Single Oral Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Derbise

    Full Text Available No efficient vaccine against plague is currently available. We previously showed that a genetically attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis producing the Yersinia pestis F1 antigen was an efficient live oral vaccine against pneumonic plague. This candidate vaccine however failed to confer full protection against bubonic plague and did not produce F1 stably.The caf operon encoding F1 was inserted into the chromosome of a genetically attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis, yielding the VTnF1 strain, which stably produced the F1 capsule. Given orally to mice, VTnF1 persisted two weeks in the mouse gut and induced a high humoral response targeting both F1 and other Y. pestis antigens. The strong cellular response elicited was directed mostly against targets other than F1, but also against F1. It involved cells with a Th1-Th17 effector profile, producing IFNγ, IL-17, and IL-10. A single oral dose (108 CFU of VTnF1 conferred 100% protection against pneumonic plague using a high-dose challenge (3,300 LD50 caused by the fully virulent Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, vaccination protected 100% of mice from bubonic plague caused by a challenge with 100 LD50 Y. pestis and 93% against a high-dose infection (10,000 LD50. Protection involved fast-acting mechanisms controlling Y. pestis spread out of the injection site, and the protection provided was long-lasting, with 93% and 50% of mice surviving bubonic and pneumonic plague respectively, six months after vaccination. Vaccinated mice also survived bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by a high-dose of non-encapsulated (F1- Y. pestis.VTnF1 is an easy-to-produce, genetically stable plague vaccine candidate, providing a highly efficient and long-lasting protection against both bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by wild type or un-encapsulated (F1-negative Y. pestis. To our knowledge, VTnF1 is the only plague vaccine ever reported that could provide high and durable protection against the two forms of plague after a single

  18. Sylvatic plague vaccine partially protects prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) in field trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Tripp, Daniel W.; Russell, Robin E.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Richgels, Katherine; Matchett, Marc R.; Biggins, Dean E.; Griebel, Randall; Schroeder, Greg; Grassel, Shaun M.; Pipkin, David R.; Cordova, Jennifer; Kavalunas, Adam; Maxfield, Brian; Boulerice, Jesse; Miller, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    Sylvatic plague, caused by Yersinia pestis, frequently afflicts prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), causing population declines and local extirpations. We tested the effectiveness of bait-delivered sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) in prairie dog colonies on 29 paired placebo and treatment plots (1–59 ha in size; average 16.9 ha) in 7 western states from 2013 to 2015. We compared relative abundance (using catch per unit effort (CPUE) as an index) and apparent survival of prairie dogs on 26 of the 29 paired plots, 12 with confirmed or suspected plague (Y. pestis positive carcasses or fleas). Even though plague mortality occurred in prairie dogs on vaccine plots, SPV treatment had an overall positive effect on CPUE in all three years, regardless of plague status. Odds of capturing a unique animal were 1.10 (95% confidence interval [C.I.] 1.02–1.19) times higher per trap day on vaccine-treated plots than placebo plots in 2013, 1.47 (95% C.I. 1.41–1.52) times higher in 2014 and 1.19 (95% C.I. 1.13–1.25) times higher in 2015. On pairs where plague occurred, odds of apparent survival were 1.76 (95% Bayesian credible interval [B.C.I.] 1.28–2.43) times higher on vaccine plots than placebo plots for adults and 2.41 (95% B.C.I. 1.72–3.38) times higher for juveniles. Our results provide evidence that consumption of vaccine-laden baits can protect prairie dogs against plague; however, further evaluation and refinement are needed to optimize SPV use as a management tool.

  19. An encapsulated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a highly efficient vaccine against pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbise, Anne; Cerdà Marín, Alba; Ave, Patrick; Blisnick, Thierry; Huerre, Michel; Carniel, Elisabeth; Demeure, Christian E

    2012-01-01

    Plague is still a public health problem in the world and is re-emerging, but no efficient vaccine is available. We previously reported that oral inoculation of a live attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, the recent ancestor of Yersinia pestis, provided protection against bubonic plague. However, the strain poorly protected against pneumonic plague, the most deadly and contagious form of the disease, and was not genetically defined. The sequenced Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 has been irreversibly attenuated by deletion of genes encoding three essential virulence factors. An encapsulated Y. pseudotuberculosis was generated by cloning the Y. pestis F1-encoding caf operon and expressing it in the attenuated strain. The new V674pF1 strain produced the F1 capsule in vitro and in vivo. Oral inoculation of V674pF1 allowed the colonization of the gut without lesions to Peyer's patches and the spleen. Vaccination induced both humoral and cellular components of immunity, at the systemic (IgG and Th1 cells) and the mucosal levels (IgA and Th17 cells). A single oral dose conferred 100% protection against a lethal pneumonic plague challenge (33×LD(50) of the fully virulent Y. pestis CO92 strain) and 94% against a high challenge dose (3,300×LD(50)). Both F1 and other Yersinia antigens were recognized and V674pF1 efficiently protected against a F1-negative Y. pestis. The encapsulated Y. pseudotuberculosis V674pF1 is an efficient live oral vaccine against pneumonic plague, and could be developed for mass vaccination in tropical endemic areas to control pneumonic plague transmission and mortality.

  20. An Encapsulated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Is a Highly Efficient Vaccine against Pneumonic Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbise, Anne; Cerdà Marín, Alba; Ave, Patrick; Blisnick, Thierry; Huerre, Michel; Carniel, Elisabeth; Demeure, Christian E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Plague is still a public health problem in the world and is re-emerging, but no efficient vaccine is available. We previously reported that oral inoculation of a live attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, the recent ancestor of Yersinia pestis, provided protection against bubonic plague. However, the strain poorly protected against pneumonic plague, the most deadly and contagious form of the disease, and was not genetically defined. Methodology and Principal Findings The sequenced Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 has been irreversibly attenuated by deletion of genes encoding three essential virulence factors. An encapsulated Y. pseudotuberculosis was generated by cloning the Y. pestis F1-encoding caf operon and expressing it in the attenuated strain. The new V674pF1 strain produced the F1 capsule in vitro and in vivo. Oral inoculation of V674pF1 allowed the colonization of the gut without lesions to Peyer's patches and the spleen. Vaccination induced both humoral and cellular components of immunity, at the systemic (IgG and Th1 cells) and the mucosal levels (IgA and Th17 cells). A single oral dose conferred 100% protection against a lethal pneumonic plague challenge (33×LD50 of the fully virulent Y. pestis CO92 strain) and 94% against a high challenge dose (3,300×LD50). Both F1 and other Yersinia antigens were recognized and V674pF1 efficiently protected against a F1-negative Y. pestis. Conclusions and Significance The encapsulated Y. pseudotuberculosis V674pF1 is an efficient live oral vaccine against pneumonic plague, and could be developed for mass vaccination in tropical endemic areas to control pneumonic plague transmission and mortality. PMID:22348169

  1. An encapsulated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a highly efficient vaccine against pneumonic plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Derbise

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plague is still a public health problem in the world and is re-emerging, but no efficient vaccine is available. We previously reported that oral inoculation of a live attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, the recent ancestor of Yersinia pestis, provided protection against bubonic plague. However, the strain poorly protected against pneumonic plague, the most deadly and contagious form of the disease, and was not genetically defined. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The sequenced Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 has been irreversibly attenuated by deletion of genes encoding three essential virulence factors. An encapsulated Y. pseudotuberculosis was generated by cloning the Y. pestis F1-encoding caf operon and expressing it in the attenuated strain. The new V674pF1 strain produced the F1 capsule in vitro and in vivo. Oral inoculation of V674pF1 allowed the colonization of the gut without lesions to Peyer's patches and the spleen. Vaccination induced both humoral and cellular components of immunity, at the systemic (IgG and Th1 cells and the mucosal levels (IgA and Th17 cells. A single oral dose conferred 100% protection against a lethal pneumonic plague challenge (33×LD(50 of the fully virulent Y. pestis CO92 strain and 94% against a high challenge dose (3,300×LD(50. Both F1 and other Yersinia antigens were recognized and V674pF1 efficiently protected against a F1-negative Y. pestis. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The encapsulated Y. pseudotuberculosis V674pF1 is an efficient live oral vaccine against pneumonic plague, and could be developed for mass vaccination in tropical endemic areas to control pneumonic plague transmission and mortality.

  2. Yersinia pestis with regulated delayed attenuation as a vaccine candidate to induce protective immunity against plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Roland, Kenneth L; Kuang, Xiaoying; Branger, Christine G; Curtiss, Roy

    2010-03-01

    Two mutant strains of Yersinia pestis KIM5+, a Deltacrp mutant and a mutant with arabinose-dependent regulated delayed-shutoff crp expression (araC P(BAD) crp), were constructed, characterized in vitro, and evaluated for virulence, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in mice. Both strains were highly attenuated by the subcutaneous (s.c.) route. The 50% lethal doses (LD(50)s) of the Deltacrp and araC P(BAD) crp mutants were approximately 1,000,000-fold and 10,000-fold higher than those of Y. pestis KIM5+, respectively, indicating that both strains were highly attenuated. Mice vaccinated s.c. with 3.8 x 10(7) CFU of the Deltacrp mutant developed high anti-Y. pestis and anti-LcrV serum IgG titers, both with a strong Th2 bias, and induced protective immunity against subcutaneous challenge with virulent Y. pestis (80% survival) but no protection against pulmonary challenge. Mice vaccinated with 3.0 x 10(4) CFU of the araC P(BAD) crp mutant also developed high anti-Y. pestis and anti-LcrV serum IgG titers but with a more balanced Th1/Th2 response. This strain induced complete protection against s.c. challenge and partial protection (70% survival) against pulmonary challenge. Our results demonstrate that arabinose-dependent regulated crp expression is an effective strategy to attenuate Y. pestis while retaining strong immunogenicity, leading to protection against the pneumonic and bubonic forms of plague.

  3. [Effect of immune modulation on immunogenic and protective activity of a live plague vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal'nik, B V; Ponomareva, T S; Deriabin, P N; Denisova, T G; Mel'nikova, N N; Tugambaev, T I; Atshabar, B B; Zakarian, S B

    2014-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of the effect of polyoxidonium and betaleukin on immunogenic and protective activity of a live plague vaccine in model animal experiments. Plague vaccine EV, polyoxidonium, betaleukin, erythrocytic antigenic diagnosticum for determination of F1 antibodies and immune reagents for detection of lymphocytes with F1 receptors (LFR) in adhesive test developed by the authors were used. The experiments were carried out in 12 rabbits and 169 guinea pigs. Immune modulation accelerated the appearance and disappearance of LFR (early phase) and ensured a more rapid and intensive antibody formation (effector phase). Activation by betaleukin is more pronounced than by polyoxidonium. The more rapid and intensive was the development of early phase, the more effective was antibody response to the vaccine. Immune modulation in the experiment with guinea pigs significantly increased protective activity of the vaccine. The use of immune modulators increased immunogenic (in both early and effector phases of antigen-specific response) and protective activity of the EV vaccine. A connection between the acceleration of the first phase of antigen-specific response and general intensity of effector phase of immune response to the EV vaccine was detected. ,

  4. Oral vaccination with salmonella simultaneously expressing Yersinia pestis F1 and V antigens protects against bubonic and pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghong; Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Trunkle, Theresa; Bosio, Catharine M; Suo, Zhiyong; Tighe, Mike; Harmsen, Ann; Becker, Todd; Crist, Kathryn; Walters, Nancy; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2007-01-15

    The gut provides a large area for immunization enabling the development of mucosal and systemic Ab responses. To test whether the protective Ags to Yersinia pestis can be orally delivered, the Y. pestis caf1 operon, encoding the F1-Ag and virulence Ag (V-Ag) were cloned into attenuated Salmonella vaccine vectors. F1-Ag expression was controlled under a promoter from the caf1 operon; two different promoters (P), PtetA in pV3, PphoP in pV4, as well as a chimera of the two in pV55 were tested. F1-Ag was amply expressed; the chimera in the pV55 showed the best V-Ag expression. Oral immunization with Salmonella-F1 elicited elevated secretory (S)-IgA and serum IgG titers, and Salmonella-V-Ag(pV55) elicited much greater S-IgA and serum IgG Ab titers than Salmonella-V-Ag(pV3) or Salmonella-V-Ag(pV4). Hence, a new Salmonella vaccine, Salmonella-(F1+V)Ags, made with a single plasmid containing the caf1 operon and the chimeric promoter for V-Ag allowed the simultaneous expression of F1 capsule and V-Ag. Salmonella-(F1+V)Ags elicited elevated Ab titers similar to their monotypic derivatives. For bubonic plague, mice dosed with Salmonella-(F1+V)Ags and Salmonella-F1-Ag showed similar efficacy (>83% survival) against approximately 1000 LD(50) Y. pestis. For pneumonic plague, immunized mice required immunity to both F1- and V-Ags because the mice vaccinated with Salmonella-(F1+V)Ags protected against 100 LD(50) Y. pestis. These results show that a single Salmonella vaccine can deliver both F1- and V-Ags to effect both systemic and mucosal immune protection against Y. pestis.

  5. A baiting system for delivery of an oral plague vaccine to black-tailed prairie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creekmore, Terry E; Rocke, Tonie E; Hurley, Jerry

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory and field studies were conducted between July and October 1999 to identify bait preference, biomarker efficacy, and bait acceptance rates for delivering an oral plague vaccine to black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). Twenty juvenile captive prairie dogs were offered alfalfa baits containing either alfalfa, alfalfa and 5% molasses, or alfalfa, 5% molasses and 4% salt. Based on the results of these trials we selected a bait containing alfalfa, 7% molasses, and 1% salt for field trials to determine bait acceptance rates by free-ranging animals. The biomarkers DuPont Blue dye, iophenoxic acid, and tetracycline hydrochloride were orally administered to captive prairie dogs to determine their efficacy. Only tetracycline proved effective as a biomarker. Two field trials were conducted at separate prairie dog colonies located at the Buffalo Gap National Grassland (Pennington County, South Dakota, USA). In Trial 1, three baits containing tetracycline were distributed around each active burrow entrance and an additional bait was placed inside the burrow (1,276 baits total). In Trial 2, baits were distributed at the same density per burrow as Trial 1, but along transects spaced 10 m apart (1,744 baits total). Trapping began 3 days after bait distribution, and 30 prairie dogs then were captured at each site to determine the percentage of animals marked. In Trial 1, 67% of the prairie dogs captured had tetracycline deposits indicative of bait consumption. In Trial 2, 83% of the prairie dogs had ingested a bait. Approximately 15% of the animals in both trials ate more than one bait. Fleas (Opisocrostis hirsutus) were found on 64 of 70 (91%) of the prairie dogs captured during this study.

  6. Immunization of black-tailed prairie dog against plague through consumption of vaccine-laden baits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E; Smith, Susan R; Stinchcomb, Dan T; Osorio, Jorge E

    2008-10-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) are highly susceptible to Yersinia pestis and, along with other wild rodents, are significant reservoirs of plague for other wildlife and humans in the western United States. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus, expressing the F1 antigen of Y. pestis, was incorporated into a palatable bait and offered to three groups (n = 18, 19, and 20) of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) for voluntary consumption, either one, two, or three times, at roughly 3-wk intervals. A control group (n = 19) received baits containing raccoon poxvirus without the inserted antigen. Mean antibody titers to Y. pestis F1 antigen increased significantly in all groups ingesting the vaccine-laden baits, whereas the control group remained negative. Upon challenge with virulent Y. pestis, immunized groups had higher survival rates (38%) than the unimmunized control group (11%). The mean survival time of groups ingesting vaccine-laden baits either two or three times was significantly higher than that of animals ingesting vaccine-laden baits just one time and of animals in the control group. These results show that oral immunization of prairie dogs against plague provides some protection against challenge at dosages that simulate simultaneous delivery of the plague bacterium by numerous (3-10) flea bites.

  7. Immunization of black-tailed prairie dog against plague through consumption of vaccine-laden baits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.R.; Stinchcomb, D.T.; Osorio, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) are highly susceptible to Yersinia pestis and, along with other wild rodents, are significant reservoirs of plague for other wildlife and humans in the western United States. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus, expressing the F1 antigen of Y. pestis, was incorporated into a palatable bait and offered to three groups (n = 18, 19, and 20) of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) for voluntary consumption, either one, two, or three times, at roughly 3-wk intervals. A control group (n = 19) received baits containing raccoon poxvirus without the inserted antigen. Mean antibody titers to Y. pestis F1 antigen increased significantly in all groups ingesting the vaccine-laden baits, whereas the control group remained negative. Upon challenge with virulent Y. pestis, immunized groups had higher survival rates (38%) than the unimmunized control group (11%). The mean survival time of groups ingesting vaccine-laden baits either two or three times was significantly higher than that of animals ingesting vaccine-laden baits just one time and of animals in the control group. These results show that oral immunization of prairie dogs against plague provides some protection against challenge at dosages that simulate simultaneous delivery of the plague bacterium by numerous (3-10) flea bites. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  8. Oral vaccination against bubonic plague using a live avirulent Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blisnick, Thierry; Ave, Patrick; Huerre, Michel; Carniel, Elisabeth; Demeure, Christian E

    2008-08-01

    We evaluated the possibility of using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a live vaccine against plague because it shares high genetic identity with Y. pestis while being much less virulent, genetically much more stable, and deliverable orally. A total of 41 Y. pseudotuberculosis strains were screened by PCR for the absence of the high pathogenicity island, the superantigens YPM, and the type IV pilus and the presence of the pYV virulence plasmid. One strain (IP32680) fulfilled these criteria. This strain was avirulent in mice upon intragastric or subcutaneous inoculation and persisted for 2 months in the mouse intestine without clinical signs of disease. IP32680 reached the mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and liver without causing major histological lesions and was cleared after 13 days. The antibodies produced in vaccinated animals recognized both Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis antigens efficiently. After a subcutaneous challenge with Y. pestis CO92, bacteria were found in low amounts in the organs and rarely in the blood of vaccinated animals. One oral IP32680 inoculation protected 75% of the mice, and two inoculations induced much higher antibody titers and protected 88% of the mice. Our results thus validate the concept that an attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis strain can be an efficient, inexpensive, safe, and easy-to-produce live vaccine for oral immunization against bubonic plague.

  9. [Morphofunctional evaluation of the state of cells of APUD-system biomodel during anti-plague vaccine process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugorkova, S A; Kutyreva, V V

    2013-01-01

    Study reaction of cells of APUD-system of lymphoid organs and intestine of guinea pigs at the stages of morpho- and immunogenesis in response to administration of Yersinia pestis EV Research Institute of Epidemiology and Hygiene (RIEH) line vaccine strain. Vaccine process was modeled in guinea pigs during subcutaneous infection of animals with culture of Yersinia pestis EV RIEH line vaccine strain. Pieces of thymus, spleen, lymphatic nodes and an area of duodenum were taken for histological study. The preparations were stained by solution of hematoxylin and eosin, impregnated with silver by Grimelius and Masson in Hamperl modification. Dose-dependent character of effect of anti-plague vaccination on reaction of apudocytes in immunocompetent organs and duodenum biomodels was established, that indirectly reflects the direction of processes of immunogenesis in central and peripheral organs of immune system. Changes in quantity and morphofunctional state of apudocytes in the intestine of immunized guinea pigs gives evidence of the interest of this segment of APUD-system in the processes of immunogenesis during plague. Range of changes of quantity and functional state of apudocytes in lymphoid organs and intestine of animals during anti-plague vaccination was established. Quantitative parameters of morphofunctional state of intestine adipocytes that may be used for characterization of the intensity of adaptation-compensatory process in the organism of biomodels during modeling of any experimental vaccine process as well as an additional indirect indicator during evaluation of reactogenicity of live anti-plague vaccines were determined.

  10. Current status and prospects of research on new plague vaccines%新型鼠疫疫苗研究现状及展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦磊

    2011-01-01

    As current available attenuated plague vaccine for human has some disadvantages in terms of product consistency, inoculating convenience, adverse reactions and protection against pneumonic plague,new plague vaccine research is promoted. In this review, potential candidate antigens for plague vaccines and immiunity against plague, as well as current status, obstacles and prospects of new plague vaccine research are discussed.%现行人用鼠疫活疫苗在产品的一致性、易操作性、不良反应以及对肺鼠疫的预防等方面均存在不足,这就促进了新型鼠疫疫苗的研究.此文从鼠疫疫苗潜在候选抗原、抗鼠疫免疫及新型鼠疫疫苗研究现状、障碍和展望等方面进行综述.

  11. The Pioneer of Cholera Vaccine and Plague Vaccine-Haffkine%霍乱疫苗鼠疫疫苗研制的先驱哈夫金

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨微

    2010-01-01

    沃尔德马·莫迪凯·哈夫金(1860-1930),犹太细菌学家,生于乌克兰敖德萨.1884年获得敖德萨大学科学博士学位,1889年进入巴黎巴斯德研究所工作.曾先后致力于研制霍乱疫苗与鼠疫疫苗,经自身试验后,在英属印度推行大规模的人群试验,证明相对安全有效并推广使用,挽救了众多生命.1902年,因马考魏事件,哈夫金被误判承担污染鼠疫疫苗之责,在1907年得到澄清,被誉称为"犹太人的琴纳".%Waldemar Mordecai Haffkine(1860-1930), a Jewish bacteriologist , was born in Odessa, Ukraine. He got the doctor's degree of science of Odessa University in 1884 and entered the Pasteur Institute in 1889. Then he successively committed himself to developing cholera vaccine and plague vaccine. After testing them to himself, he set up extensive field trials in British India to prove the safety and efficacy. Further inoculation saved many lives. Later he was accused for the contamination of plague vaccine in Mulkowal Disaster in 1902, and finally exonerated in 1907. Haffkine was hailed as "Jewish Jenner"

  12. A Yersinia pestis YscN ATPase mutant functions as a live attenuated vaccine against bubonic plague in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozue, Joel; Cote, Christopher K; Webster, Wendy; Bassett, Anthony; Tobery, Steven; Little, Stephen; Swietnicki, Wieslaw

    2012-07-01

    Yersinia pestis is the causative agent responsible for bubonic and pneumonic plague. The bacterium uses the pLcr plasmid-encoded type III secretion system to deliver virulence factors into host cells. Delivery requires ATP hydrolysis by the YscN ATPase encoded by the yscN gene also on pLcr. A yscN mutant was constructed in the fully virulent CO92 strain containing a nonpolar, in-frame internal deletion within the gene. We demonstrate that CO92 with a yscN mutation was not able to secrete the LcrV protein (V-Antigen) and attenuated in a subcutaneous model of plague demonstrating that the YscN ATPase was essential for virulence. However, if the yscN mutant was complemented with a functional yscN gene in trans, virulence was restored. To evaluate the mutant as a live vaccine, Swiss-Webster mice were vaccinated twice with the ΔyscN mutant at varying doses and were protected against bubonic plague in a dose-dependent manner. Antibodies to F1 capsule but not to LcrV were detected in sera from the vaccinated mice. These preliminary results suggest a proof-of-concept for an attenuated, genetically engineered, live vaccine effective against bubonic plague. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Vaccination as a potential means to prevent plague in black-footed ferrets:progress and continuing challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, T.E.; Nol, P.; Marinari, P.E.; Kreeger, J.S.; Smith, S.R.; Andrews, G.P.; Friedlander, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to further assess the feasibility of vaccinating black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) against plague (caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis). On days 0 and 28, 17 postreproductive ferrets were immunized by subcutaneous injection with a recombinant fusion protein containing F1 and V antigens from Y. pestis. Another 17 animals

  14. A Bivalent Anthrax–Plague Vaccine That Can Protect against Two Tier-1 Bioterror Pathogens, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis

    OpenAIRE

    Pan Tao; Marthandan Mahalingam; Jingen Zhu; Mahtab Moayeri; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Fitts, Eric C.; Andersson, Jourdan A.; Lawrence, William S.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Chopra, Ashok K.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2017-01-01

    Bioterrorism remains as one of the biggest challenges to global security and public health. Since the deadly anthrax attacks of 2001 in the United States, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis, the causative agents of anthrax and plague, respectively, gained notoriety and were listed by the CDC as Tier-1 biothreat agents. Currently, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccine against either of these threats for mass vaccination to protect general public, let alone a bivalent va...

  15. Assessment of a recombinant F1-V fusion protein vaccine intended to protect Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) from plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Lisa L.; Shenk, Tanya M.; Powell, Bradford; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an ongoing restoration program in Colorado, USA, we evaluated adverse reactions and seroconversion in captive Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) after vaccination with a recombinant F1-V fusion protein vaccine against Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes plague. Ten adult female lynx received the F1-V vaccine; 10 source- and age-matched lynx remained unvaccinated as controls. All of the vaccinated and control lynx remained apparently healthy throughout the confinement period. We observed no evidence of injection site or systemic reactions to the F1-V vaccine. Among vaccinated lynx, differences in log10 reciprocal antibody titers measured in sera collected before and after vaccination (two doses) ranged from 1.2 to 5.2 for anti-F1 antibodies and from 0.6 to 5.2 for anti-V antibodies; titers in unvaccinated lynx did not change appreciably over the course of confinement prior to release, and thus differences in anti-F1 (P=0.003) and anti-V (P=0.0005) titers were greater among vaccinated lynx than among controls. Although our findings suggest that the F1-V fusion protein vaccine evaluated here is likely to stimulate antibody responses that may help protect Canada lynx from plague, we observed no apparent differences in survival between vaccinated and unvaccinated subject animals. Retrospectively, 22 of 50 (44%; 95% confidence interval 29–59%) unvaccinated lynx captured or recaptured in Colorado during 2000–08 had passive hemagglutination antibody titers >1:16, consistent with exposure to Y. pestis; paired pre- and postrelease titers available for eight of these animals showed titer increases similar in magnitude to those seen in response to vaccination, suggesting at least some lynx may naturally acquire immunity to plague in Colorado habitats.

  16. A Bivalent Anthrax–Plague Vaccine That Can Protect against Two Tier-1 Bioterror Pathogens, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Pan; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Zhu, Jingen; Moayeri, Mahtab; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Fitts, Eric C.; Andersson, Jourdan A.; Lawrence, William S.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Chopra, Ashok K.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2017-01-01

    Bioterrorism remains as one of the biggest challenges to global security and public health. Since the deadly anthrax attacks of 2001 in the United States, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis, the causative agents of anthrax and plague, respectively, gained notoriety and were listed by the CDC as Tier-1 biothreat agents. Currently, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccine against either of these threats for mass vaccination to protect general public, let alone a bivalent vaccine. Here, we report the development of a single recombinant vaccine, a triple antigen consisting of all three target antigens, F1 and V from Y. pestis and PA from B. anthracis, in a structurally stable context. Properly folded and soluble, the triple antigen retained the functional and immunogenicity properties of all three antigens. Remarkably, two doses of this immunogen adjuvanted with Alhydrogel® elicited robust antibody responses in mice, rats, and rabbits and conferred complete protection against inhalational anthrax and pneumonic plague. No significant antigenic interference was observed. Furthermore, we report, for the first time, complete protection of animals against simultaneous challenge with Y. pestis and the lethal toxin of B. anthracis, demonstrating that a single biodefense vaccine can protect against a bioterror attack with weaponized B. anthracis and/or Y. pestis. This bivalent anthrax–plague vaccine is, therefore, a strong candidate for stockpiling, after demonstration of its safety and immunogenicity in human clinical trials, as part of national preparedness against two of the deadliest bioterror threats. PMID:28694806

  17. A Bivalent Anthrax–Plague Vaccine That Can Protect against Two Tier-1 Bioterror Pathogens, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Tao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioterrorism remains as one of the biggest challenges to global security and public health. Since the deadly anthrax attacks of 2001 in the United States, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis, the causative agents of anthrax and plague, respectively, gained notoriety and were listed by the CDC as Tier-1 biothreat agents. Currently, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccine against either of these threats for mass vaccination to protect general public, let alone a bivalent vaccine. Here, we report the development of a single recombinant vaccine, a triple antigen consisting of all three target antigens, F1 and V from Y. pestis and PA from B. anthracis, in a structurally stable context. Properly folded and soluble, the triple antigen retained the functional and immunogenicity properties of all three antigens. Remarkably, two doses of this immunogen adjuvanted with Alhydrogel® elicited robust antibody responses in mice, rats, and rabbits and conferred complete protection against inhalational anthrax and pneumonic plague. No significant antigenic interference was observed. Furthermore, we report, for the first time, complete protection of animals against simultaneous challenge with Y. pestis and the lethal toxin of B. anthracis, demonstrating that a single biodefense vaccine can protect against a bioterror attack with weaponized B. anthracis and/or Y. pestis. This bivalent anthrax–plague vaccine is, therefore, a strong candidate for stockpiling, after demonstration of its safety and immunogenicity in human clinical trials, as part of national preparedness against two of the deadliest bioterror threats.

  18. A Bivalent Anthrax-Plague Vaccine That Can Protect against Two Tier-1 Bioterror Pathogens, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Pan; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Zhu, Jingen; Moayeri, Mahtab; Kirtley, Michelle L; Fitts, Eric C; Andersson, Jourdan A; Lawrence, William S; Leppla, Stephen H; Chopra, Ashok K; Rao, Venigalla B

    2017-01-01

    Bioterrorism remains as one of the biggest challenges to global security and public health. Since the deadly anthrax attacks of 2001 in the United States, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis, the causative agents of anthrax and plague, respectively, gained notoriety and were listed by the CDC as Tier-1 biothreat agents. Currently, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccine against either of these threats for mass vaccination to protect general public, let alone a bivalent vaccine. Here, we report the development of a single recombinant vaccine, a triple antigen consisting of all three target antigens, F1 and V from Y. pestis and PA from B. anthracis, in a structurally stable context. Properly folded and soluble, the triple antigen retained the functional and immunogenicity properties of all three antigens. Remarkably, two doses of this immunogen adjuvanted with Alhydrogel(®) elicited robust antibody responses in mice, rats, and rabbits and conferred complete protection against inhalational anthrax and pneumonic plague. No significant antigenic interference was observed. Furthermore, we report, for the first time, complete protection of animals against simultaneous challenge with Y. pestis and the lethal toxin of B. anthracis, demonstrating that a single biodefense vaccine can protect against a bioterror attack with weaponized B. anthracis and/or Y. pestis. This bivalent anthrax-plague vaccine is, therefore, a strong candidate for stockpiling, after demonstration of its safety and immunogenicity in human clinical trials, as part of national preparedness against two of the deadliest bioterror threats.

  19. Protection against bubonic and pneumonic plague with a single dose microencapsulated sub-unit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvin, Stephen J; Eyles, James E; Howard, Kenneth A; Ravichandran, Easwaran; Somavarappu, Satyanarayan; Alpar, H Oya; Williamson, E Diane

    2006-05-15

    Protection against virulent plague challenge by the parenteral and aerosol routes was afforded by a single administration of microencapsulated Caf1 and LcrV antigens from Yersinia pestis in BALB/c mice. Recombinant Caf1 and LcrV were individually encapsulated in polymeric microspheres, to the surface of which additional antigen was adsorbed. The microspheres containing either Caf1 or LcrV were blended and used to immunise mice on a single occasion, by either the intra-nasal or intra-muscular route. Both routes of immunisation induced systemic and local immune responses, with high levels of serum IgG being developed in response to both vaccine antigens. In Elispot assays, secretion of cytokines by spleen and draining lymph node cells was demonstrated, revealing activation of both Th1 and Th2 associated cytokines; and spleen cells from animals immunised by either route were found to proliferate in vitro in response to both vaccine antigens. Virulent challenge experiments demonstrated that non-invasive immunisation by intra-nasal instillation can provide strong systemic and local immune responses and protect against high level challenge. Microencapsulation of these vaccine antigens has the added advantage that controlled release of the antigens occurs in vivo, so that protective immunity can be induced after only a single immunising dose.

  20. Lessons from HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Michael, Nelson L

    2016-11-01

    Only four HIV-1 vaccine concepts have been tested in six efficacy trials with no product licensed to date. Several scientific and programmatic lessons can be learned from these studies generating new hypotheses and guiding future steps. RV144 [ALVAC-HIV (canarypox vector) and AIDSVAX B/E (bivalent gp120 HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE)] remains the only efficacy trial that demonstrated a modest vaccine efficacy, which led to the identification of immune correlates of risk. Progress on subtype-specific, ALVAC (canarypox vector) and gp120 vaccine prime-boost approaches has been slow, but we are finally close to the launch of an efficacy study in Africa in 2016. The quest of a globally effective HIV-1 vaccine has led to the development of new approaches. Efficacy studies of combinations of Adenovirus type 26 (Ad26)/Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA)/gp140 vaccines with mosaic designs will enter efficacy studies mid-2017 and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-vectored vaccines begin Phase I studies at the same time. Future HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials face practical challenges as effective nonvaccine prevention programs are projected to decrease HIV-1 incidence. An HIV-1 vaccine is urgently needed. Increased industry involvement, mobilization of resources, expansion of a robust pipeline of new concepts, and robust preclinical challenge studies will be essential to accelerate efficacy testing of next generation HIV-1 vaccine candidates.

  1. Microbiota Influences Vaccine and Mucosal Adjuvant Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A symbiotic relationship between humans and the microbiota is critical for the maintenance of our health, including development of the immune system, enhancement of the epithelial barrier, and acquisition of nutrients. Recent research has shown that the microbiota impacts immune cell development and differentiation. These findings suggest that the microbiota may also influence adjuvant and vaccine efficacy. Indeed, several factors such as malnutrition and poor sanitation, which affect gut microbiota composition, impair the efficacy of vaccines. Although there is little evidence that microbiota alters vaccine efficacy, further understanding of human immune system-microbiota interactions may lead to the effective development of adjuvants and vaccines for the treatment of diseases. PMID:28261017

  2. Plague Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your pet becomes sick, seek care from a veterinarian as soon as possible. Do not allow dogs or cats that roam free in endemic areas to sleep on your bed. Note: A plague vaccine is no longer available in the United States. ...

  3. A bivalent typhoid live vector vaccine expressing both chromosome- and plasmid-encoded Yersinia pestis antigens fully protects against murine lethal pulmonary plague infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, James E; Wang, Jin Yuan; Carrasco, Jose A; Lloyd, Scott A; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Franco, Olga; Buskirk, Amanda D; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria hold great promise as multivalent mucosal vaccines against a variety of pathogens. A major challenge of this approach has been the successful delivery of sufficient amounts of vaccine antigens to adequately prime the immune system without overattenuating the live vaccine. Here we used a live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain to create a bivalent mucosal plague vaccine that produces both the protective F1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis and the LcrV protein required for secretion of virulence effector proteins. To reduce the metabolic burden associated with the coexpression of F1 and LcrV within the live vector, we balanced expression of both antigens by combining plasmid-based expression of F1 with chromosomal expression of LcrV from three independent loci. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine were assessed in mice by using a heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy and compared to those of a conventional strain in which F1 and LcrV were expressed from a single low-copy-number plasmid. The serum antibody responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced by the optimized bivalent vaccine were indistinguishable from those elicited by the parent strain, suggesting an adequate immunogenic capacity maintained through preservation of bacterial fitness; in contrast, LPS titers were 10-fold lower in mice immunized with the conventional vaccine strain. Importantly, mice receiving the optimized bivalent vaccine were fully protected against lethal pulmonary challenge. These results demonstrate the feasibility of distributing foreign antigen expression across both chromosomal and plasmid locations within a single vaccine organism for induction of protective immunity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Consumption of baits containing raccoon pox-based plague vaccines protects black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E; Pussini, Nicola; Smith, Susan R; Williamson, Judy; Powell, Bradford; Osorio, Jorge E

    2010-01-01

    Baits containing recombinant raccoon poxvirus (RCN) expressing plague antigens (fraction 1 [F1] and a truncated form of the V protein-V307) were offered for voluntary consumption several times over the course of several months to a group of 16 black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). For comparison, another group of prairie dogs (n = 12) was injected subcutaneously (SC) (prime and boost) with 40 microg of F1-V fusion protein absorbed to alum, a vaccine-adjuvant combination demonstrated to elicit immunity to plague in mice and other mammals. Control animals received baits containing RCN without the inserted antigen (n = 8) or injected diluent (n = 7), and as there was no difference in their survival rates by Kaplan-Meier analysis, all of them were combined into one group in the final analysis. Mean antibody titers to Yersinia pestis F1 and V antigen increased (p plague vaccines provides significant protection against challenge at dosages that simulate simultaneous delivery of the plague bacterium by numerous flea bites.

  5. A live attenuated strain of Yersinia pestis KIM as a vaccine against plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Six, David; Kuang, Xiaoying; Roland, Kenneth L; Raetz, Christian R H; Curtiss, Roy

    2011-04-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a potential weapon of bioterrorism. Y. pestis evades the innate immune system by synthesizing tetra-acylated lipid A with poor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-stimulating activity at 37°C, whereas hexa-acylated lipid A, a potent TLR4 agonist, is made at lower temperatures. Synthesis of Escherichia coli LpxL, which transfers the secondary laurate chain to the 2'-position of lipid A, in Y. pestis results in production of hexa-acylated lipid A at 37°C, leading to significant attenuation of virulence. Previously, we described a Y. pestis vaccine strain in which crp expression is under the control of the arabinose-regulated araC P(BAD) promoter, resulting in a 4-5 log reduction in virulence. To reduce the virulence of the crp promoter mutant further, we introduced E. coli lpxL into the Y. pestis chromosome. The χ10030(pCD1Ap) (ΔlpxP32::P(lpxL)lpxL ΔP(crp21)::TT araC P(BAD)crp) construct likewise produced hexa-acylated lipid A at 37°C and was significantly more attenuated than strains harboring each individual mutation. The LD(50) of the mutant in mice, when administered subcutaneously or intranasally was >10(7)-times and >10(4)-times greater than wild type, respectively. Mice immunized subcutaneously with a single dose of the mutant were completely protected against a subcutaneous challenge of 3.6×10(7) wild-type Y. pestis and significantly protected (80% survival) against a pulmonary challenge of 1.2×10(4) live cells. Intranasal immunization also provided significant protection against challenges by both routes. This mutant is an immunogenic, highly attenuated live Y. pestis construct that merits further development as a vaccine candidate.

  6. Waldemar Mordecai Haffkine, CIE (1860-1930): prophylactic vaccination against cholera and bubonic plague in British India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawgood, Barbara J

    2007-02-01

    Waldemar Mordecai Haffkine developed an anticholera vaccine at the Pasteur Institute, Paris, in 1892. From the results of field trials in India from 1893 to 1896, he has been credited as having carried out the first effective prophylactic vaccination for a bacterial disease in man. When the plague pandemic reached Bombay, Haffkine became bacteriologist to the Government of (British) India (1896-1915). He soon produced an effective antiplague vaccine and large inoculation schemes were commenced. In 1902 19 people in Mulkowal (Punjab) died from tetanus poisoning as a consequence of antiplague vaccination. Haffkine was blamed unjustly and exonerated only in 1907, following a campaign spear-headed by Ronald Ross. In India the stigma remained. In 1925 in tribute to the great bacteriologist, the Bombay Government renamed the laboratory as the Haffkine Institute. The Haffkine Biopharmaceutical Corporation Ltd and the Haffkine Institute for Training, Research and Testing in Mumbai continue to be important centres for public health.

  7. Multiple antigens of Yersinia pestis delivered by live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains elicit protective immunity against plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanapala, Shilpa; Rahav, Hannah; Patel, Hetal; Sun, Wei; Curtiss, Roy

    2016-05-05

    Based on our improved novel Salmonella vaccine delivery platform, we optimized the recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine (RASV) χ12094 to deliver multiple Yersinia pestis antigens. These included LcrV196 (amino acids, 131-326), Psn encoded on pYA5383 and F1 encoded in the chromosome, their synthesis did not cause adverse effects on bacterial growth. Oral immunization with χ12094(pYA5383) simultaneously stimulated high antibody titers to LcrV, Psn and F1 in mice and presented complete protection against both subcutaneous (s.c.) and intranasal (i.n.) challenges with high lethal doses of Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, no deaths or other disease symptoms were observed in SCID mice orally immunized with χ12094(pYA5383) over a 60-day period. Therefore, the trivalent S. typhimurium-based live vaccine shows promise for a next-generation plague vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic variations of live attenuated plague vaccine strains (Yersinia pestis EV76 lineage) during laboratory passages in different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yujun; Yang, Xianwei; Xiao, Xiao; Anisimov, Andrey P; Li, Dongfang; Yan, Yanfeng; Zhou, Dongsheng; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Carniel, Elisabeth; Achtman, Mark; Yang, Ruifu; Song, Yajun

    2014-08-01

    Plague, one of the most devastating infectious diseases in human history, is caused by the bacterial species Yersinia pestis. A live attenuated Y. pestis strain (EV76) has been widely used as a plague vaccine in various countries around the world. Here we compared the whole genome sequence of an EV76 strain used in China (EV76-CN) with the genomes of Y. pestis wild isolates to identify genetic variations specific to the EV76 lineage. We identified 6 SNPs and 6 Indels (insertions and deletions) differentiating EV76-CN from its counterparts. Then, we screened these polymorphic sites in 28 other strains of EV76 lineage that were stored in different countries. Based on the profiles of SNPs and Indels, we reconstructed the parsimonious dissemination history of EV76 lineage. This analysis revealed that there have been at least three independent imports of EV76 strains into China. Additionally, we observed that the pyrE gene is a mutation hotspot in EV76 lineages. The fine comparison results based on whole genome sequence in this study provide better understanding of the effects of laboratory passages on the accumulation of genetic polymorphisms in plague vaccine strains. These variations identified here will also be helpful in discriminating different EV76 derivatives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Current status and prospects of research on new plague vaccines%新型鼠疫疫苗研究现状及展望(续)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦磊

    2011-01-01

    As current available attenuated plague vaccine for human has some disadvantages in terms of product consistency,inoculating convenience,adverse reactions and protection against pneumonic plague,new plague vaccine research is promoted.In this review,potential candidate antigens for plague vaccines and immiunity against plague,as well as current status,obstacles and prospocts of new plague vaccine research are discussed.%现行人用鼠疫活疫苗在产品的一致性、易操作性、不良反应以及对肺鼠疫的预防等方面均存在不足,这就促进了新型鼠疫疫苗的研究.此文从鼠疫疫苗潜在候选抗原、抗鼠疫免疫及新型鼠疫疫苗研究现状、障碍和展望等方面进行综述.

  10. Efficacy of primate humoral passive transfer in a murine model of pneumonic plague is mouse strain-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, V A; Hatch, G J; Bewley, K R; Steeds, K; Lansley, A; Bate, S R; Funnell, S G P

    2014-01-01

    New vaccines against biodefense-related and emerging pathogens are being prepared for licensure using the US Federal Drug Administration's "Animal Rule." This allows licensure of drugs and vaccines using protection data generated in animal models. A new acellular plague vaccine composed of two separate recombinant proteins (rF1 and rV) has been developed and assessed for immunogenicity in humans. Using serum obtained from human volunteers immunised with various doses of this vaccine and from immunised cynomolgus macaques, we assessed the pharmacokinetic properties of human and cynomolgus macaque IgG in BALB/c and the NIH Swiss derived Hsd:NIHS mice, respectively. Using human and cynomolgus macaque serum with known ELISA antibody titres against both vaccine components, we have shown that passive immunisation of human and nonhuman primate serum provides a reproducible delay in median time to death in mice exposed to a lethal aerosol of plague. In addition, we have shown that Hsd:NIHS mice are a better model for humoral passive transfer studies than BALB/c mice.

  11. Efficacy of ciprofloxacin-gentamicin combination therapy in murine bubonic plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Lemaître

    Full Text Available Potential benefits of combination antibiotic therapy for the treatment of plague have never been evaluated. We compared the efficacy of a ciprofloxacin (CIN and gentamicin (GEN combination therapy with that of each antibiotic administered alone (i against Yersinia pestis in vitro and (ii in a mouse model of bubonic plague in which animals were intravenously injected with antibiotics for five days, starting at two different times after infection (44 h and 56 h. In vitro, the CIN+GEN combination was synergistic at 0.5x the individual drugs' MICs and indifferent at 1x- or 2x MIC. In vivo, the survival rate for mice treated with CIN+GEN was similar to that observed with CIN alone and slightly higher than that observed for GEN alone 100, 100 and 85%, respectively when treatment was started 44 h post challenge. 100% of survivors were recorded in the CIN+GEN group vs 86 and 83% in the CIN and GEN groups, respectively when treatment was delayed to 56 h post-challenge. However, these differences were not statistically significant. Five days after the end of treatment, Y. pestis were observed in lymph nodes draining the inoculation site (but not in the spleen in surviving mice in each of the three groups. The median lymph node log(10 CFU recovered from persistently infected lymph nodes was significantly higher with GEN than with CIN (5.8 vs. 3.2, p = 0.04 or CIN+GEN (5.8 vs. 2.8, p = 0.01. Taken as the whole, our data show that CIN+GEN combination is as effective as CIN alone but, regimens containing CIN are more effective to eradicate Y. pestis from the draining lymph node than the recommended GEN monotherapy. Moreover, draining lymph nodes may serve as a reservoir for the continued release of Y. pestis into the blood - even after five days of intravenous antibiotic treatment.

  12. Efficacy of ciprofloxacin-gentamicin combination therapy in murine bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaître, Nadine; Ricard, Isabelle; Pradel, Elizabeth; Foligné, Benoît; Courcol, René; Simonet, Michel; Sebbane, Florent

    2012-01-01

    Potential benefits of combination antibiotic therapy for the treatment of plague have never been evaluated. We compared the efficacy of a ciprofloxacin (CIN) and gentamicin (GEN) combination therapy with that of each antibiotic administered alone (i) against Yersinia pestis in vitro and (ii) in a mouse model of bubonic plague in which animals were intravenously injected with antibiotics for five days, starting at two different times after infection (44 h and 56 h). In vitro, the CIN+GEN combination was synergistic at 0.5x the individual drugs' MICs and indifferent at 1x- or 2x MIC. In vivo, the survival rate for mice treated with CIN+GEN was similar to that observed with CIN alone and slightly higher than that observed for GEN alone 100, 100 and 85%, respectively when treatment was started 44 h post challenge. 100% of survivors were recorded in the CIN+GEN group vs 86 and 83% in the CIN and GEN groups, respectively when treatment was delayed to 56 h post-challenge. However, these differences were not statistically significant. Five days after the end of treatment, Y. pestis were observed in lymph nodes draining the inoculation site (but not in the spleen) in surviving mice in each of the three groups. The median lymph node log(10) CFU recovered from persistently infected lymph nodes was significantly higher with GEN than with CIN (5.8 vs. 3.2, p = 0.04) or CIN+GEN (5.8 vs. 2.8, p = 0.01). Taken as the whole, our data show that CIN+GEN combination is as effective as CIN alone but, regimens containing CIN are more effective to eradicate Y. pestis from the draining lymph node than the recommended GEN monotherapy. Moreover, draining lymph nodes may serve as a reservoir for the continued release of Y. pestis into the blood - even after five days of intravenous antibiotic treatment.

  13. Evaluation of protective potential of Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein antigens as possible candidates for a new-generation recombinant plague vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erova, Tatiana E; Rosenzweig, Jason A; Sha, Jian; Suarez, Giovanni; Sierra, Johanna C; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Telepnev, Maxim V; Motin, Vladimir L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2013-02-01

    Plague caused by Yersinia pestis manifests itself in bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic forms. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved levofloxacin, there is no approved human vaccine against plague. The capsular antigen F1 and the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) of Y. pestis represent excellent vaccine candidates; however, the inability of the immune responses to F1 and LcrV to provide protection against Y. pestis F1(-) strains or those which harbor variants of LcrV is a significant concern. Here, we show that the passive transfer of hyperimmune sera from rats infected with the plague bacterium and rescued by levofloxacin protected naive animals against pneumonic plague. Furthermore, 10 to 12 protein bands from wild-type (WT) Y. pestis CO92 reacted with the aforementioned hyperimmune sera upon Western blot analysis. Based on mass spectrometric analysis, four of these proteins were identified as attachment invasion locus (Ail/OmpX), plasminogen-activating protease (Pla), outer membrane protein A (OmpA), and F1. The genes encoding these proteins were cloned, and the recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli for immunization purposes before challenging mice and rats with either the F1(-) mutant or WT CO92 in bubonic and pneumonic plague models. Although antibodies to Ail and OmpA protected mice against bubonic plague when challenged with the F1(-) CO92 strain, Pla antibodies were protective against pneumonic plague. In the rat model, antibodies to Ail provided protection only against pneumonic plague after WT CO92 challenge. Together, the addition of Y. pestis outer membrane proteins to a new-generation recombinant vaccine could provide protection against a wide variety of Y. pestis strains.

  14. Evaluation of Protective Potential of Yersinia pestis Outer Membrane Protein Antigens as Possible Candidates for a New-Generation Recombinant Plague Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Rosenzweig, Jason A.; Sha, Jian; Suarez, Giovanni; Sierra, Johanna C.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; van Lier, Christina J.; Telepnev, Maxim V.; Motin, Vladimir L.

    2013-01-01

    Plague caused by Yersinia pestis manifests itself in bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic forms. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved levofloxacin, there is no approved human vaccine against plague. The capsular antigen F1 and the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) of Y. pestis represent excellent vaccine candidates; however, the inability of the immune responses to F1 and LcrV to provide protection against Y. pestis F1− strains or those which harbor variants of LcrV is a significant concern. Here, we show that the passive transfer of hyperimmune sera from rats infected with the plague bacterium and rescued by levofloxacin protected naive animals against pneumonic plague. Furthermore, 10 to 12 protein bands from wild-type (WT) Y. pestis CO92 reacted with the aforementioned hyperimmune sera upon Western blot analysis. Based on mass spectrometric analysis, four of these proteins were identified as attachment invasion locus (Ail/OmpX), plasminogen-activating protease (Pla), outer membrane protein A (OmpA), and F1. The genes encoding these proteins were cloned, and the recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli for immunization purposes before challenging mice and rats with either the F1− mutant or WT CO92 in bubonic and pneumonic plague models. Although antibodies to Ail and OmpA protected mice against bubonic plague when challenged with the F1− CO92 strain, Pla antibodies were protective against pneumonic plague. In the rat model, antibodies to Ail provided protection only against pneumonic plague after WT CO92 challenge. Together, the addition of Y. pestis outer membrane proteins to a new-generation recombinant vaccine could provide protection against a wide variety of Y. pestis strains. PMID:23239803

  15. [Human papillomavirus vaccine. Efficacy and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Laia; Serrano, Beatriz; Bosch, Xavier; Castellsagué, Xavier

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prophylactic vaccines have been recognized as the most effective intervention to control for HPV-related diseases. This article reviews the major phaseii/iii trials of the bivalent (HPVs16/18), quadrivalent (HPVs6/11/16/18), and the recently approved 9-valent vaccine (HPVs6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58). Large trials have been conducted showing the safety, immunogenicity and high efficacy of the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines in the prevention of pre-invasive lesions and infection, especially when administered at young ages before exposure to HPV. Trials of the 9-valent vaccine have also demonstrated the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of the vaccine in the prevention of infection and disease associated with the vaccine types, and its potential to substantially increase the overall prevention of HPV-related diseases. Post-licensure country reports have shown the recent and early impact of these vaccines at population level after the implementation of established HPV vaccination programs, including decreases in the prevalence of vaccine HPV types, the incidence of genital warts, and the incidence of high-grade cervical abnormalities. If widely implemented, current HPV vaccines may drastically reduce the incidence of cervical cancer and other HPV-related cancers and diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Apparent field safety of a raccoon poxvirus-vectored plague vaccine in free-ranging prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Streich, Sean P.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Miller, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) suffer high rates of mortality from plague. An oral sylvatic plague vaccine using the raccoon poxvirus vector (designated RCN-F1/V307) has been developed for prairie dogs. This vaccine is incorporated into palatable bait along with rhodamine B as a biomarker. We conducted trials in August and September 2012 to demonstrate uptake and apparent safety of the RCN-F1/V307 vaccine in two prairie dog species under field conditions. Free-ranging prairie dogs and other associated small rodents readily consumed vaccine-laden baits during field trials with no apparent adverse effects; most sampled prairie dogs (90%) and associated small rodents (78%) had consumed baits. Visual counts of prairie dogs and their burrows revealed no evidence of prairie dog decline after vaccine exposure. No vaccine-related morbidity, mortality, or gross or microscopic lesions were observed. Poxviruses were not isolated from any animal sampled prior to bait distribution or on sites that received placebo baits. We isolated RCN-F1/V307 from 17 prairie dogs and two deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) captured on sites where vaccine-laden baits were distributed. Based on these findings, studies examining the utility and effectiveness of oral vaccination to prevent plague-induced mortality in prairie dogs and associated species are underway.

  17. Apparent field safety of a raccoon poxvirus-vectored plague vaccine in free-ranging prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), Colorado, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W; Rocke, Tonie E; Streich, Sean P; Abbott, Rachel C; Osorio, Jorge E; Miller, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) suffer high rates of mortality from plague. An oral sylvatic plague vaccine using the raccoon poxvirus vector (designated RCN-F1/V307) has been developed for prairie dogs. This vaccine is incorporated into palatable bait along with rhodamine B as a biomarker. We conducted trials in August and September 2012 to demonstrate uptake and apparent safety of the RCN-F1/V307 vaccine in two prairie dog species under field conditions. Free-ranging prairie dogs and other associated small rodents readily consumed vaccine-laden baits during field trials with no apparent adverse effects; most sampled prairie dogs (90%) and associated small rodents (78%) had consumed baits. Visual counts of prairie dogs and their burrows revealed no evidence of prairie dog decline after vaccine exposure. No vaccine-related morbidity, mortality, or gross or microscopic lesions were observed. Poxviruses were not isolated from any animal sampled prior to bait distribution or on sites that received placebo baits. We isolated RCN-F1/V307 from 17 prairie dogs and two deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) captured on sites where vaccine-laden baits were distributed. Based on these findings, studies examining the utility and effectiveness of oral vaccination to prevent plague-induced mortality in prairie dogs and associated species are underway.

  18. Development of Yersinia pestis F1 antigen-loaded microspheres vaccine against plague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang SS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Shih-shiung Huang,1 I-Hsun Li,2,3 Po-da Hong,1 Ming-kung Yeh1,2,41Biomedical Engineering Program, Graduate Institute of Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2School of Pharmacy, 3Department of Pharmacy Practice, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China; 4Food and Drug Administration, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of ChinaAbstract: Yersinia pestis F1 antigen-loaded poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide/polyethylene glycol (PEG (PLGA/PEG microspheres were produced using a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion/solvent extraction technique and assayed for their percent yield, entrapment efficiency, surface morphology, particle size, zeta potential, in vitro release properties, and in vivo animal protect efficacy. The Y. pestis F1 antigen-loaded microspheres (mean particle size 3.8 µm exhibited a high loading capacity (4.5% w/w, yield (85.2%, and entrapment efficiency (38.1%, and presented a controlled in vitro release profile with a low initial burst (18.5%, then continued to release Y. pestis F1 antigen over 70 days. The distribution (% of Y. pestis F1 on the microspheres surface, outer layer, and core was 3.1%, 28.9%, and 60.7%, respectively. A steady release rate was noticed to be 0.55 µg Y. pestis F1 antigen/mg microspheres/day of Y. pestis F1 antigen release maintained for 42 days. The cumulative release amount at the 1st, 28th, and 42nd days was 8.2, 26.7, and 31.0 µg Y. pestis F1 antigen/mg microspheres, respectively. The 100 times median lethal dose 50% (LD50 of Y. pestis Yokohama-R strain by intraperitoneal injection challenge in mice test, in which mice received one dose of 40 µg F1 antigen content of PLGA/PEG microspheres, F1 antigen in Al(OH3, and in comparison with F1 antigen in Al(OH3 vaccine in two doses, was evaluated after given by subcutaneous

  19. Vaccination efficacy and environmental pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsen, Katrine; Shamim, Z; Ryder, L. P.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the limited number of environmental pollutants for which such vaccination data exists, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFAS), which are described individually. In general, elevated exposures to these compounds were...... in a more direct manner. The presented results in this chapter might explain some of the wide variation in antibody responses to immunization and support the hypothesis that some people today could be immunocompromised because of their exposure to environmental pollutants. Due to their high persistence...

  20. Vaccination with F1-V fusion protein protects black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) against plague upon oral challenge with Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.; Marinari, Paul E.; Kreeger, J.; Enama, J.T.; Powell, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have established that vaccination of black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) with F1-V fusion protein by subcutaneous (SC) injection protects the animals against plague upon injection of the bacterium Yersinia pestis. This study demonstrates that the F1-V antigen can also protect ferrets against plague contracted via ingestion of a Y. pestis-infected mouse, a probable route for natural infection. Eight black-footed ferret kits were vaccinated with F1-V protein by SC injection at approximately 60 days-of-age. A booster vaccination was administered 3 mo later via SC injection. Four additional ferret kits received placebos. The animals were challenged 6 wk after the boost by feeding each one a Y. pestis-infected mouse. All eight vaccinates survived challenge, while the four controls succumbed to plague within 3 days after exposure. To determine the duration of antibody postvaccination, 18 additional black-footed ferret kits were vaccinated and boosted with F1-V by SC injection at 60 and 120 days-of-age. High titers to both F1 and V (mean reciprocal titers of 18,552 and 99,862, respectively) were found in all vaccinates up to 2 yr postvaccination, whereas seven control animals remained antibody negative throughout the same time period. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  1. Modeling the effects of prior infection on vaccine efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S.; Ackley, D.H. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    We performed computer simulations to study the effects of prior infection on vaccine efficacy. We injected three antigens sequentially. The first antigen, designated the prior, represented a prior infection or vaccination. The second antigen, the vaccine, represented a single component of the trivalent influenza vaccine. The third antigen, the epidemic, represented challenge by an epidemic strain. For a fixed vaccine to epidemic strain cross-reactivities to the vaccine and to the epidemic strains. We found that, for many cross-reactivities, vaccination, when it had been preceded by a prior infection, provided more protection than vaccination alone. However, at some cross-reactivities, the prior infection reduced protection by clearing the vaccine before it had the chance to produce protective memory. The cross-reactivities between the prior, vaccine and epidemic strains played a major role in determining vaccine efficacy. This work has applications to understanding vaccination against viruses such as influenza that are continually mutating.

  2. Efficacy of ciprofloxacin-gentamicin combination therapy in murine bubonic plague

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lemaître, Nadine; Ricard, Isabelle; Pradel, Elizabeth; Foligné, Benoît; Courcol, René; Simonet, Michel; Sebbane, Florent

    2012-01-01

    ... (i) against Yersinia pestis in vitro and (ii) in a mouse model of bubonic plague in which animals were intravenously injected with antibiotics for five days, starting at two different times after infection (44 h and 56 h). In vitro, the CIN...

  3. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF UPDATING THE INFLUENZA VACCINE ON THE EFFICACY OF REPEATED VACCINATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. SMITH; A. LAPEDES; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    The accumulated wisdom is to update the vaccine strain to the expected epidemic strain only when there is at least a 4-fold difference [measured by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay] between the current vaccine strain and the expected epidemic strain. In this study we investigate the effect, on repeat vaccines, of updating the vaccine when there is a less than 4-fold difference. Methods: Using a computer model of the immune response to repeated vaccination, we simulated updating the vaccine on a 2-fold difference and compared this to not updating the vaccine, in each case predicting the vaccine efficacy in first-time and repeat vaccines for a variety of possible epidemic strains. Results: Updating the vaccine strain on a 2-fold difference resulted in increased vaccine efficacy in repeat vaccines compared to leaving the vaccine unchanged. Conclusions: These results suggest that updating the vaccine strain on a 2-fold difference between the existing vaccine strain and the expected epidemic strain will increase vaccine efficacy in repeat vaccines compared to leaving the vaccine unchanged.

  4. Plague history: Yersin's discovery of the causative bacterium in 1894 enabled, in the subsequent century, scientific progress in understanding the disease and the development of treatments and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, T

    2014-03-01

    The causative bacterium of plague was described and cultured by Alexandre Yersin in Hong Kong in 1894, after which transmission of bacteria from rodents by flea bites was discovered by Jean-Paul Simond in 1898. Effective treatment with antiserum was initiated in 1896, but this therapy was supplanted by sulphonamides in the 1930s and by streptomycin starting in 1947. India suffered an estimated 6 million deaths in 1900-1909, and Vietnam, during its war in 1965-1975, accounted for approximately 80% of the world's cases; since then, African countries have dominated, with >90% of the world's cases in the 1990s and early 21st century. Serological diagnosis with fraction 1 antigen to detect anti-plague antibodies was developed in the 1950s. Vaccine development started in 1897 with killed whole bacterial cells, and this was followed by a live attenuated bacterial vaccine, leading to millions of persons receiving injections, but the benefits of these vaccines remain clouded by controversy. Plasmid-mediated virulence was established in 1981, and this was followed by specific DNA methods that have allowed detection of plague genes in skeletal specimens from European graves of the sixth to 17th centuries. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  5. Beyond efficacy: The full public health impact of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra; Horstick, Olaf; Breiman, Robert F; Gessner, Bradford D; Gubler, Duane J; Louis, Jacques; Parashar, Umesh D; Tapia, Roberto; Picot, Valentina; Zinsou, Jean-Antoine; Nelson, Christopher B

    2016-02-24

    There is an active discussion in the public health community on how to assess and incorporate, in addition to safety and measures of protective efficacy, the full public health value of preventive vaccines into the evidence-based decision-making process of vaccine licensure and recommendations for public health use. The conference "Beyond efficacy: the full public health impact of vaccines in addition to efficacy measures in trials" held in Annecy, France (June 22-24, 2015) has addressed this issue and provided recommendations on how to better capture the whole public health impact of vaccines. Using key examples, the expert group stressed that we are in the midst of a new paradigm in vaccine evaluation, where all aspects of public health value of vaccines beyond efficacy should be evaluated. To yield a wider scope of vaccine benefits, additional measures such as vaccine preventable disease incidence, overall efficacy and other outcomes such as under-five mortality or non-etiologically confirmed clinical syndromes should be assessed in addition to traditional efficacy or effectiveness measurements. Dynamic modelling and the use of probe studies should also be considered to provide additional insight to the full public health value of a vaccine. The use of burden reduction and conditional licensure of vaccines based on collection of outcome results should be considered by regulatory agencies.

  6. Plague Factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... areas through three techniques: Environmental management Public health education Preventive drug therapy Environmental Management Preventing epidemic plague requires the reducing or eliminating house rat populations in both urban and rural areas. Control of plague in such situations requires two ...

  7. Plague Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  8. Responses of Juvenile Black-Tailed Prairie Dogs ( Cynomys ludovicianus ) to a Commercially Produced Oral Plague Vaccine Delivered at Two Doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Canales, Elsa M; Wolfe, Lisa L; Tripp, Daniel W; Rocke, Tonie E; Abbott, Rachel C; Miller, Michael W

    2017-05-02

    We confirmed safety and immunogenicity of mass-produced vaccine baits carrying an experimental, commercial-source plague vaccine (RCN-F1/V307) expressing Yersinia pestis V and F1 antigens. Forty-five juvenile black-tailed prairie dogs ( Cynomys ludovicianus ) were randomly divided into three treatment groups (n=15 animals/group). Animals in the first group received one standard-dose vaccine bait (5×10(7) plaque-forming units [pfu]; STD). The second group received a lower-dose bait (1×10(7) pfu; LOW). In the third group, five animals received two standard-dose baits and 10 were left untreated but in contact. Two vaccine-treated and one untreated prairie dogs died during the study, but laboratory analyses ruled out vaccine involvement. Overall, 17 of 33 (52%; 95% confidence interval for binomial proportion [bCI] 34-69%) prairie dogs receiving vaccine-laden bait showed a positive anti-V antibody response on at least one sampling occasion after bait consumption, and eight (24%; bCI 11-42%) showed sustained antibody responses. The STD and LOW groups did not differ (P≥0.78) in their proportions of overall or sustained antibody responses after vaccine bait consumption. Serum from one of the nine (11%; bCI 0.3-48%) surviving untreated, in-contact prairie dogs also had detectable antibody on one sampling occasion. We did not observe any adverse effects related to oral vaccination.

  9. Responses of juvenile black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) to a commercially produced oral plague vaccine delivered at two doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Canales, Elsa M.; Wolfe, Lisa L.; Tripp. Daniel W.,; Rocke, Tonie E.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Miller, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    We confirmed safety and immunogenicity of mass-produced vaccine baits carrying an experimental, commercial-source plague vaccine (RCN-F1/V307) expressing Yersinia pestis V and F1 antigens. Forty-five juvenile black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) were randomly divided into three treatment groups (n=15 animals/group). Animals in the first group received one standard-dose vaccine bait (5×107 plaque-forming units [pfu]; STD). The second group received a lower-dose bait (1×107 pfu; LOW). In the third group, five animals received two standard-dose baits and 10 were left untreated but in contact. Two vaccine-treated and one untreated prairie dogs died during the study, but laboratory analyses ruled out vaccine involvement. Overall, 17 of 33 (52%; 95% confidence interval for binomial proportion [bCI] 34−69%) prairie dogs receiving vaccine-laden bait showed a positive anti-V antibody response on at least one sampling occasion after bait consumption, and eight (24%; bCI 11–42%) showed sustained antibody responses. The STD and LOW groups did not differ (P≥0.78) in their proportions of overall or sustained antibody responses after vaccine bait consumption. Serum from one of the nine (11%; bCI 0.3–48%) surviving untreated, in-contact prairie dogs also had detectable antibody on one sampling occasion. We did not observe any adverse effects related to oral vaccination.

  10. Measles incidence, vaccine efficacy, and mortality in two urban African areas with high vaccination coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Knudsen, K; Jensen, T G

    1990-01-01

    Measles incidence, vaccine efficacy, and mortality were examined prospectively in two districts in Bissau where vaccine coverage for children aged 12-23 months was 81% (Bandim 1) and 61% (Bandim 2). There was little difference in cumulative measles incidence before 9 months of age (6.1% and 7.......6%, respectively). Between 9 months and 2 years of age, however, 6.1% contracted measles in Bandim 1 and 13.7% in Bandim 2. Even adjusting for vaccination status, incidence was significantly higher in Bandim 2 (relative risk 1.6, P = .04). Even though 95% of the children had measles antibodies after vaccination......, vaccine efficacy was not more than 68% (95% confidence interval [CI] 39%-84%) and was unrelated to age at vaccination. Unvaccinated children had a mortality hazard ratio of 3.0 compared with vaccinated children (P = .002), indicating a protective efficacy against death of 66% (CI 32%-83%) of measles...

  11. Functional nanomaterials can optimize the efficacy of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Xu, Yingying; Tian, Yue; Chen, Chunying; Wang, Chen; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-11-01

    Nanoscale materials can improve the efficacy of vaccines. Herein we review latest developments that use nanomaterials for vaccines. By highlighting the relationships between the nanoscale physicochemical characteristics and working mechanisms of nanomaterials, this paper shows the current status of the developments where researchers employ functional nanomaterials as vector and/or immunoregulators for vaccines. It also provides us some clues for improving the design and application of nanomaterials to optimize the efficacy of vaccines. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. First generation leishmaniasis vaccines: a review of field efficacy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noazin, Sassan; Modabber, Farrokh; Khamesipour, Ali; Smith, Peter G; Moulton, Lawrence H; Nasseri, Kiumarss; Sharifi, Iraj; Khalil, Eltahir A G; Bernal, Ivan Dario Velez; Antunes, Carlos M F; Kieny, Marie Paule; Tanner, Marcel

    2008-12-09

    First generation candidate vaccines against leishmaniasis, prepared using inactivated whole parasites as their main ingredient, were considered as promising because of their relative ease of production and low cost. These vaccines have been the subject of many investigations over several decades and are the only leishmaniasis vaccine candidates which have undergone phase 3 clinical trial evaluation. Although the studies demonstrated the safety of the vaccines and several studies showed reasonable immunogenicity and some indication of protection, an efficacious prophylactic vaccine is yet to be identified. Despite this overall failure, these trials contributed significantly to increasing knowledge on human leishmaniasis immunology. To provide a collective view, this review discusses the methods and findings of field efficacy trials of first generation leishmaniasis vaccine clinical trials conducted in the Old and New Worlds.

  13. Development of an improved vaccine evaluation protocol to compare the efficacy of Newcastle disease vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas-Garcia, Stivalis; Diel, Diego G; Susta, Leonardo; Lucio-Decanini, Eduardo; Yu, Qingzhong; Brown, Corrie C; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-03-01

    While there is typically 100% survivability in birds challenged with vNDV under experimental conditions, either with vaccines formulated with a strain homologous or heterologous (different genotype) to the challenge virus, vaccine deficiencies are often noted in the field. We have developed an improved and more stringent protocol to experimentally evaluate live NDV vaccines, and showed for the first time under experimental conditions that a statistically significant reduction in mortality can be detected with genotype matched vaccines. Using both vaccine evaluation protocols (traditional and improved), birds were challenged with a vNDV of genotype XIII and the efficacy of live heterologous (genotype II) and homologous (genotype XIII) NDV vaccines was compared. Under traditional vaccination conditions there were no differences in survival upon challenge, but the homologous vaccine induced significantly higher levels of antibodies specific to the challenge virus. With the more stringent challenge system (multiple vaccine doses and early challenge with high titers of vNDV), the birds administered the homologous vaccine had superior humoral responses, reduced clinical signs, and reduced mortality levels than those vaccinated with the heterologous vaccine. These results provide basis for the implementation of more sensitive methods to evaluate vaccine efficacy.

  14. Field evaluation of measles vaccine efficacy in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, F T; Smith, P G; Colombo, S; Mann, G; Ascherio, A; Soares, A C

    1990-02-01

    Monitoring measles vaccine efficacy is an important form of quality control in immunization programs. Retrospective cohort studies of vaccine efficacy were conducted in Mozambique with the aim of adopting this method for regular use. The authors studied 1,215 and 790 children aged 12-35 months in the cities of Nampula and Beira, respectively. In Nampula (1985), vaccine efficacy was estimated to be 40%, and in Beira (1986), it was estimated to be 59%. To investigate the possibility of falsely low results due to poor specificity of maternal reporting of measles cases, a seroepidemiologic study of 600 children aged 12-47 months was conducted in Nampula in 1986. The specificity and sensitivity of a maternal history of measles in an unvaccinated child were estimated as 83% and 56%, respectively. These results were used to obtain an adjusted vaccine efficacy estimate of 66%, almost double the estimate of 37% obtained using data on history of vaccination and illness alone. The large bias introduced into the vaccine efficacy estimation by low specificity of disease diagnosis is a serious limitation to the use of retrospective cohort methods to assess efficacy.

  15. Prevention of pneumonic plague in mice, rats, guinea pigs and non-human primates with clinical grade rV10, rV10-2 or F1-V vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenee, Lauriane E.; Ciletti, Nancy A.; Elli, Derek; Hermanas, Timothy M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia pestis causes plague, a disease with high mortality in humans that can be transmitted by fleabite or aerosol. A US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-licensed plague vaccine is currently not available. Vaccine developers have focused on two subunits of Y. pestis: LcrV, a protein at the tip of type III secretion needles, and F1, the fraction 1 pilus antigen. F1-V, a hybrid generated via translational fusion of both antigens, is being developed for licensure as a plague vaccine. The rV10 vaccine is a non-toxigenic variant of LcrV lacking residues 271–300. Here we developed Current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) protocols for rV10. Comparison of clinical grade rV10 with F1-V did not reveal significant differences in plague protection in mice, guinea pigs or cynomolgus macaques. We also developed cGMP protocols for rV10-2, a variant of rV10 with an altered affinity tag. Immunization with rV10-2 adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide elicited antibodies against LcrV and conferred pneumonic plague protection in mice, rats, guinea pigs, cynomolgus macaques and African Green monkeys. The data support further development of rV10-2 for FDA Investigational New Drug (IND) authorization review and clinical testing. PMID:21763383

  16. Improved ERM vaccination efficacy using combined vaccine administration methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, Kurt; Desmukh, Sidhartha; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that immersion vaccination (30 sec) using the Aquavac Relera vaccine (containing formalin killed Yersinia ruckeri serotype O1 of both biotypes 1 and 2) provides the best protection (when compared to other commercial ERM vaccines on the Danish market) against infection...... following i. p. challenge using Y. ruckeri O1, biotype 2, which at present is the main bacterial pathogen in fingerling trout production in Denmark. Despite a significant protection conferred by this vaccine (immersion) some mortality could be observed following challenge. We have therefore performed...... a study in order to elucidate if different vaccine administration methods (using Aquavac Relera) can improve protection and reduce mortality of exposed trout following challenge with this particular pathogen. Rainbow trout (mean weight 7.8 g) reared at the Bornholm Salmon Hatchery under pathogen free...

  17. Immunogenicity and Clinical Efficacy of Influenza Vaccination In Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W Kay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pregnant women are at high risk from influenza due to disproportionate morbidity, mortality, and adverse pregnancy outcomes following infection. As such, they are classified as a high priority group for vaccination. However, changes in the maternal immune system required to accommodate the allogeneic fetus may alter the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines. A large number of studies have evaluated the safety of the influenza vaccine. Here, we will review available studies on the immunogenicity and efficacy of the influenza vaccine during pregnancy, focusing on both humoral and cellular immunity.

  18. Lessons Learned from HIV Vaccine Clinical Efficacy Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Tracey A.; Kublin, James G.

    2014-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed many promising advances in HIV prevention strategies involving pre-exposure prophylaxis approaches. Some may now wonder whether an HIV vaccine is still needed, and whether developing one is even possible. The partial efficacy reported in the RV144 trial and the encouraging results of the accompanying immune correlates analysis suggest that an effective HIV vaccine is achievable. These successes have provided a large impetus and guidance for conducting more HIV vaccine trials. A key lesson learned from RV144 is that assessment of HIV acquisition is now a feasible and valuable primary objective for HIV preventive vaccine trials. In this article we review how RV144 and other HIV vaccine efficacy trials have instructed the field and highlight some of the HIV vaccine concepts in clinical development. After a long and significant investment, HIV vaccine clinical research is paying off in the form of valuable lessons that, if applied effectively, will accelerate the path toward a safe and effective vaccine. Together with other HIV prevention approaches, preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccines will be invaluable tools in bringing the epidemic to an end. PMID:24033299

  19. Low vaccine efficacy of mumps component among MMR vaccine recipients in Chennai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevan Malaiyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of MMR vaccine was believed to have resulted in a decline in the incidence of measles, mumps and rubella infections. However, recent reports suggest the re-emergence of mumps infection worldwide in the vaccinated populations. It was proposed that the reason for this re-emergence was poor efficacy of MMR vaccine. The present study was aimed to investigate mumps infection in MMR vaccinated and non-vaccinated populations in Chennai, India. Blood samples were collected from acute mumps cases (n=74, 42<12 yr age, 54% males and investigated for IgM antibody against mumps, IgG antibody against measles, mumps and rubella viruses by ELISA. Sixty seven (91% patients had received MMR vaccine. All the 67 vaccinated cases were positive for parotitis, and mumps IgM. However, only 10 (15% were positive for IgG. All samples (100% were positive for rubella and measles IgG. These findings showed the occurrence of mumps infection among MMR vaccinated individuals in Chennai, India. The MMR vaccine failed to generate anti-mumps IgG. The reason may be low vaccine efficacy of the mumps component of the MMR vaccine used.

  20. 用于鼠疫疫苗纯菌检查的噬菌体裂解法的建立%Establishment of phage bacteriolytic method for detection of purity of plague vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏东; 李恪梅; 王国治

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish phage bacteriolytic method for detection of purity of plague vaccines,and compare the phage bacteriolytic method with the available direct inoculation method.Methods Ten strains of non-Yersinia pestis were lysed with plague phage to evaluate specificity of plague phage.The quantified Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli were respectively added into plague vaccines to prepare simulated contaminated plague vaccines.The phage bacteriolytic method was used to detect purity of plague vaccines.The detection results between phage bacteriolytic method and available direct inoculation method were compared.Results The plague phage could lyse Yersinia pestis specifically.No cross-reactions were observed between the plague phage and other strains of non-Yersinia pestis.The detection limits of phage bacteriolytic method for Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli in simulated contaminated plague vaccines were both 1 CFU/dose vaccine (50 μl).The detection limits of the available direct inoculation method for Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli in simulated contaminated plague vaccines were 50 and 5 CFU/dose vaccine (50 μl),respectively.Conclusion The phage bacteriolytic method for detection of purity of plague vaccines has better sensitivity and specificity and can be used for quality control of plague vaccines.%目的 建立用于鼠疫疫苗纯菌检查的噬菌体裂解法,并与现行的直接接种纯菌检查方法进行比较.方法 使用鼠疫噬菌体裂解在细菌分类学上与鼠疫杆菌相近的细菌及常见的污染细菌,确定鼠疫噬菌体对鼠疫杆菌裂解的特异性.分别将小肠结肠炎耶尔森菌和大肠杆菌定量掺入鼠疫疫苗来制备模拟污染鼠疫疫苗,采用噬菌体裂解纯菌检查方法检测模拟污染鼠疫疫苗,并将检测结果与现行的直接接种纯菌检查方法的检测结果进行比较.结果 鼠疫噬菌体能特异性地裂解鼠疫杆菌,对在细菌分类

  1. Pneumonic Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Specific Hazards Bioterrorism A-Z Anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) Arenaviruses Treatment & Infection Control Specimen Submission & Lab Testing Education & ... hemorrhagic fevers (filoviruses [e.g., Ebola, Marburg] and arenaviruses [e.g., Lassa, Machupo]) Yersinia pestis (plague) Fact ...

  2. [Efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine in military units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhogolev, S D; Mosiagin, V D; Demidovich, V U; Mel'nichenko, P I; Ogarkov, P I

    2003-01-01

    Pneumococcal vaccine Pneumo-23, used for specific prophylaxis of pneumonia and other pneumococcal infections, was tested in military training units of the North Western, Central and Far Eastern Military Districts. The vaccine used for immunization of servicemen, was shown to have high immunogenicity with no adverse reactions. In the training group of the North Western Military District the epidemiological effectiveness of the vaccine was particularly high a month after immunization and amounted to 83.7%. During the period between month 2 and month 5 after immunization pneumonia morbidity among the immunized servicemen was 6.12 times lower than among the non-immunized ones. In the training units of the Central and Far Eastern Military Districts, where the period of the formation of postvaccinal immunity coincided with the peak of the outbreak of pneumonia, the protective properties of the used batches of the vaccine could be observed as early as during the first month after immunization, which made it possible to recommend this vaccine for urgent prophylaxis in the foci of pneumococcal infection. During the period of 5 months the effectiveness of the vaccine with respect to pneumonia was 62.1-66.2% for all three districts. The effectiveness of the combined immunization of conscripts with vaccines Pneumo-23 and Vaxigrip with respect to pneumonia was higher (78.54%) and the index of effectiveness (4.66) was 1.58 fold greater than in monoimmunization (2.95). The epidemiological effectiveness of the pneumococcal vaccine was high also with respect to other pneumococcal infections: acute bronchitis, acute respiratory diseases of pneumococcal etiology, cases of acute sinusitis and acute otitis. The use of the vaccine for the immunization of servicemen yielded the economic effect equal to 92 US dollars per person.

  3. Polio eradication. Efficacy of inactivated poliovirus vaccine in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Hamid; Deshpande, Jagadish M; Sutter, Roland W; Bahl, Sunil; Verma, Harish; Ahmad, Mohammad; Kunwar, Abhishek; Vishwakarma, Rakesh; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Jain, Shilpi; Estivariz, Concepcion; Sethi, Raman; Molodecky, Natalie A; Grassly, Nicholas C; Pallansch, Mark A; Chatterjee, Arani; Aylward, R Bruce

    2014-08-22

    Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is efficacious against paralytic disease, but its effect on mucosal immunity is debated. We assessed the efficacy of IPV in boosting mucosal immunity. Participants received IPV, bivalent 1 and 3 oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV), or no vaccine. A bOPV challenge was administered 4 weeks later, and excretion was assessed 3, 7, and 14 days later. Nine hundred and fifty-four participants completed the study. Any fecal shedding of poliovirus type 1 was 8.8, 9.1, and 13.5% in the IPV group and 14.4, 24.1, and 52.4% in the control group by 6- to 11-month, 5-year, and 10-year groups, respectively (IPV versus control: Fisher's exact test P poliovirus types 1 and 3 between 38.9 and 74.2% and 52.8 and 75.7%, respectively. Thus, IPV in OPV-vaccinated individuals boosts intestinal mucosal immunity.

  4. Measles incidence, vaccine efficacy, and mortality in two urban African areas with high vaccination coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Knudsen, K; Jensen, T G

    1990-01-01

    Measles incidence, vaccine efficacy, and mortality were examined prospectively in two districts in Bissau where vaccine coverage for children aged 12-23 months was 81% (Bandim 1) and 61% (Bandim 2). There was little difference in cumulative measles incidence before 9 months of age (6.1% and 7.......6%, respectively). Between 9 months and 2 years of age, however, 6.1% contracted measles in Bandim 1 and 13.7% in Bandim 2. Even adjusting for vaccination status, incidence was significantly higher in Bandim 2 (relative risk 1.6, P = .04). Even though 95% of the children had measles antibodies after vaccination...

  5. Immunogenicity and Efficacy of Different Haemophilus influenzae type b Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgani, N.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Haemophilus influenzae, a major cause of meningitis in young children leading to death and other neurological sequelae. The disease leaves 15 to 35% of the survivors with permanent disabilities, such as, mental retardation or deafness. Despite the availability of new and more powerful antibiotics children with Hib meningitis still suffer from high mortality or morbidity. The emergence of multiresistant Hib strains causes increasing difficulties in selecting proper antibiotics for the treatment. Since 1970, the capsular polysaccharide polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP in H. influenzae b has been the target for vaccine development. The first Hib polysaccharide vaccine licensed in 1985, proved immunogenic in human adults, but failed to elicit an immune response in children under 2 years of age who were at greatest risk of developing the invasive Hib infection. These factors led to one of the most exciting advances in pediatrics, the development of Hib conjugate vaccines. Unlike most other vaccines for preventing a particular disease which are generally similar for all types, the specific characteristics of the available Hib conjugate vaccines licensed vary from each other in structure and immunological properties. In this review the immunogenicity and efficacy of Hib vaccines including a PRP vaccine; b Conjugate vaccines; and c Combination vaccines is evaluated.

  6. The Influence of Delivery Vectors on HIV Vaccine Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Omusiro Ondondo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Development of an effective HIV/AIDS vaccine remains a big challenge, largely due to the enormous HIV diversity which propels immune escape. Thus novel vaccine strategies are targeting multiple variants of conserved antibody and T cell epitopic regions which would incur a huge fitness cost to the virus in the event of mutational escape. Besides immunogen design, the delivery modality is critical for vaccine potency and efficacy, and should be carefully selected in order to not only maximise transgene expression, but to also enhance the immuno-stimulatory potential to activate innate and adaptive immune systems. To date, five HIV vaccine candidates have been evaluated for efficacy and protection from acquisition was only achieved in a small proportion of vaccinees in the RV144 study which used a canarypox vector for delivery. Conversely, in the STEP study (HVTN 502 where human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 was used, strong immune responses were induced but vaccination was more associated with increased risk of HIV acquisition than protection in vaccinees with pre-existing Ad5 immunity. The possibility that pre-existing immunity to a highly promising delivery vector may alter the natural course of HIV to increase acquisition risk is quite worrisome and a huge setback for HIV vaccine development. Thus, HIV vaccine development efforts are now geared towards delivery platforms which attain superior immunogenicity while concurrently limiting potential catastrophic effects likely to arise from pre-existing immunity or vector-related immuno-modulation. However, it still remains unclear whether it is poor immunogenicity of HIV antigens or substandard immunological potency of the safer delivery vectors that has limited the success of HIV vaccines. This article discusses some of the promising delivery vectors to be harnessed for improved HIV vaccine efficacy.

  7. The influence of delivery vectors on HIV vaccine efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondondo, Beatrice O.

    2014-01-01

    Development of an effective HIV/AIDS vaccine remains a big challenge, largely due to the enormous HIV diversity which propels immune escape. Thus novel vaccine strategies are targeting multiple variants of conserved antibody and T cell epitopic regions which would incur a huge fitness cost to the virus in the event of mutational escape. Besides immunogen design, the delivery modality is critical for vaccine potency and efficacy, and should be carefully selected in order to not only maximize transgene expression, but to also enhance the immuno-stimulatory potential to activate innate and adaptive immune systems. To date, five HIV vaccine candidates have been evaluated for efficacy and protection from acquisition was only achieved in a small proportion of vaccinees in the RV144 study which used a canarypox vector for delivery. Conversely, in the STEP study (HVTN 502) where human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) was used, strong immune responses were induced but vaccination was more associated with increased risk of HIV acquisition than protection in vaccinees with pre-existing Ad5 immunity. The possibility that pre-existing immunity to a highly promising delivery vector may alter the natural course of HIV to increase acquisition risk is quite worrisome and a huge setback for HIV vaccine development. Thus, HIV vaccine development efforts are now geared toward delivery platforms which attain superior immunogenicity while concurrently limiting potential catastrophic effects likely to arise from pre-existing immunity or vector-related immuno-modulation. However, it still remains unclear whether it is poor immunogenicity of HIV antigens or substandard immunological potency of the safer delivery vectors that has limited the success of HIV vaccines. This article discusses some of the promising delivery vectors to be harnessed for improved HIV vaccine efficacy. PMID:25202303

  8. Efficacy and safety of influenza vaccination in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patria, Maria Francesca; Tenconi, Rossana; Esposito, Susanna

    2012-04-01

    The mean global prevalence of asthma among children is approximately 12%, making it the most common chronic disease in children. Influenza infection has been associated with complications such as exacerbations of wheezing and asthma, increased airway hyper-reactivity and hospitalization. Although influenza vaccination is recommended for asthmatic patients by all health authorities, vaccination coverage remains significantly lower than expected and is lowest of all in children. Compliance is affected by the uncertainty of parents and physicians concerning the clinical risk of influenza in asthmatic subjects, the benefits of influenza vaccination in preventing asthma exacerbations and the safety of immunization. The aim of this review is to analyze the rationale for using influenza vaccine, discuss the relationship between influenza and the severity of asthmatic episodes and document the efficacy and safety of influenza vaccination in the pediatric asthmatic population.

  9. Construction of a gE-Deleted Pseudorabies Virus and Its Efficacy to the New-Emerging Variant PRV Challenge in the Form of Killed Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongyan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The new-emerging PRV variants plague the vaccinated pigs and caused huge economic loss to local pig industry in China since 2011. The current commercial PRV vaccines cannot provide complete protection as the new-emerging PRV variants are antigenically different from the classical viruses. It is urgent to develop more safe and effective PRV vaccines based on the current circulating field isolates. In this study, a gE gene-deleted PRV based on the PRV HN1201, a representative PRV variant, was generated and the efficacy was tested on 3-week-old pigs in the form of killed vaccine. After fatal PRV HN1201 challenge, all vaccinated pigs survived without showing any clinical symptoms, but all unvaccinated pigs exhibited pseudorabies-specific respiratory and neurological signs with 100% mortality rate within 6 days after infection. The vaccinated pigs developed high level of gB and neutralizing antibodies after vaccination which may correlate to the protection provided by vaccine. Therefore, this gE gene-deleted PRV could be a promising vaccine candidate for the control of currently epidemic pseudorabies in China.

  10. Plague Maps and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Plague in the United States Plague was first introduced ... per year in the United States: 1900-2012. Plague Worldwide Plague epidemics have occurred in Africa, Asia, ...

  11. Meta-analysis of variables affecting mouse protection efficacy of whole organism Brucella vaccines and vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Thomas E; Tibi, Omar; Lin, Yu; Sayers, Samantha; Bronner, Denise N; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2013-01-01

    Vaccine protection investigation includes three processes: vaccination, pathogen challenge, and vaccine protection efficacy assessment. Many variables can affect the results of vaccine protection. Brucella, a genus of facultative intracellular bacteria, is the etiologic agent of brucellosis in humans and multiple animal species. Extensive research has been conducted in developing effective live attenuated Brucella vaccines. We hypothesized that some variables play a more important role than others in determining vaccine protective efficacy. Using Brucella vaccines and vaccine candidates as study models, this hypothesis was tested by meta-analysis of Brucella vaccine studies reported in the literature. Nineteen variables related to vaccine-induced protection of mice against infection with virulent brucellae were selected based on modeling investigation of the vaccine protection processes. The variable "vaccine protection efficacy" was set as a dependent variable while the other eighteen were set as independent variables. Discrete or continuous values were collected from papers for each variable of each data set. In total, 401 experimental groups were manually annotated from 74 peer-reviewed publications containing mouse protection data for live attenuated Brucella vaccines or vaccine candidates. Our ANOVA analysis indicated that nine variables contributed significantly (P-value Brucella vaccine protection efficacy: vaccine strain, vaccination host (mouse) strain, vaccination dose, vaccination route, challenge pathogen strain, challenge route, challenge-killing interval, colony forming units (CFUs) in mouse spleen, and CFU reduction compared to control group. The other 10 variables (e.g., mouse age, vaccination-challenge interval, and challenge dose) were not found to be statistically significant (P-value > 0.05). The protection level of RB51 was sacrificed when the values of several variables (e.g., vaccination route, vaccine viability, and challenge pathogen strain

  12. Persistent efficacy of live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine (H2-strain) after a mass vaccination program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Fang-cheng; QIAN Wen; MAO Zi-an; GONG Yue-ping; JIANG Qi; JIANG Li-min; CHEN Nian-liang; CHAI Shao-ai; MAO Jiang-sen

    2005-01-01

    Background Live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine (H2 strain) is widely applied in prevention of hepatitis A epidemic in China and other countries now. It is essential to observe and confirm the vaccine immune efficacy, population antibody level and its persistent efficacy after mass immunization.Methods A total of 220 children with negative anti-HAV antibody (aged 1-3 years) were taken for follow-up assay to observe seroconversion and geometric mean titre(GMT)level 2 months, 12 months, 6 years, and 10 years after inoculation. Another survey sampled from subjects of different age groups (3, 6, 9, 15, 18, 25 and 35 years) to compare anti-HA antibody positive rate before and after inoculation performed 10 years previously. Epidemiological observations were taken for 10 years to evaluate the relationship between vaccine coverage and hepatitis A morbidity. Serum antibody to HAV was detected by enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA, calibrated by WHO international reference) and ABBOTT Axsym HAVAB microparticle enzyme immunoassay. Results Seroconversion in follow-up assay 2 months and 10 years after inoculation was 98.6% and 80.2% respectively. For children, the vaccination anti-HA antibody positive rates were significantly different before and after 10 years, 7.69% cf 70.45% (aged 3 years) and 52.58% cf 71.78% (aged 18 years). When vaccine coverage rose from 57% to 74%, there were no any HA epidemics. When vaccine coverage reached 85%, there were no any HA cases. With vaccine coverage between 85% and 91%, there were no any HA cases in cohorts from the age of 1 year to 15 years during the 10 years. Conclusions Live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine has an obvious long-term effectiveness in prevention and control of HA epidemics through mass vaccination.

  13. Kinetics of the immune response to the (F1+V) vaccine in models of bubonic and pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, E D; Stagg, A J; Eley, S M; Taylor, R; Green, M; Jones, S M; Titball, R W

    2007-01-22

    Protection against aerosol challenge with > 300 MLD of Yersinia pestis was observed 7 days after a single immunisation of mice with the F1+V vaccine. At day 60, mice were protected against injected challenge (10(7)MLD) in a vaccine dose-related manner. Recall responses to rV in splenocytes ex vivo at day 98 correlated significantly (p<0.001) with the immunising dose-level of V antigen; no memory response or anti-V serum IgG was detected in killed whole cell vaccine (KWCV) recipients. This may explain the susceptibility of KWCV recipients to aerosol challenge and the enhanced protection conferred by the F1+V sub-unit vaccine, particularly since the anti-F1 responses induced by either vaccine were similarly IgG1-polarised.

  14. An Alternative Approach to Combination Vaccines: Intradermal Administration of Isolated Components for Control of Anthrax, Botulism, Plague and Staphylococcal Toxic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-03

    antigens CaF1 and LcrV, previously shown to protect mice against plague [18,19]. The bubonic form of plague results from Yersinia pestis injected into...GP, Adamovicz J, Friedlander AM: Protection against experimental bubonic and pneumonic plague by a recombinant capsular F1-V antigen fusion protein...intradermal administration of isolated components for control of anthrax, botulism, plague and staphylococcal toxic shock Garry L Morefield1, Ralph F

  15. Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus strain 201, an avirulent strain to humans, provides protection against bubonic plague in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wang, Qiong; Tian, Guang; Qi, Zhizhen; Zhang, Xuecan; Wu, Xiaohong; Qiu, Yefeng; Bi, Yujing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Xin, Youquan; He, Jian; Zhou, Jiyuan; Zeng, Lin; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus is considered to be a virulent to larger mammals, including guinea pigs, rabbits and humans. It may be used as live attenuated plague vaccine candidates in terms of its low virulence. However, the Microtus strain's protection against plague has yet to be demonstrated in larger mammals. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the Microtus strain 201 as a live attenuated plague vaccine candidate. Our results show that this strain is highly attenuated by subcutaneous route, elicits an F1-specific antibody titer similar to the EV and provides a protective efficacy similar to the EV against bubonic plague in Chinese-origin rhesus macaques. The Microtus strain 201 could induce elevated secretion of both Th1-associated cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α) and Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-6), as well as chemokines MCP-1 and IL-8. However, the protected animals developed skin ulcer at challenge site with different severity in most of the immunized and some of the EV-immunized monkeys. Generally, the Microtus strain 201 represented a good plague vaccine candidate based on its ability to generate strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses as well as its good protection against high dose of subcutaneous virulent Y. pestis challenge.

  16. Understanding reduced rotavirus vaccine efficacy in low socio-economic settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Lopman

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rotavirus vaccine efficacy ranges from >90% in high socio-economic settings (SES to 50% in low SES. With the imminent introduction of rotavirus vaccine in low SES countries, understanding reasons for reduced efficacy in these settings could identify strategies to improve vaccine performance. METHODS: We developed a mathematical model to predict rotavirus vaccine efficacy in high, middle and low SES based on data specific for each setting on incidence, protection conferred by natural infection and immune response to vaccination. We then examined factors affecting efficacy. RESULTS: Vaccination was predicted to prevent 93%, 86% and 51% of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in high, middle and low SES, respectively. Also predicted was that vaccines are most effective against severe disease and efficacy declines with age in low but not high SES. Reduced immunogenicity of vaccination and reduced protection conferred by natural infection are the main factors that compromise efficacy in low SES. DISCUSSION: The continued risk of severe disease in non-primary natural infections in low SES is a key factor underpinning reduced efficacy of rotavirus vaccines. Predicted efficacy was remarkably consistent with observed clinical trial results from different SES, validating the model. The phenomenon of reduced vaccine efficacy can be predicted by intrinsic immunological and epidemiological factors of low SES populations. Modifying aspects of the vaccine (e.g. improving immunogenicity in low SES and vaccination program (e.g. additional doses may bring improvements.

  17. TLR3 and TLR9 agonists improve postexposure vaccination efficacy of live smallpox vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israely, Tomer; Melamed, Sharon; Achdout, Hagit; Erez, Noam; Politi, Boaz; Waner, Trevor; Lustig, Shlomo; Paran, Nir

    2014-01-01

    Eradication of smallpox and discontinuation of the vaccination campaign resulted in an increase in the percentage of unvaccinated individuals, highlighting the need for postexposure efficient countermeasures in case of accidental or deliberate viral release. Intranasal infection of mice with ectromelia virus (ECTV), a model for human smallpox, is curable by vaccination with a high vaccine dose given up to 3 days postexposure. To further extend this protective window and to reduce morbidity, mice were vaccinated postexposure with Vaccinia-Lister, the conventional smallpox vaccine or Modified Vaccinia Ankara, a highly attenuated vaccine in conjunction with TLR3 or TLR9 agonists. We show that co-administration of the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) even 5 days postexposure conferred protection, avoiding the need to increase the vaccination dose. Efficacious treatments prevented death, ameliorated disease symptoms, reduced viral load and maintained tissue integrity of target organs. Protection was associated with significant elevation of serum IFNα and anti-vaccinia IgM antibodies, modulation of IFNγ response, and balanced activation of NK and T cells. TLR9 agonists (CpG ODNs) were less protective than the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C). We show that activation of type 1 IFN by poly(I:C) and protection is achievable even without co-vaccination, requiring sufficient amount of the viral antigens of the infective agent or the vaccine. This study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of postexposure immune modulation by TLR activation, allowing to alleviate the disease symptoms and to further extend the protective window of postexposure vaccination.

  18. TLR3 and TLR9 agonists improve postexposure vaccination efficacy of live smallpox vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer Israely

    Full Text Available Eradication of smallpox and discontinuation of the vaccination campaign resulted in an increase in the percentage of unvaccinated individuals, highlighting the need for postexposure efficient countermeasures in case of accidental or deliberate viral release. Intranasal infection of mice with ectromelia virus (ECTV, a model for human smallpox, is curable by vaccination with a high vaccine dose given up to 3 days postexposure. To further extend this protective window and to reduce morbidity, mice were vaccinated postexposure with Vaccinia-Lister, the conventional smallpox vaccine or Modified Vaccinia Ankara, a highly attenuated vaccine in conjunction with TLR3 or TLR9 agonists. We show that co-administration of the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C even 5 days postexposure conferred protection, avoiding the need to increase the vaccination dose. Efficacious treatments prevented death, ameliorated disease symptoms, reduced viral load and maintained tissue integrity of target organs. Protection was associated with significant elevation of serum IFNα and anti-vaccinia IgM antibodies, modulation of IFNγ response, and balanced activation of NK and T cells. TLR9 agonists (CpG ODNs were less protective than the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C. We show that activation of type 1 IFN by poly(I:C and protection is achievable even without co-vaccination, requiring sufficient amount of the viral antigens of the infective agent or the vaccine. This study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of postexposure immune modulation by TLR activation, allowing to alleviate the disease symptoms and to further extend the protective window of postexposure vaccination.

  19. Efficacy of conjugate vaccines in pneumococcal infection prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Perova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of pneumococcal infection is actual for many countries of the world in connection with high incidence and mortality. Vaccination by the 7-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine of children till 2 years is available in Russia since 2009, 13-valent – since 2012. Objectives – an assessment of clinical and epidemiological efficacy in pneumococcal infection prevention infection by catamnesis after 7-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine application. Observation over incidence of pneumonia and otitis of 50 children imparted against a pneumococcal infection is made. The indicator of density of incidence of pneumonia in group of the imparted made 9,7 on 1000 (95% of CI; 9,1–10,3 in group of comparison – 92,6 on 1000 (95% of CI; 91,3–93,9. Index of efficacy of vaccination concerning pneumonia of any etiology – 9,5, effectiveness ratio – 89,5%. The indicator of density of incidence of otitis at the imparted was 1,8 times less – 155,3 on 1000 (95% of CI; 150,9–155,7 in group of comparison – 263,9 on 1000 (95% of CI; 261,7–266,1. The index and vaccination effectiveness ratio concerning acute otitis media made 1,8 and 44,3%. Thus, vaccination against pneumococcal infection is effective as concerning community acquired pneumonia, and acute otitis media of any etiology.

  20. Evaluation of adjuvant effects of fucoidan for improving vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Yeon; Joo, Hong-Gu

    2015-01-01

    Fucoidan is a sulfated polysaccharide derived from brown seaweed, including Fucus vesiculosus. This compound is known to have immunostimulatory effects on various types of immune cells including macrophages and dendritic cells. A recent study described the application of fucoidan as a vaccine adjuvant. Vaccination is regarded as the most efficient prophylactic method for preventing harmful or epidemic diseases. To increase vaccine efficacy, effective adjuvants are needed. In the present study, we determined whether fucoidan can function as an adjuvant using vaccine antigens. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that fucoidan increases the expression of the activation markers major histocompatibility complex class II, cluster of differentiation (CD)25, and CD69 in spleen cells. In combination with Bordetella bronchiseptica antigen, fucoidan increased the viability and tumor necrosis factor-α production of spleen cells. Furthermore, fucoidan increased the in vivo production of antigen-specific antibodies in mice inoculated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigen. Overall, this study has provided valuable information about the use of fucoidan as a vaccine adjuvant.

  1. Influenza vaccination in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis: efficacy and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Sasan; Argani, Hassan; Gholamin, Sharareh; Razavi, Seyed‐Mostafa; Keshtkar‐Jahromi, Marzieh; Talebian, Amir S.; Moghaddam, Keivan G.; Sepehri, Zahra; Azad, Talat M.; Keshtkar‐Jahromi, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Tavana et al. (2011) Influenza vaccination in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis: efficacy and safety. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2011.00290.x. Background  Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory, granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology. The role of cellular and humoral immune systems in this disease is unclear, whereas dysregulation of the immune system is suggested. Patients with sarcoidosis show diverse responses while exposed to various antigens. Although influenza vaccination is recommended in pulmonary sarcoidosis, its efficacy and safety has not been investigated. Objectives  To evaluate safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in patients with sarcoidosis. Patients/Methods  Influenza vaccination was performed in 23 eligible patients with sarcoidosis (SP) and 26 healthy controls (HC). Antibody titers against H1N1, H3N2, and B influenza virus antigens were evaluated just before and 1 month after vaccination. Patients were followed for 6 months to assess vaccine safety. Results  Serological response and magnitude of changes in antibody titers against influenza vaccine antigens were comparable between SPs and HCs. Women showed a better serological response against B antigen (P = 0·034) than men. Twenty‐four‐hour urine calcium was associated with antibody response against H1N1 [correlation coefficient (CC) = 0·477, P = 0·003] and H3N2 (CC = 0·352, P = 0·028) antigens. Serum angiotensin‐converting enzyme correlated negatively with antibody response against B antigen (CC = −0·331, P = 0·040). Higher residual volume was associated with fewer rises in antibody titer against H3N2 antigen (CC = −0·377, P = 0·035). No major adverse events or disease flare‐up was observed during follow‐up. Conclusions  In this study, influenza vaccination did not cause any major adverse event in SPs, and their serological response was equal to HCs

  2. Plague: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plague? Plague is an infectious disease that affects rodents, certain other animals, and humans. It is caused ... of plague? Fleas become infected by feeding on rodents, such as chipmunks, prairie dogs, ground squirrels, mice, ...

  3. Cutaneous varicella zoster virus infection following zoster vaccination: report of post-vaccination herpes zoster skin infection and literature review of zoster vaccination efficacy and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiff, Katherine M; Cohen, Philip R

    2017-06-15

    BackgroundHerpes zoster vaccine is currently recommended in the United States for immune competent individuals ≥60 years. The efficacy of the herpes zoster vaccine decreases with age and with time following vaccination.PurposeAn elderly man with herpes zoster following vaccination is described. The guidelines for vaccination and issues regarding re-vaccination are reviewed. PubMed was used to search the following terms: efficacy, elderly, herpes zoster, herpes zoster incidence, herpes zoster recurrence, and vaccination. The papers and relevant citations were reviewed. The clinical features of a patient with post-vaccination herpes zoster skin infection are presented; in addition, vaccine efficacy and guidelines are reviewed.ResultsA 91-year-old man, vaccinated for herpes zoster 10 years earlier, presented with crusted erosions on his face corresponding to the area innervated by the ophthalmic division of the left trigeminal nerve. Evaluation using polymerase chain reaction confirmed the diagnosis of herpes zoster.ConclusionsHerpes zoster vaccine decreases in efficacy with both age and number of years following vaccination. Therefore, booster shots or revaccination in the older population may be of benefit.

  4. Development and Evidence for Efficacy of CMV Glycoprotein B Vaccine with MF59 Adjuvant

    OpenAIRE

    Pass, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    A vaccine comprised of recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV) envelope glycoprotein B (gB) with MF59 adjuvant developed in the 1990s recently was recently found to have efficacy for prevention of CMV infection in a phase 2 clinical trial in young mothers. This review briefly considers the rationale for gB as a vaccine antigen, the history of this CMV gB vaccine and the data supporting vaccine efficacy.

  5. Current developments for improving efficacy of allergy vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrini, Alessandra; Rolland, Jennifer M; O'Hehir, Robyn E

    2015-01-01

    Allergic diseases are prevalent worldwide. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is a current treatment for allergy, leading to modification of the natural course of disease. Mechanisms of efficacy include Treg through release of IL-10 and TGF-β and specific IgG4 blocking antibodies. Subcutaneous and sublingual routes are popular, but uptake is limited by inconvenience and safety concerns. Inclusion criteria limit application to a small proportion of allergic patients. New forms of immunotherapy are being investigated for more efficacious, convenient and safer options with promising advances in recent years. The rationale of reducing vaccine allergenicity to increase safety while improving immunogenicity led to investigation of T-cell epitope-based peptides and recombinant allergen derivatives. Additionally, different routes of administration and adjuvants and adjunct therapies are being explored. This review discusses the current status of AIT and recent advances to improve clinical efficacy, safety and long-term immune tolerance.

  6. Safety and Efficacy of Vaccination Against Influenza in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ori Elkayam

    2006-01-01

    Vaccination against influenza is currently recommended for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The safety and efficacy of vaccination in patients suffering from rheumatic diseases is still a matter of debate. This review summarizes the studies performed on the safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccination in patients with RA as well as the rheumatic complications of the vaccine in otherwise healthy persons. Several trials have shown that the vaccine induces an adequate humoral respo...

  7. A Yersinia pestis lpxM-mutant live vaccine induces enhanced immunity against bubonic plague in mice and guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feodorova, V A; Pan'kina, L N; Savostina, E P; Sayapina, L V; Motin, V L; Dentovskaya, S V; Shaikhutdinova, R Z; Ivanov, S A; Lindner, B; Kondakova, A N; Bystrova, O V; Kocharova, N A; Senchenkova, S N; Holst, O; Pier, G B; Knirel, Y A; Anisimov, A P

    2007-11-01

    The lpxM mutant of the live vaccine Yersinia pestis EV NIIEG strain synthesising a less toxic penta-acylated lipopolysaccharide was found to be avirulent in mice and guinea pigs, notably showing no measurable virulence in Balb/c mice which do retain some susceptibility to the parental strain itself. Twenty-one days after a single injection of the lpxM-mutant, 85-100% protection was achieved in outbred mice and guinea pigs, whereas a 43% protection rate was achieved in Balb/c mice given single low doses (10(3) to 2.5 x 10(4) CFU) of this vaccine. A subcutaneous challenge with 2000 median lethal doses (equal to 20,000 CFU) of fully virulent Y. pestis 231 strain, is a 6-10-fold higher dose than that which the EV NIIEG itself can protect against.

  8. Efficacy of diphtheria and tetanus vaccination in Gaza, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Aswad, I H; Shubair, M E

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness and usefulness of vaccination against diphtheria and tetanus in different age groups in Gaza, Palestine. Blood samples were collected from 180 children aged ELISA methods, the efficacy of vaccination was estimated at 87.8% for diphtheria and 98.3% for tetanus. Mean serum titres varied significantly by age group: for diphtheria 0.24 IU/mL at age 2-4 years, 0.63 IU/mL at 7-8 years and 0.46 IU/mL at 11-12 years, and for tetanus 1.01 IU/mL, 2.63 IU/mL and 1.20 IU/mL respectively. The relatively low antibody titres, especially for diphtheria, suggest the need for a booster dose.

  9. Pandemic influenza vaccines and neuraminidase inhibitors: efficacy and side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijl, D

    2011-01-01

    At the time of the outbreak of the pandemic of New Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic influenza vaccines became available via an accelerated registration procedure. In 2005 large stocks of the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir were built up in the Netherlands and other western countries. There was considerable doubt about the efficacy of this medicine. Initially reported positive effects of the drug were largely based on unpublished research, which was sponsored by the manufacturer and was partially written by ghostwriters. There now have been reports of rare and serious side effects. The first reports on the severity of the pandemic in Australia and New Zealand indicated a mild course.

  10. Colorado animal-based plague surveillance systems: relationships between targeted animal species and prediction efficacy of areas at risk for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Jennifer L; Eisen, Rebecca J; Schotthoefer, Anna M; Xiaocheng, Liang; Montenieri, John A; Tanda, Dale; Pape, John; Schriefer, Martin E; Antolin, Michael F; Gage, Kenneth L

    2009-06-01

    Human plague risks (Yersinia pestis infection) are greatest when epizootics cause high mortality among this bacterium's natural rodent hosts. Therefore, health departments in plague-endemic areas commonly establish animal-based surveillance programs to monitor Y. pestis infection among plague hosts and vectors. The primary objectives of our study were to determine whether passive animal-based plague surveillance samples collected in Colorado from 1991 to 2005 were sampled from high human plague risk areas and whether these samples provided information useful for predicting human plague case locations. By comparing locations of plague-positive animal samples with a previously constructed GIS-based plague risk model, we determined that the majority of plague-positive Gunnison's prairie dogs (100%) and non-prairie dog sciurids (85.82%), and moderately high percentages of sigmodontine rodents (71.4%), domestic cats (69.3%), coyotes (62.9%), and domestic dogs (62.5%) were recovered within 1 km of the nearest area posing high peridomestic risk to humans. In contrast, the majority of white-tailed prairie dog (66.7%), leporid (cottontailed and jack rabbits) (71.4%), and black-tailed prairie dog (93.0%) samples originated more than 1 km from the nearest human risk habitat. Plague-positive animals or their fleas were rarely (one of 19 cases) collected within 2 km of a case exposure site during the 24 months preceding the dates of illness onset for these cases. Low spatial accuracy for identifying epizootic activity prior to human plague cases suggested that other mammalian species or their fleas are likely more important sources of human infection in high plague risk areas. To address this issue, epidemiological observations and multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analyses (MLVA) were used to preliminarily identify chipmunks as an under-sampled, but potentially important, species for human plague risk in Colorado.

  11. Genetic Diversity and Protective Efficacy of the RTS,S/AS01 Malaria Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neafsey, Daniel E; Juraska, Michal; Bedford, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Background The RTS,S/AS01 vaccine targets the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum and has partial protective efficacy against clinical and severe malaria disease in infants and children. We investigated whether the vaccine efficacy was specific to certain parasite genotypes at the c...

  12. Protective efficacy of a live, attenuated, influenza virus vaccine (‘Alice’ strain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzie, A.; Delem, A.; Huygelen, C.

    1976-01-01

    Animal studies have indicated the high degree of efficacy and broad protection of ‘Alice’ vaccine against various heterologous H3N2 influenza virus strains. Similarly, challenge studies carried out in volunteers have confirmed the high degree of efficacy of ‘Alice’ vaccine versus homologous and heterologous influenza A virus strains. PMID:785431

  13. Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    2 Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0548 TITLE: Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1...identification of these T cells will lead to downstream antigen discovery. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer, immunotherapy, vaccine , antigens 16

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Vaccination Against Influenza in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ori Elkayam

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination against influenza is currently recommended for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The safety and efficacy of vaccination in patients suffering from rheumatic diseases is still a matter of debate. This review summarizes the studies performed on the safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccination in patients with RA as well as the rheumatic complications of the vaccine in otherwise healthy persons. Several trials have shown that the vaccine induces an adequate humoral response and does not induce clinical exacerbation of RA. Rheumatic complications (mainly vasculitis following influenza vaccination in the general population are scarce.

  15. Efficacy in the field of two anticoccidial vaccines for broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Grilli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared two attenuated anticoccidial vaccines, administered to broilers by spray into the incubator (88,000 males and 210,100 females. Vaccine A container five species of Eimeria and vaccine B three. Zootechnical performance was similar in the two groups, with mean lesion scores no higher than 1; vaccine A caused only duodenal lesions, while vaccine B also caused typhlitis. Maximum oocyst count was 23,000/g feces at age 28 days with vaccine A and 38,000 at 21 days with vaccine B. Broilers vaccinated with vaccine B had more frequent enteric symptoms, and C. perfringens isolation.

  16. Antigen-Sparing and Enhanced Efficacy of Multivalent Vaccines Adjuvanted with Immunopotentiators in Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peipei; Lu, Jihu; Feng, Lei; Wu, Hongzhuan; Zhang, Xuehua; Mei, Mei; Hou, Jibo; Liu, Xiufan; Tang, Yinghua

    2017-01-01

    We previously described that immunopotentiators, CVCVA5, increased the efficacy of H5 and H9 subtype avian influenza vaccines in chickens, ducks, and geese. In this study, we further investigated the effects of the CVCVA5 for improving the efficacy of other univalent or multivalent inactivated vaccines. The immune response administrated with half-dose of monovalent vaccine plus CVCVA5 were higher than those of one dose of monovalent vaccine without immunopotentiators as measured by levels of antibodies from serum, tears and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and cytokines of IFNγ and IL-4 from serum. Vaccines included the univalent vaccine of Newcastle Disease virus (ND), Egg Drop Syndrome virus (EDS), Infectious Bronchitis virus (IB), and Infectious Bursal Disease virus (IBD). The CVCVA5 also improved the immune response of both ND and IBD vaccines with less dosage. The sterile protective immunity was monitored with one- or a half-dose of adjuvanted ND vaccine or one dose of adjuvanted IBD vaccine, respectively. The improved immune efficacy was observed in a half-dose of adjuvanted bivalent vaccines compared to one dose of vaccines without CVCVA5 as measured by the antibody levels, including bivalent vaccine of ND-H9, ND-IB, and ND-IBD. The CVCVA5 also boosted the immune efficacy of the tetravalent vaccine (ND-IB-EDS-H9). A half-dose of adjuvanted commercial vaccine or 75% antigen-sparing adjuvanted vaccine elicited similar antibody levels to those of one dose non-adjuvanted commercial vaccines. The CVCVA5 improved the effect of a booster vaccination as measured by the antibody levels against H5 or H9 virus antigens, in which chickens primed with the adjuvanted ND-IB vaccines given a booster with H5–H9 bivalent vaccines without CVCVA5 using 5-day intervals. The inflammatory response may contribute to these additional effects by increasing the levels of IFNγ and IL-4 after the injection of the adjuvanted ND-IB vaccines. Results indicated that the CVCVA5 improved

  17. Antigen-Sparing and Enhanced Efficacy of Multivalent Vaccines Adjuvanted with Immunopotentiators in Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peipei Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We previously described that immunopotentiators, CVCVA5, increased the efficacy of H5 and H9 subtype avian influenza vaccines in chickens, ducks, and geese. In this study, we further investigated the effects of the CVCVA5 for improving the efficacy of other univalent or multivalent inactivated vaccines. The immune response administrated with half-dose of monovalent vaccine plus CVCVA5 were higher than those of one dose of monovalent vaccine without immunopotentiators as measured by levels of antibodies from serum, tears and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and cytokines of IFNγ and IL-4 from serum. Vaccines included the univalent vaccine of Newcastle Disease virus (ND, Egg Drop Syndrome virus (EDS, Infectious Bronchitis virus (IB, and Infectious Bursal Disease virus (IBD. The CVCVA5 also improved the immune response of both ND and IBD vaccines with less dosage. The sterile protective immunity was monitored with one- or a half-dose of adjuvanted ND vaccine or one dose of adjuvanted IBD vaccine, respectively. The improved immune efficacy was observed in a half-dose of adjuvanted bivalent vaccines compared to one dose of vaccines without CVCVA5 as measured by the antibody levels, including bivalent vaccine of ND-H9, ND-IB, and ND-IBD. The CVCVA5 also boosted the immune efficacy of the tetravalent vaccine (ND-IB-EDS-H9. A half-dose of adjuvanted commercial vaccine or 75% antigen-sparing adjuvanted vaccine elicited similar antibody levels to those of one dose non-adjuvanted commercial vaccines. The CVCVA5 improved the effect of a booster vaccination as measured by the antibody levels against H5 or H9 virus antigens, in which chickens primed with the adjuvanted ND-IB vaccines given a booster with H5–H9 bivalent vaccines without CVCVA5 using 5-day intervals. The inflammatory response may contribute to these additional effects by increasing the levels of IFNγ and IL-4 after the injection of the adjuvanted ND-IB vaccines. Results indicated that the

  18. Efficacy of a new inactivated Chlamydophila felis vaccine in experimentally-infected cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masubuchi, Katsuo; Wakatsuki, Akira; Iwamoto, Kayo; Takahashi, Takuo; Kokubu, Teruaki; Shimizu, Mitsugu

    2010-08-01

    A new inactivated and adjuvanted Chlamydophila felis vaccine was developed and its efficacy in cats was compared with that of commercially available inactivated and live vaccines. Two commercial vaccines conferred insufficient immunity on inoculated cats, as evaluated by antibody production and a challenge experiment, whereas cats administered the newly generated vaccine produced high-titre antibodies and acquired sufficient immunity. The cats immunised with the new vaccine revealed no or only mild clinical signs, and no chlamydiae were recovered from their tissue samples after exposure to a virulent C felis. However, they shed chlamydiae in their nasal and conjunctival secretions after challenge, as did those immunised with the commercial vaccines and the non-vaccinated controls. The newly developed vaccine caused no adverse reaction in the inoculated cats. These findings suggest that the new vaccine prepared here may be promising for practical use in controlling C felis infection in cats.

  19. Serotype specificity of B-haplotype influence on the relative efficacy of Marek's disease vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, L D; Witter, R L

    1994-01-01

    B-haplotype genes in the chicken were previously shown to differentially influence vaccine efficacy against challenge with very virulent Marek's disease virus according to the type of Marek's disease (MD) vaccine used. To determine whether MD vaccines of the same serotype gave comparable levels of protection against MD in chickens of the same haplotype challenged with MD virus strain Md5, two serotype 1 and two serotype 2 vaccines were compared with one serotype 3 vaccine using chickens of 15-B-congenic lines. There was a strong correlation in development of MD lesions among chickens of the different lines receiving the two serotype 2 vaccines (r = 0.94) as well as among chickens receiving the two serotype 1 vaccines (r = 0.76). The serotype 1 vaccines were preferable for B2, B13, B15, and B21, but serotype 2 vaccines were more protective for B5 chickens. The two serotype 2 vaccines gave equivalent protection; however, of the serotype 1 vaccines, CVI988/Rispens provided more protection than Md11/75c/R2/23. We conclude that the B-haplotype influence on MD vaccine efficacy is dependent on the serotype of the vaccine.

  20. Formula to evaluate efficacy of vaccines and systemic substances against three-host ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, André de Abreu Rangel; Garcia, Marcos Valério; Szabó, Matias Pablo Juan; Barros, Jacqueline Cavalcante; Andreotti, Renato

    2015-05-01

    The control of ticks with vaccines is of global interest. Experimental vaccines incorporate new technologies as soon as they are available. Historically, the main vaccine studies have focused on the one-host cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus, and efficacy evaluations have been standardised for this tick species. On the other hand, evaluations of vaccine candidates for three-host ticks are being done somewhat arbitrarily and thus comparisons within the current literature on the efficacy of vaccines, as well as other methods of control, are difficult. We herein provide a formula for the evaluation of efficacy of a vaccine designed against three-host ticks that incorporates the whole life cycle of the tick.

  1. CAF01 potentiates immune responses and efficacy of an inactivated influenza vaccine in ferrets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Agger, Else Marie; Poulsen, Julie Juul

    2011-01-01

    experimental vaccine candidates. In this study, we compared the immune responses in ferrets to a commercially available TIV with the responses to the same vaccine mixed with the CAF01 adjuvant. Two recently circulating H1N1 viruses were used as challenge to test the vaccine efficacy. CAF01 improved......Trivalent inactivated vaccines (TIV) against influenza are given to 350 million people every year. Most of these are non-adjuvanted vaccines whose immunogenicity and protective efficacy are considered suboptimal. Commercially available non-adjuvanted TIV are known to elicit mainly a humoral immune...... the immunogenicity of the vaccine, with increased influenza-specific IgA and IgG levels. Additionally, CAF01 promoted cellular-mediated immunity as indicated by interferon-gamma expressing lymphocytes, measured by flow cytometry. CAF01 also enhanced the protection conferred by the vaccine by reducing the viral load...

  2. Plague Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  3. Effects of Immunity in Astragalan Adjuvan on Swine Plague Vaccine on Piglets%黄芪多糖佐剂对猪瘟疫苗免疫效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄德尚; 郭爱珍

    2011-01-01

    To explore the effects of swine plague antibody which was induced by swine plague vaccine in astragalan adjuvant on piglets. 40 piglets were randomly divided into 4 groups (n= 10), those groups were respectively normal sodium (NS)group, swine plague vaccine (SPV) group, astragalan injection (AGI) group and astragalan injection-swine plague vaccine (AGI-SPV) group. They were respectively injected drugs into musculi colli on the 20th day and 85th of piglets were born after were taken suction blood (5 mL) for detection from precaval vein, such as the NS 3 mL was injected for 3 d, SPV 1 mL for 1 d and NS 3 mL for 2 d, AGI 10 mg/kg for 3 d, AGI 10 mg/kg for 3 d with the SPV 1 mL for 1 d,and then they were accordingly taken suction blood on the 35th and 100th day for detecting the IgG, IgM, IgA, y-Globulin (γ-G) and swine plague antibody (SP-Ab) and so on. Those γ-G, IgG, IgM and IgA of the AGI group and AGI-SPV group are significantly higher than the NS group and the SPV group (P<0.05); the blocking rate of swine plague antibody of SPV group and the AGI-SPV group are significantly higher than themselves on the 35th and 20th day, as well the AGI-SPV group is higher than the SPV group, too.The AGI can be used for immunologic adjuvant for improving immunity of piglets on swine plague vaccine, the mechanism of action might be concerned with raising the immunoglobulin and facilitating the swine plague antibody-formaing.%本试验旨在探讨以黄芪多糖(astragalan,AG)为佐剂对仔猪猪瘟疫苗诱导猪瘟抗体的影响.将20日龄仔猪40头随机分成4组(n=10),即生理盐水(normal sodium,NS)组、猪瘟疫苗(swine plague vaccine,SPV)组、黄芪多糖注射液(astragalan injection,AGI)组以及黄芪多糖注射液和猪瘟疫苗(astragalan injection and swine plague vaccine,AGI-SPV)组.各组于前腔静脉采血5 mL(用于检测)后,分别于仔猪出生第20、85天连续3 d颈部肌肉注射NS 3 mL×3 d,SPV 1 mt×1 d+NS 3mL×2 d,AGI 10 mg/kg×3 d

  4. [Yersinia pestis and plague - an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-12-01

    The plague of man is a severe, systemic bacterial infectious disease. Without antibacterial therapy, the disease is associated with a high case fatality rate, ranging from 40% (bubonic plague) to nearly 100% (septicemic and pneumonic plague). The disease is caused by Yersinia pestis, a non-motile, gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae. In nature, Y. pestis has been found in several rodent species and some other small animals such as shrews. Within its reservoir host, Y. pestis circulates via flea bites. Transmission of Y. pestis to humans occurs by the bite of rat fleas, other flea vectors or by non vectorial routes, e. g., handling infected animals or consumption of contaminated food. Human-to-human transmission of the pathogen occurs primarily through aerosol droplets. Compared to the days when plague was a pandemic scourge, the disease is now relatively rare and limited to some rural areas of Africa. During the last ten years, however, plague outbreaks have been registered repea- tedly in some African regions. For treatment of plague, streptomycin is still considered the drug of choice. Chloramphenicol, doxycycline, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin are also promising drugs. Recombinant vaccines against plague are in clinical development.

  5. Protective efficacy of centralized and polyvalent envelope immunogens in an attenuated equine lentivirus vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi K Craigo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lentiviral Envelope (Env antigenic variation and related immune evasion present major hurdles to effective vaccine development. Centralized Env immunogens that minimize the genetic distance between vaccine proteins and circulating viral isolates are an area of increasing study in HIV vaccinology. To date, the efficacy of centralized immunogens has not been evaluated in the context of an animal model that could provide both immunogenicity and protective efficacy data. We previously reported on a live-attenuated (attenuated equine infectious anemia (EIAV virus vaccine, which provides 100% protection from disease after virulent, homologous, virus challenge. Further, protective efficacy demonstrated a significant, inverse, linear relationship between EIAV Env divergence and protection from disease when vaccinates were challenged with viral strains of increasing Env divergence from the vaccine strain Env. Here, we sought to comprehensively examine the protective efficacy of centralized immunogens in our attenuated vaccine platform. We developed, constructed, and extensively tested a consensus Env, which in a virulent proviral backbone generated a fully replication-competent pathogenic virus, and compared this consensus Env to an ancestral Env in our attenuated proviral backbone. A polyvalent attenuated vaccine was established for comparison to the centralized vaccines. Additionally, an engineered quasispecies challenge model was created for rigorous assessment of protective efficacy. Twenty-four EIAV-naïve animals were vaccinated and challenged along with six-control animals six months post-second inoculation. Pre-challenge data indicated the consensus Env was more broadly immunogenic than the Env of the other attenuated vaccines. However, challenge data demonstrated a significant increase in protective efficacy of the polyvalent vaccine. These findings reveal, for the first time, a consensus Env immunogen that generated a fully

  6. Protective Efficacy of Centralized and Polyvalent Envelope Immunogens in an Attenuated Equine Lentivirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Ezzelarab, Corin; Cook, Sheila J.; Liu, Chong; Horohov, David; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral Envelope (Env) antigenic variation and related immune evasion present major hurdles to effective vaccine development. Centralized Env immunogens that minimize the genetic distance between vaccine proteins and circulating viral isolates are an area of increasing study in HIV vaccinology. To date, the efficacy of centralized immunogens has not been evaluated in the context of an animal model that could provide both immunogenicity and protective efficacy data. We previously reported on a live-attenuated (attenuated) equine infectious anemia (EIAV) virus vaccine, which provides 100% protection from disease after virulent, homologous, virus challenge. Further, protective efficacy demonstrated a significant, inverse, linear relationship between EIAV Env divergence and protection from disease when vaccinates were challenged with viral strains of increasing Env divergence from the vaccine strain Env. Here, we sought to comprehensively examine the protective efficacy of centralized immunogens in our attenuated vaccine platform. We developed, constructed, and extensively tested a consensus Env, which in a virulent proviral backbone generated a fully replication-competent pathogenic virus, and compared this consensus Env to an ancestral Env in our attenuated proviral backbone. A polyvalent attenuated vaccine was established for comparison to the centralized vaccines. Additionally, an engineered quasispecies challenge model was created for rigorous assessment of protective efficacy. Twenty-four EIAV-naïve animals were vaccinated and challenged along with six-control animals six months post-second inoculation. Pre-challenge data indicated the consensus Env was more broadly immunogenic than the Env of the other attenuated vaccines. However, challenge data demonstrated a significant increase in protective efficacy of the polyvalent vaccine. These findings reveal, for the first time, a consensus Env immunogen that generated a fully-functional, replication

  7. Efficacy of killed whole-parasite vaccines in the prevention of leishmaniasis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noazin, Sassan; Khamesipour, Ali; Moulton, Lawrence H; Tanner, Marcel; Nasseri, Kiumarss; Modabber, Farrokh; Sharifi, Iraj; Khalil, E A G; Bernal, Ivan Dario Velez; Antunes, Carlos M F; Smith, Peter G

    2009-07-30

    Despite decades of investigation in countries on three continents, an efficacious vaccine against Leishmania infections has not been developed. Although some indication of protection was observed in some of the controlled trials conducted with "first-generation" whole, inactivated Leishmania parasite vaccines, convincing evidence of protection was lacking. After reviewing all previously published or unpublished randomized, controlled field efficacy clinical trials of prophylactic candidate vaccines, a meta-analysis of qualified trials was conducted to evaluate whether there was some evidence of protection revealed by considering the results of all trials together. The findings indicate that the whole-parasite vaccine candidates tested do not confer significant protection against human leishmaniasis.

  8. Improving the Th1 cellular efficacy of the lead Yersinia pestis rF1-V subunit vaccine using SA-4-1BBL as a novel adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinc, Gunes; Pennington, Jarrod M; Yolcu, Esma S; Lawrenz, Matthew B; Shirwan, Haval

    2014-09-03

    The lead candidate plague subunit vaccine is the recombinant fusion protein rF1-V adjuvanted with alum. While alum generates Th2 regulated robust humoral responses, immune protection against Yersinia pestis has been shown to also involve Th1 driven cellular responses. Therefore, the rF1-V-based subunit vaccine may benefit from an adjuvant system that generates a mixed Th1 and humoral immune response. We herein assessed the efficacy of a novel SA-4-1BBL costimulatory molecule as a Th1 adjuvant to improve cellular responses generated by the rF1-V vaccine. SA-4-1BBL as a single adjuvant had better efficacy than alum in generating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells producing TNFα and IFNγ, signature cytokines for Th1 responses. The combination of SA-4-1BBL with alum further increased this Th1 response as compared with the individual adjuvants. Analysis of the humoral response revealed that SA-4-1BBL as a single adjuvant did not generate a significant Ab response against rF1-V, and SA-4-1BBL in combination with alum did not improve Ab titers. However, the combined adjuvants significantly increased the ratio of Th1 regulated IgG2c in C57BL/6 mice to the Th2 regulated IgG1. Finally, a single vaccination with rF1-V adjuvanted with SA-4-1BBL+alum had better protective efficacy than vaccines containing individual adjuvants. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SA-4-1BBL improves the protective efficacy of the alum adjuvanted lead rF1-V subunit vaccine by generating a more balanced Th1 cellular and humoral immune response. As such, this adjuvant platform may prove efficacious not only for the rF1-V vaccine but also against other infections that require both cellular and humoral immune responses for protection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of age and recent influenza vaccination history on the immunogenicity and efficacy of 2009-10 seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that annual vaccination of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV may lead to reduced vaccine immunogenicity but evidence is lacking on whether vaccine efficacy is affected by prior vaccination history. The efficacy of one dose of TIV in children 6-8 y of age against influenza B is uncertain. We examined whether immunogenicity and efficacy of influenza vaccination in school-age children varied by age and past vaccination history. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 2009-10 TIV. Influenza vaccination history in the two preceding years was recorded. Immunogenicity was assessed by comparison of HI titers before and one month after receipt of TIV/placebo. Subjects were followed up for 11 months with symptom diaries, and respiratory specimens were collected during acute respiratory illnesses to permit confirmation of influenza virus infections. We found that previous vaccination was associated with reduced antibody responses to TIV against seasonal A(H1N1 and A(H3N2 particularly in children 9-17 y of age, but increased antibody responses to the same lineage of influenza B virus in children 6-8 y of age. Serological responses to the influenza A vaccine viruses were high regardless of vaccination history. One dose of TIV appeared to be efficacious against confirmed influenza B in children 6-8 y of age regardless of vaccination history. CONCLUSIONS: Prior vaccination was associated with lower antibody titer rises following vaccination against seasonal influenza A vaccine viruses, but higher responses to influenza B among individuals primed with viruses from the same lineage in preceding years. In a year in which influenza B virus predominated, no impact of prior vaccination history was observed on vaccine efficacy against influenza B. The strains that circulated in the year of study did not allow us to study the effect of prior vaccination on vaccine efficacy against influenza A.

  10. Age specific differences in efficacy and safety for the CYD-tetravalent dengue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Massad, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    CYD-TDV is the first dengue vaccine to have completed Phase 3 efficacy trials. Efficacy was consistently higher in those aged 9 and above for all variables studied: efficacy against virologically confirmed dengue of any severity and serotype, serotype specific efficacy, efficacy dependent on baseline seropositivity, efficacy against hospitalizations and efficacy against severe disease. Because of the higher efficacy and the absence of a safety signal, the age group with the best benefit of the use of CYD-TDV is individuals aged 9 and above - the age group for which licensure is now being sought.

  11. Efficacy of vaccination against influenza in patients with multiple sclerosis: The role of concomitant therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Carnovale, Carla; Perrone, Valentina; Pozzi, Marco; Antoniazzi, Stefania; Radice, Sonia; Clementi, Emilio

    2014-08-20

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic progressive demyelinating disease affecting over 2.1 million patients worldwide. Patients affected by MS are exposed to an increased risk of infection from communicable diseases, which may lead to severe disease relapses. Studies have analysed the issue of vaccination of MS-affected patients. These studies, however, deal mostly with safety-related issues documenting that most vaccines have been proven to be safe in MS patients and that vaccination is not associated with an increased risk of relapses. By contrast, evidence on the efficacy is comparatively scant and not yet systematised in a comprehensive picture. This aspect is however important, as both MS and its treatment alter the immune responses, a situation that may be associated with a reduced vaccine efficacy. We have now reviewed the literature and assessed the effects of the therapy for MS on vaccine efficacy; we focused on the vaccine against influenza as for the other vaccines the information is still too scant. The majority of drugs appear not associated with a reduced response to vaccination against influenza, with the notable exception of mitoxantrone and glatiramer acetate. For a few drugs, among which natalizumab, information is not sufficiently clear and additional studies are needed to draw a definite conclusion. These results highlight the importance to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination in patients treated with immunosuppressant drugs.

  12. Assessing the interest to participate in a dengue vaccine efficacy trial among residents of Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Guerra, Carmen L; Rodríguez-Acosta, Rosa L; Soto-Gómez, Eunice; Zielinski-Gutierrez, Emily; Peña-Orellana, Marisol; Santiago, Luis M; Rivera, Reinaldo; Cruz, R Rhode; Ramírez, Viani; Tomashek, Kay M; Dayan, Gustavo

    2012-07-01

    Dengue, endemic in Puerto Rico, is a major public health problem. Vaccines are thought the best means to prevent dengue because vector control alone has been largely ineffective. We implemented qualitative studies in 2006 and 2010 to determine the acceptability of conducting placebo-controlled dengue vaccine efficacy trials in Puerto Rican children. Key informant interviews and focus groups with parents and children were conducted in municipalities with high dengue incidence. We used structured open-ended questions to determine motivators and attitudes regarding vaccine trial participation. Knowledge about dengue risk and prevention, and knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding vaccines and vaccine trials were assessed. Using grounded theory, we conducted content analysis and established categories and sub-categories of participant responses. All participants were knowledgeable about dengue prevention and perceived children as most affected age groups. Participants were aware of vaccines benefits and they thought a vaccine could prevent dengue. However, most would not allow their children to participate in a placebo-controlled vaccine trial. Barriers included lack of trust in new vaccines and vaccine trial procedures; fear of developing dengue or side effects from the vaccine and lack of information about candidate dengue vaccines. Participants thought information, including results of previous trials might overcome barriers to participation. Motivators for participation were altruism, protection from dengue, free medical attention, and compensation for transportation and participation. Parents would consider children participation if accurate vaccine trial information is provided.

  13. Injecting drugs of abuse and immunity: implications for HIV vaccine testing and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugen, Kenneth E; Nyland, Susan B

    2006-11-01

    The recreational use of legal and illegal drugs has significant effects on immune responses and can potentially modulate susceptibility to infection by a number of pathogens. A number of agents including cannabinoids (marijuana), cocaine opiates, amphetamines, nicotine and alcohol were demonstrated to have potentially adverse effects on the susceptibility to infections, mediated most likely, by adverse effects on immunity. As such, these drugs of abuse could have significant and potentially adverse effects on the vaccination efficacy of a number of vaccines currently on the market and on potential experimental vaccines currently in the pipeline. This review will present an overview on how drugs of abuse potentially impacts immune responses and vaccination efficacy. The emphasis of this review will be the effects of opiate abuse, as exemplified by injecting/intravenous drug users (IDU), on HIV/AIDS and its potential impact on vaccine efficacy trials against this devastating infection/syndrome.

  14. Efficacy demonstration of tetanus vaccines by double antigen ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosskopf, U; Noeske, K; Werner, E

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes a double antigen ELISA (DAE) for rapid, specific and reliable assessment of the antitetanus immune status of horses and sheep. Compared with the indirect ELISA, the double antigen ELISA has the advantage of species-independent testing of sera. Thanks to its test design, it is more specific since the detected antibodies are forced to bind tetanus toxoid twice. In addition, it is very sensitive to tetanus antibodies, enabling the detection of low antibody titres, in range which is relevant for the assessment of the protective status (tetanus toxin neutralising antibodies). The detection limit of the DAE for tetanus antibodies is in the order of 10(-4) EU/ml. A comparison of in vitro results of individual sera with in vivo titres showed that horse sera with titres of 0.04 and 0.05 EU/ml in the DAE showed titres of > 0.05 IU and 0.034 IU/ml respectively during in vivo testing thus indicating good agreement. For tested sheep sera which were rated > 0.05 IU/ml in vivo, the corresponding titre in the DAE was 0.24 EU/ml. Clear tetanus antitoxin establishment of protective ELISA limits requires further comparative examination of sera with low titres (marketing authorisation procedures of tetanus vaccines ad us. vet. As a consequence, the toxin neutralisation test (still being the standard method of choice for quantifying tetanus toxin neutralising antitoxin titres) could be replaced, since it requires too great a number of animals per test and involves considerable suffering for the animals. The test described here reduces the use of mice and guinea pigs within vaccine efficacy testing. In addition, it involves less exposure of the laboratory personnel to toxin.

  15. Evaluation of the efficacy of an autogenous Escherichia coli vaccine in broiler breeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lili; Thøfner, Ida; Christensen, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    In poultry production Escherichia coli autogenous vaccines are often used. However, the efficacy of autogenous E. coli vaccinations has not been evaluated experimentally in chickens after start of lay. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of an autogenous E. coli...... infection, significant protection of an autogenous E. coli vaccine against neither a homologous nor a heterologous E. coli challenge could not be documented....

  16. Surgical cytoreduction restores the antitumor efficacy of a Listeria monocytogenes vaccine in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gregory T; Judy, Brendan F; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik; Moon, Edmund K; Fridlender, Zvi G; Albelda, Steven M; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that immunotherapy may offer a promising treatment strategy for early-stage malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), but advanced tumor burden may limit the efficacy of immunotherapy. Therefore, we hypothesized that surgical cytoreduction could restore the efficacy of vaccine-based immunotherapy for MPM. We developed a murine model of MPM through transduction of a mesothelioma cell line with mesothelin. We used this model to evaluate the efficacy of a Listeria monocytogenes vaccine expressing mesothelin. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited at four weeks in animals vaccinated two weeks prior to tumor cell inoculation as compared to those given an empty vector control (1371 ± 420 mm(3) versus 405 ± 139 mm(3); p surgery reduced MDSCs to levels comparable to those in tumor-naïve mice. This study demonstrates that cytoreduction surgery restores the efficacy of cancer vaccines for MPM by reducing tumor-related immunosuppression that impairs immunotherapy.

  17. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: Efficacy of vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we describe the characterization a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from Venezuela and evaluate the efficacy of heterologous genotype commercial vaccination under field and controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping and molecular analysis were applied. Results sh...

  18. Strain diversity plays no major role in the varying efficacy of rotavirus vaccines: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Daniel E; Parashar, Umesh D; Jiang, Baoming

    2014-12-01

    While a monovalent Rotarix® [RV1] and a pentavalent RotaTeq® [RV5] have been extensively tested and found generally safe and equally efficacious in clinical trials, the question still lingers about the evolving diversity of circulating rotavirus strains over time and their relationship with protective immunity induced by rotavirus vaccines. We reviewed data from clinical trials and observational studies that assessed the efficacy or field effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines against different rotavirus strains worldwide. RV1 provided broad clinical efficacy and field effectiveness against severe diarrhea due to all major circulating strains, including the homotypic G1P[8] and the fully heterotypic G2P[4] strains. Similarly, RV5 provided broad efficacy and effectiveness against RV5 and non-RV5 strains throughout different locations. Rotavirus vaccination provides broad heterotypic protection; however continuing surveillance is needed to track the change of circulating strains and monitor the effectiveness and safety of vaccines.

  19. Influenza vaccine efficacy trials: a simulation approach to understand failures from the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Anne; Legrand, Catherine; Dewé, Walthère

    2015-01-01

    The success of a seasonal influenza vaccine efficacy trial depends not only upon the design but also upon the annual epidemic characteristics. In this context, simulation methods are an essential tool in evaluating the performances of study designs under various circumstances. However, traditional methods for simulating time-to-event data are not suitable for the simulation of influenza vaccine efficacy trials because of the seasonality and heterogeneity of influenza epidemics. Instead, we propose a mathematical model parameterized with historical surveillance data, heterogeneous frailty among the subjects, survey-based heterogeneous number of daily contact, and a mixed vaccine protection mechanism. We illustrate our methodology by generating multiple-trial data similar to a large phase III trial that failed to show additional relative vaccine efficacy of an experimental adjuvanted vaccine compared with the reference vaccine. We show that small departures from the designing assumptions, such as a smaller range of strain protection for the experimental vaccine or the chosen endpoint, could lead to smaller probabilities of success in showing significant relative vaccine efficacy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The Evidence for Efficacy of HPV Vaccines: Investigations in Categorical Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Alison L.; Goossens, Emery T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent approval of HPV vaccines and their widespread provision to young women provide an interesting context to gain experience with the application of statistical methods in current research. We demonstrate how we have used data extracted from a meta-analysis examining the efficacy of HPV vaccines in clinical trials with students in applied…

  1. An experimental Toxoplasma gondii dose response challenge model to study therapeutic or vaccine efficacy in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Giessen, van der J.W.B.; Takumi, K.; Teunis, P.F.M.; Wisselink, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    High numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in the environment are a risk factor to humans. The environmental contamination might be reduced by vaccinating the definitive host, cats. An experimental challenge model is necessary to quantitatively assess the efficacy of a vaccine or drug treatment. Prev

  2. The Evidence for Efficacy of HPV Vaccines: Investigations in Categorical Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Alison L.; Goossens, Emery T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent approval of HPV vaccines and their widespread provision to young women provide an interesting context to gain experience with the application of statistical methods in current research. We demonstrate how we have used data extracted from a meta-analysis examining the efficacy of HPV vaccines in clinical trials with students in applied…

  3. The efficacy of a Giardia lamblia vaccine in kittens.

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, M. E.; Morck, D. W.; Ceri, H.

    1996-01-01

    Twenty kittens were vaccinated with a Giardia lamblia vaccine prepared on a commercial scale on day 0 and boosted on day 21 (group 1); while 10 kittens received only saline (group 2). These kittens were challenged on day 35 with 10(6) Giardia lamblia trophozoites by a surgical intraduodenal injection. Three control kittens were not vaccinated and not challenged (group 3). Following challenge, Giardia vaccinated kittens had significantly fewer days in which abnormal stools were observed and re...

  4. Antigenic cartography of H9N2 virus and its impact on the vaccine efficacy in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The H9 subtype of avian influenza virus (AIV) is wide-spread in Asia and the Middle East. The efficacy of vaccines is enhanced by the antigenic match of the hemagglutinin protein (HA) between the vaccine and the field strain. To determine how antigenic variations affect the vaccine efficacy, speci...

  5. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of the Rift Valley Fever Clone 13 vaccine in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungu, Baptiste; Louw, Ian; Lubisi, Alison; Hunter, Pamela; von Teichman, Beate F; Bouloy, Michele

    2010-06-23

    The efficacy and safety of the naturally attenuated Rift Valley Fever (RVF) Clone 13 vaccine were evaluated in ovines in three different experiments involving 38 ewes at different stages of pregnancy, their offsprings and four rams. In Experiment 1, 4 rams and a total of 13 pregnant ewes were vaccinated and monitored during vaccination and after a challenge with a virulent RVF virus. The ewes were vaccinated at either 50 or 100 days of pregnancy and some were challenged after lambing. In Experiment 2, nine oestrus-synchronized ewes were vaccinated at 50 days of pregnancy and challenged at 100 days of pregnancy together with 5 unvaccinated ewes at the same stage of pregnancy. In Experiment 3, 16 oestrus-synchronized ewes were vaccinated with 3 different doses of the RVF Clone 13 vaccine and challenged together with unvaccinated pregnant ewes at either 30 or 50 days of pregnancy. The results from the three experiments indicated that the vaccine did not induce clinical manifestation of RVF such as abortion in pregnant ewes, teratogeny in their offsprings, or pyrexia in all vaccinated animals. Vaccination with RVF Clone 13 vaccine also prevented clinical RVF following virulent challenge at different stages of pregnancy while unvaccinated control ewes showed pyrexia, aborted or died of RVF. A vaccine dose-response effect was also observed.

  6. The enabling effect of social support on vaccination uptake via self-efficacy and planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernsting, Anna; Knoll, Nina; Schneider, Michael; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    In the context of worksite influenza vaccination programmes, social support, action planning and perceived self-efficacy were examined as predictors of participation. Mechanisms among these predictors were analysed by applying the enabling effect model to vaccination. Moreover, this model was extended by the inclusion of planning. In a large German company, a survey on influenza vaccination was launched with 200 employees taking part in the five-month follow-up. Using regression procedures, a sequential mediation model was examined, leading from social support via self-efficacy and planning to vaccination behaviour. The three predictors jointly accounted for 47% of the vaccination participation variance. The enabling effect model was confirmed, highlighting how social support may promote self-efficacy beliefs. Further analysis yielded the extended model, revealing planning as a mediator between self-efficacy and subsequent behaviour while the indirect path from social support via self-efficacy to behaviour remained. Multiple step mediation analysis underscored the relevance of social support and self-efficacy. It also revealed planning as a proximal factor that may facilitate participation in a worksite influenza vaccination programme.

  7. The Role of Attitudes about Vaccine Safety, Efficacy, and Value in Explaining Parents' Reported Vaccination Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVail, Katherine Hart; Kennedy, Allison Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To explain vaccine confidence as it related to parents' decisions to vaccinate their children with recommended vaccines, and to develop a confidence measure to efficiently and effectively predict parents' self-reported vaccine behaviors. Method: A sample of parents with at least one child younger than 6 years ("n" = 376) was…

  8. Advancing Toward HIV-1 Vaccine Efficacy through the Intersections of Immune Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia D. Tomaras

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Interrogating immune correlates of infection risk for efficacious and non-efficacious HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials have provided hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of induction of protective immunity to HIV-1. To date, there have been six HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials (VAX003, Vaxgen, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA, VAX004 (Vaxgen, Inc., HIV-1 Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN 502 (Step, HVTN 503 (Phambili, RV144 (sponsored by the U.S. Military HIV Research Program, MHRP and HVTN 505. Cellular, humoral, host genetic and virus sieve analyses of these human clinical trials each can provide information that may point to potentially protective mechanisms for vaccine-induced immunity. Critical to staying on the path toward development of an efficacious vaccine is utilizing information from previous human and non-human primate studies in concert with new discoveries of basic HIV-1 host-virus interactions. One way that past discoveries from correlate analyses can lead to novel inventions or new pathways toward vaccine efficacy is to examine the intersections where different components of the correlate analyses overlap (e.g., virus sieve analysis combined with humoral correlates that can point to mechanistic hypotheses. Additionally, differences in durability among vaccine-induced T- and B-cell responses indicate that time post-vaccination is an important variable. Thus, understanding the nature of protective responses, the degree to which such responses have, or have not, as yet, been induced by previous vaccine trials and the design of strategies to induce durable T- and B-cell responses are critical to the development of a protective HIV-1 vaccine.

  9. Advancing Toward HIV-1 Vaccine Efficacy through the Intersections of Immune Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2013-01-01

    Interrogating immune correlates of infection risk for efficacious and non-efficacious HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials have provided hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of induction of protective immunity to HIV-1. To date, there have been six HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials (VAX003, Vaxgen, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA), VAX004 (Vaxgen, Inc.), HIV-1 Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) 502 (Step), HVTN 503 (Phambili), RV144 (sponsored by the U.S. Military HIV Research Program, MHRP) and HVTN 505). Cellular, humoral, host genetic and virus sieve analyses of these human clinical trials each can provide information that may point to potentially protective mechanisms for vaccine-induced immunity. Critical to staying on the path toward development of an efficacious vaccine is utilizing information from previous human and non-human primate studies in concert with new discoveries of basic HIV-1 host-virus interactions. One way that past discoveries from correlate analyses can lead to novel inventions or new pathways toward vaccine efficacy is to examine the intersections where different components of the correlate analyses overlap (e.g., virus sieve analysis combined with humoral correlates) that can point to mechanistic hypotheses. Additionally, differences in durability among vaccine-induced T- and B-cell responses indicate that time post-vaccination is an important variable. Thus, understanding the nature of protective responses, the degree to which such responses have, or have not, as yet, been induced by previous vaccine trials and the design of strategies to induce durable T- and B-cell responses are critical to the development of a protective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:24932411

  10. Prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants and children: rotavirus vaccine safety, efficacy, and potential impact of vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Chandran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aruna Chandran1, Sean Fitzwater1, Anjie Zhen2, Mathuram Santosham11Department of International Health, Division of Health Systems, 2Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis globally, with greater than 86% of deaths occurring in low-income and middle-income countries. There are two rotavirus vaccines currently licensed in the United States and prequalified by the World Health Organization. RV1 is a monovalent attenuated human rotavirus strain, given orally in two doses. RV5 is a pentavalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine, given orally in three doses. A third rotavirus vaccine, LLV, is a lamb rotavirus strain given orally as a single dose, which is currently available only in China. RV1 and RV5 have been shown to be highly efficacious in developed countries, and initial results from trials in Africa and Asia are promising as well. At least three other vaccines are in development, which are being developed by manufacturers of developing countries. Further studies are needed to clarify issues including administration of oral rotavirus vaccines with breastfeeding and other oral vaccines, and alterations in dosing schedule. Using new data on global diarrheal burden, rotavirus is estimated to cause 390,000 deaths in children younger than 5 years. Should rotavirus vaccines be introduced in the routine immunization programs of all countries, a potential of 170,000 deaths could be prevented annually. The largest impact on mortality would be seen in low-income and middle-income countries, despite poor immunization coverage and lower efficacy. Therefore, international efforts are needed to ensure that rotavirus vaccines reach the populations with highest burden of rotavirus disease.Keywords: vaccination, mortality, rotavirus, gastroenteritis

  11. Live attenuated HIV vaccines: predicting the tradeoff between efficacy and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, S M; Koelle, K; Kirschner, D E; Mills, J

    2001-03-13

    The utility of live attenuated vaccines for controlling HIV epidemics is being debated. Live attenuated HIV vaccines (LAHVs) could be extremely effective in protecting against infection with wild-type strains, but may not be completely safe as the attenuated strain could cause AIDS in some vaccinated individuals. We present a theoretical framework for evaluating the consequences of the tradeoff between vaccine efficacy (in terms of preventing new infections with wild-type strains) and safety (in terms of vaccine-induced AIDS deaths). We use our framework to predict, for Zimbabwe and Thailand, the epidemiological impact of 1,000 different (specified by efficacy and safety characteristics) LAHVs. We predict that paradoxically: (i) in Zimbabwe (where transmission is high) LAHVs would significantly decrease the AIDS death rate, but (ii) in Thailand (where transmission is low) exactly the same vaccines (in terms of efficacy and safety characteristics) would increase the AIDS death rate. Our results imply that a threshold transmission rate exists that determines whether any given LAHV has a beneficial or a detrimental impact. We also determine the vaccine perversity point, which is defined in terms of the fraction of vaccinated individuals who progress to AIDS as a result of the vaccine strain. Vaccination with any LAHV that causes more than 5% of vaccinated individuals to progress to AIDS in 25 years would, even 50 years later, lead to perversity (i.e., increase the annual AIDS death rate) in Thailand; these same vaccines would lead to decreases in the annual AIDS death rate in Zimbabwe.

  12. Efficacy of experimental Newcastle disease water-in-oil oil-emulsion vaccines formulated from squalane and squalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, H D; Xie, Z X

    1990-01-01

    Water-in-oil inactivated Newcastle disease oil-emulsion vaccines were formulated with the terpene oils squalane or squalene, or mixtures thereof, and injected into 4-week-old broilers. Vaccine efficacy based on hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) titers was comparable to that of control mineral oil vaccines. Tissue reaction to intramuscular injection of the terpene oil emulsion vaccines was greatly reduced 3 weeks post-vaccination compared with that of mineral oil-based vaccine. Viscosity of the terpene oil vaccines was satisfactory but increased three to four times that of mineral oil vaccine when the antigen phase volume increased from 5% to 20%.

  13. Effect of type 2 diabetes mellitus on efficacy of hepatitis B vaccine and revaccination strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-shu LI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus on vaccination efficacy of hepatitis B vaccine,and explore the effective revaccination strategy.Methods Seventy-six adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 70 sex-and age-matched healthy individuals from 4 vaccination centers,who were vaccinated for one standard schedule(month 0,1,6 with gene recombinant yeast hepatitis B vaccine,were enrolled in present study.The serum anti-HBs and geometric mean titer(GMT thereof were assayed before and month 1,12,24 after completion of one standard schedule of vaccination.The profiles of serum cytokines including interferon-γ(IFN-γ,interleukin(IL-2,-4 and-10 were determined before and after vaccination.To improve the vaccine efficacy of non-or lower-response patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus,a dose of 20μg gene recombinant yeast hepatitis B vaccine were used to revaccinate intramuscularly or subcutaneously plus intramuscularly.Results One month after completion of one standard schedule of vaccination,the positive conversion rates of anti-HBs in diabetes mellitus group and healthy group were 98.6 and 92.1%(P < 0.05,the anti-HBs GMT were 106.78 mU/ml and 167.14 mU/ml(P < 0.01,and the non-or lower-response rate were 19.7% and 7.1%,respectively(P < 0.05.The mean levels of serum IFN-γ,IL-2 and IL-4 were lower in diabetes mellitus group(P < 0.05 or P < 0.01,especially in non-or lower-response individuals,than in healthy group before and after a standard schedule of vaccination.Patients with non-or lower-response type 2 diabetes mellitus received revaccination with 20μg hepatitis B vaccine,the positive conversion rates of anti-HBs were 60.0% and 73.3%,respectively(P < 0.05,when injected subcutaneously plus intramuscularly or only intramuscularly.Conclusions Type 2 diabetes mellitus could influence the vaccination efficacy of hepatitis B vaccine,probably through a mechanism of down-regulating Th1 and Th2 mediated immune response

  14. Lessons learnt from the first efficacy trial of a new infant tuberculosis vaccine since BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tameris, Michele; McShane, Helen; McClain, J Bruce; Landry, Bernard; Lockhart, Stephen; Luabeya, Angelique K K; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Shea, Jacqui; Hussey, Gregory; van der Merwe, Linda; de Kock, Marwou; Scriba, Thomas; Walker, Robert; Hanekom, Willem; Hatherill, Mark; Mahomed, Hassan

    2013-03-01

    New tuberculosis (TB) vaccines are being developed to combat the global epidemic. A phase IIb trial of a candidate vaccine, MVA85A, was conducted in a high burden setting in South Africa to evaluate proof-of-concept efficacy for prevention of TB in infants. To describe the study design and implementation lessons from an infant TB vaccine efficacy trial. This was a randomised, controlled, double-blind clinical trial comparing the safety and efficacy of MVA85A to Candin control administered to 4-6-month-old, BCG-vaccinated, HIV-negative infants at a rural site in South Africa. Infants were followed up for 15-39 months for incident TB disease based on pre-specified endpoints. 2797 infants were enrolled over 22 months. Factors adversely affecting recruitment and the solutions that were implemented are discussed. Slow case accrual led to six months extension of trial follow up. The clinical, regulatory and research environment for modern efficacy trials of new TB vaccines are substantially different to that when BCG vaccine was first evaluated in infants. Future infant TB vaccine trials will need to allocate sufficient resources and optimise operational efficiency. A stringent TB case definition is necessary to maximize specificity, and TB case accrual must be monitored closely. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Summary of knowledge gaps related to quality and efficacy of current influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleiderer, Michael; Trouvin, Jean-Hugues; Brasseur, Daniel; Gränstrom, Marta; Shivji, Ragini; Mura, Manuela; Cavaleri, Marco

    2014-07-31

    Influenza viruses are a public health threat, as they are pathogenic, highly transmissible and prone to genetic changes. For decades vaccination strategies have been based on trivalent inactivated vaccines, which are regulated by specific guidelines. The progress in scientific knowledge and the lessons learned from the A(H1N1)2009 pandemic have highlighted further the need to improve current guidelines, including the immunogenicity criteria set by the CHMP in 1997, and to promote the discussion on the shortcomings encountered, e.g. the evaluation of vaccine efficacy in the paediatric and elderly populations, the measurement of the naivety of a population, the impact of prior immunity on subsequent vaccinations, and the technical issues with the serological assays for detection of immunity and immunogenicity. The authors attempted to summarise and tackle key gaps in the existing evidence concerning quality and efficacy of influenza vaccines, aiming at favouring a common understanding and a coordinated approach across stakeholders.

  16. Safety and Efficacy Profile of Commercial Veterinary Vaccines against Rift Valley Fever: A Review Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is an infectious illness with serious clinical manifestations and health consequences in humans as well as a wide range of domestic ruminants. This review provides significant information about the prevention options of RVF along with the safety-efficacy profile of commercial vaccines and some of RVF vaccination strategies. Information presented in this paper was obtained through a systematic investigation of published data about RVF vaccines. Like other viral diseases, the prevention of RVF relies heavily on immunization of susceptible herds with safe and cost-effective vaccine that is able to confer long-term protective immunity. Several strains of RVF vaccines have been developed and are available in commercial production including Formalin-Inactivated vaccine, live attenuated Smithburn vaccine, and the most recent Clone13. Although Formalin-Inactivated vaccine and live attenuated Smithburn vaccine are immunogenic and widely used in prevention programs, they proved to be accompanied by significant concerns. Despite Clone13 vaccine being suggested as safe in pregnant ewes and as highly immunogenic along with its potential for differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA), a recent study raised concerns about the safety of the vaccine during the first trimester of gestation. Accordingly, RVF vaccines that are currently available in the market to a significant extent do not fulfill the requirements of safety, potency, and DIVA. These adverse effects stressed the need for developing new vaccines with an excellent safety profile to bridge the gap in safety and immunity. Bringing RVF vaccine candidates to local markets besides the absence of validated serological test for DIVA remain the major challenges of RVF control. PMID:27689098

  17. Safety and Efficacy Profile of Commercial Veterinary Vaccines against Rift Valley Fever: A Review Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moataz Alhaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley Fever (RVF is an infectious illness with serious clinical manifestations and health consequences in humans as well as a wide range of domestic ruminants. This review provides significant information about the prevention options of RVF along with the safety-efficacy profile of commercial vaccines and some of RVF vaccination strategies. Information presented in this paper was obtained through a systematic investigation of published data about RVF vaccines. Like other viral diseases, the prevention of RVF relies heavily on immunization of susceptible herds with safe and cost-effective vaccine that is able to confer long-term protective immunity. Several strains of RVF vaccines have been developed and are available in commercial production including Formalin-Inactivated vaccine, live attenuated Smithburn vaccine, and the most recent Clone13. Although Formalin-Inactivated vaccine and live attenuated Smithburn vaccine are immunogenic and widely used in prevention programs, they proved to be accompanied by significant concerns. Despite Clone13 vaccine being suggested as safe in pregnant ewes and as highly immunogenic along with its potential for differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA, a recent study raised concerns about the safety of the vaccine during the first trimester of gestation. Accordingly, RVF vaccines that are currently available in the market to a significant extent do not fulfill the requirements of safety, potency, and DIVA. These adverse effects stressed the need for developing new vaccines with an excellent safety profile to bridge the gap in safety and immunity. Bringing RVF vaccine candidates to local markets besides the absence of validated serological test for DIVA remain the major challenges of RVF control.

  18. Efficacy of two canine distemper vaccines in wild Nearctic river otters (Lontra canadensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, Steven T; Peper, Randall L; Kollias, George V; Brooks, Robert P; Stevens, Sadie S; Serfass, Thomas L

    2014-09-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a contagious morbillivirus, infects families in the order Carnivora, including Nearctic river otters (Lontra canadensis). As a preventative measure, vaccinations against CDV are frequently given to mustelids in captive environments. The Pennsylvania River Otter Reintroduction Project (PRORP) used wild-caught river otters to evaluate the efficacy and need for vaccinations against CDV as part of any reintroduction project. The objectives of this study were to: 1) evaluate the prevalence of exposure to CDV in wild river otters, 2) determine the immunologic response of river otters (i.e., seroconversion) after vaccination with a single (primary) vaccine dose compared to a second (booster) dose of Galaxy-D, a modified live-virus canine distemper (CD) vaccine (MLV CDV), and 3) determine the immunologic response after being vaccinated with a primary vaccination compared to a booster dose of Fervac-D, an MLV CDV. River otters were injected subcutaneously in the nape of the neck with their designated vaccine. Timeframes for collection of blood samples and/or injection of booster vaccines varied depending on the parameters of PRORP. Ten of the 22 river otters had positive prevaccination titer levels to CD. Both vaccines, Galaxy-D and Fervac-D, produced sufficient seroconversion or rise of titer levels (86% and 57%, respectively) to recommend the use of vaccines in wild river otters. Future studies are recommended to evaluate currently produced CD vaccines. Future research should also focus on the number of days required between administration of primary and booster vaccines to achieve sufficient immune response. If only a primary dose is required, then hard-release reintroduction projects for river otters could be recommended. If primary and booster vaccines are required then soft-release reintroduction projects should be recommended. Soft-release projects should include captive management periods that allow for appropriate vaccination intervals

  19. Meta-analysis on the efficacy of foot-and-mouth disease emergency vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Boklund, Anette; Cox, S.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to provide a summary quantification of the efficacy of FMD emergency vaccination based on a systematic review and a meta-analysis of available literature, and to further discuss the suitability of this review and meta-analysis to summarize and further interpret...... the results. Peer-reviewed, symposium, and unpublished studies were considered in the analysis. Clinical protection and virological protection against foot and mouth disease were used as parameters to assess the efficacy of emergency vaccination. The clinical protection was estimated based on the appearance...... vaccine. Fortunately, no significant bias that would alter the conclusions was encountered in the analysis. Meta-analysis showed to be a useful tool to summarize literature results from a systematic review of the efficacy of foot and mouth disease emergency vaccination....

  20. Meta-analysis on the efficacy of foot-and-mouth disease emergency vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Boklund, Anette; Cox, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to provide a summary quantification of the efficacy of FMD emergency vaccination based on a systematic review and a meta-analysis of available literature, and to further discuss the suitability of this review and meta-analysis to summarize and further interpret...... the results. Peer-reviewed, symposium, and unpublished studies were considered in the analysis. Clinical protection and virological protection against foot and mouth disease were used as parameters to assess the efficacy of emergency vaccination. The clinical protection was estimated based on the appearance...... vaccine. Fortunately, no significant bias that would alter the conclusions was encountered in the analysis. Meta-analysis can be a useful tool to summarize literature results from a systematic review of the efficacy of foot and mouth disease emergency vaccination....

  1. Vector Design for Improved DNA Vaccine Efficacy, Safety and Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Williams

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA vaccination is a disruptive technology that offers the promise of a new rapidly deployed vaccination platform to treat human and animal disease with gene-based materials. Innovations such as electroporation, needle free jet delivery and lipid-based carriers increase transgene expression and immunogenicity through more effective gene delivery. This review summarizes complementary vector design innovations that, when combined with leading delivery platforms, further enhance DNA vaccine performance. These next generation vectors also address potential safety issues such as antibiotic selection, and increase plasmid manufacturing quality and yield in exemplary fermentation production processes. Application of optimized constructs in combination with improved delivery platforms tangibly improves the prospect of successful application of DNA vaccination as prophylactic vaccines for diverse human infectious disease targets or as therapeutic vaccines for cancer and allergy.

  2. Evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic HIV vaccines through analytical treatment interruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina M Graziani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The development of an effective therapeutic HIV vaccine that induces immunologic control of viral replication, thereby eliminating or reducing the need for antiretroviral therapy (ART, would be of great value. Besides the obvious challenges of developing a therapeutic vaccine that would generate effective, sustained anti-HIV immunity in infected individuals is the issue of how to best assess the efficacy of vaccine candidates. Discussion: This review discusses the various outcome measures assessed in therapeutic HIV vaccine clinical trials involving individuals receiving suppressive ART, with a particular focus on the role of analytical treatment interruption (ATI as a way to assess the virologic control induced by an immunotherapy. This strategy is critical given that there are otherwise no readily available measures to determine the ability of a vaccine-induced immune response to effectively control HIV replication. The various outcome measures that have been used to assess vaccine efficacy in published therapeutic HIV vaccine clinical trials will also be discussed. Outcome measures have included the kinetics of viral rebound, the new viral set point and changes in the size of the viral reservoir. Clinically relevant outcomes such as the CD4 decline, the time to resume therapy or the time to meet the criterion to resume therapy, the proportion of participants who resume therapy and/or the development of clinical symptoms such as acute retroviral syndrome are also measures of vaccine efficacy. Conclusions: Given the lack of consistency between therapeutic HIV vaccine trials in how efficacy is assessed, comparing vaccines has been difficult. It would, therefore, be beneficial to determine the most clinically relevant measure for use in future studies. Other recommendations for future clinical trials also include studying compartments in addition to blood and replacing ATIs with single-copy assays in situations in which the use of

  3. Lack of allele-specific efficacy of a bivalent AMA1 malaria vaccine

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    Ellis Ruth D

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive genetic diversity in vaccine antigens may contribute to the lack of efficacy of blood stage malaria vaccines. Apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1 is a leading blood stage malaria vaccine candidate with extreme diversity, potentially limiting its efficacy against infection and disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum parasites with diverse forms of AMA1. Methods Three hundred Malian children participated in a Phase 2 clinical trial of a bivalent malaria vaccine that found no protective efficacy. The vaccine consists of recombinant AMA1 based on the 3D7 and FVO strains of P. falciparum adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide (AMA1-C1. The gene encoding AMA1 was sequenced from P. falciparum infections experienced before and after immunization with the study vaccine or a control vaccine. Sequences of ama1 from infections in the malaria vaccine and control groups were compared with regard to similarity to the vaccine antigens using several measures of genetic diversity. Time to infection with parasites carrying AMA1 haplotypes similar to the vaccine strains with respect to immunologically important polymorphisms and the risk of infection with vaccine strain haplotypes were compared. Results Based on 62 polymorphic AMA1 residues, 186 unique ama1 haplotypes were identified among 315 ama1 sequences that were included in the analysis. Eight infections had ama1 sequences identical to 3D7 while none were identical to FVO. Several measures of genetic diversity showed that ama1 sequences in the malaria vaccine and control groups were comparable both at baseline and during follow up period. Pre- and post-immunization ama1 sequences in both groups all had a similar degree of genetic distance from FVO and 3D7 ama1. No differences were found in the time of first clinical episode or risk of infection with an AMA1 haplotype similar to 3D7 or FVO with respect to a limited set of immunologically important polymorphisms found in the cluster 1 loop

  4. Efficacy of single calfhood vaccination of elk with Brucella abortus strain 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffe, T.J.; Jones, L.C.; Coffin, K.; Drew, M.L.; Sweeney, Steven J.; Hagius, S.D.; Elzer, P.H.; Davis, D.

    2004-01-01

    Brucellosis has been eradicated from cattle in the states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho, USA. However, free-ranging elk (Cervus elaphus) that use feedgrounds in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) and bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks still have high seroprevalence to the disease and have caused loss of brucellosis-free status in Wyoming. Management tools to control or eliminate the disease are limited; however, wildlife vaccination is among the methods currently used by wildlife managers in Wyoming. We conducted a controlled challenge study of single calfhood vaccination. Elk calves, caught in January and February of 1999 and 2000 and acclimated to captivity for 3 weeks, were randomly assigned to control or vaccinate groups. The vaccinate groups received Brucetta abortus vaccine strain 19 (S19) by hand-delivered intramuscular injection. Calves were raised to adulthood and bred at either 2.5 or 3.5 years of age for 2000 and 1999 captures, respectively. Eighty-nine (44 controls, 45 vaccinates) pregnant elk entered the challenge portion of the study. We challenged elk at mid-gestation with pathogenic B. abortus strain 2308 by intraconjunctival instillation. Abortion occurred in significantly more (P = 0.002) controls (42; 93%) than vaccinates (32; 71%), and vaccine protected 25% of the vaccinate group. We used Brucella culture of fetus/calf tissues to determine the efficacy of vaccination for preventing infection, and we found that the number of infected fetuses/calves did not differ between controls and vaccinates (P = 0.14). Based on these data, single calfhood vaccination with S19 has low efficacy, will likely have only little to moderate effect on Brucella prevalence in elk, and is unlikely to eradicate the disease in wildlife of the GYA.

  5. Plague in China 2014-All sporadic case report of pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Fang; Li, De-Biao; Shao, Hong-Sheng; Li, Hong-Jun; Han, Yue-Dong

    2016-02-19

    Yersinia pestis is the pathogen of the plague and caused three pandemics worldwide. Pneumonic plague is rarer than bubonic and septicemic plague. We report detailed clinical and pathogenic data for all the three sporadic cases of pneumonic plagues in China in 2014. All the three patients are herders in Gansu province of China. They were all infected by Yersinia pestis and displayed in the form of pneumonic plague respectively without related. We tested patient specimens from the upper (nasopharyngeal swabs) or the lower (sputum) respiratory tract and whole blood, plasma, and serum specimens for Yersinia pestis. All patients had fever, cough and dyspnea, and for patient 2 and 3, unconscious. Respiratory symptoms were predominant with acute respiratory failure. The chest X-ray showed signs consistent with necrotizing inflammation with multiple lobar involvements. Despite emergency treatment, all patients died of refractory multiple organ failure within 24 h after admission to hospital. All the contacts were quarantined immediately and there were no secondary cases. Nowadays, the plague is epidemic in animals and can infect people who contact with the infected animals which may cause an epidemic in human. We think dogs maybe an intermediate vector for plague and as a source of risk for humans who are exposed to pet animals or who work professionally with canines. If a patient has been exposed to a risk factor and has fever and dyspnea, plague should be considered. People who had contact with a confirmed case should be isolated and investigated for F1 antigen analysis and receive post-exposure preventive treatment. A vaccination strategy might be useful for individuals who are occupationally exposed in areas where endemically infected reservoirs of plague-infected small mammals co-exist.

  6. Vaccine-induced but not tumor-derived Interleukin-10 dictates the efficacy of Interleukin-10 blockade in therapeutic vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llopiz, Diana; Aranda, Fernando; Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Ruiz, Marta; Infante, Stefany; Belsúe, Virginia; Lasarte, Juan José; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Blocking antibodies against immunosuppressive molecules have shown promising results in cancer patients. However, there are not enough data to define those conditions dictating treatment efficacy. In this scenario, IL-10 is a cytokine with controversial effects on tumor growth. Thus, our aim was to characterize in which setting IL-10 blockade may potentiate the beneficial effects of a therapeutic vaccine In the IL-10-expressing B16-OVA and TC-1 P3 (A15) tumor models, therapeutic vaccination with tumor antigens plus the TLR7 ligand Imiquimod increased IL-10 production. Although blockade of IL-10 signal with anti-IL-10R antibodies did not inhibit tumor growth, when combined with vaccination it enhanced tumor rejection, associated with stronger innate and adaptive immune responses. Interestingly, a similar enhancement on immune responses was observed after simultaneous vaccination and IL-10 blockade in naive mice. However, when using vaccines containing as adjuvants the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C) or anti-CD40 agonistic antibodies, despite tumor IL-10 expression, anti-IL-10R antibodies did not provide any beneficial effect on tumor growth and antitumor immune responses. Of note, as opposed to Imiquimod, vaccination with this type of adjuvants did not induce IL-10 and correlated with a lack of in vitro IL-10 production by dendritic cells (DC). Finally, in B16-OVA-bearing mice, blockade of IL-10 during therapeutic vaccination with a multiple adjuvant combination (MAC) with potent immunostimulatory properties but still inducing IL-10 led to superior antitumor immunity and complete tumor rejection. These results suggest that for therapeutic antitumor vaccination, blockade of vaccine-induced IL-10 is more relevant than tumor-associated IL-10.

  7. Efficacy of Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 compared to the reference vaccine Brucella abortus strain 19 in water buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Caporale

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 250 000 water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis live in the Campania region of southern Italy where the breeding of this species is very popular. Of these animals, almost 150 000 are concentrated in the Caserta province where the prevalence of Brucella abortus in this species represents approximately 20% at herd level. The Italian brucellosis eradication programme provides a slaughter and vaccination strategy for this province. B. abortus strain RB51 (RB51 has become the official vaccine for the prevention of brucellosis in cattle in several countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of RB51 in water buffalo compared to the B. abortus S19 vaccine (S19. The study was performed in accordance with a protocol described in mice. Female buffalo aged five months were inoculated. Five received a RB51 dosage on two occasions that was three times greater than that approved for use in cattle and a booster after one month, five received B. abortus S19 vaccine at the standard dosage and three controls received a phosphate buffer solution. Buffalo were then challenged with a virulent B. abortus strain 544 thirty days post vaccination. Antibodies that developed in the five animals vaccinated with RB51 were not detected by the Rose Bengal test or complement fixation test (CFT and were also tested by CFT prepared with RB51 antigen. After culling, B. abortus was cultured from the spleen, retropharyngeal and supra-mammary lymph nodes. A statistical evaluation was performed to assess the immunogenicity values obtained in buffalo vaccinated with S19, compared to those obtained in buffalo vaccinated with the RB51 vaccine and in the unvaccinated control group.

  8. Efficacy of an adjuvanted herpes zoster subunit vaccine in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Himal; Cunningham, Anthony L; Godeaux, Olivier; Chlibek, Roman; Diez-Domingo, Javier; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Levin, Myron J; McElhaney, Janet E; Poder, Airi; Puig-Barberà, Joan; Vesikari, Timo; Watanabe, Daisuke; Weckx, Lily; Zahaf, Toufik; Heineman, Thomas C

    2015-05-28

    In previous phase 1-2 clinical trials involving older adults, a subunit vaccine containing varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E and the AS01B adjuvant system (called HZ/su) had a clinically acceptable safety profile and elicited a robust immune response. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 study in 18 countries to evaluate the efficacy and safety of HZ/su in older adults (≥50 years of age), stratified according to age group (50 to 59, 60 to 69, and ≥70 years). Participants received two intramuscular doses of the vaccine or placebo 2 months apart. The primary objective was to assess the efficacy of the vaccine, as compared with placebo, in reducing the risk of herpes zoster in older adults. A total of 15,411 participants who could be evaluated received either the vaccine (7698 participants) or placebo (7713 participants). During a mean follow-up of 3.2 years, herpes zoster was confirmed in 6 participants in the vaccine group and in 210 participants in the placebo group (incidence rate, 0.3 vs. 9.1 per 1000 person-years) in the modified vaccinated cohort. Overall vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster was 97.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93.7 to 99.0; P<0.001). Vaccine efficacy was between 96.6% and 97.9% for all age groups. Solicited reports of injection-site and systemic reactions within 7 days after vaccination were more frequent in the vaccine group. There were solicited or unsolicited reports of grade 3 symptoms in 17.0% of vaccine recipients and 3.2% of placebo recipients. The proportions of participants who had serious adverse events or potential immune-mediated diseases or who died were similar in the two groups. The HZ/su vaccine significantly reduced the risk of herpes zoster in adults who were 50 years of age or older. Vaccine efficacy in adults who were 70 years of age or older was similar to that in the other two age groups. (Funded by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals; ZOE-50 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01165177.).

  9. [Analysis of the evidence on the efficacy and safety of CYD-TDV dengue vaccine and its potential licensing and implementation through Mexico's Universal Vaccination Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Hernández-Ávila, Juan Eugenio; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M; Rodríguez-López, Mario Henry; García-García, Lourdes; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; López Gatell-Ramírez, Hugo; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Díaz-Ortega, José Luis; Ángeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Barrientos-Gutiérrez, Tonatiuh; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; Santos-Preciado, José Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major global public health problem affecting Latin America and Mexico Prevention and control measures, focusing on epidemiological surveillance and vector control, have been partially effective and costly, thus, the development of a vaccine against dengue has created great expectations among health authorities and scientific communities worldwide. The CYD-TDV dengue vaccine produced by Sanofi-Pasteur is the only dengue vaccine evaluated in phase 3 controlled clinical trials. Notwithstanding the significant contribution to the development of a vaccine against dengue, the three phase 3 clinical studies of CYD-TDV and the meta-analysis of the long-term follow up of those studies, have provided evidence that this vaccine exhibited partial vaccine efficacy to protect against virologically confirmed dengue and lead to four considerations: a) adequate vaccine efficacy against dengue virus (DENV) infections 3 and 4, less vaccine efficacy against DENV 1 and no protection against infection by DENV 2; b) decreased vaccine efficacy in dengue seronegative individuals at the beginning of the vaccination; c) 83% and 90% protection against hospitalizations and severe forms of dengue, respectively, at 25 months follow-up; and d) increased hospitalization for dengue in the vaccinated group, in children under nine years of age at the time of vaccination, detected since the third year of follow-up. The benefit of the CYD-TDV vaccine can be summarized in the protection against infection by DENV 3 and 4, as well as protection for hospitalizations and severe cases in people over nine years, who have had previous dengue infection, working mainly as a booster. In this review we identified elements on efficacy and safety of this vaccine that must be taken into account in the licensing process and potential inclusion in the national vaccination program of Mexico. The available scientific evidence on the CYD-TDV vaccine shows merits, but also leads to relevant questions that

  10. Efficacies of inactivated vaccines against betanodavirus in grouper larvae (Epinephelus coioides) by bath immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Yu-Hsuan; Chi, Shau-Chi

    2008-03-10

    Betanodavirus is the pathogen of viral nervous necrosis (VNN) disease that has caused mass mortality among many species of marine fish at larval stage. In this study, the efficacy of inactivated betanodavirus was evaluated by bath-immunization and bath-challenge of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) at early larval stage. Two kinds of chemicals were used for inactivation of the virus, and the relative percent survival (RPS) values of 0.4mM binary ethylenimine (BEI)-inactivated vaccine was revealed to be 79-95, higher than that of 0.1-0.2% formalin-inactivated vaccines (39-43). Three lengths of bath immunization time were tested, and 20 min immersion of BEI-inactivated betanodavirus at a concentration of 10(6)TICD(50)/ml was sufficient to induce high protection (RPS > 75). Protection of the BEI-inactivated vaccine was evaluated at different time post immunization, and the peak of protection was observed 30 days post vaccination, and retained for at least 3 months. The efficacies of formalin-inactivated vaccines with or without encapsulation were compared, and the result revealed that the efficacy of formalin-inactivated vaccine could be significantly improved by nano-encapsulation (RPS = 85). All these data strongly suggested that bath immunization with nano-encapsulated formalin-inactivated or BEI-inactivated betanodavirus vaccines is an effective strategy to protect grouper larvae against VNN.

  11. Enzootic plague foci, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, M.A.; Hammani, A.; Beneldjouzi, A.; Bitam, I.

    2014-01-01

    In Algeria, PCR sequencing of pla, glpD and rpoB genes found Yersinia pestis in 18/237 (8%) rodents of five species, including Apodemus sylvaticus, previously undescribed as pestiferous; and disclosed three new plague foci. Multiple spacer typing confirmed a new Orientalis variant. Rodent survey should be reinforced in this country hosting reemerging plague. PMID:25834736

  12. Viper Plague Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    a private herpetological collection infested with ticks (Kiel et al, 2006). Viper Plague presented signs and symptoms in the reptiles that were...1. Introduction The term Viper Plague was coined for a lethal disease state seen in snakes belonging to a private herpetological collection...Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox). This was performed because this particular species of rattlesnake was present in the original herpetological collection

  13. Enzootic plague foci, Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Malek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In Algeria, PCR sequencing of pla, glpD and rpoB genes found Yersinia pestis in 18/237 (8% rodents of five species, including Apodemus sylvaticus, previously undescribed as pestiferous; and disclosed three new plague foci. Multiple spacer typing confirmed a new Orientalis variant. Rodent survey should be reinforced in this country hosting reemerging plague.

  14. Comprehensive Sieve Analysis of Breakthrough HIV-1 Sequences in the RV144 Vaccine Efficacy Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlefsen, Paul T.; Rolland, Morgane; Hertz, Tomer; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Gartland, Andrew J.; deCamp, Allan C.; Magaret, Craig A.; Ahmed, Hasan; Gottardo, Raphael; Juraska, Michal; McCoy, Connor; Larsen, Brendan B.; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Carrico, Chris; Menis, Sergey; Bose, Meera; Arroyo, Miguel A.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L.; Kirys, Tatsiana; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Scheffler, Konrad; Pond, Sergei L. Kosakovsky; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Michael, Nelson L.; Schief, William R.; Mullins, James I.; Kim, Jerome H.; Gilbert, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    The RV144 clinical trial showed the partial efficacy of a vaccine regimen with an estimated vaccine efficacy (VE) of 31% for protecting low-risk Thai volunteers against acquisition of HIV-1. The impact of vaccine-induced immune responses can be investigated through sieve analysis of HIV-1 breakthrough infections (infected vaccine and placebo recipients). A V1/V2-targeted comparison of the genomes of HIV-1 breakthrough viruses identified two V2 amino acid sites that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Here we extended the V1/V2 analysis to the entire HIV-1 genome using an array of methods based on individual sites, k-mers and genes/proteins. We identified 56 amino acid sites or “signatures” and 119 k-mers that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Of those, 19 sites and 38 k-mers were located in the regions comprising the RV144 vaccine (Env-gp120, Gag, and Pro). The nine signature sites in Env-gp120 were significantly enriched for known antibody-associated sites (p = 0.0021). In particular, site 317 in the third variable loop (V3) overlapped with a hotspot of antibody recognition, and sites 369 and 424 were linked to CD4 binding site neutralization. The identified signature sites significantly covaried with other sites across the genome (mean = 32.1) more than did non-signature sites (mean = 0.9) (p vaccine immunogens and because most of the associations were insignificant following correction for multiple testing, we predict that few of the genetic differences are strongly linked to the RV144 vaccine-induced immune pressure. In addition to presenting results of the first complete-genome analysis of the breakthrough infections in the RV144 trial, this work describes a set of statistical methods and tools applicable to analysis of breakthrough infection genomes in general vaccine efficacy trials for diverse pathogens. PMID:25646817

  15. Improving immunogenicity, efficacy and safety of vaccines through innovation in clinical assay development and trial design: the Phacilitate Vaccine Forum, Washington D.C. 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Ioana R; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena

    2011-06-01

    The 9th Annual Vaccine Forum organized by Phacilitate in Washington D.C. 2011 brought together 50+ senior level speakers and over 400 participants representing all the key stakeholders concerning vaccines. The main focus of the meeting was to define priorities in the global vaccines sector from funding to manufacturing and evaluation of vaccine efficacy. A special session was devoted to improving immunogenicity, efficacy and safety of vaccines through innovation in clinical assay development and trial design. The current regulatory approach to clinical assay specification, validation and standardization that enable more direct comparisons of efficacy between trials was illustrated by the success in meningococcal vaccine development. The industry approach to validation strategies was exemplified by a new serologic test used on the diagnostic of pneumococcal pneumonia. The application of the Animal Rule to bridge clinical and non-clinical studies in botulism has allowed significant progress in developing one of the first vaccines to seek approval under the FDA Animal Efficacy Rule. An example of pushing the boundaries in the correlation of immunological responses and efficacy points was represented by a recent cell-based influenza vaccine for which the same correlates of protection apply as for the traditional, egg-based flue vaccine. In the field of HIV phase 2b studies are underway, based on promising results obtained with some vaccine candidates. The conclusion of this session was that creativity in vaccine design and evaluation is beneficial and can lead to innovative new vaccine designs as well as to validated assays to assess vaccine efficacy.

  16. A New Furunculosis Challenge Method for Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy in Rainbow Trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marana, Moonika Haahr; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Skov, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    Experimental infection of fish for vaccine efficacy studies is associated with several limitations. Administration of live bacteria with the purpose of causing disease in fish can be performed by co-habitation, immersion or injection. We have developed a new Aeromonas salmonicida challenge method...... for rainbow trout and have applied it for evaluation of furunculosis vaccine efficacy. The method reveals development of systemic immunity in fish as live bacteria are introduced in the tail fin epidermis distant from the vaccine injection site (peritoneal cavity). This method seeks to mimic natural infection...... in fish farms where tail biting and therefore bacterial expo- sure to tail fin ulcers is widespread. By use of a multi-needle device ten epidermal perforations were introduced in the dorsal part of the tail fin of anaesthetized rainbow trout (vaccinated or naive). Subsequently 100 μL (3.4 × 108 colony...

  17. Ontology-supported research on vaccine efficacy, safety and integrative biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongqun

    2014-07-01

    While vaccine efficacy and safety research has dramatically progressed with the methods of in silico prediction and data mining, many challenges still exist. A formal ontology is a human- and computer-interpretable set of terms and relations that represent entities in a specific domain and how these terms relate to each other. Several community-based ontologies (including Vaccine Ontology, Ontology of Adverse Events and Ontology of Vaccine Adverse Events) have been developed to support vaccine and adverse event representation, classification, data integration, literature mining of host-vaccine interaction networks, and analysis of vaccine adverse events. The author further proposes minimal vaccine information standards and their ontology representations, ontology-based linked open vaccine data and meta-analysis, an integrative One Network ('OneNet') Theory of Life, and ontology-based approaches to study and apply the OneNet theory. In the Big Data era, these proposed strategies provide a novel framework for advanced data integration and analysis of fundamental biological networks including vaccine immune mechanisms.

  18. Efficacy of a new tetravalent coryza vaccine against emerging variant type B strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Anton A C; van den Berg, Karin; Malo, Aris

    2003-06-01

    Outbreaks of infectious coryza have been reported in vaccinated flocks in different countries, indicating that new serotype(s) of Haemophilus paragallinarum may have evolved. Several field isolates from vaccinated flocks in the US, Ecuador, Argentina and Zimbabwe were examined and, apart from one serotype C strain, all were typed as serotype B. An inactivated commercial trivalent vaccine, containing serotypes A, B and C, protected against challenge with the serotype C isolate but protection against challenge with serotype B isolates was weaker, suggesting that they might represent a new variant immunotype. An experimental tetravalent oil adjuvant vaccine, containing one of the serotype B isolates, appeared immunogenic against all isolates after one vaccination. Its efficacy and safety were further tested in layer chickens housed under field conditions. Chickens were vaccinated at 8 and 16 weeks of age while controls were unvaccinated. Vaccinates and controls were challenged with type A, B, C and variant type B at 25, 45 or 65 weeks of age. There was good protection (P<0.05) against all four immunotypes after all challenges. No systemic reactions were observed and local reactions were similar to those found with the commercial trivalent vaccine. The tetravalent vaccine may therefore be a good choice for control of new field isolates.

  19. Immunogenicity and in vitro Protective Efficacy of a Recombinant Multistage Plasmodium falciparum Candidate Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya Ping; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Sacci, John B.; Holloway, Brian P.; Fujioka, Hisashi; Kumar, Nirbhay; Wohlhueter, Robert; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Collins, William E.; Lal, Altaf A.

    1999-02-01

    Compared with a single-stage antigen-based vaccine, a multistage and multivalent Plasmodium falciparum vaccine would be more efficacious by inducing "multiple layers" of immunity. We have constructed a synthetic gene that encodes for 12 B cell, 6 T cell proliferative, and 3 cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes derived from 9 stage-specific P. falciparum antigens corresponding to the sporozoite, liver, erythrocytic asexual, and sexual stages. The gene was expressed in the baculovirus system, and a 41-kDa antigen, termed CDC/NIIMALVAC-1, was purified. Immunization in rabbits with the purified protein in the presence of different adjuvants generated antibody responses that recognized vaccine antigen, linear peptides contained in the vaccine, and all stages of P. falciparum. In vitro assays of protection revealed that the vaccine-elicited antibodies strongly inhibited sporozoite invasion of hepatoma cells and growth of blood-stage parasites in the presence of monocytes. These observations demonstrate that a multicomponent, multistage malaria vaccine can induce immune responses that inhibit parasite development at multiple stages. The rationale and approach used in the development of a multicomponent P. falciparum vaccine will be useful in the development of a multispecies human malaria vaccine and vaccines against other infectious diseases.

  20. Safety and efficacy of hepatitis A vaccine in children with chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanaa Mostafa El-Karaksy; Manal Ismail El-Hawary; Nehal Mohammad El-Koofy; Rokaya El-Sayed; Mona Al-Saeed El-Raziky; Samah Asaad Mansour; Gamal Mohammad Taha; Fatma El-Mougy

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the safety and efficacy of hepatitis A vaccine (HAV) in children with chronic liver disease of various etiologies.METHODS: Eleven children with chronic liver disease and thirteen age- and sex-matched controls negative for HAV antibodies were vaccinated against hepatitis A after they gave their informed consent. Children with uncontrolled coagulopathy or signs of hepatic decompensation were excluded. The vaccine (Havrix:720 ELISA units in 0.5 mL, from GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) was given intramuscularly in the deltoid in 2 doses 6 mo apart. Children were tested for HAV antibodies one and six months after the 1st dose and one month after the 2nd dose. Total serum bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were determined immediately before and after one month of the 1st dose of the vaccine.RESULTS: Only 7 out of the 11 patients were positive for HAV antibodies after the 1st dose of the vaccine,as compared to 100% of the controls. One month after the 2nd dose, all patients tested were positive for HAV antibodies. No deterioration in liver functions of patients was noted after vaccination. No adverse events,immediate or late, were reported by the mothers after each dose of the vaccine.CONCLUSION: Hepatitis A vaccine is both safe and effective in this small studied group of children with chronic liver disease. Given the high seroconversion rate, post-vaccination testing for HAV antibodies is not needed.

  1. Efficacy of a vaccine formula against tuberculosis in cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germinal J Canto Alarcon

    Full Text Available "Test-and-slaughter" has been successful in industrialized countries to control and eradicate tuberculosis from cattle; however, this strategy is too expensive for developing nations, where the prevalence is especially high. Vaccination with the Calmette-Guérin (BCG strain has been shown to protect against the development of lesions in vaccinated animals: mouse, cattle and wildlife species. In this study, the immune response and the pathology of vaccinated (BCG-prime and BCG prime-CFP-boosted and unvaccinated (controls calves were evaluated under experimental settings. A 10(6 CFU dose of the BCG strain was inoculated subcutaneously on the neck to two groups of ten animas each. Thirty days after vaccination, one of the vaccinated groups was boosted with an M. bovis culture filtrate protein (CFP. Three months after vaccination, the three groups of animals were challenged with 5×10(5 CFU via intranasal by aerosol with a field strain of M. bovis. The immune response was monitored throughout the study. Protection was assessed based on immune response (IFN-g release prechallenge, presence of visible lesions in lymph nodes and lungs at slaughter, and presence of bacilli in lymph nodes and lung samples in histological analysis. Vaccinated cattle, either with the BCG alone or with BCG and boosted with CFP showed higher IFN-g response, fewer lesions, and fewer bacilli per lesion than unvaccinated controls after challenge. Animals with low levels of IFN-g postvaccine-prechallenge showed more lesions than animals with high levels. Results from this study support the argument that vaccination could be incorporated into control programs to reduce the incidence of TB in cattle in countries with high prevalence.

  2. Discerning an effective balance between equine infectious anemia virus attenuation and vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigo, Jodi K; Li, Feng; Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Durkin, Shannon; Howe, Laryssa; Cook, Sheila J; Issel, Charles; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2005-03-01

    Among the diverse experimental vaccines evaluated in various animal lentivirus models, live attenuated vaccines have proven to be the most effective, thus providing an important model for examining critical immune correlates of protective vaccine immunity. We previously reported that an experimental live attenuated vaccine for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), based on mutation of the viral S2 accessory gene, elicited protection from detectable infection by virulent virus challenge (F. Li et al., J. Virol. 77:7244-7253, 2003). To better understand the critical components of EIAV vaccine efficacy, we examine here the relationship between the extent of virus attenuation, the maturation of host immune responses, and vaccine efficacy in a comparative study of three related attenuated EIAV proviral vaccine strains: the previously described EIAV(UK)DeltaS2 derived from a virulent proviral clone, EIAV(UK)DeltaS2/DU containing a second gene mutation in the virulent proviral clone, and EIAV(PR)DeltaS2 derived from a reference avirulent proviral clone. Inoculations of parallel groups of eight horses resulted in relatively low levels of viral replication (average of 10(2) to 10(3) RNA copies/ml) and a similar maturation of EIAV envelope-specific antibody responses as determined in quantitative and qualitative serological assays. However, experimental challenge of the experimentally immunized horses by our standard virulent EIAV(PV) strain by using a low-dose multiple exposure protocol (three inoculations with 10 median horse infective doses, administered intravenously) revealed a marked difference in the protective efficacy of the various attenuated proviral vaccine strains that was evidently associated with the extent of vaccine virus attenuation, time of viral challenge, and the apparent maturation of virus-specific immunity.

  3. Evaluation of efficacy of saponin and freund's incomplete adjuvanted paratuberculosis vaccine in murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jubeda Begum

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the efficacy between saponin adjuvanted paratuberculosis killed vaccine and Freund's incomplete (FIC adjuvanted paratuberculosis vaccine in mice model. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted for a period of 11 months using 80 Swiss albino mice by dividing into four groups (Group I-mice vaccinated with killed Mycobacterium avium subspp. paratuberculosis (MAP adjuvanted with saponin, Group II- for FIC, Group III- Saponin control and Gr IV- FIC control. Faecal shedding, changes in body weight, presence of local reactions and clinical symptoms, were evaluated. Serological assays for humoral and cell mediated immune response were determined by agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID and nitric oxide test (NO respectively. A total of 76 serum samples, 52 faecal samples and 20 tissue samples were collected at different intervals during the study period. ZN staining; AGID test and nitric oxide test were employed for analysis of samples. Results: A total of 38 samples (37 faecal and 1 tissue sample and 18 serum samples were recorded as positive by ZN staining and AGID test respectively from all four groups of mice. Significant decrease in faecal shedding of organisms was observed in Group I mice vaccinated with saponin adjuvanted vaccine in comparison to Group II. Gain in body weight of Group I mice was recorded as higher than Group II. NO test revealed increase in the concentration of NO level in both vaccinated group but more significant in Group I. Conclusion: The tests results obtained revealed that killed MAP vaccine adjuvanted with saponin have higher protective efficacy in terms of reduced faecal shedding, gain in body weight, less side effects, absence of attributable specific symptoms of Johne's disease, etc. in comparison to killed MAP vaccine adjuvanted with FIC. The present study also reveals that AGID and NO estimation tests are specific tests which can be employed for diagnosis and comparison of efficacy of paratuberculosis

  4. Can growth inhibition assays (GIA) predict blood-stage malaria vaccine efficacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Christopher J A; Hill, Adrian V S; Ellis, Ruth D

    2012-06-01

    An effective vaccine against P. falciparum malaria remains a global health priority. Blood-stage vaccines are an important component of this effort, with some indications of recent progress. However only a fraction of potential blood-stage antigens have been tested, highlighting a critical need for efficient down-selection strategies. Functional in vitro assays such as the growth/invasion inhibition assays (GIA) are widely used, but it is unclear whether GIA activity correlates with protection or predicts vaccine efficacy. While preliminary data in controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) studies indicate a possible association between in vitro and in vivo parasite growth rates, there have been conflicting results of immunoepidemiology studies, where associations with exposure rather than protection have been observed. In addition, GIA-interfering antibodies in vaccinated individuals from endemic regions may limit assay sensitivity in heavily malaria-exposed populations. More work is needed to establish the utility of GIA for blood-stage vaccine development.

  5. CAF01 potentiates immune responses and efficacy of an inactivated influenza vaccine in ferrets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Agger, Else Marie; Poulsen, Julie Juul;

    2011-01-01

    Trivalent inactivated vaccines (TIV) against influenza are given to 350 million people every year. Most of these are non-adjuvanted vaccines whose immunogenicity and protective efficacy are considered suboptimal. Commercially available non-adjuvanted TIV are known to elicit mainly a humoral immune...... the immunogenicity of the vaccine, with increased influenza-specific IgA and IgG levels. Additionally, CAF01 promoted cellular-mediated immunity as indicated by interferon-gamma expressing lymphocytes, measured by flow cytometry. CAF01 also enhanced the protection conferred by the vaccine by reducing the viral load...... measured in nasal washes by RT-PCR. Finally, CAF01 allowed for dose-reduction and led to higher levels of protection compared to TIV adjuvanted with a squalene emulsion. The data obtained in this human-relevant challenge model supports the potential of CAF01 in future influenza vaccines....

  6. Protection of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) against plague after voluntary consumption of baits containing recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencher, J.S.; Smith, S.R.; Powell, T.D.; Stinchcomb, D.T.; Osorio, J.E.; Rocke, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) are highly susceptible to Yersinia pestis and significant reservoirs of plague for humans in the western United States. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus, expressing the F1 antigen of Y. pestis, was incorporated into a palatable bait and offered to 18 black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) for voluntary consumption; 18 negative control animals received placebo baits. Antibody titers against Y. pestis F1 antigen increased significantly (P < 0.01) in vaccinees, and their survival was significantly higher upon challenge with Y. pestis than that of negative controls (P < 0.01).

  7. Protection of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) against plague after voluntary consumption of baits containing recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencher, Jordan S; Smith, Susan R; Powell, Tim D; Stinchcomb, Dan T; Osorio, Jorge E; Rocke, Tonie E

    2004-09-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) are highly susceptible to Yersinia pestis and significant reservoirs of plague for humans in the western United States. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus, expressing the F1 antigen of Y. pestis, was incorporated into a palatable bait and offered to 18 black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) for voluntary consumption; 18 negative control animals received placebo baits. Antibody titers against Y. pestis F1 antigen increased significantly (P < 0.01) in vaccinees, and their survival was significantly higher upon challenge with Y. pestis than that of negative controls (P < 0.01).

  8. Protein energy malnutrition alters mucosal IgA responses and reduces mucosal vaccine efficacy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Semi; Kim, Heejoo; Shim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Seung Young; Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho; Han, Byung Woo; Song, Man Ki; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Kim, Jae-Ouk

    2017-08-30

    Oral vaccine responsiveness is often lower in children from less developed countries. Childhood malnutrition may be associated with poor immune response to oral vaccines. The present study was designed to investigate whether protein energy malnutrition (PEM) impairs B cell immunity and ultimately reduces oral vaccine efficacy in a mouse model. Purified isocaloric diets containing low protein (1/10 the protein of the control diet) were used to determine the effect of PEM. PEM increased both nonspecific total IgA and oral antigen-specific IgA in serum without alteration of gut permeability. However, PEM decreased oral antigen-specific IgA in feces, which is consistent with decreased expression of polymeric Immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) in the small intestine. Of note, polymeric IgA was predominant in serum under PEM. In addition, PEM altered B cell development status in the bone marrow and increased the frequency of IgA-secreting B cells, as well as IgA secretion by long-lived plasma cells in the small intestinal lamina propria. Moreover, PEM reduced the protective efficacy of the mucosally administered cholera vaccine and recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine in a mouse model. Our results suggest that PEM can impair mucosal immunity where IgA plays an important role in host protection and may partly explain the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in malnourished subjects. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5)-based tuberculosis vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenhai; Gupta, Tuhina; Xu, Pei; Phan, Shannon; Pickar, Adrian; Yau, Wilson; Karls, Russell K; Quinn, Frederick D; Sakamoto, Kaori; He, Biao

    2015-12-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), is an important human pathogen. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), a live, attenuated variant of Mycobacterium bovis, is currently the only available TB vaccine despite its low efficacy against the infectious pulmonary form of the disease in adults. Thus, a more-effective TB vaccine is needed. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5), a paramyxovirus, has several characteristics that make it an attractive vaccine vector. It is safe, inexpensive to produce, and has been previously shown to be efficacious as the backbone of vaccines for influenza, rabies, and respiratory syncytial virus. In this work, recombinant PIV5 expressing M. tuberculosis antigens 85A (PIV5-85A) and 85B (PIV5-85B) have been generated and their immunogenicity and protective efficacy evaluated in a mouse aerosol infection model. In a long-term protection study, a single dose of PIV5-85A was found to be most effective in reducing M. tuberculosis colony forming units (CFU) in lungs when compared to unvaccinated, whereas the BCG vaccinated animals had similar numbers of CFUs to unvaccinated animals. BCG-prime followed by a PIV5-85A or PIV5-85B boost produced better outcomes highlighted by close to three-log units lower lung CFUs compared to PBS. The results indicate that PIV5-based M. tuberculosis vaccines are promising candidates for further development.

  10. A New Furunculosis Challenge Method for Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy in Rainbow Trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marana, Moonika Haahr; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Skov, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    in fish farms where tail biting and therefore bacterial expo- sure to tail fin ulcers is widespread. By use of a multi-needle device ten epidermal perforations were introduced in the dorsal part of the tail fin of anaesthetized rainbow trout (vaccinated or naive). Subsequently 100 μL (3.4 × 108 colony-forming...... for rainbow trout and have applied it for evaluation of furunculosis vaccine efficacy. The method reveals development of systemic immunity in fish as live bacteria are introduced in the tail fin epidermis distant from the vaccine injection site (peritoneal cavity). This method seeks to mimic natural infection...

  11. Efficacy of dart or booster vaccination with strain RB51 in protecting bison against experimental Brucella abortus challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccination is an effective tool for reducing the prevalence of brucellosis in natural hosts. In this study, we characterized the efficacy of the Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccine in bison when delivered by single intramuscular vaccination (Hand RB51), single pneumatic dart delivery (Dart ...

  12. [Efficacy and side effects following immunization with Salmonella typhi Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z G; Zhou, W Z; Shi, J

    1997-02-01

    Efficacy and side effects following the immunization with Salmonella typhi Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine (Vi) were assessed. The diluted solution (DS) of Vi was used as placebo. A total number of 777 children and adults were observed for side effect response. Mild and moderate fever appeared 16.93% and 0.05% in Vi group, 15.01% and 0.03% in DS group, respectively (statistically significant). Two cases with mild local reaction were observed in Vi group. A total number of 81,506 vaccinees were investigated on the efficacy of Vi vaccine, using positive blood culture of Salmonolla typhi as a diagnostic criterion. The protective rate and index of vaccine were 71.35% and 3.49% respectively. If 2 cases of positive Widal's test were included in, the protective rate would come up to 78.17% with a protective index 4.85. Clinical data showed that fever seen in the cases in Vi group was much lower than that of DS group. The systematic and local reaction of Vi vaccine were mild. The vaccine is safe and has high protective rate. It can also decrease the degree of fever with only one single dose as primary immunization. We believe Vi vaccine may serve as a vaccine of new generation to be promoted.

  13. Efficacy and safety of a combined Porcine Circovirus and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccine in finishing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Witvliet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety and protective efficacy of a new one dose combination vaccine containing Porcine Circovirus type 2 (PCV2 and M. hyopneumoniae antigens – Porcilis® PCV M Hyo - was evaluated in laboratory studies and under field conditions. Vaccination resulted in a moderate temperature increase on the day of vaccination and mild systemic and local reactions were found in only a low percentage of the vaccinated pigs. The local reactions observed were small (max. 2 cm and transient (max. 1 day. In short term (onset of immunity and long term (duration of immunity challenge studies with the individual pathogens, the vaccine significantly reduced the PCV2 load in lymphoid tissue and lungs and M. hyopneumoniae-induced lung lesions. In a placebo-controlled field trial on a farm where both PCV2 and M. hyopneumoniae were present, vaccination of piglets at 3 weeks of age resulted in a reduction of PCV2 viremia and shedding and lower lung lesion scores at slaughter. In addition, a positive effect on the average daily weight gain (+ 34 g/day in the finishing phase was observed. It can therefore be concluded that this new ready to use combination vaccine is safe and efficacious against PCV2 and M. hyopneumoniae single and combined infections.

  14. Immunogenicity and protective immunity against bubonic plague and pneumonic plague by immunization of mice with the recombinant V10 antigen, a variant of LcrV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBord, Kristin L; Anderson, Deborah M; Marketon, Melanie M; Overheim, Katie A; DePaolo, R William; Ciletti, Nancy A; Jabri, Bana; Schneewind, Olaf

    2006-08-01

    In contrast to Yersinia pestis LcrV, the recombinant V10 (rV10) variant (lacking residues 271 to 300) does not suppress the release of proinflammatory cytokines by immune cells. Immunization with rV10 generates robust antibody responses that protect mice against bubonic plague and pneumonic plague, suggesting that rV10 may serve as an improved plague vaccine.

  15. Influence of maternal immunity on vaccine efficacy and susceptibility of commercial broilers against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal antibodies provide early protection from disease, but may interfere with the vaccination efficacy in short-lived broilers. This study seeks to assess how maternal immunity can interfere with vaccine efficacy against clade 2.3.4.4 H5N2 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) and how ...

  16. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy study using combination of four tuberculosis DNA vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡宏; 田霞; 呼西旦; 潘怡; 李国利; 庄玉辉; 朱玉贤

    2003-01-01

    Immune response and protective efficacy for the combination of four tuberculosis DNA vaccines were evaluated in this study. We obtained 1:200 antibody titers against Ag85B 21d after mice were vaccinated for the first time by four recombinant eukaryotic expression vectors containing coding sequences for Ag85B, MPT-64, MPT-63 and ESAT-6. The titers of Ag85B were elevated to 1:102400 after the second injection and decreased to 1:12800 after the third injection. Antibody titers for MPT-64 and MPT-63 reached 1:25600 21 d after the first vaccination, and were then decreased following the second and third injections. No antigen-specific antibody titer against ESAT-6 was detected in sera harvested from immunized mice at any time. These DNA vaccines evoked specific IFN-λ responses in the spleens of vaccinated mice as well. When challenged with M. tuberculosis H37Rv, we found that the lungs of the vaccinated mice produced 99.8% less bacterial counts than that of the empty-vector control group and the bacterial counts were also significantly less than that of the BCG group. Histopathological analyses showed that the lungs of vaccinated mice produced no obvious caseation while over 50%-70% of the pulmonary parenchyma tissue produced central caseation in the vector control group. Our results indicated that the combination of four tuberculosis DNA vaccines may generate high levels of immune responses and result in better animal protection.

  17. Vaccines against human papillomavirus in low and middle income countries: a review of safety, immunogenicity and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakalembe, Miriam; Mirembe, Florence M; Banura, Cecily

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is limited data on the immunogenicity and efficacy of human papillomavirus vaccines in Low and Middle income countries (LMIC). The review aims to summarize the current status from published HPV vaccine safety, immunogenicity and efficacy studies in low and middle income countries (LMIC). Electronic databases (PubMed/MEDLINE and HINARI) were searched for peer reviewed English language articles on HPV vaccination in LMIC that have so far been published from 1st January 2006 up to 30th January 2015. Eligible studies were included if they had used the bivalent (bHPV) or quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccines in a LMIC and investigated safety, immunogenicity and/or efficacy. The main findings were extracted and summarized. A total of fourteen HPV vaccine studies assessing safety, Immunogenicity and efficacy of the bivalent or quadrivalent vaccines in LMIC were included. There are only ten published clinical trials where a LMIC has participated. There was no published study so far that assessed efficacy of the HPV vaccines in Sub-Saharan Africa. From these studies, vaccine induced immune response was comparable to that from results of HICs for all age groups. Studies assessing HPV vaccine efficacy of the bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine within LMIC were largely missing. Only three studies were found where a LMIC was part of a multi center clinical trial. In all the studies, there were no vaccine related serious adverse events. The findings from the only study that investigated less than three doses of the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine suggest that even with less than three doses, antibody levels were still comparable with older women where efficacy has been proven. The few studies from LMIC in this review had comparable safety, Immunogenicity and efficacy profiles like in HIC. Overall, the LMIC of Africa where immune compromising/modulating situations are prevalent, there is need for long term immunogenicity as well as surveillance studies for long term clinical

  18. A systematic review and meta-analysis for the adverse effects, immunogenicity and efficacy of Lyme disease vaccines: Guiding novel vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Alaa; Shering, Maria; Rahman, Shusmita; Lindsay, L Robbin

    2017-04-20

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most prevalent arthropod-borne infectious disease in North America. Currently, no vaccine is available to prevent LB in humans, although monovalent and multivalent vaccines have been developed in the past. The aim of the current study is to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate and compare the findings from these two classes of vaccines for their reactogenicity, immunogenicity and efficacy, in the hope this may assist in the development of future vaccines. A search strategy was developed for online databases (PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, and Embase). Search terms used were "vaccine/vaccination", "Lyme disease/Borreliosis", "clinical trial(s)" and "efficacy". Only seven clinical trials were included to compare the results of the monovalent vaccines to those of the multivalent one. Meta-analyses were conducted to evaluate the reactogenicity and immunogenicity of the two vaccine classes. Odds ratio (OR) for LB (and 95% confidence intervals; 95% CI) were calculated for the efficacy of the monovalent vaccine from three different clinical trials at different dose schedules. Incidence of redness (local adverse effect) and fever (systemic side effect) were, respectively, 6.8- and 2.9-fold significantly lower (p < 0.05) in individuals who received multivalent vaccines compared to those receiving the monovalent one. Incidences of all other local and systemic adverse effects were non-significantly lower in the multivalent vaccine compared to the monovalent vaccines. Seroprotection was comparable among individuals who received the two vaccine classes at the 30 μg dose level. Efficacy in the prevention of LB was only evaluated for the monovalent vaccines. OR of LB ranged from 0.49 (95% CI: 0.14-0.70; p < 0.005, vs. placebo) to 0.31 (95% CI: 0.26-0.63; p < 0.005) for the initial and final doses respectively, with an overall OR of 0.4 (95% CI: 0.26-0.63, p < 0.001). The current study further validates that the monovalent and multivalent

  19. Parasitism affects vaccine efficacy against Streptococcus iniae in Nile tilapia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilapia culture worldwide is estimated to be US$ 5 billion and is important to domestic and global food security. Parasites and bacteria co-occur in both extensive and intensive production of tilapia. The effect of parasitism on vaccine performance in fish is little studied. The objective of this ...

  20. Influence of moderate hypoxia on vaccine efficacy against Vibrio anguillarum in Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallage, Sanchala; Katagiri, Takayuki; Endo, Makoto; Futami, Kunihiko; Endo, Masato; Maita, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia is known as a potential immunomodulator in fish. This study therefore assesses the impact of chronic, moderate hypoxia on vaccine efficacy in Oreochromis niloticus. Serum antibody titer was used as a surrogate marker to detect vaccine efficacy. The fish were acclimatized to either moderate hypoxia (55 ± 5% DO) or normoxia (85 ± 5%DO) and immunized with formalin inactivated Vibrio anguillarum. Significantly, a higher antibody titer was found in normoxic fish than in moderate hypoxia. The normoxic group titer peaked at 14th dpv (days post vaccination) while the moderate hypoxic group peaked at 21st or 28th dpv. The absolute blood lymphocyte counts and serum bactericidal activities against V. anguillarum were significantly higher in normoxic fish. Serum killing of V. anguillarum appeared to be mainly via antibody-dependent classical complement pathway. Furthermore, the first week following vaccination appears critical for antibody production. This view was further supported by results obtained from gene expression assay, where the transcription level of all the detected immune related genes (IgM, IL-1 β, TCR-β, MHC-II β), except B cell activating factor, were significantly suppressed following exposure to moderate hypoxia. The overall results highlight that even though moderate hypoxia is not easily detectable in Oreochromis niloticus, it negatively affects antibody production by suppressing and delaying antibody response, ultimately affecting vaccine efficacy.

  1. Efficacy of a Single-Dose, Inactivated Oral Cholera Vaccine in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, Firdausi; Wierzba, Thomas F; Ali, Mohammad; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful I; Saha, Amit; Khan, Iqbal A; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Akter, Afroza; Khan, Arifuzzaman; Begum, Yasmin A; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur R; Khanam, Farhana; Chowdhury, Mohiul I; Islam, Taufiqul; Chowdhury, Atique I; Rahman, Anisur; Siddique, Shah A; You, Young A; Kim, Deok R; Siddik, Ashraf U; Saha, Nirod C; Kabir, Alamgir; Cravioto, Alejandro; Desai, Sachin N; Singh, Ajit P; Clemens, John D

    2016-05-05

    A single-dose regimen of the current killed oral cholera vaccines that have been prequalified by the World Health Organization would make them more attractive for use against endemic and epidemic cholera. We conducted an efficacy trial of a single dose of the killed oral cholera vaccine Shanchol, which is currently given in a two-dose schedule, in an urban area in which cholera is highly endemic. Nonpregnant residents of Dhaka, Bangladesh, who were 1 year of age or older were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of oral cholera vaccine or oral placebo. The primary outcome was vaccine protective efficacy against culture-confirmed cholera occurring 7 to 180 days after dosing. Prespecified secondary outcomes included protective efficacy against severely dehydrating culture-confirmed cholera during the same interval, against cholera and severe cholera occurring 7 to 90 versus 91 to 180 days after dosing, and against cholera and severe cholera according to age at baseline. A total of 101 episodes of cholera, 37 associated with severe dehydration, were detected among the 204,700 persons who received one dose of vaccine or placebo. The vaccine protective efficacy was 40% (95% confidence interval [CI], 11 to 60%; 0.37 cases per 1000 vaccine recipients vs. 0.62 cases per 1000 placebo recipients) against all cholera episodes, 63% (95% CI, 24 to 82%; 0.10 vs. 0.26 cases per 1000 recipients) against severely dehydrating cholera episodes, and 63% (95% CI, -39 to 90%), 56% (95% CI, 16 to 77%), and 16% (95% CI, -49% to 53%) against all cholera episodes among persons vaccinated at the age of 5 to 14 years, 15 or more years, and 1 to 4 years, respectively, although the differences according to age were not significant (P=0.25). Adverse events occurred at similar frequencies in the two groups. A single dose of the oral cholera vaccine was efficacious in older children (≥5 years of age) and in adults in a setting with a high level of cholera endemicity. (Funded by the Bill

  2. A Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain that improves stimulation of antigen-presenting cells does not enhance vaccine efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Schmitt

    Full Text Available Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS, does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited stimulation of antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined whether the interaction of genetically modified LVS strains with human antigen-presenting cells correlated with effectiveness as tularemia vaccine candidates. Human dendritic cells infected with wild-type LVS secrete low levels of proinflammatory cytokines, fail to upregulate costimulatory molecules, and activate human T cells poorly in vitro. One LVS mutant, strain 13B47, stimulated higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines from dendritic cells and macrophages and increased costimulatory molecule expression on dendritic cells compared to wild type. Additionally, 13B47-infected dendritic cells activated T cells more efficiently than LVS-infected cells. A deletion allele of the same gene in LVS displayed similar in vitro characteristics, but vaccination with this strain did not improve survival after challenge with a virulent Francisella strain. In vivo, this mutant was attenuated for growth and did not stimulate T cell responses in the lung comparable to wild type. Therefore, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro was improved by genetic modification of LVS, but did not correlate with efficacy against challenge in vivo within this model system.

  3. The effect of infectious bursal disease virus induced immunosuppression on avian influenza virus vaccine efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the field, poultry are exposed to a variety of infectious agents, many of which are immunosuppressive. Co-infections between these agents are common, and these co-infections have effects on disease, immune response, and vaccine efficacy. The effect of co-infections in poultry between immunosupp...

  4. Safety and efficacy of influenza vaccination in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with quiescent disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holvast, A; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J; Horst, G; De Vries, JJC; Benne, CA; Kallenberg, CGM; Bijl, M

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to assess the safety and efficacy of influenza vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and to evaluate the influence of immunosuppressive drugs on the immune response. Methods: SLE patients (n = 56) and healthy controls (n = 18) were studied. All patients had quie

  5. Increased efficacy of Eimeria oocysts delivery by gel beads or spray vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control of avian coccidiosis is increasingly being achieved by the administration of low doses of Eimeria oocysts to newly hatched chicks. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of gel-beads containing a mixture of E. acervulina, E. maxima, and E. tenella oocysts as a vaccine to protect ...

  6. Efficacy of Ichthyophthirius vaccines in channel catfish against white spot disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichthyophthirius (Ich) is a protozoan that causes white spot disease in many cultured fish and lead to severe losses in aquaculture. Two trials were conducted to determine the efficacy and serum antibody response of different formulation of Ich vaccines in channel catfish. In trial I, catfish were i...

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor enhances the efficacy of a breast cancer vaccine: role of IDO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Gargi D; Tinder, Teresa L; Bradley, Judy M; Tu, Tony; Hattrup, Christine L; Pockaj, Barbara A; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2006-08-15

    We report that administration of celecoxib, a specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, in combination with a dendritic cell-based cancer vaccine significantly augments vaccine efficacy in reducing primary tumor burden, preventing metastasis, and increasing survival. This combination treatment was tested in MMTV-PyV MT mice that develop spontaneous mammary gland tumors with metastasis to the lungs and bone marrow. Improved vaccine potency was associated with an increase in tumor-specific CTLs. Enhanced CTL activity was attributed to a significant decrease in levels of tumor-associated IDO, a negative regulator of T cell activity. We present data suggesting that inhibiting COX-2 activity in vivo regulates IDO expression within the tumor microenvironment; this is further corroborated in the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line. Thus, a novel mechanism of COX-2-induced immunosuppression via regulation of IDO has emerged that may have implications in designing future cancer vaccines.

  8. Evaluation of the efficacy of a therapeutic HIV vaccine by in vitro stimulation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaozhou; Wang, Wandi; Xu, Ke; Feng, Xia; Zeng, Yi

    2017-03-01

    A novel method for HIV vaccine efficacy evaluation was established and the experimental conditions optimized. This novel method was then applied to determine whether a recombinant adenovirus type 5 HIV therapeutic vaccine expressing Gag antigen (Ad5-HIVgag) could stimulate HIV-specific cellular responses in vitro. The results indicated that HIV-specific IFN-gama production lymphocytes were induced by the Ad5-HIVgag vaccine. Compared with other methods, this in vitro stimulation method is safe and time-efficient, and the result is more intuitive. It has the potential to be regarded as a supplement to other methods for evaluating the IFN-gamma production by PBMCs to HIV vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of an autophagy-targeted DNA vaccine against avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhenkai; Huang, Jianfei; Lei, Xiaoya; Yan, Yiming; Lu, Piaopiao; Zhang, Huanmin; Lin, Wencheng; Chen, Weiguo; Ma, Jingyun; Xie, Qingmei

    2017-02-01

    Infection with the avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can lead to neoplastic disease in chickens, inflicting significant economic losses to the poultry industry. Recent reports have identified inhibitory effects of ALV-J on autophagy, a process involving in innate and adaptive immunity. Inspired by this connection between autophagy and immunity, we developed a novel DNA vaccine against ALV-J which includes co-administration of rapamycin to stimulate autophagy. To measure the efficacy of the developed prototype vaccine, five experimental groups of seven-day-old chickens was immunized three times at three-week intervals respectively with vector, pVAX1-gp85, pVAX1-gp85-LC3, pVAX1-gp85+rapamycin and pVAX1-gp85-LC3+rapamycin through electroporation. We then tested their antibody titers, cytokine levels and cellular immune responses. The immunoprotective efficacy of the prototype vaccines against the challenge of the ALV-J GD1109 strain was also examined. The results showed that the combination of pVAX1-gp85-LC3 and rapamycin was able to induce the highest antibody titers, and enhance interleukin(IL)-2, IL-10 and interferon (IFN)-γ expression, and the chickens immunized with the combination of pVAX1-gp85-LC3 and rapamycin showed the highest percentage of CD3+CD8+T lymphocytes. Based on our results, we suggest that stimulating autophagy can improve the efficacy of DNA vaccines and that our DNA vaccine shows the potential of being a candidate vaccine against ALV-J. This study provides a novel strategy for developing vaccines against ALV-J.

  10. Critical Analysis of Compositions and Protective Efficacies of Oral Killed Cholera Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Two cholera vaccines, sold as Shanchol and Dukoral, are currently available. This review presents a critical analysis of the protective efficacies of these vaccines. Children under 5 years of age are very vulnerable to cholera and account for the highest incidence of cholera cases and more than half of the resulting deaths. Both Shanchol and Dukoral are two-spaced-dose oral vaccines comprising large numbers of killed cholera bacteria. The former contains Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 cells, and the latter contains V. cholerae O1 cells with the recombinant B subunit of cholera toxin. In a field trial in Kolkata (India), Shanchol, the preferred vaccine, protected 45% of the test subjects in all of the age groups and only 17% of the children under 5 years of age during the first year of surveillance. In a field trial in Peru, two spaced doses of Dukoral offered negative protection in children under 5 years of age and little protection (15%) in vaccinees over 6 years of age during the first year of surveillance. Little is known about Dukoral's long-term protective efficacy. Both of these vaccines have questionable compositions, using V. cholerae O1 strains isolated in 1947 that have been inactivated by heat and formalin treatments that may denature protein. Immunological studies revealed Dukoral's reduced and short-lived efficacy, as measured by several immunological endpoints. Various factors, such as the necessity for multiple doses, poor protection of children under 5 years of age, the requirement of a cold supply chain, production costs, and complex logistics of vaccine delivery, greatly reduce the suitability of either of these vaccines for endemic or epidemic cholera control in resource-poor settings. PMID:25056361

  11. Comparison of the efficacy of autogenous inactivated Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) vaccines with that of commercial vaccines against homologous and heterologous challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldhof, Marc F; Vanhee, Merijn; Van Breedam, Wander; Van Doorsselaere, Jan; Karniychuk, Uladzimir U; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2012-10-03

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a rapidly evolving pathogen of swine. At present, there is a high demand for safe and more effective vaccines that can be adapted regularly to emerging virus variants. A recent study showed that, by the use of a controlled inactivation procedure, an experimental BEI-inactivated PRRSV vaccine can be developed that offers partial protection against homologous challenge with the prototype strain LV. At present, it is however not known if this vaccine can be adapted to currently circulating virus variants. In this study, two recent PRRSV field isolates (07 V063 and 08 V194) were used for BEI-inactivated vaccine production. The main objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of these experimental BEI-inactivated vaccines against homologous and heterologous challenge and to compare it with an experimental LV-based BEI-inactivated vaccine and commercial inactivated and attenuated vaccines. In addition, the induction of challenge virus-specific (neutralizing) antibodies by the different vaccines was assessed. In a first experiment (challenge with 07 V063), vaccination with the experimental homologous (07 V063) inactivated vaccine shortened the viremic phase upon challenge with approximately 2 weeks compared to the mock-vaccinated control group. Vaccination with the commercial attenuated vaccines reduced the duration of viremia with approximately one week compared to the mock-vaccinated control group. In contrast, the experimental heterologous (LV) inactivated vaccine and the commercial inactivated vaccine did not influence viremia. Interestingly, both the homologous and the heterologous experimental inactivated vaccine induced 07 V063-specific neutralizing antibodies upon vaccination, while the commercial inactivated and attenuated vaccines failed to do so.In the second experiment (challenge with 08 V194), use of the experimental homologous (08 V194) inactivated vaccine shortened viremia upon

  12. 25 Years after Vi Typhoid Vaccine Efficacy Study, Typhoid Affects Significant Number of Population in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Deepak; Khan, M. Imran; Pach, Alfred; Shrestha, Parisha; Joshi, Nilesh; Upreti, Shyam R.; Wierzba, Thomas; Puri, Mahesh; Sahastrabuddhe, Sushant; Ochiai, R. Leon

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella Typhi, first isolated in 1884, results in infection of the intestines and can end in death and disability. Due to serious adverse events post vaccination, whole cell killed vaccines have been replaced with new generation vaccines. The efficacy of Vi polysaccharide (ViPS) vaccine, a new generation, single-dose intramuscular typhoid vaccine was assessed in Nepal in 1987. However, despite the availability of ViPS vaccine for more than 25 years, Nepal has one of the highest incidence of typhoid fever. Therefore we collected information from hospitals in the Kathmandu Valley from over the past five years. There were 9901 enteric fever cases between January 2008 and July 2012. 1,881 of these were confirmed typhoid cases from five hospitals in the Kathmandu district. Approximately 70% of the cases involved children under 15 years old. 1281 cases were confirmed as S. Paratyphi. Vaccines should be prioritized for control of typhoid in conjunction with improved water and sanitation conditions in Nepal and in endemic countries of Asia and Africa. PMID:24400067

  13. Avian influenza H5N1 vaccination efficacy in Egyptian backyard poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandeil, Ahmed; Mostafa, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; El-Taweel, Ahmed Nageh; Gomaa, Mokhtar; Galal, Hussein; Kayali, Ghazi; Ali, Mohamed A

    2017-09-25

    Raising backyard poultry under low biosecurity conditions is a common practice in Egypt. While vaccination is routinely applied in Egypt in commercial settings to curb the spread of avian influenza viruses, it remains less commonly used in backyard settings. We assessed the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a H5N1 vaccine based on a contemporary Egyptian clade 2.2.1.2 virus among turkeys, ducks, geese, and chickens raised together in a backyard setting. Results showed that this vaccine elicits an immune response in all tested species reaching up to a hemagglutination inhibition titer of 10 log2 after a booster dose. However, this response varied between species. When challenged, vaccinated birds survived and shed less virus in comparison with unvaccinated birds. However, unvaccinated ducks showed no symptoms of infection and survived the duration of the experiment. Moreover, vaccinated ducks shed more virus as compared to vaccinated birds of other species. Hence, we recommend avoiding mixing various species in the backyards of Egypt. Our data indicates that vaccination can be effective in the backyard setting in Egypt, although planning should consider the species covered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sulfated glucan can improve the immune efficacy of Newcastle disease vaccine in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mi; Yang, Ruile; Zhang, Lifang; Meng, Xinyu; Fei, Chenzhong; Zhang, Keyu; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zheng, Wenli; Xiao, Sui; Zhang, Saiqi; Xue, Feiqun; Hu, Yuanliang

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the immune effect of sulfated glucan from saccharomyces cerevisiae (SGSC) on chickens, two experiments were researched. In vitro experiment, the effects of SGSC on chicken splenic lymphocyte proliferation were determined. The results displayed that SGSC could significantly stimulate chicken splenic lymphocyte proliferation. In vivo experiment, 200 14-day-old chickens were averagely divided into 5 groups. The chickens, except blank control (BC) group, were vaccinated with Newcastle disease (ND) vaccine, repeated vaccination at 28 days old. At the same time of the first vaccination, the chickens in three SGSC groups were injected, respectively, with the SGSC at low, medium and high concentrations, in vaccination control (VC) and BC group, with equal volume of physiological saline, once a day for three successive days. On days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 after the first vaccination, the lymphocyte proliferation, serum antibody titer and interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) were measured. The results showed that SGSC at suitable dose could significantly promote lymphocyte proliferation, enhance serum antibody titer, and improve serum IL-2 and IFN-γ concentrations. It indicated that SGSC could significantly improve the immune efficacy of Newcastle disease vaccine, and would be as the candidate of a new-type immune adjuvant.

  15. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DMT liposome-adjuvanted tuberculosis subunit CTT3H vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Xindong; Tian, Maopeng; Li, Jianrong; Tan, Songwei; Yuan, Xuefeng; Yu, Qi; Jing, Yukai; Zhang, Zhiping; Yue, Tingting; Zhou, Lei; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-01-01

    Different strategies have been proposed for the development of protein subunit vaccine candidates for tuberculosis (TB), which shows better safety than other types of candidates and the currently used Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. In order to develop more effective protein subunits depending on the mechanism of cell-mediated immunity against TB, a polyprotein CTT3H, based on 5 immunodominant antigens (CFP10, TB10.4, TB8.4, Rv3615c, and HBHA) with CD8(+) epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was constructed in this study. We vaccinated C57BL/6 mice with a TB subunit CTT3H protein in an adjuvant of dimethyldioctadecylammonium/monophosphoryl lipid A/trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (DDA/MPL/TDB, DMT) liposome to investigate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine. Our results demonstrated that DMT liposome-adjuvanted CTT3H vaccine not only induced an antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 response, but also raised the number of PPD- and CTT3H-specific IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells and elicited strong CTL responses against TB10.4, which provided more effective protection against a 60 CFU M. tuberculosis aerosol challenge than PBS control and DMT adjuvant alone. Our findings indicate that DMT-liposome is an effective adjuvant to stimulate CD8(+) T cell responses and the DMT-adjuvanted subunit CTT3H vaccine is a promising candidate for the next generation of TB vaccine.

  16. 25 years after Vi typhoid vaccine efficacy study, typhoid affects significant number of population in Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Bajracharya

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhi, first isolated in 1884, results in infection of the intestines and can end in death and disability. Due to serious adverse events post vaccination, whole cell killed vaccines have been replaced with new generation vaccines. The efficacy of Vi polysaccharide (ViPS vaccine, a new generation, single-dose intramuscular typhoid vaccine was assessed in Nepal in 1987. However, despite the availability of ViPS vaccine for more than 25 years, Nepal has one of the highest incidence of typhoid fever. Therefore we collected information from hospitals in the Kathmandu Valley from over the past five years. There were 9901 enteric fever cases between January 2008 and July 2012. 1,881 of these were confirmed typhoid cases from five hospitals in the Kathmandu district. Approximately 70% of the cases involved children under 15 years old. 1281 cases were confirmed as S. Paratyphi. Vaccines should be prioritized for control of typhoid in conjunction with improved water and sanitation conditions in Nepal and in endemic countries of Asia and Africa.

  17. 25 years after Vi typhoid vaccine efficacy study, typhoid affects significant number of population in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Deepak; Khan, M Imran; Pach, Alfred; Shrestha, Parisha; Joshi, Nilesh; Upreti, Shyam R; Wierzba, Thomas; Puri, Mahesh; Sahastrabuddhe, Sushant; Ochiai, R Leon

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella Typhi, first isolated in 1884, results in infection of the intestines and can end in death and disability. Due to serious adverse events post vaccination, whole cell killed vaccines have been replaced with new generation vaccines. The efficacy of Vi polysaccharide (ViPS) vaccine, a new generation, single-dose intramuscular typhoid vaccine was assessed in Nepal in 1987. However, despite the availability of ViPS vaccine for more than 25 years, Nepal has one of the highest incidence of typhoid fever. Therefore we collected information from hospitals in the Kathmandu Valley from over the past five years. There were 9901 enteric fever cases between January 2008 and July 2012. 1,881 of these were confirmed typhoid cases from five hospitals in the Kathmandu district. Approximately 70% of the cases involved children under 15 years old. 1281 cases were confirmed as S. Paratyphi. Vaccines should be prioritized for control of typhoid in conjunction with improved water and sanitation conditions in Nepal and in endemic countries of Asia and Africa.

  18. An HSV-2 Trivalent Vaccine Is Immunogenic in Rhesus Macaques and Highly Efficacious in Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Lauren M.; Shaw, Carolyn E.; Pahar, Bapi; Liu, David; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2017-01-01

    A genital herpes vaccine is urgently needed to prevent pain and suffering, reduce the incidence of neonatal herpes, and decrease the risk of HIV acquisition and transmission that accompanies genital infection. We evaluated a trivalent HSV-2 subunit antigen vaccine administered with CpG and alum in rhesus macaques and guinea pigs. The vaccine contains glycoproteins C, D and E (gC2, gD2, gE2) to block virus entry by gD2 and immune evasion by gC2 and gE2. In rhesus macaques, the trivalent vaccine induced plasma and mucosa neutralizing antibodies, antibodies that block gC2 and gE2 immune evasion activities, and stimulated CD4 T cell responses. After intravaginal challenge, a self-limited vaginal infection of brief duration was detected by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in naïve, but not in trivalent immunized macaques. Vaccine efficacy was evaluated in female guinea pigs. Animals were mock immunized, or immunized with gD2, the trivalent vaccine or the trivalent vaccine followed by a booster dose of gD2 (trivalent + gD2). The trivalent and trivalent + gD2 groups were 97% and 99% efficacious, respectively in preventing genital lesions and both outperformed gD2 alone. As a marker of transmission risk, vaginal swabs were evaluated daily for HSV-2 DNA and replication competent virus between five and seven weeks after challenge. HSV-2 DNA shedding was reduced in all groups compared with mock. Shedding of replication competent virus occurred on fewer days in the trivalent than gD2 immunized animals while the trivalent + gD2 group had no shedding of replication competent virus. Overall, the trivalent group had genital lesions on < 1% days and shedding of replication competent virus on 0.2% days. The vaccine has outstanding potential for prevention of genital herpes in humans. PMID:28103319

  19. Evaluation of quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine efficacy against cervical and anogenital disease in subjects with serological evidence of prior vaccine type HPV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Sven-Eric; Kjaer, Susanne K; Sigurdsson, Kristján

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In the quadrivalent (types 6/11/16/18) HPV vaccine (GARDASIL((R))/SILGARD((R))) clinical program, 73% of women aged 16-26 were naïve to all vaccine HPV types. In these women, prophylactic administration of the vaccine was highly effective in preventing HPV 6/11/16/18-related cervical...... disease. Of the remaining women, 15% of had evidence of past infection with one or more vaccine HPV types (seropositive and DNA negative) at the time of enrollment. Here we present an analysis in this group of women to determine the efficacy of the HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine against new cervical and external...... anogenital disease related to the same vaccine HPV type which had previously been cleared. Vaccine tolerability in this previously infected population was also assessed. Results: Subjects were followed for an average of 40 months. Seven subjects in the placebo group developed cervical disease, and eight...

  20. Evaluation of quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine efficacy against cervical and anogenital disease in subjects with serological evidence of prior vaccine type HPV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Sven-Eric; Kjaer, Susanne K; Sigurdsson, Kristján

    2009-01-01

    In the quadrivalent (types 6/11/16/18) HPV vaccine (GARDASIL/SILGARD) clinical program, 73% of women aged 16-26 were naïve to all vaccine HPV types. In these women, prophylactic administration of the vaccine was highly effective in preventing HPV 6/11/16/18-related cervical disease....... Of the remaining women, 15% of had evidence of past infection with one or more vaccine HPV types (seropositive and DNA negative) at the time of enrollment. Here we present an analysis in this group of women to determine the efficacy of the HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine against new cervical and external anogenital disease...... related to the same vaccine HPV type which had previously been cleared. Vaccine tolerability in this previously infected population was also assessed....

  1. Immunological efficacy of Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccina-tion in Egyptian children:case series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malak Shaheen; Ashraf Madkour

    2008-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)vaccine is one of the most widely used vaccines in children.In Egypt,it is a part of the national compulsory childhood immunization program.The most controversial aspect of BCG is the variable efficacy found in different studies.This study was to evaluate the efficacy status of the available BCG vaccine in Egypt within the last 10 years (BCG-Copenhagen).The pilot cross sectional study included 597 Egyptian children randomly selected.Their ages ranged from 6 months to 10 years old (mean_5 years,medi-an:3 years).All were assessed for history of BCG vaccine intake (primary at infancy and /or secondary at school age)and examined for the presence BCG scar.A group of the vaccinated children (62 children with BCG scar and 69 children without BCG scar)were further assessed with tuberculin skin test (TST).Preva-lence of BCG vaccine intake in the studied children was 86.9% (519 /597).Efficacy in term of BCG scar af-ter vaccination was 66.6% (346 /519).However,efficacy in term of post BCG vaccination tuberculin sensiti-zation was only 3.8% (5 /131).BCG vaccination program in Egypt seems to be widely prevalent;however, the immunological efficacy of the available strain is questionable.

  2. Exploiting human memory B cell heterogeneity for improved vaccine efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Thomas Pauli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The major goal in vaccination is establishment of long-term, prophylactic humoral memory to a pathogen. Two major components to long-lived humoral memory are plasma cells for the production of specific immunoglobulin and memory B cells that survey for their specific antigen in the periphery for later affinity maturation, proliferation, and differentiation. The study of human B cell memory has been aided by the discovery of a general marker for B cell memory, expression of CD27; however, new data suggests the existence of CD27- memory B cells as well. These recently described non-canonical memory populations have increasingly pointed to the heterogeneity of the memory compartment. The novel B memory subsets in humans appear to have unique origins, localization, and functions compared to what was considered to be a classical memory B cell. In this article, we review the known B cell memory subsets, the establishment of B cell memory in vaccination and infection, and how understanding these newly described subsets can inform vaccine design and disease treatment.

  3. Comprehensive sieve analysis of breakthrough HIV-1 sequences in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Edlefsen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The RV144 clinical trial showed the partial efficacy of a vaccine regimen with an estimated vaccine efficacy (VE of 31% for protecting low-risk Thai volunteers against acquisition of HIV-1. The impact of vaccine-induced immune responses can be investigated through sieve analysis of HIV-1 breakthrough infections (infected vaccine and placebo recipients. A V1/V2-targeted comparison of the genomes of HIV-1 breakthrough viruses identified two V2 amino acid sites that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Here we extended the V1/V2 analysis to the entire HIV-1 genome using an array of methods based on individual sites, k-mers and genes/proteins. We identified 56 amino acid sites or "signatures" and 119 k-mers that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Of those, 19 sites and 38 k-mers were located in the regions comprising the RV144 vaccine (Env-gp120, Gag, and Pro. The nine signature sites in Env-gp120 were significantly enriched for known antibody-associated sites (p = 0.0021. In particular, site 317 in the third variable loop (V3 overlapped with a hotspot of antibody recognition, and sites 369 and 424 were linked to CD4 binding site neutralization. The identified signature sites significantly covaried with other sites across the genome (mean = 32.1 more than did non-signature sites (mean = 0.9 (p < 0.0001, suggesting functional and/or structural relevance of the signature sites. Since signature sites were not preferentially restricted to the vaccine immunogens and because most of the associations were insignificant following correction for multiple testing, we predict that few of the genetic differences are strongly linked to the RV144 vaccine-induced immune pressure. In addition to presenting results of the first complete-genome analysis of the breakthrough infections in the RV144 trial, this work describes a set of statistical methods and tools applicable to analysis of breakthrough infection genomes in general vaccine

  4. Comparison of vaccine efficacy for different antigen delivery systems for infectious pancreatic necrosis virus vaccines in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) in a cohabitation challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron M; Fredriksen, Børge N; Mutoloki, Stephen; Brudeseth, Bjørn; Kuo, Tsun-Yung; Marjara, Inderjit S; Dalmo, Roy A; Evensen, Øystein

    2012-06-01

    Two strains of IPNV made by reverse genetics on the Norwegian Sp strain NVI-015 (GenBank AY379740) backbone encoding the virulent (T(217)A(221)) and avirulent (P(217)T(221)) motifs were used to prepare inactivated whole virus (IWV), nanoparticle vaccines with whole virus, Escherichia coli subunit encoding truncated VP2-TA and VP2-PT, VP2-TA and VP2-PT fusion antigens with putative translocating domains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin, and plasmid DNA encoding segment A of the TA strain. Post challenge survival percentages (PCSP) showed that IWV vaccines conferred highest protection (PCSP=42-53) while nanoparticle, sub-unit recombinant and DNA vaccines fell short of the IWV vaccines in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) postsmolts challenged with the highly virulent Sp strain NVI-015 (TA strain) of IPNV after 560 degree days post vaccination. Antibody levels induced by these vaccines did not show antigenic differences between the virulent and avirulent motifs for vaccines made with the same antigen dose and delivery system after 8 weeks post vaccination. Our findings show that fish vaccinated with less potent vaccines comprising of nanoparticle, DNA and recombinant vaccines got infected much earlier and yielded to higher infection rates than fish vaccinated with IWV vaccines that were highly potent. Ability of the virulent (T(217)A(221)) and avirulent (P(217)T(221)) motifs to limit establishment of infection showed equal protection for vaccines made of the same antigen dose and delivery systems. Prevention of tissue damage linked to viral infection was eminent in the more potent vaccines than the less protective ones. Hence, there still remains the challenge of developing highly efficacious vaccines with the ability to eliminate the post challenge carrier state in IPNV vaccinology.

  5. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a recombinant subunit West Nile virus vaccine in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Michael M; Nerurkar, Vivek R; Luo, Haiyan; Cropp, Bruce; Carrion, Ricardo; de la Garza, Melissa; Coller, Beth-Ann; Clements, David; Ogata, Steven; Wong, Teri; Martyak, Tim; Weeks-Levy, Carolyn

    2009-09-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a recombinant subunit West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine was evaluated in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). The vaccine consisted of a recombinant envelope (E) protein truncated at the C-terminal end, resulting in a polypeptide containing 80% of the N-terminal amino acids of the native WNV protein (WN-80E), mixed with an adjuvant (GPI-0100). WN-80E was produced in a Drosophila melanogaster expression system with high yield and purified by immunoaffinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody specific for flavivirus E proteins. Groups of monkeys were vaccinated with formulations containing 1 or 25 microg of WN-80E antigen, and both humoral and cellular immunity were assessed after vaccination. The results demonstrated potent antibody responses to vaccination, as determined by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus-neutralizing antibody assays. All vaccinated animals responded favorably, and there was little difference in response between animals immunized with 1 or 25 microg of WN-80E. Cellular immunity was determined by lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from vaccinated animals stimulated in vitro with WN-80E. Cell-mediated immune responses varied from animal to animal within each group. About half of the animals responded with lymphoproliferation, cytokine production, or both. Again, there was little difference in response between animals immunized with a 1- or 25-microg dose of WN-80E in the vaccine formulations. In a separate experiment, groups of monkeys were immunized with the WN-80E/GPI-0100 vaccine or an adjuvant-only control formulation. Animals were then challenged by inoculation of wild-type WNV, and the level of viremia in each animal was monitored daily for 10 days. The results showed that whereas all animals in the control group had detectable viremia for at least 3 days after challenge, all of the vaccinated animals were negative on all

  6. Protective efficacy of a global HIV-1 mosaic vaccine against heterologous SHIV challenges in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouch, Dan H; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Borducchi, Erica N; Smith, Kaitlin; Stanley, Kelly; McNally, Anna G; Liu, Jinyan; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F; Seaman, Michael S; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Alter, Galit; Ferguson, Melissa; Li, Wenjun; Earl, Patricia L; Moss, Bernard; Giorgi, Elena E; Szinger, James J; Eller, Leigh Anne; Billings, Erik A; Rao, Mangala; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Weijtens, Mo; Pau, Maria G; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Korber, Bette T; Michael, Nelson L

    2013-10-24

    The global diversity of HIV-1 represents a critical challenge facing HIV-1 vaccine development. HIV-1 mosaic antigens are bioinformatically optimized immunogens designed for improved coverage of HIV-1 diversity. However, the protective efficacy of such global HIV-1 vaccine antigens has not previously been evaluated. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of bivalent HIV-1 mosaic antigens to protect rhesus monkeys against acquisition of infection following heterologous challenges with the difficult-to-neutralize simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-SF162P3. Adenovirus/poxvirus and adenovirus/adenovirus vector-based vaccines expressing HIV-1 mosaic Env, Gag, and Pol afforded a significant reduction in the per-exposure acquisition risk following repetitive, intrarectal SHIV-SF162P3 challenges. Protection against acquisition of infection correlated with vaccine-elicited binding, neutralizing, and functional nonneutralizing antibodies, suggesting that the coordinated activity of multiple antibody functions may contribute to protection against difficult-to-neutralize viruses. These data demonstrate the protective efficacy of HIV-1 mosaic antigens and suggest a potential strategy for the development of a global HIV-1 vaccine. PAPERCLIP:

  7. How to compare the efficacy of conjugate vaccines to prevent acute otitis media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wals, Philippe; Erickson, Lonny; Poirier, Béatrice; Pépin, Jacques; Pichichero, Michael E

    2009-05-11

    Although the currently available 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7-CRM(197)) has been primarily designed for the prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease, it has also demonstrated the potential to prevent acute otitis media (AOM) and its associated complications. A candidate 11-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV11-HiD), which utilizes Haemophilus influenzae (Hi)-derived protein D as a carrier has demonstrated the ability to prevent AOM caused by not only vaccine serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp), but also those caused by Hi. The methodological, clinical, and epidemiological factors influencing results of vaccine trials for AOM prevention were reviewed and a model-based approach was developed, in order to assess the relative efficacy of different vaccine formulations. Six randomized trials having AOM as a measured outcome were identified. Vaccine efficacy (VE) ranged from -1% to 34% for all-cause AOM and between 56% and 64% for AOM caused by vaccine-type Sp. Using otopathogen-specific VE rates from the FinOM and POET trials and otopathogen distributions observed in three relatively unbiased studies, VE against all-cause AOM episodes under different scenarios was modeled. The most important factor explaining variation in VE estimates was bacterial replacement, which was present in the PCV7-CRM(197) FinOM study but not in the PCV11-HiD POET study. Another contributing factor was increased protection conferred against Hi AOM by protein D. Geographical variation in the distribution of otopathogens was a third factor explaining differences between trials. More studies on the current aetiology of AOM need to be performed to accurately predict the marginal benefit of a switch from PCV7-CRM(197) to the newly licensed PCV10-HiD-DiT or to the future PCV13-CRM(197).

  8. Production and efficacy of an attenuated live vaccine against contagious ovine ecthyma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attilio Pini

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Contagious ecthyma is caused by the orf virus, a member of the family Poxviridae, genus Parapoxvirus. Morbidity in affected sheep flocks is approximately 100%, while mortality varies between 1% and 10%. A live attenuated vaccine was produced by the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell’Abruzzo e del Molise ‘G. Caporale’. Quality control was performed in accordance with the European Pharmacopoeia. A wild virus strain was attenuated through serial passages on primary chicken embryo fibroblast tissue cultures. The virus suspension was treated according to standard procedures and freeze dried. The immunising dose was 1 ml containing 104,5TCID50, administered intramuscularly. The safety of the vaccine was successfully tested by intramuscular inoculation of 20 susceptible sheep and 20 lambs with the routine dose, 10 times the immunising dose and two normal doses administered at seven-day intervals. The efficacy of the vaccine was tested using three groups of susceptible animals. The first group included 10 lambs and the second 10 adult sheep; the animals were immunised intramuscularly with 1 ml of the reconstituted vaccine. The third group, used as controls, included five sheep and five lambs. Serological reactivity was monitored by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The animals were challenged 30 days later with a pathogenic strain administered intradermally along the labial area. Vaccinated animals did not show any clinical signs of disease, whereas all the controls developed typical signs of contagious ecthyma. To confirm the efficacy of the vaccine, a field trial was conducted in four flocks affected by the disease. The trial showed that the vaccine was able to block the normal course of the disease and induce rapid recovery.

  9. Expanding vaccine efficacy estimation with dynamic models fitted to cross-sectional prevalence data post-licensure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erida Gjini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of vaccines is typically estimated prior to implementation, on the basis of randomized controlled trials. This does not preclude, however, subsequent assessment post-licensure, while mass-immunization and nonlinear transmission feedbacks are in place. In this paper we show how cross-sectional prevalence data post-vaccination can be interpreted in terms of pathogen transmission processes and vaccine parameters, using a dynamic epidemiological model. We advocate the use of such frameworks for model-based vaccine evaluation in the field, fitting trajectories of cross-sectional prevalence of pathogen strains before and after intervention. Using SI and SIS models, we illustrate how prevalence ratios in vaccinated and non-vaccinated hosts depend on true vaccine efficacy, the absolute and relative strength of competition between target and non-target strains, the time post follow-up, and transmission intensity. We argue that a mechanistic approach should be added to vaccine efficacy estimation against multi-type pathogens, because it naturally accounts for inter-strain competition and indirect effects, leading to a robust measure of individual protection per contact. Our study calls for systematic attention to epidemiological feedbacks when interpreting population level impact. At a broader level, our parameter estimation procedure provides a promising proof of principle for a generalizable framework to infer vaccine efficacy post-licensure.

  10. A New Furunculosis Challenge Method for Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy in Rainbow Trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marana, Moonika Haahr; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Skov, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    for rainbow trout and have applied it for evaluation of furunculosis vaccine efficacy. The method reveals development of systemic immunity in fish as live bacteria are introduced in the tail fin epidermis distant from the vaccine injection site (peritoneal cavity). This method seeks to mimic natural infection......-forming units (CFU) mL−1) of a 48 hour culture of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmo- nicida strain 090710-1/23 was placed at the perforation site for 60 sec whereafter fish were allowed to regain consciousness in clean freshwater. Immunohistochemistry and scanning electron microscopy illustrated the spread...

  11. The Efficacy of the BCG Vaccine against Newly Emerging Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Henao-Tamayo

    Full Text Available To date, most new vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including new recombinant versions of the current BCG vaccine, have usually been screened against the laboratory strains H37Rv or Erdman. In this study we took advantage of our recent work in characterizing an increasingly large panel of newly emerging clinical isolates [from the United States or from the Western Cape region of South Africa], to determine to what extent vaccines would protect against these [mostly high virulence] strains. We show here that both BCG Pasteur and recombinant BCG Aeras-422 [used here as a good example of the new generation BCG vaccines] protected well in both mouse and guinea pig low dose aerosol infection models against the majority of clinical isolates tested. However, Aeras-422 was not effective in a long term survival assay compared to BCG Pasteur. Protection was very strongly expressed against all of the Western Cape strains tested, reinforcing our viewpoint that any attempt at boosting BCG would be very difficult to achieve statistically. This observation is discussed in the context of the growing argument made by others that the failure of a recent vaccine trial disqualifies the further use of animal models to predict vaccine efficacy. This viewpoint is in our opinion completely erroneous, and that it is the fitness of prevalent strains in the trial site area that is the centrally important factor, an issue that is not being addressed by the field.

  12. Protective efficacy of a recombinant subunit West Nile virus vaccine in domestic geese (Anser anser)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Lieberman, M.M.; Hofmeister, E.; Nerurkar, V.R.; Wong, T.; Weeks-Levy, C.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction of the West Nile virus (WNV) to Hawai'i will undoubtedly devastate many populations of critically endangered avian species indigenous to Hawai'i. The protective efficacy of a protein-based WNV subunit vaccine formulated with adjuvant was evaluated in domestic geese as a surrogate species for the endangered Ne??ne??, the state bird of Hawai'i. Prevention of viremia following viral infection of vaccinated birds was used as the clinical endpoint of protection. ELISA and plaque reduction neutralization tests demonstrate that significant levels of vaccine antigen-specific antibody were produced in groups of birds vaccinated with 5 or 10 ??g of the WN-80E antigen formulated with ISA720 adjuvant. Moreover, after challenge with WNV, no viremia was detected in vaccinated birds, whereas viremia was detected up to 4 days after and virus was detected by oral swab for 6 days after infection among control groups. Safe and effective vaccination of managed or captive endangered bird populations will protect species with critically low numbers that could not survive the added mortality of introduced disease. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Efficacy of a BVDV subunit vaccine produced in alfalfa transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peréz Aguirreburualde, María Sol; Gómez, María Cristina; Ostachuk, Agustín; Wolman, Federico; Albanesi, Guillermo; Pecora, Andrea; Odeon, Anselmo; Ardila, Fernando; Escribano, José M; Dus Santos, María José; Wigdorovitz, Andrés

    2013-02-15

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is considered an important cause of economic loss within bovine herds worldwide. In Argentina, only the use of inactivated vaccines is allowed, however, the efficacy of inactivated BVDV vaccines is variable due to its low immunogenicity. The use of recombinant subunit vaccines has been proposed as an alternative to overcome this difficulty. Different studies on protection against BVDV infection have focused the E2 protein, supporting its putative use in subunit vaccines. Utilization of transgenic plants expressing recombinant antigens for the formulation of experimental vaccines represents an innovative and cost effective alternative to the classical fermentation systems. The aim of this work was to develop transgenic alfalfa plants (Medicago sativa, L.) expressing a truncated version of the structural protein E2 from BVDV fused to a molecule named APCH, that target to antigen presenting cells (APCH-tE2). The concentration of recombinant APCH-tE2 in alfalfa leaves was 1 μg/g at fresh weight and its expression remained stable after vegetative propagation. A methodology based an aqueous two phases system was standardized for concentration and partial purification of APCH-tE2 from alfalfa. Guinea pigs parentally immunized with leaf extracts developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies. In bovine, the APCH-tE2 subunit vaccine was able to induce BVDV-specific neutralizing antibodies. After challenge, bovines inoculated with 3 μg of APCH-tE2 produced in alfalfa transgenic plants showed complete virological protection.

  14. Effect of booster shot and investigation of vaccination efficacy period against herpesviral haematopoietic necrosis (HVHN) in goldfish Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takafumi; Maeno, Yukio

    2015-01-30

    In this study, the efficacy period of an intraperitoneal vaccination and effect of a booster shot of vaccine against herpesviral haematopoietic necrosis (HVHN) in goldfish Carassius auratus were investigated. Cell culture supernatant of cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV-2), causative agent of HVHN, propagated in goldfish fin (GFF) cells was inactivated with formalin (0.1%, v/v) for 2 days at 4 °C. Three groups of the variety Ryukin were individually intraperitoneally injected with the vaccine and each group was separately maintained in replicate tanks. After 4 weeks (Vaccinated-4w-1 and 2) and 8 weeks (Vaccinated-8w-1 and 2) from the first vaccination, the fish were CyHV-2-challenged by the immersion route (10 TCID50 l(-1)). In addition, the other vaccinated group of fish were injected with a booster vaccine 4 weeks after the first vaccination as the Vaccinated-booster groups, then the fish of these groups were CyHV-2-challenged by the immersion route (10 TCID50 l(-1)) after 8 weeks from the first vaccination. The mean of the relative percentage survival (RPS) values of the Vaccinated-4w and 8w groups showed 42.5% and 57.6%, respectively. In addition, the mean RPS value of Vaccinated-booster groups showed 63.6%. Statistical analysis showed significantly higher survival rates in all the vaccinated groups than those of the respective negative control groups using Fisher's exact test. Moreover, the survival rates of vaccinated-booster groups were significantly higher (p=0.036) compared with the respective control groups by Student's t test. The present study shows the efficacy period of the vaccine is at least 8 weeks and a booster shot showed a tendency to enhance the protection against HVHN in goldfish.

  15. Adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine: variation of emulsion components affects stability, antigen structure, and vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher B; Barnes V, Lucien; Evers, Tara; Chesko, James D; Vedvick, Thomas S; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G; Baldwin, Susan L

    2013-09-01

    Adjuvant formulations are critical components of modern vaccines based on recombinant proteins, which are often poorly immunogenic without additional immune stimulants. Oil-in-water emulsions comprise an advanced class of vaccine adjuvants that are components of approved seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. However, few reports have been published that systematically evaluate the in vitro stability and in vivo adjuvant effects of different emulsion components. To evaluate distinct classes of surfactants, oils, and excipients, for their effects on emulsion particle size stability, antigen structural interactions, and in vivo activity when formulated with a recombinant H5N1 antigen. Emulsions were manufactured by high pressure homogenization and characterized alone or in the presence of vaccine antigen by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, viscosity, pH, hemolytic activity, electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and SDS-PAGE. In vivo vaccine activity in the murine model was characterized by measuring antibody titers, antibody-secreting plasma cells, hemagglutination inhibition titers, and cytokine production. We demonstrate that surfactant class and presence of additional excipients are not critical for biological activity, whereas oil structure is crucial. Moreover, we report that simplified two-component emulsions appear more stable by particle size than more complex formulations.Finally, differences in antigen structural interactions with the various emulsions do not appear to correlate with in vivo activity. Oil-in-water emulsions can significantly enhance antibody and cellular immune responses to a pandemic influenza antigen. The dramatic differences in adjuvant activity between squalene-based emulsion and medium chain triglyceride-based emulsion are due principally to the biological activity of the oil composition rather than physical interactions of the antigen with the emulsion. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Intradermal immunization improves protective efficacy of a novel TB vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Susan L; Bertholet, Sylvie; Kahn, Maria; Zharkikh, Irina; Ireton, Gregory C; Vedvick, Thomas S; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N

    2009-05-18

    We have developed the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) fusion protein (ID83), which contains the three Mtb proteins Rv1813, Rv3620 and Rv2608. We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of ID83 in combination with several emulsion-formulated toll-like receptor agonists. The ID83 subunit vaccines containing synthetic TLR4 or TLR9 agonists generated a T helper-1 immune response and protected mice against challenge with Mtb regardless of route. The ID83 vaccine formulated with gardiquimod (a TLR7 agonist) also resulted in a protective response when administered intradermally, whereas the same vaccine given subcutaneously failed to provide protection. This highlights the need to explore different routes of immunization based on the adjuvant formulations used.

  17. MTBVAC vaccine is safe, immunogenic and confers protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in newborn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilo, Nacho; Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Monzon, Marta; Badiola, Juan; Martin, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel more efficient preventive vaccines against tuberculosis (TB) is crucial to achieve TB eradication by 2050, one of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) for the current century. MTBVAC is the first and only live attenuated vaccine based on a human isolate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis developed as BCG-replacement strategy in newborns that has entered first-in-human adult clinical trials. In this work, we characterize the safety, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of MTBVAC in a model of newborn C57/BL6 mice. Our data clearly indicate that MTBVAC is safe for newborn mice, and does not affect animal growth or organ development. In addition, MTBVAC-vaccinated mice at birth showed enhanced immunogenicity and better protection against M. tuberculosis challenge in comparison with BCG.

  18. Designing Efficacious Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Vectored Vaccines Against Ebola Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gary; Qiu, Xiangguo

    2016-01-01

    Infection with the Ebola virus (EBOV) causes an aggressive hemorrhagic disease in humans and nonhuman primates. Traditional approaches, such as vaccination with inactivated virion preparations, have had limited efficacy, whereas immunization with live-attenuated EBOV is not feasible due to the highly lethal nature of the pathogen. This has necessitated the development of other approaches towards an effective EBOV vaccine. Over the past decade, recombinant viruses expressing the EBOV glycoprotein (GP) have constituted the most promising platforms, as evidenced by their ability to protect naïve nonhuman primates from a lethal EBOV challenge. The vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is one such vector and is currently progressing through the clinical pipeline. This chapter presents methodologies for the design, cloning, rescue, and preparation of live, recombinant VSV vaccines expressing GP for research purposes.

  19. Plague in Yosemite

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-23

    Dr. Vicki Kramer, with the California Department of Public Health, discusses two cases of plague in Yosemite National Park.  Created: 3/23/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/23/2017.

  20. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF 23-VALENT PNEUMOCOCCAL POLYSACCHARIDE VACCINE IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Naumtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the clinical efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of a 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 70 patients (55 women and 15 men aged 23–70 years, including 40 patients with RA and 30 people without systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (a control group who had a recent history of 2 and more cases of lower respiratory tract infections (bronchitis, pneumonia. When included, all the patients received anti-inflammatory therapy with methotrexate (MT (n = 24, leflunomide (LEF (n = 6, or MT + tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors (n = 10. A single 0.5-ml dose of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine Pneumo-23 (Sanofi Pasteur was administered subcutaneously or intramuscularly during continuous MT or LEF therapy for the underlying disease or 3–4 weeks before the use of a TNF-α inhibitor. During control visits (1 and 3 months and 1 year after administration of the vaccine, the patients underwent physical examination and routine clinical and laboratory studies. Results. No clinical and radiological symptoms of pneumonia were recorded in any case during a 12-month follow-up. The RA and control groups showed a more than 2-fold increase in anti-pneumococcal antibody levels 1 year after vaccination. The vaccine was well tolerated by 50 patients. Sixteen patients were observed to have pain, cutaneous swelling and hyperemia and 4 had subfebrility. There were neither episodes of RA exacerbation nor new autoimmune disorders during the follow-up. Conclusion. The findings suggest that 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine shows a good clinical efficacy, adequate immunogenicity, and good tolerability in the patients with RA. 

  1. The 'experimental stable' of the BCG vaccine: safety, efficacy, proof, and standards, 1921-1933.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonah, Christian

    2005-12-01

    The anti-tuberculosis BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) vaccine was conceived and developed between 1905 and 1921 at Pasteur Institutes in France. Between 1921 and A. Calmette's death in 1933, the vaccine went through a first period of national and international production and distribution for its use in humans. In France these activities were exclusively carried out by Calmette and his collaborators at the Pasteur Institute in Paris. Initially improvised production in a small room in the cellar gave way in 1931 to the construction of the spacious and magnificent 'New laboratories for research on tuberculosis and the preparation of the BCG' within the premises of the Pasteur Institute. Presentation and image-building of the vaccine in France insisted on the fact that the BCG was not a commercial specialty but distributed free of charge. The technical monopoly of its production nevertheless lay with the Paris Pasteur Institute and standardization of scientific proof of safety, efficacy and stability was dominated by that Institute in France. In contrast, the international production and distribution of the vaccine was entrusted and transferred, free of charge, to trustworthy laboratories outside France. Multiplication of producers and users led to an increased need for standardization. For this process the analysis distinguishes between the standardization of scientific proof concerning safety, efficacy and stability of the vaccine and standardization of its medical uses. Whereas standardization was rather successful in the inter-war period in France, the international efforts remained rather unsuccessful. Only after world war II under Scandinavian leadership and in the context of mass vaccination programs supported by the WHO and UNICEF was the international standardization effectively implemented and succeeded at least to some extend.

  2. Efficacy of novel lipid-formulated whole bacterial cell vaccines against Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffin, J.F.T.; Hughes, A.D.; Liggett, S.; Farquhar, P.A.; Mackintosh, C.G.; Bakker, D.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis [MAP], the Causative agent of enteric Johne's disease, incurs significant economic losses to the livestock industry. Prophylactic vaccination can be employed as a control means, however mineral oil-based vaccines Currently in practice have limited efficacy

  3. Placebo-controlled evaluation of a modified life virus vaccine against feline infectious peritonitis: safety and efficacy under field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Fehr, D.; Holznagel, E.; Bolla, S.; Hauser, B.; Herrewegh, A.A.; Lutz, Hans

    1997-01-01

    A modified live virus vaccine against feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) was evaluated in a double blind, placebo-controlled field trial in two high-risk populations. The vaccine was found to be safe and efficacious in one population of cats that had low antibody titre against feline coronavirus (F

  4. Augmenting the efficacy of anti-cocaine catalytic antibodies through chimeric hapten design and combinatorial vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenthur, Cody J; Cai, Xiaoqing; Ellis, Beverly A; Janda, Kim D

    2017-08-15

    Given the need for further improvements in anti-cocaine vaccination strategies, a chimeric hapten (GNET) was developed that combines chemically-stable structural features from steady-state haptens with the hydrolytic functionality present in transition-state mimetic haptens. Additionally, as a further investigation into the generation of an improved bifunctional antibody pool, sequential vaccination with steady-state and transition-state mimetic haptens was undertaken. While GNET induced the formation of catalytically-active antibodies, it did not improve overall behavioral efficacy. In contrast, the resulting pool of antibodies from GNE/GNT co-administration demonstrated intermediate efficacy as compared to antibodies developed from either hapten alone. Overall, improved antibody catalytic efficiency appears necessary to achieve the synergistic benefits of combining cocaine hydrolysis with peripheral sequestration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Human plague occurrences in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neerinckx, Simon; Bertherat, Eric; Leirs, Herwig

    2010-01-01

    Plague remains a public health concern worldwide, but particularly in Africa. Despite the long-standing history of human plague, it is difficult to get a historical and recent overview of the general situation. We searched and screened available information sources on human plague occurrences...... Africa and Madagascar. We show that public health concerns regarding the current plague situation are justified and that the disease should not be neglected, despite the sometimes questionability of the numbers of cases. We conclude that improving plague surveillance strategies is absolutely necessary...

  6. Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    single antigen such as HER2 in breast cancer is likely to be insufficient - instead we need a repertoire of multiple immunologically validated T cell...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0548 TITLE: Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection

  7. BCG vaccines: their mechanisms of attenuation and impact on safety and protective efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Tran, Vanessa; Leung, Andrea S; Alexander, David C; Zhu, Baoli

    2009-02-01

    Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) was developed as an attenuated live vaccine for tuberculosis control nearly a century ago. Despite being the most widely used vaccine in human history, the mechanisms of attenuation of BCG remain poorly understood. BCG is not a single organism, but comprises a number of substrains that differ in genotypes and phenotypes. The impacts of these differences on BCG vaccine properties are largely unknown. Nevertheless, in the past decade, the development of sophisticated genome analysis techniques, coupled with advances in knowledge of the virulence mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, have provided greater insights into the attenuation and evolution of BCG. This review article discusses these new developments, focusing on molecular mechanisms that contribute to the attenuation of BCG substrains. It is evident that BCG strains comprise natural mutants of major virulence factors of M. tb, including ESX-1, PDIM/PGL and PhoP, and that BCG substrains differ markedly in virulence level. The impacts of these findings on vaccine properties including adverse reaction effect, tuberculin reactivity and protective efficacy are discussed. These new insights have extremely important implications for national immunization programs and the development of future vaccines.

  8. Efficacy comparison of adjuvants in PcrV vaccine against Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaoka, Saeko; Naito, Yoshifumi; Katoh, Hideya; Shimizu, Masaru; Kinoshita, Mao; Akiyama, Koichi; Kainuma, Atsushi; Moriyama, Kiyoshi; Ishii, Ken J; Sawa, Teiji

    2017-02-01

    Vaccination against the type III secretion system of P. aeruginosa is a potential prophylactic strategy for reducing the incidence and improving the poor prognosis of P. aeruginosa pneumonia. In this study, the efficacies of three different adjuvants, Freund's adjuvant (FA), aluminum hydroxide (alum) and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), were examined from the viewpoint of inducing PcrV-specific immunity against virulent P. aeruginosa. Mice that had been immunized intraperitoneally with recombinant PcrV formulated with one of the above adjuvants were challenged intratracheally with a lethal dose of P. aeruginosa. The PcrV-FA immunized group attained a survival rate of 91%, whereas the survival rates of the PcrV-alum and PcrV-CpG groups were 73% and 64%, respectively. In terms of hypothermia recovery after bacterial instillation, PcrV-alum was the most protective, followed by PcrV-FA and PcrV-CpG. The lung edema index was lower in the PcrV-CpG vaccination group than in the other groups. PcrV-alum immunization was associated with the greatest decrease in myeloperoxidase in infected lungs, and also decreased the number of lung bacteria to a similar number as in the PcrV-FA group. There was less neutrophil recruitment in the lungs of mice vaccinated with PcrV-alum or PcrV-CpG than in those of mice vaccinated with PcrV-FA or PcrV alone. Overall, in terms of mouse survival the PcrV-CpG vaccine, which could be a relatively safe next-generation vaccine, showed a comparable effect to the PcrV-alum vaccine.

  9. Plague: history and contemporary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoult, Didier; Mouffok, Nadjet; Bitam, Idir; Piarroux, Renaud; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Plague has caused ravaging outbreaks, including the Justinian plague and the "black death" in the Middle Ages. The causative agents of these outbreaks have been confirmed using modern molecular tests. The vector of plague during pandemics remains the subject of controversy. Nowadays, plague must be suspected in all areas where plague is endemic in rodents when patients present with adenitis or with pneumonia with a bloody expectorate. Diagnosis is more difficult in the situation of the reemergence of plague, as in Algeria for example, told by the first physician involved in that outbreak (NM). When in doubt, it is preferable to prescribe treatment with doxycycline while waiting for the test results because of the risk of fatality in individuals with plague. The typical bubo is a type of adenitis that is painful, red and nonfluctuating. The diagnosis is simple when microbiological analysis is conducted. Plague is a likely diagnosis when one sees gram-negative bacilli in lymph node aspirate or biopsy samples. Yersinia pestis grows very easily in blood cultures and is easy to identify by biochemical tests and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Pneumonic plague and septicemic plague without adenitis are difficult to diagnose, and these diagnoses are often made by chance or retrospectively when cases are not part of an epidemic or related to another specific epidemiologic context. The treatment of plague must be based on gentamicin or doxycycline. Treatment with one of these antibiotics must be started as soon as plague is suspected. Analysis of past plague epidemics by using modern laboratory tools illustrated the value of epidemic buboes for the clinical diagnosis of plague; and brought new concepts regarding its transmission by human ectoparasites. Copyright © 2012 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy of commercial canarypox vaccine for protecting Hawai'i 'Amakihi from field isolates of Avipoxvirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Wiegand, Kimberly C.; Triglia, Dennis; Jarvi, Susan I.

    2010-01-01

    At least three variants of avian pox virus are present in Hawai‘i - Fowlpox from domestic poultry and a group of genetically distinct viruses that cluster within two clades (Pox Variant 1 and Pox Variant 2) that are most similar to Canarypox based on DNA sequence of the virus 4b core protein gene. We tested whether Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi can be protected from wild virus isolates with an attenuated live Canarypox vaccine that is closely related to isolates that cluster within clade 1 (Pox Variant 1) based on sequence of the attenuated Canarypox virus 4b core protein. Thirty-one (31) Hawai`i ‘Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) with no prior physical evidence of pox infection were collected on Mauna Kea from xeric, high elevation habitats with low pox prevalence and randomly divided into two groups. One group of 16 was vaccinated with Poximmune C® while the other group received a sham vaccination with virus diluent. Four of 15 (27%) vaccinated birds developed potentially life-threatening disseminated lesions or lesions of unusually long duration, while one bird never developed a vaccine-associated lesion or "take". After vaccine-associated lesions healed, vaccinated birds were randomly divided into three groups of five and challenged with either a wild isolate of Fowlpox, a Hawai`i `Amakihi isolate of a Canarypox-like virus from clade 1 (Pox Variant 1) or a Hawai`i `Amakihi isolate of a Canarypox-like virus from clade 2 (Pox Variant 2). Similarly, three random groups of five unvaccinated ‘Amakihi were challenged with the same virus isolates. Vaccinated and unvaccinated ‘Amakihi challenged with Fowlpox had transient infections with no clinical signs of infection. Mortality in vaccinated ‘Amakihi that were challenged with Pox Variant 1 and Pox Variant 2 ranged from 0% (0/5) for Pox Variant 1 to 60% (3/5) for Pox Variant 2. Mortality in unvaccinated ‘Amakihi ranged from 40% (2/5) for Pox Variant 1 to 100% (5/5) for Pox Variant 2. While the vaccine provided some

  11. Efficacy and safety of seven-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine in American Indian children: group randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Katherine L; Moulton, Lawrence H; Reid, Raymond; Weatherholtz, Robert; Oski, Jane; Brown, Laura; Kumar, Gaurav; Parkinson, Alan; Hu, Diana; Hackell, Jill; Chang, Ih; Kohberger, Robert; Siber, George; Santosham, Mathuram

    2003-08-02

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main cause of invasive bacterial disease in children aged younger than 2 years. Navajo and White Mountain Apache children have some of the highest rates of invasive pneumococcal disease documented in the world. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of a seven-valent polysaccharide protein conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PnCRM7) against such disease. In a group-randomised study, we gave this vaccine to children younger than 2 years from the Navajo and White Mountain Apache Indian reservations; meningococcal type C conjugate vaccine (MnCC) served as the control vaccine. Vaccine schedules were determined by age at enrollment. We recorded episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease and serotyped isolates. Analyses were by intention to treat and per protocol. 8292 children enrolled in the trial. In the per protocol analysis of the primary efficacy group (children enrolled by 7 months of age) there were eight cases of vaccine serotype disease in the controls and two in the PnCRM7 group; in the intention-to-treat analysis we noted 11 cases of vaccine serotype disease in the MnCC control group and two in the PnCRM7 group. After group randomisation had been controlled for, the per protocol primary efficacy of PnCRM7 was 76.8% (95% CI -9.4% to 95.1%) and the intention-to-treat total primary efficacy was 82.6% (21.4% to 96.1%). PnCRM7 vaccine prevents vaccine serotype invasive pneumococcal disease even in a high risk population. Other regions with similar disease burden should consider including this vaccine in the routine childhood vaccine schedule.

  12. Immune protection duration and efficacy stability of DNA vaccine encoding Eimeria tenella TA4 and chicken IL-2 against coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaokai; Zhao, Xiaofang; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Li, Xiangrui

    2017-04-01

    In our previous study, an effective DNA vaccine encoding Eimeria tenella TA4 and chicken IL-2 was constructed. In the present study, the immunization dose of the DNA vaccine pVAX1.0-TA4-IL-2 was further optimized. With the optimized dose, the dynamics of antibodies induced by the DNA vaccine was determined using indirect ELISA. To evaluate the immune protection duration of the DNA vaccine, two-week-old chickens were intramuscularly immunized twice and the induced efficacy was evaluated by challenging with E. tenella at 5, 9, 13, 17 and 21weeks post the last immunization (PLI) separately. To evaluate the efficacy stability of the DNA vaccine, two-week-old chickens were immunized with 3 batches of the DNA vaccine, and the induced efficacy was evaluated by challenging with E. tenella. The results showed that the optimal dose was 25μg. The induced antibody level persisted until 10weeks PPI. For the challenge time of 5 and 9weeks PLI, the immunization resulted in ACIs of 182.28 and 162.23 beyond 160, showing effective protection. However, for the challenge time of 13, 17 and 21weeks PLI, the immunization resulted in ACIs below 160 which means poor protection. Therefore, the immune protection duration of the DNA vaccination was at least 9weeks PLI. DNA immunization with three batches DNA vaccine resulted in ACIs of 187.52, 191.57 and 185.22, which demonstrated that efficacies of the three batches DNA vaccine were effective and stable. Overall, our results indicate that DNA vaccine pVAX1.0-TA4-IL-2 has the potential to be developed as effective vaccine against coccidiosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel rabies vaccine based-on toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) agonist PIKA adjuvant exhibiting excellent safety and efficacy in animal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi [Yisheng Biopharma. Co., Ltd., Beijing (China); Zhang, Shoufeng [Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Changchun (China); Li, Wei [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, Beijing (China); Hu, Yuchi; Zhao, Jinyan [Beijing Institute for Drug Control, Beijing (China); Liu, Fang; Lin, Haixiang; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Liliang; Xu, Shu [Yisheng Biopharma. Co., Ltd., Beijing (China); Hu, Rongliang, E-mail: ronglianghu@hotmail.com [Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Changchun (China); Shao, Hui, E-mail: hui.shao@yishengbio.com [Yisheng Biopharma. Co., Ltd., Beijing (China); Li, Lietao, E-mail: lietao.li@gmail.com [Yisheng Biopharma. Co., Ltd., Beijing (China)

    2016-02-15

    Vaccination alone is not sufficiently effective to protect human from post-exposure rabies virus infection due to delayed generation of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and weak cellular immunity. Therefore, it is vital to develop safer and more efficacious vaccine against rabies. PIKA, a stabilized chemical analog of double-stranded RNA that interacts with TLR3, was employed as adjuvant of rabies vaccine. The efficacy and safety of PIKA rabies vaccine were evaluated. The results showed that PIKA rabies vaccine enhanced both humoral and cellular immunity. After viral challenge, PIKA rabies vaccine protected 70–80% of animals, while the survival rate of non-adjuvant vaccine group (control) was 20–30%. According to the results of toxicity tests, PIKA and PIKA rabies vaccine are shown to be well tolerated in mice. Thus, this study indicates that PIKA rabies vaccine is an effective and safe vaccine which has the potential to develop next-generation rabies vaccine and encourage the start of clinical studies. - Highlights: • Vaccination alone is not effective to protect human from rabies virus infection due to delayed generation of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) and weak cellular immunity. • Therefore, it is vital to develop safer and more efficacious vaccine against rabies. PIKA, a stabilized chemical analog of double-stranded RNA that interacts with TLR3, was employed as an adjuvant of rabies vaccine. • The efficacy and safety of PIKA rabies vaccine was evaluated in mice. • The results showed that PIKA rabies vaccine enhanced both humoral and cellular immunity. • After viral challenge, PIKA rabies vaccine protected 70–80% of animals, while the survival rate of non-adjuvant vaccine group was only 20–30%. • According to the results of toxicity tests, PIKA and PIKA rabies vaccine are shown to be well tolerated in mice. • Thus, this study indicates that PIKA rabies vaccine is an effective and safe vaccine which has the potential to

  14. Efficacy of RTS,S/AS01E vaccine against malaria in children 5 to 17 months of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejon, Philip; Lusingu, John; Olotu, Ally

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a pressing global health problem. A previous study of the malaria vaccine RTS,S (which targets the circumsporozoite protein), given with an adjuvant system (AS02A), showed a 30% rate of protection against clinical malaria in children 1 to 4 years of age....... We evaluated the efficacy of RTS,S given with a more immunogenic adjuvant system (AS01E) in children 5 to 17 months of age, a target population for vaccine licensure. METHODS: We conducted a double-blind, randomized trial of RTS,S/AS01E vaccine as compared with rabies vaccine in children in Kilifi...

  15. Protective efficacy and immunogenicity of a combinatory DNA vaccine against Influenza A Virus and the Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Stab

    Full Text Available The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV and Influenza A Virus (IAV are both two major causative agents of severe respiratory tract infections in humans leading to hospitalization and thousands of deaths each year. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a combinatory DNA vaccine in comparison to the single component vaccines against both diseases in a mouse model. Intramuscular electroporation with plasmids expressing the hemagglutinin (HA of IAV and the F protein of RSV induced strong humoral immune responses regardless if they were delivered in combination or alone. In consequence, high neutralizing antibody titers were detected, which conferred protection against a lethal challenge with IAV. Furthermore, the viral load in the lungs after a RSV infection could be dramatically reduced in vaccinated mice. Concurrently, substantial amounts of antigen-specific, polyfunctional CD8⁺ T-cells were measured after vaccination. Interestingly, the cellular response to the hemagglutinin was significantly reduced in the presence of the RSV-F encoding plasmid, but not vice versa. Although these results indicate a suppressive effect of the RSV-F protein, the protective efficacy of the combinatory vaccine was comparable to the efficacy of both single-component vaccines. In conclusion, the novel combinatory vaccine against RSV and IAV may have great potential to reduce the rate of severe respiratory tract infections in humans without increasing the number of necessary vaccinations.

  16. Protective efficacy and immunogenicity of a combinatory DNA vaccine against Influenza A Virus and the Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stab, Viktoria; Nitsche, Sandra; Niezold, Thomas; Storcksdieck Genannt Bonsmann, Michael; Wiechers, Andrea; Tippler, Bettina; Hannaman, Drew; Ehrhardt, Christina; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas; Tenbusch, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and Influenza A Virus (IAV) are both two major causative agents of severe respiratory tract infections in humans leading to hospitalization and thousands of deaths each year. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a combinatory DNA vaccine in comparison to the single component vaccines against both diseases in a mouse model. Intramuscular electroporation with plasmids expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) of IAV and the F protein of RSV induced strong humoral immune responses regardless if they were delivered in combination or alone. In consequence, high neutralizing antibody titers were detected, which conferred protection against a lethal challenge with IAV. Furthermore, the viral load in the lungs after a RSV infection could be dramatically reduced in vaccinated mice. Concurrently, substantial amounts of antigen-specific, polyfunctional CD8⁺ T-cells were measured after vaccination. Interestingly, the cellular response to the hemagglutinin was significantly reduced in the presence of the RSV-F encoding plasmid, but not vice versa. Although these results indicate a suppressive effect of the RSV-F protein, the protective efficacy of the combinatory vaccine was comparable to the efficacy of both single-component vaccines. In conclusion, the novel combinatory vaccine against RSV and IAV may have great potential to reduce the rate of severe respiratory tract infections in humans without increasing the number of necessary vaccinations.

  17. Efficacy of a locally produced, Chinese Vi polysaccharide typhoid fever vaccine during six years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Camilo J; Hong-Hui, Yang; Ning, Wang; Qion, Gao; Qun, Deng; Xiaolei, Ma; Baode, Zhou; Liu, Wei; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Ochiai, R Leon; Wang, Xuan-Yi; Kim, Deok-Ryun; Zhi-Yi, Xu; Bai-Qing, Dong; Galindo, Claudia M; Clemens, John D

    2005-12-01

    A locally produced Vi polysaccharide vaccine against typhoid fever was licensed in China following two placebo-controlled, efficacy trials conducted in the early 1990s in Baoying, Jiangsu Province, and Quan-zhou, Guangxi Province. The two trials each enrolled over 80,000 participants and followed participants for 12 and 19 months post-vaccination, respectively. To define the long-term efficacy of this vaccine, we retrospectively assessed the occurrence of typhoid fever, diagnosed with clinical and serological criteria, in the two study populations for 6 years following vaccination. During the second year following vaccination, vaccine efficacy was 100% (95% CI: 17%, 100%) in Baoying and 85% (95% CI: 49%, 96%) in Quan-zhou. There was suggestive protection (51%; PE: -95%, 88%) during the third year in Baoying, nearly identical to the level observed in the third year of an earlier trial in South Africa. These results confirm that this vaccine protects for at least 2 years, and are consistent with the assertion that the vaccine protects for at least 3 years.

  18. Statistical methodology for the evaluation of vaccine efficacy in a phase III multi-centre trial of the RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine in African children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lievens Marc

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been much debate about the appropriate statistical methodology for the evaluation of malaria field studies and the challenges in interpreting data arising from these trials. Methods The present paper describes, for a pivotal phase III efficacy of the RTS, S/AS01 malaria vaccine, the methods of the statistical analysis and the rationale for their selection. The methods used to estimate efficacy of the primary course of vaccination, and of a booster dose, in preventing clinical episodes of uncomplicated and severe malaria, and to determine the duration of protection, are described. The interpretation of various measures of efficacy in terms of the potential public health impact of the vaccine is discussed. Conclusions The methodology selected to analyse the clinical trial must be scientifically sound, acceptable to regulatory authorities and meaningful to those responsible for malaria control and public health policy. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00866619

  19. Molecular history of plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drancourt, M; Raoult, D

    2016-11-01

    Plague, a deadly zoonose caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, has been firmly documented in 39 historical burial sites in Eurasia that date from the Bronze Age to two historical pandemics spanning the 6th to 18th centuries. Palaeomicrobiologic data, including gene and spacer sequences, whole genome sequences and protein data, confirmed that two historical pandemics swept over Europe from probable Asian sources and possible two-way-ticket journeys back from Europe to Asia. These investigations made it possible to address questions regarding the potential sources and routes of transmission by completing the standard rodent and rodent-flea transmission scheme. This suggested that plague was transmissible by human ectoparasites such as lice, and that Y. pestis was able to persist for months in the soil, which is a source of reinfection for burrowing mammals. The analyses of seven complete genome sequences from the Bronze Age indicated that Y. pestis was probably not an ectoparasite-borne pathogen in these populations. Further analyses of 14 genomes indicated that the Justinian pandemic strains may have formed a clade distinct from the one responsible for the second pandemic, spanning in Y. pestis branch 1, which also comprises the third pandemic strains. Further palaeomicrobiologic studies must tightly connect with historical and anthropologic studies to resolve questions regarding the actual sources of plague in ancient populations, alternative routes of transmission and resistance traits. Answering these questions will broaden our understanding of plague epidemiology so we may better face the actuality of this deadly infection in countries where it remains epidemic. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Protective efficacy of standard Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccination in infants aged 4.5 months: interim analysis of a randomised clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Cesário L; Garly, May-Lill; Balé, Carlito; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Ravn, Henrik; Whittle, Hilton C.; Lisse, Ida M.; Aaby, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the protective efficacy of measles vaccination in infants in a low income country before 9 months of age. Design Randomised clinical trial. Participants 1333 infants aged 4.5 months: 441 in treatment group and 892 in control group. Setting Urban area in Guinea-Bissau. Intervention Measles vaccination using standard titre Edmonston-Zagreb vaccine at 4.5 months of age. Main outcome measures Vaccine efficacy against measles infection, admission to hospital for measles, and m...

  1. Evaluation of the efficacy provided by a Recombinant Canarypox-Vectored Equine West Nile Virus vaccine against an experimental West Nile Virus intrathecal challenge in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siger, Leonardo; Bowen, Richard; Karaca, Kemal; Murray, Michael; Jagannatha, Shyla; Echols, Brandy; Nordgren, Robert; Minke, Jules M

    2006-01-01

    Efficacy of the Recombitek Equine West Nile Virus (WNV) vaccine was evaluated against a WNV intrathecal challenge model that results in WNV-induced clinical disease. Ten vaccinated (twice at days 0 and 35) and 10 control horses were challenged 2 weeks after administration of the second vaccine with a virulent WNV by intrathecal administration. After the challenge, eight of 10 controls developed clinical signs of encephalomyelitis whereas one vaccinate exhibited muscle fasciculation only once. Nine controls and one vaccinate developed a fever. Histopathology revealed mild to moderate nonsuppurative encephalitis in eight controls and one vaccinate. None of the vaccinates and all of the controls developed WNV viremia after challenge. All vaccinated horses developed antibodies to WNV after vaccination. These and results of previous studies demonstrate efficacy of the Recombitek WNV vaccine against WNV-induced clinical disease and natural challenge with WNV-infected mosquitoes.

  2. A pathway EM-algorithm for estimating vaccine efficacy with a non-monotone validation set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Chen, Yanjun; Kenah, Eben

    2014-09-01

    Here, we consider time-to-event data where individuals can experience two or more types of events that are not distinguishable from one another without further confirmation, perhaps by laboratory test. The event type of primary interest can occur only once. The other types of events can recur. If the type of a portion of the events is identified, this forms a validation set. However, even if a random sample of events are tested, confirmations can be missing nonmonotonically, creating uncertainty about whether an individual is still at risk for the event of interest. For example, in a study to estimate efficacy of an influenza vaccine, an individual may experience a sequence of symptomatic respiratory illnesses caused by various pathogens over the season. Often only a limited number of these episodes are confirmed in the laboratory to be influenza-related or not. We propose two novel methods to estimate covariate effects in this survival setting, and subsequently vaccine efficacy. The first is a pathway expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm that takes into account all pathways of event types in an individual compatible with that individual's test outcomes. The pathway EM iteratively estimates baseline hazards that are used to weight possible event types. The second method is a non-iterative pathway piecewise validation method that does not estimate the baseline hazards. These methods are compared with a previous simpler method. Simulation studies suggest mean squared error is lower in the efficacy estimates when the baseline hazards are estimated, especially at higher hazard rates. We use the pathway EM-algorithm to reevaluate the efficacy of a trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine during the 2003-2004 influenza season in Temple-Belton, Texas, and compare our results with a previously published analysis. © 2014, The International Biometric Society.

  3. LONG-TERM EFFICACY AND IMMUNOLOGICAL MEMORY OF PLASMA-DERIVED HEPATITIS B VACCINE 11 YEARS AFTER INITIAL INOCULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and the immunological memory of plasma-derived hepatitis B vac- cine 11 years after the initial inoculation. Methods A randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled trial design was used. Results The immunogenicity and protection rate of the vaccine were good 1 1 years after vaccination, how- ever, from 9 to 11 years after vaccination, the perscn year HBV infection rate showed no noticeable difference be- tween the vaccine group and placebo-controls. Furthermore, the immunological memory remained 11 years after in- oculation, but was significantly lower than that observed in the past 10 years. Conclusion Vaccine protection wanes over the years. More information is needed to define the appropriate time for vaccine booster doses.

  4. Molecular evolutionary dynamics of Ross River virus and implications for vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anita; Lowry, Kym; Aaskov, John; Holmes, Edward C; Kitchen, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Ross River virus (RRV) is a mosquito-borne member of the genus Alphavirus that causes epidemic polyarthritis in humans, costing the Australian health system at least US$10 million annually. Recent progress in RRV vaccine development requires accurate assessment of RRV genetic diversity and evolution, particularly as they may affect the utility of future vaccination. In this study, we provide novel RRV genome sequences and investigate the evolutionary dynamics of RRV from time-structured E2 gene datasets. Our analysis indicates that, although RRV evolves at a similar rate to other alphaviruses (mean evolutionary rate of approx. 8x10(-4) nucleotide substitutions per site year(-1)), the relative genetic diversity of RRV has been continuously low through time, possibly as a result of purifying selection imposed by replication in a wide range of natural host and vector species. Together, these findings suggest that vaccination against RRV is unlikely to result in the rapid antigenic evolution that could compromise the future efficacy of current RRV vaccines.

  5. EFFICACY OF VACCINE PREVENTION OF HPV-ASSOCIATED DISEASES AND CERVICAL CANCER IN THE MOSCOW REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Krasnopol'skiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on high prevalence of papilloma virus infection and associated disorders in adults as well as in adolescents are becoming more and more frequently published in the world and domestic literature. The most severe outcome of the infection is cervical cancer which takes the second place in women of reproductive age. At present, the armamentarium of obstetricians, gynecologists, pediatricians and oncologists is enriched by a recombinant vaccine protecting against human papilloma virus and representing one of effective methods of prevention of HPV-associated disorders. There are two prophylactic vaccines in the world (quadrivalent Gardasil® and bivalent Cervarix®, which are used in 44 countries. One of the first results proving efficacy of vaccination is a decrease of incidence of anogenital warts that is well described in foreign literature. In the Moscow region, as a result of vaccination performed from 2008 to 2013, a decrease of incidence of anogenital warts in girls is also observed.

  6. The protective efficacy of chimeric SO7/IL-2 DNA vaccine against coccidiosis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongyan; Qiu, Baofeng; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Song, Xiaokai; Li, Xiangrui

    2013-06-01

    The protective efficacy of recombinant vaccines encoding an Eimeria refractile body antigen SO7 was assessed in broiler chickens following oral infection with Eimeria tenella. The SO7 and chicken IL-2 genes were cloned into the expression vector pVAX1 consecutively to construct DNA vaccines pVAX-SO7 and pVAX-SO7-IL-2. Expression of SO7 and IL-2 gene transcripts and proteins encoded by the plasmid DNAs in vivo was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Chickens were inoculated with 100 μg of plasmids pVAX-SO7 or pVAX-SO7-IL-2, or 200 μg of recombinant SO7 protein or chicken IL-2 protein by leg intramuscular injection. At 28days of age, all chickens except the unchallenged control group were challenged orally with 5×10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. tenella. All chickens were euthanized to determine the effects of immunization on the 7th day post-challenge. The results showed that both DNA vaccines containing the SO7 gene and the recombinant SO7 protein could obviously alleviate body weight loss and cecal lesions compared with unvaccinated and challenged control. These findings also suggested that chicken IL-2 could effectively enhance the immunity of SO7 against E. tenella challenge compared with vaccination using pVAX-SO7 alone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunogenicity and efficacy of chimeric dengue vaccine (DENVax) formulations in interferon-deficient AG129 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewoo, Joseph N; Kinney, Richard M; Powell, Tim D; Arguello, John J; Silengo, Shawn J; Partidos, Charalambos D; Huang, Claire Y-H; Stinchcomb, Dan T; Osorio, Jorge E

    2012-02-14

    Formulations of chimeric dengue vaccine (DENVax) viruses containing the pre-membrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes of serotypes 1-4 expressed in the context of the attenuated DENV-2 PDK-53 genome were tested for safety, immunogenicity and efficacy in interferon receptor knock-out mice (AG129). Monovalent formulations were safe and elicited robust neutralizing antibody responses to the homologous virus and only limited cross-reactivity to other serotypes. A single dose of monovalent DENVax-1, -2, or -3 vaccine provided eighty or greater percent protection against both wild-type (wt) DENV-1 (Mochizuki strain) and DENV-2 (New Guinea C strain) challenge viruses. A single dose of monovalent DENVax-4 also provided complete protection against wt DENV-1 challenge and significantly increased the survival times after challenge with wt DENV-2. In studies using tetravalent mixtures, DENVax ratios were identified that: (i) caused limited viremia, (ii) induced serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies to all four DENV serotypes with different hierarchies, and (iii) conferred full protection against clinical signs of disease following challenge with either wt DENV-1 or DENV-2 viruses. Overall, these data highlight the immunogenic profile of DENVax, a novel candidate tetravalent dengue vaccine and the advantage of sharing a common attenuated genomic backbone among the DENVax monovalent vaccines that confer protection against homologous or heterologous virus challenge.

  8. Plague and climate: scales matter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Ben-Ari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Plague is enzootic in wildlife populations of small mammals in central and eastern Asia, Africa, South and North America, and has been recognized recently as a reemerging threat to humans. Its causative agent Yersinia pestis relies on wild rodent hosts and flea vectors for its maintenance in nature. Climate influences all three components (i.e., bacteria, vectors, and hosts of the plague system and is a likely factor to explain some of plague's variability from small and regional to large scales. Here, we review effects of climate variables on plague hosts and vectors from individual or population scales to studies on the whole plague system at a large scale. Upscaled versions of small-scale processes are often invoked to explain plague variability in time and space at larger scales, presumably because similar scale-independent mechanisms underlie these relationships. This linearity assumption is discussed in the light of recent research that suggests some of its limitations.

  9. Plague and climate: scales matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Tamara; Ben Ari, Tamara; Neerinckx, Simon; Gage, Kenneth L; Kreppel, Katharina; Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2011-09-01

    Plague is enzootic in wildlife populations of small mammals in central and eastern Asia, Africa, South and North America, and has been recognized recently as a reemerging threat to humans. Its causative agent Yersinia pestis relies on wild rodent hosts and flea vectors for its maintenance in nature. Climate influences all three components (i.e., bacteria, vectors, and hosts) of the plague system and is a likely factor to explain some of plague's variability from small and regional to large scales. Here, we review effects of climate variables on plague hosts and vectors from individual or population scales to studies on the whole plague system at a large scale. Upscaled versions of small-scale processes are often invoked to explain plague variability in time and space at larger scales, presumably because similar scale-independent mechanisms underlie these relationships. This linearity assumption is discussed in the light of recent research that suggests some of its limitations.

  10. Plague: Clinics, Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Vladimir V; Gao, He; Zhou, Lei; Anisimov, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Plague still poses a significant threat to human health and as a reemerging infection is unfamiliar to the majority of the modern medical doctors. In this chapter, the plague is described according to Dr. Nikiforov's experiences in the diagnosis and treatment of patients, and also a review of the relevant literature on this subject is provided. The main modern methods and criteria for laboratory diagnosis of plague are briefly described. The clinical presentations include the bubonic and pneumonic form, septicemia, rarely pharyngitis, and meningitis. Early diagnosis and the prompt initiation of treatment reduce the mortality rate associated with bubonic plague and septicemic plague to 5-50 %; although a delay of more than 24 h in the administration of antibiotics and antishock treatment can be fatal for plague patients. Most human cases can successfully be treated with antibiotics.

  11. Plague and Climate: Scales Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ari, Tamara; Neerinckx, Simon; Gage, Kenneth L.; Kreppel, Katharina; Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    2011-01-01

    Plague is enzootic in wildlife populations of small mammals in central and eastern Asia, Africa, South and North America, and has been recognized recently as a reemerging threat to humans. Its causative agent Yersinia pestis relies on wild rodent hosts and flea vectors for its maintenance in nature. Climate influences all three components (i.e., bacteria, vectors, and hosts) of the plague system and is a likely factor to explain some of plague's variability from small and regional to large scales. Here, we review effects of climate variables on plague hosts and vectors from individual or population scales to studies on the whole plague system at a large scale. Upscaled versions of small-scale processes are often invoked to explain plague variability in time and space at larger scales, presumably because similar scale-independent mechanisms underlie these relationships. This linearity assumption is discussed in the light of recent research that suggests some of its limitations. PMID:21949648

  12. Reversion to virulence and efficacy of an attenuated Canarypox vaccine in Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Hemignathus virens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Carter T; Wiegand, Kimberly C; Triglia, Dennis; Jarvi, Susan I

    2012-12-01

    Vaccines may be effective tools for protecting small populations of highly susceptible endangered, captive-reared, or translocated Hawaiian honeycreepers from introduced Avipoxvirus, but their efficacy has not been evaluated. An attenuated Canarypox vaccine that is genetically similar to one of two passerine Avipoxvirus isolates from Hawai'i and distinct from Fowlpox was tested to evaluate whether Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) can be protected from wild isolates of Avipoxvirus from the Hawaiian Islands. Thirty-one (31) Hawai'i 'Amakihi were collected from high-elevation habitats on Mauna Kea Volcano, where pox transmission is rare, and randomly divided into two groups. One group was vaccinated with Poximune C, whereas the other group received a sham vaccination with sterile water. Four of 15 (27%) vaccinated birds developed life-threatening disseminated lesions or lesions of unusually long duration, whereas one bird never developed a vaccine-associated lesion or "take." After vaccine lesions healed, vaccinated birds were randomly divided into three groups of five and challenged with either a wild isolate of Fowlpox (FP) from Hawai'i, a Hawai'i 'Amakihi isolate of a Canarypox-like virus (PV1), or a Hawai'i 'Amakihi isolate of a related, but distinct, passerine Avipoxvirus (PV2). Similarly, three random groups of five unvaccinated 'Amakihi were challenged with the same virus isolates. Vaccinated and unvaccinated 'Amakihi challenged with FP had transient infections with no clinical signs of infection. Mortality in vaccinated 'Amakihi challenged with PV1 and PV2 ranged from 0% (0/5) for PV1 to 60% (3/5) for PV2. Mortality in unvaccinated 'Amakihi ranged from 40% (2/5) for PV1 to 100% (5/5) for PV2. Although the vaccine provided some protection against PV1, both potential for vaccine reversion and low efficacy against PV2 preclude its use in captive or wild honeycreepers.

  13. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  14. Plague in Tanzania: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziwa, Michael H; Matee, Mecky I; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Kilonzo, Bukheti S

    2013-10-01

    Human plague remains a public health concern in Tanzania despite its quiescence in most foci for years, considering the recurrence nature of the disease. Despite the long-standing history of this problem, there have not been recent reviews of the current knowledge on plague in Tanzania. This work aimed at providing a current overview of plague in Tanzania in terms of its introduction, potential reservoirs, possible causes of plague persistence and repeated outbreaks in the country. Plague is believed to have been introduced to Tanzania from the Middle East through Uganda with the first authentication in 1886. Xenopsylla brasiliensis, X. cheopis, Dinopsyllus lypusus, and Pulex irritans are among potential vectors while Lophuromys spp, Praomys delectorum, Graphiurus murinus, Lemniscomys striatus, Mastomys natalensis, and Rattus rattus may be the potential reservoirs. Plague persistence and repeated outbreaks in Tanzania are likely to be attributable to a complexity of factors including cultural, socio-economical, environmental and biological. Minimizing or preventing people's proximity to rodents is probably the most effective means of preventing plague outbreaks in humans in the future. In conclusion, much has been done on plague diagnosis in Tanzania. However, in order to achieve new insights into the features of plague epidemiology in the country, and to reorganize an effective control strategy, we recommend broader studies that will include the ecology of the pathogen, vectors and potential hosts, identifying the reservoirs, dynamics of infection and landscape ecology.

  15. Four year efficacy of prophylactic human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine against low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and anogenital warts: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillner, Joakim; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M;

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata)....

  16. Investigating the efficacy of monovalent and tetravalent dengue vaccine formulations against DENV-4 challenge in AG129 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Jeremy; Chu, Haiyan; O'Day, Peter; Pyles, Richard; Bourne, Nigel; Das, Subash C; Milligan, Gregg N; Barrett, Alan D T; Partidos, Charalambos D; Osorio, Jorge E

    2014-11-12

    Dengue (DEN) is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease, with a major impact on global health and economics, caused by four serologically and distinct viruses termed DENV-1 to DENV-4. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine to prevent DEN. We have developed a live attenuated tetravalent DENV vaccine candidate (TDV) (formally known as DENVax) that has shown promise in preclinical and clinical studies and elicits neutralizing antibody responses to all four DENVs. As these responses are lowest to DENV-4 we have used the AG129 mouse model to investigate the immunogenicity of monovalent TDV-4 or tetravalent TDV vaccines, and their efficacy against lethal DENV-4 challenge. Since the common backbone of TDV is based on an attenuated DENV-2 strain (TDV-2) we also tested the efficacy of TDV-2 against DENV-4 challenge. Single doses of the tetravalent or monovalent vaccines elicited neutralizing antibodies, anti-NS1 antibodies, and cellular responses to both envelope and nonstructural proteins. All vaccinated animals were protected against challenge at 60 days post-immunization, whereas all control animals died. Investigation of DENV-4 viremias post-challenge showed that only the control animals had high viremias on day 3 post-challenge, whereas vaccinated mice had no detectable viremia. Overall, these data highlight the excellent immunogenicity and efficacy profile of our candidate dengue vaccine in AG129 mice.

  17. NINE-YEAR EFFICACY OF HEPATITIS B VACCINATION WITHLOW-DOSE IN THE THIRD INJECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective In order to observe the efficacy of low-dose in the third injection of hepatitis B vaccine. Methods 126 children aged 5~9 years were enrolled in a double-blind, place-controlled and randomized field trial. They were randomly divided into 10μg and 20μg dose group, and were redivided into 2μg, 5μg, 10μg, 20μg or non-in jected subgroups when the third booster injections were given. Results During the 9 years follow-up, the differences of the anti-HBs levels(GMT) among the groups were not significant at every time (P > 0. 05). The GMTs at the ninth year(T108) were 7. 0, 6. 4, 9.9, 6.1, 9.7, 5. 4 and 7.4, respectively (P> 0. 05). The HBV infection rates among the groups had no significant difference (P > 0. 05). The protective rates in the groups were all higher than 75% at T108. Conclusion According to the data, it can be concluded that the third injection with low-dose has no influence on the vaccine efficacy(either short-term or long-term efficacy).

  18. Streptococcus suis bacterin and subunit vaccine immunogenicities and protective efficacies against serotypes 2 and 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, Christoph Georg; Kock, Christoph; Beineke, Andreas; Bennecke, Katharina; Goethe, Ralph; Schröder, Charlotte; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Streptococcus suis causes numerous diseases in pigs, most importantly, meningitis, arthritis, septicemia, and bronchopneumonia. One of the major problems in modern swine production is the lack of a vaccine protecting against more than one S. suis serotype. The objective of this study was to determine the protective efficacy of a serotype 2 murein-associated protein (MAP) fraction subunit vaccine in comparison to that of a bacterin against experimental challenge with serotype 2 (containing muramidase-released protein [MRP], extracellular factor, and suilysin [SLY]) and serotype 9 (containing MRP variant MRP* and SLY) strains. MAP was shown to include different surface-associated proteins, such as the MRP and surface antigen one (SAO) expressed by both pathotypes used for challenge. The results of this study demonstrated that the serotype 2 bacterin induced protective immunity against homologous challenge. In contrast, the protective efficacy of the MAP subunit vaccine was low, though MAP immunization resulted in high serum immunoglobulin G2 titers against MRP and SAO. Importantly, immunization with bacterin but not with MAP induced opsonizing antibody titers against the serotype 2 strain, and these antibody titers were found to correlate with protection. However, after absorption with a nonencapsulated isogenic mutant, the sera from bacterin-immunized piglets failed to facilitate neutrophil killing, indicating that antibodies directed against capsule may not have been essential for opsonophagocytosis. Furthermore, induction of opsonizing antibodies against serotype 9 was not detectable in the group receiving bacterin or in the group receiving the MAP vaccine. In agreement, protection against the heterologous serotype 9 strain was low in both groups. Thus, identification of an antigen protecting against these two important S. suis pathotypes remains an important goal of future studies.

  19. The Recombinant Bacille Calmette–Guérin Vaccine VPM1002: Ready for Clinical Efficacy Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie E. Nieuwenhuizen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB, bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG, protects against severe extrapulmonary forms of TB but is virtually ineffective against the most prevalent form of the disease, pulmonary TB. BCG was genetically modified at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology to improve its immunogenicity by replacing the urease C encoding gene with the listeriolysin encoding gene from Listeria monocytogenes. Listeriolysin perturbates the phagosomal membrane at acidic pH. Urease C is involved in neutralization of the phagosome harboring BCG. Its depletion allows for rapid phagosome acidification and promotes phagolysosome fusion. As a result, BCGΔureC::hly (VPM1002 promotes apoptosis and autophagy and facilitates release of mycobacterial antigens into the cytosol. In preclinical studies, VPM1002 has been far more efficacious and safer than BCG. The vaccine was licensed to Vakzine Projekt Management and later sublicensed to the Serum Institute of India Pvt. Ltd., the largest vaccine producer in the world. The vaccine has passed phase I clinical trials in Germany and South Africa, demonstrating its safety and immunogenicity in young adults. It was also successfully tested in a phase IIa randomized clinical trial in healthy South African newborns and is currently undergoing a phase IIb study in HIV exposed and unexposed newborns. A phase II/III clinical trial will commence in India in 2017 to assess efficacy against recurrence of TB. The target indications for VPM1002 are newborn immunization to prevent TB as well as post-exposure immunization in adults to prevent TB recurrence. In addition, a Phase I trial in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients has been completed, and phase II trials are ongoing. This review describes the development of VPM1002 from the drawing board to its clinical assessment.

  20. Efficacy of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus vaccine in pigs against the pandemic influenza virus is superior to commercially available swine influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, W L A; Stockhofe, N; Weesendorp, E; van Zoelen-Bos, D; Heutink, R; Quak, S; Goovaerts, D; Heldens, J G M; Maas, R; Moormann, R J; Koch, G

    2011-09-28

    In April 2009 a new influenza A/H1N1 strain, currently named "pandemic (H1N1) influenza 2009" (H1N1v), started the first official pandemic in humans since 1968. Several incursions of this virus in pig herds have also been reported from all over the world. Vaccination of pigs may be an option to reduce exposure of human contacts with infected pigs, thereby preventing cross-species transfer, but also to protect pigs themselves, should this virus cause damage in the pig population. Three swine influenza vaccines, two of them commercially available and one experimental, were therefore tested and compared for their efficacy against an H1N1v challenge. One of the commercial vaccines is based on an American classical H1N1 influenza strain, the other is based on a European avian H1N1 influenza strain. The experimental vaccine is based on reassortant virus NYMC X179A (containing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of A/California/7/2009 (H1N1v) and the internal genes of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1)). Excretion of infectious virus was reduced by 0.5-3 log(10) by the commercial vaccines, depending on vaccine and sample type. Both vaccines were able to reduce virus replication especially in the lower respiratory tract, with less pathological lesions in vaccinated and subsequently challenged pigs than in unvaccinated controls. In pigs vaccinated with the experimental vaccine, excretion levels of infectious virus in nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, were at or below 1 log(10)TCID(50) per swab and lasted for only 1 or 2 days. An inactivated vaccine containing the HA and NA of an H1N1v is able to protect pigs from an infection with H1N1v, whereas swine influenza vaccines that are currently available are of limited efficaciousness. Whether vaccination of pigs against H1N1v will become opportune remains to be seen and will depend on future evolution of this strain in the pig population. Close monitoring of the pig population, focussing on presence and evolution of

  1. Efficacy of a recombinant Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 with NSm deletion as a vaccine candidate in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingartl, Hana M; Nfon, Charles K; Zhang, Shunzhen; Marszal, Peter; Wilson, William C; Morrill, John C; Bettinger, George E; Peters, Clarence J

    2014-04-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne virus in the Bunyaviridae family and Phlebovirus genus, causes RVF, a disease of ruminants and man, endemic in Sub-Saharan African countries. However, outbreaks in Yemen and Saudi Arabia demonstrate the ability for RVFV to spread into virgin territory and thus the need exists to develop safe and efficacious vaccines that can be used outside the endemic zones. Commercial RVFV vaccines are available but have limitations that prevent their use in disease-free countries. Consequently, there are ongoing efforts to develop and/or improve RVFV vaccines with global acceptability. In this study a previously developed MP-12-derived vaccine candidate with a large deletion of the NSm gene in the pre Gn region of the M segment (arMP-12-ΔNSm21/384) developed by T. Ikegami, that was already shown to be safe in pregnant sheep causing neither abortion nor fetal malformation was further evaluated. This vaccine was tested for protection of sheep from viremia and fever following challenge with virulent RVFV ZH501 strain. A single vaccination with arMP-12-ΔNSm21/384 fully protected sheep when challenged four weeks post vaccination, thereby demonstrating that this vaccine is efficacious in protecting these animals from RVFV infection.

  2. Are the Two Human Papillomavirus Vaccines Really Similar? A Systematic Review of Available Evidence: Efficacy of the Two Vaccines against HPV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Di Mario

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. When the bivalent and the quadrivalent HPV vaccines were marketed they were presented as having comparable efficacy against cervical cancer. Differences between the vaccines are HPV types included and formulation of the adjuvant. Method. A systematic review was conducted to assess the efficacy of the two vaccines against cervical cancer. Outcomes considered were CIN2+, CIN3+, and AIS. Results. Nine reports (38,419 women were included. At enrolment mean age of women was 20 years, 90% had negative cytology, and 80% were seronegative and/or DNA negative for HPV 16 or 18 (naïve women. In the TVC-naïve, VE against CIN2+ was 58% (95% CI: 35, 72; heterogeneity was detected, VE being 65% (95% CI: 54, 74 for the bivalent and 43% (95% CI: 23, 57 for the quadrivalent. VE against CIN3+ was 78% (95% CI: <0, 97; heterogeneity was substantial, VE being 93% (95% CI: 77, 98 for the bivalent and 43% (95% CI: 12, 63 for the quadrivalent. VE in the TVC was much lower. No sufficient data were available on AIS. Conclusions. In naïve girls bivalent vaccine shows higher efficacy, even if the number of events detected is low. In women already infected the benefit of the vaccination seems negligible.

  3. INFLUENZA AND PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINATION IN HEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF EFFICACY, EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe La Torre

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The risk of getting influenza and pneumococcal disease is higher in cancer patients and serum antibody levels tend to be lower in patients with hematological malignancy. Objective To asses flu and pneumococcal vaccinations efficacy, effectiveness and safety in onco-hematological patients. Methods Two systematic reviews and possible meta-analysis were conducted to summarize the results of all primary study in scientific literature about flu and pneumococcal vaccine in onco-hematological patients. Literature searches were performed using Pub-Med and Scopus databases. StatsDirect 2.8.0 was used for the analysis. Results 23 and 26 studies were collected respectively for flu and pneumococcal vaccinations. Protection rate of booster dose was 30% (95% CI = 6.2- 61% for H1N1. Pooled prevalence protection rate of H3N2 and B was available for meta-analysis only for first dose, 42.6% (95% CI = 23.2 – 63.3 % and 39.6 % (95% CI = 26%- 54.1% for H3N2 and B, respectively. Response rate of booster dose resulted 35% (95% CI = 19.7-51.2% for H1N1, 23% (95% CI = 16.6-31.5% for H3N2, 29% (95% CI = 21.3- 37% for B. Conclusion Despite low rate of response, flu and pneumococcal vaccines are worthwhile for patients with hematological malignancies. Patients undergoing chemotherapy in particular rituximab, splenectomy, transplant recipient had lower and impaired response. No serious adverse events were reported for both vaccines.

  4. Immunogenicity and efficacy of flagellin-envelope fusion dengue vaccines in mice and monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ge; Song, Langzhou; Beasley, David W C; Putnak, Robert; Parent, Jason; Misczak, John; Li, Hong; Reiserova, Lucia; Liu, Xiangyu; Tian, Haijun; Liu, Wenzhe; Labonte, Darlene; Duan, Lihua; Kim, Youngsun; Travalent, Linda; Wigington, Devin; Weaver, Bruce; Tussey, Lynda

    2015-05-01

    The envelope (E) protein of flaviviruses includes three domains, EI, EII, and EIII, and is the major protective antigen. Because EIII is rich in type-specific and subcomplex-specific neutralizing epitopes and is easy to express, it is particularly attractive as a recombinant vaccine antigen. VaxInnate has developed a vaccine platform that genetically links vaccine antigens to bacterial flagellin, a Toll-like receptor 5 ligand. Here we report that tetravalent dengue vaccines (TDVs) consisting of four constructs, each containing two copies of EIII fused to flagellin (R3.2x format), elicited robust and long-lived neutralizing antibodies (geometric mean titers of 200 to 3,000), as measured with a 50% focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT50). In an immunogenicity study, rhesus macaques (n = 2) immunized subcutaneously with 10 μg or 90 μg of TDV three or four times, at 4- to 6-week intervals, developed neutralizing antibodies to four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (mean post-dose 3 FRNT50 titers of 102 to 601). In an efficacy study, rhesus macaques (n = 4) were immunized intramuscularly with 16 μg or 48 μg of TDV or a placebo control three times, at 1-month intervals. The animals that received 48-μg doses of TDV developed neutralizing antibodies against the four serotypes (geometric mean titers of 49 to 258) and exhibited reduced viremia after DENV-2 challenge, with a group mean viremia duration of 1.25 days and 2 of 4 animals being completely protected, compared to the placebo-treated animals, which all developed viremia, with a mean duration of 4 days. In conclusion, flagellin-EIII fusion vaccines are immunogenic and partially protective in a nonhuman primate model.

  5. Virological confirmation of suspected dengue in a Phase 2 Latin American vaccine trial: Implications for vaccine efficacy evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Boaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The CYD tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate is being evaluated for protective efficacy against symptomatic dengue in Phase 3 efficacy trials. The laboratory test algorithm to confirm dengue cases was evaluated prior to Phase 3 trials. During a Phase 2 trial in Latin America a dengue epidemic occurred in the study countries. A total of 72 suspected dengue cases were reported and assessed: virological confirmation comprised qRT-PCR methods and a commercial ELISA kit for NS1 protein (Bio-Rad. The qRT-PCR included a screening assay targeting a conserved dengue region of the 3′-UTR (dengue screen assay followed by 4 individual serotype assays targeting the conserved dengue NS5 genomic region (WT dengue qRT-PCR assays. The NS1 and WT dengue qRT-PCR were endpoint assays for protocol virological confirmation (PVC. Of the 72 suspected cases, 14 were PVC. However, a unique pattern of dengue qRT-PCR results were observed in 5 suspected cases from Honduras: the dengue screen qRT-PCR assay was positive but WT dengue qRT-PCR and NS1 Ag ELISA were negative. To investigate these observations, additional molecular methods were applied: a SYBR® Green-based RT-PCR assay, sequencing assays directed at the genome regions covered by the WT dengue qRT-PCR, and a modified commercial dengue RT-PCR test (Simplexa™ Dengue, Focus Diagnostics. The exploratory data confirmed these additional cases as dengue and indicated the serotype 2 WT dengue qRT-PCR assay was unable to detect a circulating Latin American strain (DENV-2/NI/BID-V608/2006 due to a sequence variation in the isolate. The Simplexa Dengue RT-PCR test was able to detect and serotype dengue. Based on these findings an updated molecular test algorithm for the virological confirmation of dengue cases was developed and implemented in the Phase 3 efficacy trials.

  6. Brazilian avian metapneumovirus subtypes A and B: experimental infection of broilers and evaluation of vaccine efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    dos Santos, Marcia B.; Matheus C. Martini; Ferreira, Helena L.; Luciana H.A. da Silva; Paulo A. Fellipe; Spilki,Fernando R.; Arns, Clarice W.

    2012-01-01

    Santos M.B., Martini M.C., Ferreira H.L., Silva L.H.A., Fellipe P.A., Spilki F.R. & Arns C.W. 2012. Brazilian avian metapneumovirus subtypes A and B: experimental infection of broilers and evaluation of vaccine efficacy. Pesquisa Veterinaria Brasileira 32(12):1257-1262. Laboratorio de Virologia, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Rua Monteiro Lobato s/n, Cx. Postal 6109, Campinas, SP 13083-970, Brazil. E-mail: Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is a respirator...

  7. A New Furunculosis Challenge Method for Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy in Rainbow Trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marana, Moonika Haahr; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Skov, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    Experimental infection of fish for vaccine efficacy studies is associated with several limitations. Administration of live bacteria with the purpose of causing disease in fish can be performed by co-habitation, immersion or injection. We have developed a new Aeromonas salmonicida challenge method......-forming units (CFU) mL−1) of a 48 hour culture of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmo- nicida strain 090710-1/23 was placed at the perforation site for 60 sec whereafter fish were allowed to regain consciousness in clean freshwater. Immunohistochemistry and scanning electron microscopy illustrated the spread...

  8. Immunogenicity and efficacy of codon optimized DNA vaccines encoding the F-protein of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternette, Nicola; Tippler, Bettina; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2007-10-10

    Respiratory syncytial virus F-protein (RSV-F) is poorly expressed from DNA expression plasmids containing the wild type RSV-F open reading frame. By codon optimization, premature polyadenylation signals were deleted and a striking enhancement of RSV-F expression levels was achieved. Therefore, the immunogenicity and efficacy of wild type DNA vaccines were compared to codon optimized expression plasmids encoding full-length RSV-F or its ectodomain. Mice were immunized twice with the different DNA vaccines followed by an RSV challenge. Only codon optimized DNA vaccines and in particular the one encoding the ectodomain of RSV-F induced substantial antibody levels and reduced viral load 13-170-fold. Thus, codon optimization enhances the immunogenicity and efficacy of RSV encoding DNA vaccines.

  9. Blood-stage challenge for malaria vaccine efficacy trials: a pilot study with discussion of safety and potential value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Frances; Andrews, Laura; Douglas, Alexander D; Hunt-Cooke, Angela; Bejon, Philip; Hill, Adrian V S

    2008-06-01

    There is increasing interest in malaria vaccines targeting the asexual blood stage of Plasmodium falciparum. Without accepted immunologic correlates of clinical protection, challenge studies are useful for assessing the efficacy of candidate vaccines in vivo in healthy volunteers. We report a pilot study of a safe and robust challenge protocol using a blood-stage inoculum. We have applied well-validated trial endpoints and twice daily real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction monitoring of parasitemia to blood-stage challenge, which enabled direct comparison with sporozoite challenge. We found that greater accuracy in quantification of blood-stage growth rates can be achieved with blood-stage challenge. This finding may provide greater power to detect partial efficacy of many blood-stage candidate vaccines. We discuss the potential utility of blood-stage challenge studies in accelerating malaria vaccine development.

  10. Efficacy of inactivated H5N2 influenza vaccines against lethal A/Chicken/Queretaro/19/95 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A; Johnson, H; Srivastava, D K; Jayawardene, D A; Wehr, D R; Webster, R G

    1998-01-01

    The control and eventual eradication of H5N2 influenza virus from domestic poultry in Mexico is dependent on the use of avian influenza (AI) vaccine strategies. This study was performed to determine the amount of hemagglutinin (HA) antigen required to control the signs of disease from a highly pathogenic H5N2 influenza virus (A/Chicken/ Queretaro/19/95) and the amount of antigen required to prevent shedding of virus from vaccinated birds. Six commercial inactivated water in oil H5N2 vaccines available in Mexico were compared with standardized vaccines to assess their efficacy. The amount of HA required to prevent the signs of disease from A/Chicken/Queretaro/19/95 influenza virus was approximately 0.4 microgram per dose. Each of the six commercially available vaccines prevented disease signs, and half of the vaccines significantly reduced viral shedding from vaccinated birds. There is a need for standardization of AI virus vaccine, and the antigen content should be increased in some of the commercially available AI vaccines in Mexico.

  11. Efficacy of a square presentation of V-RG vaccine baits in red fox, domestic dog and raccoon dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliquet, F; Guiot, A L; Schumacher, C; Maki, J; Cael, N; Barrat, J

    2008-01-01

    Oral vaccination programmes conducted in rabies infected countries from Eastern Europe and Eurasia should not be restricted to foxes but should target other major rabies vectors such as dogs and raccoon dogs as well. The objective of this experimental trial was to assess the protection induced by the vaccine by challenging these different species, which had been previously vaccinated intramuscularly with the square V-RG baits (produced in the US). Different parameters were evaluated such as attractiveness of the baits and induction of neutralising antibodies as an indicator for immunogenicity and protection after rabies challenge. The acceptability of the square bait was satisfactory in dogs, foxes and raccoon dogs, confirming previous laboratory and field studies conducted with the rectangular baits. Only one vaccinated dog out of nine seroconverted after vaccination and among them one dog died of rabies. Eight of ten vaccinated foxes seroconverted after vaccination and survived the rabies challenge. All vaccinated raccoon dogs seroconverted after challenge and all survived the challenge. These trials demonstrated that the square presentation of the V-RG vaccine was attractive, immunogenic and efficacious.

  12. Re-evaluation the immune efficacy of Newcastle disease virus vaccine in commercial laying chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingsong; Gao, Xiaolong; Wu, Pengpeng; Xiao, Sa; Wang, Xinglong; Liu, Peng; Tong, Lina; Hao, Huafang; Zhang, Shuxia; Dang, Ruyi; Yang, Zengqi

    2017-04-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infection causes serious problems in laying chickens, like reducing egg production, increasing rate of abnormal eggs in spite of strict vaccination in layer farms program. A new evaluation system is needed to show complete protection of the immunization in laying chickens based on the egg-laying performance, rather than clinical signs of the disease. In this study, laying chickens with different anti-NDV HI (hemagglutination-inhibition) antibody titer after vaccination were divided into different groups. These chickens were then challenged with field isolated highly virulent NDV strains. Results showed that the chickens in low HI titers group (5log2 to 8log2) and medium HI titers group (9log2 to 11log2) had atypical symptoms, produced abnormal eggs, and shed virus. Whereas, with HI titers≥12log2, the chickens were completely protected, and did not show symptoms, or produce abnormal eggs or shed virus. Morbidity, positive viral shedding rate and abnormal egg-rate decreased with increase in pre-challenge HI antibody titer. Our result suggested that 12log2 is the threshold of the HI antibody in providing complete protection to laying chickens under field condition, and protective efficacy is correlated with HI antibody titer. This study provides a valuable reference for the vaccination and control of ND in poultry. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Immunogenic efficacy of differently produced recombinant vaccines candidates against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To describe the expression and immunogenic efficacy of differently produced recombinant vaccines candidates against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. Methods: The hybrid protein OprF (aa 190-342)-Opr I (aa 21-83) was modified N-terminally, either with a minimal histidine tag or with a homologous sequence of OprF. Both recombinant proteins were purified by nickel chelate affinity chromatography under native and denaturing conditions. Results :This produced three suitable candidates for a vaccination trial: protein His-F- I , which was purified in its native as well as in its refolded form,and the native purified N-terminally extended protein ex-F- I . In mice, significantly higher antibody titers and survival rates after challenge with P. aeruginosa were observed, following immunization with protein His-F- I purified under native conditions. Conclusion: A hybrid OprF-Opr I molecule was cloned and a purification method which yields a protective vaccine against P. aeruginosa infections was established.

  14. On the efficacy of malaria DNA vaccination with magnetic gene vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawwab Al-Deen, Fatin; Ma, Charles; Xiang, Sue D; Selomulya, Cordelia; Plebanski, Magdalena; Coppel, Ross L

    2013-05-28

    We investigated the efficacy and types of immune responses from plasmid malaria DNA vaccine encoding VR1020-PyMSP119 condensed on the surface of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated SPIONs. In vivo mouse studies were done firstly to determine the optimum magnetic vector composition, and then to observe immune responses elicited when magnetic vectors were introduced via different administration routes. Higher serum antibody titers against PyMSP119 were observed with intraperitoneal and intramuscular injections than subcutaneous and intradermal injections. Robust IgG2a and IgG1 responses were observed for intraperitoneal administration, which could be due to the physiology of peritoneum as a major reservoir of macrophages and dendritic cells. Heterologous DNA prime followed by single protein boost vaccination regime also enhanced IgG2a, IgG1, and IgG2b responses, indicating the induction of appropriate memory immunity that can be elicited by protein on recall. These outcomes support the possibility to design superparamagnetic nanoparticle-based DNA vaccines to optimally evoke desired antibody responses, useful for a variety of diseases including malaria.

  15. Modern adjuvants do not enhance the efficacy of an inactivated African swine fever virus vaccine preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blome, Sandra; Gabriel, Claudia; Beer, Martin

    2014-06-30

    African swine fever (ASF) is among the most devastating viral diseases of pigs. In recent years, the disease has spread alarmingly. Despite intensive research activities, promising vaccine candidates are still lacking. For this reason, a study was undertaken to re-assess inactivated ASFV preparations with state-of-the-art adjuvants. Inactivated preparations of ASF virus (ASFV) "Armenia08" were adjuvanted with either Polygen™ or Emulsigen(®)-D, respectively, and used to immunize six weaner pigs two times with a three-week interval. Six weeks after the first immunization, animals were challenged with the homologues highly virulent ASFV. Although ASFV-specific antibodies were detectable in all but one vaccinated animal prior to challenge, no protective effect of immunization was observed. All animals developed acute-lethal ASF and had to be euthanized within eleven days post challenge. A slightly accelerated clinical course in vaccinees could even indicate an antibody dependent enhancement, which could also influence efficacy of other vaccine approaches.

  16. A NEW APPROACH TO BACTERIAL VACCINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GREENBERG, L

    1963-08-31

    Immunizing antigens against only 10 bacterial diseases-cholera, diphtheria, paratyphoid, pertussis, plague, scarlet fever, staphylococcal disease, tetanus, tuberculosis and typhoid-have been licensed for sale in Canada and the United States. Convincing evidence of efficacy is available for only four of these-diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, and pertussis and typhoid vaccines.The principles which determine the efficacy of different immunizing antigens are not always the same. Toxoids, for example, stimulate the formation of antitoxin-producing mechanisms which can neutralize toxins produced by invading organisms, thereby rendering them harmless. Conversely, vaccines stimulate the formation of antibacterial mechanisms which stop the growth of organisms before they can produce disease.Use of enzyme-lysed vaccines for prevention of staphylococcal disease represents a new approach in vaccine research. Animal tests have shown lysed vaccines to be 10 to 100 times less toxic, and about eight times more effective, than whole bacterial vaccines. Studies with lysed vaccines for other diseases are now in progress.

  17. Replacement of the in vivo neutralisation test for efficacy demonstration of tetanus vaccines ad us. vet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosskopf, Ute; Noeske, Kerstin; Werner, Esther

    2005-01-01

    The bacterium Clostridium (C.) tetani is an ubiquitous pathogen. This anaerobic, gram-positive bacterium can form spores and can be found in the whole environment. It enters the body via injuries of the skin and wounds where it releases the neurotoxin "tetanospasmin" (= tetanus toxin). The animals most susceptible to tetanus infection are horses and sheep. Only active immunisation by tetanus vaccine provides effective protection against tetanus intoxication. The marketing authorisation requirements stipulate that efficacy of tetanus vaccines ad us. vet. must be demonstrated in all target animal species via determination of neutralising tetanus serum antitoxin concentrations. The standard method used for this purpose is still the toxin neutralisation test (TNT), as it quantifies the tetanus toxin-neutralising effect of tetanus serum antibodies in vivo. In this test, tetanus toxin is added to dilutions of serum from vaccinated horse and sheep. The serum dilutions are then administered to mice or guinea pigs, which are observed for toxic symptoms. Against the background of animal protection, the goal of one project of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (Bundesministerium fuer Bildung und Forschung (Federal Ministry for Education and Research), 0312636) was to establish an alternative to the toxin neutralisation test, enabling the testing of efficacy of tetanus vaccines with serological in vitro methods. For this purpose, a so-called double antigen ELISA (DAE) was established which enables the testing of sera of different species in one assay. In addition, the sera were tested in an indirect ELISA for horses and sheep separately. Altogether, ten groups of horses and eight groups of sheep were immunised with ten animals per group each. The tetanus vaccines comprised almost all products authorised for the German market at the start of the project. 564 horse sera and 257 sheep sera were tested using the two ELISA methods. Some sera were also tested in vivo. The kinetics of

  18. Efficacy of an inactivated bivalent vaccine against the prevalent strains of Newcastle disease and H9N2 avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Huiming; Xu, Hongjun; Ma, Zengbin; Zhang, Guozhong

    2017-03-16

    Newcastle disease (ND) and avian influenza subtype H9N2 (H9N2 AI) are two of the most important diseases of poultry, causing severe economic losses in the global poultry industry. Vaccination is an effective way to prevent and control the spread of ND virus (NDV) and H9N2 AI virus (AIV), but the antigenic differences between the current circulating strains and the vaccine strains might account for recent ND and H9N2 AI outbreaks in vaccinated poultry flocks. We developed an inactivated bivalent H9N2 and NDV vaccine based on the current prevalent strains of H9N2 AIV and NDV in China and evaluated its efficacy in chickens in this study. The results indicated that the inactivated bivalent vaccine could induce a fast antibody response in vaccinated chickens. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer in the sera increased rapidly, and the highest HI titer was observed at 4 weeks post-vaccination (wpv) with a mean titre of 8.6 log2 for NDV and 9.5 log2 for H9N2. Up until 15 wpv, HI titers were still detectable at a high level of over 6 log2. The immunized chickens showed no signs of disease after challenge at 3 wpv with the prevalent strains of NDV and H9N2 AIV isolated in 2012-2014. Moreover, viral shedding was completely inhibited in vaccinated chickens after challenge with H9N2 AIV and inhibited by at least 90% with NDV compared to the controls at 5dpc. Our findings suggest that the inactivated NDV and H9N2 vaccine induces a fast and strong antibody response in vaccinated chickens and is efficacious in poultry against NDVs and H9N2 AIVs.

  19. Efficacy of an inactivated FeLV vaccine compared to a recombinant FeLV vaccine in minimum age cats following virulent FeLV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuke, Kristin; King, Vickie; Southwick, Kendra; Stoeva, Mira I; Thomas, Anne; Winkler, M Teresa C

    2014-05-07

    The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of an inactivated feline leukemia virus (FeLV) vaccine (Versifel(®) FeLV, Zoetis.) compared to a recombinant FeLV vaccine (Purevax(®) FeLV, Merial Animal Health) in young cats, exposed under laboratory conditions to a highly virulent challenge model. The study was designed to be consistent with the general immunogenicity requirements of the European Pharmacopoeia 6.0 Monograph 01/2008:1321-Feline Leukaemia Vaccine (Inactivated) with the exception that commercial-strength vaccines were assessed. Fifty seronegative cats (8-9 weeks old) were vaccinated subcutaneously on two occasions, three weeks apart, with either placebo (treatment group T01), Versifel FeLV Vaccine (treatment group T02), or Purevax FeLV Vaccine (treatment group T03) according to the manufacturer's directions. Cats were challenged three weeks after the second vaccination with a virulent FeLV isolate (61E strain). Persistent FeLV antigenemia was determined from 3 to 15 weeks postchallenge. Bone marrow samples were tested for the presence of FeLV proviral DNA to determine FeLV latent infection. At week 15 after challenge with the virulent FeLV 61E strain, the Versifel FeLV Vaccine conferred 89.5% protection against FeLV persistent antigenemia and 94.7% protection against FeLV proviral DNA integration in bone marrow cells. In comparison, the Purevax FeLV Vaccine conferred 20% protection against FeLV persistent antigenemia and 35% protection against FeLV proviral DNA integration in bone marrow cells following challenge. The data from this study show that the Versifel FeLV Vaccine was efficacious in preventing both FeLV persistent p27 antigenemia and FeLV proviral DNA integration in bone marrow cells of cats challenged with this particular challenge model under laboratory conditions and provided better protection than Purevax FeLV in this experimental challenge model with highly virulent FeLV.

  20. Efficacy of an anticoccidial live vaccine in prevention of necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangoura, Berit; Alnassan, Alaa Aldin; Lendner, Matthias; Shehata, Awad Ali; Krüger, Monika; Daugschies, Arwid

    2014-10-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is an important disease in poultry caused by Clostridium perfringens combined with predisposing factors, mainly eimeriosis. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of a commercial attenuated anticoccidial live vaccine against NE in a clinical infection model using 60 day-old chicks. Vaccination was performed on study day (SD) 1 with natural booster-infections for 4 weeks from Eimeria spp. oocysts present in litter. On SD 28, five groups were formed (n=12): group V+/C-E- (vaccinated, uninfected), group V+/C-E+ (vaccinated, infected with Eimeria spp.), group V+/C+E+ (vaccinated, infected with clostridia and Eimeria spp.), group V-/C+E+ (unvaccinated, infected with clostridia and Eimeria spp.), and group NC (negative control). Efficacy was measured by clinical parameters, pathogen multiplication, and pathological parameters assessed during two necropsies on SD 34 and SD 40, respectively. Additionally, cytokine expression was measured in gut and spleen tissues at necropsy. Clinical signs of NE were observed only in the coinfected groups, mainly in group V-/C+E+. Accordingly, lowest body weight gain was observed in group V-/C+E+ (301.8 g from SD 28 to SD 40; group NC: 626.2 g). Oocyst excretion varied significantly (P<0.01) between all Eimeria spp. infected groups and was highest in group V-/C+E+, followed by V+/C+E+, and lowest in group V+/C-E+. NE typical intestinal lesions showed only in groups V+/C+E+ and V-/C+E+. The intestinal mucosa featured partly severe lesions in the jejunum, C. perfringens colonization was histologically visible. Upregulation of IFN-γ, was observed in the jejunal tissue of group V-/C+E+ (P<0.01 (SD 34) or P<0.05 (SD 40) compared to all other groups). IL-10 and IL-12 were upregulated in group V-/C+E+, IL-10 also in group V+/C+E+ (SD 40) while IL-2 expression remained unaltered. In conclusion, vaccination against coccidiosis was effective in preventing NE in a mixed infection comparable to field

  1. Immunogenicity and efficacy of two rabies vaccines in wild-caught, captive raccoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L J; Rosatte, R C; Fehlner-Gardiner, C; Knowles, M K; Bachmann, P; Davies, J C; Wandeler, A; Sobey, K; Donovan, D

    2011-01-01

    The immunogenicity and efficacy of two rabies vaccines in wild-caught, captive raccoons (Procyon lotor) were investigated. Raccoons were fed Ontario Slim (OS) baits containing a recombinant vaccinia virus-rabies glycoprotein (VRG) oral rabies vaccine, or they were given an intramuscular (IM) injection of IMRAB(®) 3 rabies vaccine. Blood samples collected before treatment and from weeks 1 to 16 posttreatment were assessed for the presence of rabies virus antibody (RVA). There were significantly more positive responders in the group that received an IM injection of IMRAB 3 (18/27) than in the group that consumed VRG in OS baits (VRG-OS; 4/ 26). There were no significant associations among age, sex, and seroconversion. Of those animals that mounted a humoral immune response to vaccination, RVA was first detected between weeks 1 and 5, with the majority of initial seroconversions detectable at week 2. A subsample of 50 raccoons (19 VRG-OS, 18 IMRAB 3, and 13 controls) from the longitudinal serology study was challenged with live raccoon variant rabies virus 442 days after initial treatment. There were significantly more survivors in the group that received IMRAB 3 (13/18) than in the VRG-OS (5/19) or control (2/13) groups. All 15 raccoons that demonstrated a serologic response survived challenge regardless of treatment. Of the 35 raccoons with no detectable serologic response, 30 (86%) succumbed to rabies virus infection (14/15 VRG-OS, 5/7 IMRAB 3, and 11/13 controls).

  2. Enhanced protective efficacy of a chimeric form of the schistosomiasis vaccine antigen Sm-TSP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Pearson

    Full Text Available The large extracellular loop of the Schistosoma mansoni tetraspanin, Sm-TSP-2, when fused to a thioredoxin partner and formulated with Freund's adjuvants, has been shown to be an efficacious vaccine against murine schistosomiasis. Moreover, Sm-TSP-2 is uniquely recognised by IgG(1 and IgG(3 from putatively resistant individuals resident in S. mansoni endemic areas in Brazil. In the present study, we expressed Sm-TSP-2 at high yield and in soluble form in E. coli without the need for a solubility enhancing fusion partner. We also expressed in E. coli a chimera called Sm-TSP-2/5B, which consisted of Sm-TSP-2 fused to the immunogenic 5B region of the hookworm aspartic protease and vaccine antigen, Na-APR-1. Sm-TSP-2 formulated with alum/CpG showed significant reductions in adult worm and liver egg burdens in two separate murine schistosomiasis challenge studies. Sm-TSP-2/5B afforded significantly greater protection than Sm-TSP-2 alone when both antigens were formulated with alum/CpG. The enhanced protection obtained with the chimeric fusion protein was associated with increased production of anti-Sm-TSP-2 antibodies and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ from spleen cells of vaccinated animals. Sera from 666 individuals from Brazil who were infected with S. mansoni were screened for potentially deleterious IgE responses to Sm-TSP-2. Anti-Sm-TSP-2 IgE to this protein was not detected (also shown previously for Na-APR-1, suggesting that the chimeric antigen Sm-TSP-2/5B could be used to safely and effectively vaccinate people in areas where schistosomes and hookworms are endemic.

  3. Four year efficacy of prophylactic human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine against low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and anogenital warts: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillner, Joakim; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M;

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata).......To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata)....

  4. Delivery route, MyD88 signaling and cross-priming events determine the anti-tumor efficacy of an adenovirus based melanoma vaccine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangalapura, B.N.; Oosterhoff, D.; Gupta, T.; Groot, J. de; Wijnands, P.G.J.T.B.; Beusechem, V.W. van; Haan, J.; Tuting, T.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Curiel, D.T.; Scheper, R.J.; Gruijl, T.D. de

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)-based vaccines are considered for cancer immunotherapy, yet, detailed knowledge on their mechanism of action and optimal delivery route for anti-tumor efficacy is lacking. Here, we compared the anti-tumor efficacy of an Ad-based melanoma vaccine after intradermal, intravenous, intran

  5. MOLECULAR AND EVOLUTIONARY INSIGHTS INTO YERSINIA PESTIS; HARBINGER OF PLAGUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Anderson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plague has been the scourge of mankind for millennia; yet it was not until the late 18th Century that its causative agent was identified. Prokaryotic Y. pestis is responsible for plague; bacilli are consumed through arthropod feeding on infected rodential reservoirs. Arthropod uptake is essential for transmission as the bacilli proliferate within their gut before being refluxed into new mammalian hosts. Genomic analysis has elucidated the mechanisms facilitating this cycle along with the means by which bacilli acquire their characteristic virulence. Increasing our understanding of the evolution of Y. pestis provides putative avenues for future research. Whilst plague is considered a disease of the past by many, it interaction with humanity continues across various geographic foci. The rise of antibiotic resistant bacteria threatens to bring this ancient foe once again to the fore through the acquisition of drug resistance. This review will detail notable advances of the past decade enabling the elusive possibility of a universal vaccine for the three manifestations of plague. Development of suitable vaccines before drug resistant strains emerge is paramount. Researchers are pitted in an on-going race against bacterial evolution.

  6. Plague: Infections of Companion Animals and Opportunities for Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra C.F. Oyston

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Plague is a zoonotic disease, normally circulating in rodent populations, transmitted to humans most commonly through the bite of an infected flea vector. Secondary infection of the lungs results in generation of infectious aerosols, which pose a significant hazard to close contacts. In enzootic areas, plague infections have been reported in owners and veterinarians who come into contact with infected pets. Dogs are relatively resistant, but can import infected fleas into the home. Cats are acutely susceptible, and can present a direct hazard to health. Reducing roaming and hunting behaviours, combined with flea control measures go some way to reducing the risk to humans. Various vaccine formulations have been developed which may be suitable to protect companion animals from contracting plague, and thus preventing onward transmission to man. Since transmission has resulted in a number of fatal cases of plague, the vaccination of domestic animals such as cats would seem a low cost strategy for reducing the risk of infection by this serious disease in enzootic regions.

  7. Efficacy of Marek's disease vaccines in Mhc heterozygous chickens: Mhc congenic x inbred line F1 matings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, L D; Witter, R L

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this study is to demonstrate that Mhc (B) heterozygous chickens differ in efficacy of response to several Marek's disease (MD) vaccines. Four types of B2 heterozygotes, in addition to B2B2 homozygotes, were developed by crossing 15.B congenic males to inbred line 7(1) (B2B2) hens. The five types of F1 chicks were intermingled in isolators and vaccinated with one of four types of MD vaccine before inoculation with the very virulent Md5 strain of MD herpesvirus. The F1 chickens differ in development of protective immunity following MD vaccination from two perspectives. First, chickens of a particular Mhc genotype were protected better by some vaccines than others. Second, individual vaccine preparations protected some Mhc genotypes more effectively. We conclude that some MD vaccines are more appropriate than others for certain B-haplotypes when chickens are heterozygous for the Mhc. The value of using Mhc-congenic x inbred line F1 animals for studies concerning the influence of the Mhc on vaccinal immunity is discussed.

  8. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in dogs of an MF59™-adjuvanted vaccine against recombinant canine/porcine coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Mari, Viviana; Sciarretta, Rossana; Colao, Valeriana; Losurdo, Michele; Catella, Cristiana; Elia, Gabriella; Martella, Vito; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2011-03-03

    Recently, canine coronavirus (CCoV) strains with putative recombinant origin with porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) were shown to be widespread in Europe. In this study, a killed vaccine against TGEV-like CCoV strains, included in the new subtype CCoV-IIb, was developed through inactivation with betapropiolactone and emulsification with MF59™ adjuvant. Safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of the developed vaccine were evaluated in vivo. Five 10-week-old beagle pups were administered (three weeks apart) two vaccine doses, whereas two animals served as unvaccinated controls. The vaccine was shown to be safe as no local neither systemic reactions were observed after first and second dose administration. Serum antibodies against CCoV were detected in vaccinates starting from study day 14 (by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) or 28 (by virus neutralisation test). Subsequent challenge with virulent CCoV-IIb resulted in the development of mild gastroenteric disease in control pups, whereas vaccinates did not display clinical signs. Faecal shedding of the challenge virus occurred in both treatment groups, but vaccinated dogs were found to shed very low viral titres in comparison to controls. The developed vaccine may help control the CCoV-IIb-induced disease (and active virus circulation) in environments, such as kennels and shelters, where the pathogenic potential of this virus is greater as a consequence of predisposing factors and concurrent infections. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of an infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus DNA vaccine in Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye O. nerka salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garver, Kyle A; LaPatra, Scott E; Kurath, Gael

    2005-04-06

    The level of protective immunity was determined for Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye/kokanee salmon (anadromous and landlocked) O. nerka following intramuscular vaccination with a DNA vaccine against the aquatic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). A DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of IHNV protected Chinook and sockeye/kokanee salmon against waterborne or injection challenge with IHNV, and relative percent survival (RPS) values of 23 to 86% were obtained under a variety of lethal challenge conditions. Although this is significant protection, it is less than RPS values obtained in previous studies with rainbow trout (O. mykiss). In addition to the variability in the severity of the challenge and inherent host susceptibility differences, it appears that use of a cross-genogroup challenge virus strain may lead to reduced efficacy of the DNA vaccine. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in both Chinook and sockeye that had been vaccinated with 1.0 and 0.1 pg doses of the DNA vaccine, and vaccinated fish responded to viral challenges with higher antibody titers than mock-vaccinated control fish.

  10. Protective Efficacy of the Calicivirus Valency of the Leucofeligen Vaccine against a Virulent Heterologous Challenge in Kittens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Lesbros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Feline calicivirus (FCV is a common feline pathogen with a potential for antigenic diversity. This study aimed to evaluate and characterize the protective efficacy of the FCV-F9 valency of a tetravalent vaccine, Leucofeligen, against challenge with an unrelated strain. Ten 9-week-old kittens were vaccinated while 10 remained as unvaccinated controls. The vaccinated cats received Leucofeligen twice subcutaneously with a 3-week interval. Four weeks after the second vaccination, all cats were challenged with virulent heterologous FCV and followed up for 21 days, monitoring their general condition, clinical signs, and immunological responses. During the vaccination phase, rectal temperatures and body weights were indistinguishable between the two groups. Only vaccinated cats showed FCV-specific seroconversion (both total and neutralizing antibodies. In the first week after challenge, the vaccinated cats had an 82.6% reduction in median clinical score compared to controls. Leucofeligen was thus shown to provide a significant clinical protection to kittens challenged with heterologous virulent FCV. This protection was similar whether the cats had neutralizing antibody or not, indicating a key role for cellular immunity in the overall protection. This also suggests that previously reported seroneutralisation studies may underestimate the level of cross-protection against field strains obtained with this modified live FCV-F9 vaccine.

  11. A New Recombinant BCG Vaccine Induces Specific Th17 and Th1 Effector Cells with Higher Protective Efficacy against Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Adeliane Castro; Costa-Júnior, Abadio de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Fábio Muniz; Nogueira, Sarah Veloso; Rosa, Joseane Damaceno; Resende, Danilo Pires; Kipnis, André; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that is a major public health problem. The vaccine used for TB prevention is Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), which provides variable efficacy in protecting against pulmonary TB among adults. Consequently, several groups have pursued the development of a new vaccine with a superior protective capacity to that of BCG. Here we constructed a new recombinant BCG (rBCG) vaccine expressing a fusion protein (CMX) composed of immune dominant epitopes from Ag85C, MPT51, and HspX and evaluated its immunogenicity and protection in a murine model of infection. The stability of the vaccine in vivo was maintained for up to 20 days post-vaccination. rBCG-CMX was efficiently phagocytized by peritoneal macrophages and induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Following mouse immunization, this vaccine induced a specific immune response in cells from lungs and spleen to the fusion protein and to each of the component recombinant proteins by themselves. Vaccinated mice presented higher amounts of Th1, Th17, and polyfunctional specific T cells. rBCG-CMX vaccination reduced the extension of lung lesions caused by challenge with Mtb as well as the lung bacterial load. In addition, when this vaccine was used in a prime-boost strategy together with rCMX, the lung bacterial load was lower than the result observed by BCG vaccination. This study describes the creation of a new promising vaccine for TB that we hope will be used in further studies to address its safety before proceeding to clinical trials. PMID:25398087

  12. Association between Interferon Response and Protective Efficacy of NS1-Truncated Mutants as Influenza Vaccine Candidates in Chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyesun Jang

    Full Text Available Influenza virus mutants that encode C-terminally truncated NS1 proteins (NS1-truncated mutants are attractive candidates for avian live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV development because they are both attenuated and immunogenic in chickens. We previously showed that a high protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV in chickens corresponds with induction of high levels of type I interferon (IFN responses in chicken embryonic fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the relationship between induction of IFN and IFN-stimulated gene responses in vivo and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV. Our data demonstrates that accelerated antibody induction and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV correlates well with upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes. Further, through oral administration of recombinant chicken IFN alpha in drinking water, we provide direct evidence that type I IFN can promote rapid induction of adaptive immune responses and protective efficacy of influenza vaccine in chickens.

  13. Oral vaccination of brushtail possums with BCG: Investigation into factors that may influence vaccine efficacy and determination of duration of protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddle, B M; Aldwell, F E; Keen, D L; Parlane, N A; Hamel, K L; de Lisle, G W

    2006-10-01

    To determine factors that may influence the efficacy of an oral pelleted vaccine containing Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) to induce protection of brushtail possums against tuberculosis. To determine the duration of protective immunity following oral administration of BCG. In Study 1, a group of possums (n=7) was immunised by feeding 10 pellets containing dead Pasteur BCG, followed 15 weeks later with a single pellet of live Pasteur BCG. At that time, four other groups of possums (n=7 per group) were given a single pellet of live Pasteur BCG orally, a single pellet of live Danish BCG orally, 10 pellets of live Pasteur BCG orally, or a subcutaneous injection of live Pasteur BCG. For the oral pelleted vaccines, BCG was formulated into a lipid matrix, and each pellet contained approximately 107 colony forming units (cfu) of BCG, while the vaccine injected subcutaneously contained 106 cfu of BCG. A sixth, non-vaccinated, group (n=7) served as a control. All possums were challenged by the aerosol route with a low dose of virulent M. bovis 7 weeks after vaccination, and killed 7-8 weeks after challenge. Protection against challenge with M. bovis was assessed from pathological and bacteriological findings. In Study 2, lipid-formulated live Danish BCG was administered orally to three groups of possums (10-11 per group), and these possums were challenged with virulent M. bovis 8, 29 or 54 weeks later. The possums were killed 7 weeks after challenge, to assess protection in comparison to a non-vaccinated group. The results from Study 1 showed that vaccine efficacy was not adversely affected by feeding dead BCG prior to live BCG. Feeding 10 vaccine pellets induced a level of protection similar to feeding a single pellet. Protection was similar when feeding possums a single pellet containing the Pasteur or Danish strains of BCG. All vaccinated groups had significantly reduced pathological changes or bacterial counts when compared to the non-vaccinated group

  14. Plague and the Human Flea, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Makundi, Rhodes H

    2007-01-01

    Domestic fleas were collected in 12 villages in the western Usambara Mountains in Tanzania. Of these, 7 are considered villages with high plague frequency, where human plague was recorded during at least 6 of the 17 plague seasons between 1986 and 2004. In the remaining 5 villages with low plague...

  15. Plague Outbreak in Libya, 2009, Unrelated to Plague in Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanel, Nicolas; Leclercq, Alexandre; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Annajar, Badereddin; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Bekkhoucha, Souad; Bertherat, Eric

    2013-01-01

    After 25 years of no cases of plague, this disease recurred near Tobruk, Libya, in 2009. An epidemiologic investigation identified 5 confirmed cases. We determined ribotypes, Not1 restriction profiles, and IS100 and IS1541 hybridization patterns of strains isolated during this outbreak. We also analyzed strains isolated during the 2003 plague epidemic in Algeria to determine whether there were epidemiologic links between the 2 events. Our results demonstrate unambiguously that neighboring but independent plague foci coexist in Algeria and Libya. They also indicate that these outbreaks were most likely caused by reactivation of organisms in local or regional foci believed to be dormant (Libya) or extinct (Algeria) for decades, rather than by recent importation of Yersinia pestis from distant foci. Environmental factors favorable for plague reemergence might exist in this area and lead to reactivation of organisms in other ancient foci. PMID:23347743

  16. Plague outbreak in Libya, 2009, unrelated to plague in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanel, Nicolas; Leclercq, Alexandre; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Annajar, Badereddin; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Bekkhoucha, Souad; Bertherat, Eric; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2013-02-01

    After 25 years of no cases of plague, this disease recurred near Tobruk, Libya, in 2009. An epidemiologic investigation identified 5 confirmed cases. We determined ribotypes, Not1 restriction profiles, and IS100 and IS1541 hybridization patterns of strains isolated during this outbreak. We also analyzed strains isolated during the 2003 plague epidemic in Algeria to determine whether there were epidemiologic links between the 2 events. Our results demonstrate unambiguously that neighboring but independent plague foci coexist in Algeria and Libya. They also indicate that these outbreaks were most likely caused by reactivation of organisms in local or regional foci believed to be dormant (Libya) or extinct (Algeria) for decades, rather than by recent importation of Yersinia pestis from distant foci. Environmental factors favorable for plague reemergence might exist in this area and lead to reactivation of organisms in other ancient foci.

  17. The Formula of Plague Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Riber

    2015-01-01

    it is possible to establish a stable formula for plague narratives despite the spread over centuries and in different text types, and to explain this formula and possible variations of it. The initial and tentative hypothesis is that a formulaic narrative structure exists for accounts, both documentary...... and fictional, of epidemics. The samples include: Exodus, History of the Peloponnesian War, Samuel Pepys’ Diary, A Journal of the Plague Year, The Last Man, The Plague in Bergamo, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, Doomsday, The Dead Zone, World War Z. An Oral History of the Zombie War, Pandemic...

  18. Enhanced efficacy of CTLA-4 fusion anti-caries DNA vaccines in gnotobiotic hamsters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng ZHANG; Yu-hong LI; Ming-wen FAN; Rong JIA; Qing-an XU; Ji-hua GUO; Fei YU; Qi-wei TIAN

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the comparative immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte.associated antigen 4(CTLA-4)fusion anti-caries DNA vaccines pGJA-P/VAX1,pGJA-P,and non-fusion anti-caries DNA construct pGLUA-P in hamsters.In addition,the ability of CTLA-4 to target pGJA-P/VAX1-encoding antigen to dendritic cells was tested in vitro.Methods:All DNA constructs contain genes encoding the A-P regions of a cell surface protein(PAc) and the glucan binding(GLU) domain of glucosyltransferases(GTFs)of cari-ogenic organism Streptococcus mutans.Human dendritic cells were mixed with the CTLA-4-Ig-GLU-A-P protein expressed by pGJA-P/VAX1-transfected cells and analyzed by flow cytometry.Gnotobiotic hamsters were immunized with anti-caries DNA vaccines by intramuscular injection or intranasal administration.Antibody responses to a representative antigen PAc were assayed by ELlSA,and caries protection was evaluated by Keyes caries scores.Results:A flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that CTLA-4-Ig-GLU-A-P protein was capable of bind-ing to human dendritic cells.pGJA-P/VAX1 and pGJA-P induced significantly higher specific salivary and serum anti-PAc antibody responses than pGLUA-R.Significantly fewet caries lesions were alSO observed in hamsters immunized with pGJA-P/VAX1 and pGJA-p There was no significant difference in the anti-PAC antibody level or caries scores between pGJA-P/VAX1 and pGJA-P-immunized groups.Conclusion:Antigen encoded by CTLA-4 fusion anti-caries DNA vac-cine pGJA-P/VAX1 could specifically bind to human dendritic cells through the interaction of CTLA-4 and B7 molecules.Fusing antigen to CTLA-4 has been proven to greatly enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of anti-caries DNA vaccines.

  19. Comparison of the safety and efficacy of a new live Salmonella Gallinarum vaccine candidate, JOL916, with the SG9R vaccine in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kiku; Chaudhari, Atul A; Lee, John Hwa

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated a recently developed live vaccine candidate for fowl typhoid (FT)-JOL916, a lon/cpxR mutant of Salmonella Gallinarum (SG)-by comparing its safety and efficacy with that of the well-known rough mutant strain SG9R vaccine in 6-wk-old Hy-Line hens. Forty-five chickens were divided into three groups of 15 chickens each. The chickens were then intramuscularly inoculated with 2 x 10(7) colony-forming units (CFUs) of JOL916 (JOL916 group), 2 x 10(7) CFUs of SG9R (SG9R group), or phosphate-buffered saline (control group). After vaccination, no clinical symptoms were observed in any of the groups. No differences in body weight increase were detected among the three groups postvaccination. A cellular immune response was observed at 2 wk postvaccination (wpv) in the JOL916 group with the peripheral lymphocyte proliferation assay, whereas no response was detected in the SG9R group. Elevation of SG antigen-specific plasma immunoglobulin was observed 2 and 3 wpv in the JOL916 and SG9R vaccine groups, respectively. After virulent challenge on day 25 postvaccination, 0, 1, and 15 chickens in the JOL916 group, SG9R group, and control group, respectively, died by 12 days postchallenge; the death rate of the SG9R vaccine group was statistically similar to that of the JOL916 group. Postmortem examination revealed that the JOL916 vaccine offered more efficient protection than the SG9R vaccine, with significantly decreased hepatic necrotic foci scores, splenic enlargement scores, necrotic foci scores, and recovery of the challenge strain from the spleen. Vaccination with JOL916 appears to be safe and offers better protection than SG9R against FT in chickens.

  20. Pre- and post-exposure safety and efficacy of attenuated rabies virus vaccines are enhanced by their expression of IFNγ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhouse, Darryll A. [Department of Cancer Biology, 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Center for Neurovirology 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Faber, Milosz [Center for Neurovirology 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 465, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Hooper, D. Craig, E-mail: douglas.hooper@jefferson.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Center for Neurovirology 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with evidence of a strong correlation between interferon gamma (IFNγ) production and rabies virus (RABV) clearance from the CNS, we recently demonstrated that engineering a pathogenic RABV to express IFNγ highly attenuates the virus. Reasoning that IFNγ expression by RABV vaccines would enhance their safety and efficacy, we reverse-engineered two proven vaccine vectors, GAS and GASGAS, to express murine IFNγ. Mortality and morbidity were monitored during suckling mice infection, immunize/challenge experiments and mixed intracranial infections. We demonstrate that GASγ and GASγGAS are significantly attenuated in suckling mice compared to the GASGAS vaccine. GASγ better protects mice from lethal DRV4 RABV infection in both pre- and post-exposure experiments compared to GASGAS. Finally, GASγGAS reduces post-infection neurological sequelae, compared to control, during mixed intracranial infection with DRV4. These data show IFNγ expression by a vaccine vector can enhance its safety while increasing its efficacy as pre- and post-exposure treatment. - Highlights: • IFNγ expression improves attenuated rabies virus safety and immunogenicity. • IFNγ expression is safer and more immunogenic than doubling glycoprotein expression. • Co-infection with IFNγ-expressing RABV prevents wild-type rabies virus lethality. • Vaccine safety and efficacy is additive for IFNγ and double glycoprotein expression.

  1. "THE INCIDENCE OF INFLUENZA LIKE ILLNESS AND DETERMINATION OF THE EFFICACY OF FLU VACCINE IN IRANIAN PILGRIMS DURING HAJJ PILGRIMAGE"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM. Razavy

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Every year, millions of Moslems depart to Saudi Arabia from more than one hundred countries around the world for paying to Hajj precept. High percentages of these pilgrims suffer from an influenza-like illness (ILI. This study was designed and conducted on 32370 Iranian pilgrims (36% of total number of Iranian pilgrims to evaluate the incidence of the illness and determination of influenza vaccine’s efficacy to prevent it. A total of 3465 individuals, 10.7% of under studied population, had vaccinated themselves voluntarily against the influenza and the rest were not vaccinated. As a whole, 70% of the studied population suffered from ILI. In this study, the incidence of illness among those vaccinated was about 56% and among those not vaccinated about 72%; the difference was significant (P < 0.001, with odds ratio (OD = 0.50 and (1 - OD = 0.50; thus the efficacy of the vaccine in this study was estimated to be 50% and it was efficient in reducing the cases of ILI. We recommend administration of the influenza vaccine to Iranian pilgrims one month before departure to Saudi Arabia for Hajj pilgrimage.

  2. Preclinical development of a dengue tetravalent recombinant subunit vaccine: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Meschino, Steven; Guan, Liming; Clements, David E; ter Meulen, Jan H; Casimiro, Danilo R; Coller, Beth-Ann G; Bett, Andrew J

    2015-08-07

    We describe here the preclinical development of a dengue vaccine composed of recombinant subunit carboxy-truncated envelope (E) proteins (DEN-80E) for each of the four dengue serotypes. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy studies in Rhesus monkeys were conducted to evaluate monovalent and tetravalent DEN-80E vaccines formulated with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant. Three different doses and two dosing regimens (0, 1, 2 months and 0, 1, 2, and 6 months) were evaluated in these studies. We first evaluated monomeric (DEN4-80E) and dimeric (DEN4-80EZip) versions of DEN4-80E, the latter generated in an attempt to improve immunogenicity. The two antigens, evaluated at 6, 20 and 100 μg/dose formulated with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, were equally immunogenic. A group immunized with 20 μg DEN4-80E and Alhydrogel™ induced much weaker responses. When challenged with wild-type dengue type 4 virus, all animals in the 6 and 20 μg groups and all but one in the DEN4-80EZip 100 μg group were protected from viremia. Two out of three monkeys in the Alhydrogel™ group had breakthrough viremia. A similar study was conducted to evaluate tetravalent formulations at low (3, 3, 3, 6 μg of DEN1-80E, DEN2-80E, DEN3-80E and DEN4-80E respectively), medium (10, 10, 10, 20 μg) and high (50, 50, 50, 100 μg) doses. All doses were comparably immunogenic and induced high titer, balanced neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV. Upon challenge with the four wild-type DENV, all animals in the low and medium dose groups were protected against viremia while two animals in the high-dose group exhibited breakthrough viremia. Our studies also indicated that a 0, 1, 2 and 6 month vaccination schedule is superior to the 0, 1, and 2 month schedule in terms of durability. Overall, the subunit vaccine was demonstrated to induce strong neutralization titers resulting in protection against viremia following challenge even 8-12 months after the last vaccine dose.

  3. A phase 2b randomized, controlled trial of the efficacy of the GMZ2 malaria vaccine in African children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sirima, Sodiomon B; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Milligan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GMZ2 is a recombinant protein malaria vaccine, comprising two blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum, glutamate-rich protein and merozoite surface protein 3. We assessed efficacy of GMZ2 in children in Burkina Faso, Gabon, Ghana and Uganda. METHODS: Children 12-60months old wer...

  4. Proteomic analysis of Mecistocirrus digitatus and Haemonchus contortus intestinal protein extracts and subsequent efficacy testing in a vaccine trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison J Dicker

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal nematode infections, such as Haemonchus contortus and Mecistocirrus digitatus, are ranked in the top twenty diseases affecting small-holder farmers' livestock, yet research into M. digitatus, which infects cattle and buffalo in Asia is limited. Intestine-derived native protein vaccines are effective against Haemonchus, yet the protective efficacy of intestine-derived M. digitatus proteins has yet to be determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A simplified protein extraction protocol (A is described and compared to an established method (B for protein extraction from H. contortus. Proteomic analysis of the H. contortus and M. digitatus protein extracts identified putative vaccine antigens including aminopeptidases (H11, zinc metallopeptidases, glutamate dehydrogenase, and apical gut membrane polyproteins. A vaccine trial compared the ability of the M. digitatus extract and two different H. contortus extracts to protect sheep against H. contortus challenge. Both Haemonchus fractions (A and B were highly effective, reducing cumulative Faecal Egg Counts (FEC by 99.19% and 99.89% and total worm burdens by 87.28% and 93.64% respectively, compared to the unvaccinated controls. There was no effect on H. contortus worm burdens following vaccination with the M. digitatus extract and the 28.2% reduction in cumulative FEC was not statistically significant. However, FEC were consistently lower in the M. digitatus extract vaccinates compared to the un-vaccinated controls from 25 days post-infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Similar, antigenically cross-reactive proteins are found in H. contortus and M. digitatus; this is the first step towards developing a multivalent native vaccine against Haemonchus species and M. digitatus. The simplified protein extraction method could form the basis for a locally produced vaccine against H. contortus and, possibly M. digitatus, in regions where effective cold chains for vaccine

  5. A Randomized Study Comparing the Efficacy of Three Hepatitis B Vaccine Induction Regimens in Adult Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zübeyde Nur Özkurt

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-responsiveness to hepatitis B virus (HBV vaccines is not rare in hemato-oncological patients due to disease-associated or treatment-induced immune suppression. Although different strategies have been employed to improve the response rates, to date there is not an approved schedule for HBV immunization in patients with hematological malignancies. We designed a prospective randomized study to evaluate the efficacy of 3 different induction regimens for HBV vaccination. Materials and Methods: In the standard-dose (SD group, total vaccine dose delivered was 40 μg and patients were vaccinated with 20 μg at weeks 0 and 4. In the high-dose dose-intensive (HDDI group, total vaccine dose delivered was 80 μg and patients were vaccinated with 40 μg at weeks 0 and 4. In the high-dose time-intensive (HDTI group, total vaccine dose delivered was 80 μg and patients were vaccinated with 20 μg at weeks 0, 2, 4, and 6. Results: In a cohort of 114 patients, 38.6% responded to HBV vaccination. The response rate in the SD arm, HDDI arm, and HDTI arm was 26.2%, 29.7%, and 44.4%, respectively (p>0.05. Age was the only variable identified as having a negative impact on response. Conclusion: Short of achieving statistical significance, a higher response rate was observed in the HDTI arm. Therefore, this study supports a high-dose, time-intensive HBV vaccine induction regimen in patients with hematological malignancies who are not on chemotherapy.

  6. The Formula of Plague Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Riber

    2015-01-01

    The article is a narratological investigation of a selection of plague tales. The selection spans millennia and different text types, technologies and genres, from The Bible to apocalyptical films, iPhone games and testimonials from Médecins Sans Frontières. The research question is whether...... it is possible to establish a stable formula for plague narratives despite the spread over centuries and in different text types, and to explain this formula and possible variations of it. The initial and tentative hypothesis is that a formulaic narrative structure exists for accounts, both documentary...... and fictional, of epidemics. The samples include: Exodus, History of the Peloponnesian War, Samuel Pepys’ Diary, A Journal of the Plague Year, The Last Man, The Plague in Bergamo, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, Doomsday, The Dead Zone, World War Z. An Oral History of the Zombie War, Pandemic...

  7. Measles outbreak among the Dukpa tribe of Buxa hills in West Bengal, India: epidemiology and vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuniya, Satinath; Maji, Dipankar; Mandal, Debasis; Mondal, Nilanjan

    2013-01-01

    Although measles is a vaccine preventable disease, its occurrence and outbreaks are common in India. Four remote and inaccessible hamlets, inhabited by the Dukpa tribe, at Buxa Hills under Kalchini Block of Jalpaiguri District, West Bengal experienced a measles outbreak during the months of April-June, 2011. The authors conducted an investigation to assess vaccine coverage, vaccine efficacy (VE) and to describe the patterns of measles outbreaks in this community. The over-all attack rate was 14.3%; that among males and females were 12.6% and 16.0% respectively (P = 0.189). Attack rate was highest (40%) in 0 to <5 years followed by that in the 5 to <15 years (36.5%). VE was 66.3% (95% of the confidence interval 46.9-78.6%). There is an urgent need to increase the vaccination coverage through special tactics for reaching the unreached.

  8. Measles outbreak among the Dukpa tribe of Buxa hills in West Bengal, India: Epidemiology and vaccine efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satinath Bhuniya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although measles is a vaccine preventable disease, its occurrence and outbreaks are common in India. Four remote and inaccessible hamlets, inhabited by the Dukpa tribe, at Buxa Hills under Kalchini Block of Jalpaiguri District, West Bengal experienced a measles outbreak during the months of April-June, 2011. The authors conducted an investigation to assess vaccine coverage, vaccine efficacy (VE and to describe the patterns of measles outbreaks in this community. The over-all attack rate was 14.3%; that among males and females were 12.6% and 16.0% respectively (P = 0.189. Attack rate was highest (40% in 0 to <5 years followed by that in the 5 to <15 years (36.5%. VE was 66.3% (95% of the confidence interval 46.9-78.6%. There is an urgent need to increase the vaccination coverage through special tactics for reaching the unreached.

  9. Immunogenicity and efficacy of alphavirus-derived replicon vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, John T; Pickens, Jennifer A; Schuster, Jennifer E; Johnson, Monika; Tollefson, Sharon J; Williams, John V; Davis, Nancy L; Johnston, Robert E; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Slaughter, James C; Smith-House, Frances; Crowe, James E

    2016-02-10

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are major causes of illness among children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. No vaccine has been licensed for protection against either of these viruses. We tested the ability of two Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-based viral replicon particle (VEE-VRP) vaccines that express the hRSV or hMPV fusion (F) protein to confer protection against hRSV or hMPV in African green monkeys. Animals immunized with VEE-VRP vaccines developed RSV or MPV F-specific antibodies and serum neutralizing activity. Compared to control animals, immunized animals were better able to control viral load in the respiratory mucosa following challenge and had lower levels of viral genome in nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. The high level of immunogenicity and protective efficacy induced by these vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates suggest that they hold promise for further development.

  10. Efficacy and duration of immunity after yellow fever vaccination: systematic review on the need for a booster every 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Yactayo, Sergio; Córdova, Erika

    2013-09-01

    Abstract. Current regulations stipulate a yellow fever (YF) booster every 10 years. We conducted a systematic review of the protective efficacy and duration of immunity of YF vaccine in residents of disease-endemic areas and in travelers to assess the need for a booster in these two settings and in selected populations (human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons, infants, children, pregnant women, and severely malnourished persons). Thirty-six studies and 22 reports were included. We identified 12 studies of immunogenicity, 8 of duration of immunity, 8 of vaccine response in infants and children, 7 of human-immunodeficiency virus-infected persons, 2 of pregnant women, and 1 of severely malnourished children. Based on currently available data, a single dose of YF vaccine is highly immunogenic and confers sustained life-long protective immunity against YF. Therefore, a booster dose of YF vaccine is not needed. Special considerations for selected populations are detailed.

  11. Neutralizing Antibody Response and Efficacy of Novel Recombinant Tetravalent Dengue DNA Vaccine Comprising Envelope Domain III in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Kulkarni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue is a global arboviral threat to humans; causing 390 million infections per year. The availability of safe and effective tetravalent dengue vaccine is a global requirement to prevent epidemics, morbidity, and mortality associated with it. Methods: Five experimental groups (6 mice per group each of 5-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized with vaccine and placebo (empty plasmid (100 µg, i.m. on days 0, 14 and 28. Among these, four groups (one group per serotype of each were subsequently challenged 3 weeks after the last boost with dengue virus (DENV serotypes 1-4 (100 LD50, 20 µl intracerebrally to determine vaccine efficacy. The fifth group of each was used as a control. The PBS immunized group was used as mock control. Serum samples were collected before and after subsequent immunizations. EDIII fusion protein expression was determined by Western blot. Total protein concentration was measured by Bradford assay. Neutralizing antibodies were assessed by TCID50-CPE inhibition assay. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata/IC 10.1 software for Windows. One-way repeated measures ANOVA and Mann-Whitney test were used for neutralizing antibody analysis and vaccine efficacy, respectively. Results: The recombinant EDIII fusion protein was expressed adequately in transfected 293T cells. Total protein concentration was almost 3 times more than the control. Vaccine candidate induced neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV serotypes with a notable increase after subsequent boosters. Vaccine efficacy was 83.3% (DENV-1, -3, -4 and 50% (DENV-2. Conclusion: Our results suggest that vaccine is immunogenic and protective; however, further studies are required to improve the immunogenicity particularly against DENV-2.

  12. Protein energy malnutrition during vaccination has limited influence on vaccine efficacy but abolishes immunity if administered during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Truc; Agger, Else Marie; Cassidy, Joseph P; Christensen, Jan P; Andersen, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) increases susceptibility to infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB), but it is not clear how PEM influences vaccine-promoted immunity to TB. We demonstrate that PEM during low-level steady-state TB infection in a mouse model results in rapid relapse of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as well as increased pathology, in both Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated and unvaccinated animals. PEM did not change the overall numbers of CD4 T cells in BCG-vaccinated animals but resulted in an almost complete loss of antigen-specific cytokine production. Furthermore, there was a change in cytokine expression characterized by a gradual loss of multifunctional antigen-specific CD4 T cells and an increased proportion of effector cells expressing gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha (IFN-γ(+) TNF-α(+) and IFN-γ(+) cells). PEM during M. tuberculosis infection completely blocked the protection afforded by the H56-CAF01 subunit vaccine, and this was associated with a very substantial loss of the interleukin-2-positive memory CD4 T cells promoted by this vaccine. Similarly, PEM during the vaccination phase markedly reduced the H56-CAF01 vaccine response, influencing all cytokine-producing CD4 T cell subsets, with the exception of CD4 T cells positive for TNF-α only. Importantly, this impairment was reversible and resupplementation of protein during infection rescued both the vaccine-promoted T cell response and the protective effect of the vaccine against M. tuberculosis infection.

  13. Potential corridors and barriers for plague spread in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Plague (Yersinia pestis infection) is a vector-borne disease which caused millions of human deaths in the Middle Ages. The hosts of plague are mostly rodents, and the disease is spread by the fleas that feed on them. Currently, the disease still circulates amongst sylvatic rodent populations all over the world, including great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus) populations in Central Asia. Great gerbils are social desert rodents that live in family groups in burrows, which are visible on satellite images. In great gerbil populations an abundance threshold exists, above which plague can spread causing epizootics. The spatial distribution of the host species is thought to influence the plague dynamics, such as the direction of plague spread, however no detailed analysis exists on the possible functional or structural corridors and barriers that are present in this population and landscape. This study aims to fill that gap. Methods Three 20 by 20 km areas with known great gerbil burrow distributions were used to analyse the spatial distribution of the burrows. Object-based image analysis was used to map the landscape at several scales, and was linked to the burrow maps. A novel object-based method was developed – the mean neighbour absolute burrow density difference (MNABDD) – to identify the optimal scale and evaluate the efficacy of using landscape objects as opposed to square cells. Multiple regression using raster maps was used to identify the landscape-ecological variables that explain burrow density best. Functional corridors and barriers were mapped using burrow density thresholds. Cumulative resistance of the burrow distribution to potential disease spread was evaluated using cost distance analysis. A 46-year plague surveillance dataset was used to evaluate whether plague spread was radially symmetric. Results The burrow distribution was found to be non-random and negatively correlated with Greenness, especially in the floodplain areas. Corridors and

  14. Potential corridors and barriers for plague spread in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilschut, Liesbeth I; Addink, Elisabeth A; Heesterbeek, Hans; Heier, Lise; Laudisoit, Anne; Begon, Mike; Davis, Stephen; Dubyanskiy, Vladimir M; Burdelov, Leonid A; de Jong, Steven M

    2013-10-31

    Plague (Yersinia pestis infection) is a vector-borne disease which caused millions of human deaths in the Middle Ages. The hosts of plague are mostly rodents, and the disease is spread by the fleas that feed on them. Currently, the disease still circulates amongst sylvatic rodent populations all over the world, including great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus) populations in Central Asia. Great gerbils are social desert rodents that live in family groups in burrows, which are visible on satellite images. In great gerbil populations an abundance threshold exists, above which plague can spread causing epizootics. The spatial distribution of the host species is thought to influence the plague dynamics, such as the direction of plague spread, however no detailed analysis exists on the possible functional or structural corridors and barriers that are present in this population and landscape. This study aims to fill that gap. Three 20 by 20 km areas with known great gerbil burrow distributions were used to analyse the spatial distribution of the burrows. Object-based image analysis was used to map the landscape at several scales, and was linked to the burrow maps. A novel object-based method was developed - the mean neighbour absolute burrow density difference (MNABDD) - to identify the optimal scale and evaluate the efficacy of using landscape objects as opposed to square cells. Multiple regression using raster maps was used to identify the landscape-ecological variables that explain burrow density best. Functional corridors and barriers were mapped using burrow density thresholds. Cumulative resistance of the burrow distribution to potential disease spread was evaluated using cost distance analysis. A 46-year plague surveillance dataset was used to evaluate whether plague spread was radially symmetric. The burrow distribution was found to be non-random and negatively correlated with Greenness, especially in the floodplain areas. Corridors and barriers showed a mostly NWSE

  15. An experimental Toxoplasma gondii dose response challenge model to study therapeutic or vaccine efficacy in cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan B W J Cornelissen

    Full Text Available High numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in the environment are a risk factor to humans. The environmental contamination might be reduced by vaccinating the definitive host, cats. An experimental challenge model is necessary to quantitatively assess the efficacy of a vaccine or drug treatment. Previous studies have indicated that bradyzoites are highly infectious for cats. To infect cats, tissue cysts were isolated from the brains of mice infected with oocysts of T. gondii M4 strain, and bradyzoites were released by pepsin digestion. Free bradyzoites were counted and graded doses (1000, 100, 50, 10, and 250 intact tissue cysts were inoculated orally into three cats each. Oocysts shed by these five groups of cats were collected from faeces by flotation techniques, counted microscopically and estimated by real time PCR. Additionally, the number of T. gondii in heart, tongue and brains were estimated, and serology for anti T. gondii antibodies was performed. A Beta-Poisson dose-response model was used to estimate the infectivity of single bradyzoites and linear regression was used to determine the relation between inoculated dose and numbers of oocyst shed. We found that real time PCR was more sensitive than microscopic detection of oocysts, and oocysts were detected by PCR in faeces of cats fed 10 bradyzoites but by microscopic examination. Real time PCR may only detect fragments of T. gondii DNA without the presence of oocysts in low doses. Prevalence of tissue cysts of T. gondii in tongue, heart and brains, and anti T. gondii antibody concentrations were all found to depend on the inoculated bradyzoite dose. The combination of the experimental challenge model and the dose response analysis provides a suitable reference for quantifying the potential reduction in human health risk due to a treatment of domestic cats by vaccination or by therapeutic drug application.

  16. An Experimental Toxoplasma gondii Dose Response Challenge Model to Study Therapeutic or Vaccine Efficacy in Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Jan B. W. J.; van der Giessen, Joke W. B.; Takumi, Katsuhisa; Teunis, Peter F. M.; Wisselink, Henk J.

    2014-01-01

    High numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in the environment are a risk factor to humans. The environmental contamination might be reduced by vaccinating the definitive host, cats. An experimental challenge model is necessary to quantitatively assess the efficacy of a vaccine or drug treatment. Previous studies have indicated that bradyzoites are highly infectious for cats. To infect cats, tissue cysts were isolated from the brains of mice infected with oocysts of T. gondii M4 strain, and bradyzoites were released by pepsin digestion. Free bradyzoites were counted and graded doses (1000, 100, 50, 10), and 250 intact tissue cysts were inoculated orally into three cats each. Oocysts shed by these five groups of cats were collected from faeces by flotation techniques, counted microscopically and estimated by real time PCR. Additionally, the number of T. gondii in heart, tongue and brains were estimated, and serology for anti T. gondii antibodies was performed. A Beta-Poisson dose-response model was used to estimate the infectivity of single bradyzoites and linear regression was used to determine the relation between inoculated dose and numbers of oocyst shed. We found that real time PCR was more sensitive than microscopic detection of oocysts, and oocysts were detected by PCR in faeces of cats fed 10 bradyzoites but by microscopic examination. Real time PCR may only detect fragments of T. gondii DNA without the presence of oocysts in low doses. Prevalence of tissue cysts of T. gondii in tongue, heart and brains, and anti T. gondii antibody concentrations were all found to depend on the inoculated bradyzoite dose. The combination of the experimental challenge model and the dose response analysis provides a suitable reference for quantifying the potential reduction in human health risk due to a treatment of domestic cats by vaccination or by therapeutic drug application. PMID:25184619

  17. Effect of Different Human Papillomavirus Serological and DNA Criteria on Vaccine Efficacy Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Gonzalez, Paula; Wacholder, Sholom; Ghosh, Arpita; Li, Yan; Lowy, Douglas R.; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Poncelet, Sylviane; Schussler, John; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Sherman, Mark E.; Sidawy, Mary; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Schiller, John T.; Schiffman, Mark; Wacholder, Sholom; Lowy, Douglas R.; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Sherman, Mark E.; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Porras, Carolina; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Gonzalez, Paula; Herrero, Rolando; Gonzalez, Paula; Herrero, Rolando; Ghosh, Arpita; Li, Yan; Poncelet, Sylviane; Schussler, John; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Sidawy, Mary; Self, Steve; Benavides, Adriana; Calzada, Luis Diego; Karron, Ruth; Nayar, Ritu; Roach, Nancy; Cain, Joanna; Davey, Diane; DeMets, David; Fuster, Francisco; Gershon, Ann; Holly, Elizabeth; Raventós, Henriette; Rida, Wasima; Rosero-Bixby, Luis; Suthers, Kristen; Lara, Silvia; Thomas, Sarah; Alfaro, Mario; Barrantes, Manuel; Concepción Bratti, M.; Cárdenas, Fernando; Cortés, Bernal; Espinoza, Albert; Estrada, Yenory; González, Paula; Guillén, Diego; Herrero, Roland; Jiménez, Silvia E.; Morales, Jorge; Villegas, Luis; Morera, Lidia Ana; Pérez, Elmer; Porras, Carolina; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Rivas, Libia; Freer, Enrique; Bonilla, José; García-Piñeres, Alfanso; Silva, Sandra; Atmella, Ivannia; Ramírez, Margarita; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Macklin, Nora; Schiffman, Mark; Schiller, John T.; Sherman, Mark; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Pinto, Ligia; Kemp, Troy; Eklund, Claire; Hutchinson, Martha; Sidawy, Mary; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Two trials of clinically approved human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, Females United to Unilaterally Reduce Endo/Ectocervical Disease (FUTURE I/II) and the Papilloma Trial Against Cancer in Young Adults (PATRICIA), reported a 22% difference in vaccine efficacy (VE) against cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse in HPV-naïve subcohorts; however, serological testing methods and the HPV DNA criteria used to define HPV-unexposed women differed between the studies. We applied previously described methods to simulate these HPV-naïve subcohorts within the Costa Rica HPV16/18 Vaccine Trial and assessed how these criteria affect the estimation of VE. We applied 2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) thresholds for HPV16 and HPV18 seropositivity (8 and 7 ELISA units/mL, respectively, for PATRICIA; 54 and 65 ELISA units/mL, respectively, for FUTURE I/II (to approximate the competitive Luminex immunoassay)) and 2 criteria for HPV DNA positivity (12 oncogenic HPV types, plus HPV66 and 68/73 for PATRICIA; or plus HPV6 and 11 for FUTURE I/II). VE was computed in the 2 naïve subcohorts. Using the FUTURE I/II and PATRICIA criteria, VE estimates against cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse, regardless of HPV type, were 69.0% (95% confidence interval: 40.3%, 84.9%) and 80.8% (95% confidence interval: 52.6%, 93.5%), respectively (P = 0.1). Although the application of FUTURE I/II criteria to our cohort resulted in the inclusion of more sexually experienced women, methodological differences did not fully explain the VE differences. PMID:25139208

  18. The Formula of Plague Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Riber

    2015-01-01

    The article is a narratological investigation of a selection of plague tales. The selection spans millennia and different text types, technologies and genres, from The Bible to apocalyptical films, iPhone games and testimonials from Médecins Sans Frontières. The research question is whether it is......, Plague Inc. and testimonials from Médecins Sans Frontières about the 2014-15 ebola outbreak in West Africa....

  19. Yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine: efficacy with hepatitis B immune globulin in prevention of perinatal hepatitis B virus transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, C.E.; Taylor, P.E.; Tong, M.J.; Toy, P.T.; Vyas, G.N.; Nair, P.V.; Weissman, J.Y.; Krugman, S.

    1987-05-15

    A yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine was licensed recently by the Food and Drug administration and is now available. To assess the efficacy of the yeast-recombinant vaccine, the authors administered the vaccine in combination with hepatitis B immune globulin to high-risk newborns. If infants whose mothers were positive for both hepatitis B surface antigen and the e antigen receive no immunoprophylaxis, 70% to 90% become infected with the virus, and almost all become chronic carriers. Among infants in this study who received hepatitis B immune globulin at birth and three 5-/sup +/g doses of yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine, only 4.8% became chronic carriers, a better than 90% level of protection and a rate that is comparable with that seen with immune globulin and plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine. Hepatitis surface antigen and antibodies were detected by radioimmunoassay. These data suggest that, in this high-risk setting, the yeast-recombinant vaccine is as effective as the plasma-derived vaccine in preventing hepatitis B virus infection and the chronic carrier state.

  20. Protective efficacy of multivalent replication-abortive vaccine strains in horses against African horse sickness virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulla, Valeria; Losada, Andres; Lecollinet, Sylvie; Kerviel, Adeline; Lilin, Thomas; Sailleau, Corinne; Beck, Cecile; Zientara, Stephan; Roy, Polly

    2017-07-24

    African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is an orbivirus, a member of the Reoviridae family. Nine different serotypes have been described so far. AHSV is vectored by Culicoides spp. to equids, causing high mortality, particularly in horses, with considerable economic impacts. For development of a safe attenuated vaccine, we previously established an efficient reverse genetics (RG) system to generate Entry Competent Replication-Abortive (ECRA) virus strains, for all nine serotypes and demonstrated the vaccine potential of these strains in type I interferon receptor (IFNAR)-knockout mice. Here, we evaluated the protective efficacies of these ECRA viruses in AHSV natural hosts. One monoserotype (ECRA.A4) vaccine and one multivalent cocktail (ECRA.A1/4/6/8) vaccine were tested in ponies and subsequently challenged with a virulent AHSV4. In contrast to control animals, all vaccinated ponies were protected and did not develop severe clinical symptoms of AHS. Furthermore, the multivalent cocktail vaccinated ponies produced neutralizing antibodies against all serotypes present in the cocktail, and a foal born during the trial was healthy and had no viremia. These results validate the suitability of these ECRA strains as a new generation of vaccines for AHSV. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Reversion to virulence and efficacy of an attenuated canarypox vaccine in Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Hemignathus Virens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Wiegand, Kimberly C.; Triglia, Dennis; Jarvi, Susan I.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines may be effective tools for protecting small populations of highly susceptible endangered, captive-reared, or translocated Hawaiian honeycreepers from introduced Avipoxvirus, but their efficacy has not been evaluated. An attenuated Canarypox vaccine that is genetically similar to one of two passerine Avipoxvirus isolates from Hawai‘i and distinct from Fowlpox was tested to evaluate whether Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) can be protected from wild isolates of Avipoxvirus from the Hawaiian Islands. Thirty-one (31) Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi were collected from high-elevation habitats on Mauna Kea Volcano, where pox transmission is rare, and randomly divided into two groups. One group was vaccinated with Poximune C®, whereas the other group received a sham vaccination with sterile water. Four of 15 (27%) vaccinated birds developed life-threatening disseminated lesions or lesions of unusually long duration, whereas one bird never developed a vaccine-associated lesion or “take.” After vaccine lesions healed, vaccinated birds were randomly divided into three groups of five and challenged with either a wild isolate of Fowlpox (FP) from Hawai‘i, a Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi isolate of a Canarypox-like virus (PV1), or a Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi isolate of a related, but distinct, passerine Avipoxvirus (PV2). Similarly, three random groups of five unvaccinated ‘Amakihi were challenged with the same virus isolates. Vaccinated and unvaccinated ‘Amakihi challenged with FP had transient infections with no clinical signs of infection. Mortality in vaccinated ‘Amakihi challenged with PV1 and PV2 ranged from 0% (0/5) for PV1 to 60% (3/5) for PV2. Mortality in unvaccinated ‘Amakihi ranged from 40% (2/5) for PV1 to 100% (5/5) for PV2. Although the vaccine provided some protection against PV1, both potential for vaccine reversion and low efficacy against PV2 preclude its use in captive or wild honeycreepers.

  2. Loss of anti-mycobacterial efficacy in mice over time following vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Yuriko; Hirayama, Yukio; Takii, Takemasa; Yamamoto, Saburo; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Sohkichi

    2011-09-16

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the most often used vaccine worldwide and sole vaccine against tuberculosis. BCG is protective against severe form of childhood tuberculosis but less or not protective to adult pulmonary tuberculosis. Therefore, improved vaccination strategies and development of new tuberculosis vaccines are urgent demands. For those purposes, appropriate animal models that reflect human are critically useful. However, in animal models, BCG vaccination protects well against subsequent challenge of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this study we evaluated the duration of protective efficacy of the BCG vaccination in mice over time and found that efficacy was diminished 40 weeks after vaccination. The aged mice older than 45 weeks are protected sufficiently after the vaccination with BCG, suggesting that loss of its efficacy is not dependent on the age of mice but rather depends on the period from vaccination. The loss of protection occurred in TH1 polarized STAT6 deficient mice despite the maintenance of interferon (IFN)-gamma production activity of lymph node cells and splenic CD4(+) T cells against M. tuberculosis antigens. Our data suggest that the duration from vaccination may explain the variation in BCG efficacy against adult pulmonary tuberculosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Preventable Disease Practices Among a Lower SES, Multicultural, Nonurban, U.S. Community: The Roles of Vaccination Efficacy and Personal Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Elizabeth Johnson; Lariscy, Ruthann Weaver

    2014-09-01

    In spite of knowledge that early vaccination against contagious diseases such as swine flu reduces morbidity and contains contagion, rates of vaccination in the most recent three annual disease cycles were lower than anticipated. Some previous research suggests that lower socioeconomic status, mixed-racial population composition, and a nonurban environment may all contribute to lower vaccination rates. This study adopts the health belief model to create two composite indexes-vaccine efficacy and personal constraints-to analyze the role of each in predicting vaccination behavior/intention and to explore the role of each on behavior/intention in terms of information sources. Findings indicate that vaccine efficacy significantly predicts vaccination behavior and intention to receive the vaccine and that personal constraints do not significantly predict either. Social media and a notification from a school or employer were the most important information sources for persons who had received the vaccine, while signage in a pharmacy or grocery store and information from a school or employer were the most important motivators for behavioral intentions. Vaccination efficacy was perceived most highly by persons for whom physicians are their most important information source. Finally, satisfaction with public health care services did not predict the location where individuals would seek the flu vaccine-convenience seemed more important, as grocery and drug stores were the most cited locations.

  4. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in mice and hamsters of a β-propiolactone inactivated whole virus SARS-CoV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Anjeanette; Lamirande, Elaine W; Vogel, Leatrice; Baras, Benoît; Goossens, Geneviève; Knott, Isabelle; Chen, Jun; Ward, Jerrold M; Vassilev, Ventzislav; Subbarao, Kanta

    2010-10-01

    The immunogenicity and efficacy of β-propiolactone (BPL) inactivated whole virion SARS-CoV (WI-SARS) vaccine was evaluated in BALB/c mice and golden Syrian hamsters. The vaccine preparation was tested with or without adjuvants. Adjuvant Systems AS01(B) and AS03(A) were selected and tested for their capacity to elicit high humoral and cellular immune responses to WI-SARS vaccine. We evaluated the effect of vaccine dose and each adjuvant on immunogenicity and efficacy in mice, and the effect of vaccine dose with or without the AS01(B) adjuvant on the immunogenicity and efficacy in hamsters. Efficacy was evaluated by challenge with wild-type virus at early and late time points (4 and 18 wk post-vaccination). A single dose of vaccine with or without adjuvant was poorly immunogenic in mice; a second dose resulted in a significant boost in antibody levels, even in the absence of adjuvant. The use of adjuvants resulted in higher antibody titers, with the AS01(B)-adjuvanted vaccine being slightly more immunogenic than the AS03(A)-adjuvanted vaccine. Two doses of WI-SARS with and without Adjuvant Systems were highly efficacious in mice. In hamsters, two doses of WI-SARS with and without AS01(B) were immunogenic, and two doses of 2 μg of WI-SARS with and without the adjuvant provided complete protection from early challenge. Although antibody titers had declined in all groups of vaccinated hamsters 18 wk after the second dose, the vaccinated hamsters were still partially protected from wild-type virus challenge. Vaccine with adjuvant provided better protection than non-adjuvanted WI-SARS vaccine at this later time point. Enhanced disease was not observed in the lungs or liver of hamsters following SARS-CoV challenge, regardless of the level of serum neutralizing antibodies.

  5. Motivation for HPV Vaccination Among Young Adult Men: Validation of TTM Decisional Balance and Self-Efficacy Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Anne C; Amoyal, Nicole R; Paiva, Andrea L; Prochaska, James O

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, 36% of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers occur among men. HPV vaccination can substantially reduce the risk of HPV infection; however, the vast majority of men are unvaccinated. This study developed and validated transtheoretical model-based measures for HPV vaccination in young adult men. Cross-sectional measurement development. Online survey of young adult men. Three hundred twenty-nine mostly college-attending men, ages 18 to 26. Stage of change, decisional balance (pros/cons), and self-efficacy. The sample was randomly split into halves for exploratory principal components analysis (PCA), followed by confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) to test measurement models. Multivariate analyses examined relationships between scales. For decisional balance, PCA revealed two uncorrelated five-item factors (pros α = .78; cons α = .83). For the self-efficacy scale, PCA revealed a single-factor solution (α = .83). CFA confirmed that the two-factor uncorrelated model for decisional balance and a single-factor model for self-efficacy. Follow-up analyses of variance supported the theoretically predicted relationships between stage of change, pros, and self-efficacy. This study resulted in reliable and valid measures of pros and self-efficacy for HPV vaccination that can be used in future clinical research.

  6. Using epitope predictions to evaluate efficacy and population coverage of the Mtb72f vaccine for tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Yongqun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mtb72f subunit vaccine for tuberculosis, currently in clinical trials, is hoped to provide improved protection compared to the current BCG vaccine. It is not clear, however, whether Mtb72f would be equally protective in the different human populations suffering from a high burden of tuberculosis. Previous work by Hebert and colleagues demonstrated that the PPE18 protein of Mtb72f had significant variability in a sample of clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. However, whether this variation might impact the efficacy of Mtb72f in the context of the microbial and host immune system interactions remained to be determined. The present study assesses Mtb72f's predicted efficacy in people with different DRB1 genotypes to predict whether the vaccine will protect against diverse clinical strains of M. tuberculosis in a diverse host population. Results We evaluated the binding of epitopes in the vaccine to different alleles of the human DRB1 Class II MHC protein using freely available epitope prediction programs and compared protein sequences from clinical isolates to the sequences included in the Mtb72f vaccine. This analysis predicted that the Mtb72f vaccine would be less effective for several DRB1 genotypes, due either to limited vaccine epitope binding to the DRB1 proteins or to binding primarily by unconserved PPE18 epitopes. Furthermore, we found that these less-protective DRB1 alleles are found at a very high frequency in several populations with a high burden of tuberculosis. Conclusion Although the Mtb72f vaccine candidate has shown promise in animal and clinical trials thus far, it may not be optimally effective in some genotypic backgrounds. Due to variation in both M. tuberculosis protein sequences and epitope-binding capabilities of different HLA alleles, certain human populations with a high burden of tuberculosis may not be optimally protected by the Mtb72f vaccine. The efficacy of the Mtb72f vaccine should be further

  7. Long-term efficacy of plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine among Chinese children: a 12-year follow-up study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION To evaluate long-term efficacy of a plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine and provide evidence for decision-making on the vaccine booster doses, we conducted a prevalent follow-up study to examine serologic changes in hepatitis markers and vaccine efficacy in 350 children from the original cohort of 513 children who participated in a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled trial on a plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine in Longan County, Guangxi Autonomous Region, China, in 1982.

  8. Testing the efficacy of a multi-component DNA-prime/DNA-boost vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E Aparicio-Burgos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas Disease, is a major vector borne health problem in Latin America and an emerging infectious disease in the United States. METHODS: We tested the efficacy of a multi-component DNA-prime/DNA-boost vaccine (TcVac1 against experimental T. cruzi infection in a canine model. Dogs were immunized with antigen-encoding plasmids and cytokine adjuvants, and two weeks after the last immunization, challenged with T. cruzi trypomastigotes. We measured antibody responses by ELISA and haemagglutination assay, parasitemia and infectivity to triatomines by xenodiagnosis, and performed electrocardiography and histology to assess myocardial damage and tissue pathology. RESULTS: Vaccination with TcVac1 elicited parasite-and antigen-specific IgM and IgG (IgG2>IgG1 responses. Upon challenge infection, TcVac1-vaccinated dogs, as compared to non-vaccinated controls dogs, responded to T. cruzi with a rapid expansion of antibody response, moderately enhanced CD8(+ T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, and suppression of phagocytes' activity evidenced by decreased myeloperoxidase and nitrite levels. Subsequently, vaccinated dogs controlled the acute parasitemia by day 37 pi (44 dpi in non-vaccinated dogs, and exhibited a moderate decline in infectivity to triatomines. TcVac1-immunized dogs did not control the myocardial parasite burden and electrocardiographic and histopatholgic cardiac alterations that are the hallmarks of acute Chagas disease. During the chronic stage, TcVac1-vaccinated dogs exhibited a moderate decline in cardiac alterations determined by EKG and anatomo-/histo-pathological analysis while chronically-infected/non-vaccinated dogs continued to exhibit severe EKG alterations. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, these results demonstrated that TcVac1 provided a partial resistance to T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease, and provide an impetus to improve the vaccination strategy against Chagas disease.

  9. Evaluation of Oral Bait Vaccine Efficacy Against Classical Swine Fever in Village Backyard Pig Farms in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, V R; Stegeman, J A; Dukpa, K; Gurung, R B; Loeffen, W L A

    2016-12-01

    Control and eradication of classical swine fever (CSF) in countries with a high proportion of backyard holdings is a challenge. Conventional attenuated Chinese C-strain vaccines, though safe and effective, are difficult to use in backyard farms due to various practical reasons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the CSF oral bait vaccine in village backyard pig farms and to assess the farmers' knowledge on CSF and motivation on using oral vaccines. The pigs were fed the bait by the farmers themselves; one bait was given on day 0, followed by second bait on the next day. Seventy-three per cent (140 of 193 pigs) of vaccinated pigs had either a slight (2-fold-3-fold; 60 pigs) or significant (at least 4-fold; 80 pigs) increase of the antibody titre against CSFV. A significant increase of the antibody titres was mainly observed in pigs with no pre-vaccination titre (OR = 12, 95% CI = 4-40). The number of pigs with protective antibody titres (≥40) rose from 47 (24%) to 115 (60%) following vaccination. Only 30% of the farmers claimed to be familiar with CSF, although clinical signs they mentioned were rather unspecific and could relate to many other pig diseases. Most of the farmers claimed to be motivated to use oral vaccines if made available. The oral vaccine could be a substitute for the conventional attenuated CSF vaccines in areas where it is logistically difficult for veterinarians to visit. It may therefore be a useful tool to combat endemic CSF disease in regions where the disease continues to have a serious impact on the backyard farmers who depend on pig farming for their sustenance and livelihoods.

  10. Immune responses of bison and efficacy after booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to saline (control; n=7) or single vaccination (n=24) with 1010 CFU of B. abortus strain RB51 (RB51). Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with 10**10 CFU of RB51 at 11 months after initial vaccination (n=16). When comp...

  11. Protective efficacy of crude virus-like particle vaccine against HPAI H5N1 in chickens and its application on DIVA strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Keun; Lee, Dong-Hun; Youn, Ha-Na; Kim, Myeong-Seob; Lee, Yu-Na; Yuk, Seong-Su; Lim, Tae-Hyun; Jang, Jun-Hyuk; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Byoung-Yoon; Kang, Sang-Moo; Seong, Baik-Lin; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2013-05-01

    Currently, Asian lineage highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 has become widespread across continents. These viruses are persistently circulating among poultry populations in endemic regions, causing huge economic losses, and raising concerns about an H5N1 pandemic. To control HPAI H5N1, effective vaccines for poultry are urgently needed. In this study, we developed HPAI virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine as a candidate poultry vaccine and evaluated its protective efficacy and possible application for differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Specific pathogen-free chickens received a single injection of HPAI H5N1 VLP vaccine generated using baculovirus expression vector system. Immunogenicity of VLP vaccines was determined using hemagglutination inhibition (HI), neuraminidase inhibition (NI), and ELISA test. Challenge study was performed to evaluate efficacy of VLP vaccines. A single immunization with HPAI H5N1 VLP vaccine induced high levels of HI and NI antibodies and protected chickens from a lethal challenge of wild-type HPAI H5N1 virus. Viral excretion from the vaccinated and challenged group was strongly reduced compared with a mock-vaccinated control group. Furthermore, we were able to differentiate VLP-vaccinated chickens from vaccinated and then infected chickens with a commercial ELISA test kit, which offers a promising strategy for the application of DIVA concept. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Isolation of Pasteurella multocida from chickens, preparation of formalin killed fowl cholera vaccine, and determination of efficacy in experimental chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmuda Akhtar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objectives of this study were to isolate and identify Pasteurella multocida from fowl cholera (FC suspected chicken, and to prepare and efficacy determination of formalin killed fowl cholera vaccine using the isolated P. multocida strain. Materials and methods: A total of five suspected dead chickens were collected from Brothers Poultry Farm located at Gazipur district, Bangladesh. The samples were processed and the P. multocida was isolated through conventional bacteriological techniques, were finally confirmed by polymerase chain reaction using P. multocida specific primers targeting cap gene. The P. multocida isolate was used to develop a formalin killed fowl cholera vaccine. The efficacy of the newly prepared vaccine was determined in Starcross-579 chickens (n=30 aging 15 weeks either by injecting 1 mL (group-A; n=10 or 0.5 mL (group-B; n=10 vaccine containing approximately 3.2x108 CFU/mL P. multocida organism; 10 birds were kept as unvaccinated control. The sera from the vaccinated and control birds were collected and were subjected for antibody titre determination by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Finally the vaccinated birds were challenged using virulent strains of P. multocida to confer the protection against FC. Results: P. multocida could be isolated from both the samples. The formalin killed vaccine prepared from the isolated bacteria was subjected for the determination of antibody titre in chicken, and found that the antibody titres in the birds of group A and group B were 4.513 and 4.07 respectively after primary vaccination, and 4.893 and 4.37 respectively after booster vaccination. Most of the vaccinated birds were found to be survived after challenging with virulent strain of P. multocida. Conclusion: It is concluded that the causal agent of FC (P. multocida was successfully isolated from FC affected dead chickens. The prepared formalin killed fowl cholera vaccine induces protective immune response and

  13. Plague and the Human Flea, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Makundi, Rhodes H

    2007-01-01

    Domestic fleas were collected in 12 villages in the western Usambara Mountains in Tanzania. Of these, 7 are considered villages with high plague frequency, where human plague was recorded during at least 6 of the 17 plague seasons between 1986 and 2004. In the remaining 5 villages with low plague...... frequency, plague was either rare or unrecorded. Pulex irritans, known as the human flea, was the predominant flea species (72.4%) in houses. The density of P. irritans, but not of other domestic fleas, was significantly higher in villages with a higher plague frequency or incidence. Moreover, the P....... irritans index was strongly positively correlated with plague frequency and with the logarithmically transformed plague incidence. These observations suggest that in Lushoto District human fleas may play a role in plague epidemiology. These findings are of immediate public health relevance because...

  14. Efficacy and transmissibility of Newcastle disease I-2 vaccine strain against a field isolate of virulent ND virus (JF820294.1) in village chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Hassan; Nili, Hassan; Asasi, Kramat; Mosleh, Najmeh; Firouzi, Sobhan; Mohammadi, Mitra

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess efficacy of heat-stable I-2 vaccine against Newcastle diseases in vaccinated and vaccinated in contact birds group following challenge against virulent Newcastle disease (ND) virus in village chicken. Also, to assess whether birds that have been exposed to vaccine virus-shedding, birds were protected against mortality and clinical signs after infection with a virulent strain of the ND virus (NDV). One hundred fifty one-day-old native chickens were divided into seven groups (4 experimental groups of 30 birds/group and 3 control groups (unvaccinated unchallenged, challenged, and just vaccinated). Birds in experimental groups were vaccinated either via drinking water or as food carrier with thermostable I-2 vaccine and then challenged with virulent isolate of NDV (JF820294.1), and eight birds were added as in-contact birds to vaccinated groups. Following challenge, seven extra birds were added to each group as in contact with vaccinated and challenged birds. Survival rate, clinical signs, necropsy finding, and mean antibody titer were evaluated in different experimental and control groups. Birds vaccinated via drinking water showed 100% survival rate. However, birds vaccinated with food carrier vaccine showed less than 50% survival rate. Based on the results obtained from this study, it can be recommended that I-2 vaccination via drinking water can effectively prevent ND in village chicken, since I-2 strain has been able to transmit to non-vaccinated-sensitive birds more effectively than velogenic NDV.

  15. A live attenuated strain of Yersinia pestis ΔyscB provides protection against bubonic and pneumonic plagues in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuecan; Qi, Zhizhen; Du, Zongmin; Bi, Yujing; Zhang, Qingwen; Tan, Yafang; Yang, Huiying; Xin, Youquan; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2013-05-24

    To develop a safe and effective live plague vaccine, the ΔyscB mutant was constructed based on Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus strain 201 that is avirulent to humans, but virulent to mice. The virulence, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the ΔyscB mutant were evaluated in this study. The results showed that the ΔyscB mutant was severely attenuated, elicited a higher F1-specific antibody titer and provided protective efficacy against bubonic and pneumonic plague in mouse model. The ΔyscB mutant could induce the secretion of both Th1-associated cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α) and Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Taken together, the ΔyscB mutant represented a potential vaccine candidate based on its ability to generate strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and to provide good protection against both subcutaneous and intranasal Y. pestis challenge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A critical analysis of the cynomolgus macaque, Macaca fascicularis, as a model to test HIV-1/SIV vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Joseph M; MacDonald, Kelly S

    2015-06-17

    The use of a number of non-rhesus macaque species, but especially cynomolgus macaques as a model for HIV-1 vaccine development has increased in recent years. Cynomolgus macaques have been used in the United Kingdom, Europe, Canada and Australia as a model for HIV vaccine development for many years. Unlike rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques infected with SIV show a pattern of disease pathogenesis that more closely resembles that of human HIV-1 infection, exhibiting lower peak and set-point viral loads and slower progression to disease with more typical AIDS defining illnesses. Several advances have been made recently in the use of the cynomolgus macaque SIV challenge model that allow the demonstration of vaccine efficacy using attenuated viruses and vectors that are both viral and non-viral in origin. This review aims to probe the details of various vaccination trials carried out in cynomolgus macaques in the context of our modern understanding of the highly diverse immunogenetics of this species with a view to understanding the species-specific immune correlates of protection and the efficacy of vectors that have been used to design vaccines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. THE COMPARISON OF INFLUENZA VACCINE EFFICACY ON RESPIRATORY DISEASE AMONG IRANIAN PILGRIMS IN THE 2003 AND 2004 SEASONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Razavi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged cough occurs in a large proportion of the 2 million pilgrims who participate in the annual Hajj in Saudi Arabia. There is no unique cause for pilgrims’ respiratory involvement, but several studies suggest a high incidence of influenza as a cause of the disease. To determine influenza vaccine efficacy against respiratory disease in pilgrims, we conducted two similar cohort studies on 51100 Iranian pilgrims who had participated in the annual Hajj in the years 2003 and 2004. We calculated vaccine efficacy in these two years with the use of “1- odd’s ratio” formula and compared the results. The vaccine efficacy for prevention of influenza like illness in the year 2003 was 51% but the vaccine was not efficient in the year 2004. It was concluded that etiologic agents other than influenza virus should be considered as the cause of respiratory disease in Hajj. Bacterial infections superimposed on chronic respiratory diseases, and allergic or toxic conditions are suggested caourses for more investigation.

  18. [The Justinian plague (part one)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Manfredi, Roberto; Fiorino, Sirio

    2012-06-01

    In their medical-historical review, the authors assess the evolution of bubonic plague epidemics: after breaking out in the Egyptian port of Pelusium in October 541 AD, the epidemics hit several regions in the Mediterranean basin in a succession of waves. The so-called Justinian plague took its name from the Byzantine emperor of the period, and seriously conditioned the expansionary aims of the Eastern Roman empire towards Italy (which was occupied by Goths), and Northern Africa (where the Vandals had settled), during the first decades of its spread. In the Eastern Empire the plague played a considerable role in reducing the tensions between Persians and Byzantines, especially on the Syrian and Anatolian fronts. It had a major demographic impact, reducing the possibility of recruitment to the Roman legions and leading to a significant drop in tax revenues, which were essential to sustain the state and its military machine. Finally, the plague also took its toll on economic resources (especially agriculture), indirectly leading to a vicious inflationary circle. In the space of over two centuries, plague epidemics paralyzed most trade and commercial exchanges. Furthermore, the Justinian plague, halting the consolidation of the influence of the Eastern Roman empire over some Western regions (including Italy and Northern Africa, which were ruled by Barbarians), supported the development and rise of a number of Roman-Barbarian kingdoms. It may therefore be suggested that the Justinian plague occurred at a very critical historical moment, which represents the real watershed between the Ancient World and the upcoming Middle Ages.

  19. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 infection decreases the efficacy of an attenuated classical swine fever virus (CSFV vaccine

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    Huang Yu-Liang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Lapinized Philippines Coronel (LPC vaccine, an attenuated strain of classical swine fever virus (CSFV, is an important tool for the prevention and control of CSFV infection and is widely and routinely used in most CSF endemic areas, including Taiwan. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PCV2 infection affects the efficacy of the LPC vaccine. Eighteen 6-week-old, cesarean-derived and colostrum-deprived (CDCD, crossbred pigs were randomly assigned to four groups. A total of 105.3 TCID50 of PCV2 was experimentally inoculated into pigs through both intranasal and intramuscular routes at 0 days post-inoculation (dpi followed by LPC vaccination 12 days later. All the animals were challenged with wild-type CSFV (ALD stain at 27 dpi and euthanized at 45 dpi. Following CSFV challenge, the LPC-vaccinated pigs pre-inoculated with PCV2 showed transient fever, viremia, and viral shedding in the saliva and feces. The number of IgM+, CD4+CD8-CD25+, CD4+CD8+CD25+, and CD4-CD8+CD25+ lymphocyte subsets and the level of neutralizing antibodies against CSFV were significantly higher in the animals with LPC vaccination alone than in the pigs with PCV2 inoculation/LPC vaccination. In addition, PCV2-derived inhibition of the CSFV-specific cell proliferative response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was demonstrated in an ex vivo experiment. These findings indicate that PCV2 infection decreases the efficacy of the LPC vaccine. This PCV2-derived interference may not only allow the invasion of wild-type CSFV in pig farms but also increases the difficulty of CSF prevention and control in CSF endemic areas.

  20. Methodology and lessons-learned from the efficacy clinical trial of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, K; Yunus, M; El Arifeen, Shams; Azim, Tasnim; Faruque, A S G; Huq, Ehsanul; Hossain, Ilias; Luby, Stephen P; Victor, John C; Dallas, Michael J; Lewis, Kristen D C; Rivers, Stephen B; Steele, A Duncan; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Ciarlet, Max; Sack, David A

    2012-04-27

    An efficacy clinical trial with pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (PRV), RotaTeq(®), was conducted at Matlab field site of ICDDR,B, Bangladesh from March 2007 to March 2009. The methodology, including operation logistics, and lessons-learned are described in this report. Vaccination was organized at 41 fixed-site clinics twice/month. A total of 1136 infants were randomized 1:1 to receive 3 doses of PRV/placebo at approximately 6-, 10-, and 14-weeks of age with routine vaccines of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) schedule. Twelve field-workers routinely visited study participants for safety and efficacy follow-up. The study was conducted following good clinical practices and maintaining cold-chain requirements. There were no temperature deviations of clinical vaccine supplies. Data entry was done using the source documents to a central database developed by the sponsor which was linked to web. Among enrolled infants, 1128 (99.3%) received 3 doses of PRV/placebo and efficacy follow-up was conducted for a median of 554 days. For the evaluation of immunogenicity, blood samples were collected from 150 participants predose 1 and from 147 (98%) of the same participants post dose 3. Stool samples were collected from 778 (99.9%) acute gastroenteritis episodes among children who reported to diarrhoea treatment centres. Thirty-nine serious adverse events, including 6 deaths, occurred among study participants. The efficacy of PRV against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis was 42.7% through the entire follow-up period; serum anti-rotavirus IgA response was 78.1%. Inclement weather, difficult transportation, and movement of study participants were some of the challenges identified. This is the first vaccine trial in rural Bangladesh with online data entry. The study was well accepted in the community and was completed successfully. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Vaccine efficacy in senescent mice challenged with recombinant SARS-CoV bearing epidemic and zoonotic spike variants.

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    Damon Deming

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2003, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV was identified as the etiological agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome, a disease characterized by severe pneumonia that sometimes results in death. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that crossed the species barrier, most likely originating from bats or from other species including civets, raccoon dogs, domestic cats, swine, and rodents. A SARS-CoV vaccine should confer long-term protection, especially in vulnerable senescent populations, against both the 2003 epidemic strains and zoonotic strains that may yet emerge from animal reservoirs. We report the comprehensive investigation of SARS vaccine efficacy in young and senescent mice following homologous and heterologous challenge.Using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP expressing the 2003 epidemic Urbani SARS-CoV strain spike (S glycoprotein (VRP-S or the nucleocapsid (N protein from the same strain (VRP-N, we demonstrate that VRP-S, but not VRP-N vaccines provide complete short- and long-term protection against homologous strain challenge in young and senescent mice. To test VRP vaccine efficacy against a heterologous SARS-CoV, we used phylogenetic analyses, synthetic biology, and reverse genetics to construct a chimeric virus (icGDO3-S encoding a synthetic S glycoprotein gene of the most genetically divergent human strain, GDO3, which clusters among the zoonotic SARS-CoV. icGD03-S replicated efficiently in human airway epithelial cells and in the lungs of young and senescent mice, and was highly resistant to neutralization with antisera directed against the Urbani strain. Although VRP-S vaccines provided complete short-term protection against heterologous icGD03-S challenge in young mice, only limited protection was seen in vaccinated senescent animals. VRP-N vaccines not only failed to protect from homologous or heterologous challenge, but resulted in enhanced immunopathology with eosinophilic

  2. The threatened plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, P

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses changes in disease patterns affecting human health that may be related to environmental and social changes in the world. The World Health Report reveals that 30 new diseases emerged in the past 20 years. Old diseases are becoming resistant to new drugs. Infectious diseases that were in decline are spreading: diphtheria, whooping cough, and measles. Illnesses such as malaria, fevers, cholera, and rodent-borne viruses are becoming more frequent. Diseases that are transmitted by animals or water are related to environmental and social changes. Degraded environments are susceptible to the appearance of opportunistic species, such as weeds, rodents, insects, and microorganisms. Stable environments support the welfare of large predators and control opportunistic species. Owls, coyotes, and snakes eat rodents that carry Lyme disease ticks and a variety of viruses, plague, and bacteria. Reptiles, birds, spiders, ladybugs, bats, and fish consume larvae and mosquitoes that cause malaria and fevers. Habitat loss and fragmentation, monocultures, excessive use of toxic chemicals, climate change, and weather instability are widespread global changes that reduce the predator population. Small wilderness habitats favor pests. Monocultures reduce genetic diversity and increase vulnerability. Excessive use of pesticides harms birds and helpful insects. A sign of a failing ecosystem is the population explosion of pests and disequilibrium. The Environmental Distress Syndrome is characterized as: 1) emerging infectious diseases, 2) loss of biodiversity, 3) increased generalist species and decreased specialist species, 4) declines in specific specialists, such as pollinators responsible for preservation of flowering plants, and 5) increased coastal algal blooms. The impacts of disease mean considerable costs to humans, agriculture, and livestock. Loss of resources is also costly.

  3. A dual TLR agonist adjuvant enhances the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the tuberculosis vaccine antigen ID93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Mark T; Beebe, Elyse A; Hudson, Thomas E; Moon, James J; Fox, Christopher B; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N

    2014-01-01

    With over eight million cases of tuberculosis each year there is a pressing need for the development of new vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Subunit vaccines consisting of recombinant proteins are an attractive vaccine approach due to their inherent safety compared to attenuated live vaccines and the uniformity of manufacture. Addition of properly formulated TLR agonist-containing adjuvants to recombinant protein vaccines enhances the antigen-specific CD4(+) T cell response characterized by IFN-γ and TNF, both of which are critical for the control of TB. We have developed a clinical stage vaccine candidate consisting of a recombinant fusion protein ID93 adjuvanted with the TLR4 agonist GLA-SE. Here we examine whether ID93+GLA-SE can be improved by the addition of a second TLR agonist. Addition of CpG containing DNA to ID93+GLA-SE enhanced the magnitude of the multi-functional TH1 response against ID93 characterized by co-production of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-2. Addition of CpG also improved the protective efficacy of ID93+GLA-SE. Finally we demonstrate that this adjuvant synergy between GLA and CpG is independent of TRIF signaling, whereas TRIF is necessary for the adjuvant activity of GLA-SE in the absence of CpG.

  4. A dual TLR agonist adjuvant enhances the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the tuberculosis vaccine antigen ID93.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Orr

    Full Text Available With over eight million cases of tuberculosis each year there is a pressing need for the development of new vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Subunit vaccines consisting of recombinant proteins are an attractive vaccine approach due to their inherent safety compared to attenuated live vaccines and the uniformity of manufacture. Addition of properly formulated TLR agonist-containing adjuvants to recombinant protein vaccines enhances the antigen-specific CD4(+ T cell response characterized by IFN-γ and TNF, both of which are critical for the control of TB. We have developed a clinical stage vaccine candidate consisting of a recombinant fusion protein ID93 adjuvanted with the TLR4 agonist GLA-SE. Here we examine whether ID93+GLA-SE can be improved by the addition of a second TLR agonist. Addition of CpG containing DNA to ID93+GLA-SE enhanced the magnitude of the multi-functional TH1 response against ID93 characterized by co-production of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-2. Addition of CpG also improved the protective efficacy of ID93+GLA-SE. Finally we demonstrate that this adjuvant synergy between GLA and CpG is independent of TRIF signaling, whereas TRIF is necessary for the adjuvant activity of GLA-SE in the absence of CpG.

  5. Efficacy and immunogenicity of single-dose AdVAV intranasal anthrax vaccine compared to anthrax vaccine absorbed in an aerosolized spore rabbit challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vyjayanthi; Andersen, Bo H; Shoemaker, Christine; Sivko, Gloria S; Tordoff, Kevin P; Stark, Gregory V; Zhang, Jianfeng; Feng, Tsungwei; Duchars, Matthew; Roberts, M Scot

    2015-04-01

    AdVAV is a replication-deficient adenovirus type 5-vectored vaccine expressing the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA83) from Bacillus anthracis that is being developed for the prevention of disease caused by inhalation of aerosolized B. anthracis spores. A noninferiority study comparing the efficacy of AdVAV to the currently licensed Anthrax Vaccine Absorbed (AVA; BioThrax) was performed in New Zealand White rabbits using postchallenge survival as the study endpoint (20% noninferiority margin for survival). Three groups of 32 rabbits were vaccinated with a single intranasal dose of AdVAV (7.5 × 10(7), 1.5 × 10(9), or 3.5 × 10(10) viral particles). Three additional groups of 32 animals received two doses of either intranasal AdVAV (3.5 × 10(10) viral particles) or intramuscular AVA (diluted 1:16 or 1:64) 28 days apart. The placebo group of 16 rabbits received a single intranasal dose of AdVAV formulation buffer. All animals were challenged via the inhalation route with a targeted dose of 200 times the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of aerosolized B. anthracis Ames spores 70 days after the initial vaccination and were followed for 3 weeks. PA83 immunogenicity was evaluated by validated toxin neutralizing antibody and serum anti-PA83 IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). All animals in the placebo cohort died from the challenge. Three of the four AdVAV dose cohorts tested, including two single-dose cohorts, achieved statistical noninferiority relative to the AVA comparator group, with survival rates between 97% and 100%. Vaccination with AdVAV also produced antibody titers with earlier onset and greater persistence than vaccination with AVA. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. The efficacy of oral vaccination of mice with alginate encapsulated outer membrane proteins of Pasteurella haemolytica and One-Shot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidane, A; Guimond, P; Ju, T R; Sanchez, M; Gibson, J; Bowersock, T L

    2001-03-21

    The goal of this study was to examine the efficacy of oral delivery of alginate encapsulated outer membrane proteins (OMP) of Pasteurella haemolytica and a commercial One-Shot vaccine in inducing protection in mice against lethal challenge with virulent P. haemolytica. We examined two alginate microsphere formulations and compared them with oral unencapsulated and subcutaneously administered vaccines. Alginate microspheres were made by the emulsion-cross-linking technique. They were examined for size, hydrophobicity, and antigen loading efficiency before they were used in the study. Mice were vaccinated by administering 200 microg of antigens in 200 microl of microspheres suspension orally or subcutaneously. One group of mice received blank microspheres and a second group was given unencapsulated antigen orally. A third and a fourth group received different formulations of alginate encapsulated antigens by oral administration. Three groups received subcutaneous inoculations (alginate encapsulated, non-adjuvanted and unencapsulated antigens, and adjuvanted One-Shot), and one group received water (naïve group). Mice were vaccinated orally for four consecutive days and challenged with P. haemolytica 5 weeks after the first vaccination. Weekly serum and feces samples were assayed for antigen specific antibodies. The number of dead mice in each group 4 days post challenge was used to compare the efficacy of the various vaccination groups. The mean volume sizes of blank alginate microsphere formulations A, and AA were 15.9, 16 and 9.2 microm, respectively. Hydrophobicity of the microspheres was evaluated by measuring contact angle on a glass slide coated with the microspheres. The contact angles on A and AA were 37.8 and 74.3 degrees, respectively. Antigen concentration in a 1:1 w/w suspension of microspheres in water was 0.9 mg/ml. Rate of death for the blank group was 42.8% whereas for groups vaccinated with antigens encapsulated in A and AA the death rates were 40

  7. Immune responses of bison and efficacy after booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S C; McGill, J L; Sacco, R E; Hennager, S G

    2015-04-01

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to receive saline or a single vaccination with 10(10) CFU of Brucella abortus strain RB51. Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with RB51 at 11 months after the initial vaccination. Mean antibody responses to RB51 were greater (P abortus strain 2308. The incidences of abortion and infection were greater (P Brucella organisms in all tissues, except in retropharyngeal and supramammary lymph nodes. Our study suggests that RB51 booster vaccination is an effective vaccination strategy for enhancing herd immunity against brucellosis in bison.

  8. Efficacy of vaccination with different combinations of MF59-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines against pandemic H1N1 (2009) influenza virus infection in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brand, Judith M A; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; Bodewes, Rogier; Stittelaar, Koert J; van Amerongen, Geert; Kuiken, Thijs; Simon, James; Fouchier, Ron A M; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2011-03-01

    Serum antibodies induced by seasonal influenza or seasonal influenza vaccination exhibit limited or no cross-reactivity against the 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza virus of the H1N1 subtype (pH1N1). Ferrets immunized once or twice with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine exhibited significantly reduced lung virus titers but no substantial clinical protection against pH1N1-associated disease. However, priming with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine significantly increased the efficacy of a pandemic MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine against pH1N1 challenge. Elucidating the mechanism involved in this priming principle will contribute to our understanding of vaccine- and infection-induced correlates of protection. Furthermore, a practical consequence of these findings is that during an emerging pandemic, the implementation of a priming strategy with an available adjuvanted seasonal vaccine to precede the eventual pandemic vaccination campaign may be useful and life-saving.

  9. A systematic review of the efficacy of prophylactic control measures for naturally-occurring canine leishmaniosis, part I: vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, C E; Carbonell-Antoñanzas, M; Aiassa, E; Dhollander, S; Zagmutt, F J; Brodbelt, D C; Solano-Gallego, L

    2014-11-01

    Canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is an important zoonotic disease; however, the efficacy of available vaccines for the prevention of naturally-occurring Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) infection in dogs remains unclear. The objective of this review was to determine the efficacy of currently available vaccines to prevent naturally-occurring L. infantum infection in dogs. Four bibliographic databases (CAB Direct 2011, Web of Science 2011, U.S. National Library of Medicine 2011 and Literatura Latino Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde) were searched along with eight sets of conference proceedings and the International Veterinary Information Service (IVIS) database, from 1980 to November 2012. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised clinical trials (NRCTs), cohort studies and case-control studies that investigated vaccine efficacy for natural L. infantum infection in dogs were eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed each study against the inclusion criteria, independently extracted relevant data from all included studies and assessed the risk of methodological shortcomings in each individual study. The odds ratio (OR) and absolute risk reduction (ARR) for dichotomous outcomes and mean difference for continuous outcomes were calculated. Meta-analysis was not performed due to heterogeneity of the studies identified. The search was conducted for all mitigations for CanL and yielded the title and abstract of 937 articles, from which 84 articles were screened based on full text. Twelve studies on vaccinations (five RCTs, seven NRCTs) were identified. Ten studies were at a high risk of methodological shortcomings, whilst two were at an unclear risk. The use of 200 μg ALM protein, Leishmune(®), CaniLeish(®), LiESAp with MDP, and ALM with BCG tended to significantly reduce the proportion of dogs infected with L. infantum based on either parasitological or serological evidence. The use of lyophilized protein vaccine significantly

  10. Exploring of primate models of tick-borne flaviviruses infection for evaluation of vaccines and drugs efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia S Pripuzova

    Full Text Available Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV is one of the most prevalent and medically important tick-borne arboviruses in Eurasia. There are overlapping foci of two flaviviruses: TBEV and Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV in Russia. Inactivated vaccines exist only against TBE. There are no antiviral drugs for treatment of both diseases. Optimal animal models are necessary to study efficacy of novel vaccines and treatment preparations against TBE and relative flaviviruses. The models for TBE and OHF using subcutaneous inoculation were tested in Cercopithecus aethiops and Macaca fascicularis monkeys with or without prior immunization with inactivated TBE vaccine. No visible clinical signs or severe pathomorphological lesions were observed in any monkey infected with TBEV or OHFV. C. aethiops challenged with OHFV showed massive hemolytic syndrome and thrombocytopenia. Infectious virus or viral RNA was revealed in visceral organs and CNS of C. aethiops infected with both viruses; however, viremia was low. Inactivated TBE vaccines induced high antibody titers against both viruses and expressed booster after challenge. The protective efficacy against TBE was shown by the absence of virus in spleen, lymph nodes and CNS of immunized animals after challenge. Despite the absence of expressed hemolytic syndrome in immunized C. aethiops TBE vaccine did not prevent the reproduction of OHFV in CNS and visceral organs. Subcutaneous inoculation of M. fascicularis with two TBEV strains led to a febrile disease with well expressed viremia, fever, and virus reproduction in spleen, lymph nodes and CNS. The optimal terms for estimation of the viral titers in CNS were defined as 8-16 days post infection. We characterized two animal models similar to humans in their susceptibility to tick-borne flaviviruses and found the most optimal scheme for evaluation of efficacy of preventive and therapeutic preparations. We also identified M. fascicularis to be more susceptible to

  11. Red Plague Control Plan (RPCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    SCOPE: Prescribes the minimum requirements for the control of cuprous / cupric oxide corrosion (a.k.a. Red Plague) of silver-coated copper wire, cable, and harness assemblies. PURPOSE: Targeted for applications where exposure to assembly processes, environmental conditions, and contamination may promote the development of cuprous / cupric oxide corrosion (a.k.a. Red Plague) in silver-coated copper wire, cable, and harness assemblies. Does not exclude any alternate or contractor-proprietary documents or processes that meet or exceed the baseline of requirements established by this document. Use of alternate or contractor-proprietary documents or processes shall require review and prior approval of the procuring NASA activity.

  12. Protective efficacy of standard Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccination in infants aged 4.5 months: interim analysis of a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, C.L.; Garly, May-Lill; Bale, C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the protective efficacy of measles vaccination in infants in a low income country before 9 months of age. Design Randomised clinical trial. Participants 1333 infants aged 4.5 months: 441 in treatment group and 892 in control group. Setting Urban area in Guinea-Bissau. Interve......Objective To examine the protective efficacy of measles vaccination in infants in a low income country before 9 months of age. Design Randomised clinical trial. Participants 1333 infants aged 4.5 months: 441 in treatment group and 892 in control group. Setting Urban area in Guinea......-Bissau. Intervention Measles vaccination using standard titre Edmonston-Zagreb vaccine at 4.5 months of age. Main outcome measures Vaccine efficacy against measles infection, admission to hospital for measles, and measles mortality before standard vaccination at 9 months of age. Results 28% of the children tested at 4.......5 months of age had protective levels of maternal antibodies against measles at enrolment. After early vaccination against measles 92% had measles antibodies at 9 months of age. A measles outbreak offered a unique situation for testing the efficacy of early measles vaccination. During the outbreak, 96...

  13. Mucosal delivery switches the response to an adjuvanted tuberculosis vaccine from systemic TH1 to tissue-resident TH17 responses without impacting the protective efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Mark T; Beebe, Elyse A; Hudson, Thomas E; Argilla, David; Huang, Po-Wei D; Reese, Valerie A; Fox, Christopher B; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N

    2015-11-27

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the leading causes of infectious disease death despite widespread usage of the BCG vaccine. A number of new TB vaccines have moved into clinical evaluation to replace or boost the BCG vaccine including ID93+GLA-SE, an adjuvanted subunit vaccine. The vast majority of new TB vaccines in trials are delivered parenterally even though intranasal delivery can augment lung-resident immunity and protective efficacy in small animal models. Parenteral immunization with the adjuvanted subunit vaccine ID93+GLA-SE elicits robust TH1 immunity and protection against aerosolized Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice and guinea pigs. Here we describe the immunogenicity and efficacy of this vaccine when delivered intranasally. Intranasal delivery switches the CD4 T cell response from a TH1 to a TH17 dominated tissue-resident response with increased frequencies of ID93-specific cells in both the lung tissue and at the lung surface. Surprisingly these changes do not affect the protective efficacy of ID93+GLA-SE. Unlike intramuscular immunization, ID93+GLA does not require the squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion SE to elicit protective CD4 T cells when delivered intranasally. Finally we demonstrate that TNF and the IL-17 receptor are dispensable for the efficacy of the intranasal vaccine suggesting an alternative mechanism of protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mucosal delivery switches the response to an adjuvanted tuberculosis vaccine from systemic TH1 to tissue-resident TH17 responses without impacting the protective efficacy§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Mark T.; Beebe, Elyse A.; Hudson, Thomas; Argilla, David; Huang, Po-Wei D.; Reese, Valerie A.; Fox, Christopher B.; Reed, Steven G.; Coler, Rhea N.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the leading causes of infectious disease death despite widespread usage of the BCG vaccine. A number of new TB vaccines have moved into clinical evaluation to replace or boost the BCG vaccine including ID93+GLA-SE, an adjuvanted subunit vaccine. The vast majority of new TB vaccines in trials are delivered parenterally even though intranasal delivery can augment lung-resident immunity and protective efficacy in small animal models. Parenteral immunization with the adjuvanted subunit vaccine ID93+GLA-SE elicits robust TH1 immunity and protection against aerosolized Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice and guinea pigs. Here we describe the immunogenicity and efficacy of this vaccine when delivered intranasally. Intranasal delivery switches the CD4 T cell response from a TH1 to a TH17 dominated tissue-resident response with increased frequencies of ID93-specific cells in both the lung tissue and at the lung surface. Surprisingly these changes do not affect the protective efficacy of ID93+GLA-SE. Unlike intramuscular immunization, ID93+GLA does not require the squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion SE to elicit protective CD4 T cells when delivered intranasally. Finally we demonstrate that TNF and the IL-17 receptor are dispensable for the efficacy of the intranasal vaccine suggesting an alternative mechanism of protection. PMID:26541135

  15. Multiple efficacy studies of an adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A24 subunit vaccine in cattle using direct homologous challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    The safety and efficacy of an experimental, replication-deficient, human adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype A24 Cruzeiro capsid-based subunit vaccine (AdtA24) was examined in eight independent cattle studies. AdtA24 non-adjuvanted vaccine was administered intramuscularl...

  16. A pooled analysis of continued prophylactic efficacy of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (Types 6/11/16/18) vaccine against high-grade cervical and external genital lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Susanne K; Sigurdsson, Kristján; Iversen, Ole-Erik;

    2009-01-01

    Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been shown to provide protection from HPV 6/11/16/18-related cervical, vaginal, and vulvar disease through 3 years. We provide an update on the efficacy of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine against high-grade cervical, vaginal, and vulvar lesions bas...

  17. Determination of efficacious vaccine seed strains for use against Egyptian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses through antigenic cartography and in vivo challenge studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 2006, there have been reported outbreaks of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in vaccinated chickens in Africa and Asia. This study provides experimental data for selection of efficacious H5N1 vaccine seed strains against recently circulating strains of H5N1 HPAI viruses in Egypt....

  18. Enzootic plague reduces black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) survival in Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchett, Marc R.; Biggins, Dean E.; Carlson, Valerie; Powell, Bradford; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2010-01-01

    Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) require extensive prairie dog colonies (Cynomys spp.) to provide habitat and prey. Epizootic plague kills both prairie dogs and ferrets and is a major factor limiting recovery of the highly endangered ferret. In addition to epizootics, we hypothesized that enzootic plague, that is, presence of disease-causing Yersinia pestis without any noticeable prairie dog die off, may also affect ferret survival. We reduced risk of plague on portions of two ferret reintroduction areas by conducting flea control for 3 years. Beginning in 2004, about half of the ferrets residing on dusted and nondusted colonies were vaccinated against plague with an experimental vaccine (F1-V fusion protein). We evaluated 6-month reencounter rates (percentage of animals observed at the end of an interval that were known alive at the beginning of the interval), an index to survival, for ferrets in four treatment groups involving all combinations of vaccination and flea control. For captive-reared ferrets (115 individuals observed across 156 time intervals), reencounter rates were higher for vaccinates (0.44) than for nonvaccinates (0.23, p = 0.044) on colonies without flea control, but vaccination had no detectable effect on colonies with flea control (vaccinates = 0.41, nonvaccinates = 0.42, p = 0.754). Flea control resulted in higher reencounter rates for nonvaccinates (p = 0.026), but not for vaccinates (p = 0.508). The enhancement of survival due to vaccination or flea control supports the hypothesis that enzootic plague reduces ferret survival, even when there was no noticeable decline in prairie dog abundance. The collective effects of vaccination and flea control compel a conclusion that fleas are required for maintenance, and probably transmission, of plague at enzootic levels. Other studies have demonstrated similar effects of flea control on several species of prairie dogs and, when combined with this study, suggest

  19. Are Carnivores Universally Good Sentinels of Plague?

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkerhoff, R. Jory; Collinge, Sharon K.; Bai, Ying; Ray, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Sylvatic plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is a flea-borne disease that primarily affects rodents but has been detected in over 200 mammal species worldwide. Mammalian carnivores are routinely surveyed as sentinels of local plague activity, since they can present antibodies to Y. pestis infection but show few clinical signs. In Boulder County, Colorado, USA, plague epizootic events are episodic and occur in black-tailed prairie dogs. Enzootic hosts are unidentified as are plagu...

  20. Evaluation on Immunogenicity and Immune Efficacy of Different Kinds of Hepatitis B Vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁争论; 李河民; 张华远

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis B vaccine, as the first high-effective recombinant commercial vaccine, was successfully developed inthe early 1980s. Since then, different opinions have occurred on the quality of vaccines with rapid developmentof target gene selecting, antigen expression system, andquality evaluation. Different antigens of hepatitis B vaccines are derived from different expression system, andthere are also some differences on manufacture procedureor glycosylated degree of antigen.

  1. A PfRH5-Based Vaccine Is Efficacious against Heterologous Strain Blood-Stage Plasmodium falciparum Infection in Aotus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Alexander D.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Lucas, Carmen M.; Lugo-Roman, Luis A.; Crosnier, Cécile; Bartholdson, S. Josefin; Diouf, Ababacar; Miura, Kazutoyo; Lambert, Lynn E.; Ventocilla, Julio A.; Leiva, Karina P.; Milne, Kathryn H.; Illingworth, Joseph J.; Spencer, Alexandra J.; Hjerrild, Kathryn A.; Alanine, Daniel G.W.; Turner, Alison V.; Moorhead, Jeromy T.; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Wu, Yimin; Long, Carole A.; Wright, Gavin J.; Lescano, Andrés G.; Draper, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Antigenic diversity has posed a critical barrier to vaccine development against the pathogenic blood-stage infection of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. To date, only strain-specific protection has been reported by trials of such vaccines in nonhuman primates. We recently showed that P. falciparum reticulocyte binding protein homolog 5 (PfRH5), a merozoite adhesin required for erythrocyte invasion, is highly susceptible to vaccine-inducible strain-transcending parasite-neutralizing antibody. In vivo efficacy of PfRH5-based vaccines has not previously been evaluated. Here, we demonstrate that PfRH5-based vaccines can protect Aotus monkeys against a virulent vaccine-heterologous P. falciparum challenge and show that such protection can be achieved by a human-compatible vaccine formulation. Protection was associated with anti-PfRH5 antibody concentration and in vitro parasite-neutralizing activity, supporting the use of this in vitro assay to predict the in vivo efficacy of future vaccine candidates. These data suggest that PfRH5-based vaccines have potential to achieve strain-transcending efficacy in humans. PMID:25590760

  2. Efficacy and safety of human papillomavirus vaccine for primary prevention of cervical cancer: A review of evidence from phase III trials and national programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Basu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccines have been widely introduced in the national immunization programs in most of the medium and high income countries following endorsement from national and international advisory bodies. HPV vaccine is unique and its introduction is challenging in many ways - it is the first vaccine developed to prevent any cancer, the vaccine is gender specific, it targets adolescent females who are difficult to reach by any health intervention programs. It is not unusual for such a vaccine to face scepticism and reservations not only from lay public but also from professionals in spite of the clinical trial results convincingly and consistently proving their efficacy and safety. Over the last few years millions of doses of the HPV vaccine have been administered round the world and the efficacy and safety data have started coming from the real life programs. A comprehensive cervical cancer control program involving HPV vaccination of the adolescent girls and screening of the adult women has been proved to be the most cost-effective approach to reduce the burden of cervical cancer. The present article discusses the justification of HPV vaccination in the backdrop of natural history of cervical cancer, the mechanism of action of the vaccines, efficacy and safety data from phase III randomized controlled trials as well as from the national immunization programs of various countries.

  3. Efficacy of hepatitis B vaccine in a cohortcommunity--based study in Riyadh and hail regions of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Faleh Faleh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Saudi Arabia used to be hyperendemic for HBV infection. Most of infection occurs in early life. HBV vaccine was, therefore, introduced in 1989 as the seventh primary immunogen of the EPI Program. This study is conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this program in Riyadh and Hail Regions. Method and Patients: A cohort follow-up study of children from Riyadh and Hail, who had been vaccinated in 1989, evaluated in 1991 and tested for HBV markers six years later. Results: The files of 303 children from Riyadh and Hail, who were investigated in 1991 retrieved and only 119, were available for testing. Fifty percent of the children have still a protective anti-HBs tittre. One vaccinated child was found to be positive for HBsAg. According to this study, the efficacy rate against HBsAg carriage is 88%. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the tremendous effect of HB vaccine on the HBV infection of Saudi children in these two regions

  4. Efficacy of INOVOJECT egg injection system for delivering Marek's disease vaccine under hatchery conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, T E; Fluke, D K; Villegas, P

    1997-01-01

    The ability of the INOVOJECT egg injection system to effectively deliver the appropriate titer of herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) vaccine during normal hatchery operation was evaluated. The INOVOJECT machines configured for the Jamesway and Chickmaster commercial hatchers both maintained the integrity of the HVT vaccine without an appreciable loss in titer from the diluted vaccine to the egg.

  5. WHO informal consultation on quality, safety and efficacy specifications for live attenuated rotavirus vaccines Mexico City, Mexico, 8-9 February 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, David

    2005-12-01

    Rotavirus vaccines are at an advanced stage of development but there are as yet no WHO recommendations on production and quality control to provide regulatory guidance. A meeting of experts was convened by WHO and PAHO/AMRO to review the scientific basis for production and quality control of rotavirus vaccines, and to discuss specific measures to assure the safety and efficacy of rotavirus vaccines. The meeting was attended by 25 experts from 14 countries, drawn from academia, public health, national regulatory authorities and vaccine producers. It was agreed that existing guidance for other live virus vaccines provides a very good basis for product characterization, especially for source materials and control of production. The basis for attenuation of current vaccines or vaccine candidates is not known but, at least for the vaccines based on the Jennerian approach of using animal (bovine) rotaviruses, is likely to be multigenic. The risk of intussusception in humans is influenced by genetic background and age. Recent analyzes of large vaccine safety trials found that certain strains of vaccine virus were not associated with intussusception, although in these trials the first dose of vaccine was not administered to children over 3 months of age. Since age is a risk factor for intussusception, this may suggest that early delivery of the first dose of vaccine is desirable. However, maternal antibodies may mitigate against early delivery of the first vaccine dose. Factors which could affect vaccine efficacy or safety include strain diversity, malnutrition, other enteric infections, parasitic infection or immune suppression. It was concluded that data from clinical trials conducted in one part of the world would not necessarily be predictive of vaccine efficacy in other places. It was agreed that in nonclinical evaluations there was a need to use oral dosing for toxicity studies and, because rotavirus is non-neurovirulent, that there was no need for an animal

  6. Multiple Roles of Myd88 in the Immune Response to the Plague F1-V Vaccine and in Protection against an Aerosol Challenge of Yersinia pestis CO92 in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Dankmeyer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current candidate vaccine against Yersinia pestis infection consists of two subunit proteins: the capsule protein or F1 protein and the low calcium response V protein or V-antigen. Little is known of the recognition of the vaccine by the host’s innate immune system and how it affects the acquired immune response to the vaccine. Thus, we vaccinated Toll-like receptor (Tlr 2, 4, and 2/4-double deficient, as well as signal adaptor protein Myd88-deficient mice. We found that Tlr4 and Myd88 appeared to be required for an optimal immune response to the F1-V vaccine but not Tlr2 when compared to wild-type mice. However, there was a difference between the requirement for Tlr4 and MyD88 in vaccinated animals. When F1-V vaccinated Tlr4 mutant (lipopolysaccharide tolerant and Myd88-deficient mice were challenged by aerosol with Y. pestis CO92, all but one Tlr4 mutant mice survived the challenge, but no vaccinated Myd88-deficient mice survived the challenge. Spleens from these latter nonsurviving mice showed that Y. pestis was not cleared from the infected mice. Our results suggest that MyD88 appears to be important for both an optimal immune response to F1-V and in protection against a lethal challenge of Y. pestis CO92 in F1-V vaccinated mice.

  7. Protective Efficacy in Sheep of Adenovirus-Vectored Vaccines against Bluetongue Virus Is Associated with Specific T Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Verónica; Pascual, Elena; Avia, Miguel; Peña, Lourdes; Valcárcel, Félix; Sevilla, Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus of the Reoviridae family that causes a hemorrhagic disease in ruminants. Its control has been achieved by inactivated-vaccines that have proven to protect against homologous BTV challenge although unable to induce long-term immunity. Therefore, a more efficient control strategy needs to be developed. Recombinant adenovirus vectors are lead vaccine candidates for protection of several diseases, mainly because of their potency to induce potent T cell immunity. Here we report the induction of humoral and T-cell mediated responses able to protect animals against BTV challenge by recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing either VP7, VP2 or NS3 BTV proteins. First we used the IFNAR(-/-) mouse model system to establish a proof of principle, and afterwards we assayed the protective efficacy in sheep, the natural host of BTV. Mice were completely protected against BTV challenge, developing humoral and BTV-specific CD8+- and CD4+-T cell responses by vaccination with the different rAd5. Sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP2 and Ad5-BTV-VP7 or only with Ad5-BTV-VP7 and challenged with BTV showed mild disease symptoms and reduced viremia. This partial protection was achieved in the absence of neutralizing antibodies but strong BTV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in those sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP7. These data indicate that rAd5 is a suitable vaccine vector to induce T cell immunity during BTV vaccination and provide new data regarding the relevance of T cell responses in protection during BTV infection. PMID:26619062

  8. Efficacy of influenza vaccination and tamiflu® treatment--comparative studies with Eurasian Swine influenza viruses in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerrwald, Ralf; Schlegel, Michael; Bauer, Katja; Vissiennon, Théophile; Wutzler, Peter; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological developments demonstrated that gene segments of swine influenza A viruses can account for antigenic changes as well as reduced drug susceptibility of pandemic influenza A viruses. This raises questions about the efficacy of preventive measures against swine influenza A viruses. Here, the protective effect of vaccination was compared with that of prophylactic Tamiflu® treatment against two Eurasian swine influenza A viruses. 11-week-old pigs were infected by aerosol nebulisation with high doses of influenza virus A/swine/Potsdam/15/1981 (H1N1/1981, heterologous challenge to H1N1 vaccine strain) and A/swine/Bakum/1832/2000 (H1N2/2000, homologous challenge to H1N2 vaccine strain) in two independent trials. In each trial (i) 10 pigs were vaccinated twice with a trivalent vaccine (RESPIPORC® FLU3; 28 and 7 days before infection), (ii) another 10 pigs received 150 mg/day of Tamiflu® for 5 days starting 12 h before infection, and (iii) 12 virus-infected pigs were left unvaccinated and untreated and served as controls. Both viruses replicated efficiently in porcine respiratory organs causing influenza with fever, dyspnoea, and pneumonia. Tamiflu® treatment as well as vaccination prevented clinical signs and significantly reduced virus shedding. Whereas after homologous challenge with H1N2/2000 no infectious virus in lung and hardly any lung inflammation were detected, the virus titre was not and the lung pathology was only partially reduced in H1N1/1981, heterologous challenged pigs. Tamiflu® application did not affect these study parameters. In conclusion, all tested preventive measures provided protection against disease. Vaccination additionally prevented virus replication and histopathological changes in the lung of homologous challenged pigs.

  9. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Vibrio harveyi pcFlaA DNA vaccine in Epinephelus awoara

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Yingxue; SU Yongquan; WANG Shifeng; YAN Qingpi

    2009-01-01

    The FlaA gene from Vibrio harveyi, with a short nucleotide sequence encoding the Flag marker, was cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+) (designated as pcFlaA). Ninety grouper (Epinephelus awoara) were separated into three equal size groups. An experimental group was immunized with pcFlaA, Control I group was immunized with the vector pcDNA3.1(+), and Control II group was immunized with PBS. The expression of pcFlaA mRNA and protein was examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. We also evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of pcFlaA against V. harveyi by measuring the lymphocyte proliferation response and serum levels of specific antibody and conducting a bacterial challenge test. We successfully transfected the fish muscle with pcFlaA. The pcFlaA mRNA and protein was expressed in the muscle cells for up to one month following injection. The proliferation response of lymphocytes in fish immunized with pcFlaA was significantly higher than in control group II. Furthermore, the immunized fish generated specific antibody. The vaccination also resulted in significantly higher survival during the bacterial challenge test.

  10. Efficacy of a commercial canarypox vaccine for protecting Hawai'i 'Amakihi from field isolates of avipoxvirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Wiegand, Kimberly C.; Triglia, Dennis; Jarvi, Susan I.

    2010-01-01

    At least three variants of avian pox virus are present in Hawai’i - Fowlpox from domestic poultry and a group of genetically distinct viruses that cluster within two clades (Pox Variant 1 and Pox Variant 2) that are most similar to Canarypox based on DNA sequence of the virus 4b core protein gene. We tested whether Hawai’i ‘Amakihi can be protected from wild virus isolates with an attenuated live Canarypox vaccine that is closely related to isolates that cluster within clade 1 (Pox Variant 1) based on sequence of the attenuated Canarypox virus 4b core protein. Thirty-one (31) Hawai`i ‘Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) with no prior physical evidence of pox infection were collected on Mauna Kea from xeric, high elevation habitats with low pox prevalence and randomly divided into two groups. One group of 16 was vaccinated with Poximmune C® while the other group received a sham vaccination with virus diluent. Four of 15 (27%) vaccinated birds developed potentially life-threatening disseminated lesions or lesions of unusually long duration, while one bird never developed a vaccine-associated lesion or “take”. After vaccine-associated lesions healed, vaccinated birds were randomly divided into three groups of five and challenged with either a wild isolate of Fowlpox, a Hawai`i `Amakihi isolate of a Canarypox-like virus from clade 1 (Pox Variant 1) or a Hawai`i `Amakihi isolate of a Canarypox-like virus from clade 2 (Pox Variant 2). Similarly, three random groups of five unvaccinated ‘Amakihi were challenged with the same virus isolates. Vaccinated and unvaccinated ‘Amakihi challenged with Fowlpox had transient infections with no clinical signs of infection. Mortality in vaccinated ‘Amakihi that were challenged with Pox Variant 1 and Pox Variant 2 ranged from 0% (0/5) for Pox Variant 1 to 60% (3/5) for Pox Variant 2. Mortality in unvaccinated ‘Amakihi ranged from 40% (2/5) for Pox Variant 1 to 100% (5/5) for Pox Variant 2. While the vaccine provided some

  11. Study of the safety and efficacy of a recombinant vaccine for bluetongue virus serotype 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Giovanni; Nicolussi, Paola; Pilo, Giovanantonio; Colorito, Paolo; Fresi, Sandra; Teodori, Liana; Leone, Alessandra; Bonfini, Barbara; Patta, Cristiana

    2007-01-01

    A total of 7 cows, 10 sheep and 10 goats were vaccinated subcutaneously with 5 ml of a recombinant vaccine consisting of synthetic virions containing the four principal proteins (VP2, VP3, VP5 and VP7) of bluetongue virus serotype 2 (BTV-2). The same number of animals and species were vaccinated with 2.5 ml (the normal vaccination dose) and 2 cows, 2 sheep and 2 goats were inoculated with a placebo and the adjuvant added to the vaccine. Animals vaccinated with the normal dose received a booster 14 days after the first injection and 8 sheep a third vaccination 4 months after the second inoculation. One month after the third vaccination, the 8 sheep and another 4 that had never come into contact with the virus were challenged with 1 ml of 10(5.8) TCID(50) of a BTV-2 Italian field isolate. All animals showed competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA) antibodies starting 14 days following the first vaccination. Conversely, no animal demonstrated neutralising antibodies to BTV-2 after vaccination. Fever (>40 degrees C) was observed in 6 vaccinated animals and 2 controls between 8 and 13 days post challenge. The virus was isolated from all animals from the 7th day post challenge. There was no significant difference in the blood chemical parameters tested and no significant interaction was found in the trial group.

  12. Experimental infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: efficacy of a vaccine prepared from nonhemolytic strains of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, G W; McDonald, T J; Kopecky, K E

    1982-06-01

    Calves vaccinated with a bacterin prepared from 4 nonhemolytic strains of Moraxella bovis were challenge exposed with a virulent hemolytic strain of M bovis. Ten calves were given 2 vaccinal inoculations 21 days apart. Twenty-one days after the last vaccinal inoculation, the eyes of the 10 vaccinated and the eyes of the 12 non-vaccinated calves were exposed to a hemolytic heterologous strain of M bovis. The percentage of eyes with infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis was lower, the lesions were less severe, and the duration of infection was shorter in vaccinated calves than in nonvaccinated calves. Seemingly, the resistance induced by nonhemolytic strains of M bovis was at least comparable with the induced by hemolytic virulent strains of that organism. The nature of the immune response in vaccinated calves is discussed.

  13. Protective efficacy of multiple vaccine platforms against Zika virus challenge in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbink, Peter; Larocca, Rafael A; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Bricault, Christine A; Moseley, Edward T; Boyd, Michael; Kirilova, Marinela; Li, Zhenfeng; Ng'ang'a, David; Nanayakkara, Ovini; Nityanandam, Ramya; Mercado, Noe B; Borducchi, Erica N; Agarwal, Arshi; Brinkman, Amanda L; Cabral, Crystal; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Giglio, Patricia B; Jetton, David; Jimenez, Jessica; Lee, Benjamin C; Mojta, Shanell; Molloy, Katherine; Shetty, Mayuri; Neubauer, George H; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Peron, Jean Pierre S; Zanotto, Paolo M de A; Misamore, Johnathan; Finneyfrock, Brad; Lewis, Mark G; Alter, Galit; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Jarman, Richard G; Eckels, Kenneth H; Michael, Nelson L; Thomas, Stephen J; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-09-09

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for a major ongoing epidemic in the Americas and has been causally associated with fetal microcephaly. The development of a safe and effective ZIKV vaccine is therefore an urgent global health priority. Here we demonstrate that three different vaccine platforms protect against ZIKV challenge in rhesus monkeys. A purified inactivated virus vaccine induced ZIKV-specific neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV strains from both Brazil and Puerto Rico. Purified immunoglobulin from vaccinated monkeys also conferred passive protection in adoptive transfer studies. A plasmid DNA vaccine and a single-shot recombinant rhesus adenovirus serotype 52 vector vaccine, both expressing ZIKV premembrane and envelope, also elicited neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV challenge. These data support the rapid clinical development of ZIKV vaccines for humans.

  14. Immunogenicity and efficacy of an in-house developed cell-culture derived veterinarian rabies vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallel, Héla; Diouani, Mohamed Fethi; Loukil, Houssem; Trabelsi, Khaled; Snoussi, Mohamed Ali; Majoul, Samy; Rourou, Samia; Dellagi, Koussay

    2006-05-29

    The efficiency of an inactivated tissue culture rabies vaccine produced on BHK-21 cells, according to an in-house developed process, was evaluated and compared to a commercial cell-tissue culture vaccine (Rabisin). Fifteen experimental dogs from local common breed were duly conditioned during a quarantine period, then vaccinated via the subcutaneous route with 1 ml of either the tissue culture vaccine developed in-house or the commercial vaccine Rabisin. The immune response of each dog was monitored for 162 days. Serum-neutralizing antibodies titers to rabies virus were determined by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) which confirmed the strong response of dogs to both vaccines except one dog in the Rabisin group. The dogs were then challenged in the masseter muscle with a rabies street virus of canine origin. All vaccinated dogs except the single dog in the Rabisin group that failed to respond to the vaccine, survived the challenge. In contrast, 80% of animals in the control non-vaccinated group, developed rabies and died. A field vaccine trial was also conducted: 1,000 local dogs living in field conditions received one subcutaneous dose of the locally developed vaccine. Serum neutralizing antibody titers to rabies virus was determined by RFFIT at days 0, 60 and 360. Mean rabies neutralizing antibody titers were equal to 0.786, 3.73 and 1.55 IU/ml, respectively. The percentage of dogs with a neutralizing rabies antibody titer higher than the 0.5 IU/ml mandated WHO threshold, was 30%, 91.4% and 87.5% at day 0, 2 months and 1 year post-vaccination, respectively. These data demonstrate the efficiency of the in-house developed vaccine produced on BHK-21 cells in both experimental and field conditions and support its use in dog mass vaccination campaigns.

  15. Safety and High Level Efficacy of the Combination Malaria Vaccine Regimen of RTS,S/AS01B With Chimpanzee Adenovirus 63 and Modified Vaccinia Ankara Vectored Vaccines Expressing ME-TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampling, Tommy; Ewer, Katie J.; Bowyer, Georgina; Bliss, Carly M.; Edwards, Nick J.; Wright, Danny; Payne, Ruth O.; Venkatraman, Navin; de Barra, Eoghan; Snudden, Claudia M.; Poulton, Ian D.; de Graaf, Hans; Sukhtankar, Priya; Roberts, Rachel; Ivinson, Karen; Weltzin, Rich; Rajkumar, Bebi-Yassin; Wille-Reece, Ulrike; Lee, Cynthia K.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Sinden, Robert E.; Gerry, Stephen; Lawrie, Alison M.; Vekemans, Johan; Morelle, Danielle; Lievens, Marc; Ballou, Ripley W.; Cooke, Graham S.; Faust, Saul N.; Gilbert, Sarah; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The need for a highly efficacious vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum remains pressing. In this controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) study, we assessed the safety, efficacy and immunogenicity of a schedule combining 2 distinct vaccine types in a staggered immunization regimen: one inducing high-titer antibodies to circumsporozoite protein (RTS,S/AS01B) and the other inducing potent T-cell responses to thrombospondin-related adhesion protein (TRAP) by using a viral vector. Method. Thirty-seven healthy malaria-naive adults were vaccinated with either a chimpanzee adenovirus 63 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara–vectored vaccine expressing a multiepitope string fused to TRAP and 3 doses of RTS,S/AS01B (group 1; n = 20) or 3 doses of RTS,S/AS01B alone (group 2; n = 17). CHMI was delivered by mosquito bites to 33 vaccinated subjects at week 12 after the first vaccination and to 6 unvaccinated controls. Results. No suspected unexpected serious adverse reactions or severe adverse events related to vaccination were reported. Protective vaccine efficacy was observed in 14 of 17 subjects (82.4%) in group 1 and 12 of 16 subjects (75%) in group 2. All control subjects received a diagnosis of blood-stage malaria parasite infection. Both vaccination regimens were immunogenic. Fourteen protected subjects underwent repeat CHMI 6 months after initial CHMI; 7 of 8 (87.5%) in group 1 and 5 of 6 (83.3%) in group 2 remained protected. Conclusions. The high level of sterile efficacy observed in this trial is encouraging for further evaluation of combination approaches using these vaccine types. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01883609. PMID:27307573

  16. Protein energy malnutrition during vaccination has limited influence on vaccine efficacy but abolishes immunity if administered during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Truc; Agger, Else Marie; Cassidy, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) increases susceptibility to infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB), but it is not clear how PEM influences vaccine-promoted immunity to TB. We demonstrate that PEM during low-level steady-state TB infection in a mouse model results in rapid relapse...

  17. Immunogenicity and efficacy of flagellin-fused vaccine candidates targeting 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Liu

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that the globular head of the hemagglutinin (HA antigen fused to flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium fljB (STF2, a TLR5 ligand elicits protective immunity to H1N1 and H5N1 lethal influenza infections in mice (Song et al., 2008, PLoS ONE 3, e2257; Song et al., 2009, Vaccine 27, 5875-5888. These fusion proteins can be efficiently and economically manufactured in E. coli fermentation systems as next generation pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccines. Here we report immunogenicity and efficacy results of three vaccine candidates in which the HA globular head of A/California/07/2009 (H1N1 was fused to STF2 at the C-terminus (STF2.HA1, in replace of domain 3 (STF2R3.HA1, or in both positions (STF2R3.2xHA1. For all three vaccines, two subcutaneous immunizations of BALB/c mice with doses of either 0.3 or 3 µg elicit robust neutralizing (HAI antibodies, that lead to > = 2 Log(10 unit reduction in day 4 lung virus titer and full protection against a lethal A/California/04/2009 challenge. Vaccination with doses as low as 0.03 µg results in partial to full protection. Each candidate, particularly the STF2R3.HA1 and STF2R3.2xHA1 candidates, elicits robust neutralizing antibody responses that last for at least 8 months. The STF2R3.HA1 candidate, which was intermediately protective in the challenge models, is more immunogenic than the H1N1 components of two commercially available trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (TIVs in mice. Taken together, the results demonstrate that all three vaccine candidates are highly immunogenic and efficacious in mice, and that the STF2R3.2xHA1 format is the most effective candidate vaccine format.

  18. Development of eczema vaccinatum in atopic mouse models and efficacy of MVA vaccination against lethal poxviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Knitlova

    Full Text Available Smallpox vaccine based on live, replicating vaccinia virus (VACV is associated with several potentially serious and deadly complications. Consequently, a new generation of vaccine based on non-replicating Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA has been under clinical development. MVA seems to induce good immune responses in blood tests, but it is impossible to test its efficacy in vivo in human. One of the serious complications of the replicating vaccine is eczema vaccinatum (EV occurring in individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD, thus excluding them from all preventive vaccination schemes. In this study, we first characterized and compared development of eczema vaccinatum in different mouse strains. Nc/Nga, Balb/c and C57Bl/6J mice were epicutaneously sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA or saline control to induce signs of atopic dermatitis and subsequently trans-dermally (t.d. immunized with VACV strain Western Reserve (WR. Large primary lesions occurred in both mock- and OVA-sensitized Nc/Nga mice, while they remained small in Balb/c and C57Bl/6J mice. Satellite lesions developed in both mock- and OVA-sensitized Nc/Nga and in OVA-sensitized Balb/c mice with the rate 40-50%. Presence of mastocytes and eosinophils was the highest in Nc/Nga mice. Consequently, we have chosen Nc/Nga mice as a model of AD/EV and tested efficacy of MVA and Dryvax vaccinations against a lethal intra-nasal (i.n. challenge with WR, the surrogate of smallpox. Inoculation of MVA intra-muscularly (i.m. or t.d. resulted in no lesions, while inoculation of Dryvax t.d. yielded large primary and many satellite lesions similar to WR. Eighty three and 92% of mice vaccinated with a single dose of MVA i.m. or t.d., respectively, survived a lethal i.n. challenge with WR without any serious illness, while all Dryvax-vaccinated animals survived. This is the first formal prove of protective immunity against a lethal poxvirus challenge induced by vaccination with MVA in an atopic organism.

  19. Plague in the genomic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drancourt, M

    2012-03-01

    With plague being not only a subject of interest for historians, but still a disease of public health concern in several countries, mainly in Africa, there were hopes that analyses of the Yersinia pestis genomes would put an end to this deadly epidemic pathogen. Genomics revealed that Y. pestis isolates evolved from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in Central Asia some millennia ago, after the acquisition of two Y. pestis-specific plasmids balanced genomic reduction parallel with the expansion of insertion sequences, illustrating the modern concept that, except for the acquisition of plasmid-borne toxin-encoding genes, the increased virulence of Y. pestis resulted from gene loss rather than gene acquisition. The telluric persistence of Y. pestis reminds us of this close relationship, and matters in terms of plague epidemiology. Whereas biotype Orientalis isolates spread worldwide, the Antiqua and Medievalis isolates showed more limited expansion. In addition to animal ectoparasites, human ectoparasites such as the body louse may have participated in this expansion and in devastating historical epidemics. The recent analysis of a Black Death genome indicated that it was more closely related to the Orientalis branch than to the Medievalis branch. Modern Y. pestis isolates grossly exhibit the same gene content, but still undergo micro-evolution in geographically limited areas by differing in the genome architecture, owing to inversions near insertion sequences and the stabilization of the YpfPhi prophage in Orientalis biotype isolates. Genomics have provided several new molecular tools for the genotyping and phylogeographical tracing of isolates and description of plague foci. However, genomics and post-genomics approaches have not yet provided new tools for the prevention, diagnosis and management of plague patients and the plague epidemics still raging in some sub-Saharan countries. © 2012 The Author. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of

  20. Positive selection in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene of Newcastle disease virus and its effect on vaccine efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Shunlin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the relationship between the selective pressure and the sequence variation of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN protein, we performed the positive selection analysis by estimating the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions with 132 complete HN gene sequences of Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs isolated in China. Results The PAML software applying a maximum likelihood method was used for the analysis and three sites (residues 266, 347 and 540 in the HN protein were identified as being under positive selection. Codon 347 was located exactly in a recognized antigenic determinant (residues 345-353 and codon 266 in a predicted linear B-cell epitope. Substitutions at codon 540 contributed to the N-linked glycosylation potential of residue 538. To further evaluate the effect of positively selected sites on the vaccine efficacy, we constructed two recombinant fowlpox viruses rFPV-JS6HN and rFPV-LaSHN, expressing the HN proteins from a genotype VII field isolate Go/JS6/05 (with A266, K347 and A540 and vaccine strain La Sota (with V266, E347 and T540, respectively. Two groups of SPF chickens, 18 each, were vaccinated with the two recombinant fowlpox viruses and challenged by Go/JS6/05 at 3 weeks post-immunization. The results showed that rFPV-JS6HN could elicit more effective immunity against the prevalent virus infection than rFPV-LaSHN in terms of reducing virus shedding. Conclusions The analysis of positively selected codons and their effect on the vaccine efficacy indicated that the selective pressure on the HN protein can induce antigenic variation, and new vaccine to control the current ND epidemics should be developed.

  1. Efficacy of a live attenuated vaccine in classical swine fever virus postnatally persistently infected pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-González, Sara; Perez-Simó, Marta; Muñoz, Marta; Bohorquez, José Alejandro; Rosell, Rosa; Summerfield, Artur; Domingo, Mariano; Ruggli, Nicolas; Ganges, Llilianne

    2015-07-09

    Classical swine fever (CSF) causes major losses in pig farming, with various degrees of disease severity. Efficient live attenuated vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) are used routinely in endemic countries. However, despite intensive vaccination programs in these areas for more than 20 years, CSF has not been eradicated. Molecular epidemiology studies in these regions suggests that the virus circulating in the field has evolved under the positive selection pressure exerted by the immune response to the vaccine, leading to new attenuated viral variants. Recent work by our group demonstrated that a high proportion of persistently infected piglets can be generated by early postnatal infection with low and moderately virulent CSFV strains. Here, we studied the immune response to a hog cholera lapinised virus vaccine (HCLV), C-strain, in six-week-old persistently infected pigs following post-natal infection. CSFV-negative pigs were vaccinated as controls. The humoral and interferon gamma responses as well as the CSFV RNA loads were monitored for 21 days post-vaccination. No vaccine viral RNA was detected in the serum samples and tonsils from CSFV postnatally persistently infected pigs for 21 days post-vaccination. Furthermore, no E2-specific antibody response or neutralising antibody titres were shown in CSFV persistently infected vaccinated animals. Likewise, no of IFN-gamma producing cell response against CSFV or PHA was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the absence of a response to vaccination in CSFV persistently infected pigs.

  2. Are carnivores universally good sentinels of plague?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Collinge, Sharon K; Bai, Ying; Ray, Chris

    2009-10-01

    Sylvatic plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is a flea-borne disease that primarily affects rodents but has been detected in over 200 mammal species worldwide. Mammalian carnivores are routinely surveyed as sentinels of local plague activity, since they can present antibodies to Y. pestis infection but show few clinical signs. In Boulder County, Colorado, USA, plague epizootic events are episodic and occur in black-tailed prairie dogs. Enzootic hosts are unidentified as are plague foci. For three years, we systematically sampled carnivores in two distinct habitat types to determine whether carnivores may play a role in maintenance or transmission of Y. pestis and to identify habitats associated with increased plague prevalence. We sampled 83 individuals representing six carnivore species and found only two that had been exposed to Y. pestis. The low overall rate of plague exposure in carnivores suggests that plague may be ephemeral in this study system, and thus we cannot draw any conclusions regarding habitat-associated plague foci or temporal changes in plague activity. Plague epizootics involving prairie dogs were confirmed in this study system during two of the three years of this study, and we therefore suggest that the targeting carnivores to survey for plague may not be appropriate in all ecological systems.

  3. Efficacy of Phase 3 Trial of RTS, S/AS01 Malaria Vaccine in infants: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Shima; Keshavarz, Hossein

    2017-01-06

    Although vaccines would be the ideal tool for control, prevention, elimination, and eradication of many infectious diseases, developing of parasites vaccines such as malaria vaccine is very complex. The most advanced malaria vaccine candidate is RTS,S, a pre-erythrocytic vaccine for which pivotal phase III trial design is underway. Few recent malaria vaccine review articles have attempted to outline of all clinical trials that have occurred globally and no meta-analysis was performed on efficacy of Phase 3 Trial of RTS, S/AS01 Malaria vaccine up to now in infants. Therefore, a systematic review and meta-analysis was carried out to review new and existing data on efficacy of Phase 3 Trial of RTS, S/AS01 Malaria Vaccine in infants. The electronic databases searched were Pubmed (1965-present) and Web of Science (1970-present) (Search date: May, 2016). After full-text review of the papers evaluating clinical/severe malaria in several well-designed phase III field efficacy trials, 5 were determined to meet the eligibility criteria for inclusion in the systematic review. Four out of the 5 publications dealing with efficacy of Phase 3 Trial of RTS, S/AS01 malaria vaccine were included in the qualitative analysis. Pooled estimate of vaccine efficacy in clinical and severe malaria in children aged 5-17 mo was 29% (95% CL: 19%-46%) and 39% (95% CI 20%-74%), while this estimate vaccine in clinical and severe malaria in children aged 6-12 mo was 19% (95% CI 14%-24%) and 21 (95% CI 19%-37%), respectively. On the other hand, higher VE was seen in both per- protocol and intention-to-treat population in children aged 5-17 than the children aged 6-12 mo. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that this candidate malaria vaccine has relatively little efficacy, and the vaccine apparently will not meet the goal of malaria eradication by itself.

  4. Low Protective Efficacy of the Current Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine against the Emerging Genotype 5 Japanese Encephalitis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Fu, Shihong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Li, Minghua; Cui, Shiheng; Li, Xiaolong; Cao, Yuxi; Lei, Wenwen; Lu, Zhi; He, Ying; Wang, Huanyu; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George Fu; Liang, Guodong

    2016-05-01

    The current Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine derived from G3 JE virus (JEV) can induce protective immunity against G1-G4 JEV genotypes. However, protective efficacy against the emerging G5 genotype has not been reported. Using in vitro and in vivo tests, biological phenotype and cross-immunoreactions were compared between G3 JEV and G5 JEV (wild strains). The PRNT90 method was used to detect neutralizing antibodies against different genotypes of JEV in JE vaccine-immunized subjects and JE patients. In JE vaccine-immunized mice, the lethal challenge protection rates against G3 and G5 JEV wild strains were 100% and 50%, respectively. The seroconversion rates (SCRs) of virus antibodies against G3 and G5 JEV among vaccinated healthy subjects were 100% and 35%, respectively. All clinically identified JE patients showed high levels of G3 JEV neutralizing antibodies (≥1:10-1280) with positive serum geometric mean titers (GMTs) of 43.2, while for G5 JEV, neutralizing antibody conversion rates were only 64% with positive serum GMTs of 11.14. Moreover, the positive rate of JEV neutralizing antibodies against G5 JEV in pediatric patients was lower than in adults. Low levels of neutralizing/protective antibodies induced by the current JE vaccine, based on the G3 genotype, were observed against the emerging G5 JEV genotype. Our results demonstrate the need for more detailed studies to reevaluate whether or not the apparent emergence of G5 JEV can be attributed to failure of the current vaccine to induce appropriate immune protectivity against this genotype of JEV.

  5. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of an elastase-dependent live attenuated swine influenza virus vaccine administered intranasally in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Aleksandar; Lu, Xinya; Li, Junwei; Mutwiri, George K; Babiuk, Lorne A; Brown, Earl G; Zhou, Yan

    2010-10-01

    Influenza A virus is an important respiratory pathogen of swine that causes significant morbidity and economic impact on the swine industry. Vaccination is the first choice for prevention and control of influenza infections. Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) are approved for use in humans and horses and their application provides broad protective immunity, however no LAIV against swine influenza virus (SIV) exists in the market. Previously we reported that an elastase-dependent mutant SIV A/Sw/Sk-R345V (R345V) derived from A/Sw/Saskatchewan/18789/02 (H1N1) (SIV/Sk02) is highly attenuated in pigs. Two intratracheal administrations of R345V induced strong cell-mediated and humoral immune responses and provided a high degree of protection to antigenically different SIV infection in pigs. Here we evaluated the immunogenicity and the protective efficacy of R345V against SIV infection by intranasal administration, the more practical route for vaccination of pigs in the field. Our data showed that intranasally administered R345V live vaccine is capable of inducing strong antigen-specific IFN-γ response from local tracheo-bronchial lymphocytes and antibody responses in serum and respiratory mucosa after two applications. Intranasal vaccination of R345V provided pigs with complete protection not only from parental wild type virus infection, but also from homologous antigenic variant A/Sw/Indiana/1726/88 (H1N1) infection. Moreover, intranasal administration of R345V conferred partial protection from heterologous subtypic H3N2 SIV infection in pigs. Thus, R345V elastase-dependent mutant SIV can serve as a live vaccine against antigenically different swine influenza viruses in pigs.

  6. Prime-boost bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination with lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines expressing antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 improves protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Jianguang; Li, Rui; Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Huang, Qi; Kong, Cong; Wang, Honghai

    2014-10-01

    To prevent the global spread of tuberculosis (TB), more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies are urgently needed. As a result of the success of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in protecting children against miliary and meningeal TB, the majority of individuals will have been vaccinated with BCG; hence, boosting BCG-primed immunity will probably be a key component of future vaccine strategies. In this study, we compared the ability of DNA-, protein- and lentiviral vector-based vaccines that express the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost the effects of BCG in the context of immunity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that prime-boost BCG vaccination with a lentiviral vector expressing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 significantly enhanced immune responses, including T helper type 1 and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, compared with DNA- and protein-based vaccines. However, lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines greatly improved the protective efficacy of BCG against M. tuberculosis, as indicated by a lack of weight loss and significantly reduced bacterial loads and histological damage in the lung. Our study suggests that the use of lentiviral or DNA vaccines containing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost BCG is a good choice for the rational design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB.

  7. Efficacy of recombinant birch pollen vaccine for the treatment of birch-allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauli, Gabrielle; Larsen, Tina H; Rak, Sabina

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recombinant DNA technology has the potential to produce allergen-specific immunotherapy vaccines with defined composition. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of a new recombinant birch pollen allergen vaccine in patients with birch pollen allergy. METHODS: A multicenter......, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken to compare the following 3 vaccines in 134 adults with birch pollen allergy: recombinant birch pollen allergen vaccine (rBet v 1a), licensed birch pollen extract, natural purified birch pollen allergen (nBet v 1), and placebo. Patients...

  8. Efficacy and safety of RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine with or without a booster dose in infants and children in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, Thor Grundtvig; Lusingu, John Peter Andrea

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy and safety of the RTS,S/AS01 candidate malaria vaccine during 18 months of follow-up have been published previously. Herein, we report the final results from the same trial, including the efficacy of a booster dose. METHODS: From March 27, 2009, until Jan 31, 2011, childr...

  9. Assessment of protective efficacy of live and killed vaccines based on a non-encapsulated mutant of Streptococcus suis serotype 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Stockhofe Zurwieden, N.; Hilgers, L.A.T.; Smith, H.E.

    2002-01-01

    The protective efficacy of a live and killed non-encapsulated isogenic mutant of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 was determined in pigs, and compared with the efficacy of the capsulated wild-type strain. SPF pigs were vaccinated twice intramuscularly at 4 and 7 weeks of age with a dose of 1x109 formal

  10. Efficacy of bacterin-, outer membrane protein- and fimbriae extract-based vaccines for the control of Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia C. Menão

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of three vaccines was evaluated in chickens for the control of experimental infection with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE phage type 4. The vaccines were produced with bacterin, outer membrane proteins (OMP and fimbriae crude extract (FE. The chickens were vaccinated intramuscularly with two doses of each vaccine at 12 and 15 weeks of age. The chickens were then orally challenged with 10(9 CFU/chicken Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 at 18 weeks of age. Fecal swabs were performed for the recovery of shedding SE, and SE was recovered from the liver and spleen. Additionally, antibody titers were measured in the serum by micro-agglutination test. The results indicated that the vaccine produced with bacterin yielded better results and resulted in reduction of fecal shedding and organ invasion by SE after oral challenge, although no vaccine was 100% effective for the control of SE experimental infection.

  11. Protective efficacy and immunogenicity of an adenoviral vector vaccine encoding the codon-optimized F protein of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmann, Rebekka; Schwannecke, Sarah; Tippler, Bettina; Ternette, Nicola; Temchura, Vladimir V; Tenbusch, Matthias; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) have received considerable attention for vaccine development because of their high immunogenicity and efficacy. In previous studies, it was shown that DNA immunization of mice with codon-optimized expression plasmids encoding the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F) resulted in enhanced protection against RSV challenge compared to immunization with plasmids carrying the wild-type cDNA sequence of RSV F. In this study, we constructed AdV carrying the codon-optimized full-length RSV F gene (AdV-F) or the soluble form of the RSV F gene (AdV-Fsol). BALB/c mice were immunized twice with AdV-F or AdV-Fsol and challenged with RSV intranasally. Substantial levels of antibody to RSV F were induced by both AdV vaccines, with peak neutralizing-antibody titers of 1:900. Consistently, the viral loads in lung homogenates and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were significantly reduced by a factor of more than 60,000. The protection against viral challenge could be measured even 8 months after the booster immunization. AdV-F and AdV-Fsol induced similar levels of immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Therefore, these results encourage further development of AdV vaccines against RSV infection in humans.

  12. Protective Efficacy and Immunogenicity of an Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Encoding the Codon-Optimized F Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmann, Rebekka; Schwannecke, Sarah; Tippler, Bettina; Ternette, Nicola; Temchura, Vladimir V.; Tenbusch, Matthias; Überla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) have received considerable attention for vaccine development because of their high immunogenicity and efficacy. In previous studies, it was shown that DNA immunization of mice with codon-optimized expression plasmids encoding the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F) resulted in enhanced protection against RSV challenge compared to immunization with plasmids carrying the wild-type cDNA sequence of RSV F. In this study, we constructed AdV carrying the codon-optimized full-length RSV F gene (AdV-F) or the soluble form of the RSV F gene (AdV-Fsol). BALB/c mice were immunized twice with AdV-F or AdV-Fsol and challenged with RSV intranasally. Substantial levels of antibody to RSV F were induced by both AdV vaccines, with peak neutralizing-antibody titers of 1:900. Consistently, the viral loads in lung homogenates and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were significantly reduced by a factor of more than 60,000. The protection against viral challenge could be measured even 8 months after the booster immunization. AdV-F and AdV-Fsol induced similar levels of immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Therefore, these results encourage further development of AdV vaccines against RSV infection in humans. PMID:19776123

  13. Efficacy of an inactivated, recombinant bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, F S; Dezen, D; Antunes, D A; Santos, H F; Arantes, T S; Cenci, A; Gomes, F; Lima, F E S; Brito, W M E D; Filho, H C K; Batista, H B C R; Spilki, F R; Franco, A C; Rijsewijk, F A M; Roehe, P M

    2011-02-24

    Bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) is the causative agent of bovine herpetic encephalitis. In countries where BoHV-5 is prevalent, attempts to vaccinate cattle to prevent clinical signs from BoHV-5-induced disease have relied essentially on vaccination with BoHV-1 vaccines. However, such practice has been shown not to confer full protection to BoHV-5 challenge. In the present study, an inactivated, oil adjuvanted vaccine prepared with a recombinant BoHV-5 from which the genes coding for glycoprotein I (gI), glycoprotein E (gE) and membrane protein US9 were deleted (BoHV-5 gI/gE/US9(-)), was evaluated in cattle in a vaccination/challenge experiment. The vaccine was prepared from a virus suspension containing a pre-inactivation antigenic mass equivalent to 10(7.69) TCID(50)/dose. Three mL of the inactivated vaccine were administered subcutaneously to eight calves serologically negative for BoHV-5 (vaccinated group). Four other calves were mock-vaccinated with an equivalent preparation without viral antigens (control group). Both groups were boostered 28 days later. Neither clinical signs of disease nor adverse effects were observed during or after vaccination. A specific serological response, revealed by the development of neutralizing antibodies, was detected in all vaccinated animals after the first dose of vaccine, whereas control animals remained seronegative. Calves were subsequently challenged on day 77 post-vaccination (pv) with 10(9.25) TCID(50) of the wild-type BoHV-5 (parental strain EVI 88/95). After challenge, vaccinated cattle displayed mild signs of respiratory disease, whereas the control group developed respiratory disease and severe encephalitis, which led to culling of 2/4 calves. Searches for viral DNA in the central nervous system (CNS) of vaccinated calves indicated that wild-type BoHV-5 did not replicate, whereas in CNS tissues of calves on the control group, viral DNA was widely distributed. BoHV-5 shedding in nasal secretions was significantly

  14. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY OF PESTE DES PETITS RUMINANTS (PPR VACCINES AVAILABLE IN PAKISTAN IN SHEEP AND GOATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. INTIZAR, M. D. AHMAD, A. A. ANJUM AND A. HANIF

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV vaccines available in Pakistan was evaluated on the basis of the humoral immune response measured by haemagglutination inhibition (HI and agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID tests in sheep (n=60 and goats (n=60. The effect of storage temperature on HA activity of vaccine virus was measured by holding the vaccine at -20, 4, 27 and 40°C for 24 hours. The titer of freshly prepared vaccine was 1:16 and remained unchanged for 24 hours in the vaccines stored at -20 and 4°C. However, drop in titer (1:2 HA was recorded in the vaccine kept at 40°C for 24 hours. The haemagglutination activity of PPR virus constituted in buffer with pH 6.8 and 7.0 was recorded as highest when assay was performed with chicken and human blood group’O’ erythrocytes (1%. The lowest titer was recorded when vaccine was reconstituted in buffer at pH 8.0. After 14th day post vaccination, there was a gradual increase in the antibody titer till 56th day. Geometric mean titer (GMT of antibodies against locally manufactured PPRV vaccine was higher (207.9 in comparison with Pestivec (73.3, a vaccine imported from Jordan at 63rd day post vaccination in sheep; the corresponding values in goats were 147.0 and 48.5, respectively. All animals of control group were negative for antibodies by both of the diagnostic tests.

  15. First evaluation of an influenza viral vector based Brucella abortus vaccine in sheep and goats: Assessment of safety, immunogenicity and protective efficacy against Brucella melitensis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Yespembetov, Bolat; Matikhan, Nurali; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Zinina, Nadezhda; Kydyrbayev, Zhailaubay; Assanzhanova, Nurika; Tabynov, Kairat; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Mukhitdinova, Gulnara; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2016-12-25

    Previously we developed and evaluated a candidate influenza viral vector based Brucella abortus vaccine (Flu-BA) administered with a potent adjuvant Montanide Gel01 in cattle, which was found safe and highly effective. This study was aimed to establish a proof-of-concept of the efficacy of Flu-BA vaccine formulation in sheep and goats. We vaccinated sheep and goats with Flu-BA vaccine and as a positive control vaccinated a group of animals with a commercial B. melitensis Rev.1 vaccine. Clinically, both Flu-BA and Rev.1 vaccines were found safe. Serological analysis showed the animals received Flu-BA vaccine did not induce antibody response against Brucella Omp16 and L7/L12 proteins during the period of our study (56days post-initial vaccination, PIV). But observed significant antigen-specific T cell response indicated by increased lymphocyte stimulation index and enhanced secretion of IFN-γ at day 56 PIV in Flu-BA group. The Flu-BA vaccinated animals completely protected 57.1% of sheep and 42.9% of goats against B. melitensis 16M challenge. The severity of brucellosis in terms of infection index and colonization of Brucella in tissues was significantly lower in the Flu-BA group compared to negative control animals group. Nevertheless, positive control commercial Rev.1 vaccine provided strong antigen-specific T cell immunity and protection against B. melitensis 16M infection. We conclude that the Flu-BA vaccine induces a significant antigen-specific T-cell response and provides complete protection in approximately 50% of sheep and goats against B. melitensis 16M infection. Further investigations are needed to improve the efficacy of Flu-BA and explore its practical application in small ruminants.

  16. Bubonic and pneumonic plague - Uganda, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-24

    Plague is a life-threatening fleaborne disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. The most common clinical form is bubonic plague, which is characterized by high fever and regional lymphadenitis. Without treatment, infection can spread from lymph nodes to the lungs, resulting in pneumonic plague and the potential for person-to-person transmission through respiratory droplets. In November 2006, the Uganda Ministry of Health received reports of an increase in bubonic plague cases and a possible outbreak of pneumonic plague among residents in the Arua and Nebbi districts. In response, the Uganda Ministry of Health and CDC conducted a joint investigation in the two districts during November 28-December 30, 2006. Overall, 127 clinical plague cases were identified, along with evidence of a focal pneumonic outbreak in Nebbi District. Median age of the patients was 14 years (range: 2 weeks-65 years); 65 (51%) were female. Twenty-eight (22%) of the 127 patients died. Among the 102 patients with documented symptoms, 90 (88%) had bubonic plague, and 12 (12%) had pneumonic plague. The results of this investigation underscore the need to 1) continue efforts to educate residents of rural Uganda regarding the source, signs, and symptoms of plague and the life-saving importance of seeking treatment; 2) strengthen plague surveillance and diagnostic capabilities; and 3) improve emergency response and vector-control capacity, especially in remote regions of the country.

  17. Efficacy of a subunit vaccine against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in an endemcally infected swine herd

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jirawattanapong, P.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Leengoed, van L.A.M.G.; Binnendijk, G.P.; Wisselink, H.J.; Raymakers, R.; Cruijsen, T.; Peet-Schwering, van der C.M.C.; Nes, van A.; Nielen, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate lung lesions at slaughter after three-dose vaccination with a subunit Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae vaccine containing ApxI, ApxII, ApxIII, and an outer membrane protein. Materials and methods: A total of 430 newborn piglets in a herd endemically infected with A

  18. Brazilian avian metapneumovirus subtypes A and B: experimental infection of broilers and evaluation of vaccine efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia B. dos Santos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV is a respiratory pathogen associated with the swollen head syndrome (SHS in chickens. In Brazil, live aMPV vaccines are currently used, but subtypes A and, mainly subtype B (aMPV/A and aMPV/B are still circulating. This study was conducted to characterize two Brazilian aMPV isolates (A and B subtypes of chicken origin. A challenge trial to explore the replication ability of the Brazilian subtypes A and B in chickens was performed. Subsequently, virological protection provided from an aMPV/B vaccine against the same isolates was analyzed. Upon challenge experiment, it was shown by virus isolation and real time PCR that aMPV/B could be detected longer and in higher amounts than aMPV/A. For the protection study, 18 one-day-old chicks were vaccinated and challenged at 21 days of age. Using virus isolation and real time PCR, no aMPV/A was detected in the vaccinated chickens, whereas one vaccinated chicken challenged with the aMPV/B isolate was positive. The results showed that aMPV/B vaccine provided a complete heterologous virological protection, although homologous protection was not complete in one chicken. Although only one aMPV/B positive chicken was detected after homologous vaccination, replication in vaccinated animals might allow the emergence of escape mutants.

  19. Immunogenicity and efficacy of a rough Brucella suis vaccine delivered orally or parenterally to feral swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucella suis strain 353-1 is a stable vaccine strain that is clinically safe, does not cause positive serologic responses on conventional brucellosis surveillance tests, and induces humoral and cellular immunity in swine after vaccination. In this study, we evaluated tissue clearance and immunologi...

  20. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a vaxfectin-adjuvanted tetravalent dengue DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kevin R; Ewing, Daniel; Chen, Lan; Wu, Shuenn-Jue; Hayes, Curtis G; Ferrari, Marilyn; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa; Raviprakash, Kanakatte

    2012-01-05

    A prototype dengue-1 DNA vaccine was shown to be safe and immunogenic in a previous Phase 1 clinical trial. Anti-dengue-1 neutralizing antibody responses were detectable only in the group of volunteers receiving the high dose of nonadjuvanted vaccine and the antibody titers were low. Vaxfectin(®), a lipid-based adjuvant, enhances the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. We conducted a nonhuman primate study to evaluate the effect of Vaxfectin(®) on the immunogenicity of a tetravalent dengue DNA vaccine. Animals were immunized on days 0, 28 and 84, with each immunization consisting of 3mg of Vaxfectin(®)-adjuvanted tetravalent dengue DNA vaccine. The use of Vaxfectin(®) resulted in a significant increase in anti-dengue neutralizing antibody responses against dengue-1, -3 and -4. There was little to no effect on T cell responses as measured by interferon gamma ELISPOT assay. Animals immunized with the Vaxfectin(®)-formulated tetravalent DNA vaccine showed significant protection against live dengue-2 virus challenge compared to control animals (0.75 mean days of viremia vs 3.3 days). Animals vaccinated with nonadjuvanted DNA had a mean 2.0 days of viremia. These results support further evaluation of the Vaxfectin(®)-adjuvanted tetravalent dengue DNA vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial.

  1. Enhanced Efficacy of a Codon-Optimized DNA Vaccine Encoding the Glycoprotein Precursor Gene of Lassa Virus in a Guinea Pig Disease Model When Delivered by Dermal Electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Y. Sardesai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV causes a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa. Presently, there are no FDA-licensed medical countermeasures for this disease. In a pilot study, we constructed a DNA vaccine (pLASV-GPC that expressed the LASV glycoprotein precursor gene (GPC. This plasmid was used to vaccinate guinea pigs (GPs using intramuscular electroporation as the delivery platform. Vaccinated GPs were protected from lethal infection (5/6 with LASV compared to the controls. However, vaccinated GPs experienced transient viremia after challenge, although lower than the mock-vaccinated controls. In a follow-on study, we developed a new device that allowed for both the vaccine and electroporation pulse to be delivered to the dermis. We also codon-optimized the GPC sequence of the vaccine to enhance expression in GPs. Together, these innovations resulted in enhanced efficacy of the vaccine. Unlike the pilot study where neutralizing titers were not detected until after virus challenge, modest neutralizing titers were detected in guinea pigs before challenge, with escalating titers detected after challenge. The vaccinated GPs were never ill and were not viremic at any timepoint. The combination of the codon-optimized vaccine and dermal electroporation delivery is a worthy candidate for further development.

  2. Characterization of systemic and pneumonic murine models of plague infection using a conditionally virulent strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Ramirez, Karina; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Rodriguez, Ana L; Galen, James E; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2013-03-01

    Yersinia pestis causes bubonic and pneumonic plague in humans. The pneumonic infection is the most severe and invariably fatal if untreated. Because of its high virulence, ease of delivery and precedent of use in warfare, Y. pestis is considered as a potential bioterror agent. No licensed plague vaccine is currently available in the US. Laboratory research with virulent strains requires appropriate biocontainment (i.e., Biosafety Level 3 (BSL-3) for procedures that generate aerosol/droplets) and secure facilities that comply with federal select agent regulations. To assist in the identification of promising vaccine candidates during the early phases of development, we characterized mouse models of systemic and pneumonic plague infection using the Y. pestis strain EV76, an attenuated human vaccine strain that can be rendered virulent in mice under in vivo iron supplementation. Mice inoculated intranasally or intravenously with Y. pestis EV76 in the presence of iron developed a systemic and pneumonic plague infection that resulted in disease and lethality. Bacteria replicated and severely compromised the spleen, liver and lungs. Susceptibility was age dependent, with younger mice being more vulnerable to pneumonic infection. We used these models of infection to assess the protective capacity of newly developed Salmonella-based plague vaccines. The protective outcome varied depending on the route and dose of infection. Protection was associated with the induction of specific immunological effectors in systemic/mucosal compartments. The models of infection described could serve as safe and practical tools for identifying promising vaccine candidates that warrant further potency evaluation using fully virulent strains in BSL-3 settings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [The arrival of the plague in São Paulo in 1899].

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Dilene Raimundo

    2011-01-01

    In October 1899, the bubonic plague arrived in Brazil through the port of Santos. A city of intensive port activity, Santos was the gateway for a plague epidemic that devastated several cities in Brazil in the early 20th century and prompted joint action by several states to fight it. More importantly, given the difficulties and delays in importing anti-plague serum from Europe, it led to the creation of the Butantan Institute in Sao Paulo (in 1899) and the Municipal Serotherapeutic Institute in Rio de Janeiro (in 1900), which developed and standardized anti-plague serum and vaccines according to the particular conditions of the country. Until then, public health efforts had been isolated and had not reached the whole country. Oswaldo Cruz, newly arrived after three years of specialization at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, worked with scientists Adolfo Lutz and Vital Brazil on identifying the plague in Santos. This article analyzes the arrival of the bubonic plague epidemic in the state of Sao Paulo and the public health measures taken to combat the disease and provide patient care in the early part of the 20th century. The primary sources for this analysis were the São Paulo newspapers, especially O Estado de Sao Paulo, and reports from the Ministry of Justice and the President of the State of Sao Paulo.

  4. SAFETY AND IMMUNOLOGIC EFFICACY OF COMBINED IMMUNIZATION IN CHILDREN AGED 6—7 YEARS WITH VACCINES FROM THE NATIONAL CALENDAR OF PROPHYLACTICS VACCINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Konovalov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the safety of the vaccination for prevention of influenza with Grippol® plus vaccine alongside with vaccination with combined preparations for the prevention of diphtheria and tetanus (Td and measles, rubella, mumps in children aged 6—7 years. We determined that combined immunization with the indicated vaccines proves good tolerability and low reactogenicity. Vaccine Grippol® Plus shows low reactogenicity , high immunologenicity and does not cause cross-suppression of antibodies in co-administration with other vaccines on vaccination calendar. Also concomitant vaccination with Grippol® plus and other vaccines does not inhibit the development of a specific immune response against influenza.

  5. Third generation DIVA vaccine towards classical swine fever virus. Efficacy in face of maternal immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova

    General purpose and objectives Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious disease that causes huge economical losses and animal welfare concerns worldwide. Generally, vaccination is an effective and safe method to control the disease. Following vaccination the pig’s immune system develops...... antibodies that are significant part of the protection. However, vaccination with the only live attenuated vaccines existing on the market that contain a whole CSF virus (CSFV) with reduced infectivity, leads to production of an antibody response that does not differ from the antibody response developed......, will hamper the ability to proof a disease free status by serosurveillance, as all vaccinated piglets will be seropositive. This PhD-project is a part of an EU project (CSFV_goDIVA grant no 227003) that has been funded by the European Commission with a main goal to develop and test to a level of registration...

  6. Immunogenicity and Efficacy of Liposome-encapsulated Influenza Split Vaccine in BALB/c Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Feng-chun; WANG Chun-yi; WANG Ya-jun; ZHANG Xue-mei; ZHANG Yan; SUI Bo; LI Xiao-bo; SHENG Jun

    2007-01-01

    The cellular immunity of current influenza split vaccine is relatively low. It is necessary to develop a novel vaccine to improve the cellular immunity. The authors of this study prepared liposome-encapsulated influenza split vaccine and tested it in BALB/c mice. The mice were immunized once with 4 μg of haemagglutinin of monovalent A/New Caledonia/20/99(H1N1) encapsulated with liposomes or the split virus vaccine only through intrastomach injection. In a comparative study, it was observed that the liposome-encapsulated vaccine elicited a higher neutralizing antibody response, more effectively stimulated spleen cell proliferation, increased cell subsets like CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+, and triggered IL-4 and IFN-γ production.

  7. Mouse models to assess the efficacy of non-typhoidal Salmonella vaccines: revisiting the role of host innate susceptibility and routes of challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Raphael; Tennant, Sharon M.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica (NTS) serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis in the USA and worldwide. In sub-Saharan Africa these two serovars are emerging as agents associated with lethal invasive disease (e.g., bacteremia, meningitis). The development of NTS vaccines, based on mucosally-administered live attenuated strains and parenteral non-living antigens, could diminish the NTS disease burden globally. Mouse models of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis invasive disease can accelerate the development of NTS vaccines. Live attenuated NTS vaccines elicit both cellular and humoral immunity in mice and their efficacy is well established. In contrast, non-living vaccines that primarily elicit humoral immunity have demonstrated variable efficacy. An analysis of the reported studies with non-living vaccines against S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis reveals that efficacy is influenced by two important independent variables: 1) the innate susceptibility to NTS infection that differs dramatically between commonly used mouse strains and, 2) the virulence of the NTS strain used for challenge. Protection by non-living vaccines has generally been seen only in host-pathogen interactions where a sub-lethal infection results, such as challenging resistant mice with either highly virulent or weakly virulent strains or susceptible mice with weakly virulent strains. The immunologic basis of this discrepancy and the implications for human NTS vaccine development are reviewed herein. PMID:21616112

  8. Safety and efficacy of yellow fever vaccine in children less thanone-year-old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinusi, K; Akinkugbe, F M; Akinwolere, O A; Fabiyi, A

    1990-01-01

    In a clinical trial of stabilized yellow fever vaccine from Institute Pasteur in 77 children aged seven to eight months, fever was the most significant immediate and delayed side effect. Fever occurred in 12 (15.6%) children with in 48 hours of vaccination while it occurred in 10 (12.9%) children within ten days of vaccination. Other recorded side effects were pain at innoculation site in four (5.2%) children and vomiting in one (1.3%) child. Temperature recorded in 20 of the 22 febrile episodes ranged from 37.8 degrees C to 38.6 degrees C. One of the two patients who had temperatures of 39 degrees C and above had malaria parasites in her blood film. All episodes of fever except one responded to antipyretic. There was no episode of febrile convulsion and no feature suggestive of encephalitis. Of the 20 children who had neutralization test carried out against yellow fever virus six weeks after vaccination, the test was positive in post vaccination sera of 12 (60%) children whose pre-vaccination sera were negative. Two others showed evidence of partial protection. Although the seroconversion rate of 60% is less than reported in adults and older children, the result of this study shows that yellow fever vaccine is safe and fairly effective in infants. It is our suggestion that if a larger trial confirms our findings, the vaccine may be incorporated into the expanded programme on immunization (EPI) to be given at the age of seven months after completion of diptheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliomyelitis vaccinations and before measles vaccination is due.

  9. Streptococcus suis Bacterin and Subunit Vaccine Immunogenicities and Protective Efficacies against Serotypes 2 and 9▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, Christoph Georg; Kock, Christoph; Beineke, Andreas; Bennecke, Katharina; Goethe, Ralph; Schröder, Charlotte; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus suis causes numerous diseases in pigs, most importantly, meningitis, arthritis, septicemia, and bronchopneumonia. One of the major problems in modern swine production is the lack of a vaccine protecting against more than one S. suis serotype. The objective of this study was to determine the protective efficacy of a serotype 2 murein-associated protein (MAP) fraction subunit vaccine in comparison to that of a bacterin against experimental challenge with serotype 2 (containing muramidase-released protein [MRP], extracellular factor, and suilysin [SLY]) and serotype 9 (containing MRP variant MRP* and SLY) strains. MAP was shown to include different surface-associated proteins, such as the MRP and surface antigen one (SAO) expressed by both pathotypes used for challenge. The results of this study demonstrated that the serotype 2 bacterin induced protective immunity against homologous challenge. In contrast, the protective efficacy of the MAP subunit vaccine was low, though MAP immunization resulted in high serum immunoglobulin G2 titers against MRP and SAO. Importantly, immunization with bacterin but not with MAP induced opsonizing antibody titers against the serotype 2 strain, and these antibody titers were found to correlate with protection. However, after absorption with a nonencapsulated isogenic mutant, the sera from bacterin-immunized piglets failed to facilitate neutrophil killing, indicating that antibodies directed against capsule may not have been essential for opsonophagocytosis. Furthermore, induction of opsonizing antibodies against serotype 9 was not detectable in the group receiving bacterin or in the group receiving the MAP vaccine. In agreement, protection against the heterologous serotype 9 strain was low in both groups. Thus, identification of an antigen protecting against these two important S. suis pathotypes remains an important goal of future studies. PMID:19109449

  10. Safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of a recombinant tetravalent dengue vaccine: a meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Vivaldo G; Marques-Silva, Ariany C; Floriano, Vitor G; Moreli, Marcos L

    2014-09-03

    The World Health Organization has stipulated a target: reduce the mortality rate caused by dengue disease by 50% until 2020. Most likely, this goal can be achieved by means of a dengue vaccine. Accordingly, the recombinant and tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV), developed by the Sanofi Pasteur Group, is in an advanced stage of human testing. Although there are multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials evaluating the CYD-TDV, individual results may have little power to identify differences between the populations studied. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to determine a more precise estimate of the overall parameters of safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of CYD-TDV. A data search was conducted in the PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and SciELO databases with defined selection criteria. We included for meta-analysis seven randomized and placebo-controlled studies that included 6678 patients randomized to receive the CYD-TDV (4586) or placebo (2092). Regarding vaccine safety, it was found that there was no significant difference between treated and placebo groups, as only approximately 5.5% of patients were withdrawn from the study. Regarding immunogenicity, the levels of neutralizing antibodies were measured by weighted mean differences (WMD), which were always higher in the vaccinated group (WMD/DENV1=59.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 57-61; WMD/DENV2=99, 95% CI 95-102; WMD/DENV3=138, 95% CI 133-142; WMD/DENV4=123, 95% CI 119-126). The clinical efficacy of the vaccine was 59% (95% CI 15-80; RR=0.41, 95% CI 0.2-0.85, I(2)=30.9%). In conclusion, safety and a balanced immune response to the CYD-TDV were found. However, to fully establish the clinical effectiveness and robustness of immunogenicity, it is necessary to perform further studies to assess the long-term effects of the vaccine.

  11. DENGUE VACCINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2015-01-01

    The uniqueness of the dengue viruses (DENVs) and the spectrum of disease resulting from infection have made dengue vaccine development difficult. Several vaccine candidates are currently being evaluated in clinical studies. The candidate currently at the most advanced clinical development stage, a live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on the chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV), has progressed to Phase 3 efficacy studies. Several other live-attenuated vaccines, as well as subunit, DNA, and purified inactivated vaccine candidates are at earlier stages of clinical development. Additional technological approaches, such as virus-vectored and Virus-Like Particles (VLP)-based vaccines are under evaluation in preclinical studies.

  12. B haplotype influence on the relative efficacy of Marek's disease vaccines in commercial chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, L D; Witter, R L

    1994-04-01

    The objectives were to investigate whether or not B haplotypes influence vaccinal immunity against Marek's disease (MD) in commercial chickens and to evaluate whether retrospective analysis would detect the influence. This method involved evaluating the B haplotypes of turkey herpesvirus (HVT)-vaccinated sick vs normal chickens from a flock afflicted with MD symptoms. An analysis of the retrospective data disclosed that MD symptoms were present in a higher proportion of B2B19 than B2B21 chickens. A prospective study was then conducted with blood-typed chickens of the strain vaccinated with HVT or HVT + 301B bivalent MD vaccines prior to inoculation of the very virulent Md5 virus. The bivalent vaccine provided better protection than HVT alone, but with either vaccine fewer B2B21 chickens developed MD lesions. We conclude that the B haplotype influence on vaccinal immunity against MD previously demonstrated in B-congenic strains of chickens is also significant in commercial chickens and that the influence can be detected through analysis of B haplotypes in sick vs normal chickens of an affected flock.

  13. Immunological efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine strategies in HIV-infected adults: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadlier, C; O'Dea, S; Bennett, K; Dunne, J; Conlon, N; Bergin, C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immunologic response to a prime-boost immunization strategy combining the 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) with the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) versus the PPSV23 alone in HIV-infected adults. HIV-infected adults were randomized to receive PCV13 at week 0 followed by PPSV23 at week 4 (n = 31, prime-boost group) or PPSV23 alone at week 4 (n = 33, PPSV23-alone group). Serotype specific IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) and functional oposonophagocytic (OPA) geometric mean titer (GMT) were compared for 12 pneumococcal serotypes shared by both vaccines at week 8 and week 28. The prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥2-fold increase in IgG GMC and a GMC >1 ug/ml at week 8 (odds ratio (OR) 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46-2.74, p boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥4-fold increase in GMT at week 8 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.22-2.39, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.15-2.3, p < 0.01). This study adds to evidence supporting current pneumococcal vaccination recommendations combining the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines in the United States and Europe for HIV-infected individuals.

  14. Seroprevalence of tetanus toxoid antibody and booster vaccination efficacy in Japanese travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Komiya, Takako; Takeshita, Nozomi; Takahashi, Motohide

    2014-01-01

    Tetanus can be prevented by vaccination, which is especially important for overseas travelers. However, despite booster vaccination every 10 years being recommended, most Japanese adults do not receive it in the absence of physical injury or overseas travel. We aimed to investigate the level of protective immunity against tetanus among Japanese travelers, which may provide valuable information for formulating booster vaccination recommendations. 113 Japanese travelers given tetanus toxoid were recruited. The collected samples included paired samples prior to and 3-5 weeks after receiving the booster vaccination. Travelers who did not return and those lacking sample collection at the second visit were excluded. Finally, 96 paired blood samples were collected. History of immunization against tetanus, including DPT and DT vaccines, was determined from interviews or immunization records. The pre-vaccination geometric mean titer for the 96 participants was 1.07 IU/mL; 76% had a protective antitoxin level (>0.1 IU/mL), and 50% had a long-term protective antitoxin level (>1.0 IU/mL). Most participants 50 years of age had protective immunity. Among the 23 participants without protective antitoxin levels (50 years of age. Although the tetanus antitoxin level decreases with age, booster vaccination helped to achieve an adequate protective antitoxin levels in Japanese travelers tetanus especially in those >50 years old need to obtain protective immunity against tetanus according to a basic immunization schedule to prevent tetanus in travelers and residents of Japan.

  15. Efficacy and safety studies on an inactivated vaccine against bluetongue virus serotype 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Emidio, B; Nicolussi, P; Patta, C; Ronchi, G F; Monaco, F; Savini, G; Ciarelli, A; Caporale, V

    2004-01-01

    An inactivated vaccine was produced from an Italian field isolate of bluetongue virus serotype 2 (BTV-2) with a titre of 10(7.8)TCID50/ml. The virus was purified through a molecular cut cassette membrane, inactivated with beta-propriolactone and emulsified with ISA 206 (Seppic) adjuvant. The vaccine was then tested for sterility, toxicity and safety in laboratory and target animals according to European Pharmacopoeia standards. Immunogenicity was assessed by inocu