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Sample records for placebo analgesia modulate

  1. Intracortical modulation, and not spinal inhibition, mediates placebo analgesia.

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    Martini, M; Lee, M C H; Valentini, E; Iannetti, G D

    2015-02-01

    Suppression of spinal responses to noxious stimulation has been detected using spinal fMRI during placebo analgesia, which is therefore increasingly considered a phenomenon caused by descending inhibition of spinal activity. However, spinal fMRI is technically challenging and prone to false-positive results. Here we recorded laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) during placebo analgesia in humans. LEPs allow neural activity to be measured directly and with high enough temporal resolution to capture the sequence of cortical areas activated by nociceptive stimuli. If placebo analgesia is mediated by inhibition at spinal level, this would result in a general suppression of LEPs rather than in a selective reduction of their late components. LEPs and subjective pain ratings were obtained in two groups of healthy volunteers - one was conditioned for placebo analgesia while the other served as unconditioned control. Laser stimuli at three suprathreshold energies were delivered to the right hand dorsum. Placebo analgesia was associated with a significant reduction of the amplitude of the late P2 component. In contrast, the early N1 component, reflecting the arrival of the nociceptive input to the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), was only affected by stimulus energy. This selective suppression of late LEPs indicates that placebo analgesia is mediated by direct intracortical modulation rather than inhibition of the nociceptive input at spinal level. The observed cortical modulation occurs after the responses elicited by the nociceptive stimulus in the SI, suggesting that higher order sensory processes are modulated during placebo analgesia.

  2. Hypnotizability and Placebo Analgesia in Waking and Hypnosis as Modulators of Auditory Startle Responses in Healthy Women: An ERP Study

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    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Scacchia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of hypnotizability, pain expectation, placebo analgesia in waking and hypnosis on tonic pain relief. We also investigated how placebo analgesia affects somatic responses (eye blink) and N100 and P200 waves of event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by auditory startle probes. Although expectation plays an important role in placebo and hypnotic analgesia, the neural mechanisms underlying these treatments are still poorly understood. We used the cold cup test (CCT) to induce tonic pain in 53 healthy women. Placebo analgesia was initially produced by manipulation, in which the intensity of pain induced by the CCT was surreptitiously reduced after the administration of a sham analgesic cream. Participants were then tested in waking and hypnosis under three treatments: (1) resting (Baseline); (2) CCT-alone (Pain); and (3) CCT plus placebo cream for pain relief (Placebo). For each painful treatment, we assessed pain and distress ratings, eye blink responses, N100 and P200 amplitudes. We used LORETA analysis of N100 and P200 waves, as elicited by auditory startle, to identify cortical regions sensitive to pain reduction through placebo and hypnotic analgesia. Higher pain expectation was associated with higher pain reductions. In highly hypnotizable participants placebo treatment produced significant reductions of pain and distress perception in both waking and hypnosis condition. P200 wave, during placebo analgesia, was larger in the frontal left hemisphere while placebo analgesia, during hypnosis, involved the activity of the left hemisphere including the occipital region. These findings demonstrate that hypnosis and placebo analgesia are different processes of top-down regulation. Pain reduction was associated with larger EMG startle amplitudes, N100 and P200 responses, and enhanced activity within the frontal, parietal, and anterior and posterior cingulate gyres. LORETA results showed that placebo analgesia modulated pain-responsive areas

  3. Hypnotizability and Placebo Analgesia in Waking and Hypnosis as Modulators of Auditory Startle Responses in Healthy Women: An ERP Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Scacchia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of hypnotizability, pain expectation, placebo analgesia in waking and hypnosis on tonic pain relief. We also investigated how placebo analgesia affects somatic responses (eye blink) and N100 and P200 waves of event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by auditory startle probes. Although expectation plays an important role in placebo and hypnotic analgesia, the neural mechanisms underlying these treatments are still poorly understood. We used the cold cup test (CCT) to induce tonic pain in 53 healthy women. Placebo analgesia was initially produced by manipulation, in which the intensity of pain induced by the CCT was surreptitiously reduced after the administration of a sham analgesic cream. Participants were then tested in waking and hypnosis under three treatments: (1) resting (Baseline); (2) CCT-alone (Pain); and (3) CCT plus placebo cream for pain relief (Placebo). For each painful treatment, we assessed pain and distress ratings, eye blink responses, N100 and P200 amplitudes. We used LORETA analysis of N100 and P200 waves, as elicited by auditory startle, to identify cortical regions sensitive to pain reduction through placebo and hypnotic analgesia. Higher pain expectation was associated with higher pain reductions. In highly hypnotizable participants placebo treatment produced significant reductions of pain and distress perception in both waking and hypnosis condition. P200 wave, during placebo analgesia, was larger in the frontal left hemisphere while placebo analgesia, during hypnosis, involved the activity of the left hemisphere including the occipital region. These findings demonstrate that hypnosis and placebo analgesia are different processes of top-down regulation. Pain reduction was associated with larger EMG startle amplitudes, N100 and P200 responses, and enhanced activity within the frontal, parietal, and anterior and posterior cingulate gyres. LORETA results showed that placebo analgesia modulated pain-responsive areas

  4. Placebo analgesia: understanding the mechanisms.

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    Medoff, Zev M; Colloca, Luana

    2015-01-01

    Expectations of pain relief drive placebo analgesia. Understanding how expectations of improvement trigger distinct biological systems to shape therapeutic analgesic outcomes has been the focus of recent pharmacologic and neuroimaging studies in the field of pain. Recent findings indicate that placebo effects can imitate the actions of real painkillers and promote the endogenous release of opioids and nonopioids in humans. Social support and observational learning also contribute to placebo analgesic effects. Distinct psychological traits can modulate expectations of analgesia, which facilitate brain pain control mechanisms involved in pain reduction. Many studies have highlighted the importance and clinical relevance of these responses. Gaining deeper understanding of these pain modulatory mechanisms has important implications for personalizing patient pain management.

  5. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

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    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  6. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Chouchou

    Full Text Available The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers. Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1 placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2 pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3 REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  7. Placebo analgesia: understanding the mechanisms

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    Medoff, Zev M; Colloca, Luana

    2015-01-01

    Expectations of pain relief drive placebo analgesia. Understanding how expectations of improvement trigger distinct biological systems to shape therapeutic analgesic outcomes has been the focus of recent pharmacologic and neuroimaging studies in the field of pain. Recent findings indicate that placebo effects can imitate the actions of real painkillers and promote the endogenous release of opioids and nonopioids in humans. Social support and observational learning also contribute to placebo a...

  8. Partial reinforcement, extinction, and placebo analgesia.

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    Au Yeung, Siu Tsin; Colagiuri, Ben; Lovibond, Peter F; Colloca, Luana

    2014-06-01

    Numerous studies indicate that placebo analgesia can be established via conditioning procedures. However, these studies have exclusively involved conditioning under continuous reinforcement. Thus, it is currently unknown whether placebo analgesia can be established under partial reinforcement and how durable any such effect would be. We tested this possibility using electrocutaneous pain in healthy volunteers. Sixty undergraduates received placebo treatment (activation of a sham electrode) under the guise of an analgesic trial. The participants were randomly allocated to different conditioning schedules, namely continuous reinforcement (CRF), partial reinforcement (PRF), or control (no conditioning). Conditioning was achieved by surreptitiously reducing pain intensity during training when the placebo was activated compared with when it was inactive. For the CRF group, the placebo was always followed by a surreptitious reduction in pain during training. For the PRF group, the placebo was followed by a reduction in pain stimulation on 62.5% of trials only. In the test phase, pain stimulation was equivalent across placebo and no placebo trials. Both CRF and PRF produced placebo analgesia, with the magnitude of initial analgesia being larger after CRF. However, although the placebo analgesia established under CRF extinguished during test phase, the placebo analgesia established under PRF did not. These findings indicate that PRF can induce placebo analgesia and that these effects are more resistant to extinction than those established via CRF. PRF may therefore reflect a novel way of enhancing clinical outcomes via the placebo effect.

  9. Bayesian prediction of placebo analgesia in an instrumental learning model

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    Jung, Won-Mo; Lee, Ye-Seul; Wallraven, Christian; Chae, Younbyoung

    2017-01-01

    Placebo analgesia can be primarily explained by the Pavlovian conditioning paradigm in which a passively applied cue becomes associated with less pain. In contrast, instrumental conditioning employs an active paradigm that might be more similar to clinical settings. In the present study, an instrumental conditioning paradigm involving a modified trust game in a simulated clinical situation was used to induce placebo analgesia. Additionally, Bayesian modeling was applied to predict the placebo responses of individuals based on their choices. Twenty-four participants engaged in a medical trust game in which decisions to receive treatment from either a doctor (more effective with high cost) or a pharmacy (less effective with low cost) were made after receiving a reference pain stimulus. In the conditioning session, the participants received lower levels of pain following both choices, while high pain stimuli were administered in the test session even after making the decision. The choice-dependent pain in the conditioning session was modulated in terms of both intensity and uncertainty. Participants reported significantly less pain when they chose the doctor or the pharmacy for treatment compared to the control trials. The predicted pain ratings based on Bayesian modeling showed significant correlations with the actual reports from participants for both of the choice categories. The instrumental conditioning paradigm allowed for the active choice of optional cues and was able to induce the placebo analgesia effect. Additionally, Bayesian modeling successfully predicted pain ratings in a simulated clinical situation that fits well with placebo analgesia induced by instrumental conditioning. PMID:28225816

  10. A meta-analysis of brain mechanisms of placebo analgesia: consistent findings and unanswered questions.

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    Atlas, Lauren Y; Wager, Tor D

    2014-01-01

    Placebo treatments reliably reduce pain in the clinic and in the lab. Because pain is a subjective experience, it has been difficult to determine whether placebo analgesia is clinically relevant. Neuroimaging studies of placebo analgesia provide objective evidence of placebo-induced changes in brain processing and allow researchers to isolate the mechanisms underlying placebo-based pain reduction. We conducted formal meta-analyses of 25 neuroimaging studies of placebo analgesia and expectancy-based pain modulation. Results revealed that placebo effects and expectations for reduced pain elicit reliable reductions in activation during noxious stimulation in regions often associated with pain processing, including the dorsal anterior cingulate, thalamus, and insula. In addition, we observed consistent reductions during painful stimulation in the amygdala and striatum, regions implicated widely in studies of affect and valuation. This suggests that placebo effects are strongest on brain regions traditionally associated with not only pain, but also emotion and value more generally. Other brain regions showed reliable increases in activation with expectations for reduced pain. These included the prefrontal cortex (including dorsolateral, ventromedial, and orbitofrontal cortices), the midbrain surrounding the periaqueductal gray, and the rostral anterior cingulate. We discuss implications of these findings as well as how future studies can expand our understanding of the precise functional contributions of the brain systems identified here.

  11. The elusive rat model of conditioned placebo analgesia.

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    McNabb, Christopher T; White, Michelle M; Harris, Amber L; Fuchs, Perry N

    2014-10-01

    Recent research on human placebo analgesia has suggested the need for rodent models to further elucidate the neural substrates of the placebo effect. This series of 3 experiments therefore was performed in an attempt to develop a model of placebo analgesia in rats. In each study, female Sprague-Dawley rats received an L5 spinal nerve ligation to induce a neuropathic pain condition. Each rat then underwent a 4-day conditioning procedure in which an active analgesic drug or its vehicle (unconditioned stimulus) was associated with the following cues (conditioned stimuli): novel testing room (environmental), vanilla scent cue (olfactory), dim incandescent lighting (visual), restraint procedure/injection (tactile), and time of day and injection-test latency (temporal). The analgesics for each experiment were as follows: Experiment 1 used 90 mg/kg gabapentin, experiment 2 used 3mg/kg loperamide hydrochloride, and experiment 3 used 6 mg/kg morphine sulfate. On the following test day, half of the animals received the opposite treatment, resulting in 4 conditioning manipulations: drug/drug, drug/vehicle, vehicle/drug, and vehicle/vehicle. Nociceptive thresholds were assessed with the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold test each day after the conditioning procedure. In all 3 experiments, no significant differences were detected on test day between control and placebo groups, indicating a lack of a conditioned placebo analgesic response. Our results contrast with prior research that implies the existence of a reliable and robust response to placebo treatment. We conclude that placebo analgesia in rats is not particularly robust and that it is difficult to achieve using conventional procedures and proper experimental design.

  12. Expectancy and Conditioning in Placebo Analgesia: Separate or Connected Processes?

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    Kirsch, Irving; Kong, Jian; Sadler, Pamela; Spaeth, Rosa; Cook, Amanda; Kaptchuk, Ted; Gollub, Randy

    2014-01-01

    Expectancy and conditioning are often tested as opposing explanations of placebo analgesia, most commonly by pitting the effects of a conditioning procedure against those of a verbally-induced expectation for pain reduction. However, conditioning procedures can also alter expectations, such that the effect of conditioning on pain might be mediated by expectancy. We assessed the effect of conditioning on expected pain and placebo-induced pain reduction. Participants were told that the treatment (real or sham acupuncture) would affect one side of the arm but not the other. Because a real acupuncture effect would not be specific to a randomly selected side of the arm, any difference in pain between the “treated” and the “untreated” side would be a placebo effect. There were no significant main effects or interactions associated with type of acupuncture (real versus sham). In both groups, conditioning decreased expected pain for “treated” location and also increased the placebo effect (i.e., the difference in pain report between “treated” and “untreated” locations). In addition, mediation analysis lent support to the hypothesis that the effects of conditioning on placebo analgesia may be mediated by expectancy, although the size of this indirect effect requires further study. PMID:25093194

  13. Expectancy and treatment interactions: A dissociation between acupuncture analgesia and expectancy evoked placebo analgesia

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    Kong, Jian; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Polich, Ginger; Kirsch, Irving; Vangel, Mark; Zyloney, Carolyn; Rosen, Bruce; Gollub, Randy

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in placebo research have demonstrated the mind’s power to alter physiology. In this study, we combined an expectancy manipulation model with both verum and sham acupuncture treatments to address: 1) how and to what extent treatment and expectancy effects --including both subjective pain intensity levels (pain sensory ratings) and objective physiological activations (fMRI) -- interact; and 2) if the underlying mechanism of expectancy remains the same whether placebo treatment is given alone or in conjunction with active treatment. The results indicate that although verum acupuncture + high expectation and sham acupuncture + high expectation induced subjective reports of analgesia of equal magnitude, fMRI analysis showed that verum acupuncture produced greater fMRI signal decrease in pain related brain regions during application of calibrated heat pain stimuli on the right arm. We believe our study provides brain imaging evidence for the existence of different mechanisms underlying acupuncture analgesia and expectancy evoked placebo analgesia. Our results also suggest that the brain network involved in expectancy may vary under different treatment situations (verum and sham acupuncture treatment). PMID:19159691

  14. Are there sex differences in placebo analgesia during visceral pain processing? A fMRI study in healthy subjects.

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    Theysohn, N; Schmid, J; Icenhour, A; Mewes, C; Forsting, M; Gizewski, E R; Schedlowski, M; Elsenbruch, S; Benson, S

    2014-12-01

    We explored sex differences in the neural mechanisms mediating placebo analgesia in an established visceral pain model involving painful rectal distensions in healthy volunteers. N = 15 men and N = 15 women underwent three consecutive functional magnetic resonance imaging sessions during which cued painful rectal distensions were delivered. After an adaptation session, positive expectations were induced with deceptive instructions regarding administration of an analgesic drug (placebo session). In the other session (control), truthful information about an inert substance was given. Sex differences in placebo-induced modulation of neural activation during anticipation and pain were analyzed along with ratings of expected and perceived pain intensity. Placebo-induced reductions in pain ratings were comparable between men and women. At the level of the brain, group comparisons with respect to differences between the placebo and control conditions revealed greater modulation of the posterior insula (regions-of-interest analysis: pFWE pain anticipation in women. During pain, placebo-induced down-regulation of the insula was altered in women compared to men (ROI analysis: pFWE pain-induced neural modulation during visceral placebo analgesia despite similar placebo-induced reductions in perceived pain intensity. These preliminary findings might contribute to elucidating mechanisms mediating placebo effects in clinical conditions associated with chronic abdominal pain such as in irritable bowel syndrome. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Personality trait predictors of placebo analgesia and neurobiological correlates.

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    Peciña, Marta; Azhar, Hamdan; Love, Tiffany M; Lu, Tingting; Fredrickson, Barbara L; Stohler, Christian S; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2013-03-01

    Personality traits have been shown to interact with environmental cues to modulate biological responses including treatment responses, and potentially having a role in the formation of placebo effects. Here, we assessed psychological traits in 50 healthy controls as to their capacity to predict placebo analgesic effects, placebo-induced activation of μ-opioid neurotransmission and changes in cortisol plasma levels during a sustained experimental pain challenge (hypertonic saline infused in the masseter muscle) with and without placebo administration. Statistical analyses showed that an aggregate of scores from Ego-Resiliency, NEO Altruism, NEO Straightforwardness (positive predictors) and NEO Angry Hostility (negative predictor) scales accounted for 25% of the variance in placebo analgesic responses. Molecular imaging showed that subjects scoring above the median in a composite of those trait measures also presented greater placebo-induced activation of μ-opioid neurotransmission in the subgenual and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), orbitofrontal cortex, insula, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and periaqueductal gray (PAG). Endogenous opioid release in the dorsal ACC and PAG was positively correlated with placebo-induced reductions in pain ratings. Significant reductions in cortisol levels were observed during placebo administration and were positively correlated with decreases in pain ratings, μ-opioid system activation in the dorsal ACC and PAG, and as a trend, negatively with NEO Angry Hostility scores. Our results show that personality traits explain a substantial proportion of the variance in placebo analgesic responses and are further associated with activations in endogenous opioid neurotransmission, and as a trend cortisol plasma levels. This initial data, if replicated in larger sample, suggest that simple trait measures easily deployable in the field could be utilized to reduce variability in clinical trials, but may also point to measures of

  16. Effects of subtle cognitive manipulations on placebo analgesia - An implicit priming study.

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    Rosén, A; Yi, J; Kirsch, I; Kaptchuk, T J; Ingvar, M; Jensen, K B

    2017-04-01

    Expectancy is widely accepted as a key contributor to placebo effects. However, it is not known whether non-conscious expectancies achieved through semantic priming may contribute to placebo analgesia. In this study, we investigated if an implicit priming procedure, where participants were unaware of the intended priming influence, affected placebo analgesia. In a double-blind experiment, healthy participants (n = 36) were randomized to different implicit priming types; one aimed at increasing positive expectations and one neutral control condition. First, pain calibration (thermal) and a credibility demonstration of the placebo analgesic device were performed. In a second step, an independent experimenter administered the priming task; Scrambled Sentence Test. Then, pain sensitivity was assessed while telling participants that the analgesic device was either turned on (placebo) or turned off (baseline). Pain responses were recorded on a 0-100 Numeric Response Scale. Overall, there was a significant placebo effect (p priming conditions (positive/neutral) did not lead to differences in placebo outcome. Prior experience of pain relief (during initial pain testing) correlated significantly with placebo analgesia (p Priming is one of many ways to influence behaviour, and non-conscious activation of positive expectations could theoretically affect placebo analgesia. Yet, we found no SST priming effect on placebo analgesia. Instead, our data point to the significance of prior experience of pain relief, trait neuroticism and social interaction with the treating clinician. Our findings challenge the role of semantic priming as a behavioural modifier that may shape expectations of pain relief, and affect placebo analgesia. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  17. Mindfulness Meditation-Based Pain Relief Employs Different Neural Mechanisms Than Placebo and Sham Mindfulness Meditation-Induced Analgesia

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    Emerson, Nichole M.; Farris, Suzan R.; Ray, Jenna N.; Jung, Youngkyoo; McHaffie, John G.; Coghill, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation reduces pain in experimental and clinical settings. However, it remains unknown whether mindfulness meditation engages pain-relieving mechanisms other than those associated with the placebo effect (e.g., conditioning, psychosocial context, beliefs). To determine whether the analgesic mechanisms of mindfulness meditation are different from placebo, we randomly assigned 75 healthy, human volunteers to 4 d of the following: (1) mindfulness meditation, (2) placebo conditioning, (3) sham mindfulness meditation, or (4) book-listening control intervention. We assessed intervention efficacy using psychophysical evaluation of experimental pain and functional neuroimaging. Importantly, all cognitive manipulations (i.e., mindfulness meditation, placebo conditioning, sham mindfulness meditation) significantly attenuated pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings when compared to rest and the control condition (p meditation reduced pain intensity (p = 0.032) and pain unpleasantness (p meditation also reduced pain intensity (p = 0.030) and pain unpleasantness (p = 0.043) ratings more than sham mindfulness meditation. Mindfulness-meditation-related pain relief was associated with greater activation in brain regions associated with the cognitive modulation of pain, including the orbitofrontal, subgenual anterior cingulate, and anterior insular cortex. In contrast, placebo analgesia was associated with activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and deactivation of sensory processing regions (secondary somatosensory cortex). Sham mindfulness meditation-induced analgesia was not correlated with significant neural activity, but rather by greater reductions in respiration rate. This study is the first to demonstrate that mindfulness-related pain relief is mechanistically distinct from placebo analgesia. The elucidation of this distinction confirms the existence of multiple, cognitively driven, supraspinal mechanisms for pain modulation. SIGNIFICANCE

  18. Placebo Analgesia Changes Alpha Oscillations Induced by Tonic Muscle Pain: EEG Frequency Analysis Including Data during Pain Evaluation

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    Li, Linling; Wang, Hui; Ke, Xijie; Liu, Xiaowu; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Deren; Xiong, Donglin; Qiu, Yunhai

    2016-01-01

    Placebo exhibits beneficial effects on pain perception in human experimental studies. Most of these studies demonstrate that placebo significantly decreased neural activities in pain modulatory brain regions and pain-evoked potentials. This study examined placebo analgesia-related effects on spontaneous brain oscillations. We examined placebo effects on four order-fixed 20-min conditions in two sessions: isotonic saline-induced control conditions (with/without placebo) followed by hypertonic saline-induced tonic muscle pain conditions (with/without placebo) in 19 subjects using continuous electroencephalography (EEG) recording. Placebo treatment exerted significant analgesic effects in 14 placebo responders, as subjective intensity of pain perception decreased. Frequency analyses were performed on whole continuous EEG data, data during pain perception rating and data after rating. The results in the first two cases revealed that placebo induced significant increases and a trend toward significant increases in the amplitude of alpha oscillation during tonic muscle pain compared to control conditions in frontal-central regions of the brain, respectively. Placebo-induced decreases in the subjective intensity of pain perception significantly and positively correlated with the increases in the amplitude of alpha oscillations during pain conditions. In conclusion, the modulation effect of placebo treatment was captured when the pain perception evaluating period was included. The strong correlation between the placebo effect on reported pain perception and alpha amplitude suggest that alpha oscillations in frontal-central regions serve as a cortical oscillatory basis of the placebo effect on tonic muscle pain. These results provide important evidence for the investigation of objective indicators of the placebo effect. PMID:27242501

  19. Beliefs About Pharmaceutical Medicines and Natural Remedies Explain Individual Variation in Placebo Analgesia.

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    Watkinson, Andrew; Chapman, Sarah C E; Horne, Rob

    2017-08-01

    This study examined whether placebo responses were predicted by a theoretical model of specific and general treatment beliefs. Using a randomized crossover, experimental design (168 healthy individuals) we assessed whether responses to a cold pressor task were influenced by 2 placebo creams described as pharmaceutical versus natural. We assessed whether placebo responses were predicted by pretreatment beliefs about the treatments (placebo) and by beliefs about the pain. The efficacy of pharmaceutical as well as natural placebos in reducing pain intensity was predicted by aspects of pain catastrophizing including feelings of helplessness (pharmaceutical: B = .03, P natural: B = .02, P natural: B = .05, P natural: B = .16, P natural placebo were informed by general background beliefs about holistic treatments. Our findings show that treatment beliefs influence the placebo effect suggesting that they may offer an additional approach for understanding the placebo effect. Placebo effects contribute to responses to active analgesics. Understanding how beliefs about different types of treatment influence placebo analgesia may be useful in understanding variations in treatment response. Using the cold pressor paradigm we found that placebo analgesia was influenced by beliefs about natural remedies, pharmaceutical medicines, and about pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Reduction of empathy for pain by placebo analgesia suggests functional equivalence of empathy and first-hand emotion experience.

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    Rütgen, Markus; Seidel, Eva-Maria; Riečanský, Igor; Lamm, Claus

    2015-06-10

    Previous research in social neuroscience has consistently shown that empathy for pain recruits brain areas that are also activated during the first-hand experience of pain. This has been interpreted as evidence that empathy relies upon neural processes similar to those underpinning the first-hand experience of emotions. However, whether such overlapping neural activations imply that equivalent neural functions are engaged by empathy and direct emotion experiences remains to be demonstrated. We induced placebo analgesia, a phenomenon specifically modulating the first-hand experience of pain, to test whether this also reduces empathy for pain. Subjective and neural measures of pain and empathy for pain were collected using self-report and event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants underwent painful electrical stimulation or witnessed that another person was undergoing such stimulation. Self-report showed decreased empathy during placebo analgesia, and this was mirrored by reduced amplitudes of the pain-related P2, an ERP component indexing neural computations related to the affective-motivational component of pain. Moreover, these effects were specific for pain, as self-report and ERP measures of control conditions unrelated to pain were not affected by placebo analgesia. Together, the present results suggest that empathy seems to rely on neural processes that are (partially) functionally equivalent to those engaged by first-hand emotion experiences. Moreover, they imply that analgesics may have the unwanted side effect of reducing empathic resonance and concern for others. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/358938-10$15.00/0.

  1. Pain-related negative emotions and placebo analgesia.

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    Flaten, Magne Arve

    2014-01-01

    Individuals undergoing treatment for a symptom like pain expect that the treatment will reduce the pain. Many studies show that healthy volunteers or patients in pain report less pain after inactive treatment, if they believe that active medication has been administrated. The reduction of pain can be partly blocked by systemic administration of naloxone, an opioid antagonist. There is reduced central nervous system activation to painful stimuli in individuals who have been given a placebo and told it is a painkiller. These findings suggest that the expectation of pain relief generates central nervous system opioid activity that inhibits pain transmission to the cerebral cortex. Expectations may thus lead to changes in central nervous system activity that reduces pain. It is proposed that expectations activate a homeostatic system that corrects perturbations to the system via negative feedback. The nocebo effect is the opposite of the placebo effect, and is due to induction of negative emotions. Part of the treatment of many symptoms and diseases is due to autonomic adjustments controlled by the central nervous system. The involvement of emotional processes in placebo effects could have important consequences for interpretation of data from randomized controlled trials.

  2. Socially-induced placebo analgesia: a comparison of a pre-recorded versus live face-to-face observation

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    Hunter, T.; Siess, F.; Colloca, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, it has been shown that live, face-to-face social observation induces marked placebo analgesia. Despite the phenomenal growth of video sharing platforms, the potential analgesic effects of video based social observation are largely unknown. This study compared video based and live social observation induced placebo analgesia and whether there was a similar relationship between analgesic responses and empathy traits for both conditions. Methods Here we compared placebo analgesia in four groups: social observation through a video (SOV Group), social observation in person (SOP Group), verbal suggestion alone (VS Group) and a natural history group (NH Group). The SOV and SOP groups underwent a placebo treatment and painful stimuli following respectively a video based and live observation of a demonstrator showing analgesic effects when the painful stimuli were paired to a green light but not a red light. The VS group received painful stimuli after they had been verbally instructed to expect less pain after the green light. The NH group received painful stimuli, but was told nothing about the meaning of the lights. Individual pain reports and empathy traits were measured. Results We found that video based observation induced substantial placebo analgesic responses that were of similar magnitude to live observation. Notably, the analgesic scores were strongly correlated with empathetic concern in the live observation group but not in the video replay group. Conclusions These findings add evidence that placebo analgesia can be induced by social observation and that empathy interacts with these effects in a context-dependent manner. PMID:24347563

  3. Expectations of analgesia do not affect spinal nociceptive R-III reflex activity: an experimental study into the mechanism of placebo-induced analgesia.

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    Roelofs, J; ter Riet G; Peters, M L; Kessels, A G; Reulen, J P; Menheere, P P

    2000-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether placebo analgesia is mediated by the release of beta-endorphin. In addition to subjective pain reports, we included an objective physiological parameter of nociception reflected by the opioid sensitive nociceptive R-III reflex. Placebo consisted of strong suggestions of pain relief and an intravenous injection of saline. Forty minutes after placebo, either the opioid antagonist naloxone or saline was administered intravenously without subjects noticing (hidden). Sixty healthy males, aged 18-30 years, voluntarily participated in this study. Subjects were randomized into one of four groups: group 1 received placebo and hidden naloxone, group 2 received hidden naloxone only, group 3 received placebo and hidden saline and group 4 received hidden saline only. Pain was induced by electrical stimulation of the sural nerve and evaluated with a visual analogue scale (VAS). In addition, changes in the magnitude of the nociceptive R-III reflex activity were assessed. We determined to what extent R-III reflex activity and subjective pain reports were decreased by placebo and we investigated whether these placebo-induced changes in reflex activity and subjective pain reports were naloxone reversible. Furthermore, we measured the degree of association between pain relief as measured on VAS and changes in R-III reflex activity. Finally, the role of beta-endorphin was assessed by measuring plasma endorphin levels before and after the administration of placebo. This study could not demonstrate a placebo effect as measured on VAS and R-III responses. The administration of placebo did not appear to have an effect on the release of beta-endorphins. Consistently, the antagonizing effects of naloxone were negligible. A subgroup analysis of those who did show a placebo response as indicated on the VAS did not support the supposition that beta-endorphin is released due to placebo suggestion. It is suggested that intensified stimuli and

  4. Placebo analgesia and its underlying mechanisms%安慰剂镇痛及内在机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑞睿; 郭建友

    2011-01-01

    安慰剂镇痛效应在常规临床实践中有着非常重要的作用和意义.有意识的预期过程及无意识的条件反射均能产生安慰剂镇痛效应,并影响相应的生理功能.安慰剂镇痛效应可以分为阿片和非阿片成分,这两类安慰剂镇痛效应可能涉及不同的通道、脑区及相关大脑回路.本文综述了产生安慰剂镇痛的机制及神经生理学研究进展,并提出今后的研究方向.%Placebo effect is a biological phenomenon with psychosocial-induced biochemical changes in a patient's brain and body. The term placebo-related effects aims to extend the concept of placebo effect to related phenomena and makes the underlying mechanisms better understood. The placebo analgesia effect is induced by different mechanisms, including the expectation of pain relief and conditioning. According to pharmacological studies, placebo analgesia is subdivided into opioid and non-opioid compo-nents while functional imaging data has also revealed brain regions and brain network involved in placebo analgesia. On the basis of previous research, this paper discussed the definition and underlying mechanisms of placebo analgesia, and gave some suggestions about related study in future.

  5. Socially induced placebo analgesia: a comparison of a pre-recorded versus live face-to-face observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, T; Siess, F; Colloca, L

    2014-08-01

    Recently, it has been shown that live, face-to-face social observation induces marked placebo analgesia. Despite the phenomenal growth of video sharing platforms, the potential analgesic effects of video-based social observation are largely unknown. This study compared video-based and live social observation induced placebo analgesia and whether there was a similar relationship between analgesic responses and empathy traits for both conditions. Here, we compared placebo analgesia in four groups: social observation through a video (SOV group), social observation in person (SOP group), verbal suggestion alone (VS group) and a natural history group (NH group). The SOV and SOP groups underwent a placebo treatment and painful stimuli following respectively a video-based and live observation of a demonstrator showing analgesic effects when the painful stimuli were paired to a green light but not a red light. The VS group received painful stimuli after they had been verbally instructed to expect less pain after the green light. The NH group received painful stimuli, but was told nothing about the meaning of the lights. Individual pain reports and empathy traits were measured. We found that video-based observation induced substantial placebo analgesic responses that were of similar magnitude to live observation. Notably, the analgesic scores were strongly correlated with empathetic concern in the live observation group but not in the video replay group. These findings add evidence that placebo analgesia can be induced by social observation and that empathy interacts with these effects in a context-dependent manner. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  6. Psychophysical testing of spatial and temporal dimensions of endogenous analgesia: conditioned pain modulation and offset analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honigman, Liat; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Weissman-Fogel, Irit

    2013-08-01

    The endogenous analgesia (EA) system is psychophysically evaluated using various paradigms, including conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and offset analgesia (OA) testing, respectively, the spatial and temporal filtering processes of noxious information. Though both paradigms assess the function of the EA system, it is still unknown whether they reflect the same aspects of EA and consequently whether they provide additive or equivalent data. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers (15 males) underwent 5 trials of different stimulation conditions in random order including: (1) the classic OA three-temperature stimulus train ('OA'); (2) a three-temperature stimulus train as control for the OA ('OAcon'); (3) a constant temperature stimulus ('constant'); (4) the classic parallel CPM ('CPM'); and (5) a combination of OA and CPM ('OA + CPM'). We found that in males, the pain reduction during the OA + CPM condition was greater than during the OA (P = 0.003) and CPM (P = 0.07) conditions. Furthermore, a correlation was found between OA and CPM (r = 0.62, P = 0.01) at the time of maximum OA effect. The additive effect found suggests that the two paradigms represent at least partially different aspects of EA. The moderate association between the CPM and OA magnitudes indicates, on the other hand, some commonality of their underlying mechanisms.

  7. Neural mechanisms mediating the effects of expectation in visceral placebo analgesia: an fMRI study in healthy placebo responders and nonresponders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Kotsis, Vassilios; Benson, Sven; Rosenberger, Christina; Reidick, Daniel; Schedlowski, Manfred; Bingel, Ulrike; Theysohn, Nina; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R

    2012-02-01

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging study analysed the behavioural and neural responses during expectation-mediated placebo analgesia in a rectal pain model in healthy subjects. In N=36 healthy subjects, the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response during cued anticipation and painful rectal stimulation was measured. Using a within-subject design, placebo analgesia was induced by changing expectations regarding the probability of receiving an analgesic drug to 0%, 50%, and 100%. Placebo responders were identified by median split based on pain reduction (0% to 100% conditions), and changes in neural activation correlating with pain reduction in the 0% and 100% conditions were assessed in a regions-of-interest analysis. Expectation of pain relief resulted in overall reductions in pain and urge to defecate, and this response was significantly more pronounced in responders. Within responders, pain reduction correlated with reduced activation of dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices, somatosensory cortex, and thalamus during cued anticipation (paired t tests on the contrast 0%>100%); during painful stimulation, pain reduction correlated with reduced activation of the thalamus. Compared with nonresponders, responders demonstrated greater placebo-induced decreases in activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during anticipation and in somatosensory cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus during pain. In conclusion, the expectation of pain relief can substantially change perceived painfulness of visceral stimuli, which is associated with activity changes in the thalamus, prefrontal, and somatosensory cortices. Placebo analgesia constitutes a paradigm to elucidate psychological components of the pain response relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of chronic abdominal pain.

  8. Morphine- and buprenorphine-induced analgesia and antihyperalgesia in a human inflammatory pain model: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, five-arm crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravn P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pernille Ravn,1 Erik L Secher,2 Ulrik Skram,3 Trine Therkildsen,1 Lona L Christrup,1 Mads U Werner41Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Juliane Marie Center, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospitals, 3Department of Intensive Care, Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospitals, 4Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Neuroscience Center, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospitals, Copenhagen, DenmarkPurpose: Opioid therapy is associated with the development of tolerance and paradoxically increased sensitivity to pain. It has been suggested that buprenorphine is associated with a higher antihyperalgesia/analgesia ratio than µ-opioid receptor agonists. The primary outcome of this study was therefore to investigate relative differences in antihyperalgesia and analgesia effects between morphine and buprenorphine in an inflammatory pain model in volunteers. The secondary outcome was to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity and opioid-induced effects on analgesia, antihyperalgesia, and descending pain modulation.Subjects and methods: Twenty-eight healthy subjects were included. The study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, five-arm crossover study with a multimodal (electrical, mechanical, and thermal stimuli testing technique. After baseline assessments, intravenous infusions of morphine (10/20 mg, buprenorphine (0.3/0.6 mg, or placebo (normal saline were administered over a 210-minute period, during which a cold pressor test, heat injury (47°C, 7 minutes, 12.5 cm2, and the first postburn assessment were done. After completion of the drug infusions, two additional postburn assessments were done. The subjects were monitored during each 8-hour session by an anesthesiologist.Results: For nearly all tested variables, significant dose-dependent analgesic effects were demonstrated. The median antihyperalgesia/analgesia ratio (secondary hyperalgesia

  9. Analgesia Is Enhanced by Providing Information regarding Good Outcomes Associated with an Odor: Placebo Effects in Aromatherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Masaoka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available No previous report has described whether information regarding an odor used in aromatherapy has placebo effects. We investigated whether placebo analgesia was engendered by verbal information regarding the analgesic effects of an odor. Twelve of 24 subjects were provided with the information that a lavender odor would reduce pain (informed, whereas the other 12 subjects were not (not-informed. Concurrent with respiration recording, the subjects were administered a lavender-odor or no-odor treatment during application of painful stimulation to the forefinger. The subjects reported their experience of pain and its unpleasantness on a visual analogue scale after the painful stimulation. The lavender-odor treatment significantly alleviated pain and unpleasantness compared with the no-odor treatment in the informed (P<0.01 and not-informed groups (P<0.05. The no-odor treatment in the informed group significantly alleviated pain and unpleasantness compared with both the no-odor and lavender-odor treatments in the not-informed group (P<0.05. Rapid and shallow breathing induced by the painful stimulation became slow and deep during the lavender-odor and no-odor treatments in both groups. Information regarding a lavender odor, the lavender odor itself, and slower breathing contributed to reduced perceptions of pain and unpleasantness during painful stimulation, suggesting that placebo effects significantly contribute to analgesia in aromatherapy.

  10. Low-dose ketamine infusion for labor analgesia: A double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Joel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most primary and secondary level hospitals in developing countries provide inadequate labor analgesia due to various medical, technical and economic reasons. This clinical trial was an effort to study the efficacy, safety and feasibility of intravenous (IV ketamine to provide labor analgesia. Materials and Methods: A total of 70 parturients were consented and randomly assigned to receive either IV ketamine or 0.9% saline. A loading dose of ketamine (0.2 mg/kg was followed-by an infusion (0.2 mg/kg/h until the delivery of the neonate. Similar volume of saline was infused in the placebo-group. Intramuscular meperidine was the rescue analgesic in both groups. The pain score, hemodynamic parameters of mother and fetus and the anticipated side-effects of ketamine were observed for. The newborn was assessed by the Neonatologist. Results: The pain score showed a decreasing trend in the ketamine group and after the 1 st h more than 60% of women in the ketamine group had pain relief, which was statistically significant. There was no significant clinical change in the maternal hemodynamics and fetal heart rate. However, 17 (48.5% of them had transient light headedness in the ketamine group. All the neonates were breast fed and the umbilical cord blood pH was between 7.1 and 7.2. The overall satisfaction was significantly high in the intervention group (P = 0.028. Conclusion: A low-dose ketamine infusion (loading dose of 0.2 mg/kg delivered over 30 min, followed-by an infusion at 0.2 mg/kg/h could provide acceptable analgesia during labor and delivery.

  11. Buprenorphine for postoperative analgesia: Axillary brachial plexus block versus intramuscular administration in a placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Peripheral administration of opioids has been suggested for prolongation of regional analgesia. This prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study was undertaken to compare the effect of regional (axillary brachial plexus block [ABPB] versus intramuscular (IM buprenorphine (2 μg/kg in adults. Material and Methods: Seventy-five adults undergoing upper limb surgery received ABPB with local anaesthetic (15 ml 0.5% bupivacaine, 15 ml 2% lignocaine with adrenaline 1:200,000, 9 ml normal saline [NS]. In addition, regional group RB (n = 25 received buprenorphine 2 μg/kg in ABPB and 1 ml NS IM. Systemic Group SB (n = 25 received 1 ml NS in ABPB and buprenorphine 2 μg/kg IM. Group C (n = 25 received 1 ml NS in ABPB and IM. Onset, duration of sensory and motor block, hemodynamic parameters, sedation score, pain scores using visual analog scale, duration of postoperative analgesia, rescue analgesic (RA requirement, adverse events, and patient satisfaction were noted. Results: Demographics, onset and duration of sensory, motor block were similar. RB group had longest duration of analgesia (20.61 ± 1.33 h compared to SB (10.91 ± 0.90 h and control group (5.86 ± 0.57 h (P < 0.05 RB vs. SB/C and SB vs. C. RA requirement was highest in the control group and least in RB group (P = 0.000 RB vs. SB/C and SB vs. C. SB group had a maximum number of side effects (P = 0.041, SB vs. RB/C. Patient satisfaction was highest with group RB (P < 0.05 RB vs. SB/C, and P = 0.06 SB vs. C. Conclusion: Buprenorphine 2 μg/kg in axillary plexus block provides significantly prolonged analgesia with less RA requirement and greater patient satisfaction compared to IM administration. This is highly suggestive of action on peripheral opioid receptors.

  12. Intraperitoneal Instillation of Lidocaine Improves Postoperative Analgesia at Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ruchira; Carvalho, Jose C A; Downey, Kristi; Kanczuk, Marcelo; Bernstein, Paul; Siddiqui, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    Cesarean delivery is a commonly performed procedure worldwide. Despite improvements in balanced multimodal analgesia, there remains a proportion of women for whom postoperative pain relief and patient satisfaction are still inadequate. Intraperitoneal instillation of local anesthetic has been shown to be effective in reducing postoperative pain after abdominal surgery. We sought to investigate the effect of intraperitoneal instillation of lidocaine on postcesarean delivery pain as part of a multimodal analgesia regimen. We studied women scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia was performed with 0.75% hyperbaric bupivacaine, fentanyl, and morphine. At the end of the cesarean delivery, immediately before parietal peritoneum or fascia closure, patients were randomized to receive either lidocaine (20 mL 2% lidocaine with epinephrine) or placebo (20 mL normal saline) instilled into the peritoneal cavity. The primary outcome was pain score on movement at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes were pain score at rest and on movement at 2, 24, and 48 hours; maternal satisfaction score; analgesic consumption; incidence of nausea, vomiting, and itching; and return of bowel function. Two hundred four women were recruited. Baseline characteristics were similar between the lidocaine and placebo groups. Pain scores at 24 hours postcesarean delivery on movement (parameter estimate 0.02 [95% confidence interval {CI} -0.14 to 0.18]; P = .823) and at rest (parameter estimate 0.00 [95% CI -0.32 to 0.33]; P = .986) were similar in both groups. Pain scores at 2 hours postcesarean delivery on movement (parameter estimate -0.58 [95% CI -0.90 to -0.26]; P = .001) and at rest (parameter estimate -1.00 [95% CI -1.57 to -0.43]; P = .001) were lower in the lidocaine group. Subgroup analysis of patients with peritoneum closure revealed significantly lower pain scores at 24 hours on movement (parameter estimate -0.33 [95% CI -0.64 to -0.03]; P = .032) in the

  13. Migraine treatment and placebo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciali, José G; Peres, Mário; Bigal, Marcelo E

    2010-03-01

    Placebos are typically defined as physiologically inactive substances that elicit a therapeutic response. The antipode of the placebo effect is the nocebo effect, or the negative effects of placebo, where unpleasant symptoms (e.g., adverse events) emerge after the administration of placebo. Placebo analgesia is one of the most striking examples of the cognitive modulation of pain perception. Herein we focus on the importance of placebo in headache research. We first review the mechanisms of the placebo effect. We then focus on the importance of placebo in the acute treatment of migraine. We follow by discussing the importance of placebo on the preventive treatment of migraine and our perspectives for the 5 years to come regarding the study of the placebos.

  14. Local infiltration analgesia in urogenital prolapse surgery: a prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Billy B; Rasmussen, Yvonne H; Agerlin, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the analgesic effect of high-volume infiltration analgesia in urogenital prolapse surgery and provide a detailed description of the infiltration technique.......To evaluate the analgesic effect of high-volume infiltration analgesia in urogenital prolapse surgery and provide a detailed description of the infiltration technique....

  15. Polypeptide Modulators of TRPV1 Produce Analgesia without Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslav A. Andreev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors (TRPV1 play a significant physiological role. The study of novel TRPV1 agonists and antagonists is essential. Here, we report on the characterization of polypeptide antagonists of TRPV1 based on in vitro and in vivo experiments. We evaluated the ability of APHC1 and APHC3 to inhibit TRPV1 using the whole-cell patch clamp approach and single cell Ca2+ imaging. In vivo tests were performed to assess the biological effects of APHC1 and APHC3 on temperature sensation, inflammation and core body temperature. In the electrophysiological study, both polypeptides partially blocked the capsaicin-induced response of TRPV1, but only APHC3 inhibited acid-induced (pH 5.5 activation of the receptor. APHC1 and APHC3 showed significant antinociceptive and analgesic activity in vivo at reasonable doses (0.01–0.1 mg/kg and did not cause hyperthermia. Intravenous administration of these polypeptides prolonged hot-plate latency, blocked capsaicin- and formalin-induced behavior, reversed CFA-induced hyperalgesia and produced hypothermia. Notably, APHC3’s ability to inhibit the low pH-induced activation of TRPV1 resulted in a reduced behavioural response in the acetic acid-induced writhing test, whereas APHC1 was much less effective. The polypeptides APHC1 and APHC3 could be referred to as a new class of TRPV1 modulators that produce a significant analgesic effect without hyperthermia.

  16. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial on the role of preemptive analgesia with acetaminophen [paracetamol] in reducing headache following electroconvulsive therapy [ECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isuru, Amila; Rodrigo, Asiri; Wijesinghe, Chamara; Ediriweera, Dileepa; Premadasa, Shan; Wijesekara, Carmel; Kuruppuarachchi, Lalith

    2017-07-28

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a safe and efficient treatment for several severe psychiatric disorders, but its use is limited by side effects. Post-ECT headache is one of the commonest side effects. Preemptive analgesia is effective in post-surgical pain management. The most commonly used analgesic is acetaminophen (paracetamol). However, acetaminophen as a preemptive analgesic for post-ECT headache has not been studied adequately. This study was conducted to compare the incidence and severity of post-ECT headache in patients who were administered acetaminophen pre-ECT with a placebo group. This study was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Sixty-three patients received 1 g acetaminophen and 63 patients received a placebo identical to acetaminophen. The incidence and severity of headache 2 h before and after ECT were compared between placebo and acetaminophen groups. The severity was measured using a visual analog scale. Generalised linear models were used to evaluate variables associated with post ECT headache. Demographic and clinical variables of placebo and acetaminophen groups were comparable except for the energy level used to induce a seizure. Higher proportion of the placebo group (71.4%) experienced post-ECT headache when compared to the acetaminophen group (p acetaminophen group whereas the score was 2 (IQR: 0-4) in placebo group (P acetaminophen is associated with less post-ECT headache (odds ratio = 0.23, 95% CI: 0.11-0.48, P acetaminophen. Ethical approval was granted by an Ethic review committee, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka (P/166/10/2015) and the trial was registered in the Sri Lanka Clinical Trials Registry ( SLCTR/2015/27 ).

  17. Mindfulness Meditation-Based Pain Relief Employs Different Neural Mechanisms Than Placebo and Sham Mindfulness Meditation-Induced Analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidan, Fadel; Emerson, Nichole M.; Farris, Suzan R.; Ray, Jenna N.; Jung, Youngkyoo; McHaffie, John G.; Coghill, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation reduces pain in experimental and clinical settings. However, it remains unknown whether mindfulness meditation engages pain-relieving mechanisms other than those associated with the placebo effect (e.g., conditioning, psychosocial context, beliefs). To determine whether the analgesic mechanisms of mindfulness meditation are different from placebo, we randomly assigned 75 healthy, human volunteers to 4 d of the following: (1) mindfulness meditation, (2) placebo condition...

  18. Clinical evaluation of XaraColl®, a bupivacaine-collagen implant, for postoperative analgesia in two multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cusack SL

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan L Cusack,1 Mark Jaros,2 Michael Kuss,3 Harold S Minkowitz,4 Peter Winkle,5 Lisa Hemsen61Cusack Pharmaceutical Consulting, Burlington, NJ, 2Summit Analytical, Denver, CO, USA; 3Premier Research Group, Austin, TX, USA; 4Memorial Hermann Memorial City Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA; 5Advanced Clinical Research Institute, Anaheim, CA, USA; 6Innocoll Technologies, Athlone, IrelandBackground: XaraColl®, a collagen-based implant that delivers bupivacaine to the site of surgical trauma, is under development for postoperative analgesia. Because of differing patient attitudes to postoperative pain control and the inability to assess baseline pain, standard clinical methods for evaluating analgesic efficacy are compromised and justify application of novel integrated approaches.Methods: We conducted two independent, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in men undergoing unilateral inguinal hernioplasty by open laparotomy to evaluate the safety and efficacy of XaraColl at different doses (100 mg and 200 mg of bupivacaine hydrochloride; study 1 and 2, respectively. Enrolled patients (50 in study 1 and 53 in study 2 were randomized to receive active or placebo implants in a 1:1 ratio. Postoperative pain intensity and use of supplementary opioid medication were recorded through 72 hours. Safety was assessed through 30 days. The principal efficacy variables were the summed pain intensity (SPI, total use of opioid analgesia (TOpA, and an integrated endpoint (I-SPI-TOpA. Each variable was analyzed at 24, 48, and 72 hours after implantation. A pooled analysis of both studies was also performed retrospectively.Results: Through 24 and 48 hours, XaraColl-treated patients experienced significantly less pain in study 1 (P < 0.001 and P = 0.012, respectively whereas they took significantly less opioid analgesia in study 2 (P = 0.004 and P = 0.042, respectively. Over the same time intervals in the pooled analysis, treated patients experienced

  19. A blinded randomised placebo-controlled trial investigating the efficacy of morphine analgesia for procedural pain in infants: Trial protocol [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeccah Slater

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infant pain has both immediate and long-term negative consequences, yet in clinical practice it is often undertreated. To date, few pain-relieving drugs have been tested in infants. Morphine is a potent analgesic that provides effective pain relief in adults, but there is inconclusive evidence for its effectiveness in infants. The purpose of this study is to establish whether oral morphine provides effective analgesia for procedural pain in infants.   A blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group randomized, phase II, clinical trial will be undertaken to determine whether morphine sulphate administered orally prior to clinically-required retinopathy of prematurity (ROP screening and heel lancing provides effective analgesia. 
156 infants between 34 and 42 weeks’ gestational age who require a clinical heel lance and ROP screening on the same test occasion will be included in the trial. Infants will be randomised to receive either a single dose of morphine sulphate (100 μg/kg or placebo. Each infant will be monitored for 48 hours and safety data will be collected during the 24 hours following drug administration.   The primary outcome will be the Premature Infant Pain Profile–revised (PIPP-R score 30 seconds after ROP screening. The co-primary outcome will be the magnitude of nociceptive-specific brain activity evoked by a clinically-required heel lance. Infant clinical stability will be assessed by comparing the number of episodes of bradycardia, tachycardia, desaturation and apnoea, and changes in respiratory support requirements in the 24-hour periods before and after the clinical intervention. In addition, drug safety will be assessed by considering the occurrence of apnoeic and hypotensive episodes requiring intervention in the 24-hour period following drug administration. This study has been published as an Accepted Protocol Summary by The Lancet.

  20. Time to onset of analgesia and analgesic efficacy of effervescent acetaminophen 1000 mg compared to tablet acetaminophen 1000 mg in postoperative dental pain: a single-dose, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, P L; Nørholt, S E; Ganry, H E; Insuasty, J H; Vincent, F G; Skoglund, L A; Sindet-Pedersen, S

    2000-04-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the time to onset of analgesia and the analgesic efficacy of two formulations of acetaminophen 1000 mg--an effervescent solution and tablet--in 242 patients with moderate or severe pain following dental surgery. Onset of analgesia was determined using a two-stopwatch procedure. Analgesia was assessed over a 4-hour period. Treatments were compared using standard indexes of pain intensity and pain relief and summary measures. Both acetaminophen formulations were significantly more effective than their corresponding placebo for all efficacy assessments. The median time to onset of analgesia was significantly shorter with effervescent acetaminophen (20 minutes) compared to tablet acetaminophen (45 minutes). During the first 45 minutes after administration, effervescent acetaminophen was significantly more effective at each scheduled assessment time than tablet acetaminophen. The median time to meaningful pain relief was significantly shorter with effervescent acetaminophen (45 minutes) compared to tablet acetaminophen (60 minutes). At 4 hours after administration, the pain relief was significantly better with tablet acetaminophen than with effervescent acetaminophen. No other significant differences were observed between the active treatments. In conclusion, effervescent acetaminophen produces a significantly faster onset of analgesia than tablet acetaminophen.

  1. The Effect of EMLA Cream on Patient-Controlled Analgesia with Remifentanil in ESWL Procedure: A Placebo-Controlled Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Arzu; Erhan, Elvan; Nuri Deniz, M; Ugur, Gulden

    2013-01-01

    To alleviate stinging pain in the skin entry area and visceral discomfort in patients who are undergoing ESWL. This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of the EMLA cream in combination with remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in patients undergoing ESWL treatment. Sixty patients were divided into two double-blind randomized groups. Those in the first group were administered 3-5mm of EMLA 5% cream on a marked area; the second group received, as a placebo, a cream with no analgesic effect in the same amount. All patients were administered a remifentanil bolus with a PCA device. Arterial blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate were recorded throughout the procedure; postoperative side effects, agitation, and respiratory depression were measured after. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores were taken preoperatively, perioperatively, directly postoperatively, and 60 minutes subsequent to finishing the procedure. There were no statistically significant differences in the frequency of PCA demands and delivered boluses or among perioperative VAS. No significant side effects were noted. Patient satisfaction was recorded high in both groups. EMLA cream offered no advantage over the placebo cream in patients undergoing ESWL with remifentanil PCA.

  2. Paracetamol e dipirona por via endovenosa aplicados à analgesia pós-operatória de pacientes pediátricos submetidos à amigdelectomia em hospital-dia: um estudo prospectivo, randomizado, duplo-cego, placebo controlado Intravenous paracetamol and dipyrone for postoperative analgesia after day-case tonsillectomy in children: a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysu Inan Kocum

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available O manejo da dor pós-amigdelectomia pode ser feito com uma série de medicamentos. OBJETIVO: O presente estudo duplo-cego placebo controlado pretendeu avaliar a eficácia de paracetamol e dipirona administrados por via endovenosa na analgesia de pacientes pediátricos pós-amigdelectomia. MÉTODO: Cento e vinte crianças com idades entre três e seis anos submetidas à amigdelectomia com ou sem adenoidectomia e/ou entubação foram randomizadas para receber infusões de paracetamol (15 mg/kg, dipirona (15 mg/kg ou placebo (0,9% NaCl durante a cirurgia. As avaliações foram executadas com 0,25, 0,50, 1, 2, 4, 6h de pós-operatório. Petidina 0,25 mg/kg foi utilizada como analgésico de resgate. Dose acumulada de petidina foi o desfecho primário. Medições de intensidade da dor, alívio da dor, nível de sedação, náusea e vômitos, hemorragia no pós-operatório e outros efeitos adversos foram anotados. RESULTADOS: Nenhuma diferença significativa foi encontrada na dose acumulada de petidina entre os grupos paracetamol e dipirona. A dose acumulada de petidina foi significativamente menor nos grupos paracetamol e dipirona em comparação ao grupo placebo. Nenhuma diferença significativa foi observada entre os escores de dor no pós-operatório dos grupos durante o estudo. CONCLUSÃO: Paracetamol endovenoso tem eficácia analgésica semelhante à da dipirona endovenosa; ambos ajudam a reduzir a necessidade de opioides na analgesia pós-operatória de pacientes pediátricos submetidos à amigdelectomia em hospital-dia.Tonsillectomy is associated with severe postoperative pain for which, several drugs are employed for management. OBJECTIVE: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous paracetamol and dipyrone when used for post-tonsillectomy analgesia in children. METHOD: 120 children aged 3-6 yr, undergoing tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy and/or ventilation tube insertion were

  3. COMPARATIVE STUDY TO EVALUATE THE EFFICACY OF ETORICOXIB VS PLACEBO AS PREEMPTIVE ANALGESIA FOR ACUTE POSTOPERATIVE PAIN RELIEF IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowbhagya Lakshmi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Etoricoxib, a selective Cox-2 inhibitor has been found to be effective as preemptive analgesia for acute postoperative pain. This study evaluates the effect of preoperative use of oral etoricoxib on postoperative pain relief and sleep in patients undergoing lumbar laminectomies. MATERIALS & METHODS: In this prospective, randomized controlled study, fifty patients (ASA I & II aged between 20-50yrs scheduled to undergo lumbar laminectomies were given either etoricoxib 120mg (Group E or placebo (Group P orally one hour before surgery. Visual analog score (VAS was assessed at 0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours at rest and on movement. Sleep overnight, total fentanyl consumption, incidence of nausea and vomiting, intra-operative blood loss and patient satisfaction were noted. RESULTS: In our study we found that there was reduction in VAS at rest and on movement in the etoricoxib group when compared with the control group at all intervals till 24 hours postoperatively. Total fentanyl consumption was higher in control group in postoperative period. CONCLUSION: Single preoperative oral dose (120mg of etoricoxib given one hour before surgery, has significantly reduced the postoperative pain at rest and on movement and improved sleep in patients undergoing lumbar laminectomies without any side effects and with good patient’s satisfaction

  4. Pain and placebo in pediatrics: A comprehensive review of laboratory and clinical findings

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Kanesha; Ortiz, Robin; Kossowsky, Joe; Krummenacher, Peter; Grillon, Christian; Pine, Daniel; Colloca, Luana

    2014-01-01

    Pain modulation by placebo mechanisms is one of the most robust and best-studied phenomena, yet almost all research investigating the mechanisms and implications of the placebo analgesia are based on adult research. After highlighting crucial aspects that need to be considered in studying pain modulation in children, this comprehensive review examines studies related to pain modulation with an emphasis on factors such as age, neural development and pain measures. Psychological mechanisms unde...

  5. Individual Differences in Placebo Analgesia: Contributions of Psychological and Neurobiological Factors%安慰剂镇痛效应的个体差异及其影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾丽佳; 郭建友

    2014-01-01

    Placebos are traditionally used as controls in clinical trials to measure the specific effect of certain therapeutic treatment.More recently,placebo analgesia has attacted more attention as a research paradigm for mind-body interaction.Previous studies have demonstrated placebo effects depend on conscious expectancy or learning mechanisms such as conditioning.However,individual response to placebo analgesic effect ranges from no effect(non-responders) to complete pain relief(responders).The mechanisms underlying this inter-individual differences of placebo responses are poorly understood.Convincing evidence support that efficiency of endogenous receptors,brain activity,and genetic factors may contribute to the individual differences of placebo responses.%安慰剂在随机临床试验中有着悠久而重要的作用,主要用于控制考察药物的真实疗效.而近几十年来,安慰剂本身作为一种典型的“身心交互”模型,得到了更多的关注.对安慰剂作用机制的研究也有助于揭示心理因素影响临床结果的本质.然而安慰剂效应在不同的个体中有较大的差异.本文试综述在疼痛领域与安慰剂个体差异相关的文献,并总结影响该差异的各种因素.同时提出目前研究中存在的问题及今后的研究方向.

  6. Pain modulation as a function of hypnotizability: Diffuse noxious inhibitory control induced by cold pressor test vs explicit suggestions of analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidanza, Fabrizia; Varanini, Maurizio; Ciaramella, Antonella; Carli, Giancarlo; Santarcangelo, Enrica L

    2017-03-15

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of explicit suggestions of analgesia and of the activation of the Diffuse Noxious Inhibitory Control (DNIC) by cold pressor test on pain perception and heart rate in healthy participants with high (highs, N=18), low (lows, N=18) and intermediate scores of hypnotizability (mediums, N=15) out of hypnosis. Pain reports and the stimulus-locked heart rate changes induced by electrical nociceptive stimulation of the left hand were studied in the absence of concomitant stimuli (Control), during suggestions of analgesia (SUGG, glove analgesia) and during cold pressor test used as a conditioning stimulus to the right hand (DNIC, water temperature=10-12°C) in the REAL session. Participants were submitted also to a SHAM session in which the DNIC water temperature was 30°C and the suggestions for analgesia were substituted with weather forecast information. Both suggestions and DNIC reduced pain significantly in all subjects; however, the percentage of reduction was significantly larger in highs (pain intensity=55% of the control condition) than in mediums (70%) and lows (80%) independently of the REAL/SHAM session and of the specific pain manipulation. Heart rate was not modulated consistently with pain experience. Findings indicate that both suggestions and DNIC influence pain experience as a function of hypnotizability and suggest that both sensory and cognitive mechanisms co-operate in DNIC induced analgesia.

  7. [Analgesic placebo effect: contribution of the neurosciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berna, C; Cojan, Y; Vuilleumier, P; Desmeules, J

    2011-06-29

    Over the past twenty years, neuroscience has changed our understanding of placebo analgesia. Often perceived by researchers as a response bias adding noise to the assessment of efficacy, in the patients' view, it is associated with charlatanism. The origin of the word, qualifying a patient's response to "please" the doctor, did not help its rightful appreciation. However, today the placebo analgesia is considered as a psychobiological phenomenon. Thanks to pharmacological manipulations and the development of functional brain imaging, the neural circuitry involved in this effect as well as the role of endorphins and dopamine have been identified. This article describes our current knowledge about this fascinating phenomenon: a psychological modulation can lead to a biological effect.

  8. Modulation of peripheral μ-opioid analgesia by σ1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fernández, Cristina; Montilla-García, Ángeles; González-Cano, Rafael; Nieto, Francisco Rafael; Romero, Lucía; Artacho-Cordón, Antonia; Montes, Rosa; Fernández-Pastor, Begoña; Merlos, Manuel; Baeyens, José Manuel; Entrena, José Manuel; Cobos, Enrique José

    2014-01-01

    , σ1-receptor inhibition may be used as a systemic or local adjuvant to enhance peripheral μ-opioid analgesia without affecting opioid-induced constipation.

  9. Sucrose-induced analgesia during early life modulates adulthood learning and memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuseir, Khawla Q; Alzoubi, Karem H; Alabwaini, Jehad; Khabour, Omar F; Kassab, Manal I

    2015-06-01

    This study is aimed at examining the long-term effects of chronic pain during early life (postnatal day 0 to 8weeks), and intervention using sucrose, on cognitive functions during adulthood in rats. Pain was induced in rat pups via needle pricks of the paws. Sucrose solution or paracetamol was administered for analgesia before the paw prick. Control groups include tactile stimulation to account for handling and touching the paws, and sucrose alone was used. All treatments were started on day one of birth and continued for 8weeks. At the end of the treatments, behavioral studies were conducted to test the spatial learning and memory using radial arm water maze (RAWM), as well as pain threshold via foot-withdrawal response to a hot plate apparatus. Additionally, the hippocampus was dissected, and blood was collected. Levels of neurotrophins (BDNF, IGF-1 and NT-3) and endorphins were assessed using ELISA. The results show that chronic noxious stimulation resulted in comparable foot-withdrawal latency between noxious and tactile groups. On the other hand, pretreatment with sucrose or paracetamol increased pain threshold significantly both in naive rats and noxiously stimulated rats (Psucrose treatment prevented such impairment (PSucrose significantly increased serum levels of endorphin and enkephalin. Chronic pain decreased levels of BDNF in the hippocampus and this decrease was prevented by sucrose and paracetamol treatments. Hippocampal levels of NT-3 and IGF-1 were not affected by any treatment. In conclusion, chronic pain induction during early life induced short memory impairment, and pretreatment with sucrose prevented this impairment via mechanisms that seem to involve BDNF. As evident in the results, sucrose, whether alone or in the presence of pre-noxious stimulation, increases pain threshold in such circumstances; most likely via a mechanism that involves an increase in endogenous opioids.

  10. A blinded randomised placebo-controlled trial investigating the efficacy of morphine analgesia for procedural pain in infants: Trial protocol [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeccah Slater

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infant pain has both immediate and long-term negative consequences, yet in clinical practice it is often undertreated. To date, few pain-relieving drugs have been tested in infants. Morphine is a potent analgesic that provides effective pain relief in adults, but there is inconclusive evidence for its effectiveness in infants. The purpose of this study is to establish whether oral morphine provides effective analgesia for procedural pain in infants.   A blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group randomized, phase II, clinical trial will be undertaken to determine whether morphine sulphate administered orally prior to clinically-required retinopathy of prematurity (ROP screening and heel lancing provides effective analgesia. 
156 infants between 34 and 42 weeks’ gestational age who require a clinical heel lance and ROP screening on the same test occasion will be included in the trial. Infants will be randomised to receive either a single dose of morphine sulphate (100 μg/kg or placebo. Each infant will be monitored for 48 hours and safety data will be collected during the 24 hours following drug administration.   The primary outcome will be the Premature Infant Pain Profile–revised (PIPP-R score during the 30 second periods after ROP screening. The co-primary outcome will be the magnitude of nociceptive-specific brain activity evoked by a clinically-required heel lance. Infant clinical stability will be assessed by comparing the number of episodes of bradycardia, tachycardia, desaturation and apnoea, and changes in respiratory support requirements in the 24-hour periods before and after the clinical intervention. In addition, drug safety will be assessed by considering the occurrence of apnoeic and hypotensive episodes requiring intervention in the 24-hour period following drug administration. This study has been published as an Accepted Protocol Summary by The Lancet.

  11. Patient-controlled analgesia: therapeutic interventions using transdermal electro-activated and electro-modulated drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermun, Sunaina; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; Luttge, Regina; Pillay, Viness

    2014-02-01

    Chronic pain poses a major concern to modern medicine and is frequently undertreated, causing suffering and disability. Patient-controlled analgesia, although successful, does have limitations. Transdermal delivery is the pivot to which analgesic research in drug delivery has centralized, especially with the confines of needle phobias and associated pain related to traditional injections, and the existing limitations associated with oral drug delivery. Highlighted within is the possibility of further developing transdermal drug delivery for chronic pain treatment using iontophoresis-based microneedle array patches. A concerted effort was made to review critically all available therapies designed for the treatment of chronic pain. The drug delivery systems developed for this purpose and nondrug routes are elaborated on, in a systematic manner. Recent developments and future goals in transdermal delivery as a means to overcome the individual limitations of the aforementioned delivery routes are represented as well. The approval of patch-like devices that contain both the microelectronic-processing mechanism and the active medicament in a small portable device is still awaited by the pharmaceutical industry. This anticipated platform may provide transdermal electro-activated and electro-modulated drug delivery systems a feasible attempt in chronic pain treatment. Iontophoresis has been proven an effective mode used to administer ionized drugs in physiotherapeutic, diagnostic, and dermatological applications and may be an encouraging probability for the development of devices and aids in the treatment of chronic pain.

  12. Pain and placebo in pediatrics: a comprehensive review of laboratory and clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Kanesha; Ortiz, Robin; Kossowsky, Joe; Krummenacher, Peter; Grillon, Christian; Pine, Daniel; Colloca, Luana

    2014-11-01

    Pain modulation by placebo mechanisms is one of the most robust and best-studied phenomena, yet almost all research investigating the mechanisms and implications of the placebo analgesia are based on adult research. After highlighting crucial aspects that need to be considered in studying pain modulation in children, this comprehensive review examines studies related to pain modulation with an emphasis on factors such as age, neural development and pain measures. We critically discuss psychological mechanisms underlying placebo effects, including (1) verbally induced expectations, (2) conditioning and learning mechanisms, and (3) child-parent-physician interactions. Taken together, research suggests that placebo mechanisms can affect therapeutic outcomes and potentially be exploited clinically to improve clinical outcomes in pediatric population. Recommendations for further investigating the mechanistic bases and harnessing placebo effects for supportive therapeutic applications are given.

  13. Multi-regional local anesthetic infiltration during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients receiving prophylactic multi-modal analgesia: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, T; Klarskov, B; Kristiansen, V B

    1999-01-01

    undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In addition, all patients received multi-modal prophylactic analgesic treatment. Fifty-eight patients were randomized to receive a total of 286 mg (66 mL) ropivacaine or 66 mL saline via periportal and intraperitoneal infiltration. During the first 3...... receiving prophylactic multi-modal analgesic treatment. IMPLICATIONS: A combination of incisional and intraabdominal local anesthetic treatment reduced incisional pain but had no effect on deep intraabdominal pain or shoulder pain in patients receiving multimodal prophylactic analgesia after laparoscopic...

  14. Preventive analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jørgen B; Kehlet, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    findings: The nature of central sensitization during acute and chronic postsurgical pain share common features, and there may be interactions between acute and persistent postoperative pain. The term ‘pre-emptive analgesia’ should be abandoned and replaced by the term ‘preventive analgesia’. Recent studies......This paper will discuss the concepts of pre-emptive and preventive analgesia in acute and persistent postsurgical pain, based on the most recent experimental and clinical literature, with a special focus on injury-induced central sensitization and the development from acute to chronic pain. Recent...... of preventive analgesia for persistent postoperative pain are promising. However, clinicians must be aware of the demands for improved design of their clinical studies in order to get more conclusive answers regarding the different avenues for intervention. Summary: The concept of preventive analgesia is still...

  15. Involvement of protein kinase C in the modulation of morphine-induced analgesia and the inhibitory effects of exposure to 60-hz magnetic fields in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavaliers, M.; Ossenkopp, K.P. (Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1990-02-26

    One of the more consistent and dramatic effects of exposure to magnetic fields is the attenuation of morphine-induced analgesia. Results of previous studies have implicated alterations in calcium channel functioning and Ca{sup ++} flux in the mediation of these effects. It is generally accepted that Ca{sup ++}-activated-phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (Protein kinase C; PKC) plays an important role in relaying trans-membrane signaling in diverse Ca{sup ++} dependent cellular processes. In experiment 1 we observed that morphine-induced analgesia in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, as measured by the latency of an avoidance behavior to a warmed surface, was reduced by the PKC activator, SC-9, and was enhanced by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 and H-9. In contrast, HA-10004, a potent inhibitor of other protein kinases, but only a very weak inhibitor of PKC, had no effect on morphine-induced analgesia. In experiment 2 exposure of snails for 30 minutes to a 1.0 gauss (rms) 60-Hz magnetic field reduced morphine-induced analgesia. This inhibitory effect of the magnetic field was reduced by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 and H-9, and was augmented by the PKC activator SC-9. These results suggest that: (i) PKC is involved in the modulation of morphine-induced analgesia and, (ii) the inhibitory effects of magnetic fields involve PKC.

  16. [Placebo and placebo effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulas, J-J

    2005-11-01

    The word placebo appeared for the first time in an English medical dictionary in 1785. In French, it appeared much latter in 1958. This word defines an experimental tool used for rigourous evaluation of a specific effect of pharmacological treatment and the non specific effect of any therapy. The placebo effect is the strictly psychological or psychophysiological effect of a placebo. The two principal components of placebo effect as a pain killer, which has been extensively studied in this field, are positive expectancies of both the patient and the physician. Although the mechanisms of action of placebo effect are not well understood, results of several recent works are particularly interesting.

  17. Placebo response: relevance to the rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, Antonella; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Recent interest in the neurobiology of the placebo effect has brought about a new awareness of its potential exploitation for patient benefit, framing it as a positive context effect with the power to influence therapy outcome. Among the different placebo effects described in clinical conditions and experimental settings, placebo analgesia is of particular relevance to the rheumatologist. Placebo analgesia is the field that has most contributed to our understanding of the multiple mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. The possible clinical applications of placebo studies range from the design of clinical trials incorporating specific recommendations and minimizing the use of placebo arms to the optimization of the context surrounding the patient so that the placebo component in any treatment is maximized.

  18. Placebo, nocebo, and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vase, Lene; Skyt, Ina; Hall, Kathryn T

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, the apparent increase in placebo responses in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropathic pain have complicated and potentially limited development and availability of new effective pain medication. Placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia effects are well described in nociceptive and idiopathic pain conditions, but less is known about the magnitude and mechanisms of placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, placebo treatments have primarily been used as control conditions for active agents under investigation in RCTs and these placebo responses are typically not controlled for the natural history of pain and other confounding factors. Recently, mechanistic studies that control for the natural history of pain have investigated placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain in their own right. Large placebo analgesia but no nocebo hyperalgesic effects have been found, and the underlying mechanisms are beginning to be elucidated. Here we review placebo and nocebo effects and the underlying mechanisms in neuropathic pain and compare them with those of nociceptive and idiopathic pain. This allows for a novel discussion on how knowledge of psychological, neurobiological, and genetic factors underlying well-controlled placebo effects may help improve the information that can be obtained from and potentially restore the utility of RCTs.

  19. Exploration of whole brain networks modulated by acupuncture at analgesia acupoint ST36 using scale-specific wavelet correlation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Hao; YAN Hao; BAI Li-jun; WANG Bao-guo

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that acupuncture could modulate various brain systems in the resting brain networks.Graph theoretical analysis offers a novel way to investigate the functional organization of the large-scale cortical networks modulated by acupuncture at whole brain level.In this study,we used wavelets correlation analysis to estimate the pairwise correlations between 90 cortical and subcortical human brain regions in normal human volunteers scanned during the post-stimulus resting state.Methods Thirty-two college students,all right-handed and acupuncture na(i)ve,participated in this study.Every participant received only one acupoint stimulation,resulting in 16 subjects in one group.Both structural functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data (3D sequence with a voxel size of 1 mm3 for anatomical localization) and functional fMRI data (TR=1500 ms,TE=30 ms,flip angle=90°) were collected for each subject.After thresholding the resulting scale-specific wavelet correlation matrices to generate undirected binary graphs,we compared graph metrics of brain organization following verum manual acupuncture (ACU) and sham acupuncture (SHAM) groups.Results The topological parameters of the large-scale brain networks in ACU group were different from those of the SHAM group at multiple scales.There existed distinct modularity functional brain networks during the post-stimulus resting state following ACU and SHAM at multiple scales.Conclusions The distinct modulation patterns of the resting brain attributed to the specific effects evoked by acupuncture.In addition,we also identified that there existed frequency-specific modulation in the post-stimulus resting brain following ACU and SHAM.The modulation may be related to the effects of verum acupuncture on modulating special disorder treatment.This preliminary finding may provide a new clue to understand the relatively functionoriented specificity of acupuncture effects.

  20. Acupuncture, psyche and the placebo response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enck, Paul; Klosterhalfen, Sibylle; Zipfel, Stephan

    2010-10-28

    With growing use of acupuncture treatment in various clinical conditions, the question has been posed whether the reported effects reflect specific mechanisms of acupuncture or whether they represent placebo responses, as they often are similar in effect size and resemble similarities to placebo analgesia and its mechanisms. We reviewed the available literature for different placebos (sham procedures) used to control the acupuncture effects, for moderators and potential biases in respective clinical trials, and for central and peripheral mechanisms involved that would allow differentiation of placebo effects from acupuncture and sham acupuncture effects. While the evidence is still limited, it seems that biological differences exist between a placebo response, e.g. in placebo analgesia, and analgesic response during acupunture that does not occur with sham acupuncture. It seems advisable that clinical trials should include potential biomarkers of acupuncture, e.g. measures of the autonomic nervous system function to verify that acupuncture and sham acupuncture are different despite similar clinical effects.

  1. Brain Connectivity Predicts Placebo Response across Chronic Pain Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétreault, Pascal; Mansour, Ali; Vachon-Presseau, Etienne; Schnitzer, Thomas J.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2016-01-01

    Placebo response in the clinical trial setting is poorly understood and alleged to be driven by statistical confounds, and its biological underpinnings are questioned. Here we identified and validated that clinical placebo response is predictable from resting-state functional magnetic-resonance-imaging (fMRI) brain connectivity. This also led to discovering a brain region predicting active drug response and demonstrating the adverse effect of active drug interfering with placebo analgesia. Chronic knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain patients (n = 56) underwent pretreatment brain scans in two clinical trials. Study 1 (n = 17) was a 2-wk single-blinded placebo pill trial. Study 2 (n = 39) was a 3-mo double-blinded randomized trial comparing placebo pill to duloxetine. Study 3, which was conducted in additional knee OA pain patients (n = 42), was observational. fMRI-derived brain connectivity maps in study 1 were contrasted between placebo responders and nonresponders and compared to healthy controls (n = 20). Study 2 validated the primary biomarker and identified a brain region predicting drug response. In both studies, approximately half of the participants exhibited analgesia with placebo treatment. In study 1, right midfrontal gyrus connectivity best identified placebo responders. In study 2, the same measure identified placebo responders (95% correct) and predicted the magnitude of placebo’s effectiveness. By subtracting away linearly modeled placebo analgesia from duloxetine response, we uncovered in 6/19 participants a tendency of duloxetine enhancing predicted placebo response, while in another 6/19, we uncovered a tendency for duloxetine to diminish it. Moreover, the approach led to discovering that right parahippocampus gyrus connectivity predicts drug analgesia after correcting for modeled placebo-related analgesia. Our evidence is consistent with clinical placebo response having biological underpinnings and shows that the method can also reveal that active

  2. Fear of pain reduces the effect of a placebo intervention on pain

    OpenAIRE

    Forsberg, June Thorvaldsen

    2010-01-01

    Placebo analgesia refers to a reduction in pain after a placebo treatment has been provided. Fear of pain has been shown reduce placebo analgesic response. The present study investigated if experimentally induced fear of pain reduces the efficacy of a placebo intervention on pain. A balanced within-group design (n = 45) with a natural history, a placebo, and a placebo+fear condition was employed. In the placebo condition the participants were exposed to heat stimuli before and after administr...

  3. Schisandra chinensis fruit modulates the gut microbiota composition in association with metabolic markers in obese women: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi-young; Wang, Jing-hua; Eom, Taewoong; Kim, Hojun

    2015-08-01

    Schisandra chinensis fruit (SCF) is known to have beneficial effects on metabolic diseases, including obesity, and to affect gut microbiota in in vivo studies. However, in human research, there have been a few studies in terms of its clinical roles in lipid metabolism and modulation of gut microbiota. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study with 28 obese women with SCF or placebo was conducted for 12 weeks. Anthropometry and blood and fecal sampling were performed before and after treatment. Analysis of the gut microbiota in feces was performed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Although the values did not differ significantly between the 2 groups, the SCF group tended to show a greater decrease in waist circumference, fat mass, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase than the placebo group. Clustering of the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints for total bacteria before and after treatment indicated more separate clustering in SCF group than placebo. In correlation analysis, Bacteroides and Bacteroidetes (both increased by SCF) showed significant negative correlation with fat mass, aspartate aminotransferase, and/or alanine aminotransferase, respectively. Ruminococcus (decreased by SCF) showed negative correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and fasting blood glucose. In conclusion, administration of SCF for 12 weeks resulted in modulation of the gut microbiota composition in Korean obese women, and significant correlations with some bacterial genera and metabolic parameters were noted. However, in general, SCF was not sufficient to induce significant changes in obesity-related parameters compared with placebo.

  4. Saffron supplements modulate serum pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance in patients with metabolic syndrome: A randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyebeh Kermani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We have investigated the effect of a saffron supplement, given at a dose of 100 mg/kg, on prooxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial design was used in 75 subjects with metabolic syndrome who were randomly allocated to one of two study groups: (1 the case group received 100mg/kg saffron and (2 the placebo control group received placebo for 12 weeks. The serum PAB assay was applied to all subjects before (week 0 and after (weeks 6 and 12 the intervention. Results: There was a significant (p=0.035 reduction in serum PAB between week 0 to week 6 and also from week 0 to week 12.  Conclusion: Saffron supplements can modulate serum PAB in subjects with metabolic syndrome, implying an improvement in some aspects of oxidative stress or antioxidant protection.

  5. A RANDOMIZED DOUBLE-BLIND PLACEBO-CONTROLLED CLINIC AL TRIAL TO ASSESS THE EFFICACY OF DEXAMETHASONE TO PR OVIDE POSTOPERATIVE ANALGESIA AFTER PARAVERTEBRAL BLOCK I N PATIENTS UNDERGOING ELECTIVE THORACOTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhurjoti Proad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:BACKGROUND: In an attempt to improve the recovery and early reha bilitation after thoracotomy, various methods of pain-relief ha ve been tried to prolong the duration and to improve the quality of postoperative analgesia. Parave rtebral block using steroids like dexamethasone, administered as an adjuvant along wi th local anaesthetic agents, could be of particular interest. METHODS: Fifty patients undergoing elective thoracotomy were randomly assigned to one of the following groups containing t wenty five patients each. Group D patients received 8 mg (2 ml of dexamethasone added to 18 m l of 0.25% levobupivacaine as paravertebral block (total volume 20 ml. Group L pat ients received 18 ml of 0.25% levobupivacaine and 2 ml of isotonic saline (20 ml i n total as paravertebral block. Analgesic effect was evaluated by measuring pain intensity (VA S score and duration of analgesia. RESULTS: A longer delay was observed between paravertevral b lock with study medication and first requirement of supplementary analgesic in g roup D (602.24±78.72 minutes compared to group L (410.48±56.64 minutes. Total con sumption of diclofenac sodium in first 24 hours in postoperative period was significantly les s in group D. No significant side effects were noted. CONCLUSION: Dexamethasone, used as adjuncts to levobupivacaine f or thoracic paravertebral block in patients undergoing thoracotom y, improve the quality and prolong the duration of post operative analgesia.

  6. Placebo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD The placebo effect Joseph H. Friedman, MD Richard Dubinsky, MD WHAT ... placebo: a “dummy” medication that should have no effect on the condition. Placebos are not only drugs. ...

  7. Analgesia adjuvante e alternativa Analgesia adyuvante y alternativa Adjuvant and alternative analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Bezerra do Vale

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Embora a dor aguda e a crônica sejam habitualmente controladas com intervenções farmacológicas, 14 métodos complementares de analgesia adjuvante e alternativa (AAA podem reduzir o uso e abuso na prescrição de analgésicos e diminuir os efeitos colaterais que eventualmente comprometem o estado fisiológico do paciente. CONTEÚDO: Todos os mecanismos antiálgicos atuam através da via espinal de controle da comporta de Melzack e Wall e/ou através da transdução do sinal nos sistemas de neurotransmissão e neuromodulação central relacionados com analgesia, relaxamento e humor: peptidérgico, monaminérgico, gabaérgico, colinérgico e canabinóide. A analgesia adjuvante complementar é habitualmente utilizada nos tratamentos fisiátricos, ortopédicos, reumatológicos, obstétricos e com acupuntura. A analgesia alternativa complementar pode potencializar os métodos analgésicos convencionais, a exposição à luz do sol matutino, luz e cores sob luz artificial, o tempo (T - anestésicos gerais mais potentes à noite, opióides de manhã e anestésicos locais à tarde, dieta, bom humor e riso, espiritualidade, religião, meditação, musicoterapia, hipnose e efeito placebo. CONCLUSÕES: Se a dor aguda é um mecanismo de defesa, a dor crônica é um estado patológico desagradável relacionado com a depressão endógena e a uma baixa qualidade de vida. É importante estabelecer relações interdisciplinares entre a Medicina adjuvante e alternativa nas terapias analgésicas e antiinflamatórias clássicas.JUSTIFICACIÓN Y OBJETIVOS: Aunque el dolor agudo y el crónico sean habitualmente controlados con intervenciones farmacológicas, 14 métodos complementarios de analgesia adyuvante y alternativa (AAA pueden reducir el uso y el abuso en la prescripción de analgésicos y disminuir los efectos colaterales que eventualmente comprometen el estado fisiológico del paciente. CONTENIDO: Todos los mecanismos anti

  8. Mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia: effective therapy for musculoskeletal pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Roland

    2007-12-01

    Acupuncture (AP) is effective for the treatment of postoperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting and for postoperative dental pain. Several recent randomized trials have provided strong evidence for beneficial AP effects on chronic low-back pain and pain from knee osteoarthritis. For many other chronic pain conditions, including headaches, neck pain, and fibromyalgia, the evidence supporting AP's efficacy is less convincing. AP's effects on experimental pain appear to be mediated by analgesic brain mechanisms through the release of neurohumoral factors, some of which can be inhibited by the opioid antagonist naloxone. In contrast to placebo analgesia, AP-related pain relief takes considerable time to develop and to resolve. Thus, some of the long-term effects of AP analgesia cannot be explained by placebo mechanisms. Furthermore, it appears that some forms of AP are more effective for providing analgesia than others. Particularly, electro-AP seems best to activate powerful opioid and non-opioid analgesic mechanisms.

  9. Resolving the Brainstem Contributions to Attentional Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jonathan C.W.; Davies, Wendy-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Previous human imaging studies manipulating attention or expectancy have identified the periaqueductal gray (PAG) as a key brainstem structure implicated in endogenous analgesia. However, animal studies indicate that PAG analgesia is mediated largely via caudal brainstem structures, such as the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and locus coeruleus (LC). To identify their involvement in endogenous analgesia, we used brainstem optimized, whole-brain imaging to record responses to concurrent thermal stimulation (left forearm) and visual attention tasks of titrated difficulty in 20 healthy subjects. The PAG, LC, and RVM were anatomically discriminated using a probabilistic atlas. Pain ratings disclosed the anticipated analgesic interaction between task difficulty and pain intensity (p pain intensity. Intersubject analgesia scores correlated to activity within a distinct region of the RVM alone. These results identify distinct roles for a brainstem triumvirate in attentional analgesia: with the PAG activated by attentional load; specific RVM regions showing pronociceptive and antinociceptive processes (in line with previous animal studies); and the LC showing lateralized activity during conflicting attentional demands. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attention modulates pain intensity, and human studies have identified roles for a network of forebrain structures plus the periaqueductal gray (PAG). Animal data indicate that the PAG acts via caudal brainstem structures to control nociception. We investigated this issue within an attentional analgesia paradigm with brainstem-optimized fMRI and analysis using a probabilistic brainstem atlas. We find pain intensity encoding in several forebrain structures, including the insula and attentional activation of the PAG. Discrete regions of the rostral ventromedial medulla bidirectionally influence pain perception, and locus coeruleus activity mirrors the interaction between attention and nociception. This approach has enabled the

  10. Placebo manipulations reduce hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Gitte Laue; Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Nørskov, Kathrine Næsted; Grosen, Kasper; Pilegaard, Hans K; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Price, Donald D; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Vase, Lene

    2012-06-01

    Several studies have shown that placebo analgesia effects can be obtained in healthy volunteers, as well as patients suffering from acute postoperative pain and chronic pain conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome. However, it is unknown whether placebo analgesia effects can be elicited in chronic pain conditions with a known pathophysiology such as a nerve injury. Nineteen patients who had developed neuropathic pain after thoracotomy were exposed to a placebo manipulation in which they received either open or hidden administrations of lidocaine. Before the treatment, the patients rated their levels of spontaneous pain and expected pain and completed a questionnaire on their emotional feelings (Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule) and went through quantitative sensory testing of evoked pain (brush and cold allodynia, heat pain tolerance, area of pinprick hyperalgesia, wind-up-like pain after pinprick stimulation). The placebo manipulation significantly reduced the area of pinprick hyperalgesia (P=.027), and this placebo effect was significantly related to low levels of negative affect (P=.008; R(2)=0.362) but not to positive affect or expected pain levels. No placebo effect was observed in relation to spontaneous pain or evoked pain, which is most likely due to low pain levels resulting in floor effects. This is the first study to demonstrate a placebo effect in neuropathic pain. The possible mechanisms underlying the placebo effects in hyperalgesia are discussed, and implications for treatment are outlined.

  11. Mouse anesthesia and analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sean; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2015-03-02

    Providing anesthesia and analgesia for mouse subjects is a common and critical practice in the laboratory setting. These practices are necessary for performing invasive procedures, achieving prolonged immobility for sensitive imaging modalities (magnetic resonance imaging for instance), and providing intra- and post-procedural pain relief. In addition to facilitating the procedures performed by the investigator, the provision of anesthesia and analgesia is crucial for the preservation of animal welfare and for humane treatment of animals used in research. Furthermore, anesthesia and analgesia are important components of animal use protocols reviewed by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees, requiring careful consideration and planning for the particular animal model. In this article, we provide technical outlines for the investigator covering the provision of anesthesia by two routes (injectable and inhalant), guidelines for monitoring anesthesia, current techniques for recognition of pain, and considerations for administering preventative analgesia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. ANALGESIA IN SMALL CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Opioids provide effective analgesia, but also have known side ... significance of the study lies in the improvement in post-operative pain management in children after day-case .... have required intervention or delay in discharge from hospital.

  13. Placebo Use in Pain Management: A Mechanism-Based Educational Intervention Enhances Placebo Treatment Acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaalita, Nkaku R; Hurley, Robert W; Staud, Roland; Robinson, Michael E

    2016-02-01

    Health care providers use treatments whose effectiveness derives partially or completely from 'nonspecific' factors, frequently referred to as placebo effects. Although the ethics of interventional placebo use continues to be debated, evidence suggests that placebos can produce clinically meaningful analgesic effects. Burgeoning evidence suggest that patients with chronic pain might be open to placebo treatments in certain contexts despite limited knowledge of their well-established psychoneurobiological underpinnings. In this investigation we sought to examine the effects of a brief, mechanism-based placebo analgesia educational intervention on aspects placebo knowledge and acceptability. Participants with chronic musculoskeletal pain completed a web-based survey in which they rated their knowledge of placebo analgesia, assessed placebo acceptability across different medical contexts, and evaluated 6 unique patient-provider treatment scenarios to assess the role of treatment effectiveness and deception on patient-provider attributions. Using a pre-post design, participants were randomized to receive either a placebo educational intervention or an active control education. Results showed that the educational intervention greatly improved perceptions of placebo knowledge, effectiveness, and acceptability, even in deceptive treatment contexts. This was the first study of its kind to show the value of an educational intervention in increasing openness to and knowledge of placebo analgesic interventions among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. In this we article highlight how patients with chronic pain might be open to placebo interventions, particularly adjunct and/or complementary treatments, when provided education on the neurobiological and psychological mechanisms that underlie placebo effects. Study findings highlight ethically acceptable ways to potentially use placebo factors to enhance existing pain treatments and improve patient health outcomes

  14. Understanding Placebo and Nocebo Responses for Pain Management

    OpenAIRE

    Colloca, Luana; Grillon, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Placebo analgesia makes individuals experience relief of their pain simply by virtue of the anticipation of a benefit. A reduction of pain can occur also when placebos follow the administration of active and effective painkillers. In fact, studies indicate that placebos mimic the action of active treatments and promote the endogenous release of opioids in both humans and animals. Finally, social support and observational learning also lead to analgesic effects. Thus, different psychological f...

  15. Oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 for the modulation of grass pollen allergic rhinitis: a randomized, placebo-controlled study during the pollen season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nembrini, Chiara; Singh, Anurag; De Castro, Carlos Antonio; Mercenier, Annick; Nutten, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 in modulating allergic rhinitis was previously evaluated in two exploratory clinical studies. Oral administration with NCC 2461 reduced specific subjective symptoms following nasal provocation tests with controlled grass pollen allergen concentrations. Our aim was to confirm the anti-allergic effect of NCC 2461 in grass pollen allergic subjects exposed to natural doses of allergens during the pollen season. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel study was conducted with 131 grass pollen allergic subjects from May to July 2012 in concomitance with the pollen season in Berlin. NCC 2461 or placebo was administered daily for an 8-week period to adult subjects with clinical history of allergic rhinitis to grass pollen, positive skin prick test and IgE to grass pollen. During the 8 weeks, symptoms and quality of life questionnaires were filled out, and plasma was collected for IgE analysis at screening and at the end of the intervention. All subjects were included within a 5-day interval, ensuring exposure to similar air pollen counts for each individual during the trial period. The results obtained show that symptoms increased with pollen loads, confirming a natural exposure to the allergen and presence of pollen-induced allergic rhinitis in the subjects. However, no significant differences were observed in allergic rhinitis symptoms scores, quality of life, or specific IgE levels between subjects receiving NCC 2461 as compared to placebo administration. In contrast to previous findings, oral administration of NCC 2461 did not show a beneficial effect on allergic rhinitis in a field trial. The influence of study design, allergen exposure and intervention window on the efficacy of NCC 2461 in modulating respiratory allergy should be further evaluated.

  16. Multimodal analgesia and regional anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero Tornero, C; Fernández Rodríguez, L E; Orduña Valls, J

    Multimodal analgesia provides quality analgesia, with fewer side effects due to the use of combined analgesics or analgesic techniques. Regional anaesthesia plays a fundamental role in achieving this goal. The different techniques of regional anaesthesia that include both peripheral and central blocks in either a single dose or in continuous infusion help to modulate the nociceptive stimuli that access the central level. The emergence of the ultrasound as an effective system to perform regional anaesthesia techniques has allowed the development of new regional anaesthesia techniques that formerly could not be carried out since only neurostimulation or skin references were used. It is essential to take into account that even with effective blocking it is advisable to associate other drugs by other routes, in this way we will be able to reduce the required doses individually and attempt to achieve a synergistic, not purely additive, effect. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Placebo effects: clinical aspects and neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oken, Barry S

    2008-11-01

    Placebo effects are beneficial health outcomes not related to the relatively direct biological effects of an intervention and can be elicited by an agent that, by itself, is inert. Understanding these placebo effects will help to improve clinical trial design, especially for interventions such as surgery, CNS-active drugs and behavioural interventions which are often non-blinded. A literature review was performed to retrieve articles discussing placebo implications of clinical trials, the neurobiology of placebo effects and the implications of placebo effect for several disorders of neurological relevance. Recent research in placebo analgesia and other conditions has demonstrated that several neurotransmitter systems, such as opiate and dopamine, are involved with the placebo effect. Brain regions including anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia have been activated following administration of placebo. A patient's expectancy of improvement may influence outcomes as much as some active interventions and this effect may be greater for novel interventions and for procedures. Maximizing this expectancy effect is important for clinicians to optimize the health of their patient. There have been many relatively acute placebo studies that are now being extended into clinically relevant models of placebo effect.

  18. GABAergic modulation in central sensitization in humans: a randomized placebo-controlled pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study comparing clobazam with clonazepam in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Marie; Matthey, Alain; Daali, Youssef; Poncet, Antoine; Vuilleumier, Pascal; Vuillemier, Pascal; Curatolo, Michele; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Desmeules, Jules

    2015-03-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors (GAMs) acting at specific subtypes of GABAA receptors effectively restore compromised spinal pain control in rodents. Studies addressing a similar antihyperalgesic effect in humans are sparse and are hampered by sedative effects of nonselective GAMs available for use in humans. We present results from a randomized controlled double-blind crossover study in 25 healthy volunteers, which addressed potential antihyperalgesic actions of clobazam (CBZ) and clonazepam (CLN) at mildly sedating equianticonvulsive doses. Clobazam was chosen because of its relatively low sedative properties and CLN because of its use in neuropathic pain. Tolterodine (TLT) was used as an active placebo. The primary outcome parameter was a change in the area of cutaneous UVB irradiation-induced secondary hyperalgesia (ASH), which was monitored for 8 hours after drug application. Sedative effects were assessed in parallel to antihyperalgesia. Compared with TLT, recovery from hyperalgesia was significantly faster in the CBZ and CLN groups (P = 0.009). At the time point of maximum effect, the rate of recovery from hyperalgesia was accelerated by CBZ and CLN, relative to placebo by 15.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8-30.5), P = 0.040, and 28.6% (95% CI 4.5-52.6), P = 0.022, respectively. Active compounds induced stronger sedation than placebo, but these differences disappeared 8 hours after drug application. We demonstrate here that GAMs effectively reduce central sensitization in healthy volunteers. These results provide proof-of-principle evidence supporting efficacy of GAMs as antihyperalgesic agents in humans and should stimulate further research on compounds with improved subtype specificity.

  19. Activation of Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) C receptors enhances morphine-induced analgesia through modulation of coupling of μ-opioid receptor to Gi-protein in rat spinal dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Chen, T; Zhou, X; Couture, R; Hong, Y

    2013-12-03

    Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) G protein-coupled receptors are exclusively expressed in small-sized neurons in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in mammals. The present study investigated the effect of MrgC receptor activation on morphine analgesic potency and addressed its possible mechanisms. Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of the specific MrgC receptor agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (BAM8-22, 3 nmol) increased morphine-induced analgesia and shifted the morphine dose-response curve to the left in rats. Acute morphine (5 μg) reduced the coupling of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) to Gi-, but not Gs-, protein in the spinal dorsal horn. The i.t. BAM8-22 (3 nmol) prevented this change of G-protein repertoire while the inactive MrgC receptor agonist BAM8-18 (3 nmol, i.t.) failed to do so. A double labeling study showed the co-localization of MrgC and MORs in DRG neurons. The i.t. BAM8-22 also increased the coupling of MORs to Gi-protein and recruited Gi-protein from cytoplasm to the cell membrane in the spinal dorsal horn. Application of BAM8-22 (10nM) in the cultured ganglion explants for 30 min increased Gi-protein mRNA, but not Gs-protein mRNA. The present study demonstrated that acute administration of morphine inhibited the repertoire of MOR/Gi-protein coupling in the spinal dorsal horn in vivo. The findings highlight a novel mechanism by which the activation of MrgC receptors can modulate the coupling of MORs with Gi-protein to enhance morphine-induced analgesia. Hence, adjunct treatment of MrgC agonist BAM8-22 may be of therapeutic value to relieve pain.

  20. Placebo, a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniak, Efrat; Davidson, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Substances and interventions with no specific therapeutic effect have been in use since the dawn of history. The term placebo has first been mentioned in the Scriptures, but it was not until the 19th century that it appeared in a medical context. Although lay people like Voltaire, and physicians such as Sir William Osler, have raised the possibility that much of what physicians did had no specific therapeutic effect, this notion was not shared by the public at large or by the medical profession. It was only by the end of the 18th century that a placebo-controlled trial has been conducted, repudiating the therapeutic effect of mesmerism. The advent, in the late 1940s, of effective treatments, which also had serious adverse effects, made the distinction between placebo and putative, active drug effects more relevant and urgent, and cleared the way for double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials. This in turn triggered an ethical debate on the use of placebo, both in research and in clinical practice. Anthropologists, sociologists, physiologists, and medical researchers are all focusing their efforts on understanding the mechanism, role and modulating factors of placebo.

  1. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  2. A phase IIA randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial to study the efficacy and safety of the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM), MK-0773 in female participants with sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, D A; Ather, S N; Zhu, H; Zhou, Y; Lutkiewicz, J; Scott, B B; Chandler, J

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass [defined as appendicular LBM/Height2 (aLBM/ht2) below peak value by>1SD], strength and function, is a major contributing factor to frailty in the elderly. MK-0773 is a selective androgen receptor modulator designed to improve muscle function while minimizing effects on other tissues. The primary objective of this study was to demonstrate an improvement in muscle strength and lean body mass (LBM) in sarcopenic frail elderly women treated with MK-0773 relative to placebo. This was a randomized, double-blind, parallel-arm, placebo-controlled, multicenter, 6-month study. Participants were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive either MK-0773 50mg b.i.d. or placebo; all participants received Vitamin D and protein supplementation. General community. 170 Women aged ≥65 with sarcopenia and moderate physical dysfunction. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, muscle strength and power, physical performance measures. Participants receiving MK-0773 showed a statistically significant increase in LBM from baseline at Month 6 vs. placebo (p<0.001). Participants receiving both MK-0773 and placebo showed a statistically significant increase in strength from baseline to Month 6, but the mean difference between the two groups was not significant (p=0.269). Both groups showed significant improvement from baseline at Month 6 in physical performance measures, but there were no statistically significant differences between participants receiving MK-0773 and placebo. A greater number of participants experienced elevated transaminases in the MK-0773 group vs. placebo, which resolved after discontinuation of study therapy. MK-0773 was generally well-tolerated with no evidence of androgenization. The MK-0773-induced increase in LBM did not translate to improvement in strength or function vs. placebo. The improvement of strength and physical function in the placebo group could be at least partly attributed to protein and vitamin D supplementation.

  3. Specifying the non-specific components of acupuncture analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that acupuncture has pain-relieving effects, but the contribution of specific and especially non-specific factors to acupuncture analgesia is less clear. One hundred and one patients who developed pain ≥ 3 on a visual analog scale (VAS, 0-10) following third molar surgery were randomized to receive active acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, or no treatment for 30 min with acupuncture needles with potential for double-blinding. Patients’ perception of the treatment (active or placebo), and expected pain levels (VAS) were assessed prior to and halfway through the treatment. Looking at actual treatment allocation, there was no specific effect of active acupuncture (P = 0.240), but a large and significant non-specific effect of placebo acupuncture (P acupuncture (P acupuncture had significantly lower pain levels than those who believed they received placebo acupuncture. Expected pain levels accounted for significant and progressively larger amounts of the variance in pain ratings following both active and placebo acupuncture (up to 69.8%), This is the first study to show that under optimized blinding conditions non-specific factors such as patients’ perception of and expectations toward treatment are central to the efficacy of acupuncture analgesia and that these factors may contribute to self-reinforcing effects in acupuncture treatment To obtain an effect of acupuncture in clinical practice it may, therefore, be important to incorporate and optimize these factors. PMID:23707680

  4. Placebo use in pain management: The role of medical context, treatment efficacy, and deception in determining placebo acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaalita, Nkaku; Staud, Roland; Hurley, Robert; Robinson, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Placebo effects can act as powerful pain relievers. Although the ethics of therapeutic placebo use are highly controversial, recent evidence suggests that medical providers frequently utilize placebo treatments and patients may be open to these interventions in certain contexts. This investigation used a patient-centered approach to answer essential questions about placebo treatment acceptability. People with chronic musculoskeletal pain completed a placebo survey in which they rated their knowledge of placebo and its efficacy for alleviating pain, evaluated the acceptability of placebo analgesic interventions across several unique medical contexts, and responded to 6 different patient-physician treatment scenarios to assess the role of deception and placebo effectiveness on mood and provider trust. Results showed that participants had limited knowledge of placebo and its efficacy for alleviating pain. Placebo acceptability was highly dependent on the context of the intervention, as placebo treatments were considered acceptable when used as complementary/adjunct treatments and when no other established treatments were available. Also, an analgesic placebo response mitigated the negative consequences of deception by improving provider trust and decreasing negative mood. These findings suggest that, contrary to popular belief, patients may be rather pragmatic in their appraisals of placebo treatment acceptability, and may consider a variety of treatments/contexts as ethically permissible for managing their pain. This is the first study of its kind to quantify perceptions of placebo analgesia knowledge and efficacy among individuals with chronic pain, and to assess the role of different medical contexts in treatment acceptability.

  5. The Effect of the Type and Colour of Placebo Stimuli on Placebo Effects Induced by Observational Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świder, Karolina; Bąbel, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia can be induced through observational learning. Our aim was to replicate and extend these results by studying the influence of the type and colour of stimuli used as placebos on the placebo effects induced by observational learning. Three experimental and two control groups were tested. All participants received pain stimuli of the same intensity preceded by colour lights (green and red) or geometric shapes (circles and squares). Before receiving pain stimuli, participants in the experimental groups, but not in the control groups, observed a model who rated pain stimuli that were preceded by either green lights (green placebo group), red lights (red placebo group), or circles (circle placebo group) as being less painful than those preceded by either red lights (green placebo group), green lights (red placebo group), or squares (circle placebo group). As a result participants in the experimental groups rated pain stimuli preceded by either green lights (green placebo group), red lights (red placebo group), or circles (circle placebo group) as being less painful than the participants in the control groups did, indicating that placebo effect was induced. No statistically significant differences were found in the magnitudes of the placebo effects between the three experimental groups (green placebo, red placebo, and circle placebo groups), indicating that neither the type nor the colour of placebo stimuli affected the placebo effects induced by observational learning. The placebo effects induced by observational learning were found to be unrelated to the individual differences in pain anxiety, fear of pain, and empathy.

  6. The Effect of the Type and Colour of Placebo Stimuli on Placebo Effects Induced by Observational Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Świder

    Full Text Available Research shows that placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia can be induced through observational learning. Our aim was to replicate and extend these results by studying the influence of the type and colour of stimuli used as placebos on the placebo effects induced by observational learning. Three experimental and two control groups were tested. All participants received pain stimuli of the same intensity preceded by colour lights (green and red or geometric shapes (circles and squares. Before receiving pain stimuli, participants in the experimental groups, but not in the control groups, observed a model who rated pain stimuli that were preceded by either green lights (green placebo group, red lights (red placebo group, or circles (circle placebo group as being less painful than those preceded by either red lights (green placebo group, green lights (red placebo group, or squares (circle placebo group. As a result participants in the experimental groups rated pain stimuli preceded by either green lights (green placebo group, red lights (red placebo group, or circles (circle placebo group as being less painful than the participants in the control groups did, indicating that placebo effect was induced. No statistically significant differences were found in the magnitudes of the placebo effects between the three experimental groups (green placebo, red placebo, and circle placebo groups, indicating that neither the type nor the colour of placebo stimuli affected the placebo effects induced by observational learning. The placebo effects induced by observational learning were found to be unrelated to the individual differences in pain anxiety, fear of pain, and empathy.

  7. Melatonin analgesia is associated with improvement of the descending endogenous pain-modulating system in fibromyalgia: a phase II, randomized, double-dummy, controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Zanette, Simone Azevedo; Vercelino, Rafael; Laste, Gabriela; Rozisky, Joanna Ripoll; Schwertner, André; Machado, Caroline Buzzatti; Xavier, Fernando; de Souza, Izabel Cristina Custódio; Deitos, Alicia; Torres, Iraci L S; Caumo, Wolnei

    2014-01-01

    .... Melatonin can improve sleep quality, pain and pain threshold. We hypothesized that treatment with melatonin alone or in combination with amitriptyline would be superior to amitriptyline alone in modifying the endogenous pain-modulating system (PMS...

  8. Epidural analgesia during labor vs no analgesia: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesam Farid Mousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidural analgesia is claimed to result in prolonged labor. Previous studies have assessed epidural analgesia vs systemic opioids rather than to parturients receiving no analgesia. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of epidural analgesia on labor duration compared with parturients devoid of analgesia. Methods: One hundred sixty nulliparous women in spontaneous labor at full term with a singleton vertex presentation were assigned to the study. Parturients who request epidural analgesia were allocated in the epidural group, whereas those not enthusiastic to labor analgesia were allocated in the control group. Epidural analgesia was provided with 20 mL bolus 0.5% epidural lidocaine plus fentanyl and maintained at 10 mL for 1 h. Duration of the first and second stages of labor, number of parturients receiving oxytocin, maximal oxytocin dose required for each parturient, numbers of instrumental vaginal, vacuum-assisted, and cesarean deliveries and neonatal Apgar score were recorded. Results: There was no statistical difference in the duration of the active-first and the second stages of labor, instrumental delivery, vacuum-assisted or cesarean delivery rates, the number of newborns with 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores less than 7 between both groups and number of parturients receiving oxytocin, however, the maximal oxytocin dose was significantly higher in the epidural group. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia by lidocaine (0.5% and fentanyl does not prolong labor compared with parturients without analgesia; however, significant oxytocin augmentation is required during the epidural analgesia to keep up the aforementioned average labor duration.

  9. CENTRAL MECHANISMS OF ACUPUNCTURE ANALGESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman S. Mansour

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acupuncture is an component of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM that has been used for three thousand years to treat diseases and relieve pain. Pain is found to be the most common reason for people to use acupuncture. Due to recent scientific findings, acupuncture treatment has been accepted worldwide. Numerous trials have been conducted especially in analgesia. The mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia has been widely investigated, however, the underlying mechanism still not clear. This article summarizes the central mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia and reviews recent studies on the topic. Method: We have focused on examining the recent literature on acupuncture analgesia. The central mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia and reviews recent studies on the topic. We focused on the studies related to central mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia from these aspects: (neurophysiology, neurochemistry and neuroanatomy. Result: The result revealed that acupuncture act on various parts of the central nervous system, including the spinal cord, brain stem, cerebral ganglia and cerebral cortex to alleviate pain. The central mechanisms underlying the effects of acupuncture include neurohumors and neurotransmitters, which are involved in analgesia. At spinal level, Spinal opioids, glutamate, norepinephrine and serotonin are the key elements acupuncture-induced analgesia. At brain level, Endogenous opioid peptides, limbic system play essential roles in mediating the analgesia. Conclusion: Acupuncture is an effective approach to pain management. There is good evidence in both experimental and clinical research that supports acupuncture efficacy in management of chronic pain through central nervous system. Acupuncture should be strongly used as a part of pain management plans. This work helps in improving our understanding of the scientific basis underlying acupuncture analgesia.

  10. Placebo Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature and Science ran completely different news line-ups this week. But their lead stories agreed on one thing: patients matter. Nature led with a story about a group of patients who will share in a patent after giving blood and tissue samples to scientists. Science chose to lead with the controversial World Medical Association decision to recommend restricting the use of placebos in certain clinical trials.

  11. Mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia for clinical and experimental pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Roland; Price, Donald D

    2006-05-01

    There is convincing evidence that acupuncture (AP) is effective for the treatment of postoperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, as well as postoperative dental pain. Less convincing data support AP's efficacy for chronic pain conditions, including headache, fibromyalgia and low back pain. There is no evidence that AP is effective in treating addiction, insomnia, obesity, asthma or stroke deficits. AP seems to be efficacious for alleviating experimental pain by increasing pain thresholds in human subjects and it appears to activate analgesic brain mechanisms through the release of neurohumoral factors, some of which can be inhibited by the opioid antagonist naloxone. In contrast to placebo analgesia, AP-related pain relief takes some time to develop and to resolve. Furthermore, repetitive use of AP analgesia can result in tolerance that demonstrates cross-tolerance with morphine. However, it appears that not all forms of AP are equally effective for providing analgesia. In particular, electro-AP seems to best deliver stimuli that activate powerful opioid and nonopioid analgesic mechanisms. Thus, future carefully controlled clinical trials using adequate electro-AP may be able to provide the necessary evidence for relevant analgesia in chronic pain conditions, such as headache, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and low back pain.

  12. Information Models of Acupuncture Analgesia and Meridian Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hua Zou

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture and meridian channels have been major components of Chinese and Eastern Asian medicine—especially for analgesia—for over 2000 years. In recent decades, electroacupuncture (EA analgesia has been applied clinically and experimentally. However, there were controversial results between different treatment frequencies, or between the active and the placebo treatments; and the mechanisms of the treatments and the related meridian channels are still unknown. In this study, we propose a new term of infophysics therapy and develop information models of acupuncture (or EA analgesia and meridian channels, to understand the mechanisms and to explain the controversial results, based on Western theories of information, trigonometry and Fourier series, and physics, as well as published biomedical data. We are trying to build a bridge between Chinese medicine and Western medicine by investigating the Eastern acupuncture analgesia and meridian channels with Western sciences; we model the meridians as a physiological system that is mostly constructed with interstices in or between other physiological systems; we consider frequencies, amplitudes and wave numbers of electric field intensity (EFI as information data. Our modeling results demonstrate that information regulated with acupuncture (or EA is different from pain information, we provide answers to explain the controversial published results, and suggest that mechanisms of acupuncture (or EA analgesia could be mostly involved in information regulation of frequencies and amplitudes of EFI as well as neuronal transmitters such as endorphins.

  13. Placebos and painkillers: is mind as real as matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colloca, Luana; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2005-07-01

    Considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms of the placebo effect, and most of our knowledge originates from the field of pain and analgesia. Today, the placebo effect represents a promising model that could allow us to shed new light on mind-body interactions. The mental events induced by placebo administration can activate mechanisms that are similar to those activated by drugs, which indicates a similarity between psychosocial and pharmacodynamic effects. These new neurobiological advances are already changing our conception of how clinical trials and medical practice must be viewed and conducted.

  14. A yeast fermentate improves gastrointestinal discomfort and constipation by modulation of the gut microbiome: results from a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Iris; Robinson, Larry; Verhelst, An; Marzorati, Massimo; Winkens, Björn; den Abbeele, Pieter Van; Possemiers, Sam

    2017-09-04

    Constipation and symptoms of gastrointestinal discomfort such as bloating are common among otherwise healthy individuals, but with significant impact on quality of life. Despite the recognized contribution of the gut microbiome to this pathology, little is known about which group(s) of microorganism(s) are playing a role. A previous study performed in vitro suggests that EpiCor® fermentate has prebiotic-like properties, being able to favorably modulate the composition of the gut microbiome. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of EpiCor fermentate in a population with symptoms of gastrointestinal discomfort and reduced bowel movements and to evaluate its effect at the level of the gut microbiome. This pilot study was performed according to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel design. Eighty subjects with symptoms of gastrointestinal discomfort and constipation were allocated to one of two trial arms (placebo or EpiCor fermentate). Randomization was done in a stratified manner according to symptom severity, resulting in two subgroups of patients: severe and moderate. Daily records of gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed on a 5-point scale, and also stool frequency and consistency were documented during a 2-week run-in and a 6-week intervention phases. Averages over two-week intervals were calculated. Constipation-associated quality of life and general perceived stress were assessed at baseline and after 3 and 6 weeks of intervention. Fecal samples were also collected at these same time points. EpiCor fermentate led to a significant improvement of symptoms such as bloating/distension (p = 0.033 and p = 0.024 after 2 and 4 weeks of intervention, respectively), feeling of fullness (p = 0.004 and p = 0.023 after 2 and 4 weeks of intervention, respectively) and general daily scores (p = 0.046 after 2 weeks of intervention) in the moderate subgroup. A significant improvement in stool consistency was observed

  15. Popularizing labor analgesia in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zi Tian; Gao, Xue Lian; Yang, Hui Xia

    2007-09-01

    In China many women in labor are young primigravidas whose fear of labor pain leads them to request cesarean deliveries. While the rate of cesarean deliveries has reached 50% in many hospitals, less than 1% of women in labor are given neuraxial analgesia. The necessary equipment is seldom available in China and many physicians have misconceptions about the risks associated with neuraxial analgesia, which are low with the ultra-low-dosages used today. However, attitudes have begun to change. Meetings held in China have brought together Chinese physicians and world experts on the various epidural and combined spinal-epidural techniques. Thanks to the information and support provided at these meetings clinical trials were carried out, more than 5000 women benefited from labor analgesia, and publications appeared in Chinese journals. An effective, safe, and cost-effective way to provide analgesia to women in labor may slow the increase in cesarean delivery rates across China and improve women's health in general.

  16. [Intravenous remifentanyl for labor analgesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, D; Serrano, M L; Corral, E M; García del Valle, S

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous remifentanil may be the preferred analgesic when regional techniques are contraindicated. To perform a systematic review on the use of remifentanil for analgesia in labor. We searched MEDLINE (January 1995-August 2007) for studies on obstetric analgesia with remifentanil. We found 32 references representing the use of remifentanil in 257 women in labor. In most cases, patients reported relief of pain and a high level of satisfaction, with no severe side effects in mothers or neonates. When compared with meperidine and nitrous oxide in clinical trials, remifentanil provided better analgesia with fewer adverse effects. Analgesia with intravenous remifentanil is more effective and safer than other alternatives to regional analgesic techniques in obstetrics. Nevertheless, the optimum system for infusing the drug must b e established and further studies of maternal and fetal safety should be carried out.

  17. Pain and the placebo: what we have learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ginger A; Harrington, Anne; Fields, Howard L

    2005-01-01

    Despite the recent blossoming of rigorous research into placebo mechanisms and the long-standing use of placebos in clinical trials, there remains widespread and profound misunderstanding of the placebo response among both practicing physicians and clinical researchers. This review identifies and clarifies areas of current confusion about the placebo response (including whether it exists at all), describes its phenomenology, and outlines recent advances in our knowledge of its underlying psychological and neural mechanisms. The focus of the review is the placebo analgesic response rather than placebo responses in general, because much of the best established clinical and experimental work to date has been done on this type of placebo response. In addition, this subfield of placebo research offers a specific neural circuit hypothesis capable of being integrated with equally rigorous experimental work on the psychological (including social psychological) and clinical levels. In this sense, placebo analgesia research bears all the marks of a genuine multilevel interdisciplinary research paradigm in the making, one that could serve as a model for research into other kinds of placebo responses, as well as into other kinds of mind-body responses.

  18. The use of different doses of metamizol for post-operative analgesia in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagawa, Vivianne H; Fantoni, Denise T; Tatarunas, Angélica C; Mastrocinque, Sandra; Almeida, Tatiana F; Ferreira, Fernando; Posso, Irimar P

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the post-operative analgesic effect of metamizol (dipyrone) administered intravenously at three different doses (15 mg kg(-1), 25 mg kg(-1) and 35 mg kg(-1)) compared to placebo in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Prospective, comparative, randomized, blinded trial. Forty healthy bitches, aged 1-6 years, weighing 10-35 kg The animals were randomly divided into four groups and received their respective treatments immediately after surgery: placebo group (0.9% saline solution), D15 group (metamizol 15 mg kg(-1) IV), D25 group (metamizol 25 mg kg(-1) IV), D35 group (metamizol 35 mg kg(-1) IV). The following variables were measured: sedation, pulse rate (PR), respiratory rate (f(R)), arterial blood pressure (ABP), plasma catecholamines, serum cortisol, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine metabolites, albumin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), hemogram, platelet counts and level of analgesia which was assessed by visual analog (VAS), descriptive and behavioral scales. Patients were monitored for 48 hours after the administration of the analgesic agent. Rescue analgesia (tramadol, 2 mg kg(-1), intramuscularly) was provided for animals with pain scores ≥4, as determined by the VAS or descriptive scale. The D25 and D35 groups showed equivalent post-operative analgesia, as shown by decreased pain scores, according to the three different pain scales, and fewer animals that required rescue analgesia. Significantly lower serum cortisol concentrations were observed in the D25 and D35 groups when compared to the placebo and D15 groups. No hematologic, renal, hepatic or clinical adverse effects were observed during the treatment. Metamizol administered intravenously at 25 or 35 mg kg(-1) can provide adequate post-operative analgesia in bitches undergoing ovariohysterectomy. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2011 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary

  19. [Clinical significance of the placebo effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeltjenbruns, J; Schäfer, M

    2008-05-01

    Placebo controlled studies examining clinical problems, e.g. in pain therapy, are considered the "gold standard" for evidence-based medicine. In these studies the placebo effect itself is not the main focus of interest, but serves more as a control for the specificity of the effect of a certain treatment. What physicians in this context often do not realize is that the placebo effect itself represents a true measurable correlate of an organism's psycho-neurobiological response and, thereby, influences the healing process, e.g. the pain relief. Placebo is, therefore, not equivalent to "no treatment". The number of placebo responders, the degree and the duration of the placebo effect is not fixed, but are subject to a much greater variability then hitherto believed. The myth that placebo responders have a certain personality has not been proven correct; instead, the relationships between physicians and patients as well as sociocultural factors have a considerable impact on the placebo effect. Psychological theories explain that classical conditioning, enhanced expectation and motivation of the patient determine the degree of the placebo effect. These directly influence neurobiological systems such as the endogenous opioids which according to modern brain imaging are predominantly activated in pain-relevant areas and contribute to the effect of placebo analgesia. Placebo effects that should be deliberately excluded in controlled clinical trials, can be desirable in clinical practice to optimize the total therapeutic effect. This should mean that the context effect of each therapeutic intervention is maximized towards an improved therapeutic effect, as outlined in the recent AWMF guidelines for postoperative pain therapy, but should not include the administration of an inert substance. The latter is controlled by rigorous ethical guidelines and is only permitted in the context of ethically approved controlled clinical trials. A possible alternative is suggested by

  20. Evolution of endogenous analgesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesters, Marieke

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous pain modulation is a complex phenomenon involved in the perception of pain. It consists of top-down inhibitory and facilitatory pathways that originate at higher sites within the central nervous system and converge at dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord, to modulate incoming afferent n

  1. Effect of probiotic Bifidobacterium longum BB536 [corrected] in relieving clinical symptoms and modulating plasma cytokine levels of Japanese cedar pollinosis during the pollen season. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, J Z; Kondo, S; Yanagisawa, N; Takahashi, N; Odamaki, T; Iwabuchi, N; Iwatsuki, K; Kokubo, S; Togashi, H; Enomoto, K; Enomoto, T

    2006-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms have been shown to be effective in the treatment of allergic inflammation and food allergy, but their efficacy remains controversial. This study tested the effect of a yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum BB536 in the treatment of Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCPsis). Forty subjects with a clinical history of JCPsis were given yoghurt either containing BB536 (BB536 yoghurt) or without BB536 (placebo yoghurt) at 2 X 100 g per day for 14 weeks, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjective symptoms and self-care measures were recorded daily and blood samples were taken before and during the intervention (at weeks 4, 9, and 14) to measure the blood parameter levels related to JCPsis. Yoghurt supplemented with BB536 significantly alleviated eye symptoms compared with placebo yoghurt (odds ratio 0.31; 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.97; p = 0.044). Although no statistically significant differences were detected, nasal symptoms such as itching, rhinorrhea, and blockage, as well as throat symptoms tended to be relieved with the BB536 yoghurt. BB536 tended to suppress the decreasing blood levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-y) and the increasing blood eosinophil rates; a significantly higher IFN-gamma level was observed for the difference from baseline at week 4. A decreased trend in the difference from baseline levels of JCP-specific IgE levels was also observed at week 4 in the BB536 group compared with the placebo group. In conclusion, these results suggest that intake of BB536-supplemented yoghurt may relieve JCPsis symptoms, probably through a modulating effect on Th balance.

  2. The selective androgen receptor modulator GTx-024 (enobosarm) improves lean body mass and physical function in healthy elderly men and postmenopausal women: results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, James T; Barnette, Kester G; Bohl, Casey E; Hancock, Michael L; Rodriguez, Domingo; Dodson, Shontelle T; Morton, Ronald A; Steiner, Mitchell S

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Cachexia, also known as muscle wasting, is a complex metabolic condition characterized by loss of skeletal muscle and a decline in physical function. Muscle wasting is associated with cancer, sarcopenia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, end-stage renal disease, and other chronic conditions and results in significant morbidity and mortality. GTx-024 (enobosarm) is a nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) that has tissue-selective anabolic effects in muscle and bone, while sparing other androgenic tissue related to hair growth in women and prostate effects in men. GTx-024 has demonstrated promising pharmacologic effects in preclinical studies and favorable safety and pharmacokinetic profiles in phase I investigation. METHODS: A 12-week double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II clinical trial was conducted to evaluate GTx-024 in 120 healthy elderly men (>60 years of age) and postmenopausal women. The primary endpoint was total lean body mass assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and secondary endpoints included physical function, body weight, insulin resistance, and safety. RESULTS: GTx-024 treatment resulted in dose-dependent increases in total lean body mass that were statistically significant (P < 0.001, 3 mg vs. placebo) and clinically meaningful. There were also significant improvements in physical function (P = 0.013, 3 mg vs. placebo) and insulin resistance (P = 0.013, 3 mg vs. placebo). The incidence of adverse events was similar between treatment groups. CONCLUSION: GTx-024 showed a dose-dependent improvement in total lean body mass and physical function and was well tolerated. GTx-024 may be useful in the prevention and/or treatment of muscle wasting associated with cancer and other chronic diseases.

  3. The neuroscience of placebo effects: connecting context, learning and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Tor D; Atlas, Lauren Y

    2015-07-01

    Placebo effects are beneficial effects that are attributable to the brain-mind responses to the context in which a treatment is delivered rather than to the specific actions of the drug. They are mediated by diverse processes--including learning, expectations and social cognition--and can influence various clinical and physiological outcomes related to health. Emerging neuroscience evidence implicates multiple brain systems and neurochemical mediators, including opioids and dopamine. We present an empirical review of the brain systems that are involved in placebo effects, focusing on placebo analgesia, and a conceptual framework linking these findings to the mind-brain processes that mediate them. This framework suggests that the neuropsychological processes that mediate placebo effects may be crucial for a wide array of therapeutic approaches, including many drugs.

  4. Reduction of conditioned pain modulation in humans by naltrexone: an exploratory study of the effects of pain catastrophizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher D; Goodin, Burel; Kindler, Lindsay L; Caudle, Robert M; Edwards, Robert R; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Riley, Joseph L; Fillingim, Roger B

    2013-06-01

    The current study tested the hypothesis that conditioned pain modulation is mediated by the release of endogenous opioids with a placebo-controlled (sugar pill) study of naltrexone (50 mg) in 33 healthy volunteers over two counter-balanced sessions. Pain modulation consisted of rating of heat pain (palm) during concurrent cold water immersion (foot). Compared to baseline heat pain ratings, concurrent foot immersion lowered pain intensity ratings, which suggests an inhibitory effect, was reduced with naltrexone, suggesting at least partial dependence of inhibition on endogenous opioids. An exploratory analysis revealed that individual differences in catastrophizing moderated the effects of naltrexone; endogenous opioid blockade abolished modulation in subjects lower in catastrophizing while modulation was unaffected by naltrexone among high catastrophizers. The results suggest a role of endogenous opioids in endogenous analgesia, but hint that multiple systems might contribute to conditioned pain modulation, and that these systems might be differentially activated as a function of individual differences in responses to pain.

  5. The placebo effect: from concepts to genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colagiuri, Ben; Schenk, Lieven A.; Kessler, Michael D.; Dorsey, Susan G.; Colloca, Luana

    2017-01-01

    Despite its initial treatment as a nuisance variable, the placebo effect is now recognized as a powerful determinant of health across many different diseases and encounters. This is in light of some remarkable findings ranging from demonstrations that the placebo effect significantly modulates the response to active treatments in conditions such as pain, anxiety, Parkinson’s disease, and some surgical procedures. Here, we review pioneering studies and recent advances in behavioral, neurobiological, and genetic influences on the placebo effect. Based on a previous developed conceptual framework, the placebo effect is presented as the product of a general expectancy learning mechanism in which verbal, conditioned and social cues are centrally integrated to change behaviors and outcomes. Examples of the integration of verbal and conditioned cues, such as instructed reversal of placebo effects are also incorporated into this model. We discuss neuroimaging studies that using well-established behavioral paradigms have identified key brain regions and modulatory mechanisms underlying placebo effects. Finally, we present a synthesis of recent genetics studies on the placebo effect, highlighting a promising link between genetic variants in the dopamine, opioid, serotonin, and endocannabinoid pathways and placebo responsiveness. Greater understanding of the behavioral, neurobiological, and genetic influences on the placebo effect is critical for evaluating medical interventions and may allow health professionals to tailor and personalize interventions in order to maximize treatment outcomes in clinical settings. PMID:26272535

  6. Are all placebo effects equal? Placebo pills, sham acupuncture, cue conditioning and their association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Kong

    Full Text Available Placebo treatments and healing rituals have been used to treat pain throughout history. The present within-subject crossover study examines the variability in individual responses to placebo treatment with verbal suggestion and visual cue conditioning by investigating whether responses to different types of placebo treatment, as well as conditioning responses, correlate with one another. Secondarily, this study also examines whether responses to sham acupuncture correlate with responses to genuine acupuncture. Healthy subjects were recruited to participate in two sequential experiments. Experiment one is a five-session crossover study. In each session, subjects received one of four treatments: placebo pills (described as Tylenol, sham acupuncture, genuine acupuncture, or no treatment rest control condition. Before and after each treatment, paired with a verbal suggestion of positive effect, each subject's pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain ratings to calibrated heat pain were measured. At least 14 days after completing experiment one, all subjects were invited to participate in experiment two, during which their analgesic responses to conditioned visual cues were tested. Forty-eight healthy subjects completed experiment one, and 45 completed experiment two. The results showed significantly different effects of genuine acupuncture, placebo pill and rest control on pain threshold. There was no significant association between placebo pills, sham acupuncture and cue conditioning effects, indicating that individuals may respond to unique healing rituals in different ways. This outcome suggests that placebo response may be a complex behavioral phenomenon that has properties that comprise a state, rather than a trait characteristic. This could explain the difficulty of detecting a signature for "placebo responders." However, a significant association was found between the genuine and sham acupuncture treatments, implying that the non

  7. Are All Placebo Effects Equal? Placebo Pills, Sham Acupuncture, Cue Conditioning and Their Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jian; Spaeth, Rosa; Cook, Amanda; Kirsch, Irving; Claggett, Brian; Vangel, Mark; Gollub, Randy L.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.

    2013-01-01

    Placebo treatments and healing rituals have been used to treat pain throughout history. The present within-subject crossover study examines the variability in individual responses to placebo treatment with verbal suggestion and visual cue conditioning by investigating whether responses to different types of placebo treatment, as well as conditioning responses, correlate with one another. Secondarily, this study also examines whether responses to sham acupuncture correlate with responses to genuine acupuncture. Healthy subjects were recruited to participate in two sequential experiments. Experiment one is a five-session crossover study. In each session, subjects received one of four treatments: placebo pills (described as Tylenol), sham acupuncture, genuine acupuncture, or no treatment rest control condition. Before and after each treatment, paired with a verbal suggestion of positive effect, each subject's pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain ratings to calibrated heat pain were measured. At least 14 days after completing experiment one, all subjects were invited to participate in experiment two, during which their analgesic responses to conditioned visual cues were tested. Forty-eight healthy subjects completed experiment one, and 45 completed experiment two. The results showed significantly different effects of genuine acupuncture, placebo pill and rest control on pain threshold. There was no significant association between placebo pills, sham acupuncture and cue conditioning effects, indicating that individuals may respond to unique healing rituals in different ways. This outcome suggests that placebo response may be a complex behavioral phenomenon that has properties that comprise a state, rather than a trait characteristic. This could explain the difficulty of detecting a signature for “placebo responders.” However, a significant association was found between the genuine and sham acupuncture treatments, implying that the non-specific effects of

  8. Methylphenidate modulates activity within cognitive neural networks of patients with post-stroke major depression: A placebo-controlled fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamannar Ramasubbu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Rajamannar Ramasubbu1, Bradley G Goodyear21Departments of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences; 2Department of Radiology and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Calgary, AB, CanadaBackground: Methylphenidate (MP is a dopamine- and noradrenaline-enhancing agent beneficial for post-stroke depression (PSD and stroke recovery due to its therapeutic effects on cognition, motivation, and mood; however, the neural mechanisms underlying its clinical effects remain unknown. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate the effect of MP on brain activity in response to cognitive tasks in patients with PSD.Methods: Nine stroke outpatients with DSM IV defined major depression underwent fMRI during two cognitive tasks (2-back and serial subtraction on four occasions, on the first and third day of a three-day treatment of MP and placebo. Nine healthy control (HC subjects matched for age and sex scanned during a single session served as normative data for comparison. The main outcome measure was cognitive task-dependent brain activity.Results: For the 2-back task, left prefrontal, right parietal, posterior cingulate, and temporal and bilateral cerebellar regions exhibited significantly greater activity during the MP condition relative to placebo. Less activity was detected in rostral prefrontal and left parietal regions. For serial subtraction, greater activity was detected in medial prefrontal, biparietal, bitemporal, posterior cingulate, and bilateral cerebellar regions, as well as thalamus, putamen, and insula. Further, underactivation observed during the placebo condition relative to HC improved or reversed during MP treatment. No significant differences in behavioral measures were found between MP and placebo conditions or between patients and HC.Conclusions: Short-term MP treatment may improve and normalize activity in cognitive neuronal networks in patients with PSD

  9. Effect of labor analgesia on labor outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Stephen H; Abdallah, Faraj W

    2010-06-01

    Labor is among the most painful experiences that humans encounter. Neuraxial analgesia is the most effective means of treating this pain. In this review, we discussed the effect of neuraxial analgesia on the progress of labor when compared with parenteral opioids. We then compared initiation of analgesia with a combined spinal-epidural technique (CSE) to conventional epidural analgesia. Finally we discussed the impact of neuraxial analgesia, given early in labor, compared with later administration. Compared with parenteral opioids, neuraxial analgesia does not increase the incidence of cesarean section, although it is associated with a longer (approximately 16 min) second stage of labor. The incidence of operative vaginal delivery is higher in the epidural group but this may be due to indirect reasons such as changes in physician behavior. There was no difference in labor outcome when CSE was compared with low-concentration epidural analgesia, but higher concentrations may prolong labor. Early administration of neuraxial analgesia does not increase the incidence of operative delivery or prolong labor. Neuraxial analgesia does not interfere with the progress or outcome of labor. There is no need to withhold neuraxial analgesia until the active stage of labor.

  10. Differential effects of experimental central sensitization on the time-course and magnitude of offset analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martucci, Katherine T; Yelle, Marc D; Coghill, Robert C

    2012-02-01

    Pain perception is temporally altered during states of chronic pain and acute central sensitization; however, the mechanisms contributing to temporal processing of nociceptive information remain poorly understood. Offset analgesia is a phenomenon that reflects the presence of temporal contrast mechanisms for nociceptive information and can provide an end point to study temporal aspects of pain processing. In order to investigate whether offset analgesia is disrupted during sensitized states, 23 healthy volunteers provided real-time continuous visual analogue scale responses to noxious heat stimuli that evoke offset analgesia. Responses to these stimuli were evaluated during capsaicin-heat sensitization (45°C stimulus, capsaicin cream 0.1%) and heat-only sensitization (40°C stimulus, placebo cream). Capsaicin-heat sensitization produced significantly larger regions of secondary mechanical allodynia compared to heat-only sensitization. Although areas of mechanical allodynia were positively related to individual differences in heat pain sensitivity, this relationship was altered at later time points after capsaicin-heat sensitization. Heat hyperalgesia was observed in the secondary region following both capsaicin-heat and heat-only sensitization. Increased latencies to maximal offset analgesia and prolonged aftersensations were observed only in the primary regions directly treated by capsaicin-heat or heat alone. However, contrary to the hypothesis that offset analgesia would be reduced following capsaicin-heat sensitization, the magnitude of offset analgesia remained remarkably intact after both capsaicin-heat and heat-only sensitization in zones of both primary and secondary mechanical allodynia. These data indicate that offset analgesia is a robust phenomenon and engages mechanisms that interact minimally with those supporting acute central sensitization.

  11. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour : randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Liv M; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W; Franssen, Maureen T; Papatsonis, Dimitri N; Hajenius, Petra J; Hollmann, Markus W; Woiski, Mallory D; Porath, Martina; van den Berg, Hans J; van Beek, Erik; Borchert, Odette W H M; Schuitemaker, Nico; Sikkema, J Marko; Kuipers, A H M; Logtenberg, Sabine L M; van der Salm, Paulien C M; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Lopriore, Enrico; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; le Cessie, Saskia; van Lith, Jan M; Struys, Michel M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M; Oude Rengerink, K

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine women's satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. DESIGN: Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Women with an interm

  12. Labour pain with remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia : a randomised equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logtenberg, Slm; Oude Rengerink, K; Verhoeven, C J; Freeman, L M; van den Akker, Esa; Godfried, M B; van Beek, E; Borchert, Owhm; Schuitemaker, N; van Woerkens, Ecsm; Hostijn, I; Middeldorp, J M; van der Post, J A; Mol, B W

    OBJECTIVE: To distinguish satisfaction with pain relief using remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (RPCA) compared with epidural analgesia (EA) in low-risk labouring women. DESIGN: Randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: Eighteen midwifery practices and six hospitals in the

  13. Pharmacogenomic considerations in opioid analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuilleumier PH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Pascal H Vuilleumier,1 Ulrike M Stamer,1 Ruth Landau21Klinik für Anästhesiologie und Schmerztherapie, Inselspital Universität Bern, Switzerland; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Translating pharmacogenetics to clinical practice has been particularly challenging in the context of pain, due to the complexity of this multifaceted phenotype and the overall subjective nature of pain perception and response to analgesia. Overall, numerous genes involved with the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of opioids response are candidate genes in the context of opioid analgesia. The clinical relevance of CYP2D6 genotyping to predict analgesic outcomes is still relatively unknown; the two extremes in CYP2D6 genotype (ultrarapid and poor metabolism seem to predict pain response and/or adverse effects. Overall, the level of evidence linking genetic variability (CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 to oxycodone response and phenotype (altered biotransformation of oxycodone into oxymorphone and overall clearance of oxycodone and oxymorphone is strong; however, there has been no randomized clinical trial on the benefits of genetic testing prior to oxycodone therapy. On the other hand, predicting the analgesic response to morphine based on pharmacogenetic testing is more complex; though there was hope that simple genetic testing would allow tailoring morphine doses to provide optimal analgesia, this is unlikely to occur. A variety of polymorphisms clearly influence pain perception and behavior in response to pain. However, the response to analgesics also differs depending on the pain modality and the potential for repeated noxious stimuli, the opioid prescribed, and even its route of administration.Keywords: pain perception, opioid analgesia, genetic variation, pharmacogenetics

  14. The experience of labour with epidural analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Keller, Kurt Dauer

    2014-01-01

    of the epidural analgesia as high, in general, their satisfaction with labour is unchanged or even lower when epidural analgesia is used. Question: How do women experience being in labour with epidural analgesia, and what kind of midwifery care do they, consequently, need? Methods: A field study and semi......-structured interviews were conducted on a phenomenological basis. Nine nulliparous women were observed from initiation of epidural analgesia until birth of their baby. They were interviewed the day after the birth and again 2 months later. The involved midwives were interviewed 2–3 h after the birth. Findings......: Initiation of epidural analgesia can have considerable implications for women’s experience of labour. Two different types of emotional reactions towards epidural analgesia are distinguished, one of which is particularly marked by a subtle sense of worry and ambivalence. Another important finding refers...

  15. Administration of paracetamol versus dipyrone by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for postoperative pain relief in children after tonsillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Sener

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We compared the efficacy of intravenous (IV paracetamol versus dipyrone via patient-controlled analgesia (PCA for postoperative pain relief in children. METHODS: The study was composed of 120 children who had undergone elective tonsillectomy after receiving general anesthesia. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the dosage of postoperative intravenous-patient-controlled analgesia: paracetamol, dipyrone, or placebo. Pain was evaluated using a 0- to 100-mm visual analog scale and 1- to 4-pain relief score at 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h postoperatively. Pethidine (0.25 mg kg-1 was administered intravenously to patients requiring rescue analgesia. Pethidine requirements were recorded during the first 24 h postoperatively, and treatment related adverse effects were noted. RESULTS: Postoperative visual analog scale scores were significantly lower with paracetamol group compared with placebo group at 6 h (p 0.05. Postoperative pethidine requirements were significantly lower with paracetamol and dipyrone groups compared with placebo group (62.5%, 68.4% vs 90%, p 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Paracetamol and dipyrone have well tolerability profile and effective analgesic properties when administered IV-PCA for postoperative analgesia in children after tonsillectomy.

  16. Single dose spinal analgesia: Is it a good alternative to epidural analgesia in controlling labour pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek AbdElBarr

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: Based on the results of our study we concluded that single dose spinal analgesia is a good alternative to epidural analgesia in controlling labour pain i.e. spinal compared to epidural is more easy performed, faster, less expensive, and provide effective analgesia.

  17. Effects of the Mu opioid receptor polymorphism (OPRM1 A118G) on pain regulation, placebo effects and associated personality trait measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peciña, Marta; Love, Tiffany; Stohler, Christian S; Goldman, David; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-03-01

    Mu-opioid receptors (MOPRs) are critically involved in the modulation of pain and analgesia, and represent a candidate mechanism for the development of biomarkers of pain conditions and their responses to treatment. To further understand the human implications of genetic variation within the opioid system in pain and opioid-mediated placebo responses, we investigated the association between the functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), A118G, and psychophysical responses, personality traits, and neurotransmitter systems (dopamine (DA), opioid) related to pain and placebo analgesia. OPRM1 G carriers, compared with AA homozygotes, showed an overall reduction of baseline μ-opioid receptor availability in regions implicated in pain and affective regulation. In response to a sustained painful stimulus, we found no effect of A118G on pain-induced endogenous opioid release. Instead, AA homozygotes showed a blunted DA response in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in response to the pain challenge. After placebo administration, G carriers showed more pronounced mood disturbances and lower placebo-induced μ-opioid system activation in the anterior insula (aINS), the amygdala (AMY), the NAc, the thalamus (THA), and the brainstem, as well as lower levels of DA D2/3 activation in the NAc. At a trait level, G carriers reported higher NEO-Neuroticism scores; a personality trait previously associated with increased pain and lower placebo responses, which were negatively correlated with baseline μ-opioid receptor availability in the aINS and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC). Our results demonstrate that the A118G OPRM1 polymorphism contributes to interindividual variations in the function of neurotransmitters responsive to pain (endogenous opioid and dopamine), as well as their regulation through cognitive-emotional influences in the context of therapeutic expectations, the so-called placebo effect. These effects are relevant to

  18. Influence of preemptive analgesia on pulmonary function and complications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Meral; Özol, Duygu; Bozer, Mikdat

    2009-12-01

    Pain and diaphragmatic dysfunction are the major reasons for postoperative pulmonary complications after upper abdominal surgery. Preoperative administration of analgesics helps to reduce and prevent pain. The objective of this study was first to research the rate of pulmonary complications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and then analyze the influence of preemptive analgesia on pulmonary functions and complications. Seventy patients scheduled for elective LC were included in our double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, prospective study. Randomly, 35 patients received 1 g etofenamate (group 1) and 35 patients 0.9% saline (group 2) intramuscularly 1 h before surgery. All patients underwent physical examination, chest radiography, lung function tests, and pulse oxygen saturation measurements 2 h before surgery and postoperatively on day 2. Atelectasis was graded as micro, focal, segmental, or lobar. With preemptive analgesia, the need for postoperative analgesia decreased significantly in group 1. In both groups mean spirometric values were reduced significantly after the operation, but the difference and proportional change according to preoperative recordings were found to be similar [29.5 vs. 31.3% reduction in forced vital capacity (FVC) and 32.9 vs. 33.5% reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) for groups 1 and 2, respectively]. There was an insignificant drop in oxygen saturation rates for both groups. The overall incidence of atelectasia was similar for group 1 and 2 (30.2 vs. 29.2%). Although the degree of atelectesia was found to be more severe in the placebo group, the difference was not statistically significant. We concluded that although preemptive analgesia decreased the need for postoperative analgesia, this had no effect on pulmonary functions and pulmonary complications.

  19. Labor analgesia for the obese parturient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinas, Elizabeth H

    2012-10-01

    Obese parturients present obstetric anesthesia providers with multiple challenges, including increased incidence of maternal coexisting disease, labor complications, and potential for difficult initiation and failure of neuraxial labor analgesia. This focused review discusses these challenges, and suggests potential methods to increase labor analgesia success in this population.

  20. Intravenous dexmedetomidine versus clonidine for prolongation of bupivacaine spinal anesthesia and analgesia: A randomized double-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velayudha Sidda Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alpha 2 -adrenergic agonists have synergistic action with local anesthetics and may prolong the duration of sensory, motor blockade and postoperative analgesia obtained with spinal anesthesia. Aim: The objectives of this study are to compare and evaluate the efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine premedication with clonidine and placebo on spinal blockade duration, postoperative analgesia and sedation in patients undergoing surgery under bupivacaine intrathecal block. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study, 75 patients of the American Society of Anesthesiologists status I or II, scheduled for orthopedic lower limb surgery under spinal anesthesia, were randomly allocated into three groups of 25 each. Group DE received dexmedetomidine 0.5 μgkg−1 , group CL received clonidine 1.0 μgkg−1 and placebo group PL received 10 ml of normal saline intravenously before subarachnoid anesthesia with 15 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine. Onset time and regression times of sensory and motor blockade, the maximum upper level of sensory blockade were recorded. Duration of postoperative analgesia and sedation scores along with side effects were also recorded. Data was analyzed using analysis of variance or Chi-square test, and the value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The sensory block level was higher with dexmedetomidine (T4 ± 1 than clonidine (T6 ± 1 or placebo (T6 ± 2. Dexmedetomidine also increased the time (243.35 ± 56.82 min to first postoperative analgesic request compared with clonidine (190.93 ± 42.38 min, P < 0.0001 and placebo (140.75 ± 28.52 min, P < 0.0001. The maximum Ramsay sedation score was greater in the dexmedetomidine group than other two groups (P < 0.0001. Conclusion: Premedication with intravenous dexmedetomidine is better than intravenous clonidine to provide intraoperative sedation and postoperative analgesia during bupivacaine

  1. Hypnosis, hypnotizability, and placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischholz, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Raz's speculations about the relation between placebo responsivity and hypnotizability are critically examined. While there is no generally accepted theoretical definition of hypnosis, there is a general consensus that hypnotizability can be reliably measured. In contrast, there seems to be a general consensus about a theoretical definition of placebo (including placebo effect, placebo response, and nocebo). There is no widely accepted measure of individual differences in placebo responsivity. Various methodological considerations about how to examine the relation between placebo responsivity and hypnotizability are identified. Studies are identified which indicate that response to treatments which utilize adjunctive hypnosis are superior to placebo treatments. The only study which examined whether placebo responsivity was correlated with hypnotizability seems to indicate that they are only slightly related at best. The possibility that there may be such thing as a "good placebo responder (GPR)" is questioned, while the known clinical value of hypnotizability assessment is reaffirmed. Future directions for empirical research on the relation between placebo responsivity and hypnotizability are identified.

  2. Analgesia regional em cuidados intensivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Guedes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVAS E OBJETIVOS: A analgesia regional desempenha um papel importante na abordagem multimodal da dor no doente crítico e permite amenizar o desconforto do doente e reduzir os estresses fisiológico e psicológico associados. Ao diminuir as doses de opioides sistêmicos, reduz alguns dos seus efeitos colaterais, como a síndrome de abstinência, possíveis alterações psicológicas e disfunção gastrintestinal. Apesar desses benefícios, seu uso é controverso, uma vez que os doentes em unidades de cuidados intensivos apresentam frequentemente contraindicações, como coagulopatia, instabilidade hemodinâmica e dificuldade na avaliação neurológica e na execução da técnica regional. CONTEÚDO: Os autores apresentam uma revisão sobre analgesia regional em cuidados intensivos, com foco nas principais vantagens e limitações de seu uso no doente crítico, e descrevem as técnicas regionais mais usadas e a sua aplicabilidade nesse contexto.

  3. EMG assessment of analgesia in treatment of posttonsillectomy pain: random allocation, preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Krakovski, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Surface electromyographic (sEMG) study of posttonsillectomy swallow-evoked muscular reactions was performed to assess validity of EMG in evaluation of analgesic drugs. Sixty randomly chosen operated adults were divided into group 1 (n=30) treated with oxycodone, and group 2 (n=30) treated with placebo. Pain assessment included visual analog scale (VAS) pain score and EMG data: the timing, electric amplitude, and graphic patterns of muscular activity. We investigated masseter, infrahyoid, and submental-submandibular muscles. Records from trapezius muscle were used for control. The results were compared with previously established normative database. The sEMG data were compared with VAS score. Oxycodone significantly reduced VAS pain score and changed muscle reactions to analgesia (amplitude) as was recorded by sEMG, whereas placebo reduced VAS pain score nonsignificantly and changed the reaction of the trapezius muscle only. Analgesia smoothes the recorded swallow peaks and increases time of deglutition. Statistically significant difference in muscle reactions was detected between the 2 groups. sEMG might be used for quantitative evaluation of analgesic drugs by assessment of muscular reactions to pain and to analgesia. This method might add quantitative justification to the information obtained by VAS pain testing and clinical data.

  4. Opposite effects of the same drug: reversal of topical analgesia by nocebo information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslaksen, Per Matti; Zwarg, Maria Lorentze; Eilertsen, Hans-Ingvald Hage; Gorecka, Marta Maria; Bjørkedal, Espen

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that psychological factors such as learning, expectation, and emotions can affect pharmacological treatment and shape both favorable and adverse effects of drugs. This study investigated whether nocebo information provided during administration of an analgesic cream could reverse topical analgesia to hyperalgesia. Furthermore, we tested whether nocebo effects were mediated by negative emotional activation. A total of 142 healthy volunteers (73 women) were randomized into 6 groups. A topical analgesic cream (Emla) was administered together with suggestions of analgesia in 1 group, whereas another group received Emla with suggestions of hyperalgesia. Two other groups received a placebo cream together with the same information as the groups receiving Emla. A fifth group received Emla with no specific information about the effect, and the sixth group received no treatment but the same pain induction as the other groups. Heat pain stimulation (48°C) was administered during a pretest and 2 posttests. Pain was continuously recorded during stimulation, and measures of subjective stress and blood pressure were obtained before the pretest, after the application of cream, and after the posttests. The results revealed that pain was significantly lower in the group receiving Emla with positive information and highest in the groups receiving suggestions of hyperalgesia, regardless of whether Emla or the placebo was administered. Mediation analyses showed that stress and blood pressure mediated hyperalgesia after nocebo suggestions. These results suggest that nocebo information can reverse topical analgesia and that emotional factors can explain a significant proportion of variance in nocebo hyperalgesia.

  5. [Pneumoencephalotomography under diaz-analgesia and narco-analgesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, J L; Renou, A M; Boulard, G; Vernhiet, J; Nicod, J

    1978-01-01

    The authors reported 92 observations of anesthesia for gaseous encephalotomography interest the adult. The contrast produce is air. 49 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. 25 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, succinylcholine, N2O to 60 p. 100. 18 under narco-analgesia and myoresolution. +Fentyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. The conditions of the study are described in the first part. The results and their analysis permit the appreciation of: - the patient confort, the quality of the examination; -the respect of the hemodynamics for this examination, reputed to be "difficult"; -the immediatly noticeable diminution of side effects; -the absence of side effects; -the justification and interesting of the control ventilation; -the quality of waking up. In the conclusion the authors underline the interest of their different techniques and the possibility of using them in operations in sitting position in neurosurgery, and all important chirurgical intervention.

  6. Paediatric analgesia in an Emergency Department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hawkes, C

    2012-02-03

    Timely management of pain in paediatric patients in the Emergency Department (ED) is a well-accepted performance indicator. We describe an audit of the provision of analgesia for children in an Irish ED and the introduction of a nurse-initiated analgesia protocol in an effort to improve performance. 95 children aged 1-16 presenting consecutively to the ED were included and time from triage to analgesia, and the rate of analgesia provision, were recorded. The results were circulated and a nurse initiated analgesia protocol was introduced. An audit including 145 patients followed this. 55.6% of patients with major fractures received analgesia after a median time of 54 minutes, which improved to 61.1% (p = 0.735) after 7 minutes (p = 0.004). Pain score documentation was very poor throughout, improving only slightly from 0% to 19.3%. No child had a documented pain score, which slightly improved to 19.3%. We recommend other Irish EDs to audit their provision of analgesia for children.

  7. Cost of treatment as a placebo effect in psychopharmacology: importance in the context of generic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-04-01

    Nonspecific factors have long been known in both psychotherapy and psychopharmacology. In recent years, 2 studies showed that placebo benefits were lower when the treated subjects were told that the placebo, presented as an active treatment, cost less. One of these studies had assessed motor and other outcomes in Parkinson disease patients; the other had assessed analgesia in paid, healthy volunteers to whom electric shocks were administered. The implication of the finding that lower treatment cost may diminish treatment gains is that patients who receive generic medicines may have lower expectations and may consequently derive less placebo-related benefit. This could be of concern in psychiatric disorders that are characterized by a large placebo response. Although the 2 "placebo cost" studies cannot be easily generalized to clinical and especially psychiatric contexts, clinicans should consider offering reassurance to patients receiving generic drugs that cost, per se, has no bearing on treatment-related benefit.

  8. Local infiltration analgesia in joint replacement: the evidence and recommendations for clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Andersen, L Ø

    2011-01-01

    trials. It is concluded that a predominant part of the data have had an insufficient design by not being placebo-controlled or with comparable systemic analgesia provided in the investigated groups. It is concluded that there is little evidence to support the use of the technique in hip replacement...... administration. In knee replacement, a compression bandage prolongs the analgesic effect. There are limited data to support the use of NSAIDs or epinephrine in the solution and the data on post-operative hospitalisation and recovery are conflicting. Thus, shorter lengths of stay have been achieved by oral...... multimodal, non-opioid analgesia together with organisational optimisation of care according to the fast-track methodology....

  9. Understanding Central Mechanisms of Acupuncture Analgesia Using Dynamic Quantitative Sensory Testing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Ti Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the emerging translational tools for the study of acupuncture analgesia with a focus on psychophysical methods. The gap between animal mechanistic studies and human clinical trials of acupuncture analgesia calls for effective translational tools that bridge neurophysiological data with meaningful clinical outcomes. Temporal summation (TS and conditioned pain modulation (CPM are two promising tools yet to be widely utilized. These psychophysical measures capture the state of the ascending facilitation and the descending inhibition of nociceptive transmission, respectively. We review the basic concepts and current methodologies underlying these measures in clinical pain research, and illustrate their application to research on acupuncture analgesia. Finally, we highlight the strengths and limitations of these research methods and make recommendations on future directions. The appropriate addition of TS and CPM to our current research armamentarium will facilitate our efforts to elucidate the central analgesic mechanisms of acupuncture in clinical populations.

  10. The effect of low-dose intravenous ketamine on continuous intercostal analgesia following thoracotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Yazigi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist, provides analgesia and prevents chronic pain following thoracotomy. The study was aimed to assess the effect of intravenous low-dose ketamine on continuous intercostal nerve block analgesia following thoracotomy. The study was a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled clinical study, performed in a single university hospital. Sixty patients, undergoing elective lobectomy through an open posterolateral thoracotomy, were included. For postoperative pain, all patients received a continuous intercostal nerve block with bupivacaine plus intravenous paracetamol and ketoprofen. In addition, patients were randomized to have intravenous ketamine (0.1 mg/kg as a preincisional bolus followed by a continuous infusion of 0.05 mg/kg/h in group 1 or intravenous placebo in group 2. Patients reporting a visual analog scale pain score at rest ≥40 mm received intravenous morphine sulfate as rescue analgesia. The following parameters were assessed every 6 hours for 3 postoperative days: Visual analog scale pain scores at rest and during coughing, requirement of rescue analgesia with morphine, Ramsay sedation scores and psychomimetic adverse effects. Both the groups were statistically comparable regarding visual analog scale pain scores at rest (P=0.75 and during coughing (P=0.70, number of morphine deliveries (P=0.17, cumulative dose of rescue morphine (P=0.2, sedation scores (P=0.4, and psychomimetic adverse effects (P=0.09. Intravenous low-dose ketamine, when combined with continuous intercostal nerve block, did not decrease acute pain scores and supplemental morphine consumption following thoracotomy.

  11. ANALYSIS OF POSTOPERATIVE PAIN AFTER EXTRACTION OF IMPACTED MANDIBULAR THIRD MOLARS AND ADMINISTRATION OF PREEMPTIVE ANALGESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyan Neychev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available patients because of the effect of pain symptoms on the healing process and quality of life. The objective of this study is to make a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the postoperative pain in patients to whom preemptive analgesia was administered. Material and Methods: This is a randomised, placebo-controlled study in 80 patients who underwent surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars. The patients were divided into three groups – with the preemptive administration of placebo, metamizole sodium and nimesulide. The short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS were used for assessment and analysis of postoperative pain. Results: For the first 24 hours after molar extraction the comparison of the values of the various pain components showed a superior effect of the preemptive analgesia with nimesulide for the alleviation of sensory and total pain compared to metamizole sodium and placebo. In all three groups, pain intensity was highest at postoperative hour 6. Conclusion: Preemptive use of NSAIDs in the extraction of impacted mandibular third molars reduces the perception of postoperative pain and its intensity.

  12. AMPAkines and morphine provide complementary analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongjun; Liu, Kevin; Martinez, Erik; Dale, Jahrane; Huang, Dong; Wang, Jing

    2017-09-15

    Glutamate signaling in the central nervous system is known to play a key role in pain regulation. AMPAkines can enhance glutamate signaling through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. previous studies have shown that AMPAkines are effective analgesic agents, and their site of action is likely in the brain. It is not known, however, if AMPAkines can provide complementary analgesia in combination with opioids, the most commonly used analgesics. Here, we show that the co-administration of an AMPAkine with morphine can provide additional analgesia, both in naïve rats and in rats that experience postoperative pain. Furthermore, we show that this AMPAkine can be administered directly into the prefrontal cortex to provide analgesia, and that prefrontal AMPAkine infusion, similar to systemic administration, can provide added pain relief to complement morphine analgesia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Analgesia pós-operatória Postoperative analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Sílvia Beozzo Bassanezi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVAS E OBJETIVOS: A dor sempre foi uma das maiores preocupações do homem, entretanto, apesar dos progressos da ciência, ainda existem várias barreiras ao seu adequado tratamento, incluindo a falta de conhecimento por parte da equipe médica, sobre o mecanismo das diversas drogas e técnicas empregadas. O objetivo deste trabalho é abordar as principais drogas e técnicas empregadas no controle da dor pós-operatória, visando estimular o interesse sobre o assunto bem como aumentar a eficácia do tratamento dado aos pacientes. CONTEÚDO: Está ressaltada neste artigo, a importância da adequada analgesia pós-operatória, considerando as principais drogas e técnicas utilizadas no controle da dor, seus mecanismos de ação, posologias, vias de administração e efeitos colaterais, bem como a importância da integração de toda a equipe envolvida nos cuidados do paciente para o sucesso do tratamento. O tratamento inadequado da dor no pós-operatório não se justifica, pois há um arsenal considerável de drogas e técnicas analgésicas. O que se faz necessário, portanto, é que toda equipe, anestesistas, cirurgiões, e enfermeiros tenham conhecimento e estejam integrados na utilização deste arsenal.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pain has been one of the men's biggest worries. Despite of scientific progress there still exist many barriers in an adequate treatment of pain including the lack of knowledge of many drugs and pain management techniques. The objective of this study is to discuss the main drugs and analgesics process in an effort to stimulate our colleague interest about the subject and thus increasing treatment efficiency of our patients. CONTENTS: It is emphasized in this study the importance of an adequate postoperative analgesia discussing the main drugs and techniques used in pain management, their mechanism of action, dose, administration route and side effects of each drug. It is also pointed out the great importance

  14. Intranasal sufentanil/ketamine analgesia in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bettina Nygaard; Friis, Susanne M; Rømsing, Janne

    2014-01-01

    The management of procedural pain in children ranges from physical restraint to pharmacological interventions. Pediatric formulations that permit accurate dosing, are accepted by children and a have a rapid onset of analgesia are lacking.......The management of procedural pain in children ranges from physical restraint to pharmacological interventions. Pediatric formulations that permit accurate dosing, are accepted by children and a have a rapid onset of analgesia are lacking....

  15. Intraperitoneal And Incisional Bupivacaine Analgesia For Major Abdominal/Gynecologic Surgery: A Placebocontrolled

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    R. Azarfarin

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Postoperative pain is an important surgical problem. Recent studies in pain pathophysiology have led to the hypothesis that with perioperative administration of analgesics (pre-emptive analgesia it may be possible to prevent or reduce postoperative pain. This study was planned to investigate the efficacy of pre-emptive analgesia on postoperative pain after major gynecologic abdominal surgeries. Methods: In this prospective, double-blinded, randomized, and placebocontrolled trial, 60 ASA physical status I and II patients undergoing major abdominal gynecologic surgeries were randomized to receive 45 mL of bupivacaine 0.375% or 45mL of normal saline; 30 mL and 15 mL of the treatment solution was administered into the peritoneal cavity and incision, respectively, before wound closure. The pain score of the patients was evaluated by the visual analogue scale (VAS on awakening, and at 6, 12, and 24h after surgery. Time to first analgesia request and total analgesic requirements in the first 24h were recorded. Results: Pain scores were significantly higher in the placebo group than in the bupivacaine group on awakening (5.98±1.01 v.s 1.05±1.05; p<0.001, and at 6h after surgery (5.37±0.85 vs. 2.51±1.02; p<0.001. First request to analgesia was significantly longer in the bupivacaine patients than in the placebo group (5.87±3.04 h vs.1.35±0.36; p<0.001.Meperidine consumption over 24h was 96.00 ±17.53 mg in the placebo group compared with 23.28 ±14.89 mg in the bupivacaine patients (p<0.001.Conclusion:A combination of intraperitoneal and incisional bupivacaine infiltration at the end of abdominal gynecologic surgeries reduces postoperative pain on awakening and for 6 hours after surgery, and provides significant opioidsparing analgesia for 24 h after gynecologic abdominal surgeries.

  16. Hypno-analgesia and acupuncture analgesia: a neurophysiological reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletu, B; Saletu, M; Brown, M; Stern, J; Sletten, I; Ulett, G

    1975-01-01

    The effects of hypnosis, acupuncture and analgesic drugs on the subjective experience of pain and on objective neurophysiological parameters were investigated. Pain was produced by brief electric stimuli on the wrist. Pain challengers were: hypnosis (induced by two different video tapes), acupuncture (at specific and unspecific loci, with and without electrical stimulation of the needles), morphine and ketamine. Evaluation of clinical parameters included the subjective experience of pain intensity, blood pressure, puls, temperature, psychosomatic symptoms and side effects. Neurophysiological parameters consisted of the quantitatively analyzed EEG and somatosensory evlked potential (SEP). Pain was significantly reduced by hypnosis, morphine and ketamine, but not during the control seesion. Of the four acupuncture techniques, only electro-acupuncture at specific loci significantly decreased pain. The EEG changes during hypnosis were dependent on the wording of the suggestion and were characterized by an increase of slow and a decrease of fast waves. Acupuncture induced just the opposite changes, which were most significant when needles were inserted at traditional specific sites and stimulated electrically. The evoked potential findings suggested that ketamine attenuates pain in the thalamo-cortical pathways, while hypnosis, acupuncture and morphine induce analgesia at the later CNS stage of stimulus processing. Finally some clinical-neurophysiological correlations were explored.

  17. Cortical and subcortical responses to high and low effective placebo treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuter, Stephan; Eippert, Falk; Hindi Attar, Catherine; Büchel, Christian

    2013-02-15

    The effectiveness of placebo treatments depends on the recipient's expectations, which are at least in part shaped by previous experiences. Thus, positive past experience together with an accordant verbal instruction should enhance outcome expectations and subsequently lead to higher placebo efficacy. This should be reflected in subjective valuation reports and in activation of placebo-related brain structures. We tested this hypothesis in a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, where subjects experienced different levels of pain relief and conforming information about price levels for two placebo treatments during a manipulation phase, thereby establishing a weak and a strong placebo. As expected, both placebos led to a significant pain relief and the strong placebo induced better analgesic efficacy. Individual placebo value estimates reflected treatment efficacy, i.e. subjects were willing to pay more money for the strong placebo even though pain stimulation was completed at this time. On the neural level, placebo effects were associated with activation of the rostral anterior cingulate cortex, the anterior insula, and the ventral striatum and deactivations in the thalamus and secondary somatosensory cortex. However, only placebo-related responses in rostral anterior cingulate cortex were consistent across both the anticipation of painful stimuli and their actual administration. Most importantly, rostral anterior cingulate cortex responses were higher for the strong placebo, thus mirroring the behavioral effects. These results directly link placebo analgesia to anticipatory activity in the ventral striatum, a region involved in reward processing, and highlight the role of the rostral anterior cingulate cortex, as its activity consistently scaled with increasing analgesic efficacy.

  18. Analgesia preemptiva com dexametasona ou ibuprofeno em tratamentos e retratamentos endodônticos com ampliação foraminal

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Analgesia preemptiva é um regime analgésico instituído antes da lesão tecidual, porém sua eficácia na clínica endodôntica ainda é controversa. Este estudo avaliou se a dexametasona e o ibuprofeno promovem analgesia preemptiva em tratamentos ou retratamentos endodônticos, se comparados a um placebo, quando empregada a técnica de instrumentação do sistema de canais radiculares em que se trabalha 1 mm além do comprimento real do dente (ampliação foraminal). Para tal, 97 sujeitos foram divididos ...

  19. Progress in analgesia for labor: focus on neuraxial blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Sudharma Ranasinghe

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available J Sudharma Ranasinghe, David J BirnbachMiller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Florida, USAAbstract: Neuraxial analgesia is widely accepted as the most effective and the least depressant method of providing pain relief in labor. Over the last several decades neuraxial labor analgesia techniques and medications have progressed to the point now where they provide high quality pain relief with minimal side effects to both the mother and the fetus while maximizing the maternal autonomy possible for the parturient receiving neuraxial analgesia. The introduction of the combined spinal epidural technique for labor has allowed for the rapid onset of analgesia with minimal motor blockade, therefore allowing the comfortable parturient to ambulate. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia techniques have evolved to allow for more flexible analgesia that is tailored to the individual needs of the parturient and effective throughout the different phases of labor. Computer integrated systems have been studied to provide seamless analgesia from induction of neuraxial block to delivery. New adjuvant drugs that improve the effectiveness of neuraxial labor analgesia while decreasing the side effects that may occur due to high dose of a single drug are likely to be added to future labor analgesia practice. Bupivacaine still remains a popular choice of local anesthetic for labor analgesia. New local anesthetics with less cardiotoxicity have been introduced, but their cost effectiveness in the current labor analgesia practice has been questioned.Keywords: labor, neuraxial, analgesia, neuraxial labor analgesia

  20. The placebo effect and nothingness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine

    In this paper I shall discuss the placebo effect from a posthuman angle. The placebo effect is a medical conundrum, as it is a medical effect that is produced by “nothing”. Placebo literally means, ”I please”, and the placebo has, among other things, been defined as an inert substance, often...... a calcium pill. Placebos are being used in medical trials to determine how much of the medical effect is caused by other factors than medical. There is a vast amount of literature on the placebo effect and it has been studied since the late 1940’ies, mainly for the purpose of pre-elimination from medical......, applying Karen Barad’s concept of agential realism to the problem. I argue that the placebo effect is a cuttingtogether- apart that produces specific agencies in the placebo phenomenon – that is, both the subject under treatment and the placebo emerge in the placebo effect. Through quantum physics, Barad...

  1. OUR EXPERIENCE WITH EPIDURAL LABOUR ANALGESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uršula Reš Muravec

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. To evaluate the effects of regional labour analgesia used at the Hospital for Gynecology and Obstetrics in Postojna, Slovenia, in the year 2002.Patients and methods. In this retrospective study we enrolled 294 parturients who delivered in the year 2002 in the Postojna Maternity Hospital: in group 1 there were 147 parturients in whom three different regional analgesic techniques (study group were used at labour; in group 2 there were 147 parturients in whom regional analgesia was not used (control group. In the first step the two groups were compared in terms of maternal demographic data, duration and outcome of labour and 1' and 5' Apgar scores. In the second step the three regional analgesic groups were compared in terms of the course and outcome of labour, fetal condition, side and adverse effects of regional analgesic techniques, and patient satisfaction with a particular analgesic technique.Results. Regional labour analgesia was used in 147 (14% of the 1048 women who delivered in 2002: epidural analgesia (EPI was performed in 51.0%, combined spinal-epidural (CSE in 42.2% and spinal analgesia (SA in 6.8% of cases. The women in the regional analgesia group were significantly older, more educated, more often nulliparous and accompanied by their partner at labour than the women in the control group. Further, the duration of labour was significantly longer, oxytocin more frequently administered than in the control group. In terms of labour outcome there were no differences in the Cesarean section rates and 1- and 5-min Apgar scores minutes, but and the vacuum extraction rate was significantly higher in the regional analgesia group. Among the three regional analgesia techniques used, there were no statistically significant differences observed in terms of labour duration and outcome, and Apgar scores. The patient satisfaction was greatest with CSE. Adverse side effects such as weak muscles, reduced motion abilities, itching, nausea

  2. Analgesia peridural para o trabalho de parto e para o parto: efeitos da adição de um opióide Effects of the association of an opioid with epidural analgesia for labor and delivery

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    José Guilherme Cecatti

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a eficácia e segurança da associação bupivacaína com sufentanil para a analgesia no trabalho de parto e do parto por meio de um bloqueio peridural contínuo. Realizou-se um ensaio clínico duplo-cego, prospectivo e aleatório, incluindo sessenta mulheres nulíparas da Maternidade do CAISM/UNICAMP. No momento da analgesia, as mulheres foram aleatoriamente alocadas em dois grupos: BS, recebendo 12,5 mg de bupivacaína com adrenalina mais 30 µg de sufentanil e BP, recebendo 12,5 mg de bupivacaína com adrenalina mais placebo. Foram avaliados os parâmetros relativos à qualidade e duração da analgesia, duração do trabalho de parto e também possíveis efeitos sobre o recém-nascido. Os resultados mostraram a superioridade da adição do sufentanil sobre o grau de analgesia durante o tempo de ação da primeira dose de anestésico local. Não houve aumento na duração do trabalho de parto depois do início da analgesia quando se compararam ambos os grupos, nem qualquer diferença quanto à via de parto. Não houve também diferenças entre os grupos com relação à avaliação dos recém-nascidos. Conclui-se que a associação de 30 µg de sufentanil à primeira dose de bupivacaína é segura e eficaz, melhorando a qualidade da analgesia, sua duração e não afetando a progressão do trabalho de parto e o resultado neonatal.The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the association bupivacaine with sufentanil for labor and delivery analgesia through a continuous epidural blockade, for both mother and the neonate. A randomized double blind prospective clinical trial was performed including sixty nulliparous women at the Maternity of CAISM/UNICAMP. When requesting analgesia, the women were randomly allocated to two groups: BS, receiving 12.5 mg of bupivacaine with adrenaline plus 30 µg of sufentanil and BP, receiving 12.5 mg of bupivacaine with adrenaline plus placebo

  3. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial

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    Freeman Liv M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries, partly as a result of non-availability due to logistic problems. Remifentanil, a synthetic opioid, is very suitable for patient controlled analgesia. Recent studies show that epidural analgesia is superior to remifentanil patient controlled analgesia in terms of pain intensity score; however there was no difference in satisfaction with pain relief between both treatments. Methods/design The proposed study is a multicentre randomized controlled study that assesses the cost-effectiveness of remifentanil patient controlled analgesia compared to epidural analgesia. We hypothesize that remifentanil patient controlled analgesia is as effective in improving pain appreciation scores as epidural analgesia, with lower costs and easier achievement of 24 hours availability of pain relief for women in labour and efficient pain relief for those with a contraindication for epidural analgesia. Eligible women will be informed about the study and randomized before active labour has started. Women will be randomly allocated to a strategy based on epidural analgesia or on remifentanil patient controlled analgesia when they request pain relief during labour. Primary outcome is the pain appreciation score, i.e. satisfaction with pain relief. Secondary outcome parameters are costs, patient satisfaction, pain scores (pain-intensity, mode of delivery and maternal and neonatal side effects. The economic analysis will be performed from a short-term healthcare perspective. For both strategies the cost of perinatal care for mother and child, starting at the onset of labour and ending ten days after delivery, will be registered and compared. Discussion This study, considering cost

  4. Involvement of connexin 43 in acupuncture analgesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Guang-ying; ZHENG Cui-hong; YU Wei-chang; TIAN Dai-shi; WANG Wei

    2009-01-01

    Background Connexin 43 (Cx43) is one of the major components of human keratinocyte gap junctions. To study whether gap junctional intercellular communication participates in the transfer of acupoint signals and acupuncture analgesia, the expression of Cx43 was studied in Zusanli (ST36) acupoints compared with control non-acupoint regions in rats after acupuncture. In addition, Cx43 heterozygous gene knockout mice were used to further explore the relationship between Cx43 and acupuncture analgesia. Methods The expression of Cx43 was detected by immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and RT-PCR for the Cx43 protein and mRNA. The influence of the Cx43 gene knockout on acupuncture analgesia was measured by a hot plate and observing the writhing response on Cx43 heterozygous gene knockout mice. Results Immunohistochemistry showed abundant Cx43 expression in some cells in the skin and subcutaneous tissue of rat ST36 acupoints. The mRNA and protein levels of Cx43 in acupoints were significantly higher than those in the control points in the non-acupuncture group, and even more so after acupuncture. The hot plate and writhing response experiments showed that partial knockout of the Cx43 gene decreased acupuncture analgesia. Conclusion Cx43 expression and acupuncture analgesia showed a positive correlation.

  5. Effect of postoperative epidural analgesia on surgical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, K; Holte, Kathrine

    2002-01-01

    Pain relief allowing sufficient mobilization after major surgical procedures can only be achieved by continuous epidural analgesia with local anesthetics, which also reduces the stress response to surgery. However, the role of postoperative epidural analgesia on postoperative morbidity is controv......Pain relief allowing sufficient mobilization after major surgical procedures can only be achieved by continuous epidural analgesia with local anesthetics, which also reduces the stress response to surgery. However, the role of postoperative epidural analgesia on postoperative morbidity...... is controversial. We therefore update the effects of postoperative analgesia on surgical outcome. After major abdominal surgery, postoperative epidural analgesia with local anesthetics significantly reduces postoperative ileus and pulmonary complications while effects on cardiac morbidity are debatable. Continuous...... regimen does not contain a sufficient amount of local anesthetics. Future evaluation of the effects of epidural analgesia on postoperative outcome also requires integration of epidural analgesia within a multimodal rehabilitation programme....

  6. Effect of postoperative epidural analgesia on surgical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, K; Holte, Kathrine

    2002-01-01

    Pain relief allowing sufficient mobilization after major surgical procedures can only be achieved by continuous epidural analgesia with local anesthetics, which also reduces the stress response to surgery. However, the role of postoperative epidural analgesia on postoperative morbidity is controv...

  7. Epidural anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzimas, P; Prout, J; Papadopoulos, G; Mallett, S V

    2013-06-01

    Although epidural analgesia is routinely used in many institutions for patients undergoing hepatic resection, there are unresolved issues regarding its safety and efficacy in this setting. We performed a review of papers published in the area of anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection surgery and selected four areas of current controversy for the focus of this review: the safety of epidural catheters with respect to postoperative coagulopathy, a common feature of this type of surgery; analgesic efficacy; associated peri-operative fluid administration; and the role of epidural analgesia in enhanced recovery protocols. In all four areas, issues are raised that question whether epidural anaesthesia is always the best choice for these patients. Unfortunately, the evidence available is insufficient to provide definitive answers, and it is clear that there are a number of areas of controversy that would benefit from high-quality clinical trials.

  8. Bupivacaine versus lidocaine analgesia for neonatal circumcision

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    Stolik-Dollberg Orit C

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analgesia for neonatal circumcision was recently advocated for every male infant, and its use is considered essential by the American Academy of Pediatrics. We compared the post-operative analgesic quality of bupivacaine to that of lidocaine for achieving dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB when performing neonatal circumcision. Methods Data were obtained from 38 neonates following neonatal circumcision. The infants had received DPNB analgesia with either lidocaine or bupivacaine. The outcome variable was the administration by the parents of acetaminophen during the ensuing 24 hours. Results Seventeen infants received lidocaine and 19 received bupivacaine DPNB. Ten infants in the lidocaine group (59% were given acetaminophen following circumcision compared to only 3 (16% in the bupivacaine group (P 2 = 20.6; P = 0.006. Conclusion DPNB with bupivacaine for neonatal circumcision apparently confers better analgesia than lidocaine as judged by the requirement of acetaminophen over the ensuing 24-hour period.

  9. The placebo effect in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutile, Stefanie; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Wechsler, Michael E

    2014-08-01

    The placebo effect is a complex phenomenon occurring across a variety of clinical conditions. While much placebo research has been conducted in diseases defined by self-report such as depression, chronic pain, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), asthma has been proposed as a useful model because of its easily measured objective outcomes. Studies examining the placebo response in asthma have not only contributed to an understanding of the mechanisms behind the placebo response but also shed an interesting light on the current treatment and diagnosis of asthma. This paper will review current literature on placebos in general and specifically on the placebo response in asthma. It focuses on what we know about the mechanisms behind the placebo effect, whether there is a specific portion of the population who responds to placebos, which patient outcomes are influenced by the placebo effect, and whether the effect can be augmented.

  10. Age-dependency of analgesia elicited by intraoral sucrose in acute and persistent pain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anseloni, Vanessa C Z; Weng, H-R; Terayama, R; Letizia, David; Davis, Barry J; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald; Ennis, Matthew

    2002-05-01

    mechanisms and that an enhanced sucrose effect takes place in hyperalgesic, inflamed animals as compared to naive animals. Taken together, these results indicate that intraoral sucrose alleviates transient pain in response to thermal and mechanical stimuli, and also effectively reduces inflammatory hyperalgesia and allodynia. Sucrose-induced analgesia is age-dependent and limited to the pre-weaning period in rats. The age-dependency of sucrose-induced analgesia and its differential maturation for the fore- and hindpaw may be due to developmental changes in endogenous analgesic mechanisms and developmental modulation of the interaction between gustatory and pain modulatory pathways.

  11. Interaction of acupuncture treatment and manipulation laterality modulated by the default mode network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xuan; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Zhenyu; Bai, Lijun; Sun, Chuanzhu; Wang, Shan; Wang, Xiaocui; Chen, Zhen; Chen, Hongyan; Tian, Jie

    2017-01-01

    lobule, inferior parietal lobule, precuneus, and left posterior cingulate cortex. It is also proved that disruptions of the default mode network may account for the cognitive and behavioral impairments in chronic pain patients. Our findings further suggested that default mode network participates in the modulation of spatial-oriented attention on placebo analgesia as a mechanism underlying the degree to which treatment side corresponding to the pain.

  12. Intravenous vs Oral Acetaminophen as an Adjunct to Multimodal Analgesia After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Jason B; Freiberg, Andrew A; Yelle, Marc D; Jiang, Yandong; Zhang, Chengwei; Gu, Yin; Kong, Xiangyi; Jian, Wenling; O'Neal, Wesley T; Wang, Jingping

    2017-05-18

    The efficacy of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen compared with its oral formulation for postoperative analgesia is unknown. We hypothesized that the addition of acetaminophen to a multimodal analgesia regimen would provide improved pain management in patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and that the effect of acetaminophen would be variable based on the route of delivery. The study was a single-center, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial on the efficacy of IV vs oral acetaminophen in patients undergoing unilateral TKA. One hundred seventy-four subjects were randomized to one of the 3 groups: IV acetaminophen group (IV group, n = 57) received 1 g IV acetaminophen and oral placebo before postanesthesia care unit (PACU) admission; oral acetaminophen group (PO group, n = 58) received 1 g oral acetaminophen and volume-matched IV normal saline; placebo group (Placebo group, n = 59) received oral placebo and volume-matched IV normal saline. Pain scores were obtained every 15 minutes during PACU stay. Average pain scores, maximum pain score, and pain scores before physical therapy were compared among the 3 groups. Secondary outcomes included total opiate consumption, time to PACU discharge, time to rescue analgesia, and time to breakthrough pain. The average PACU pain score was similar in the IV group (0.56 ± 0.99 [mean ± standard deviation]) compared with the PO group (0.67 ± 1.20; P = .84) and Placebo group (0.58 ± 0.99; P = .71). Total opiate consumption at 6 hours (0.47 mg hydromorphone equivalents ± 0.56 vs 0.54 ± 0.53 vs 0.54 ± 0.61; P = .69) and at 24 hours (1.25 ± 1.30 vs 1.49 ± 1.34 vs 1.36 ± 1.31; P = .46) were also similar between the IV, PO, and Placebo groups. No significant differences were found between all groups for any other outcome. Neither IV nor oral acetaminophen provides additional analgesia in the immediate postoperative period when administered as an adjunct to multimodal analgesia in patients

  13. Analgesia preemptiva com nepafenaco 0,1% na fotocoagulação da retina

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    Emerson Fernandes de Sousa e Castro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar o efeito preemptivo com nepafenaco 0,1% em pacientes submetidos à fotocoagulação da retina para tratamento da retinopatia diabética proliferativa. Métodos: Trinta pacientes foram submetidos à fotocoagulação com laser de argônio em ambos os olhos. O olho contralateral de cada paciente foi o controle. O nepafenaco e o placebo foram utilizados 30 minutos antes da aplicação do laser. Ambos os olhos foram fotocoagulados no mesmo dia. A intensidade da dor foi avaliada por meio da escala analógica visual e da escala descritiva de dor. Resultados: A análise da interação instilação versus nepafenaco mostrou que os pacientes do grupo placebo apresentaram níveis de dor semelhantes em ambos os olhos, e os do grupo nepafenaco apresentaram redução importante do nível de dor no olho em que foi instilado a suspensão de 0,1% quando comparado ao olho contralateral que recebeu placebo (p=0,023. Conclusão: Este estudo sugere que a suspensão de 0,1% de nepafenaco foi útil na analgesia preemptiva de pacientes submetidos à fotocoagulação de retina quando comparada ao placebo.

  14. [Placebo effect in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Hideto

    2007-02-01

    "Placebo" is Latin for "I shall please". The placebo effect has been widely documented by randomized placebo-controlled drug studies. One of the best examples of placebo effectiveness is that have been shown in clinical trials of anti-parkinsonian drugs. The placebo effect is observable not only in drug trials but also with deep brain stimulation. Recent advances in research on the placebo effect in Parkinson's disease (PD) have suggested that motor symptoms of PD can be essentially improved by placebo. A recent study using positron emission tomography (PET) with raclopride demonstrated that release of endogeneous dopamine in the dorsal striatum occurs in placebo-responsive patients with PD. This suggests that placebo-induced expectation of clinical improvement may activate endogenous dopamine in the striatum, and that placebo effectiveness is thus achieved by endogenous dopamine supplementation. Indeed, decreased neuronal activities in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), that were recorded during surgery to implant deep brain stimulation electrodes, correlated well with placebo-induced clinical improvement in patients with PD. Although the detailed pathophysiological mechanism underlying the placebo effects remains uncertain, theoretically, the placebo effect has generally been explained by two different mechanisms: one is conditioning theory (pavlovian conditioning), and the other is cognitive theory (expectation of clinical improvement). Although both mechanisms may contribute to placebo effects, the placebo effect in PD may be attributed more to cognitive mechanisms such as expectation of improvement, because the placebo effect can be obtained in de novo PD patients. There have been accumulating findings that suggest a functional relationship between dopamine and the expectation of clinical improvement (reward). Further basic studies are required to clarify the complex link between dopamine and the reward system, but such findings will contribute to a better

  15. Central administration of neuropeptide FF and related peptides attenuate systemic morphine analgesia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Quan; Jiang, Tian-nan; Li, Ning; Han, Zheng-lan; Wang, Rui

    2011-04-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) belongs to an opioid-modulating peptide family. NPFF has been reported to play important roles in the control of pain and analgesia through interactions with the opioid system. However, very few studies examined the effect of supraspinal NPFF system on analgesia induced by opiates administered at the peripheral level. In the present study, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPFF (1, 3 and 10 nmol) dose-dependently inhibited systemic morphine (0.12 mg, i.p.) analgesia in the mouse tail flick test. Similarly, i.c.v. administration of dNPA and NPVF, two agonists highly selective for NPFF(2) and NPFF(1) receptors, respectively, decreased analgesia induced by i.p. morphine in mice. Furthermore, these anti-opioid activities of NPFF and related peptides were blocked by pretreatment with the NPFF receptors selective antagonist RF9 (10 nmol, i.c.v.). These results demonstrate that activation of central NPFF(1) and NPFF(2) receptors has the similar anti-opioid actions on the antinociceptive effect of systemic morphine.

  16. Hahnemann and placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jütte, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843) known today as the founder of homoeopathy, was - as far as we know - the first physician who administrated placebos to his patient on a systematic and regular basis. This study is based upon unpublished documents (e.g. patients' letters) in the Archives of the Institute for the History of Medicine of the Robert Bosch Foundation in Stuttgart. It also profited from the critical edition of Hahnemann's case journals and the editorial comments which have also been published in this series. Hahnemann differentiated clearly between homeopathic drugs and pharmaceutical substances which he considered as sham medicine (e.g. milk sugar). A close look at Hahnemann's case journals reveals that the percentage of placebo prescriptions was very high (between 54 and 85 percent). In most instances Hahnemann marked placebos with the paragraph symbol (§). The rationale behind this practice was that Hahnemann had encountered the well-known problem that patients were used to taking medicine on a daily basis as it was typical for the age of heroic medicine. The main reason for giving placebo was therefore to please the impatient patient who was used to frequent medications in allopathic medicine, not only every day but sometimes also hourly.

  17. No evidence of a clinically important effect of adding local infusion analgesia administrated through a catheter in pain treatment after total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, K.; Leonhardt, Jane Schwartz; Revald, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    for multiple testing, there was no statistically significant postoperative difference between the LINFA group and the placebo group regarding pain and tiredness. We found some evidence of a short-term effect on nausea and vomiting. Opioid consumption and length of stay were similar in the two groups......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Postoperative analgesia after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) using opioids is associated with troublesome side effects such as nausea and dizziness, and epidural analgesic means delayed mobilization. Thus, local infiltration analgesia (LIA) during surgery prolonged...... with local infusion analgesia (LINFA) into the soft tissue in the hip region through a catheter in the first postoperative days has gained major interest in THA fast-track settings within a short period of time. LIA at the time of surgery is a validated treatment. We investigated the additional effect...

  18. Neuraxial block and postoperative epidural analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, K; McIlroy, D; Kasza, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed associations between intraoperative neuraxial block and postoperative epidural analgesia, and a composite primary outcome of death or non-fatal myocardial infarction, at 30 days post-randomization in POISE-2 Trial subjects. METHODS: 10 010 high-risk noncardiac surgical pat...

  19. Analgesia and sedation after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andrew R; Jackman, Lara

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, the importance of appropriate intra-operative anesthesia and analgesia during cardiac surgery has become recognized as a factor in postoperative recovery. This includes the early perioperative management of the neonate undergoing radical surgery and more recently the care surrounding fast-track and ultra fast-track surgery. However, outside these areas, relatively little attention has focused on postoperative sedation and analgesia within the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). This reflects perceived priorities of the primary disease process over the supporting structure of PICU, with a generic approach to sedation and analgesia that can result in additional morbidities and delayed recovery. Management of the marginal patient requires optimisation of not only cardiac and other attendant pathophysiology, but also every aspect of supportive care. Individualized sedation and analgesia strategies, starting in the operating theater and continuing through to hospital discharge, need to be regarded as an important aspect of perioperative care, to speed the process of recovery. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Postoperative opioid analgesia: time for a reconsideration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Rung, G W; Callesen, T

    1996-01-01

    limit their future use in some situations. Thus, the recent emphasis on ambulatory surgery and accelerated surgical stay programs, both with a focus on early recovery of organ function and provision of functional analgesia [i.e., pain relief that allows normal function (Kehlet H: Postoperative pain...

  1. Nerve injury caused by mandibular block analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2006-01-01

    : feather light touch, pinprick, sharp/dull discrimination, warm, cold, point location, brush stroke direction, 2-point discrimination and pain perception. Gustation was tested for recognition of sweet, salt, sour and bitter. Mandibular block analgesia causes lingual nerve injury more frequently than...

  2. The effects of maternal labour analgesia on the fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Felicity

    2010-06-01

    Maternal labour pain and stress are associated with progressive fetal metabolic acidosis. Systemic opioid analgesia does little to mitigate this stress, but opioids readily cross the placenta and cause fetal-neonatal depression and impair breast feeding. Pethidine remains the most widely used, but alternatives, with the possible exception of remifentanil, have little more to offer. Inhalational analgesia using Entonox is more effective and, being rapidly exhaled by the newborn, is less likely to produce lasting depression. Neuraxial analgesia has maternal physiological and biochemical effects, some of which are potentially detrimental and some favourable to the fetus. Actual neonatal outcome, however, suggests that benefits outweigh detrimental influences. Meta-analysis demonstrates that Apgar score is better after epidural than systemic opioid analgesia, while neonatal acid-base balance is improved by epidural compared to systemic analgesia and even compared to no analgesia. Successful breast feeding is dependent on many factors, therefore randomized trials are required to elucidate the effect of labour analgesia.

  3. Comparison between paracetamol, piroxicam, their combination, and placebo in postoperative pain management of upper limb orthopedic surgery (a randomized double blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khalili

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: IV infusion of 15 mg/kg Paracetamol used as a preventive may provide effective analgesia in comparison with IM 0.4 mg/kg Piroxicam or placebo. Addition of Piroxicam to Paracetamol has not much more benefit than Paracetamol alone, in reducing pain after upper limb orthopedic surgery.

  4. [Placebo and the relationship between doctors and patients. Overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriba, P C

    2012-09-01

    In medicine, placebos are used both in scientific studies and for practical therapeutic purposes. In evidence-based medicine, the efficacy of treatment may be determined as the difference between the effects of the verum (the active study drug) and the placebo, the latter being a substance lacking specific action on the disease under consideration. However, the improvements in patients' conditions under placebo treatment may be substantial and comparable to those with verum. Genuine placebos predominate in clinical studies, while pseudoplacebos prevail in practical therapy. The term pseudoplacebo can also be applied to many procedures in complementary medicine, including homeopathic medicine (Büchel et al., Placebo in der Medizin, 2011). The comprehensive definition of placebo, as used in a report by the German Medical Association (Büchel et al., Placebo in der Medizin, 2011), states that a placebo effect may occur even when treating with verum. The placebo effect is modulated by the context of the treatment, by the expectations of the patients and the doctors, and by the success of the relationship between doctors and patients. A number of unspecific effects, e.g., spontaneous alleviation, statistical effects, variance with time, methodological errors, in addition to the placebo effect make up the total response that is called"placebo reaction." A complete list of the effectiveness of placebo for all important diseases is still lacking. Further, it is not possible to predict which patients will respond to placebo. Which characteristics of doctors are important (competence, empathy, communicative ability and partnership, trust) in order to achieve a placebo effect, particularly in addition to the verum effect measures of evidence-based medicine? Are there doctors who are better in this than others? Could the nocebo effect weaken the efficacy of treatment in evidence-based medicine? Since a placebo effect may occur in almost any standard therapy, information about

  5. Placebo psychotherapy: synonym or oxymoron?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Irving

    2005-07-01

    Contrary to some recent claims, the placebo effect is real and in some cases very substantial. Placebo effects can be produced or enhanced by classical conditioning, but consistent with virtually all contemporary conditioning theories, these effects are generally mediated by expectancy. Expectancy can also produce placebo effects that are inconsistent with conditioning history. Although expectancy also plays an important role in psychotherapy outcome, the logic of placebo-controlled trials does not map well onto psychotherapy research. The idea of evaluating the efficacy of psychotherapy by controlling for nonspecific or placebo factors is based on a flawed analogy and should be abandoned.

  6. Single dose oral clonidine premedication does not enhance postoperative, single low dose epidural morphine analgesia in hysterectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oofuvong, Maliwan; Chanvej, Laksamee; Thongsuksai, Paramee

    2005-03-01

    In this randomized, double blind placebo controlled study, the authors evaluated the effects of oral clonidine premedication on very low dose epidural morphine analgesia in 50 hysterectomy patients. Patients were randomized to receive a single oral clonidine 300 microg (n = 25) or a placebo (n = 25) 90 minutes before insertion of the epidural catheter. 3 ml of 2% lidocaine with adrenaline (5 microg ml(-1) mixed with 2 mg morphine were injected via epidural, followed by an additional volume of 2% lidocaine with adrenaline (5 microg ml(-1)) titrated to T6 block height before commencing general anesthesia. The postoperative analgesia regimen was 2 mg of intravenous morphine every 10 minutes for the first 48 hr and 1 gm of oral acetaminophen every 4-6 hr after initiation of oral diet at 24-48 hr as required. Morphine consumption, acetaminophen, pain scores, and side effects were recorded thoughout 48 hr after surgery. The results show patients in the clonidine and placebo groups were not different in terms of local anesthetics dose (p = 0.27), total morphine and acetaminophen requirement (p = 0.34, p = 0.1) respectively. Pain scores at rest and movement were also not different in both groups (p = 0.83, p = 0.64) respectively. No serious adverse effects were noted. The authors concluded that oral clonidine approximately 6 microg kg(-1) does not enhance the analgesic effect of epidural morphine 2 mg after hysterectomy.

  7. Epidural Analgesia and Fever at Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. M. Shifman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the incidence of labor fever under epidural analgesia (EA and to evaluate its impact on the courses of puerperium and early neonatality. Subjects and methods. The paper presents the data of a prospective study of the course of labor, puerperium, and early neonatality in 397 women in whom labors occurred at the Republican Peritoneal Center in 2006. A study group included 324 parturients in whom labor pain was relieved by EA. A comparison group comprised 55 parturients in whom no analgesics were used at labor. Results. There were no significant statistical differences between the groups in the incidence of labor fever and complicated puerperium and in that of neonatal pyoseptic diseases. Key words: labor hyperthermia, epidural analgesia, labor pain relief.

  8. [Epidural analgesia in combination with general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Antje; Poepping, Daniel M

    2015-07-01

    Epidural anaesthesia is a widely used and accepted technique for perioperative analgesia in different kinds of surgery. Apart from analgetic effect and due to wide positve effects on patients outcome epidural analgesia is often used with general anaesthesia. It represents a reliable and reversible neural deafferentation technique that effectively contributes to a reduction of the surgical stress response with subsequent positive effects on cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, and immune function. Animal studies suggest that the use of epidural anaesthesia may be beneficial for cancer surgery because of less tumour recurrence. Further, a benefit is expected in patient's mortality. This article summarizes and critically discusses the current knowledge on the effects of epidural anaesthesia on pain management, cardiopulmonary as well as gastrointestinal functions and patient's outcome.

  9. Acupuncture for analgesia in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Lindsey M; Neary, Susan M; Sharrock, Joseph; Rychel, Jessica K

    2014-06-01

    Acupuncture for analgesia is growing rapidly in popularity with veterinarians and pet owners. This article summarizes the mechanisms of analgesia derived from acupuncture and reviews current literature on the topic. Areas covered include the local effects at area of needle insertion, systemic effects secondary to circulating neurotransmitters and changes in cell signaling, central nervous system effects including the brain and spinal cord, and myofascial trigger point and pathology treatment. Clinical applications are discussed and suggested in each section. When used by appropriately trained professionals, acupuncture offers a compelling and safe method for pain management in our veterinary patients and should be strongly considered as a part of multimodal pain management plans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    epidurally. They are opiods and local anesthetics. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of each class are different, and they may act...overall pharmacodynamics of the drug. Epidural Opioids Brown (2000) states that opioids are one class of drug that may be used for epidural analgesia...morphine with lidocaine or bupivacaine with the effects of these medications when administered alone in mice. They used various tests to measure

  11. Remifentanil for labor analgesia: an evidence-based narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, M; Carvalho, B

    2016-02-01

    This manuscript reviews the available literature on remifentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia in labor focusing on efficacy and safety. Remifentanil compares favorably to other potent systemic opioids but with fewer opioid-related neonatal effects. However, remifentanil provides modest and short-lasting labor analgesia that is consistently inferior when compared to neuraxial analgesia. The initial analgesic effect provided with remifentanil also diminishes as labor progresses. In several studies, remifentanil induced significant respiratory depressant effects in laboring women with episodes of desaturation, hypoventilation and even apnea. Given the safety concerns, we recommend that remifentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia should not be a routine analgesia technique during labor. In cases where neuraxial analgesia is refused or contraindicated and the use of remifentanil justified, continuous and careful monitoring is required to detect respiratory depression to provide safe care of both the pregnant woman and unborn child.

  12. Offset analgesia is reduced in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugle, Kelly M; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Fillingim, Roger B; Riley, Joseph L

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that aging is associated with dysfunctional changes in pain modulatory capacity, potentially contributing to increased incidence of pain in older adults. However, age-related changes in offset analgesia (offset), a form of temporal pain inhibition, remain poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate age differences in offset analgesia of heat pain in healthy younger and older adults. To explore the peripheral mechanisms underlying offset, an additional aim of the study was to test offset at 2 anatomical sites with known differences in nociceptor innervation. A total of 25 younger adults and 20 older adults completed 6 offset trials in which the experimental heat stimulus was presented to the volar forearm and glabrous skin of the palm. Each trial consisted of 3 continuous phases: an initial 15-second painful stimulus (T1), a slight increase in temperature from T1 for 5 seconds (T2), and a slight decrease back to the initial testing temperature for 10 seconds (T3). During each trial, subjects rated pain intensity continuously using an electronic visual analogue scale (0-100). Older adults demonstrated reduced offset compared to younger adults when tested on the volar forearm. Interestingly, offset analgesia was nonexistent on the palm for all subjects. The reduced offset found in older adults may reflect an age-related decline in endogenous inhibitory systems. However, although the exact mechanisms underlying offset remain unknown, the absence of offset at the palm suggests that peripheral mechanisms may be involved in initiating this phenomenon.

  13. Hands-and-knees positioning during labor with epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremler, Robyn; Halpern, Stephen; Weston, Julie; Yee, Jennifer; Hodnett, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Hands-and-knees position has shown promise as an intervention to improve labor and birth outcomes, but no reports exist that examine its use with women laboring with epidural analgesia. Concerns of safety, effects on analgesia, and acceptability of use may limit use of active positioning during labor with regional analgesia. This article presents a case study series of 13 women who used hands-and-knees position in the first stage of labor.

  14. Sedation and analgesia in gastrointestinal endoscopy: What’s new?

    OpenAIRE

    Fanti, Lorella; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Various types of sedation and analgesia technique have been used during gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures. The best methods for analgesia and sedation during gastrointestinal endoscopy are still debated. Providing an adequate regimen of sedation/analgesia might be considered an art, influencing several aspects of endoscopic procedures: the quality of the examination, the patient’s cooperation and the patient’s and physician’s satisfaction with the sedation. The properties of a model sedat...

  15. Sedation and analgesia in gastrointestinal endoscopy: What’s new?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lorella; Fanti; Pier; Alberto; Testoni

    2010-01-01

    Various types of sedation and analgesia technique have been used during gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures.The best methods for analgesia and sedation during gastrointestinal endoscopy are still debated.Providing an adequate regimen of sedation/analgesia might be considered an art,influencing several aspects of endoscopic procedures: the quality of the examination,the patient’s cooperation and the patient’s and physician’s satisfaction with the sedation.The properties of a model sedative agent for endosc...

  16. Analgesia accompanying food consumption requires ingestion of hedonic foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, H; Mason, Peggy

    2009-10-14

    Animals eat rather than react to moderate pain. Here, we examined the behavioral, hedonic, and neural requirements for ingestion analgesia in ad libitum fed rats. Noxious heat-evoked withdrawals were similarly suppressed during self-initiated chocolate eating and ingestion of intraorally infused water, sucrose, or saccharin, demonstrating that ingestion analgesia does not require feeding motivation, self-initiated food procurement, sucrose, or calories. Rather, food hedonics is important because neither salt ingestion nor quinine rejection elicited analgesia. During quinine-induced nausea and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced illness, conditions when chocolate eating was presumably less pleasurable, analgesia accompanying chocolate consumption was attenuated, yet analgesia during water ingestion was preserved in LPS-injected rats who showed enhanced palatability for water within this context. The dependence of ingestion analgesia on the positive hedonics of an ingestate was confirmed in rats with a conditioned taste aversion to sucrose: after paired exposure to sucrose and LPS, rats no longer showed analgesia during sucrose ingestion but continued to show analgesia during chocolate consumption. Eating pauses tended to occur less often and for shorter durations in the presence of ingestion analgesia than in its absence. Therefore, we propose that ingestion analgesia functions to defend eating from ending. Muscimol inactivation of the medullary raphe magnus blocked the analgesia normally observed during water ingestion, showing the involvement of brainstem endogenous pain inhibitory mechanisms in ingestion analgesia. Brainstem-mediated defense of the consumption of palatable foods may explain, at least in part, why overeating tasty foods is so irresistible even in the face of opposing cognitive and motivational forces.

  17. Intrathecal analgesia and palliative care: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen S Salins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrathecal analgesia is an interventional form of pain relief with definite advantages and multiple complications. Administration of intrathecal analgesia needs a good resource setting and expertise. Early complications of intrathecal analgesia can be very distressing and managing these complications will need a high degree of knowledge, technical expertise and level of experience. Pain control alone cannot be the marker of quality in palliative care. A holistic approach may need to be employed that is more person and family oriented.

  18. LABOUR ANALGESIA: EPIDURAL DEXMEDITOMIDINE WITH EITHER BUPIVACAINE OR ROPIVACAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varaprasad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain relief in labour is associated with myths and controversies. Providing effective and safe analgesia has remained a challenge. AIM: The purpose of the study was to compare the effect of analgesia with epidural bupivacain or ropivacain along with dexme ditomidine. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Sixty parturients of ASA grade I and II were randomly selected for the study. Each group consisted of thirty patients. The analgesia, motor loss and level of sedation were studied. RESULTS: There was no significant differ ence between the two groups in maternal satisfaction, analgesia and neonatal outcome .

  19. Placebo and deception: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhill, Anne; Miller, Franklin G

    2015-02-01

    In a recent article in this Journal, Shlomo Cohen and Haim Shapiro (2013) introduce the concept of "comparable placebo treatments" (CPTs)--placebo treatments with biological effects similar to the drugs they replace--and argue that doctors are not being deceptive when they prescribe or administer CPTs without revealing that they are placebos. We critique two of Cohen and Shapiro's primary arguments. First, Cohen and Shapiro argue that offering undisclosed placebos is not lying to the patient, but rather is making a self-fulfilling prophecy--telling a "lie" that, ideally, will become true. We argue that offering undisclosed placebos is not a "lie" but is a straightforward case of deceptively misleading the patient. Second, Cohen and Shapiro argue that offering undisclosed CPTs is not equivocation. We argue that it typically is equivocation or deception of another sort. If justifiable, undisclosed placebo use will have to be justified as a practice that is deceptive in most instances.

  20. Semiotics and the placebo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Franklin G; Colloca, Luana

    2010-01-01

    Despite substantial progress in elucidating its neurobiological mechanisms, theoretical understanding of the placebo effect is poorly developed. Application of the semiotic theory developed by the American philosopher Charles Peirce offers a promising account of placebo effects as involving the apprehension and response to signs. The semiotic approach dovetails with the various psychological mechanisms invoked to account for placebo effects, such as conditioning and expectation, and bridges the biological and cultural dimensions of this fascinating phenomenon.

  1. The placebo effect and nothingness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine

    In this paper I shall discuss the placebo effect from a posthuman angle. The placebo effect is a medical conundrum, as it is a medical effect that is produced by “nothing”. Placebo literally means, ”I please”, and the placebo has, among other things, been defined as an inert substance, often...... trials. It has been studied as an effect of personality traits, as an expectational effect, and from a physiological point of departure. Still it remains a medical riddle how something that is “nothing” can cause a measurable effect? In this paper I shall address this issue from a posthuman angle...

  2. Intraarticular analgesia after arthroscopic knee surgery: comparison of neostigmine, clonidine, tenoxicam, morphine and bupivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagol, A; Calpur, O U; Usar, P Saral; Turan, N; Pamukcu, Z

    2005-11-01

    We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blinded study to compare the analgesic effects of intraarticular neostigmine, morphine, tenoxicam, clonidine and bupivacaine in 150 patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery. General anaesthesia protocol was same in all patients. At the end of the surgical procedure, patients were randomized into six intraarticular groups equally. Group N received 500 mug neostigmine, Group M received 2 mg morphine, Group T received 20 mg tenoxicam, Group C received 1 microg kg(-1) clonidine, Group B received 100 mg bupivacaine and Group S received saline 20 ml. Visual analog scale scores 0, 30 and 60 min and 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h, time to first analgesic need, analgesic consumption at 48 h and 72 h and side effects were noted. Demographic and operational parameters were similar in six groups. All study groups provided analgesia when compared with saline group (P<0.05). Duration of analgesia in Group N and C was longer than other groups (P<0.001). Analgesic consumptions of Group N, C and T were lower than other groups (P<0.01). Pain scores during 2 h postoperatively were lower in all study groups than the control group (P<0.001). In Group B, median pain scores were higher than Groups N and C at 0 min and 30 min postoperatively (P<0.001). Side effects were not significantly different among the six groups. We conclude that the most effective drugs that are administered intraarticularly are neostigmine and clonidine among the five drugs we studied. Tenoxicam provided longer analgesia when compared with morphine and bupivacaine, postoperatively.

  3. Oral self-administration of buprenorphine in the diet for analgesia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Cimadevila, M J; Segura, S; Merino, C; Ruiz-Reig, N; Andrés, B; de Madaria, E

    2014-07-01

    Postsurgical oral self-administration of analgesics in rodents is an interesting technique of providing analgesia, avoiding the negative effects of manipulation. Several strategies, using gelatin or nutella, have already been described. However, rodents require some habituation period to reach a good intake because of their neophobic behavior. The current study aimed to explore whether buprenorphine when mixed with an extruded diet offers a potential treatment option in the pain management of mice using a triple approach: by measuring the spontaneous intake in healthy animals; by using the hot-plate test; and finally by assessing the drug's ability to provide postoperative analgesia in a surgical intervention of moderate severity (intra-utero electroporation). Mice consumed during 20 hours, similar amounts of extruded diet alone, mixed with glucosaline, and mixed with buprenorphine (0.03 mg per pellet) or meloxicam (0.25 mg per pellet) both of which were diluted in glucosaline, showing that no neophobia was associated with these administrations. Relative increase from baseline latency (% maximal possible effect) in the hot-plate test at 20 h of administration was significantly higher for oral buprenorphine in diet 0.03 mg/pellet, and diet 0.15 mg/pellet, compared with placebo and no differences were found between those oral administrations and subcutaneous buprenorphine 0.1 mg/kg measured 3 h later. The treatment was also effective in attenuating the reductions in food consumption and body weight that occur after surgery. These data suggest that providing buprenorphine with the diet is a feasible and effective way of self-administration of analgesia in mice and does not cause neophobia and may easily contribute to the refinement of surgical procedures.

  4. Premedicación con clonidina para la analgesia posoperatoria en niños

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    Cuando la clonidina se comparó con el placebo, al agrupar estudios con riesgo de sesgo bajo o poco claro, la necesidad de analgesia adicional se redujo cuando la premedicación con clonidina se administró porvía oral en dosis de 4 μg/kg (cociente de riesgos [CR] 0,24; intervalo de confianza [IC] del 95%: 0,11 a 0,51. Sólo un ensayo pequeño (15 pacientes por brazo comparó la clonidina con el midazolam para el mismo resultado; también se encontró una reducción en la necesidad de analgesia posoperatoria adicional (CR 0,25; IC del 95%: 0,09 a 0,71 cuando la premedicación con clonidina se proporcionó porvía oral en dosis de 2 ó 4 μg/kg en comparación con el midazolam oral en dosis de 0,5 mg/kg. Un ensayo que comparó la clonidina oral en dosis de 4 μg/kg con el fen-tanilo intravenoso en dosis de 3 μg/kg no encontró ninguna diferencia estadísticamente significativa en la necesidad de analgesia de rescate (CR 0,89; IC del 95%: 0,56 a 1,42. Cuando la clonidina en dosis de 4 μg/kg se comparó con la clonidina 2 μg/kg, hubo una diferencia estadísticamente significativa en el número d

  5. Influence of repeated painful procedures and sucrose analgesia on the development of hyperalgesia in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddio, Anna; Shah, Vibhuti; Atenafu, Eshetu; Katz, Joel

    2009-07-01

    This study determined the effects of cumulative exposure to painful needle procedures and sucrose analgesia on the development of remote hyperalgesia in newborn infants, defined as an increase in response to a normally painful stimulus at a site distal from the site of injury. One-hundred and twenty healthy newborns and 120 healthy newborn infants of diabetic mothers equally randomized to sucrose analgesia or placebo prior to all needle procedures in the first two days after birth were divided into two exposure groups according to number of needle procedures they had undergone [high (> or =5) or low (pain response during a subsequent venipuncture distal to the site of previous injury, assessed by the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) [7.1 vs. 8.4; p=0.012] and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) [2.5 cm vs. 3.2 cm; p=0.047], and a trend for longer cry duration [25.7 s vs. 33.8 s; p=0.171]. PIPP scores did not differ during a routine diaper change, suggesting a nociceptive specific mechanism for the remote hyperalgesia to venipuncture. Sucrose reduced PIPP, VAS, and cry duration scores during venipuncture, but did not prevent hyperalgesia (p>0.05). There was a preponderance of infants of diabetic mothers in the high exposure group; however, the analysis did not demonstrate this to be a confounding factor. In conclusion, sucrose analgesia for repeated painful procedures in the first day of life does not prevent development of remote hyperalgesia in newborns.

  6. Labor analgesia: An update on the effect of epidural analgesia on labor outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samina Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the introduction of epidural for labor analgesia, debate has centered on the issue of its effect on outcome of labor; in terms of length of labor and increase in the rate of instrumental vaginal delivery and cesarean section (CS. There is no ideal study on the effect of epidural analgesia (EA on the outcome of labor due to logistic problems in randomization, blinding and getting a control group; as a result these queries are partly answered. Despite these problems, it has been established that labor epidural has minimal effect on progress of established labor and maternal request should be a sufficient indication to start an epidural. Although instrumental vaginal delivery is probably increased with epidural but obstetrician practice, pain free patient and teaching opportunity are likely factors increasing the incidence. Maternal-fetal factors and obstetric management and not the use of EA are the most important determinants of the CS rate. The purpose of this review is to summarize data from controlled trials addressing the question of whether neuraxial labor analgesia causes an increased risk of CS or rate of instrumental delivery. In addition, the review discusses whether the timing of initiation of analgesia infl uences the mode of delivery.

  7. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Liv M.; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W. M.; Franssen, Maureen T. M.; Papatsonis, Dimitri N. M.; Hajenius, Petra J.; van Huizen, Marloes E.; Bremer, Henk A.; van den Akker, Eline S. A.; Woiski, Mallory D.; Porath, Martina M.; van Beek, Erik; Schuitemaker, Nico; van der Salm, Paulien C. M.; Fong, Bianca F.; Radder, Celine; Bax, Caroline J.; Sikkema, Marko; van den Akker-van Marle, M. Elske; van Lith, Jan M. M.; Lopriore, Enrico; Uildriks, Renske J.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries, partly as a res

  8. Measurement of event-related potentials and placebo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sovilj Platon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ERP is common abbreviation for event-related brain potentials, which are measured and used in clinical practice as well as in research practice. Contemporary studies of placebo effect are often based on functional neuromagnetic resonance (fMRI, positron emission tomography (PET, and event related potentials (ERP. This paper considers an ERP instrumentation system used in experimental researches of placebo effect. This instrumentation system can be divided into four modules: electrodes and cables, conditioning module, digital measurement module, and PC module for stimulations, presentations, acquisition and data processing. The experimental oddball paradigm is supported by the software of the instrumentation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR32019 and Provincial Secretariat for Science and Technological Development of Autonomous Province of Vojvodina (Republic of Serbia under research grant No. 114-451-2723

  9. Endocannabinoids and pain: spinal and peripheral analgesia in inflammation and neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, A S C; Farquhar-Smith, W P; Nagy, I

    2002-01-01

    Analgesia is an important physiological function of the endocannabinoid system and one of significant clinical relevance. This review discusses the analgesic effects of endocannabinoids at spinal and peripheral levels, firstly by describing the physiological framework for analgesia and secondly by reviewing the evidence for analgesic effects of endocannabinoids obtained using animal models of clinical pain conditions. In the spinal cord, CB(1) receptors have been demonstrated in laminae of the dorsal horn intimately concerned with the processing of nociceptive information and the modulation thereof. Similarly, CB(1) receptors have been demonstrated on the cell bodies of primary afferent neurones; however, the exact phenotype of cells which express this receptor requires further elucidation. Local administration, peptide release and electrophysiological studies support the concept of spinally mediated endocannabinoid-induced analgesia. Whilst a proportion of the peripheral analgesic effect of endocannabinoids can be attributed to a neuronal mechanism acting through CB(1) receptors expressed by primary afferent neurones, the antiinflammatory actions of endocannabinoids, mediated through CB(2) receptors, also appears to contribute to local analgesic effects. Possible mechanisms of this CB(2)-mediated effect include the attenuation of NGF-induced mast cell degranulation and of neutrophil accumulation, both of which are processes known to contribute to the generation of inflammatory hyperalgesia. The analgesic effects of cannabinoids have been demonstrated in models of somatic and visceral inflammatory pain and of neuropathic pain, the latter being an important area of therapeutic need. Analgesia is one of the principal therapeutic targets of cannabinoids. This review will discuss the analgesic effects of endocannabinoids in relation to two areas of therapeutic need, persistent inflammation and neuropathic pain. The more general aspects of the role of cannabinoids

  10. Beyond the placebo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Frede

    2015-01-01

    potentiale, som kunne skåne mange patienter for sygdomsforværring og unødvendig medicinsk behandling. Artiklen peger på tre faktorer, som særligt udgør forhindringer for i øget grad præcist at bruge placebo i betydningen den samlede kontekst og ”the doctor drug”: negative videnskabelige tanker knyttet til...... termen ”placebo”, manglende viden om kontekstens rolle i det kliniske møde (herunder betydningen af lægens evne til at skabe tillid og relation til patienten) og manglen på translationel forskning fra videnskab til daglig klinik i, hvordan biologiske processer i hjernen påvirkes af kulturelle aspekter...

  11. Efficacy of a multimodal analgesia protocol in total knee arthroplasty: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, P L; Xiao, J; Zhu, Y L; Wu, H S; Li, X H; Wu, Y L; Qian, Q R

    2010-01-01

    A total of 100 osteoarthritis patients undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to receive either a multimodal analgesia protocol, comprising oral celecoxib and tramadol before and after surgery and intra-articular injection of large doses of morphine, ropivacaine, adrenaline and betamethasone during surgery (trial group), or oral and intra-articular placebo (control group). All patients received patient-controlled analgesia for 48 h after surgery. Morphine consumption up to 48 h after surgery was significantly lower in the trial than in the control group. Compared with the control group, the trial group had significantly lower visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for pain at rest from 6 h to 7 days after surgery and significantly lower VAS scores during activity from 24 h to 7 days after surgery. Active straight leg raise and active 90 degrees knee flexion were achieved sooner and range of knee movement at postoperative days 1 - 15 were significantly greater in the trial group. Postoperative wound healing, infection, blood pressure, heart rate, rash, respiratory depression, urinary retention and deep vein thrombosis were similar in the two groups, but nausea and vomiting were significantly less frequent in the trial group.

  12. The many meanings of placebo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bugel, P

    1998-01-01

    Physicians throughout medical history knew three possible ways to explain the association between treatment and cure: 1. the beneficial effect of the treatment itself, 2. the healing power of nature, and 3. the placebo effect. In the modern definition by Grunbaum, a treatment is a placebo when the

  13. The many meanings of placebo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bugel, P

    1998-01-01

    Physicians throughout medical history knew three possible ways to explain the association between treatment and cure: 1. the beneficial effect of the treatment itself, 2. the healing power of nature, and 3. the placebo effect. In the modern definition by Grunbaum, a treatment is a placebo when the e

  14. Effect of postoperative epidural analgesia on surgical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, K; Holte, Kathrine

    2002-01-01

    epidural analgesia significantly lowers the risk of thromboembolic complications after lower body procedures, while no effect is seen after major abdominal surgery. Unfortunately, many studies have inadequate study design, with use of lumbar epidural analgesia for abdominal procedures, or the epidural...

  15. Influence of adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms in baclofen induced analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, L; Rifo, J; Contreras, E

    1988-01-01

    1. Baclofen induced analgesia was confirmed by means of the mouse hot plate test. 2. Physostigmine significantly increased the response to baclofen whilst neostigmine was ineffective. Baclofen analgesia was reduced by atropine. 3. The response to baclofen was increased by the administration of tolazoline, propranolol and nadolol. In contrast, the analgesic response to morphine was attenuated by the antiadrenergic drugs phenoxybenzamine, tolazoline and nadolol.

  16. Inhibiting pain with pain--A basic neuromechanism of acupuncture analgesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    (i) The structure and function of the meridian (chamd and collateral) described by ancient medical doctors may correspond to the blood circulation, nerve control and neurohumoral modulation of modern medicine. ( ii ) The needling, which can injure the tissue, is a noxious stimulation inducing pain. Acupuncture manipulation, such as lifting and thrusting, twisting and twirling, or electroacupuncturc (EA) with the sufferable biggest intensity for patients should be a stronger pain stimulation. The needling sensation of soreness, numbness, distension and heaviness is a deep pain.(iii) There is an intrinsic analgesic system in brain, which centers around the periventricular and periaqueductal grey matter, contains endorphins as possible mediators, goes through the descending inhibition system in medulla oblongata, and acts on the gating mechanism in spinal cord. It could be producing analgesia while the system is activated.(iv) NRM might be a supraspinal center modulating pain,and the R-S neurons could form a basic circuit of negative feedback modulating pain. The discovery of excitatory-inhibitory reversible R-S neurons may give a neurophysiological explanation for the double direction modulation of acupuncture at acupoint. (v) Non-noxious stimulation such as massage or stroking could excite type Ⅰ and Ⅱ afferent fibers, producing a weaker and transient analgesia through the spinal mechanism. When the acupoint is near the pain area, the afferent information from them could be converged on the same and neighboring spinal segments, the light acupuncture or low intensity of EA also has analgesic effects, showing acupoint specificity. But the acupoint specificity is not limited in a specialiy designated channel line, and it is closely related to the segment of innervation. (vi) While acupuncture manipulation of lifting and thrusting, twisting and twirling or a high intensity of EA is used, because the intensities of these stimulations exceed the threshold of afferent

  17. Transdermal nitroglycerine enhances postoperative analgesia of intrathecal neostigmine following abdominal hysterectomies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fareed Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to assess the effect of nitroglycerine (transdermal on intrathecal neostigmine with bupivacaine on postoperative analgesia and note the incidence of adverse effects, if any. After taking informed consent, 120 patients of ASA Grade I and II were systematically randomised into four groups of 30 each. Patients were premedicated with midazolam 0.05 mg/kg intravenously and hydration with Ringer′s lactate solution 10ml/kg preoperatively in the holding room. Group I patients received Intrathecal injection of 15 mg bupivacaine with 1ml of normal saline and transdermal placebo patch. Group II patients received Intrathecal injection of 15 mg bupivacaine with 5 mcg of neostigmine and transdermal placebo patch. Group III patients received Intrathecal injection of 15 mg bupivacaine with 1ml of normal saline with transdermal nitroglycerine patch (5 mg/24 hours. Group IV patients received Intrathecal injection of 15 mg bupivacaine with 5mcg of neostigmine and transdermal nitroglycerine patch (5 mg/24 hours, applied on a non anaesthetised area after 20 minutes. Groups were demographically similar and did not differ in intraoperative characteristics like sensory block, motor block, haemodynamic parameters and SpO 2 . The mean duration of analgesia was 202.17 minutes, 407.20 minutes, 207.53 minutes and 581.63 minutes in control group (I, neostigmine group (II, nitroglycerine group (III and nitroglycerine neostigmine group (IV respectively (P< 0.01. To conclude, our results show that transdermal nitroglycerine itself does not show any analgesic potential but it enhances the analgesic potential of intrathecal neostigmine.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of gabapentin on postoperative analgesia with epidural morphine after abdominal hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diptesh Aryal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Gabapentin has been used successfully as a non-opioid analgesic adjuvant for postoperative pain management. We hypothesized that the preoperative use of gabapentin prolonged the analgesic effect of epidural morphine without an increase in adverse effects of morphine. Materials & Methods: In a randomized, double blind study sixty ASA PS I and II patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy were assigned to receive either placebo or gabapentin 1200mg 1 hour before surgery. Postoperatively, 0.125% bupivacaine with morphine 50 µg per kg body weight was used for epidural analgesia. Vital parameters, time to the first request for analgesic, visual analogue scale scoring for pain at rest and during movement, 24-hour morphine consumption, and side effects were studied.Results: The patients were comparable with respect to age, weight, ASA PS, baseline hemodynamic parameters and duration of surgery. Gabapentin significantly decreased the duration of analgesia compared to placebo (1078.26 min Vs. 303.5 min; P value <0.0001. The VAS scores at rest and during movement at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24h were significantly lower in gabapentin group. The total amount of morphine consumption in 24 h postoperatively was significantly lower in gabapentin group (1.93mg Vs. 6.30mg; P value <0.0001. The incidence of nausea and pruritus was significantly lower with gabapentin. Conclusion: Oral gabapentin 1200 mg as a premedication decreases the dose requirement of epidural morphine and postoperative pain after total abdominal hysterectomy. It also decreases the pain scores at rest and during movement significantly. 

  19. 对立的双生子:基于疼痛的安慰剂效应和反安慰剂效应机制%The Opposite Twins:Mechanisms Underlying Placebo/Nocebo Effect in Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓潇斐; 罗非; 郭建友

    2015-01-01

    Expectation can bidirectionally regulate diseases or sensory experiences. In terms of pain field, positive expectation alleviates pain (i.e., placebo effect); while negative expectation makes it worse (i.e., nocebo effect). So far, most of researches on placebo and nocebo effect mainly come from the field of pain. Interestingly, although placebo and nocebo share similar psychological processes in modulating pain, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the placebo and nocebo are different. Placebo analgesia might be involved with endogenous opioids system. On the contrary, the nocebo effect is considered to be mediated by cholecystokinin (CCK). In addition, brain imaging researches suggested that placebo and nocebo could lead to contrary activation patterns in pain-related networks. Some areas such as the hippocampus were specifically activated in nocebo condition.%心理预期是具有方向性的,可分为正性(积极的)和负性(消极的)预期,它们相互对立,并对人的身心状况产生不同的影响。在长久以来的临床实践中,预期对疾病治疗和某些生理体验的强大调节作用逐渐为人们所知,并根据其调节方向的不同催生出两个重要概念,即安慰剂与反安慰剂效应。目前关于安慰剂与反安慰剂的研究主要集中在疼痛领域。出人意料的是,尽管二者在疼痛调节上具有相似的心理机制,其内在神经基础并不完全相同:安慰剂效应与反安慰剂效应分别由阿片肽系统和胆囊收缩素系统所介导;在影像学研究中,疼痛加工系统和脊髓在安慰剂/反安慰剂的调节下呈现相反的激活模式,而海马在反安慰剂中的活动具有特异性。

  20. Epidural analgesia for labour: maternal knowledge, preferences and informed consent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-29

    Epidural analgesia has become increasingly popular as a form of labour analgesia in Ireland. However obtaining true inform consent has always been difficult. Our study recruited 100 parturients who had undergone epidural analgesia for labour, aimed to determine the information they received prior to regional analgesia, and to ascertain their preferences regarding informed consent. Only 65 (65%) of patients planned to have an epidural. Knowledge of potential complications was variable and inaccurate, with less than 30 (30%) of women aware of the most common complications. Most women 79 (79%) believed that discomfort during labour affected their ability to provide informed consent, and believe consent should be taken prior to onset of labour (96, 96%). The results of this study helps define the standards of consent Irish patients expect for epidural analgesia during labour.

  1. Relationship between analgesia and turnover of brain biogenic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensemana, D; Gascon, A L

    1978-10-01

    The analgesic activity of morphine, delta9THC, and sodium salicylate was studied concomitantly with changes in brainstem and cortex turnover of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5HT). The results show that a correlation exists between the presence of analgesia and the increased turnover rates of the three biogenic amines. Morphine and sodium salicylate induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of all three biogenic amines; delta9THC-induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of DA and 5HT only. There is, however, no consistent relationship between the degree of analgesia and the degree of change in the turnover rates. The existence of the endogenous morphine-like substances, endorphines, may explain why morphine analgesia is distinct from that of delta9THC and sodium salicylate. The possible relationship between this morphine-like substance and biogenic amines is discussed.

  2. Preventive analgesia for postoperative pain control: a broader concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadivelu N

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nalini Vadivelu,1 Sukanya Mitra,2 Erika Schermer,3 Vijay Kodumudi,4 Alan David Kaye,5 Richard D Urman61Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh, India; 3Yale College, New Haven, 4School of Liberal Arts and Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 6Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Pain from surgical procedures occurs as a consequence of tissue trauma and may result in physical, cognitive, and emotional discomfort. Almost a century ago, researchers first described a possible relationship between intraoperative tissue damage and an intensification of acute pain and long-term postoperative pain, now referred to as central sensitization. Nociceptor activation is mediated by chemicals that are released in response to cellular or tissue damage. Pre-emptive analgesia is an important concept in understanding treatment strategies for postoperative analgesia. Pre-emptive analgesia focuses on postoperative pain control and the prevention of central sensitization and chronic neuropathic pain by providing analgesia administered preoperatively but not after surgical incision. Additional research in pre-emptive analgesia is warranted to better determine good outcome measurements and a better appreciation with regard to treatment optimization. Preventive analgesia reduces postoperative pain and consumption of analgesics, and this appears to be the most effective means of decreasing postoperative pain. Preventive analgesia, which includes multimodal preoperative and postoperative analgesic therapies, results in decreased postoperative pain and less postoperative consumption of analgesics.Keywords: preventive analgesia, central

  3. The experience of giving birth with epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Keller, Kurt Dauer

    2014-06-01

    There is a lack of literature about what constitutes good midwifery care for women who have epidural analgesia during labour. It is known that an increasing number of women receive epidural analgesia for labour pain. We also know that while women rate the painkilling effect of the epidural analgesia as high, in general, their satisfaction with labour is unchanged or even lower when epidural analgesia is used. How do women experience being in labour with epidural analgesia, and what kind of midwifery care do they, consequently, need? A field study and semi-structured interviews were conducted on a phenomenological basis. Nine nulliparous women were observed from initiation of epidural analgesia until birth of their baby. They were interviewed the day after the birth and again 2 months later. The involved midwives were interviewed 2-3h after the birth. Initiation of epidural analgesia can have considerable implications for women's experience of labour. Two different types of emotional reactions towards epidural analgesia are distinguished, one of which is particularly marked by a subtle sense of worry and ambivalence. Another important finding refers to the labouring woman's relationship with the midwife, which represents an essential influencing factor on the woman' experience of labour. Within this relationship, some rather unnoticed matters of communication and recognition appear to be of decisive significance. After initiation of epidural analgesia the requirements of midwifery care seem to go beyond how women verbalise and define their own needs. The midwife should be attentive to the labouring woman's type of emotional reaction to epidural analgesia and her possible intricate worries. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A COMPARISON OF ANALGESIA AND FOETAL OUTCOME IN TERM PARTURIENTS WITH AND WITHOUT LOW DOSE COMBINED SPINAL EPIDURAL LABOUR ANALGESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunath

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : STUDY OBJECTIVE: We aimed to find a safe method of labor analgesia with minimal side effects and toxicity in mother and fetus using combined ‘low dose’ spinal and epidural (CSE. DESIGN: prospective case control study. SETTING: Labour suite of a tertiary care hospital. PATIENTS: study population included 120 pregnant women of ASA physical status I and II parturients in active labor who requested analgesia, 60 of these patients were given labour analgesia - ‘GROUP T’ and 60 of who underwent a delivery without labour analgesia -‘GROUP C’. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Maternal hemodynamics, degree of pain relief, duration of labour, fetal heart rate, Apgar scores, mode of delivery, intervention to relieve pain, Adverse effects because of procedure and drugs used were also noted. Low dose epidural analgesia does not prolong labour and does not increase the incidence of instrumental deliveries when compared to parturients undergoing delivery without labour analgesia. Even with the reduced dose of fentanyl the parturients had acceptable pain relief and a decreased incidence of intervention for pain. It does not cause more fetal depression when compared to normally laboring term parturients. ‘Low dose’ labour analgesia is a safe technique for painless labour with no harmful effects on the mother or baby and it does not significantly affect the obstetric outcome. CONCLUSION: ‘Low dose’ labour analgesia is a safe technique for painless labour with no harmful effects on the mother or baby and it does not significantly affect the obstetric outcome.

  5. [Maternal postures and epidural analgesia during labour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducloy-Bouthors, A-S; De Gasquet, B; Davette, M; Cuisse, M

    2006-06-01

    The evolution of birth is of interest for obstetricians and midwives. Postures with asymmetric stretching and balance, kneeling, or sitting have been claimed to be able to help foetal head rotation. Although walking during labour have no influence on the outcome of labour, hip-flexed postures enlarging the pelvic diameter are yet evaluated to improve the obstetric course of labour. In a prospective randomised study including 93 parturients, we compared the supine 30 degrees lateral tilt (control group) to three hip-flexed postures: sitting (S), right hip-flexed left lateral position (L) and left hip-flexed right lateral position (R). Epidural analgesia with 12 ml ropivacaine 0.1% and sufentanil 0.5 microg/ml was administered over a period of six minutes. The total epidural spread was 15+/-0.3 dermatomes and the upper level of thermo-analgesic blockade reached T7-T8 (T5 to T10) in each group. There were no differences between groups for the left and right total spread and upper level of epidural blockade, for the time to maximal block and pain relief. There was no motor block and no maternal or foetal side effects. We conclude that, for the three hip-flexed postures tested, position does not influence local anesthetic spread or symmetry of analgesia after induction of obstetric epidural anaesthesia.

  6. Regional analgesia in postsurgical critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliner Velázquez, S; Rubio Haro, R; De Andrés Serrano, C; De Andrés Ibáñez, J

    2017-03-01

    Regional analgesia intrinsically, based on its physiological effects, is routinely used for the perioperative treatment of pain associated with surgical procedures. However, in other areas such as the non-surgical treatment of acute pain for patients in a critical condition, it has not been subjected to specific prospective studies. If we confine ourselves to the physiological effects of the nerve block, in a situation of stress, the indications for regional anaesthesia in this group of patients extend to the management of a wide variety of medical as well as postsurgical conditions, of trauma patients and of other painful procedures performed in the patient's bed. The critical patient certainly must be analyzed individually as their own primary conditions is of vital importance, as well as any associated conditions they have developed that can potentially increase the risk of systemic toxicity or morbidity, such as, coagulopathies, infection, immunosuppressive states, sedation and problems associated with mechanical ventilation. This review aims to assess the role of regional analgesia in critically ill patients, placing it within the algorithm decision tree of the professional responsible for patients in critical care units, all based on the evidence of potential benefits according to the published literature. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Intrapleural analgesia after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patrícia Gomes da; Cataneo, Daniele Cristina; Leite, Fernanda; Hasimoto, Erica Nishida; Barros, Guilherme Antonio Moreira de

    2011-12-01

    To compare analgesia traditionally used for thoracic sympathectomy to intrapleural ropivacaine injection in two different doses. Twenty-four patients were divided into three similar groups, and all of them received intravenous dipyrone. Group A received intravenous tramadol and intrapleural injection of saline solution. Group B received intrapleural injection of 0.33% ropivacaine, and Group C 0.5% ropivacaine. The following aspects were analyzed: inspiratory capacity, respiratory rate and pain. Pain was evaluated in the immediate postoperative period by means of the visual analog scale and over a one-week period. In Groups A and B, reduced inspiratory capacity was observed in the postoperative period. In the first postoperative 12 hours, only 12.5% of the patients in Groups B and C showed intense pain as compared to 25% in Group A. In the subsequent week, only one patient in Group A showed mild pain while the remainder reported intense pain. In Group B, half of the patients showed intense pain, and in Group C, only one presented intense pain. Intrapleural analgesia with ropivacaine resulted in less pain in the late postoperative period with better analgesic outcomes in higher doses, providing a better ventilatory pattern.

  8. A randomized, controlled, dose-ranging study investigating single doses of GW406381, naproxen sodium, or placebo in patients with acute pain after third molar tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, Julie; Lomax, Mark; Blum, David; Quessy, Steve

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 4 doses of GW406381, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, compared with placebo in a standard model of acute inflammatory pain. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-center study compared single doses of GW406381 (10 to 70 mg) or naproxen sodium 550 mg with placebo in patients after extraction of 2 or more partially bony impacted third molar teeth. A total of 300 patients were randomized (50 per group). The primary efficacy variable was the pain relief intensity difference score at each time point, which was calculated as the sum of the pain intensity difference and pain relief categorical scores at each time point. Each treatment was compared with placebo at each time point using an ordered hierarchical approach with closed testing procedures and last observation carried forward imputation methods. Pain relief intensity differences from placebo were statistically significant beginning at 1.5 hours postdosing for GW406381 70 and 50 mg and at 2-hour postdosing for GW406381 25 and 10 mg. The median time to onset of analgesia was 71 minutes for GW406381 50 mg, 72 minutes for GW406381 70 mg, and 36 minutes for naproxen. The median duration of analgesia was 5.9 hours for GW406381 50 mg, 7.9 hours for GW406391 70 mg, and 11.3 hours for naproxen. All treatments were well tolerated. GW406381 50 and 70 mg demonstrated clinically meaningful analgesia in this acute pain setting, although the onset of analgesia was greater than 1 hour.

  9. The effect of placebo and neurophysiological involvements

    OpenAIRE

    Galli, Federica; Riccio, Barbara; Guidetti, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Placebo and placebo effect are important issues related to the drug therapy for clinical and scientific meanings. The rates of placebo may get as many as 50% for analgesic drugs in headache. The high answer to placebo brings questions on pathophysiology of headache. Answers may offer a new strategy in the implementation of trials and new insight in neurophysiology of headache. Current knowledge on placebo and placebo effect will be analysed and dicussed looking for new direction in headache f...

  10. A comparative study on relieving post-episiotomy pain with diclofenac and indomethacin suppositories or placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Z; Haghighi, Z; Haeri, G; Hekmatdoust, A

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we compare the prophylactic efficacy of a diclofenac suppository and an indomethacin suppository on decreasing post-episiotomy pain. A total of 90 women with 2nd-degree episiotomy were assigned to receive a single dose of diclofenac suppository (30), indomethacin suppository (30) or placebo (30), according to randomised blocks. The pain was assessed at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 12 hours after receiving analgesia, using the two methods of pain score and visual analogue. This study showed that in the group given diclofenac or indomethacin, at all the assessed hours, the pain measured was considerably less than in the suppository-free group (p episiotomy pain.

  11. Emotional valence contributes to music-induced analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mathieu; Peretz, Isabelle; Rainville, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The capacity of music to soothe pain has been used in many traditional forms of medicine. Yet, the mechanisms underlying these effects have not been demonstrated. Here, we examine the possibility that the modulatory effect of music on pain is mediated by the valence (pleasant-unpleasant dimension) of the emotions induced. We report the effects of listening to pleasant and unpleasant music on thermal pain in healthy human volunteers. Eighteen participants evaluated the warmth or pain induced by 40.0, 45.5, 47.0 and 48.5 degrees C thermal stimulations applied to the skin of their forearm while listening to pleasant and unpleasant musical excerpts matched for their high level of arousal (relaxing-stimulating dimension). Compared to a silent control condition, only the pleasant excerpts produced highly significant reductions in both pain intensity and unpleasantness, demonstrating the effect of positive emotions induced by music on pain (Pairwise contrasts with silence: p'smusic condition further indicated that pain decreased significantly (p'smusic pleasantness. In contrast, the unpleasant excerpts did not modulate pain significantly, and warmth perception was not affected by the presence of pleasant or unpleasant music. Those results support the hypothesis that positive emotional valence contributes to music-induced analgesia. These findings call for the integration of music to current methods of pain control.

  12. Meditative analgesia: the current state of the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    Since the first demonstrations that mindfulness-based therapies could have a positive influence on chronic pain patients, numerous studies have been conducted with healthy individuals in an attempt to understand meditative analgesia. This review focuses explicitly on experimental pain studies of meditation and attempts to draw preliminary conclusions based on the work completed in this new field over the past 6 years. Dividing meditative practices into the broad categories of focused attention (FA) and open monitoring (OM) techniques allowed several patterns to emerge. The majority of evidence for FA practices suggests they are not particularly effective in reducing pain. OM, on the other hand, seems to influence both sensory and affective pain ratings depending on the tradition or on whether the practitioners were meditating. The neural pattern underlying pain modulation during OM suggests meditators actively focus on the noxious stimulation while inhibiting other mental processes, consistent with descriptions of mindfulness. A preliminary model is presented for explaining the influence of mindfulness practice on pain. Finally, the potential analgesic effect of the currently unexplored technique of compassion meditation is discussed.

  13. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF GABAPENTIN AND CLONIDINE PREMEDICATION ON POST OPERATIVE ANALGESIA REQUIREMENT FOLLOWING ABDOMINAL SURGERIES UNDER GENERAL ANAESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Aim of our study was to compare the relative effectiveness of gabapentin and clonidine premedication on patients undergoing elective abdominal surgeries under G.A. OBJECTIVE: gabapentine and clonidine have anti-nociceptive properties .This study assess their efficacy in prolonging the analgesic effect intra-operative and postoperative analgesic requirement. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 225 patients of either sex of age between 20-60 years, ASA grade I & II, patient admitted to Hamidia hospital for elective abdominal surgeries under general anaesthesia were included in the study. The patients were randomly allocated into three groups 75 each group I : Control group (patients received placebo tablet at 90 min before the surgery,group II Gabapentin 300 mg tablet orally 90 min before surgery ,groupIII:clonidine150µg tablet orally given 90 min before surgery. Duration of postoperative analgesia, Degree of postoperative pain (VAS scoreand added rescue analgesia required in 24 hrs were recorded postoperatively. RESULT: Analysis reveled that there was no difference in the HR, SBP among the three group during the study. Duration of postoperative analgesia, observed from time of reversal to first demand of analgesia in the recovery room was more in group II compared to group I and group III (p-value <0.001, highly significant. Pain perception was highly blunted in groups II compared to group I & group III. Total rescue analgesic requirement during the postoperative 24hrs period was much lower in group II inj Diclofenac compared to group I and group III . ( p-value < 0.001, highly significant.CONCLUSION: Given 90 min before induction of GA oral gabapentin(300 mg or clonidine(150 µg preoperatively was effective in lowering postoperative VAS pain score and consumption of analgesics, it was also shows that gabapentin significantly decreases postoperative pain intensity and analgesic consumption after abdominal surgeries.

  14. Developments in labour analgesia and their use in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, V A; Callaway, L; van Zundert, A A

    2015-07-01

    Since the introduction of chloroform for labour analgesia in 1847, different methods and medications have been used to relieve the pain of labour. The use of heavy sedative medication in the early 1900s was encouraged by enthusiastic doctors and by women empowered by the women's suffrage movement in America. Nitrous oxide by inhalation has been used in Australia since the 1950s and improved methods of administration have made this method of analgesia safe and practical. Caudal epidural analgesia and lumbar epidural analgesia were first made popular in America and by the 1970s these techniques were more widely available in Australia. In 1847, physicians and the public were unsure whether relieving labour pains was the 'right' thing to do. However, many medical and social changes have occurred thanks to the clinical connection between Australia and the United Kingdom and those first settlers to land on Australian shores. Thanks to this historical connection, in today's Australia there is no question that women should use analgesia as a pain relief if they wish. Currently, the majority of women worldwide use some form of analgesia during labour and different methods are widely available. This paper discusses the four milestones of the development of obstetric analgesia and how they were introduced into patient care in Australia.

  15. Time course of altered sensitivity to inhibitory and excitatory agonist responses in the longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus and analgesia in the guinea pig after chronic morphine treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dane M Barrett

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tolerance that develops after chronic morphine exposure has been proposed to be an adaptive response that develops and decays over a defined time course. The present study examined the development of tolerance to the acute hypothermic and analgesic effects of morphine and correlated the time course for the desensitization in vivo with the reduced responsiveness to DAMGO and 2-CADO and increased responsiveness to nicotine of the longitudinal muscle/myenteric plexus (LM/MP preparation in vitro. Assessment was performed at various times after morphine or placebo pellet implantation. Morphine produced a modest hypothermic response to which no tolerance developed. However, the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine, the inhibitory effect of DAMGO and CADO on neurogenic twitches of the LM/MP and hypersensitivity to the contractile response to nicotine was observed to occur in a time-dependent manner. The alterations in sensitivity to DAMGO, nicotine and responsiveness to morphine analgesia occurred between days 4 and 10 and returned to normal by day 14 post-implantation. In contrast, sensitivity of LM/MP preparations to 2-CADO displayed a similar time-dependent onset but the tolerance persisted beyond 14 days after implantation. These data suggest that the heterologous tolerance that develops after chronic morphine treatment is time-dependent and persistent but, ultimately returns to normal in the absence of any intervention. Furthermore, the data suggest that the basis of the adaptive phenomenon may involve multiple cellular mechanisms including the modulation of cell excitability and normal physiology but the consequences of the adaptation extend to all effects of the agonist.

  16. COMPARISON OF PATIENT CONTROLLED EPIDURAL ANALGESIA WITH CONTINUOUS EPIDURAL INFUSION FOR LABOUR ANALGESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaiah Tahseen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a study to compare the efficacy and safety of Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia (PCEA with that of Continuous Infusion of Epidural Analgesia (CIEA for maintenance of labour analgesia and evaluated the quality of analgesia and obstetric and safety outcomes. METHODS The study was a hospital-based prospective, randomised control trial on 80 parturients who had a normal antenatal period. Each parturient received 500-1000 mL lactated ringer solution Intravenously (IV prior to initiating epidural blockade. Epidural catheter placement was performed in a standard manner and all patients received an initial dose of 8-10 mL bupivacaine 0.25%. Parturients self-administered 0.125% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2.5 µg/mL using PCA pumps programmed as follows: 4 mL bolus with a 20 mins Lockout Interval (LI. Group B received CIEA of 8 mL 0.125% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2.5/mL. Hourly assessments included: VAS scores for pain and satisfaction, sensory and motor block, analgesic supplements, bupivacaine and fentanyl consumption. RESULTS Data from 80 patients showed no differences among groups in pain relief. Maternal satisfaction was greater in PCEA group. Anaesthetic interventions by way of supplemental doses of Bupivacaine and Fentanyl in the PCEA group were minimal (4 and 2 vs 25 and 12 P <0.001 compared to CEI group. PCEA group received less local anaesthetic (5.2 vs 9.4 p <0.001 and few patients in PCEA group had motor weakness compared to CEI group (6 vs 17 p <0.05. Both methods were safe for mother and newborn. CONCLUSION Patients who received PCEA required less anaesthetic interventions, required lower doses of local anaesthetic, fentanyl and have less motor weakness than those who received CEI.

  17. Inclusion of authorized deception in the informed consent process does not affect the magnitude of the placebo effect for experimentally induced pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrea L; Katz, Joel

    2010-05-01

    The ethics of placebo research have been of paramount concern since the discovery of the phenomenon. To address these ethical concerns, Miller and colleagues (PLoS Med 2005 Sep;2(9):e262, 0853-0859) propose an alternate approach to placebo research, called "authorized deception", in which participants are alerted of the use of deception in the research prior to study enrollment and thus knowingly permit its use if they decide to participate. The present study sought to investigate the authorized deception methodology in experimentally induced placebo analgesia. The participants were randomly assigned to an authorized deception or non-authorized deception group. A commonly used protocol was employed wherein heat pain stimulation was surreptitiously lowered following the application of a placebo cream during a series of conditioning trials and the magnitude of the placebo effect was subsequently assessed in test trials for which the stimulus intensity was the same for both the placebo and control creams. Authorized deception did not have any negative impact on the magnitude of the placebo effect, recruitment and retention of participants, nor did it result in any significant psychological harm. The majority of participants who received this form of consent preferred it to the traditional approach in which the participants are not alerted to the presence of deception. These findings suggest that the use of authorized deception is a viable and ethically preferable alternative consent process for laboratory-based studies on placebo analgesia. Further studies are needed to examine the effect of authorized deception in clinical trials and other placebo research within a clinical setting.

  18. Efficacy of the Bilateral Ilioinguinal-Iliohypogastric Block with Intrathecal Morphine for Postoperative Cesarean Delivery Analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel C. Vallejo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric (IIIH block is frequently used as multimodal analgesia for lower abdominal surgeries. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of IIIH block using ultrasound visualization for reducing postoperative pain after caesarean delivery (CD in patients receiving intrathecal morphine (ITM under spinal anesthesia. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups for the bilateral IIIH block: Group A = 10 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine, Group B = 10 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine on one side and 10 mL of a normal saline (NSS placebo block on the opposite side, and Group C = 10 mL of NSS placebo per side. Pain and nausea scores, treatment for pain and nausea, and patient satisfaction were recorded for 48 hours after CD. No differences were noted with respect to pain scores or treatment for pain over the 48 hours. There were no differences to the presence of nausea (P=0.64, treatment for nausea (P=0.21, pruritus (P=0.39, emesis (P=0.35, or patient satisfaction (P=0.29. There were no differences in pain and nausea scores over the measured time periods (MANOVA, P>0.05. In parturients receiving ITM for elective CD, IIIH block offers no additional postoperative benefit for up to 48 hours.

  19. The selective androgen receptor modulator GTx-024 (enobosarm) improves lean body mass and physical function in healthy elderly men and postmenopausal women: results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dalton, James T; Barnette, Kester G; Bohl, Casey E; Hancock, Michael L; Rodriguez, Domingo; Dodson, Shontelle T; Morton, Ronald A; Steiner, Mitchell S

    2011-01-01

    ...) is a nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) that has tissue-selective anabolic effects in muscle and bone, while sparing other androgenic tissue related to hair growth in women and prostate effects in men...

  20. Post operatory analgesia in caesarean surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Lucía Cabezas Poblet

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-operatory pain is a spread and constant problem during the care of the surgical patient. The tendency to find new therapeutic techniques to alleviate pain has lead scientists to make and use a great variety of analgesics which are administered by different vias. The effects of narcotics on the new born are well known and the author´s worries about this problem has been the motivational point to search about the use of epidural and intratecal narcotics in the obstetric patient. Objective: To assess the use of peridural liophilized morphine in the Caesarean Section Method: A study of a series of cases was carried out at the Surgical Unit of the Gynecobstetric service of the University Hospital ¨Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨ from February 2001 to August 2002 . This search included 120 patient who were selected to elective iterative caesarean section The variables under study were blood pressure, pulse and respiration during the pre- trans and post operative phases, onset of the anaesthetic effect and its duration, peri operatory complications , quality of the post operatory analgesia and its effect on the newborn measured by using Apgar values . The statistical procedure was developed by using the statistical package Epi Info 6. Results: The onset of the anesthetic effect and the duration of the anesthesia were not modified with the use of liophilized morphine. Vital signs remained within normal limits in most of the patients during the pre- trans and post operatory phases. The complications were: pruritus, urinary retention, nausea nad vomiting. The quality of the analgesia was satisfactory in most of the patients. The Apgar values were normal in all neonates. Conclusion: The administration of peridural liophilized morphine in elective caesarean sections is a reliable, sure and useful method in our environment.

  1. Analgesia acupuntural en las extracciones dentarias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana María Abreu Correa

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Se compararon los resultados de la exodoncia con anestesia y con analgesia con acupuntura en 2 grupos de 60 pacientes cada uno, en los cuales se evaluaron los efectos de ambos tratamientos a las 24, 48 y 72 horas de realizada la extracción. Los aspectos evaluados fueron las complicaciones posextracción y la presencia de dolor, molestias o inflamación con posterioridad a ésta. En el grupo de los pacientes a los que se les aplicó la anestesia a las 24 horas, 51 tenían inflamación y a las 72 horas 31 continuaban con ligero enrojecimiento e inflamación, 3 casos presentaron alveolitis fungosa. Entre los que recibieron la acupuntura a las 24 horas, 26 tenían ligero enrojecimiento que desapareció antes de las 72 horas sin otras complicaciones.The results of exodontia with anesthesia and with acupuncture analgesia are compared in two groups of 60 patients each, in which the effects of both treatments were evaluated 24, 48 and 72 hours after the extraction. The aspects evaluated were the postextraction complications and the presence of pain, disturbance or inflammation after it. In the group of patients that received anesthesia, 51 had inflammation 24 hours after the extraction, whereas 31 still had a mild redness and inflammation 72 hours later. 3 patients presented fungous alveolitis. Among those who were treated with acupuncture, 26 showed a mild redness 24 hours after the extraction that dissapeared before the 72 hours without other complications.

  2. Preemptive analgesia with ketamine for laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsimran Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of preemptive analgesia is to reduce central sensitization that arises from noxious inputs across the entire perioperative period. N-methyl d-aspartate receptor antagonists have the potential for attenuating central sensitization and preventing central neuroplasticity. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized into four groups of 20 patients each, who were administered the study drug intravenously 30 min before incision. Groups A, B, and C received ketamine in a dose of 1.00, 0.75 and 0.50 mg/kg, respectively, whereas group D received isotonic saline. Anesthetic and surgical techniques were standardized. Postoperatively, the degree of pain at rest, movement, and deep breathing using visual analogue scale, time of request for first analgesic, total opioid consumption, and postoperative nausea and vomiting were recorded in postanesthesia care unit for 24 h. Results: Pain scores were highest in Group D at 0 h. Groups A, B, and C had significantly decreased postoperative pain scores at 0, 0.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 12 h. Postoperative analgesic consumption was significantly less in groups A, B, and C as compared with group D. There was no significant difference in the pain scores among groups A, B, and C. Group A had a significantly higher heart rate and blood pressure than groups B and C at 0 and 0.5 h along with 10% incidence of hallucinations. Conclusion: Preemptive ketamine has a definitive role in reducing postoperative pain and analgesic requirement in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The lower dose of 0.5 mg/kg being devoid of any adverse effects and hemodynamic changes is an optimal dose for preemptive analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  3. Preemptive analgesia with Ketamine for Laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harsimran; Kundra, Sandeep; Singh, Rupinder M; Grewal, Anju; Kaul, Tej K; Sood, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of preemptive analgesia is to reduce central sensitization that arises from noxious inputs across the entire perioperative period. N-methyl d-aspartate receptor antagonists have the potential for attenuating central sensitization and preventing central neuroplasticity. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized into four groups of 20 patients each, who were administered the study drug intravenously 30 min before incision. Groups A, B, and C received ketamine in a dose of 1.00, 0.75 and 0.50 mg/kg, respectively, whereas group D received isotonic saline. Anesthetic and surgical techniques were standardized. Postoperatively, the degree of pain at rest, movement, and deep breathing using visual analogue scale, time of request for first analgesic, total opioid consumption, and postoperative nausea and vomiting were recorded in postanesthesia care unit for 24 h. Results: Pain scores were highest in Group D at 0 h. Groups A, B, and C had significantly decreased postoperative pain scores at 0, 0.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 12 h. Postoperative analgesic consumption was significantly less in groups A, B, and C as compared with group D. There was no significant difference in the pain scores among groups A, B, and C. Group A had a significantly higher heart rate and blood pressure than groups B and C at 0 and 0.5 h along with 10% incidence of hallucinations. Conclusion: Preemptive ketamine has a definitive role in reducing postoperative pain and analgesic requirement in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The lower dose of 0.5 mg/kg being devoid of any adverse effects and hemodynamic changes is an optimal dose for preemptive analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:24249984

  4. Efficacy and safety of K-877, a novel selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α modulator (SPPARMα), in combination with statin treatment: Two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials in patients with dyslipidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Hidenori; Yamashita, Shizuya; Yokote, Koutaro; Araki, Eiichi; Suganami, Hideki; Ishibashi, Shun

    2017-06-01

    Substantial residual cardiovascular risks remain despite intensive statin treatment. Residual risks with high triglyceride and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are not the primary targets of statins. K-877 (pemafibrate) demonstrated robust efficacy on triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a good safety profile as a monotherapy. The aim of these studies was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of K-877 add-on therapy to treat residual hypertriglyceridaemia during statin treatment. The objectives were investigated in two, multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group comparison clinical trials: (A) K-877 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/day in combination with pitavastatin for 12 weeks in 188 patients, (B) K-877 0.2 (fixed dose) and 0.2 (0.4) (conditional up-titration) mg/day in combination with any statin for 24 weeks in 423 patients. In both studies, we found a robust reduction in fasting triglyceride levels by approximately 50% in all combination therapy groups, which was significant compared to the statin-monotherapy (placebo) groups (p K-877 add-on therapy, i.e. small low-density lipoproteins decreased whereas larger ones increased, and larger high-density lipoproteins decreased whereas smaller ones increased. The incidence rates of adverse events and adverse drug reactions in K-877 combination therapy groups were comparable to those in statin-monotherapy groups without any noteworthy event in both studies. These results strongly support the favourable benefit-to-risk ratio of K-877 add-on therapy in combination with statin treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nothingness and the placebo effect phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine

    a posthuman angle, applying Karen Barad’s concept of agential realism to tackle the issue of nothingness. I argue that the placebo effect produces specific agencies in the placebo effect phenomenon – that is, both the subject under treatment and the placebo emerge in the placebo effect in the act of measuring it...

  6. Impure placebo is a useless concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louhiala, Pekka; Hemilä, Harri; Puustinen, Raimo

    2015-08-01

    Placebos are allegedly used widely in general practice. Surveys reporting high level usage, however, have combined two categories, 'pure' and 'impure' placebos. The wide use of placebos is explained by the high level usage of impure placebos. In contrast, the prevalence of the use of pure placebos has been low. Traditional pure placebos are clinically ineffective treatments, whereas impure placebos form an ambiguous group of diverse treatments that are not always ineffective. In this paper, we focus on the impure placebo concept and demonstrate problems related to it. We also show that the common examples of impure placebos are not meaningful from the point of view of clinical practice. We conclude that the impure placebo is a scientifically misleading concept and should not be used in scientific or medical literature. The issues behind the concept, however, deserve serious attention in future research.

  7. Emprego do antiinflamatório não esteróide ketoprofeno na analgesia preemptiva em cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Aline de Souza

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A analgesia preemptiva tem como princípio básico a administração de analgésicos antes da ocorrência de estímulos dolorosos, reduzindo ou prevenindo a dor e diminuindo a dose analgésica requerida, comparada com a dose usada após a ocorrência do estímulo doloroso. Há redução ou prevenção da "memória" da dor junto ao sistema nervoso central. A analgesia preemptiva permite atenuar ou prevenir o desenvolvimento da sensibilização central induzida pela cirurgia. O presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o uso do antiinflamatório não esteróide (AINE ketoprofeno na analgesia preemptiva. Foram utilizados 16 cães, com idades variadas, fêmeas e machos, com peso superior a 10kg. Os animais foram divididos, aleatoriamente, em dois grupos: no grupo K, foram tratados com ketoprofeno e no grupo P foi utilizado placebo constituído de solução fisiológica; no final do procedimento cirúrgico os animais do grupo K receberam placebo e os do grupo P foram tratados com ketoprofeno. Esses procedimentos foram feitos antes da ocorrência do estímulo doloroso causado pela cirurgia de toracotomia. Parâmetros como freqüência cardíaca, freqüência respiratória, volume corrente, volume minuto, hemogasometria e grau de dor foram mensurados por seis horas pós-operatórias. O protocolo utilizado apresentou variações significativas do bicarbonato e dióxido de carbono total, não apresentando variações significativas nos escores de dor. Esses resultados, aparentemente, não justificam o uso do ketoprofeno na analgesia preemptiva.

  8. Parecoxib Supplementation to Morphine Analgesia Decreases Incidence of Delirium in Elderly Patients After Hip or Knee Replacement Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Dong-Liang; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Wang, Dong-Xin; Wang, Geng; Li, Chun-Jing; Meng, Zhao-Ting; Li, Ya-Wei; Liu, Chao; Li, Xue-Ying

    2017-06-01

    Severe pain and high-dose opioids are both associated with increased risk of postoperative delirium. The authors investigated whether parecoxib-supplemented IV morphine analgesia could decrease the incidence of delirium in elderly patients after total hip or knee replacement surgery. In a randomized, double-blind, 2-center trial, patients of 60 years or older who underwent elective total hip or knee replacement surgery were assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either parecoxib (40 mg at the end of surgery and then every 12 hours for 3 days) or placebo (normal saline). All patients received combined spinal-epidural anesthesia during surgery and IV morphine for postoperative analgesia. The primary outcome was the incidence of delirium within 5 days after surgery. Between January 2011 and May 2013, 620 patients were enrolled and were included in the intention-to-treat and safety analyses. The incidence of delirium was significantly reduced from 11.0% (34/310) with placebo to 6.2% (19/310) with parecoxib (relative risk 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.33-0.96, P = .031). The severity of pain and the cumulative consumptions of morphine at 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery were significantly lower with parecoxib than with placebo (all P delirium without increasing adverse events.

  9. [Epidural obstetric analgesia, maternal fever and neonatal wellness parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; Delgado Arnáiz, C; Rodríguez Caravaca, G; Serrano Rodríguez, M L; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2005-04-01

    To study the relation between epidural analgesia and the development of maternal fever during labor and childbirth, and to determine the possible relation between that association and neonatal welfare and in the performance of tests to rule out sepsis in newborns. Prospective study of all women who gave birth at Fundación Hospital Alcorcón over a period of 3 years. All the women were offered epidural analgesia based on infusion of 0.0625% bupivacaine and 2 microg x mL(-1). Data collected were age, nulliparity, epidural analgesia infusion, induction of labor, uterine stimulation with oxytocin, type of birth, fetal weight, duration of dilation and expulsion, Apgar score (at 1 and 5 minutes), umbilical artery pH, and maternal temperature. Data for 4364 women were analyzed. Fever developed during labor in 5.7%; 93.7% of the fevers occurred in women receiving epidural analgesia (Pneonatal wellness parameters studied.

  10. Stability of piritramide in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remane, D; Scriba, G; Meissner, W; Hartmann, M

    2009-06-01

    For patient controlled analgesia, syringes with solutions of 1.5 mg/ml piritramide in 0.9% aqueous sodium chloride are used. The physical and chemical stability for dilutions of the commercially available preparation of piritramide is limited up to 72 hours by the manufacturer. Since application duration for patient-controlled analgesia can exceed that limited time, stability was investigated by HPLC. Our results show that these solutions are chemically stable over a time period of 60 days.

  11. Proinflammatory cytokines oppose opioid induced acute and chronic analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchinson, Mark R.; Coats, Benjamen D; Lewis, Susannah S.; Zhang, Yingning; Sprunger, David B.; Rezvani, Niloofar; Baker, Eric M.; Jekich, Brian M.; Wieseler, Julie L.; Somogyi, Andrew A; Martin, David; Poole, Stephen; Judd, Charles M.; Steven F. Maier; Watkins, Linda R.

    2008-01-01

    Spinal proinflammatory cytokines are powerful pain-enhancing signals that contribute to pain following peripheral nerve injury (neuropathic pain). Recently, one proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1, was also implicated in the loss of analgesia upon repeated morphine exposure (tolerance). In contrast to prior literature, we demonstrate that the action of several spinal proinflammatory cytokines oppose systemic and intrathecal opioid analgesia, causing reduced pain suppression. In vitro morp...

  12. The Neuroanatomy of Sexual Dimorphism in Opioid Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-13

    2012 for review). Studies utilizing orofacial, somatosensory or visceral pain assays typically report that morphine produces a significantly greater...The reported sex differences in morphine analgesia are not trivial; in both persistent inflammatory pain (Wang et al., 2006) and visceral pain (Ji et al...117 (3), 433–442. Ji, Y., Murphy, A.Z., Traub, R.J., 2006. Sex differences in morphine-induced analgesia of visceral pain are supraspinally and

  13. Heart rate variability in subjects with different hypnotic susceptibility receiving nociceptive stimulation and suggestions of analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balocchi, R; Varanini, M; Menicucci, D; Santarcangelo, E L; Migliorini, S; Fontani, G; Carli, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible hypnotizability-related modulation of heart activity during nociceptive stimulation (pressor pain) and during nociceptive stimulation associated with the suggestion of analgesia in not hypnotized healthy individuals with a high (Highs) and a low (Lows) hypnotic susceptibility. ECG and respirogram were recorded. Standard time and frequency domain indexes were evaluated, together with the sd1 and sd2 values of the Poincaré plot over the RR series. Results showed self reports of analgesia in Highs and a significant increase of the respiratory frequency during stimulation in both groups. Very few significant differences between groups and among conditions were detected for mean RR and heart rate variability (HRV) through spectral analysis. and through the Poincaré indexes evaluation. On the contrary, a promising approach seems to be the study of the correlations among standard and Poincaré variables. In particular, different changes in (or even lost of) correlations were enlightened in Highs and Lows, suggesting a different modulation of RR in the two groups, probably due to the very low frequency components of HRV. Different roles of sympathetic and parasympathetic activities during stimulation can be suggested.

  14. Different profiles of buprenorphine-induced analgesia and antihyperalgesia in a human pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppert, Wolfgang; Ihmsen, Harald; Körber, Nicole; Wehrfritz, Andreas; Sittl, Reinhard; Schmelz, Martin; Schüttler, Jürgen

    2005-11-01

    Different mechanisms were proposed for opioid-induced analgesia and antihyperalgesia, which might result in different pharmacodynamics. To address this issue, the time course of analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects of intravenous (i.v.) and sublingual (s.l.) buprenorphine was assessed in an experimental human pain model. Fifteen volunteers were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, and placebo controlled cross-over study. The magnitude of pain and the area of secondary hyperalgesia following transcutaneous stimulation were repetitively assessed before and up to 150 min after administration of (1) 0.15 mg buprenorphine i.v. and placebo pill s.l., (2) 0.2 mg buprenorphine s.l. and saline 0.9% i.v. or (3) saline 0.9% i.v. and placebo pill s.l. as a control. The sessions were separated by 2 week wash-out periods. For both applications of buprenorphine the antihyperalgesic effects were more pronounced as compared to the analgesic effects (66+/-9 vs. 26+/-5% and 43+/-10 vs. 10+/-6%, for i.v. and s.l. application, respectively). This contrasts the pattern for the intravenous administration of pure mu-receptor agonists in the same model in which the antihyperalgesic effects are weaker. The apparent bioavailability of buprenorphine s.l. as compared to buprenorphine i.v. was 58% with a 15.8 min later onset of antinociceptive effects. The half-life of buprenorphine-induced analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects were 171 and 288 min, respectively. In contrast to pure mu-receptor agonists, buprenorphine exerts a lasting antihyperalgesic effect in our model. It will be of major clinical interest whether this difference will translate into improved treatment of pain states dominated by central sensitization.

  15. Intravenous lidocaine for post-operative pain relief after hand-assisted laparoscopic colon surgery: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tikuišis, R.; Miliauskas, P.; Samalavičius, N. E.; Žurauskas, A.; Samalavičius, R.; Zabulis, V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Perioperative intravenous (IV) infusion of lidocaine has been shown to decrease post-operative pain, shorten time to return of bowel function, and reduce the length of hospital stay. This randomized, prospective, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluated the impact of IV lidocaine on the quality of post-operative analgesia and other outcomes after hand-assisted laparoscopic colon surgery. Methods Sixty four patients with colon cancer scheduled for elective colon r...

  16. A randomized, controlled study to investigate the analgesic efficacy of single doses of the cannabinoid receptor-2 agonist GW842166, ibuprofen or placebo in patients with acute pain following third molar tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenfeld, Thor; Price, Jeffrey; Albanese, Massimo; Bullman, Jonathan; Guillard, Fiona; Meyer, Ingo; Leeson, Rachel; Costantin, Cristina; Ziviani, Luigi; Nocini, Pier Francesco; Milleri, Stefano

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the postoperative analgesic efficacy of GW842166, a noncannabinoid CB2 agonist, in patients undergoing third molar tooth extraction. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the analgesic efficacy of single doses of GW842166 (100 or 800 mg) or ibuprofen with placebo in patients undergoing extraction of at least 1 fully or partially impacted third molar tooth. Eligible participants were dosed preoperatively within 1 hour of surgery. Participants allocated to active comparator received a second dose of ibuprofen (400 mg), 4 hours after the first 800 mg dose. Participants in the GW842166 and placebo groups received placebo at 4 hours. Procedures for the assessment of efficacy included a visual analog scale and verbal rating scale for scoring pain up to 10 hours postsurgery, duration of analgesia, patient global evaluation, proportion of patients requiring rescue medication, and elapsed time to rescue analgesia. Analysis of covariance was used to compare efficacy variables. Patient global evaluation was analyzed using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and time to data was analyzed using the log-rank test. Ibuprofen was significantly more effective than placebo across all endpoints. Trends for an improvement in pain scores for GW842166 800 mg failed to be of either clinical or statistical significance. GW842166 100 mg showed little separation from placebo. There was no evidence for any beneficial adjunctive effect after coadministration of rescue analgesia with GW842166. All treatments were well tolerated. In comparison to ibuprofen, single doses of GW842166 (100 and 800 mg) failed to demonstrate clinically meaningful analgesia in the setting of acute dental pain.

  17. Hemokinin-1(4-11-induced analgesia selectively up-regulates δ-opioid receptor expression in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Yun Fu

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown that an active fragment of human tachykinins (hHK-1(4-11 produced an opioid-independent analgesia after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. injection in mice, which has been markedly enhanced by a δ OR antagonist, naltrindole hydrochloride (NTI. In this study, we have further characterized the in vivo analgesia after i.c.v. injection of hHK-1(4-11 in mouse model. Our qRT-PCR results showed that the mRNA levels of several ligands and receptors (e.g. PPT-A, PPT-C, KOR, PDYN and PENK have not changed significantly. Furthermore, neither transcription nor expression of NK1 receptor, MOR and POMC have changed noticeably. In contrast, both mRNA and protein levels of DOR have been up-regulated significantly, indicating that the enhanced expression of δ opioid receptor negatively modulates the analgesia induced by i.c.v. injection of hHK-1(4-11. Additionally, the combinatorial data from our previous and present experiments strongly suggest that the discriminable distribution sites in the central nervous system between hHK-1(4-11 and r/mHK-1 may be attributed to their discriminable analgesic effects. Altogether, our findings will not only contribute to the understanding of the complicated mechanisms regarding the nociceptive modulation of hemokinin-1 as well as its active fragments at supraspinal level, but may also lead to novel pharmacological interventions.

  18. Modern neuraxial labor analgesia: options for initiation, maintenance and drug selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, M

    2009-11-01

    In the present review we outline the state-of-the-art of neuraxial analgesia. As neuraxial analgesia remains the gold standar of analgesia during labor, we review the most recent literature on this topic. The neuraxial analgesia techniques, types of administration, drugs, adjuvants, and adverse effects are investigated from the references. Most authors would agree that central neuraxial analgesia is the best form to manage labor pain. When neuraxial analgesia is administered to the parturient in labor, different management choices must be made by the anesthetist: how will we initiate analgesia, how will analgesia be maintained, which local anesthetic will we use for neuraxial analgesia and which adjuvant drugs will we combine? The present manuscript tries to review the literature to answer these questions.

  19. Antidepressants and the Placebo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Antidepressants are supposed to work by fixing a chemical imbalance, specifically, a lack of serotonin in the brain. Indeed, their supposed effectiveness is the primary evidence for the chemical imbalance theory. But analyses of the published data and the unpublished data that were hidden by drug companies reveals that most (if not all) of the benefits are due to the placebo effect. Some antidepressants increase serotonin levels, some decrease it, and some have no effect at all on serotonin. Nevertheless, they all show the same therapeutic benefit. Even the small statistical difference between antidepressants and placebos may be an enhanced placebo effect, due to the fact that most patients and doctors in clinical trials successfully break blind. The serotonin theory is as close as any theory in the history of science to having been proved wrong. Instead of curing depression, popular antidepressants may induce a biological vulnerability making people more likely to become depressed in the future. PMID:25279271

  20. Peripheral morphine analgesia in dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likar, R; Sittl, R; Gragger, K; Pipam, W; Blatnig, H; Breschan, C; Schalk, H V; Stein, C; Schäfer, M

    1998-05-01

    The recent identification of opioid receptors on peripheral nerve endings of primary afferent neurons and the expression of their mRNA in dorsal root ganglia support earlier experimental data about peripheral analgesic effects of locally applied opioids. These effects are most prominent under localized inflammatory conditions. The clinical use of such peripheral analgesic effects of opioids was soon investigated in numerous controlled clinical trials. The majority of these have tested the local, intraarticular administration of morphine in knee surgery and have demonstrated potent and long-lasting postoperative analgesia. As the direct application of morphine into the pain-generating site of injury and inflammation appears most promising, we examined direct morphine infiltration of the surgical site in a unique clinical model of inflammatory tooth pain. Forty-four patients undergoing dental surgery entered into this prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Before surgery they received, together with a standard local anesthetic solution (articaine plus epinephrine) a submucous injection of either 1 mg of morphine (group A) or saline (group B). Postoperative pain intensity was assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS) and numeric rating scale (NRS) at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20 and 24 h after surgery. In addition, patients recorded the occurrence of side effects and the supplemental consumption of diclofenac tablets. Results of 27 patients were analyzed (group A: n=14, group B: n=13). Pain scores which were moderate to severe preoperatively were reduced to a similar extent in both groups up to 8 h postoperatively. Thereafter, pain scores in group A were significantly lower than those in group B for up to 24 h, demonstrating the analgesic efficacy of additional morphine. The time to first analgesic intake and the total amount of supplemental diclofenac were less in group A than in group B. No serious side effects were reported. Our results show that 1 mg of

  1. Meningitis tras anestesia y analgesia espinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Robles Romero

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta revisión es una puesta al día en la etiología, diagnóstico, profilaxis y tratamiento de la meningitis tras anestesia y analgesia espinales. Aunque es una complicación mayor de esta técnica y su incidencia es baja, cada vez son más frecuentes los casos publicados en la literatura médica. Según su etiología se les clasifica en meningitis sépticas, víricas y asépticas. Las meningitis sépticas son las más frecuentes, y en su etiología cada vez juega un papel más destacado como agente implicado el estreptococo salivarius. Como meningitis asépticas se clasifican aquellas en las que el cultivo de líquido cefalorraquídeo es negativo, con un periodo de latencia de síntomas inferior a seis horas, que pueden cursar con eosinofilia en el líquido cefalorraquídeo y unos niveles cercanos a la normalidad en la glucorraquia. Suelen tener buena respuesta y evolución con tratamiento antibiótico con vancomicina y cefalosporinas de tercera generación. Como profilaxis incidir en las medidas de asepsia, sobre todo en el uso de mascarilla facial para realizar la técnica, como práctica para disminuir la incidencia de gérmenes cuyo origen está en la cavidad oral y orofaringe. Asimismo podrían reducir la incidencia de meningitis las medidas de asepsia tales como el lavado de manos, uso de guantes y asepsia de la piel. La diferenciación entre meningitis séptica y aséptica se hará con mayor seguridad cuando se estandaricen las técnicas para detectar genoma bacteriano en el líquido cefalorraquídeo; actualmente se etiquetan como meningitis asépticas aquellas en las que el cultivo de líquido cefalorraquídeo es negativo y cuya tinción de Gram es negativa. Pese a que el pronóstico y evolución en rasgos generales de las meningitis tras anestesia y analgesia espinal es bueno, en comparación con las meningitis adquiridas en la comunidad, por la escasa virulencia de las bacterias implicadas (Estreptococo salivarius

  2. Impact of intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative analgesia and recovery from surgery: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Grace C; Megalla, Sohair A; Habib, Ashraf S

    2010-06-18

    Postoperative pain continues to be inadequately managed. While opioids remain the mainstay for postoperative analgesia, their use can be associated with adverse effects, including ileus, which can prolong hospital stay. A number of studies have investigated the use of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion for improving postoperative analgesia and enhancing recovery of bowel function. This systematic review was performed to determine the overall efficacy of intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative analgesia and recovery from surgery in patients undergoing various surgical procedures. We searched the databases of MEDLINE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library from 1966 to December 2009. We searched for randomized controlled comparisons of lidocaine infusion with placebo in the surgical setting and reporting on postoperative analgesia and other aspects of patient recovery from surgery. The quality of all included studies was assessed using the Modified Oxford Scale. Information on postoperative pain intensity and analgesic requirements was extracted from the trials and compared qualitatively. Other relevant data such as return of bowel function, length of hospital stay, intraoperative anaesthetic requirement and adverse effects were also compared. Sixteen trials were included. A total of 395 patients received intravenous lidocaine with 369 controls. In open and laparoscopic abdominal surgery, as well as in ambulatory surgery patients, intravenous perioperative infusion of lidocaine resulted in significant reductions in postoperative pain intensity and opioid consumption. Pain scores were reduced at rest and with cough or movement for up to 48 hours postoperatively. Opioid consumption was reduced by up to 85% in lidocaine-treated patients when compared with controls. Infusion of lidocaine also resulted in earlier return of bowel function, allowing for earlier rehabilitation and shorter duration of hospital stay. First flatus occurred up to 23 hours earlier

  3. Analgesia epidural para parto en la gestante obesa Epidural analgesia for labour in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Guasch

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available La obesidad es un problema global de salud en continuo aumento en el mundo desarrollado. Dado que la incidencia de la obesidad es mayor en mujeres que en hombres, los anestesiólogos con especial dedicación a la obstetricia, tendrán mayor oportunidad de enfrentarse a este tipo de pacientes. Nuestro objetivo es determinar la dificultad en la realización de la técnica epidural para analgesia de parto y analizar la incidencia de complicaciones ocurridas durante la punción en las gestantes obesas, así como evaluar la eficacia de la analgesia epidural en este grupo de pacientes en un estudio observacional retrospectivo de todos los bloqueos epidurales para analgesia de parto realizados en un hospital universitario de nivel 4 durante un periodo de cuatro años. Se ha estudiado un total de 13616 pacientes, clasificándolas según el índice de masa corporal en Kg./m² (IMC. En las pacientes no obesas (IMCObesity is an increasing global health problem in Developer countries. As its incidence is grater in women than men, obstetric anesthesiologists wil be envolved in the care of the obese patient more often. Our aim is to study punction dificulties in obese parturients requiring epidural analgesia for labor, and to compare punction complications between obese and non obese parturients as analgesic efficacy between obese and non obese patients in a retrospective observational study among all the epidural analgesic blocks performed in a universitary hospital in a four years period. We studied 13616 patients, who were classified according to body mass index in Kg/m² (BMI. In the non obese group patients (BMI<30; first attempt epidural success was achieved in 76,5%. Mild obese patients (BMI 30-32, severe obese (BMI 33-39 and morbid obese (BMI≥40, the percents were 69, 3%, 63,2% y 47,4% respectively. The comparison among obese and non obese patients was significati-vely different (p<0,001. Punction complications did not show differences among groups

  4. Sedation and analgesia in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Joseph D

    2005-08-01

    Various clinical situations may arise in the PICU that necessitate the use of sedation, analgesia, or both. Although there is a large clinical experience with midazolam in the PICU population and it remains the most commonly used benzodiazepine in this setting, lorazepam may provide an effective alternative, with a longer half-life and more predictable pharmacokinetics without the concern of active metabolites. However, there are limited reports regarding its use in the PICU population, and concerns exist regarding the potential for toxicity related to its diluent, propylene glycol. Although the synthetic opioid fentanyl frequently is chosen for use in the PICU setting because of its hemodynamic stability, preliminary data suggest morphine may have a slower development of tolerance and may cause fewer withdrawal symptoms than fentanyl. Morphine's safety profile includes long-term follow-up studies that have demonstrated no adverse central nervous system developmental effects from its use in neonates and infants. In the critically ill infant at risk following surgery for congenital heart disease, clinical experience supports the use of the synthetic opioids, given their ability to modulate PVR and prevent pulmonary hypertensive crisis. Alternatives to the benzodiazepines and opioids include ketamine, pentobarbital, or dexmedetomidine. Ketamine may be useful for patients with hemodynamic instability or airway reactivity. There are limited reports regarding the use of pentobarbital in the PICU, with one study raising concerns of a high incidence of adverse effects associated with its use. Propofol has gained great favor in the adult population as a means of providing deep sedation while allowing for rapid awakening; however, its routine use is not recommended because of its potential association with "propofol infusion syndrome." As the pediatric experience increases, it appears that there will be a role for newer agents such as dexmedetomidine.

  5. Effect of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist Dextromethorphan on Opioid Analgesia in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

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    Mohammed Naeem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pain control is an essential goal in the management of critical children. Narcotics are the mainstay for pain control. Patients frequently need escalating doses of narcotics. In such cases an adjunctive therapy may be beneficial. Dextromethorphan (DM is NMDA receptor antagonist and may prevent tolerance to narcotics; however, its definitive role is still unclear. We sought whether dextromethorphan addition could decrease the requirements of fentanyl to control pain in critical children. Design. Double-blind, randomized control trial (RCT. Setting. Pediatric multidisciplinary ICU in tertiary care center. Patients. Thirty-six pediatric patients 2–14 years of age in a multidisciplinary PICU requiring analgesia were randomized into dextromethorphan and placebo. The subjects in both groups showed similarity in most of the characteristics. Interventions. Subjects while receiving fentanyl for pain control received dextromethorphan or placebo through nasogastric/orogastric tubes for 96 hours. Pain was assessed using FLACC and faces scales. Measurements and Main Results. This study found no statistical significant difference in fentanyl requirements between subjects receiving dextromethorphan and those receiving placebo (p=0.127. Conclusions. Dextromethorphan has no effect on opioid requirement for control of acute pain in children admitted with acute critical care illness in PICU. The registration number for this trial is NCT01553435.

  6. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhair Bani Ismail

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1 and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2. The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg, bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg, ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg, xylazine (0.05 mg/kg, medetomidine (15 μg/kg, romifidine (30-50 μg/kg, ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg, tramadol (1 mg/kg, and neostigmine (10 μg/kg, and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed.

  7. Newborn Analgesia Mediated by Oxytocin during Delivery.

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    Mazzuca, Michel; Minlebaev, Marat; Shakirzyanova, Anastasia; Tyzio, Roman; Taccola, Giuliano; Janackova, Sona; Gataullina, Svetlana; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Giniatullin, Rashid; Khazipov, Rustem

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling pain in newborns during delivery are poorly understood. We explored the hypothesis that oxytocin, an essential hormone for labor and a powerful neuromodulator, exerts analgesic actions on newborns during delivery. Using a thermal tail-flick assay, we report that pain sensitivity is two-fold lower in rat pups immediately after birth than 2 days later. Oxytocin receptor antagonists strongly enhanced pain sensitivity in newborn, but not in 2-day-old rats, whereas oxytocin reduced pain at both ages suggesting an endogenous analgesia by oxytocin during delivery. Similar analgesic effects of oxytocin, measured as attenuation of pain-vocalization induced by electrical whisker pad stimulation, were also observed in decerebrated newborns. Oxytocin reduced GABA-evoked calcium responses and depolarizing GABA driving force in isolated neonatal trigeminal neurons suggesting that oxytocin effects are mediated by alterations of intracellular chloride. Unlike GABA signaling, oxytocin did not affect responses mediated by P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors. In keeping with a GABAergic mechanism, reduction of intracellular chloride by the diuretic NKCC1 chloride co-transporter antagonist bumetanide mimicked the analgesic actions of oxytocin and its effects on GABA responses in nociceptive neurons. Therefore, endogenous oxytocin exerts an analgesic action in newborn pups that involves a reduction of the depolarizing action of GABA on nociceptive neurons. Therefore, the same hormone that triggers delivery also acts as a natural pain killer revealing a novel facet of the protective actions of oxytocin in the fetus at birth.

  8. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-12-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed.

  9. [Nitrous oxide - oxygen analgesia in aesthetic dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosner, M

    2013-06-01

    Local anaesthesia often is insufficient for more extensive procedures. Instead of general anaesthesia or sedation, pediatricians, gynaecologists and dentists increasingly use nitrous oxide (N2O). This study evaluates the suitability of this form of anesthesia in dermatology. In 24 patients (18 w, 6 m, mean age 49 y.) N2O/O2 inhalation (Livopan®) was used during 46 procedures with indications including fractional RF/wrinkle reduction, IPL/rosacea, q-sw. laser/tattoos and hemosiderosis as well as fractional Er:Glass laser for scars and hypopigmentation. In 26 procedures subjective pain intensity was measured (visual analogue scale 0-10). With N2O the treatment pain was lowered from 6.6 ± 1.6 to 2.9 ± 1.7 (median, p = 0.000). 23/24 patients chose N2O for their next treatment. Beside euphoria, fatigue, slight drowsiness, dizziness, nausea or change in auditory perception, no other side effects occurred. The pronounced analgesia, the easy self-administration, the fast onset and complete recovery after a few minutes and the low ratio of side effects make the N2O/O2 inhalation to an ideal addendum in the management of larger painful procedures in dermatology as long as contraindications and safety precautions are respected.

  10. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed. PMID:28096620

  11. Control of postoperative pain after awake craniotomy with local intradermal analgesia and metamizol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Rachel; Ram, Zvi; Perel, Azriel; Yusim, Yakov; Zaslansky, Ruth; Berkenstadt, Haim

    2007-05-01

    Pain following brain surgery is a significant problem. Infiltration of the scalp with local intradermal anesthetics was suggested for postoperative pain control but was assessed only in the first hour postoperatively. To evaluate wound infiltration with a single dose of metamizol (dipyrone) for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing awake craniotomy. This open, prospective, non-randomized observational study, conducted in anesthesiology and neurosurgical departments of a teaching hospital, included 40 patients undergoing awake craniotomy for the removal of brain tumor. Intraoperative anesthesia included wound infiltration with lidocaine and bupivacaine, conscious sedation using remifentanil and propofol, and a single dose of metamizol (dipyrone) for postoperative pain control. Outcome was assessed by the Numerical Pain Scale on arrival at the postoperative care unit, and 2, 4 and 12 hours after the end of surgery. On arrival at the postoperative care unit, patients reported NPS scores of 1.2 +/- 1.1 in a scale of 0-10 (mean +/- SD) (median = 1, range 0-4). The scores were 0.8 +/-0.9, 0.9 +/- 0.9 and 1 +/- 0.9 at 2 hours, 4 hours and 12 hours after the end of surgery, respectively. Based on patients' complaints and NPS lower than 3, 27 patients did not require any supplementary analgesia during the first 12 postoperative hours, 11 patients required a single dose of oral metamizol or intramuscular diclofenac, one patient was given 2 mg of intravenous morphine, and one patient required two separate doses of metamizol. Although the clinical setup prevents the use of placebo local analgesia as a control group, the results suggest the possible role of local intradermal infiltration of the scalp combined with a single dose of metamizol to control postoperative pain in patients undergoing craniotomy.

  12. Intravenous lidocaine for postmastectomy pain treatment: randomized, blind, placebo controlled clinical trial

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    Tania Cursino de Menezes Couceiro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Postoperative pain treatment in mastectomy remains a major challenge despite the multimodal approach. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic effect of intravenous lidocaine in patients undergoing mastectomy, as well as the postoperative consumption of opioids. METHODS: After approval by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira in Recife, Pernambuco, a randomized, blind, controlled trial was conducted with intravenous lidocaine at a dose of 3 mg/kg infused over 1 h in 45 women undergoing mastectomy under general anesthesia. One patient from placebo group was. RESULTS: Groups were similar in age, body mass index, type of surgery, and postoperative need for opioids. Two of 22 patients in lidocaine group and three of 22 patients in placebo group requested opioid (p = 0.50. Pain on awakening was identified in 4/22 of lidocaine group and 5/22 of placebo group (p = 0.50; in the post-anesthetic recovery room in 14/22 and 12/22 (p = 0.37 of lidocaine and placebo groups, respectively. Pain evaluation 24 h after surgery showed that 2/22 and 3/22 patients (p = 0.50 of lidocaine and placebo groups, respectively, complained of pain. CONCLUSION: Intravenous lidocaine at a dose of 3 mg/kg administered over a period of an hour during mastectomy did not promote additional analgesia compared to placebo in the first 24 h, and has not decreased opioid consumption. However, a beneficial effect of intravenous lidocaine in selected and/or other therapeutic regimens patients cannot be ruled out.

  13. Expectations and positive emotional feelings accompany reductions in ongoing and evoked neuropathic pain following placebo interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Gitte L; Finnerup, Nanna B; Grosen, Kasper; Pilegaard, Hans K; Tracey, Irene; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Price, Donald D; Jensen, Troels S; Vase, Lene

    2014-12-01

    Research on placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia has primarily included healthy subjects or acute pain patients, and it is unknown whether these effects can be obtained in ongoing pain in patients with chronic pain caused by an identifiable nerve injury. Eighteen patients with postthoracotomy neuropathic pain were exposed to placebo and nocebo manipulations, in which they received open and hidden administrations of pain-relieving (lidocaine) or pain-inducing (capsaicin) treatment controlled for the natural history of pain. Immediately after the open administration, patients rated their expected pain levels on a mechanical visual analogue scale (M-VAS). They also reported their emotional feelings via a quantitative/qualitative experiential method. Subsequently, patients rated their ongoing pain levels on the M-VAS and underwent quantitative sensory testing of evoked pain (brush, pinprick, area of hyperalgesia, wind-up-like pain). There was a significant placebo effect on both ongoing (P=.009 to .019) and evoked neuropathic pain (P=.0005 to .053). Expected pain levels accounted for significant amounts of the variance in ongoing (53.4%) and evoked pain (up to 34.5%) after the open lidocaine administration. Furthermore, patients reported high levels of positive and low levels of negative emotional feelings in the placebo condition compared with the nocebo condition (P⩽.001). Pain increases during nocebo were nonsignificant (P=.394 to 1.000). To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate placebo effects in ongoing neuropathic pain. It provides further evidence for placebo-induced reduction in hyperalgesia and suggests that patients' expectations coexist with emotional feelings about treatments. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of a Suggestive Placebo Intervention on Psychobiological Responses to Social Stress: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann-Viehoff, Frank; Steckhan, Nico; Meissner, Karin; Deter, Hans-Christian; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a suggestive placebo intervention can reduce the subjective and neurobiological stress response to psychosocial stress. Fifty-four healthy male subjects with elevated levels of trait anxiety were randomly assigned in a 4:4:1 fashion to receive either no treatment (n = 24), a placebo pill (n = 24), or a herbal drug (n = 6) before undergoing a stress test. We repeatedly measured psychological variables as well as salivary cortisol, alpha-amylase, and heart rate variability prior to and following the stress test. The stressor increased subjective stress and anxiety, salivary cortisol, and alpha-amylase, and decreased heart rate variability (all P placebo or no treatment were found. Subjects receiving placebo showed increased wakefulness during the stress test compared with no-treatment controls (P placebo intervention increased alertness, but modulated neither subjective stress and anxiety nor the physiological response to psychosocial stress.

  15. Experimental pain and opioid analgesia in volunteers at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea.

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    Anthony G Doufas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is characterized by recurrent nocturnal hypoxia and sleep disruption. Sleep fragmentation caused hyperalgesia in volunteers, while nocturnal hypoxemia enhanced morphine analgesic potency in children with OSA. This evidence directly relates to surgical OSA patients who are at risk for airway compromise due to postoperative use of opioids. Using accepted experimental pain models, we characterized pain processing and opioid analgesia in male volunteers recruited based on their risk for OSA. METHODS: After approval from the Intitutional Review Board and informed consent, we assessed heat and cold pain thresholds and tolerances in volunteers after overnight polysomnography (PSG. Three pro-inflammatory and 3 hypoxia markers were determined in the serum. Pain tests were performed at baseline, placebo, and two effect site concentrations of remifentanil (1 and 2 µg/ml, an μ-opioid agonist. Linear mixed effects regression models were employed to evaluate the association of 3 PSG descriptors [wake after sleep onset, number of sleep stage shifts, and lowest oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO(2 during sleep] and all serum markers with pain thresholds and tolerances at baseline, as well as their changes under remifentanil. RESULTS: Forty-three volunteers (12 normal and 31 with a PSG-based diagnosis of OSA were included in the analysis. The lower nadir SaO(2 and higher insulin growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1 were associated with higher analgesic sensitivity to remifentanil (SaO(2, P = 0.0440; IGFBP-1, P = 0.0013. Other pro-inflammatory mediators like interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α were associated with an enhanced sensitivity to the opioid analgesic effect (IL-1β, P = 0.0218; TNF-α, P = 0.0276. CONCLUSIONS: Nocturnal hypoxemia in subjects at high risk for OSA was associated with an increased potency of opioid analgesia. A serum hypoxia marker (IGFBP-1 was associated with hypoalgesia and

  16. Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganich, Christina; Erdal, Kristi

    2014-01-01

    The placebo effect is any outcome that is not attributed to a specific treatment but rather to an individual's mindset (Benson & Friedman, 1996). This phenomenon can extend beyond its typical use in pharmaceutical drugs to involve aspects of everyday life, such as the effect of sleep on cognitive functioning. In 2 studies examining whether…

  17. Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganich, Christina; Erdal, Kristi

    2014-01-01

    The placebo effect is any outcome that is not attributed to a specific treatment but rather to an individual's mindset (Benson & Friedman, 1996). This phenomenon can extend beyond its typical use in pharmaceutical drugs to involve aspects of everyday life, such as the effect of sleep on cognitive functioning. In 2 studies examining whether…

  18. Epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walaszczyk, Malgorzata; Knapik, Piotr; Misiolek, Hanna; Korlacki, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Parents have the right to decide on behalf of their children and deny consent to regional anaesthesia. The investigators decided to investigate quality of postoperative analgesia in adolescents undergoing epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure. Material/Methods The study subjects were 61 adolescents aged 11–18 years who underwent pectus excavatum repair with the Nuss procedure. Patients were divided into epidural (n=41) and opioid (n=20) groups, depending on their parents’ consent to epidural catheter insertion. Intraoperatively, 0.5% epidural ropivacaine with fentanyl or intermittent intravenous injections of fentanyl were used. Postoperative analgesia was achieved with either epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine with fentanyl, or subcutaneous morphine via an intraoperatively inserted “butterfly” cannula. Additionally, both groups received metamizol and paracetamol. Primary outcome variables were postoperative pain scores (Numeric Rating Scale and Prince Henry Hospital Pain Score). Secondary outcome variables included hemodynamic parameters, additional analgesia and side effects. Results Heart rate and blood pressure values in the postoperative period were significantly higher in the opioid group. Pain scores requiring intervention were noted almost exclusively in the opioid group. Conclusions Denial of parental consent to epidural analgesia following the Nuss procedure results in significantly worse control of postoperative pain. Our data may be useful when discussing with parents the available anaesthetic techniques for exceptionally painful procedures. PMID:22037752

  19. Preemptive analgesia I: physiological pathways and pharmacological modalities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, D J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: This two-part review summarizes the current knowledge of physiological mechanisms, pharmacological modalities and controversial issues surrounding preemptive analgesia. SOURCE: Articles from 1966 to present were obtained from the MEDLINE databases. Search terms included: analgesia, preemptive; neurotransmitters; pain, postoperative; hyperalgesia; sensitization, central nervous system; pathways, nociception; anesthetic techniques; analgesics, agents. Principal findings: The physiological basis of preemptive analgesia is complex and involves modification of the pain pathways. The pharmacological modalities available may modify the physiological responses at various levels. Effective preemptive analgesic techniques require multi-modal interception of nociceptive input, increasing threshold for nociception, and blocking or decreasing nociceptor receptor activation. Although the literature is controversial regarding the effectiveness of preemptive analgesia, some general recommendations can be helpful in guiding clinical care. Regional anesthesia induced prior to surgical trauma and continued well into the postoperative period is effective in attenuating peripheral and central sensitization. Pharmacologic agents such as NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) opioids, and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) - and alpha-2-receptor antagonists, especially when used in combination, act synergistically to decrease postoperative pain. CONCLUSION: The variable patient characteristics and timing of preemptive analgesia in relation to surgical noxious input requires individualization of the technique(s) chosen. Multi-modal analgesic techniques appear most effective.

  20. Preemptive analgesia II: recent advances and current trends.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, D J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: This two-part review summarizes the current knowledge of physiological mechanisms, pharmacological modalities and controversial issues surrounding preemptive analgesia. SOURCE: Articles from 1966 to present were obtained from the MEDLINE databases. Search terms included analgesia, preemptive; neurotransmitters; pain, postoperative; hyperalgesia; sensitization, central nervous system; pathways, nociception; anesthetic techniques; analgesics, agents. Principal findings: In Part I of this review article, techniques and agents that attenuate or prevent central and peripheral sensitization were reviewed. In Part II, the conditions required for effective preemptive techniques are evaluated. Specifically, preemptive analgesia may be defined as an antinociceptive treatment that prevents establishment of altered central processing of afferent input from sites of injury. The most important conditions for establishment of effective preemptive analgesia are the establishment of an effective level of antinociception before injury, and the continuation of this effective analgesic level well into the post-injury period to prevent central sensitization during the inflammatory phase. Although single-agent therapy may attenuate the central nociceptive processing, multi-modal therapy is more effective, and may be associated with fewer side effects compared with the high-dose, single-agent therapy. CONCLUSION: The variable patient characteristics and timing of preemptive analgesia in relation to surgical noxious input require individualization of the technique(s) chosen. Multi-modal analgesic techniques appear more effective.

  1. The moral case for the clinical placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Azgad; Lichtenberg, Pesach

    2014-04-01

    Placebos are arguably the most commonly prescribed drug, across cultures and throughout history. Nevertheless, today many would consider their use in the clinic unethical, since placebo treatment involves deception and the violation of patients' autonomy. We examine the placebo's definition and its clinical efficacy from a biopsychosocial perspective, and argue that the intentional use of the placebo and placebo effect, in certain circumstances and under several conditions, may be morally acceptable. We highlight the role of a virtue-based ethical orientation and its implications for the beneficent use of the placebo. In addition, the definitions of lying and deception are discussed, clarified and applied to the clinical placebo dilemma. Lastly, we suggest that concerns about patient autonomy, when invoked as a further argument against administering placebos, are extended beyond their reasonable and coherent application.

  2. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF INTRAVENOUS DEXMEDETOMIDINE PLUS INTRATHECAL BUPIVACAINE VS INTRATHECAL BUPIVACAINE ALONE FOR PROLONGATION OF SPINAL ANALGESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: The prolongation of spinal anaesthesia by using clonidine through the oral, intravenous and spinal route has been known. The new alpha-2 agonist, dexmedetomidine has been proved to prolong the spinal anaesthesia through the intrathecal route. We hypothesized that dexmedetomidine when administered intravenously following spinal block also prolongs spinal analgesia. A placebo controlled randomized controlled trial study was done. METHODOLOGY: 50 Patients were randomly allocated into two equal groups group D and group C. Both group received spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 15mg intrathecally. Patients in group D received intravenously a loading dose of 1mcg/kg dexmedetomidine over 10 min followed by C maintenance dose of 0.5mcg/kg/hr till the end of surgery. Patients in group C (The control group received normal saline. The regression times to reach S1 sensory level and bromage 0 motor scale, hemodynamic changes and the level of sedation were recorded. RESULTS: The duration of sensory block was longer in intravenous dexmedetomidine group compared with control group (264.32+15.3 min vs 164.2+13.12 min, p 0.001. The duration of motor block was longer in dexmedetomidine group than control group (198.8+16.9 min vs 135.8+12.38 min, p 0.001 CONCLUSION: Intravenous dexmedetomidine administration prolonged the sensory and motor blocks of bupivacaine spinal analgesia with good sedation effect and hemodynamic stability. The incidence of bradycardia is significantly high when intravenous dexmedetomidine is used as an adjuvant to bupivacaine spinal anaesthesia. Dexmedetomidine induced bradycardia and hypotension can be easily managed with atropine and mephentermine respectively. Dexmedetomidine provides excellent sedation and postoperative analgesia.

  3. A randomized, controlled trial comparing local infiltration analgesia with epidural infusion for total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karen Vestergaard; Bak, Marie; Christensen, Birgitte Viebæk;

    2010-01-01

    There have been few studies describing wound infiltration with additional intraarticular administration of multimodal analgesia for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In this study, we assessed the efficacy of wound infiltration combined with intraarticular regional analgesia with epidural infusion...

  4. EFFECT OF INTRAOPERATIVE ESMOLOL INFUSION ON POSTOPERATIVE ANALGESIA IN LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY PATIENTS: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TR IAL

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    Shreya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, gaining worldwide popularity, can be performed on a short stay basis if postoperative pain is adequately addressed. Our present study determines the effect of intraoperative infusion of intravenous esmolol primarily in terms of postoperative analgesia and intraoperative haemodynamic stability. METHODS: 60 ASAPS 1 and 2 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in this randomi s ed, prospective, placebo - controlled clinical study. Patients were alloca ted into two groups to receive intraoperative intravenous esmolol (Group A, n=30 or normal saline (Group B, n=30 over a period of 10 minutes before induction. Intraoperative heart rate, mean arterial pressure and postoperative fentanyl requirement ( D uri ng first 6 postoperative hours were recorded. RESULTS: Postoperative requirement of fentanyl was significantly lower (92.73±17.42mcg in group A compared to 117.32±19.22mcg in group B, p value 0.05. CONCLUSION: Intravenous esmolol effectively reduces postoperative fentanyl requirement, thereby is a safe adjunct in the fie ld of postoperative analgesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  5. Classical conditioning and pain: conditioned analgesia and hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A; Miller, Ralph R

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity.

  6. CLASSICAL CONDITIONING AND PAIN: CONDITIONED ANALGESIA AND HYPERALGESIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity. PMID:24269884

  7. Role of collagen fibers in acupuncture analgesia therapy on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaojia; Ding, Guanghong; Huang, Hong; Lin, Jun; Yao, Wei; Zhan, Rui

    2009-01-01

    Acupuncture, a traditional Chinese therapeutic technique, has been put into practice for more than 4000 years and widely used for pain management since 1958. However, what is the mechanism underlying the acupuncture for analgesia effects by stimulation of acupoints, what substances receive the original mechanical acupuncture signals from the acupoints, or what transforms these signals into effective biological signals are not well understood. In this work, the role of collagen fibers at acupoints during acupuncture analgesia on rats was investigated. When the structure of the collagen fibers at Zusanli (ST36) was destroyed by injection of type I collagenase, the needle force caused by the acupuncture declined and the analgesic effects of rotation or lift-thrusting manipulations was attenuated accompanying the restraint of the degranulation ratios of mast cells. We propose that collagen fibers play an important role in acupuncture-induced analgesia, and they participate in signal transmission and transform processes.

  8. Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Lone; Haroutiunian, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Intravenous patient-controlled therapy is used routinely in postoperative care in much of the developed world. Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia results in higher patient satisfaction than conventional administration of analgesics, although it appears to have no advantage over conventional...... analgesia in terms of adverse effects and consumption of opioids. Standard orders and nursing procedure protocols are recommended for patients receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia to monitor treatment efficacy and development of adverse effects. Some subgroups of patients need special...... consideration. For example, opioid-tolerant patients need higher postoperative opioid doses to achieve satisfactory analgesic effect. In patients with renal or hepatic insufficiency, the elimination of some opioids may be substantially impaired, and the optimal opioid should be selected based on its...

  9. Association between KCNJ6 (GIRK2) gene polymorphism rs2835859 and post-operative analgesia, pain sensitivity, and nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Daisuke; Fukuda, Ken-ichi; Kasai, Shinya; Ogai, Yasukazu; Hasegawa, Junko; Sato, Naomi; Yamada, Hidetaka; Tanioka, Fumihiko; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Hayashida, Masakazu; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2014-01-01

    G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are expressed in many tissues and activated by several Gi/o protein-coupled receptors, such as opioid and dopamine receptors, and thus are known to be involved in the modulation of opioid-induced analgesia, pain, and reward. We focused on a GIRK-channel subunit that plays a pivotal role in the brain, GIRK2, and investigated the contribution of genetic variations of the GIRK2 (KCNJ6) gene to individual differences in the sensitivity to opioid analgesia. In our initial linkage disequilibrium analysis, a total of 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected within and around the regions of the KCNJ6 gene. Among them, the rs2835859 SNP, for which associations with analgesia and pain have not been previously reported, was selected in the exploratory study as a potent candidate SNP associated with opioid analgesic sensitivity. The results were corroborated in further confirmatory study. Interestingly, this SNP was also found to be associated with sensitivity to both cold and mechanical pain, susceptibility to nicotine dependence, and successful smoking cessation. The results indicate that this SNP could serve as a marker that predicts sensitivity to analgesic and pain and susceptibility to nicotine dependence.

  10. Racial differences in the use of epidural analgesia for labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glance, Laurent G; Wissler, Richard; Glantz, Christopher; Osler, Turner M; Mukamel, Dana B; Dick, Andrew W

    2007-01-01

    There is strong evidence that pain is undertreated in black and Hispanic patients. The association between race and ethnicity and the use of epidural analgesia for labor is not well described. Using the New York State Perinatal Database, the authors examined whether race and ethnicity were associated with the likelihood of receiving epidural analgesia for labor after adjusting for clinical characteristics, demographics, insurance coverage, and provider effect. This retrospective cohort study was based on 81,883 women admitted for childbirth between 1998 and 2003. Overall, 38.3% of the patients received epidural analgesia for labor. After adjusting for clinical risk factors, socioeconomic status, and provider fixed effects, Hispanic and black patients were less likely than non-Hispanic white patients to receive epidural analgesia: The adjusted odds ratio was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.78-0.93) for white/Hispanic and 0.78 (0.74-0.83) for blacks compared with non-Hispanic whites. Compared with patients with private insurance, patients without insurance were least likely to receive epidural analgesia (adjusted odds ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.64-0.89). Black patients with private insurance had similar rates of epidural use to white/non-Hispanic patients without insurance coverage: The adjusted odds ratio was 0.66 (95% CI, 0.53-0.82) for white/non-Hispanic patients without insurance versus 0.69 (0.57-0.85) for black patients with private insurance. Black and Hispanic women in labor are less likely than non-Hispanic white women to receive epidural analgesia. These differences remain after accounting for differences in insurance coverage, provider practice, and clinical characteristics.

  11. Effect of sufentanil combined with different concentrations of ropivacaine for labor analgesia on maternal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-He Wang; Min-Jia Jiang; Wan-Dong Liao

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of sufentanil combined with different concentration of ropivacaine for stepped analgesia on stage of labor, stress indexes and blood coagulation function.Methods:A total of 178 cases of full-term singleton primiparas who awaited delivery and received epidural labor analgesia in our hospital from January 2015 to June 2016 were selected and randomly divided into stepped analgesia group and routine analgesia group, and the stage of labor, levels of stress hormones and pain mediators during childbirth and blood coagulation function indexes after childbirth were observed between two groups.Results: The duration of latent phase of labor of stepped analgesia group was shorter than that of routine analgesia group while the duration of active phase of labor, the duration of second stage of labor and the duration of third stage of labor were not significantly different from those of routine analgesia group; serum PRL level of stepped analgesia group was significantly higher than that of routine analgesia group while PA, NE, E, DYN,β-EP, SP, PGE2, 5-HT, TF, TFPI, FPA, AT-III and DD levels were not significantly different from those of routine analgesia group.Conclusions: Sufentanil combined with different concentration of ropivacaine for stepped analgesia is with equivalent effect to routine analgesia, and can shorten the latent phase of labor and reduce the inhibitory effect of pain on prolactin without affecting the degree of stress during childbirth and the blood coagulation function after childbirth.

  12. Remifentanil em analgesia para o trabalho de parto Remifentanil en analgesia para el trabajo de parto Remifentanil as analgesia for labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane C S Soares

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: As técnicas neuroaxiais representam atualmente os métodos mais efetivos para controle da dor durante o trabalho de parto e a analgesia peridural utilizando soluções anestésicas ultradiluídas é considerada o padrão ouro, promovendo alívio adequado da dor com mínimos efeitos colaterais. Em algumas situações, no entanto, o emprego dessas técnicas é limitado pela existência de contraindicações maternas ou obstáculos estruturais e materiais. Nestes casos, as opções alternativas ainda são precárias e escassas, oferecendo resultados pouco otimistas e de eficácia questionável. CONTEÚDO: Este artigo apresenta, com base em uma revisão da literatura, as informações disponíveis relacionadas ao emprego do remifentanil como técnica alternativa para a analgesia de parto discutindo aspectos farmacocinéticos, farmacodinâmicos, eficácia analgésica, satisfação materna e efeitos colaterais maternos e fetais. CONCLUSÕES: Os dados iniciais apontam o remifentanil como uma opção promissora a ser empregada nas situações em que a gestante não quer ou não pode receber a analgesia neuroaxial.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: Las técnicas neuroaxiales representan actualmente los métodos más efectivos para el control del dolor durante el trabajo de parto, y la analgesia epidural utilizando soluciones anestésicas ultradiluidas se considera el estándar oro, promoviendo el alivio correcto del dolor con los mínimos efectos colaterales. En algunas situaciones, sin embargo, el uso de esas técnicas queda limitado por la existencia de contraindicaciones maternas u obstáculos estructurales y materiales. En esos casos, las alternativas todavía son precarias y escasas, ofreciendo resultados poco optimistas y de una eficacia cuestionable. CONTENIDO: Con base en una revisión de la literatura, este artículo muestra que las informaciones disponibles relacionadas a lo empleo de lo remifetanil como técnica alternativa

  13. Regional anesthesia and analgesia for oral and dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Judy

    2005-07-01

    Regional anesthesia and analgesia benefit the client, the patient, and the practitioner, and their use is becoming the standard for care. Familiarity with the processes involved in the generation of pain aids in understanding the benefits of preemptive and multimodal analgesia. Local anesthetic blocks should be a key component of a treatment plan, along with opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, and other therapies. Nerve blocks commonly used for dentistry and oral surgery include the infraorbital, maxillary, mental,and mandibular blocks.

  14. Effects of hypnotic focused analgesia on dental pain threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facco, Enrico; Casiglia, Edoardo; Masiero, Serena; Tikhonoff, Valery; Giacomello, Margherita; Zanette, Gastone

    2011-01-01

    The rate, intensity, and selectivity of hypnotic focused analgesia (HFA) were tested with dental pulp stimulation. Thirty-one healthy subjects were hypnotized, and hypnotic suggestions were given for anesthesia of the right mandibular arch. A posthypnotic suggestion of persisting analgesia was also given. The pain threshold of the first premolar was bilaterally measured before, during, and after hypnosis using a pulp tester. During hypnosis, the pain threshold increased significantly (p < .0001) for both sides. The posthypnotic right pain threshold was also significantly (p < .0015) higher than in the basal condition.

  15. Hyperventilation-induced tetany associated with epidural analgesia for labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, N; Camann, W

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of painful carpo-pedal spasm associated with the initiation of epidural analgesia for labor. The patient, an otherwise healthy primigravida in early labor at term, was experiencing severe hyperventilation as a result of inappropriate use of the Lamaze breathing technique. Bilateral carpo-pedal spasm occurred, and produced severe pain. Resolution of symptoms coincided with onset of effective epidural labor pain relief. A diagnostic challenge was presented to the anesthesiologist, as the symptoms could have been consistent with subdural block, local anesthetic toxicity, high sensory level of analgesia or eclamptic neuro-excitation activity.

  16. CLINICAL EFFECTS OF ROPIVACAINE MESYLATE IN EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA AND ANALGESIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-qing Xu; Bo Zhu; Tie-hu Ye

    2005-01-01

    @@ SINCE the report that ropivacaine hydrochloride, a new amide local anesthetic, is of lower cardiac toxicity both in animals and humans,1 several studies have shown it to be a clinically effective local anesthetic widely used for both epidural anesthesia2-4 and analgesia5-7. Ropivacaine mesylate made in China is structurally from ropivacaine hydrochloride by substituting a mesylate group for hydrochloride group.8 This study was designed to clinically provide a double-blind comparison of ropivacaine mesylate with ropivacaine hydrochloride in epidural anesthesia and analgesia.

  17. Stellate ganglion blockade for analgesia following upper limb surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, J G

    2012-01-31

    We report the successful use of a stellate ganglion block as part of a multi-modal postoperative analgesic regimen. Four patients scheduled for orthopaedic surgery following upper limb trauma underwent blockade of the stellate ganglion pre-operatively under ultrasound guidance. Patients reported excellent postoperative analgesia, with postoperative VAS pain scores between 0 and 2, and consumption of morphine in the first 24 h ranging from 0 to 14 mg. While these are preliminary findings, and must be confirmed in a clinical trial, they highlight the potential for stellate ganglion blockade to provide analgesia following major upper limb surgery.

  18. Placebo and other psychological interactions in headache treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autret, A; Valade, D; Debiais, S

    2012-04-01

    administration was limited, the control of attacks uncertain as well as the evolution of the co-morbid psycho-pathology. Considering the reviews and meta-analysis of complex prophylactic procedures, it must be concluded that their effect is mostly linked to a placebo and non-specific psychological effects. Acupuncture may have a slight specific effect on tension type headache, but not on migraine. Manual therapy studies do not exhibit difference between manipulation, mobilization, and controls; touch has no proven specific effect. A comprehensive efficacy review of biofeedback studies concludes to a small specific effect on tension type headache but not on migraine. A review of behavioral treatment conclude to an interesting mean improvement but did not demonstrated a specific effect with the exception of a four arm study including a pseudo meditation control group. Expectation-linked placebo, conditioning, and non-specific psychological effects vary according clinical situations and psychological context; likely low in RCT, high after anempathic medical contact, and at its maximum with a desired charismatic healer. The announcements of doctors strongly influence the beliefs of patients, and in consequence their pain and anxiety sensibilities; this modulates the amplitude of the placebo and the non-specific psychological effects and is therefore a major determinant of the therapeutic success. Furthermore, any repetitive contact, even through a placebo, may interfere positively with the psychopathological co-morbidity. One has to keep in mind that the non-specific psychological interactions play a major role in the improvement of the majority of the headache sufferers.

  19. PLACEBO EFFECTS IN COMPETITIVE SPORT: QUALITATIVE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Beedie

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the placebo effect in sports performance. The possibility that the placebo effect is a more common phenomenon than the quantity of published research would suggest is briefly addressed. It is suggested that the placebo control design often used in sports performance research masks any placebo effects and thus presents a false picture of the mechanisms underlying performance-enhancing interventions in the real world. An electronic survey was sent to 48 competitive, international and professional athletes. Questions related to the placebo effect in competitive sport. Thirty responses were received. Data indicate that the majority (97% of respondents believe that the placebo effect can exert an influence on sports performance, and that a significant number (73% have experienced what they defined as a placebo effect. Inductive content analysis reveals that these experiences fall into several categories such as explicit placebo effects, inadvertent false beliefs, ritual and reverse placebo effects. Furthermore, 10 respondents (33% offer explanations as to the nature of the placebo effect. Again, inductive content analysis reveals that these explanations fall into several categories including deliberate changes in competitive strategy, belief/expectancy, faith in a third party, and marketing. Overall, responses support previous experimental research and anecdotal reports that have found a relationship between belief and sports performance. It is suggested that further research be structured to not simply control for the placebo effect, but to elucidate it

  20. Regulating the placebo effect in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tracey E

    2015-01-01

    Recent research and ethical analysis have forced a clinical and ethical reappraisal of the utility of placebos in medical practice. The main concern of ethics and law is that using placebos in health care involves deception, which is antithetical to patient autonomy and trust in the physician-patient relationship. This article reviews the various, more nuanced scientific conceptions of the placebo effect, and evaluates the ethical and legal objections to deploying placebos in clinical practice. It argues that the placebo effect may be legitimately accommodated on the basis that it does not engage the requirement for material or quasi-fiduciary disclosures of information, and may also be justified by therapeutic privilege. In addition, this reconceptualisation of the placebo effect offers a new justification for therapeutic privilege in these contexts. Notwithstanding this, using the placebo effect in clinical practice raises regulatory issues that will require special regulatory supervision.

  1. Comparison of relative oxycodone consumption in surgical pleth index-guided analgesia versus conventional analgesia during sevoflurane anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Young Ju; Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, So Hyun; Park, Sangwoo; Kim, Heezoo; Lee, Il Ok; Kong, Myoung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The surgical pleth index (SPI) is proposed for titration of analgesic drugs during general anesthesia. Several reports have investigated the effect of SPI on the consumption of opioids including remifentanil, fentanyl, and sufentanil during anesthesia, but there are no reports about oxycodone. We aimed to investigate intravenous oxycodone consumption between SPI-guided analgesia and conventional analgesia practices during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Methods: Forty-five patients undergoing elective thyroidectomy were randomly assigned to an SPI group (SPI-guided analgesia group, n = 23) or a control group (conventional analgesia group, n = 22). Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane to achieve bispectral index values between 40 and 60. In the SPI group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at SPI values over 50; in the control group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at the occurrence of tachycardia or hypertension event. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption and extubation time were recorded. The number of hemodynamic and somatic movement events was recorded, as were postoperative pain and recovery scores. Results: Patients’ characteristics were comparable between the groups. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption in the SPI group was significantly lower than the control group (3.5 ± 2.4 vs 5.1 ± 2.4 mg; P = 0.012). Extubation time was significantly shorter in the SPI group (10.6 ± 3.5 vs 13.4 ± 4.6 min; P = 0.026). Hemodynamic and somatic movement events during anesthesia were comparable between the groups, as were numeric rating scales for pain and modified Aldrete scores at postanesthesia care unit. Conclusions: SPI-guided analgesia reduces intravenous oxycodone consumption and extubation time compared with conventional analgesia based on clinical parameters during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. PMID:27583920

  2. Inhaled analgesia for pain management in labour (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, T.; Poppel, M. van; Jones, L.; Lazet, J.; Nisio, M. Di; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many women would like to have a choice in pain relief during labour and also would like to avoid invasive methods of pain management in labour. Inhaled analgesia during labour involves the self-administered inhalation of sub-anaesthetic concentrations of agents while the mother remains a

  3. Analgesia in the horse, assessing and treating pain in equines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, Thijs van

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on pain and nociception in horses and is based on the PhD thesis “Analgesia in the Horse, various approaches for assessment and treatment of pain and nociception in equines” by J.P.A.M. van Loon. Apart from a scientific review of the related literature, a multi-disciplinary appro

  4. Inhaled analgesia for pain management in labour (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, T.; Poppel, M. van; Jones, L.; Lazet, J.; Nisio, M. Di; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many women would like to have a choice in pain relief during labour and also would like to avoid invasive methods of pain management in labour. Inhaled analgesia during labour involves the self-administered inhalation of sub-anaesthetic concentrations of agents while the mother remains

  5. Side effects of pain and analgesia in animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirkof, Paulin

    2017-03-22

    This review highlights selected effects of untreated pain and of widely used analgesics such as opioids, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and antipyretics, to illustrate the relevance of carefully planned, appropriate and controlled analgesia for greater reproducibility in animal experiments involving laboratory rodents.

  6. Ingestion analgesia occurs when a bad taste turns good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Hayley; Mason, Peggy

    2011-12-01

    During ingestion of water, chocolate, sucrose, and saccharin, pain-related behaviors are suppressed. This ingestion analgesic effect is reversed when the hedonic valence of a food is switched from "good" to "bad" as occurs during conditioned taste aversion. Here, we tested the converse hedonic shift to determine if ingestion analgesia occurs when 0.3 M NaCl is made palatable by inducing a sodium appetite. In Experiment 1, sham- and sodium-depleted rats were tested for paw withdrawal and lick latencies to brief noxious heat during quiet wake and intraoral NaCl ingestion. Only sodium-depleted rats showed a suppression of heat-evoked reactions during NaCl ingestion. In Experiment 2, we tested whether this analgesic effect is mediated by the brainstem nucleus raphe magnus (NRM). Inactivation of NRM with muscimol blocked ingestion analgesia during NaCl ingestion by sodium-depleted rats. This attenuation was not due to a hyperalgesic effect of NRM inactivation. Muscimol microinjections into a nearby region, the nucleus raphe obscurus (NRO), were ineffective. The present findings demonstrate that the internal milieu of an animal can modify ingestion analgesia, and that the analgesia during NaCl ingestion by sodium hungry rats is mediated by NRM. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S Hajnour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications.

  8. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnour, Mohamed S; Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Ejaz, Abdul Aziz Ahmed; Al Zahrani, Tariq; Kanchi, Naveed Uddin

    2017-01-01

    For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications.

  9. Analgesia and anesthesia for neonates : Study design and ethical issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anand, KJS; Aranda, JV; Berde, CB; Buckman, S; Capparelli, EV; Carlo, WA; Hummel, P; Lantos, P; Johnston, CC; Lehr, VT; Lynn, AM; Oberlander, TF; Raju, TNK; Soriano, SG; Taddio, A; Walco, GA; Maxwell, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to summarize the clinical, methodologic, and ethical considerations for researchers interested in designing future trials in neonatal analgesia and anesthesia, hopefully stimulating additional research in this field. Methods: The MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and

  10. Labour epidural analgesia in Poland in 2009 - a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmanik, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Labour analgesia in most developed countries is funded by the state, available to every woman in labour, and plays an important role in the everyday activities of most anaesthetists. This paper presents the second part of an Obstetric Anaesthesia Survey which was conducted in 2009. The first part of the Survey, relating to anaesthesia for caesarean sections, was published in 2010. The author sent out 432 questionnaires containing questions about hospital size and location, staffing levels and numbers of deliveries per year. There were also questions regarding regional and other pain relief methods used in labour, ways of administration, drugs used and monitoring of patients. The response rate was 24%. Around 45% of responding hospitals had only 1-3 deliveries per year, which makes it difficult to provide separate obstetric anaesthetic cover. Only ten hospitals (11%) employed an anaesthetist for the labour ward. Epidural analgesia was used in 55% of hospitals but only 20% provided the service for 24 hours per day and free of charge. Entonox was used very occasionally, but the most common means of pain relief was pethidine injection. There were marked differences in the medication used for labour epidurals, with 18% of units using high concentrations of local anaesthetics which could result in motor block. Despite a lack of regulations in Polish law and a lack of proper training in 50% of units, midwives were looking after the patients with established labour epidural which could create medico-legal consequences. There was also a marked variation in the parameters monitored during labour analgesia. Epidural labour analgesia was offered for 24 hours per day and free of charge in only 20% of hospitals. Without public pressure it will be difficult to get more funding from the National Health Fund (NFZ) to enable other hospitals, especially those with small obstetric units, to introduce regional labour analgesia. Although the 2009 guidelines addressed most of the issues

  11. Placebo effects in competitive sport: qualitative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beedie, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    The paper examines the placebo effect in sports performance. The possibility that the placebo effect is a more common phenomenon than the quantity of published research would suggest is briefly addressed. It is suggested that the placebo control design often used in sports performance research masks any placebo effects and thus presents a false picture of the mechanisms underlying performance-enhancing interventions in the real world. An electronic survey was sent to 48 competitive, international and professional athletes. Questions related to the placebo effect in competitive sport. Thirty responses were received. Data indicate that the majority (97%) of respondents believe that the placebo effect can exert an influence on sports performance, and that a significant number (73%) have experienced what they defined as a placebo effect. Inductive content analysis reveals that these experiences fall into several categories such as explicit placebo effects, inadvertent false beliefs, ritual and reverse placebo effects. Furthermore, 10 respondents (33%) offer explanations as to the nature of the placebo effect. Again, inductive content analysis reveals that these explanations fall into several categories including deliberate changes in competitive strategy, belief/expectancy, faith in a third party, and marketing. Overall, responses support previous experimental research and anecdotal reports that have found a relationship between belief and sports performance. It is suggested that further research be structured to not simply control for the placebo effect, but to elucidate it. Key pointsA survey of 30 athletes revealed that 73% have experienced a placebo effect in sport.Athletes suggest several potential explanations for these effects.Findings support the idea that placebo effects might be common in sport.Researchers and practitioners should be aware of the possible impact of these effects on research findings and competitive performance.

  12. Xylo-oligosaccharides alone or in synbiotic combination with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis induce bifidogenesis and modulate markers of immune function in healthy adults: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, factorial cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Caroline E; Röytiö, Henna; Alhoniemi, Esa; Fekete, Agnes A; Forssten, Sofia D; Hudjec, Natasa; Lim, Ying Ni; Steger, Cara J; Yaqoob, Parveen; Tuohy, Kieran M; Rastall, Robert A; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Gibson, Glenn R

    2014-06-14

    Prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics are dietary ingredients with the potential to influence health and mucosal and systemic immune function by altering the composition of the gut microbiota. In the present study, a candidate prebiotic (xylo-oligosaccharide, XOS, 8 g/d), probiotic (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bi-07, 109 colony-forming units (CFU)/d) or synbiotic (8 g XOS+109 CFU Bi-07/d) was given to healthy adults (25-65 years) for 21 d. The aim was to identify the effect of the supplements on bowel habits, self-reported mood, composition of the gut microbiota, blood lipid concentrations and immune function. XOS supplementation increased mean bowel movements per d (P= 0·009), but did not alter the symptoms of bloating, abdominal pain or flatulence or the incidence of any reported adverse events compared with maltodextrin supplementation. XOS supplementation significantly increased participant-reported vitality (P= 0·003) and happiness (P= 0·034). Lowest reported use of analgesics was observed during the XOS+Bi-07 supplementation period (P= 0·004). XOS supplementation significantly increased faecal bifidobacterial counts (P= 0·008) and fasting plasma HDL concentrations (P= 0·005). Bi-07 supplementation significantly increased faecal B. lactis content (P= 0·007), lowered lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-4 secretion in whole-blood cultures (P= 0·035) and salivary IgA content (P= 0·040) and increased IL-6 secretion (P= 0·009). XOS supplementation resulted in lower expression of CD16/56 on natural killer T cells (P= 0·027) and lower IL-10 secretion (P= 0·049), while XOS and Bi-07 supplementation reduced the expression of CD19 on B cells (XOS × Bi-07, P= 0·009). The present study demonstrates that XOS induce bifidogenesis, improve aspects of the plasma lipid profile and modulate the markers of immune function in healthy adults. The provision of XOS+Bi-07 as a synbiotic may confer further benefits due to the discrete effects of Bi-07 on the gut

  13. EFFECT OF INTRATHECAL CLONIDINE ON DURATION OF SPINAL ANALGESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clonidine is an α 2 adrenoreceptor agonist that has been shown to effectively prolong the duration of analgesia when administered intrathecally or in the epidural space along with local anaesthetic. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of two different doses of intrathecal clonidine (37.5 μg and 75 μg on the duration of analgesia and side effects produced by hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5%. MATERIALS AND METHODS : A prospective hospital based, randomized and double blind study. Selected 75 patients who was scheduled for elective below umbilical surgeries were randomly allocated to one of three groups. Group I (n=25, control group received 3ml hyperbaric bupivacaine, Group II (n=25 3ml hyperbar ic bupivacaine + 37.5 μg clonidine and Group III (n=25 3 ml hyperbaric bupivacaine + 75μg clonidine intrathecally. Total volume (4ml remained constant by adding sterile water. Data were analyzed by using SPSS software ver.18. RESULTS: The (mean ±SD dura tion of analgesia was found to be 171.3±6.37 mins in Group I, 217.7±7.01 mins in Group II and 257.1±6.50 mins in Group III (p<0.05. It shows that 37.5  g & 75  g intrathecal clonidine increases the duration of analgesia of 15mg hyperbaric bupivacaine by abo ut 46 mins & 86 mins respectively. The addition of intrathecal clonidine upto 75 μg does not cause any significant major side effect except mild sedation, without an increase in incidence of hypotension, bradycardia and respiratory depression. CONCLUSION: Intrathecal clonidine (37.5  g & 75  g as an adjuvant to hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% prolong the duration of analgesia in a dose dependent manner without increase in incidence of significant side effects

  14. Epidural analgesia associated with better survival in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelaar, F J; Abegg, R; van der Linden, J C; Cornelisse, H G J M; van Dorsten, F R C; Lemmens, V E; Bosscha, K

    2015-08-01

    Surgery remains the mainstay of treatment for potentially curable colon cancer. Otherwise, the surgical stress response might increase the likelihood of cancer dissemination during and after cancer surgery. There is growing evidence that the type of anaesthesia during cancer surgery plays a role in the metastatic process. Therefore, we assessed if the method of anaesthesia is associated with long-term survival after colon cancer surgery. A retrospective single-centre study was conducted including 588 patients who underwent colorectal cancer surgery, TNM stage I-IV, in the Jeroen Bosch Hospital between 1995 and 2003. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for statistical analysis. Adjustments were made for age, sex, comorbidity, TNM stage, chemotherapy, emergency surgery status and year of incidence. Of the 588 primary colon cancer patients with a median age of 70 years, 399 (68 %) patients underwent colon surgery with epidural anaesthesia, whilst 189 (32 %) patients were operated without epidural anaesthesia. Five-year survival for patients not receiving epidural analgesia was 42 % versus 51 % for patients receiving epidural analgesia (p = 0.03). This effect remained after adjustment for relevant patient, tumour, and treatment characteristics (hazard ratio (HR) 1.30 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.59), p = 0.01). Subgroup analysis in patients of 80 years and older (n = 100) showed also a better overall survival after receiving epidural analgesia (HR 1.74 (95 % CI 1.11-2.72), p = 0.01). Epidural analgesia during colon cancer surgery was associated with a better overall survival. Prospective trials evaluating the effects of locoregional analgesia on colon cancer recurrence are warranted.

  15. [Prehospital analgesia by emergency physicians and paramedics : Comparison of effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempf, B; Casu, S; Häske, D

    2017-05-01

    In some German emergency medical service districts, analgesia is performed by paramedics without support of emergency physicians on scene. With regard to safety and effectiveness, paramedics should not be overshadowed by emergency physicians. Is prehospital analgesia performed by paramedics under medical supervision or emergency physicians comparable regarding processes and effectiveness in the case of isolated limb injury? As a retrospective analysis of patients with isolated limb injury, analgesia performed by paramedics and by emergency physicians was analyzed. In addition to pain reduction, prescribed monitoring, and further airway maneuvers, vital parameters (Glasgow coma scale, systolic blood pressure, heartrate and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation) were recorded at the beginning and end of prehospital treatment. Pain was reduced from NRS 8 ± 1 to NRS 2 ± 1 in the paramedic group, and from NRS 8 ± 2 to NRS 2 ± 2 in the physician group, so the mean pain reduction was 6 ± 2 in the paramedic-group and 5 ± 2 in the physician group (p < 0.001). Adequate analgesia was found in 96.9% in the physician group and 91.7% in the paramedic group (p = 0.113). ECG monitoring and oxygen administration according to SOP was significantly more frequent in the paramedic group than in the physician group (p < 0.001). Respiratory frequency was significantly more frequent in the physician group than in the paramedic group (p < 0.001). The study shows, with a given indication, that German paramedics can independently perform safe and successful analgesia under medical supervision.

  16. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA DURING LABOR Analgesia epidural para el trabajo de parto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Zafra Pedone

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The labor pain affect to all pregnant woman and it has biochemical and physiological changes that affect to mother and fetus and interact with your normal evolution. Currently there are analgesic techniques to less effectively labor pain, to provide a high satisfaction level and supply clinical and laboratory beneficial outcomes. In own context these techniques are very low used. Objective: To describe the use of epidural analgesic procedures in a pregnancy woman group during labor at the Universitarian Hospital San Jose – Popayan, Colombia. Materials and methods: Case series design. We recollected information of patients from Obstetric service during two months of 2006. The patient’s information was recollected from medical history with an instrument that content variables related with the analgesic technique and labor. The analyses were performed using descriptive statistics Results: 41 pregnant woman with a mean age of 23,4 were included. 65,9% were nulliparous and 85,4% were term pregnancy. At the moment of dural puncture the dilation and EVA pain scale mode was 6 and 8 respectively. The latency mean was 14,1 minutes. 95,1% were require a booster applied in a mean of 80 minutes and 61% were required a second booster applied in a mean of 49 min after that. The way of termination of pregnancy was vaginal predominantly. Conclusions: The results of this study are congruent to reporting in the world literature. These conclusions support the effectiveness of epidural analgesia and its favorable benefit/risk relation to the control of labor pain. Introducción: El dolor asociado con el trabajo de parto afecta a todas las pacientes e involucra alteraciones que afectan a la madre y al feto e interactúan interfiriendo con su evolución normal. Actualmente disponemos de alternativas analgésicas peridurales que han demostrado controlar en forma efectiva el dolor, proporcionar un alto grado de satisfacción de las pacientes y proveer

  17. Postoperative Analgesic Efficacy of Bilateral Transversus Abdominis Plane Block in Patients Undergoing Midline Colorectal Surgeries Using Ropivacaine: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Nahida; Bhat, Wasim Mohammad; Iqbal, Malik Zaffar; Wani, Anisur Rehman; Gurcoo, Showkat A.; Rasool, Sahir

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is done as a part of multimodal analgesia for pain relief after abdominal surgeries. This prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the postoperative analgesic efficacy of bilateral TAP block in patients undergoing midline colorectal surgeries using ropivacaine. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients scheduled for elective colorectal surgeries involving midline abdominal wall incision under general anesthesia were enrolled in this prospective randomized controlled trial. Group A received TAP block with 20 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine on either side of the abdominal wall, and Group B received 20 ml of normal saline. The time to request for rescue analgesia, total analgesic consumption in 24 h, and satisfaction with the anesthetic technique were assessed. Results: The mean visual analog scale scores at rest and on coughing were higher in control group (P > 0.05). Time (min) to request for the first rescue analgesia was prolonged in study group compared to control group (P tramadol consumption in 24 h postoperatively was significantly high in control group (P 0.05). The level of satisfaction concerning postoperative pain control/anesthetic technique was higher in study group (P tramadol requirements, reduction in postoperative pain scores, and increased time to first request for further analgesia, both at rest and on movement. PMID:28928585

  18. Epidural analgesia practices for labour: results of a 2005 national survey in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, Rebecca A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The last 25 years have seen changes in the management of epidural analgesia for labour, including the advent of low-dose epidural analgesia, the development of new local anaesthetic agents, various regimes for maintaining epidural analgesia and the practice of combined spinal-epidural analgesia. We conducted a survey of Irish obstetric anaesthetists to obtain information regarding the conduct and management of obstetric epidural analgesia in Ireland in 2005. The specific objective of this survey was to discover whether new developments in obstetric anaesthesia have been incorporated into clinical practice. METHODS: A postal survey was sent to all anaesthetists with a clinical commitment for obstetric anaesthesia in the sites approved for training by the College of Anaesthetists, Ireland. RESULTS: Fifty-three per cent of anaesthetists surveyed responded. The majority of anaesthetists (98%) use low-dose epidural analgesia for the maintenance of analgesia. Only 11% use it for test-dosing and 32% for the induction of analgesia. The combined spinal-epidural analgesia method is used by 49%, but two-thirds of those who use it perform fewer than five per month. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia was in use at only one site. CONCLUSION: It appears that Irish obstetric anaesthetists have adopted the low-dose epidural analgesia trend for the maintenance of labour analgesia. This practice is not as widespread, however, for test dosing, the induction of analgesia dose or in the administration of intermittent epidural boluses to maintain analgesia when higher concentrations are used. Since its introduction in 2000, levobupivacaine has become the most popular local anaesthetic agent.

  19. Differential effectiveness of placebo treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meissner, Karin; Fässler, Margrit; Rücker, Gerta

    2013-01-01

    in migraine days, the number of headache days, or headache score or a significant improvement as assessed by the patients or their physicians. RESULTS Of the 102 eligible trials, 23 could not be included in the meta-analyses owing to insufficient data. Sham acupuncture (proportion of responders, 0.38 [95% CI......, respectively). Network meta-analysis confirmed that more patients reported response in sham acupuncture groups than in oral pharmacological placebo groups (odds ratio, 1.88 [95% CI, 1.30-2.72]). Corresponding analyses for continuous outcomes showed similar findings. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Sham acupuncture...

  20. Placebo responses in patients with gastrointestinal disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frauke Musial; Sibylle Klosterhalfen; Paul Enck

    2007-01-01

    Over the last several years there has been a growing interest in placebo, not only as an inert control in clinical trials, but also in the placebo effect as a group effect as well as a reaction in individual subjects. Methodological factors such as regression to the mean and natural history of the disease play a role in the evaluation of a possible placebo effect. In this report, we discuss several factors including Pavlovian conditionincg,beliefs outcome, expectations, and other factors as potential mediators of the placebo response. Placebo effects are common in gastrointestinal diseases and there seems to be no clear difference between placebo effects in functional gastrointestinal diseases (functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome)and organic gastrointestinal disease (duodenal ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease).

  1. The placebo effect in popular culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Mary Faith

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the placebo effect in popular culture, especially as it pertains to the work of authors Patrick O'Brian and Sinclair Lewis. The beloved physician as placebo, and the clinician scientist as villain are themes that respectively inform the novels, The Hundred Days and Arrowsmith. Excerpts from the novels, and from film show how the placebo effect, and the randomized clinical trial, have emerged into popular culture, and evolved over time.

  2. Posterior paramedian subrhomboidal analgesia versus thoracic epidural analgesia for pain control in patients with multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Casey L; Berry, Stepheny; Howard, James; De Ruyter, Martin; Thepthepha, Melissa; Nazir, Niaman; McDonald, Tracy; Dalton, Annemarie; Moncure, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Rib fractures are common in trauma admissions and are associated with an increased risk of pulmonary complications, intensive care unit admissions, and mortality. Providing adequate pain control in patients with multiple rib fractures decreases the risk of adverse events. Thoracic epidural analgesia is currently the preferred method for pain control. This study compared outcomes in patients with multiple acute rib fractures treated with posterior paramedian subrhomboidal (PoPS) analgesia versus thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). This prospective study included 30 patients with three or more acute rib fractures admitted to a Level I trauma center. Thoracic epidural analgesia or PoPS catheters were placed, and local anesthesia was infused. Data were collected including patients' pain level, adjunct morphine equivalent use, adverse events, length of stay, lung volumes, and discharge disposition. Nonparametric tests were used and two-sided p Pain rating was lower in the PoPS group (2.5 vs. 5; p = 0.03) after initial placement. Overall, there was no other statistically significant difference in pain control or use of oral morphine adjuncts between the groups. Hypotension occurred in eight patients, 75% with TEA and only 25% with PoPS. No difference was found in adverse events, length of stay, lung volumes, or discharge disposition. In patients with rib fractures, PoPS analgesia may provide pain control equivalent to TEA while being less invasive and more readily placed by a variety of hospital staff. This pilot study is limited by its small sample size, and therefore additional studies are needed to prove equivalence of PoPS compared to TEA. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  3. Tenoxicam 20 mg or 40 mg after thoracotomy: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, A F; Sidebotham, D A; Middleton, N G; Calder, M V; Webster, C S

    2002-04-01

    Forty-five adults undergoing thoracotomy were randomized to receive placebo, tenoxicam 20 mg or tenoxicam 40 mg IV during chest wall closure. All patients received intraoperative fentanyl and intercostal blocks followed by morphine by patient-controlled analgesia. Patient numbers 13 to 45 also received thoracic epidural analgesia by continuous infusion of bupivacaine 0.125%, patient numbers 25 to 45 having fentanyl 2 microg/ml added to the epidural infusion. Efficacy parameters and adverse reactions were assessed over the first 24 hours postoperatively. On a 100 mm visual analogue scale, mean (SD) pain at rest (adjusted area under curve for hours 1 to 24) was 25.8 (12.5), 17.4 (14.8) and 16.5 (13.3) mm for groups receiving placebo, 20 mg and 40 mg tenoxicam, respectively (ANOVA: P<0.05). There were no significant differences between study groups postoperatively in pain on coughing, opioid consumption, blood gas measurements, nausea, vomiting, sedation, blood loss, haemoglobin or serum creatinine. One patient in each tenoxicam group reported epigastric pain, rated moderate. These data support the inclusion of tenoxicam 20 mg IV in the management of pain at rest for patients undergoing thoracotomy, but do not show additional benefit for a higher dose.

  4. Placebo-induced decrease in fatigue: evidence for a central action on the preparatory phase of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedimonte, Alessandro; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Carlino, Elisa

    2015-02-01

    Placebos have been found to affect a number of pathological processes and physiological functions through expectations of clinical improvement. Recently, the study of the placebo effect has moved from the clinical to the physical performance setting, wherein placebos can boost performance by increasing muscle work and by decreasing perceived exertion. However, nothing is known about the neurobiological underpinnings of this phenomenon. Here we show for the first time that a placebo, which subjects believed to be endurance-increasing caffeine, reduces fatigue by acting at the central level on the preparatory phase of movement. In fact, we recorded the readiness potential, which is the expression of the preparatory phase of movement at the level of the supplementary motor area, during repeated flexions of the index finger in a control group that did not receive any treatment and in a placebo group that received placebo caffeine. In the control group, as the number of flexions increased, both fatigue and readiness potential amplitude increased. By contrast, in the placebo group, as the number of flexions increased we found a decrease in perceived exertion along with no increase in readiness potential amplitude. This placebo-induced modulation of the readiness potential suggests that placebos reduce fatigue by acting centrally during the anticipatory phase of movement, thus emphasizing the important role of the central nervous system in the generation of fatigue.

  5. Placebo interventions for all clinical conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Placebo interventions are often claimed to substantially improve patient-reported and observer-reported outcomes in many clinical conditions, but most reports on effects of placebos are based on studies that have not randomised patients to placebo or no treatment. Two previous versions...... of this review from 2001 and 2004 found that placebo interventions in general did not have clinically important effects, but that there were possible beneficial effects on patient-reported outcomes, especially pain. Since then several relevant trials have been published....

  6. Placebo and antidepressant treatment for major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Esben

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is generally considered the primary treatment for major depressive disorders (MDD), but antidepressant treatment has recently approached a crisis with shrinking specific effects and growing placebo responses in current trials. The aim of the paper is to review the placebo...... problem within antidepressant treatment for MDD, and to draw lines to similar problems within the field of psychotherapy. Although clinicians might profit from the large placebo response in their treatment of MDD, the small differences between active treatment and placebo groups found in controlled...

  7. Placebo interventions for all clinical conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Placebo interventions are often claimed to substantially improve patient-reported and observer-reported outcomes in many clinical conditions, but most reports on effects of placebos are based on studies that have not randomised patients to placebo or no treatment. Two previous versions...... of this review from 2001 and 2004 found that placebo interventions in general did not have clinically important effects, but that there were possible beneficial effects on patient-reported outcomes, especially pain. Since then several relevant trials have been published....

  8. Electromyographic assessment of dexamethasone in treatment of post-tonsillectomy pain: randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Aviram, Eliad; Krakovski, Daniel; Gavriel, Haim; Eviatar, Ephraim

    2011-06-01

    Surface electromyographic (sEMG) study of post-tonsillectomy swallow-evoked muscular reactions was performed to assess analgesic properties of dexamethasone. Sixty randomly chosen operated adults were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 (n = 30) was treated with dexamethasone (Dexacort, 20 mg); group 2 (n = 30) was treated with placebo. Pain assessment included visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score and the EMG data such as the timing, electric amplitude and graphic patterns of muscular activity during deglutition. We investigated masseter, infrahyoid and submental-submandibular muscles. Records from trapezius muscle were used for control. The results were compared with previously established normative database. The sEMG data were compared with VAS pain score with regard to changes in clinical condition of the patients. Surface EMG signs of analgesia after tonsillectomy did not always correspond with the VAS pain score. Dexamethasone normalizes muscular activity in deglutition as detected by the EMG records. Statistically significant difference in muscle reactions was detected between the 2 groups. If dexamethasone is administered, the reduction of the postoperative pain could be secondary to the reduction of edema. The sEMG might be used for quantitative evaluation of analgesics via assessment of neuromuscular reactions to analgesia.

  9. Placebo effect and placebos: what are we talking about? Some conceptual and historical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Ana; Farré, Magí; Baños, Josep-E

    2003-08-01

    Placebos and the placebo effect have always been present in medical history. However, they have not received the same consideration over the years. Somewhere between art and science, the placebo historical references come from Ancient Egypt and cross over the major civilisations, beliefs and scientific advances. The use of placebo as a methodological tool has assumed a leading role in the last 50 years and has become an important role in controlled clinical trials, the main element of the "evidence-based-medicine" paradigm. Knowledge of the conceptual and historical considerations of placebo may help to understand its role in medical practice. Even without a consensual definition, and assuming that the placebo effect does not seem to be fully dependent on a placebo administration, one issue seems unquestionable: the placebo effect is present in clinical practice and in clinical trials, no matter which name we choose to call it.

  10. Oxycodone and dexamethasone for pain management after tonsillectomy: a placebo-controlled EMG assessed clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Krakovski, Daniel; Haitov, Zoe

    2011-10-01

    Surface electromyographic (sEMG) study of post-tonsillectomy swallow-evoked muscular reactions was performed in order to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oxycodone and dexamethasone in pain management after tonsillectomy. 90 randomly chosen operated adults were divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 30) was treated with OxyContin (Oxycodone) injections; Group 2 (n = 30) was treated with Dexacort (Dexamethasone), and Group 3 (n = 30) was a placebo group. Pain assessment included visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score and the EMG data like the timing, electric amplitude and graphic patterns of muscular activity during deglutition. We investigated masseter, infrahyoid and submental-submandibular muscles. Records from trapezius muscle were used for control. The results were compared with previously established normative database. The patients were tested 24 h after surgery. The sEMG data were compared with VAS pain score with regard to changes in clinical condition of the patients. Analgesia with oxycodone smoothed the recorded sEMG swallow peaks and increases time of deglutition. Dexamethasone normalized muscular activity in deglutition in cases with edema as detected by the EMG records. Statistically significant difference in muscle reactions was detected between the two Groups and the placebo group. Application of oxycodone significantly reduces the postoperative pain. Application of dexamethasone after tonsillectomy is advisable because of the reduction of postoperative morbidity while the reduction of the postoperative pain is secondary to the reduction of edema. SEMG might be used as an adjunctive measure of pain behavior via assessment of muscular reactions to pain and to analgesia.

  11. Placebo reactions in double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieg-Boerstra, B. J.; van der Heide, S.; Bijleveld, C. M. A.; Kukler, J.; Duiverman, E. J.; Dubois, A. E. J.

    Background: A cardinal feature of the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) is that placebo administration is included as a control. To date, the occurrence and diagnostic significance of placebo events have not extensively been documented. Objective: To analyse the occurrence and

  12. Placebo reactions in double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieg-Boerstra, B. J.; van der Heide, S.; Bijleveld, C. M. A.; Kukler, J.; Duiverman, E. J.; Dubois, A. E. J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: A cardinal feature of the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) is that placebo administration is included as a control. To date, the occurrence and diagnostic significance of placebo events have not extensively been documented. Objective: To analyse the occurrence and

  13. Placebo effect and placebo concept: a critical methodological and conceptual analysis of reports on the magnitude of the placebo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, G S; Kiene, H

    1996-11-01

    Since 1955, when HK Beecher published his classic "The Powerful Placebo," it generally has been accepted that 35% of patients with any of a wide variety of disorders can be treated with placebos alone. In recent years, average cure rates of 70%, and up to 100%, also have been quoted. Like pharmacological preparations, placebos are credited with possessing time-effect curves; cumulation and carry-over effects; differentiated actions depending on color, size, or packaging; even toxic effects. It has been postulated that placebos can prolong life, that their effects occur in surgery as well as in medicine, and that they are mediated by endorphins. In this article source material that forms the scientific basis for such claims is examined. Analysis shows that the studies on which such ideas are based, except perhaps in bronchial asthma, do not in any way justify the conclusions drawn from them. The truth is that the placebo effect is counterfeited by a variety of factors including the natural history of the disease, regression to the mean, concomitant treatments, obliging reports, experimental subordination, severe methodological defects in the studies, misquotations, etc; even, on occasion, by the fact that the supposed placebo is actually not a placebo, but has to be acknowledged as having a specific action on the condition for which it is being given. A further reason for misjudgment is the lack of clarity of the placebo concept itself. Experimental subordination and conditioning are other areas of insufficient conceptual differentiation. The authors conclude that the literature relating to the magnitude and frequency of the placebo effect is unfounded and grossly overrated, if not entirely false. They pose the question whether the existence of the so-called placebo effect is itself not largely-or indeed totally-illusory.

  14. Fatores relacionados ao uso de analgesia sistêmica em neonatologia Factors related to use of systemic analgesia in neonatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Lúcia Guimarães de Aymar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse trabalho foi realizar uma revisão da literatura sobre o histórico e o estágio atual de conhecimento sobre a analgesia sistêmica em neonatologia e os fatores que influenciam a sua utilização. Foi realizada busca de artigos científicos através das bases dados do MEDLINE, SciELO e LILACS com as palavras chave: analgesia, analgésicos sistêmicos, dor, neonatologia, recém-nascido, unidade de terapia intensiva e unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal, além de pesquisa adicional em bancos de dados de dissertações, teses e livros texto. A literatura consultada revela que a analgesia não é uma prática rotineira nas unidades de terapia intensiva neonatal, de uma forma geral, apesar dos inúmeros estudos demonstrando a importância do tema. Apesar de ser o alívio da dor um dos princípios básicos da medicina, de envolver questões éticas e humanitárias, e de estarem disponíveis atualmente vários guias práticos e consensos a respeito do manejo da dor no neonato de risco, os resultados encontrados no presente estudo estão muito aquém das recomendações atuais, tornando-se necessária uma intervenção urgente para reverter a situação observada.The purpose of this paper was to carry out a review of literature on the history and current stage of the knowledge of systemic analgesia in neonatology and the factors influencing its use. A search for scientific articles was made in the MEDLINE, SciELO and LILACS databases using the keywords: analgesia, systemic analgesics, pain, neonatology, newborn, intensive care units and neonatal intensive care units. Additional research was made on dissertations and thesis databanks as well as text books. Literature consulted disclosed that, in general, analgesia is not a routine practice in neonatal intensive care units, despite the numerous studies demonstrating its importance. Although pain relief is a basic principle of medicine, involving ethic and humanitarian issues and despite

  15. How first time mothers experience the use of epidural analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    How first time mothers experience the use of epidural analgesia during birth Ingrid Jepsen, Midwife, SD, MPH, Kurt Dauer Keller cand.psych, PhD Contact email irj@ucn.dk Aim: to investigate the experiences of epidural analgesia as to the choice of epidurals, the changes in pain, the period from th...... midwives handle the epidurals. Conclusion: In particular, the use of an epidural does not diminish the need for an individual approach. The woman’s level of consciousness and the entire situation makes her very sensitive to the midwives care....... factors influencing the relationship with the midwives were: the very choice of an epidural, the midwives accept of that choice, satisfaction with the presence of the midwifes, the continuity of the process, and a high level of information. Clearly, the establishment of an epidural implies important...

  16. Epidural analgesia during labour - maternal understanding and experience - informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, K; Chin, D; Drew, A

    2015-01-01

    Women obtain information on epidural analgesia from various sources. For epidural for pain relief in labour this is provided by the anaesthetist as part of the consenting process. There is much discussion about the inadequacy of this consenting process; we report on women's knowledge, experience and recall of this process at a regional hospital with a 24-h epidural service. Fifty-four women were interviewed within 72 h of a vaginal birth. 91% of the women had acquired information from friends, relatives and antenatal classes. Lack of recall of benefits of epidural analgesia accounted for 26 (38%) and 25 (26%) of the responses, respectively. Similarly in terms of amount of pain relief they could expect, 13 (21%) could not remember and 13 (21%) thought that it may not work. We suggest use of varying methods of disseminating information and wider utilisation of anaesthetists in the antenatal educational programmes.

  17. Current Strategies in Anesthesia and Analgesia for Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moucha, Calin Stefan; Weiser, Mitchell C; Levin, Emily J

    2016-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is associated with substantial postoperative pain that may impair mobility, reduce the ability to participate in rehabilitation, lead to chronic pain, and reduce patient satisfaction. Traditional general anesthesia with postoperative epidural and patient-controlled opioid analgesia is associated with an undesirable adverse-effect profile, including postoperative nausea and vomiting, hypotension, urinary retention, respiratory depression, delirium, and an increased infection rate. Multimodal anesthesia--incorporating elements of preemptive analgesia, neuraxial perioperative anesthesia, peripheral nerve blockade, periarticular injections, and multimodal oral opioid and nonopioid medications during the perioperative and postoperative periods--can provide superior pain control while minimizing opioid-related adverse effects, improving patient satisfaction, and reducing the risk of postoperative complications.

  18. Comparison of the analgesic efficacy of oral ketorolac versus intramuscular tramadol after third molar surgery: A parallel, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario-Alberto; Martinez-Rider, Ricardo; Perez-Urizar, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Preemptive analgesia is considered an alternative for treating the postsurgical pain of third molar removal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preemptive analgesic efficacy of oral ketorolac versus intramuscular tramadol after a mandibular third molar surgery. Material and Methods A parallel, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out. Thirty patients were randomized into two treatment groups using a series of random numbers: Group A, oral ketorolac 10 mg plus intramuscular placebo (1 mL saline solution); or Group B, oral placebo (similar tablet to oral ketorolac) plus intramuscular tramadol 50 mg diluted in 1 mL saline solution. These treatments were given 30 min before the surgery. We evaluated the time of first analgesic rescue medication, pain intensity, total analgesic consumption and adverse effects. Results Patients taking oral ketorolac had longer time of analgesic covering and less postoperative pain when compared with patients receiving intramuscular tramadol. Conclusions According to the VAS and AUC results, this study suggests that 10 mg of oral ketorolac had superior analgesic effect than 50 mg of tramadol when administered before a mandibular third molar surgery. Key words:Ketorolac, tramadol, third molar surgery, pain, preemptive analgesia. PMID:27475688

  19. Placebo-Controlled Trials, Ethics of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, R; Rid, Annette

    2015-01-01

    There are often good scientific and ethical reasons for using placebo controls in clinical trials. At the same time placebo use is controversial, especially when an established effective treatment is being withheld from the control group. This article gives an overview of the key ethical positions

  20. Mood Predicts Response to Placebo CPAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl J. Stepnowsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy is efficacious for treating obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, but recent studies with placebo CPAP (CPAP administered at subtherapeutic pressure have revealed nonspecific (or placebo responses to CPAP treatment. This study examined baseline psychological factors associated with beneficial effects from placebo CPAP treatment. Participants. Twenty-five participants were studied with polysomnography at baseline and after treatment with placebo CPAP. Design. Participants were randomized to either CPAP treatment or placebo CPAP. Baseline mood was assessed with the Profile of Mood States (POMS. Total mood disturbance (POMS-Total was obtained by summing the six POMS subscale scores, with Vigor weighted negatively. The dependent variable was changed in apnea-hypopnea index (ΔAHI, calculated by subtracting pre- from post-CPAP AHI. Negative values implied improvement. Hierarchical regression analysis was performed, with pre-CPAP AHI added as a covariate to control for baseline OSA severity. Results. Baseline emotional distress predicted the drop in AHI in response to placebo CPAP. Highly distressed patients showed greater placebo response, with a 34% drop (i.e., improvement in AHI. Conclusion. These findings underscore the importance of placebo-controlled studies of CPAP treatment. Whereas such trials are routinely included in drug trials, this paper argues for their importance even in mechanical-oriented sleep interventions.

  1. Placebo-Controlled Trials, Ethics of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, R; Rid, Annette

    2015-01-01

    There are often good scientific and ethical reasons for using placebo controls in clinical trials. At the same time placebo use is controversial, especially when an established effective treatment is being withheld from the control group. This article gives an overview of the key ethical positions i

  2. Preemptive analgesia: the prevention of neurogenous orofacial pain.

    OpenAIRE

    Foreman, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic neurogenous pain is often an extremely difficult condition to manage. In the orofacial region, trauma from injury or dental procedures may lead to the development of severe neuralgic pains and major distress to the patient. Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the use of adequate preemptive regional anesthesia, systemic analgesia, and the avoidance of repeated, painful stimuli may reduce the incidence of this problem.

  3. Intrapartum analgesia as a condition of human satisfaction at hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Polizzi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates parturients’ satisfaction with intrapartum analgesia. It aims to assess their opinions about hospital and health staff involved in delivery, besides investigating emotional control, locus control and bond between mothers and their newborn infants. A multidimensional approach has been used to investigate the variable of woman as a person, the variable of context and the variable of bond with the newborn infant. The study was conducted according to a quasi-experimental design, with a control group. The study was performed within the Analgesia and Intensive Care Operational Unit of the Maternal-Infant Department of the P. Giaccone University General Hospital of Palermo. It involved 60 women subdivided into two groups of 30 women each, the experimental group (women who requested intrapartum analgesia called the A group, and the control group (women who refused it called the B group. The following tools were administered: the STAI-Y (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, form Y scale; the Depression Questionnaire of CBA (Cognitive Behavioural Assessment scale; the Locus of Control questionnaire; and an interview designed for the purpose. The experimental A group women exhibited lower levels of state anxiety and depression post-partum than those of the control B group; moreover, the women in the A group exhibited higher levels of external locus of control and evaluated delivery more positively than those of the B group. There were no significant differences with regard to the relationship with their newborn infants. The study shows that intrapartum analgesia provides hospitals with the possibility to satisfy women’s needs for safety and well-being.

  4. [Systemic analgesia for postoperative pain management in the adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binhas, M; Marty, J

    2009-02-01

    Severe postsurgical pain contributes to prolonged hospital stay and is also believed to be a risk factor for the development of chronic pain. Locoregional anesthesia, which results in faster patient recovery with fewer side effects, is favored wherever feasible, but is not applicable to every patient. Systemic analgesics are the most widely used method for providing pain relief in the postoperative period. Improvements in postoperative systemic analgesia for pain management should be applied and predictive factors for severe postoperative pain should be anticipated in order to control pain while minimizing opioid side effects. Predictive factors for severe postoperative pain include severity of preoperative pain, prior use of opiates, female gender, non-laparoscopic surgery, and surgeries involving the knee and shoulder. Pre- and intraoperative use of small doses of ketamine has a preventive effect on postoperative pain. Multimodal or balanced analgesia (the combined use of various analgesic agents) such as NSAID/morphine, NSAID/nefopam, morphine/ketamine improves analgesia with morphine-sparing effects. Nausea and vomiting, the principle side effects of morphine, can be predicted using Apfel's simplified score; patients with a high Apfel score risk should receive preemptive antiemetic agents aimed at different receptor sites, such as preoperative dexamethasone and intraoperative droperidol. Droperidol can be combined with morphine for postoperative patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA). When PCA is used, dosage parameters should be adjusted every day based on pain evaluation. Patients with presurgical opioid requirements will require preoperative administration of their daily opioid maintenance dose before induction of anesthesia: PCA offers useful options for effective postsurgical analgesia using a basal rate equivalent to the patient's hourly oral usage plus bolus doses as required.

  5. Clinical study of diffusion hypoxia after nitrous oxide analgesia.

    OpenAIRE

    Quarnstrom, F. C.; Milgrom, P.; Bishop, M. J.; DeRouen, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    In order to estimate the incidence of diffusion hypoxia, arterial oxygen saturation was measured in 104 healthy adult dental patients who were administered nitrous oxide-oxygen analgesia and who did not receive postcessation oxygen. Pretreatment saturation levels as determined by pulse oximetry ranged from 93% to 100%. When the nitrous oxide-oxygen administration ceased, the saturation levels were from 95% to 100%. The mean saturation dropped about 2% over the next 4 min and then stabilized. ...

  6. Pain relief and clinical outcome: from opioids to balanced analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1996-01-01

    If it is generally accepted that adequate postoperative pain relief will improve outcome from surgery, several controlled trials demonstrated this only for lower body surgical procedures with epidural and spinal anesthetics. Important effects on outcome were not shown when postoperative opioids...... were administered with patient controlled (PCA) or epidural techniques. However, the most optimal pain relief seems to be best achieved with balanced analgesia techniques using combinations of epidural opioids and local anesthetics and systemic non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Future efforts...

  7. Pregabalin and placebo responders show different effects on central pain processing in chronic pancreatitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwense SA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stefan AW Bouwense,1 Søren S Olesen,2 Asbjørn M Drewes,2 Harry van Goor,1 Oliver HG Wilder-Smith31Pain and Nociception Neuroscience Research Group, Department of Surgery, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; 2Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 3Pain and Nociception Neuroscience Research Group, Department of Anaesthesiology, Pain and Palliative Medicine, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsBackground: Pain control in chronic pancreatitis is a major challenge; the mechanisms behind analgesic treatment are poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the differences in pain sensitivity and modulation in chronic pancreatitis patients, based on their clinical response (responders vs nonresponders to placebo or pregabalin treatment. Methods: This study was part of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluating the analgesic effects of pregabalin and placebo in chronic pancreatitis. Post hoc, patients were assigned to one of four groups, ie, responders and nonresponders to pregabalin (n=16; n=15 or placebo (n=12; n=17 treatment. Responders were defined as patients with >30% pain reduction after 3 weeks of treatment. We measured change in pain sensitivity before and after the treatment using electric pain detection thresholds (ePDT in dermatomes C5 (generalized effects and Ventral T10 (segmental effects. Descending endogenous pain modulation was quantified via conditioned pain modulation (CPM paradigm. Results: Sixty patients were analyzed in a per-protocol analysis. ePDT change in C5 was significant vs baseline and greater in pregabalin (1.3 mA vs placebo responders (−0.1 mA; P=0.015. This was not so for ePDT in Ventral T10. CPM increased more in pregabalin (9% vs placebo responders (−17%; P<0.001. CPM changed significantly vs baseline only for pregabalin responders (P=0.006. Conclusion: This hypothesis

  8. Acute morphine induces matrix metalloproteinase-9 up-regulation in primary sensory neurons to mask opioid-induced analgesia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yen-Chin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite decades of intense research efforts, actions of acute opioids are not fully understood. Increasing evidence suggests that in addition to well-documented antinociceptive effects opioids also produce paradoxical hyperalgesic and excitatory effects on neurons. However, most studies focus on the pronociceptive actions of chronic opioid exposure. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 plays an important role in neuroinflammation and neuropathic pain development. We examined MMP-9 expression and localization in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs after acute morphine treatment and, furthermore, the role of MMP-9 in modulating acute morphine-induced analgesia and hyperalgesia in mice. Results Subcutaneous morphine induced a marked up-regulation of MMP-9 protein in DRGs but not spinal cords. Morphine also increased MMP-9 activity and mRNA expression in DRGs. MMP-9 up-regulation peaked at 2 h but returned to the baseline after 24 h. In DRG tissue sections, MMP-9 is expressed in small and medium-sized neurons that co-express mu opioid receptors (MOR. In DRG cultures, MOR agonists morphine, DAMGO, and remifentanil each increased MMP-9 expression in neurons, whereas the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and the MOR-selective antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTAP suppressed morphine-induced MMP-9 expression. Notably, subcutaneous morphine-induced analgesia was enhanced and prolonged in Mmp9 knockout mice and also potentiated in wild-type mice receiving intrathecal injection of MMP-9 inhibitors. Consistently, intrathecal injection of specific siRNA targeting MMP-9 reduced MMP-9 expression in DRGs and enhanced and prolonged morphine analgesia. Subcutaneous morphine also produced heat hyperalgesia at 24 h, but this opioid-induced hyperalgesia was not enhanced after MMP-9 deletion or inhibition. Conclusions Transient MMP-9 up-regulation in DRG neurons can mask opioid analgesia, without modulating opioid-induced hyperalgesia

  9. Epidural analgesia during labor and delivery: effects on the initiation and continuation of effective breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zorina Marzan; Heaman, Maureen I

    2005-08-01

    This prospective cohort study examined the association between epidural analgesia during labor and delivery, infant neurobehavioral status, and the initiation and continuation of effective breastfeeding. Healthy, term infants delivered vaginally by mothers who received epidural analgesia (n = 52) or no analgesia (n = 63) during labor and delivery were assessed at 8 to 12 hours postpartum, followed by a telephone interview with the mothers at 4 weeks postpartum. There was no significant difference between the epidural analgesia and no-analgesia groups in breastfeeding effectiveness or infant neurobehavioral status at 8 to 12 hours or in the proportion of mothers continuing to breastfeed at 4 weeks. Therefore, epidural analgesia did not appear to inhibit effective breastfeeding. There was a positive correlation between infant neurobehavioral status and breastfeeding effectiveness (Spearman rho = 0.48, P = .01), suggesting that neurobehavioral assessment may prove beneficial in identifying infants at greater risk for breastfeeding difficulties.

  10. A systematic review of randomized trials evaluating regional techniques for postthoracotomy analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, G.P.; Bonnet, F.; Shah, R.

    2008-01-01

    of the evidence is needed to assess the comparative benefits of alternative techniques, guide clinical practice and identify areas requiring further research. METHODS: In this systematic review of randomized trials we evaluated thoracic epidural, paravertebral, intrathecal, intercostal, and interpleural analgesic...... incidence of hypotension. Paravertebral block reduced the incidence of pulmonary complications compared with systemic analgesia, whereas thoracic epidural analgesia did not. Thoracic epidural analgesia was superior to intrathecal and intercostal techniques, although these were superior to systemic analgesia......; interpleural analgesia was inadequate. CONCLUSIONS: Either thoracic epidural analgesia with LA plus opioid or continuous paravertebral block with LA can be recommended. Where these techniques are not possible, or are contraindicated, intrathecal opioid or intercostal nerve block are recommended despite...

  11. Effects of hypnotic analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBenedittis, G; Panerai, A A; Villamira, M A

    1989-01-01

    Mechanisms of hypnotic analgesia are still poorly understood and conflicting data are reported regarding the underlying neurochemical correlates. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of hypnotically induced analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain, taking into account pain and distress tolerance as well as the neurochemical correlates. 11 high hypnotizable Ss and 10 low hypnotizable Ss, as determined by scores on the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (Weitzenhoffer & E. R. Hilgard, 1962), were administered an ischemic pain test in both waking and hypnotic conditions. The following variables were measured: (a) pain and distress tolerance, (b) anxiety levels, and (c) plasma concentrations of beta-endorphin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Results confirmed significant increases of pain and distress tolerance during hypnosis as compared to the waking state, with positive correlations between pain and distress relief and hypnotizability. Moreover, a hypnotically induced dissociation between the sensory-discriminative and the affective-motivational dimensions of pain experience was found, but only in high hypnotizable Ss. Hypnotic analgesia was unrelated to anxiety reduction and was not mediated either by endorphins or by ACTH.

  12. The early history of the placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jütte, Robert

    2013-04-01

    In the late 18th century the term "placebo" became part of medical jargon. In contrast to the prevailing opinion that it was the Scottish physician and pharmacologist William Cullen (1710-1790) who introduced this expression into medical language in 1772, the credit must be given to another English physician, Alexander Sutherland (born before 1730 - died after 1773). The main reason for administering placebos in late 18th-century medical practice was to satisfy the patient's demand and his expectations. Another reason was obstinancy of the patient: the motivation behind such prescriptions may be summarized as prescribing inert drugs for the satisfaction of the patient's mind, and not with the view of producing any direct remedial effect. In most cases these 18th century physicians did not administer "pure" placebos but resorted to any kind of medicine which they thought simple, feeble, or altogether powerless, non-perturbing medicines. Today we make the distinction between pure placebos (substances with no pharmacological effect, e.g. sugar pills) and impure placebos (substances with pharmacological effect but not on the condition being treated). In the 18th century those physicians who prescribed placebo usually thought of drugs which were considered not very effective in the particular case, e.g. a mild ointment. At the same time, only very few brilliant minds came up with the ingenious idea of using inert substances as placebo. An alternative to milk sugar used as placebo in homeopathy was breadpills. Recent research suggests that expectancy is an integral part of the placebo effect. As early as 1775 the English bishop John Douglas (1721-1807) anticipated the findings of modern research on the placebo effect.

  13. Placebo-induced somatic sensations: a multi-modal study of three different placebo interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beissner, Florian; Brünner, Franziska; Fink, Maria; Meissner, Karin; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Napadow, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Somatic sensations induced by placebos are a frequent phenomenon whose etiology and clinical relevance remains unknown. In this study, we have evaluated the quantitative, qualitative, spatial, and temporal characteristics of placebo-induced somatic sensations in response to three different placebo interventions: (1) placebo irritant solution, (2) placebo laser stimulation, and (3) imagined laser stimulation. The quality and intensity of evoked sensations were assessed using the McGill pain questionnaire and visual analogue scales (VAS), while subjects' sensation drawings processed by a geographic information system (GIS) were used to measure their spatial characteristics. We found that all three interventions are capable of producing robust sensations most frequently described as "tingling" and "warm" that can reach consider-able spatial extent (≤ 205 mm²) and intensity (≤ 80/100 VAS). Sensations from placebo stimulation were often referred to areas remote from the stimulation site and exhibit considerable similarity with referred pain. Interestingly, there was considerable similarity of qualitative features as well as spatial patterns across subjects and placebos. However, placebo laser stimulation elicited significantly stronger and more widespread sensations than placebo irritant solution. Finally, novelty seeking, a character trait assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory and associated with basal dopaminergic activity, was less pronounced in subjects susceptible to report placebo-induced sensations. Our study has shown that placebo-induced sensations are frequent and can reach considerable intensity and extent. As multiple somatosensory subsystems are involved despite the lack of peripheral stimulus, we propose a central etiology for this phenomenon.

  14. Effects of block analgesia on attenuating intraoperative stress responses during oral surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Mamiya, H.; Ichinohe, T.; Kaneko, Y

    1997-01-01

    Surgical intervention affects cardiorespiratory function and deteriorates the homeostatic mechanisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of block analgesia, which may minimize the intraoperative stress responses during oral surgery. In addition, we evaluated whether block analgesia could lessen the anesthetic requirements. Twenty-eight operative patients were randomly allocated to one of four groups: group 1, 1.3MAC without block analgesia; group 2, 1.6MAC without block analgesi...

  15. Assessment of Sedation and Analgesia in Mechanically Ventilated Patients in Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Post traumatic stress resulting from an intensive care unit(ICU) stay may be prevented by adequate level of sedation and analgesia. Aims of the study were reviewing the current practices of sedation and analgesia in our ICU setup and to assess level of sedation and analgesia to know the requirement of sedative and analgesics in mechani-cally ventilated ICU patients. This prospective observational study was conducted on 50 consecutive mechanically ventilated patients in ICU over a period of 6 ...

  16. Bilateral Heel Numbness due to External Compression during Obstetric Epidural Analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian P. Kamphuis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 32-year-old woman who developed bilateral heel numbness after obstetric epidural analgesia. We diagnosed her with bilateral neuropathy of the medial calcaneal nerve, most likely due to longstanding pressure on both heels. Risk factors for the development of this neuropathy were prolonged labour with spinal analgesia and a continuation of analgesia during episiotomy. Padded footrests decrease pressure and can possibly prevent this neuropathy.

  17. Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia during Labour: Effect of Addition of Background Infusion on Quality of Analgesia & Maternal Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Srivastava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA is a well established technique for pain relief during labor. But the inclusion of continuous background infusion to PCEA is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess whether the use of continuous infusion along with PCEA was beneficial for laboring women with regards to quality of analgesia, maternal satisfaction and neonatal outcome in comparison to PCEA alone. Fifty five parturients received epidural bolus of 10ml solution containing 0.125% bupivacaine +2 ìg.ml-1 of fentanyl. For maintenance of analgesia the patients of Group PCEA self administered 8 ml bolus with lockout interval of 20 minutes of above solution on demand with no basal infusion. While the patients of Group PCEA + CI received continuous epidural infusion at the rate of 10 ml.hr-1 along with self administered boluses of 3 ml with lockout interval of 10 minutes of similar epidural solution. Patients of both groups were given rescue boluses by the anaesthetists for distressing pain. Verbal analogue pain scores, incidence of distressing pain, need of supplementary/rescue boluses, dose of bupivacaine consumed, maternal satisfaction and neonatal Apgar scores were recorded. No significant difference was observed between mean VAS pain scores during labor, maternal satisfaction, mode of delivery or neonatal Apgar scores. But more patients (n=8 required rescue boluses in PCEA group for distressing pain. The total volume consumed of bupivacaine and opioid was slightly more in PCEA + CI group. In both the techniques the highest sensory level, degree of motor block were comparable& prolongation of labor was not seen. It was concluded that both the techniques provided equivalent labor analgesia, maternal satisfaction and neonatal Apgar scores. PCEA along with continuous infusion at the rate of 10 ml/ hr resulted in lesser incidence of distressing pain and need for rescue analgesic. Although this group consumed higher dose of bupivacaine

  18. Patient controlled intravenous analgesia with tramadol for labor pain relief

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙健晶; 岳云

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and analgesic efficacy of patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) with tramadol, and to compare its benefits and risks with combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA)+ patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA). Methods Eighty American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) Ⅰ-Ⅱ at term parturients in active labor were randomly divided into 3 groups: the control group (n=30) received no analgesia; group A (n=30) received spinal administration with ropivacaine 2.5 mg and fentanyl 5 μg, then with PCEA; group B (n=20) received 1 mg/kg tramadol loading dose I.v.. PCIA with 0.75% tramadol and it included: PCA dose 2 ml, lockout time 10 minutes, background infusion 2 ml/h, total dose no more than 400 mg. The intensity of pain was evaluated using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Results Both group A and B showed good pain relief. VAS pain scores were significantly decreased in group A and B compared with those in the control group (P<0.01). In comparison with group B, the VAS pain scores decreased in group A (P<0.05). The onset times of analgesia in group A were shorter than those in group B (P<0.05). Apgar scores in group B were lower than those in group A (P<0.05). The periods of second stage of labor in group A were longer than those in the control group and group B (P<0.05). The cesarean delivery rate was significantly higher in the control group (16.7%) than in group A (3.3%) and group B (5.0%), but it did not differ between group A and B. There were no significant differences in vital signs, fetal heart rate, degree of motor block, and uterine contractions among the 3 groups. Conclusions PCIA with tramadol is now a useful alternative when patients are not candidates for CSEA for labor, or do not want to have a neuraxial block anesthesia. However, sometimes it may not provide satisfactory analgesic effect.

  19. A compression bandage improves local infiltration analgesia in total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse; Husted, Henrik; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl Kri;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-volume local infiltration analgesia has been shown to be an effective pain treatment after knee replacement, but the role of bandaging to prolong analgesia has not been evaluated. METHODS: 48 patients undergoing fast-track total knee replacement with high-volume (170 mL) 0...... with compression bandage than in those with non-compression bandage and with a similar low use of oxycodone. Mean hospital stay was similar (2.8 days and 3.3 days, respectively). INTERPRETATION: A compression bandage is recommended to improve analgesia after high-volume local infiltration analgesia in total knee...... arthroplasty Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  20. The influence of analgesia on labor--is it related to primary cesarean rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cynthia A

    2012-10-01

    Multiple observational studies have reported an association between neuraxial (epidural, spinal, or combined spinal-epidural) labor analgesia and cesarean delivery. The purpose of this review is to summarize data from controlled trials addressing the question of whether neuraxial labor analgesia causes an increased risk of cesarean delivery. Additionally, the review will discuss whether the timing of initiation of analgesia or the specific type of neuraxial analgesia influences mode of delivery. Finally, the issue of external validity of published trials will be discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Asenapine versus placebo for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Alistair; Byers, Amy; Sereno, Marco; Basra, Manpreet Kaur; Dutta, Snigdha

    2015-11-24

    Schizophrenia is a highly prevalent and chronic disorder that comprises a wide range of symptomatology. Asenapine is a recently developed atypical antipsychotic that is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of schizophrenia. To determine the clinical effects of asenapine for adults with schizophrenia or other schizophrenia-like disorders by comparing it with placebo. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Trials Register (July 04, 2014) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, BIOSIS, AMED, PubMed, PsycINFO, and registries of clinical trials. There are no language, date, document type, or publication status limitation for inclusion of records into the register. We inspected references of all included studies for further relevant studies. Our review includes randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing asenapine with placebo in adults (however defined) with schizophrenia or related disorders, including schizophreniform disorder, schizoaffective disorder and delusional disorder, again, by any means of diagnosis. We inspected citations from the searches and identified relevant abstracts, and extracted data from all included studies. For binary data we calculated risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and for continuous data we calculated mean differences (MD). We used the GRADE approach to produce a 'Summary of findings' table which included our outcomes of interest, where possible. We used a fixed-effect model for our analyses. We obtained and scrutinised 41 potentially relevant records, and from these we could include only six trials (n = 1835). Five of the six trials had high risk of attrition bias and all trials were sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. Results showed a clinically important change in global state (1 RCT, n = 336, RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.97, low-quality evidence) and mental state (1 RCT, n = 336, RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.86, very low-quality evidence) at short

  2. An fMRI study measuring analgesia enhanced by religion as a belief system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiech, Katja; Farias, Miguel; Kahane, Guy; Shackel, Nicholas; Tiede, Wiebke; Tracey, Irene

    2008-10-15

    Although religious belief is often claimed to help with physical ailments including pain, it is unclear what psychological and neural mechanisms underlie the influence of religious belief on pain. By analogy to other top-down processes of pain modulation we hypothesized that religious belief helps believers reinterpret the emotional significance of pain, leading to emotional detachment from it. Recent findings on emotion regulation support a role for the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), a region also important for driving top-down pain inhibitory circuits. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in practicing Catholics and avowed atheists and agnostics during painful stimulation, here we show the existence of a context-dependent form of analgesia that was triggered by the presentation of an image with a religious content but not by the presentation of a non-religious image. As confirmed by behavioral data, contemplation of the religious image enabled the religious group to detach themselves from the experience of pain. Critically, this context-dependent modulation of pain specifically engaged the right VLPFC, whereas group-specific preferential liking of one of the pictures was associated with activation in the ventral midbrain. We suggest that religious belief might provide a framework that allows individuals to engage known pain-regulatory brain processes.

  3. From medicine to psychotherapy: the placebo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justman, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    If placebos have been squeezed out of medicine to the point where their official place in in clinical trials designed to identify their own confounding effect, the placebo effect nevertheless thrives in psychotherapy. Not only does psychotherapy dispose of placebo effects that are less available to medicine as it becomes increasingly technological and preoccupied with body parts, but factors of the sort inhibiting the use of placebos in medicine have no equivalent in psychology. Medicine today is disturbed by the placebo effect in a way psychotherapy is not. Psychotherapy does not have to grapple with such a disconcerting paradox as successful sham surgery, and unlike those physicians who once pretended to treat the patient's body while actually attempting to treat the mind, the psychotherapist can treat the mind in all frankness. Perhaps it is because psychotherapy is less burdened by doubts about the placebo effect that it was able to come to its aid when it was orphaned by medicine. It is vain to expect something with so long a history as the placebo effect to disappear from the practices of healing.

  4. The effect of wound instillation of a novel purified capsaicin formulation on postherniotomy pain: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Hansen, J.B.; Malmstrom, J.;

    2008-01-01

    more often in the capsaicin-treated group. CONCLUSION: In the setting of a well-defined analgesic protocol standard, VAS AUC analysis and a mixed-effect analysis showed superior analgesia of capsaicin relative to placebo during the first 3-4 days after inguinal hernia repair Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...... 4975) after open mesh groin hernia repair in 41 adult male patients. The primary end-point was average daily visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores during the first week after surgery assessed as area under the curve (AUC). Pain was recorded twice daily in a pain diary for 4 wk. Physical examination...

  5. How the number of learning trials affects placebo and nocebo responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colloca, Luana; Petrovic, Predrag; Wager, Tor D.; Ingvar, Martin; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Conditioning procedures are used in many placebo studies because evidence suggests that conditioning-related placebo responses are usually more robust than those induced by verbal suggestions alone. However, it has not been shown whether there is a causal relation between the number of conditioning trials and the resistance to extinction of placebo and nocebo responses. Here we test the effects of either one or four sessions of conditioning on the modulation of both non-painful and painful stimuli delivered to the dorsum of the foot. Placebo and nocebo manipulations were obtained by pairing green or red light to a series of stimuli that were made lower or higher with respect to a yellow light associated with a series of control stimuli. Subjects were told that the lights would indicate a treatment that would reduce or increase non-painful and painful stimuli to the foot. They were randomly assigned to either Group 1 or 2. Group 1 underwent one session of conditioning and Group 2 received four sessions of conditioning. We found that one session of conditioning (Group 1) induced nocebo responses, but not placebo responses in no pain condition. After one session of conditioning, we observed both nocebo and placebo responses to painful stimulation. However, these effects extinguished over time. Conversely, four sessions of conditioning (Group 2) induced robust placebo and nocebo responses to both non-painful and painful stimuli that persisted over the entire experiment. These findings suggest that the strength of learning may be clinically important for producing long-lasting placebo effects. PMID:20817355

  6. Hidden Variables and Placebo Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2006-03-01

    God's response to prayers and placebo leads to a question. How does He respond deterministically? He may be controlling at least one of the two variables of the uncertainty principle by extending His invisible soul to each body particle locally. Amazingly, many Vedic verses support this answer. One describes the size of the soul as arithmetically matching the size of the nucleons as if a particle is a soul. One gives a name meaning particle soul (anu-atma), consistent with particle's indeterministic behavior like that of (soulful) bird’s flying in any directions irrespective of the direction of throw. One describes souls as eternal consistent with the conservation of baryon number. One links the souls to the omnipresent (param- atma) like Einstein Rosen bridges link particles to normal spacetime. One claims eternal coexistence of matter and soul as is inflationary universe in physics/0210040 V2. The implicit scientific consistency of such verses makes the relationship of particle source of consciousness to the omnipresent Supreme analogous to the relationship of quantum source of gravitons in my gr-qc/0507130 to normal spacetime This frees us from the postulation of quantum wormholes and quantum foam. Dr. Hooft's view in ``Does God play dice,'' Physicsword, Dec 2005 seems consistent with my progressive conference presentations in Russia, Europe, India, and USA (Hindu University) in 2004/05. I see implications for nanoscience.

  7. A Neural Mechanism for Nonconscious Activation of Conditioned Placebo and Nocebo Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Karin B.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Chen, Xiaoyan; Kirsch, Irving; Ingvar, Martin; Gollub, Randy L.; Kong, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of human behavior operate outside of conscious awareness. Yet, theories of conditioned responses in humans, such as placebo and nocebo effects on pain, have a strong emphasis on conscious recognition of contextual cues that trigger the response. Here, we investigated the neural pathways involved in nonconscious activation of conditioned pain responses, using functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy participants. Nonconscious compared with conscious activation of conditioned placebo analgesia was associated with increased activation of the orbitofrontal cortex, a structure with direct connections to affective brain regions and basic reward processing. During nonconscious nocebo, there was increased activation of the thalamus, amygdala, and hippocampus. In contrast to previous assumptions about conditioning in humans, our results show that conditioned pain responses can be elicited independently of conscious awareness and our results suggest a hierarchical activation of neural pathways for nonconscious and conscious conditioned responses. Demonstrating that the human brain has a nonconscious mechanism for responding to conditioned cues has major implications for the role of associative learning in behavioral medicine and psychiatry. Our results may also open up for novel approaches to translational animal-to-human research since human consciousness and animal cognition is an inherent paradox in all behavioral science. PMID:25452576

  8. Chest pain control with kinesiology taping after lobectomy for lung cancer: initial results of a randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatori, Andrea; Grande, Annamaria; Castiglioni, Massimo; Gasperini, Laura; Faini, Agnese; Spampatti, Sebastiano; Nardecchia, Elisa; Terzaghi, Lorena; Dominioni, Lorenzo; Rotolo, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Kinesiology taping (KT) is a rehabilitative technique performed by the cutaneous application of a special elastic tape. We tested the safety and efficacy of KT in reducing postoperative chest pain after lung lobectomy. One-hundred and seventeen consecutive patients, both genders, age 18-85, undergoing lobectomy for lung cancer between January 2013 and July 2015 were initially considered. Lobectomies were performed by the same surgical team, with thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) access. Exclusion criteria (n = 25 patients) were: previous KT exposure, recent trauma, pre-existing chest pain, lack of informed consent, >24-h postoperative intensive care unit treatment. After surgery, the 92 eligible patients were randomized to KT experimental group (n = 46) or placebo control group (n = 46). Standard postoperative analgesia was administered in both groups (paracetamol/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, epidural analgesia including opioids), with supplemental analgesia boluses at patient request. On postoperative day 1 in addition, in experimental group patients a specialized physiotherapist applied KT, with standardized tape length, tension and shape, over three defined skin areas: at the chest access site pain trigger point; over the ipsilateral deltoid/trapezius; lower anterior chest. In control group, usual dressing tape mimicking KT was applied over the same areas, as placebo. Thoracic pain severity score [visual analogue scale (VAS) ranging 0-10] was self-assessed by all patients on postoperative days 1, 2, 5, 8, 9 and 30. The KT group and the control group had similar demographics, lung cancer clinico-pathological features and thoracotomy/VATS ratio. Postoperatively, the two groups also resulted similar in supplemental analgesia, complication rate, mean duration of chest drainage and length of stay. There were no adverse events with KT application. After tape application, KT patients reported overall less thoracic pain than the

  9. DHA-enriched fish oil upregulates cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (P16(INK)) expression and downregulates telomerase activity without modulating effects of PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism in type 2 diabetic patients: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupchian, Omid; Sotoudeh, Gity; Mansoori, Anahita; Abdollahi, Shima; Ali Keshavarz, Seyyed; Djalali, Mahmoud; Nasli-Esfahani, Ensieh; Alvandi, Ehsan; Chahardoli, Reza; Koohdani, Fariba

    2016-12-19

    The present study investigated the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-enriched fish oil supplement on telomerase activity, mRNA expression of P16(INK), IL-6, and TNF-α considering Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARγ gene. In this double-blind randomized controlled trial, 72 PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism genotyped type 2 diabetic patients aged 30-70 years were randomly assigned to receive 2.4 gr of DHA-enriched fish oil or a placebo for 8 weeks. Genotyping of the Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARγ gene was assessed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), telomerase activity in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) was measured using PCR-ELISA based on the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP), and changes in the mRNA expression of P16, IL-6, and TNF-α were measured using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the DHA group, telomerase activity was decreased (p = 0.001) during the intervention. In addition, between-group comparisons showed significant differences in the changes in telomerase activity (p = 0.003) and P16 mRNA expression (p = 0.028) and non-significant differences in TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA expression. The gene*DHA interaction could not affect changes in P16, IL-6, or TNF-α mRNA expression or in telomerase activity in PBMC. Short-time DHA-enriched fish oil supplementation caused increased levels of P16 expression and a decline in telomerase activity compared with the control group without modulating the effects of Pro12Ala polymorphism on the PPARγ gene. Because of the positive correlation between P16 activity and cellular senescence, the possibility of senescence stimulation by DHA is proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparison of intrathecal dexmedetomidine verses intrathecal fentanyl with epidural bupivacaine for combined spinal epidural labor analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P K Dilesh

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: 10 μg dexmedetomidine intrathecally provides a longer duration of analgesia with lesser incidence of pruritus compared to 20 μg fentanyl intrathecally for CSE labor analgesia with comparable neonatal side-effects.

  11. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial of thoracic epidural or patient-controlled opiate analgesia on perioperative quality of life.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, M

    2010-03-01

    Perioperative epidural analgesia provides continuous pain control and may have advantages over parenteral opiate administration. This study assessed the impact of epidural analgesia on quality of life (QOL) of patients undergoing major surgery.

  12. Double blind placebo controlled exposure to molds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, H W; Jensen, K A; Nielsen, K F

    2005-01-01

    with a positive histamine release test to Penicillium chrysogenum were exposed double- blinded to either placebo, approximately 600,000 spores/m3 air of P. chrysogenum or approximately 350,000 spores/m3 of Trichoderma harzianum for 6 min on three separate days. A statistically significant rise in symptoms from...... mucous membranes appeared from the 9-graded symptom scale after exposure to T. harzianum or placebo. Dichotomizing the data, whether the participants experienced at least a two-step rise on the symptom scale or not, gave borderline increase in mucous membrane symptoms after exposure to P. chrysogenum...... to placebo in eight sensitive school employees. However, a statistical type II error cannot be excluded because of the small sample size. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: In this double blind, placebo controlled study of mold exposure changes in symptoms, objective measurements and blood samples were small and mostly...

  13. Enhancing placebo effects: insights from social psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwinski, Jim; Elkins, Gary R

    2013-01-01

    Placebo effects are widely recognized as having a potent impact upon treatment outcomes in both medical and psychological interventions, including hypnosis. In research utilizing randomized clinical trials, there is usually an effort to minimize or control placebo effects. However, in clinical practice there may be significant benefits in enhancing placebo effects. Prior research from the field of social psychology has identified three factors that may enhance placebo effects, namely: priming, client perceptions, and the theory of planned behavior. These factors are reviewed and illustrated via a case example. The consideration of social-psychological factors to enhance positive expectancies and beliefs has implications for clinical practice as well as future research into hypnotic interventions.

  14. What questions can a placebo answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Spencer Phillips; Weijer, Charles

    2016-03-01

    The concept of clinical equipoise restricts the use of placebo controls in clinical trials when there already exists a proven effective treatment. Several critics of clinical equipoise have put forward alleged counter-examples to this restriction-describing instances of ethical placebo-controlled trials that apparently violate clinical equipoise. In this essay, we respond to these examples and show that clinical equipoise is not as restrictive of placebos as these authors assume. We argue that a subtler appreciation for clinical equipoise-in particular the distinction between de facto and de jure interpretations of the concept-allows the concept to explain when and why a placebo control may be necessary to answer a question of clinical importance.

  15. DREAM ablation selectively alters THC place aversion and analgesia but leaves intact the motivational and analgesic effects of morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai-Ying M; Laviolette, Steven R; van der Kooy, Derek; Penninger, Josef M

    2004-06-01

    DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator) is a novel transcriptional repressor for the prodynorphin gene, and genetic deletion of DREAM in mice results in a phenotype of ongoing analgesia by virtue of its effect on opioid gene expression. In the present study, we evaluated the motivational effects of opioids (morphine), cannabinoids [Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)] and cocaine in mice lacking the dream gene (dream(-/-)). The aversive effects of THC were potentiated in dream(-/-) mice in a kappa-opioid receptor-dependent fashion, whereas morphine reward and the aversive effects of morphine withdrawal remained intact. The rewarding and aversive effects of cocaine were likewise unperturbed in dream(-/-) mice. Moreover, the aversive properties of lithium chloride and naloxone were unaffected by the absence of DREAM, indicating that the effect of DREAM on THC-induced dysphoria is not due to a general involvement in the behavioral response to aversive stimuli. Additionally, physical dependence to morphine and the locomotor-sensitizing effects of cocaine were unaltered in these animals. Finally, whereas the absence of DREAM reduced the analgesic efficacy of THC, morphine analgesia was unaffected in dream(-/-) mice.

  16. The impact of patients controlled analgesia undergoing orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aluane Silva Dias

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: The currently common musculoskeletal disorders have been increasingly treated surgically, and the pain can be a limiting factor in postoperative rehabilitation. RATIONALE: Patient controlled analgesia (PCA controls pain, but its adverse effects can interfere with rehabilitation and in the patient discharge process. This study becomes important, since there are few studies evaluating this correlation. OBJECTIVES: To compare the outcomes of patients who used and did not use patient controlled analgesia in postoperative orthopedic surgery with respect to pain, unscheduled need for O2 (oxygen, and time of immobility and in-hospital length of stay. METHODS: This is an observational, prospective study conducted at Hospital Abreu Sodré from May to August 2012. The data was daily obtained through assessments and interviews of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA and total knee arthroplasty (TKA, thoracolumbar spine arthrodesis (long PVA, cervical spine arthrodesis (cervical AVA and lumbar spine arthrodesis (lumbar PVA. RESULTS: The study showed some differences between groups, namely: the painful level was higher in the group undergoing lumbar PVA without PCA compared with the group with PCA (p = 0.03 and in the group of long PVA without PCA in the early postoperative period. This latter group used O2 for a longer time (p = 0.09. CONCLUSION: In this study, PCA was useful for analgesia in patients undergoing lumbar PVA and probably would have influenced the usage time of O2 in the group of long PVA in face of a larger sample. The use of PCA did not influence the time of leaving the bed and the in-hospital length of stay for the patients studied.

  17. The effect of adding epinephrine to combination of sufentanil and bupivacaine in spinal analgesia during labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Golfam

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal analgesia is one of the effective and rapid methods for labor. It is not commonly used because of short duration of analgesia and motor block, which limits mother's force in labor progression. We attempted to prolong duration and quality of analgesia by adding Epinephrine.Methods: In this quasi-experimental study 90 pregnant women gravid II and III who referred to Motazedi and Imam Reza Educational & Medical Centers were recruited and divided into two groups of case and control (45 subjects in each group. The case group received spinal analgesia using Sufentanil and Bupivacaine, and Epinephrine while the control group received Sufentanil and Bupivacaine. Data including feeling of pain, motor block, duration of analgesia, fetal heart rate, nausea and vomiting, blood pressure was collected and analyzed using chi-square and t test. Results: duration of analgesia and vomiting were significantly increased in the case group. (p=0.001, p=0.01 respectively. Hemodynamic status in mothers and Apgar score of neonates were not significantly different between two groups.Conclusion: It seems that adding Epinephrine to Sufentanil and Bupivacaine could increase analgesia duration without altering in sensory level although could increase nausea and vomiting its recommended in labor analgesia.

  18. Labour epidural analgesia audit in a tertiary state hospital in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the epidural analgesia records could be retrieved for analysis. The figure ... midline approach (98%) with loss of resistance to saline (70.5%). Follow up ... were preeclampsia (36.2%), body mass index (BMI) exceeding. 45 kg/m2 ... NYHA II exercise tolerance. .... analgesia influenced the mode of delivery, because the audit.

  19. [Epidural analgesia in obstetrics: is there an effect on labor and delivery?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segado Jiménez, M I; Arias Delgado, J; Domínguez Hervella, F; Casas García, M L; López Pérez, A; Izquierdo Gutiérrez, C

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is routinely used in obstetrics but has been blamed for possible effects on labor that lead to greater use of instruments or conversion to cesarean delivery. We aimed to assess this possibility in a cohort of obstetric patients receiving or not receiving epidural analgesia. Prospectively enrolled full-term obstetric patients were distributed in 2 groups according to whether they received epidural analgesia or not. We compared maternal and fetal characteristics, obstetric variables, and type of delivery between groups to record the likely causes of difficult labor and delivery and detect a possible influence of epidural analgesia. Of a total of 602 patients, 462 received epidural analgesia and 140 did not. Epidural analgesia was related to a higher rate of use of instruments but not cesareans (P labor (6.4 [4.2] hours in the epidural group vs 4.7 [3.5] hours in the no-epidural group, P initiation of epidural analgesia after the fetus has reached Hodge's first plane decreased risk 2.7-fold and 3.03-fold, respectively. Although epidural analgesia has traditionally been associated with a higher incidence of difficult labor and delivery, this association was not unequivocally evident in this cohort of patients. The apparent increase seems to be attributable to such obstetric factors as longer duration of stages of labor, higher body mass index, and first delivery.

  20. Unpredictability of regression of analgesia during the continuous postoperative extradural infusion of bupivacaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T; Hjortsø, N C; Bigler, D;

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four otherwise healthy patients scheduled for elective major abdominal surgery received general anaesthesia plus lumbar extradural analgesia. A loading dose of 0.5% plain bupivacaine was given to produce sensory analgesia (pin prick) from T4 to S5 and followed by a continuous infusion of 0...

  1. Mode of delivery after epidural analgesia in a cohort of low-risk nulliparas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Lena Mariann; Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard; Kjaergaard, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    Although epidural analgesia is widespread and very effective for alleviating labor pain, its use is still controversial, as the literature is inconsistent about the risk of adverse birth outcome after administration of epidural analgesia. The aim of this study was to explore associations between...

  2. INTRAVENOUS DEXMEDETOMIDINE FOR LABOUR ANALGESIA IN WOMEN WITH PREECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Parenteral opioids and sedatives are the most frequently prescribed agents for women in labour in many poor resource settings. These have shown poor pain relief and a lot of side effects in both the mother and the foetus. In patients with severe pre-eclampsia who are already haemodynamically compromised labour pains and delivery can result in haemodynamic instability, which can compromise both the mother and the neonate. Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective α-2 agonist, which when used in recommended dose in the form of an infusion has several desirable properties like sedation, anxiolysis, sympatholysis, analgesia, decreased anaesthetic requirements, maintains cardiovascular stability and provides a smooth recovery. AIM The aim of this study was to study the haemodynamic effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine when used in patients with severe pre-eclampsia for labour analgesia. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of Bundelkhand Medical College, Sagar, between January 2015 and December 2016; 40 labouring patients with severe pre-eclampsia were included in the study; 20 each were allocated to the study and control group. The study group received intravenous Dexmedetomidine in the recommended doses (1 ug/kg loading dose over 10-15 minutes followed by an infusion at 0.2-0.7 ug/kg/hour when in active labour, while the control group received Intravenous Fentanyl. The two groups were compared regarding the duration of labour, the mode of delivery, the neonatal outcome, the onset and duration of analgesia and maternal haemodynamic parameters during labour and delivery. The data obtained in this study was tabulated and analysed using the Chi-square test and the Z test with p value of 0.05 taken as significant. RESULTS It was found out that the group of patients who received Dexmedetomidine were more haemodynamically stable during labour and delivery; there was significant pain relief

  3. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Schwartz, Kobi

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs) in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers) and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. "Hyperstimulation analgesia" with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study.

  4. Intravenous regional analgesia in a patient with Glanzmann thrombastenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goksu, Sitki; Gul, Rauf; Ozen, Onder; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Buyukbebeci, Orhan; Oner, Unsal

    2010-02-01

    Glanzmann thrombastenia (GT) is a rare condition of an inherited autosomal recessive gene characterized with bleeding tendency. The condition is rarely met in the OR. and therefore it is essential that anesthesiologist be cognizant of the risk involved and be prepared with all necessary precautionary measures. We present a GT case in a 27-year-old male with a mass in the anticubital region of right wrist that was successfully excised using the non-invasive intravenous regional analgesia (IVRA). The use of platelet transfusion and the recombinant factor VIIa, are stressed.

  5. Regional anaesthesia and analgesia on the front line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D M

    2009-11-01

    Deployment to a combat zone with the military poses many challenges to the anaesthetist. One of these challenges is the safe, rapid and comfortable initial wound management and repatriation of wounded combat soldiers to their home country or tertiary treatment facility for definitive care and rehabilitation. The current conflict in Afghanistan is associated with injury patterns that differ from wars such as Vietnam or Korea. This report describes the experience of an Australian military anaesthetist and the value of regional anaesthesia and analgesia for the care of the wounded combat soldier

  6. Placebo: the lie that comes true?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justman, Stewart

    2013-04-01

    Over the decades of experimentation on the placebo effect, it has become clear that it is driven largely by expectation, and that strong expectations of efficacy are more likely to give rise to the experience of benefit. No wonder the placebo effect has come to resemble a self-fulfilling prophecy. However, this resemblance is considerably exaggerated. The placebo effect does not work as strongly as it is advertised to do in some efforts to elicit it. Half-truths about the placebo effect are now in circulation, reinforced by a number of other equivocations that it seems to attract. As the deceptive use of placebos has fallen into discredit, the use of half-truths and exaggerations-neither of which is technically a deception-becomes an ever more inviting possibility. However, there are risks and costs associated with the half-truth that the doctor possesses the power to make his or her words come true by the alchemy of the placebo effect.

  7. Comparison of pre-emptive ibuprofen, paracetamol, and placebo administration in reducing post-operative pain in primary tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baygin, Ozgul; Tuzuner, Tamer; Isik, Berrin; Kusgoz, Adem; Tanriver, Mehmet

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates preliminary investigations that a pre-emptive analgesia administration may reduce post-extraction pain. This prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind trial was planned to compare the efficacy of the pre-emptive administration of ibuprofen, paracetamol, and placebo in reducing post-extraction pain in children. Forty-five children, ages 6-12, who needed primary mandibular molar tooth extraction were treated in paediatric dental clinics, with treatment preceded by local anaesthesia and analgesic drugs during the preoperative period. A five-face scale was used to evaluate pain reaction during the injection, extraction, and post-operative period. Self-report scores were recorded when the local anaesthesia had been administered in soft tissues and both before and after the extraction was completed. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (with Bonferroni correction paired t-test as the post hoc test) were used at a confidence level of 95%. The use of pre-emptive analgesics showed lower scores compared to the placebo, irrespective of the age, weight, gender of the child, and the number of teeth extracted during the study period. Additionally, ibuprofen exhibited lower pain scores (P tooth extraction. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of intercostal nerve block after percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, R John D'A; Ghiculete, Daniela; Ray, A Andrew; Pace, Kenneth T

    2013-04-01

    The optimal method of pain control after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) remains controversial. We sought to determine whether intercostal nerve block with bupivicaine provided superior pain control, when compared with placebo, with a lower need for narcotics and improved health-related quality of life (HRQL) in the immediate postoperative period. Sixty-three patients were randomized to receive intercostal blockade with either 20 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine with epinephrine or 20 mL physiologic saline. All patients received intravenous narcotic patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively. Data were collected on stone parameters, demographics, analgesic usage, length of stay, and HRQL as assessed by the Postoperative Recovery Scale. The mean age was 47.7±1.2 years; mean body mass index was 28.0±5.0 kg/m(2); mean stone diameter was 29.2±15.8 mm. Within the first 3 to 6 hours after surgery, there was a significant reduction in narcotic use for the group receiving intercostal nerve blockade with bupivacaine compared with placebo. At 3 hours, narcotic use was 2.4±3.1 mg vs 4.3±3.8 mg morphine equivalents (P=0.034), and within 6 hours of surgery, narcotic use was 5.9±6.1 mg vs 8.8±7.4 mg (P=0.096). Durable improvement in HRQL was also observed in patients receiving intercostal nerve blockade with bupivacaine compared with placebo (P=0.034). No complications were attributable to the intercostal nerve blocks in either group. Intercostal blockade with bupivacaine significantly improves both pain control and HRQL in the early postoperative period. The effectiveness of bupivacaine disappears within 6 hours of surgery, after which narcotic use becomes indistinguishable. Intercostal nerve blockade is an easy, safe, and inexpensive method that can be used to optimize pain control after PCNL.

  9. [Assessment of pain relief in patients receiving different variants of multimodal analgesia after major gynecological surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timerbaev, V H; Smimova, O V; Genov, P G; Olejnikova, O N; Rebrova, O Yu

    2014-01-01

    The major gynecology surgery generally results in severe postoperative pain. Currently multimodal analgesia concept is widely used for the aim of postoperative pain relief optimization. According to this theory it is worth using the medication with different mechanism in order to increase analgesia qualify, decrease analgesic consumption and avoid adverse reaction. Unfortunately the surveys recently conducted have been pointed out the postoperative analgesia quality is still insufficient despite of using the concept mentioned above. One way to solve the problem is appearing in daily practice nefopam--centrally acting non-opioid analgesic that inhibits reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine and also mitigates glutamatergic neurotransmission. In this trial we tried to assess the postoperative daily used analgesia quality and potency of preemptive multimodal analgesia model consisted of nefopam, ketoprofen, paracetamol and morphine.

  10. [High thoracic epidural analgesia in the postoperative period after correction of congenital heart defects in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slin'ko, S K

    1999-01-01

    The effects and side effects of thoracic epidural analgesia on the respiratory response, awakening time, and cooperation with nurses were studied. Forty children received epidural analgesia after open-heart surgery. Lidocaine was injected in a dose of 1.5-2 mg/kg every 1.5-2 h. Controls (16 pts) received intravenous fentanyl + diazepam analgesia. Respiratory response and awakening were significantly earlier (p < 0.001) in the epidural group. Cooperation with nurses was much better in this group, too. No side effects were observed in the epidural group. Therefore, thoracic epidural analgesia is a safe and effective method of postoperative analgesia for children subjected to open-heart surgery.

  11. Opioid and nonopioid interactions in two forms of stress-induced analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisel, J E; Fleshner, M; Watkins, L R; Maier, S F

    1993-05-01

    Stressful environmental events activate endogenous mechanisms of pain inhibition. Under some circumstances the analgesia is blocked by naloxone/naltrexone ("opioid"), while under others it is not ("nonopioid"). The existence of these two categories of analgesia leads to the question of how they are related. In a collateral inhibition model proposed by Kirshgessner, Bodnar, and Pasternak (1982), opiate and nonopiate mechanisms were viewed as acting in a mutually inhibitory fashion. In the present experiments, rats were exposed to either of two environmental stressors that produce a nonopioid stress-induced analgesia (SIA) following injections of the opiate antagonist naltrexone or agonist morphine. In the presence of naltrexone, SIA produced by either cold water swim (CWS) or social defeat was enhanced. These same SIAs were found to attenuate the analgesic effect of morphine, demonstrating that an activation of opioid systems can inhibit nonopioid analgesias. These results support an inhibitory interaction of opioid and nonopioid mechanisms in some forms of stress-induced analgesia.

  12. Placebo Effects and the Ethics of Therapeutic Communication: A Pragmatic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annoni, Marco; Miller, Franklin G

    2016-03-01

    In this article we explore the ethics of manipulating verbal information for the sake of influencing health outcomes through placebo and nocebo responses. Recent scientific research on placebo and nocebo effects has drawn attention to the ways in which communication by health professionals may modulate the symptoms of patients across an array of highly prevalent conditions such as pain, depression, anxiety, insomnia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine, and Parkinson's disease. The positive and negative effects of clinicians' communication on patient outcomes pose important ethical issues, which we describe in this article under the label of "the ethics of therapeutic communication" (TC). We begin by reviewing available evidence supporting the claim that doctor-patient communication has therapeutic effects. We then identify in truthfulness, helpfulness, and pragmatism three morally relevant considerations that can guide clinicians in therapeutic communication with their patients. Finally, we examine the ethics of using TC to enhance the effectiveness of proven medical interventions and open-label placebos.

  13. Comparing etoricoxib and celecoxib for preemptive analgesia for acute postoperative pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glabglay Prapakorn

    2010-10-01

    Etoricoxib is more effective than celecoxib and placebo for using as preemptive analgesia for acute postoperative pain control in patients underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Trial registration number NCT01017380

  14. Epidural Analgesia Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Pain Relief in Uterine Artery Embolization for Uterine Fibroids: A Decision Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooij, Sanne M. van der, E-mail: s.m.vanderkooij@amc.uva.nl; Moolenaar, Lobke M.; Ankum, Willem M. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Gynaecology (Netherlands); Reekers, Jim A. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Mol, Ben Willem J. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Gynaecology (Netherlands); Hehenkamp, Wouter J. K. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Gynaecology (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the costs and effects of epidural analgesia (EDA) to those of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) for postintervention pain relief in women having uterine artery embolization (UAE) for systematic uterine fibroids. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) based on data from the literature by constructing a decision tree to model the clinical pathways for estimating the effects and costs of treatment with EDA and PCA. Literature on EDA for pain-relief after UAE was missing, and therefore, data on EDA for abdominal surgery were used. Outcome measures were compared costs to reduce one point in visual analogue score (VAS) or numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain 6 and 24 h after UAE and risk for complications. Results: Six hours after the intervention, the VAS was 3.56 when using PCA and 2.0 when using EDA. The costs for pain relief in women undergoing UAE with PCA and EDA were Euro-Sign 191 and Euro-Sign 355, respectively. The costs for EDA to reduce the VAS score 6 h after the intervention with one point compared with PCA were Euro-Sign 105 and Euro-Sign 179 after 24 h. The risk of having a complication was 2.45 times higher when using EDA. Conclusions: The results of this indirect comparison of EDA for abdominal surgery with PCA for UAE show that EDA would provide superior analgesia for post UAE pain at 6 and 24 h but with higher costs and an increased risk of complications.

  15. Fentanyl versus tramadol with levobupivacaine for combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor

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    Veena Chatrath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuraxial labor analgesia using new local anesthetics such as levobupivacaine has become very popular by virtue of the safety and lesser motor blockade caused by these agents. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA has become the preferred method for labor analgesia as it combines benefits of both spinal analgesia and flexibility of the epidural catheter. Adding opioids to local anesthetic drugs provide rapid onset and prolonged analgesia but may be associated with several maternal and fetal adverse effects. The purpose of this study is to compare fentanyl and tramadol used in CSEA in terms of duration of analgesia and frequency of the adverse fetomaternal outcome. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 primiparas with a singleton pregnancy in active labor were given CSEA after randomly allocating them in two groups of 30 each. Group I received intrathecal 2.5 mg levobupivacaine + 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top ups of 20 ml 0.125% solution of the same combination. Group II received 25 mg tramadol instead of fentanyl. Epidural top ups were given when parturient complained of two painful contractions (visual analogue scale ≥ 4. Data collected were demographic profile of the patients, analgesic qualities, side- effects and the fetomaternal outcome. Results: Patients in Group II had significantly prolonged analgesia (145 ± 9 minutes than in Group I (95 ± 7 minutes. Patients receiving fentanyl showed rapid onset of analgesia, but there were more incidence of side-effects like shivering, pruritus, transient fetal bradycardia, hypotension, nausea and vomiting. Only side-effect in the tramadol group was nausea and vomiting. During labor, maternal satisfaction was excellent. Conclusions: Adding tramadol to local anesthetic provides prolonged analgesia with minimal side effects. Fentanyl, when used as adjuvant to local anesthetic, has a rapid onset of analgesia but has certain fetomaternal side-effects.

  16. CLINICAL OBSERVATION ON ACUPOINT INJECTION ANALGESIA FOR ARTIFICIAL ABORTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马民玉; 李红; 等

    2000-01-01

    In the present study,the effect of acupoint injection analgesia for artificial abortion Was observed.40patients were divided at random into2groups:Acupoint injection group(n=20)and control group(n=20).In the former group,bilateral Zusanli(ST36)and Sanyinjiao(SP6)were selected.1-1.5ml diluted analgesic solution was injected into each acupoint respectively about5-10minutes before operation.The blood pressure(BP)and heart rate(HR)of the patients were all moni-tored before and during operation.Results showed that the effective rates of analgesia for uterus aspira-tion and dilation of the uterine cervix were90percent and 85percent respectively.Patients'BP and HR during operation were all stable as compared with those before operation(P>0.05).It indicates that this method has a better effect in relieving abdominalgia and preventing nausea and vomiting dur-ing artificial abortion.It can be developed and used in clinic.

  17. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Update on epidural analgesia during labor and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, S; Priscu, V

    1993-05-01

    Properly administered epidural analgesia provides adequate pain relief during labor and delivery, shortens the first stage of labor, avoids adverse effects of narcotics, hypnotics, or inhalation drugs and it could be used as anesthesia in case a cesarean section is required. Epidural analgesia should be provided to all patients who need and ask for it with an exception of contraindications such as coagulation disorders, suspected infection or gross anatomic abnormality. The technique must be carried out with care if serious life-threatening complications, such as intravenous or intrathecal injection of local anesthetic, are to be avoided. The aim of many recent investigations has been to reduce the total dose of local anesthetic used. Supplementation of an opioid (mainly fentanyl) and introduction of the patient controlled epidural pump may not only serve this goal, but also reduce the demands on the time of obstetric anesthetists. We conclude that properly and skillfully administered epidural is the best form of pain relief during labor and delivery and we hope that more mothers could enjoy its benefits.

  19. Human psychophysiology, macroscopic information entanglement, and the placebo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, William A

    2006-12-01

    For the past 20 years, the magnitude of the "placebo effect" in double-blind, medical experiments has strongly increased. This paper asks why and how. Starting with the human "psychophysiologic principle," two unconscious and one conscious biofeedback examples are given to demonstrate how malleable we humans are to our expectations and our intentions and how strong our psychoenergetic forces can be relative to conventional chemical forces. Ending with several experimental examples wherein a therapeutically processed device and an unprocessed device are critically compared, one finds strong evidence to propose that an information entanglement process is converting the unprocessed device to a functional replica of the processed device in that its therapeutic efficacy is comparable to that of the treatment device. Furthermore, arguments are provided to indicate that a practitioner's biofield is capable of expanding the range of diagnostic capability of commercial measurement instruments so that the practitioner/device hybrid system becomes a potent psychoenergetic instrument for diagnostic and treatment purposes. In between, a theoretical model is provided, based on the author's extensive experimental psychoenergetic research on long-range interconnectivity between objects, between humans and between humans and objects, to show how long-range, quantitative coupling can occur between our normal atom/molecule level of physical reality and a second, unique level of physical reality whose physics can be modulated by psychoenergetic forces. It is the material qualities of this duplex physical reality that convert a seemingly inert object/device (placebo) into a synergistically active element in double-blind placebo experiments.

  20. Novel study designs to investigate the placebo response

    OpenAIRE

    Klosterhalfen Sibylle; Enck Paul; Zipfel Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Investigating the size and mechanisms of the placebo response in clinical trials have relied on experimental procedures that simulate the double-blind randomized placebo-controlled design. However, as the conventional design is thought to elucidate drug rather than placebo actions, different methodological procedures are needed for the placebo response. Methods We reviewed the respective literature for trials designs that may be used to elucidate the size of the placebo re...

  1. Analgesia PCA por catéter interesternocleidomastoideo frente analgesia PCA intravenosa tras cirugía proximal de húmero Continuous Intersternocleidomastoid PCA analgesia Vs intravenous PCA analgesia after proximal shoulder surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ortiz de la Tabla

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Comparar la eficacia analgésica e incidencia de efectos adversos entre el bloqueo interesternocleidomastoideo continuo y una pauta analgésica intravenosa tras cirugía proximal de húmero. Material y Métodos: Estudio prospectivo descriptivo no aleatorizado de pacientes intervenidos de cirugía de hombro bajo anestesia general con fentanilo intravenoso como analgesia intraoperatoria. Al grupo 1 se realizó bloqueo interesternocleidomastoideo con ropivacaína 0,5% 0,4 mL Kg-1 y en URPA se comenzó una perfusión de ropivacaína 0,2% 5mL h-1, con bolos PCA 5 mL y tiempo de cierre de 30 minutos. Al grupo 2, a su llegada a la URPA se administró una dosis carga de metamizol 2 gr, tramadol 100 mgr y ondansetrón 4 mgr, seguido por una perfusión de metamizol 0,16%, tramadol 0,04% y ondansetrón 0,0016% a 1,5 mL h-1 bolos PCA 1 mL y tiempo de cierre 20 minutos. La variable principal fue la valoración del dolor postoperatorio, en reposo y movimiento, mediante escala verbal numérica de 0 (no dolor a 10 (máximo dolor y la aparición de efectos indeseables. Resultados: Se incluyeron 38 pacientes en el grupo 1 y 39 en el 2. La valoración del dolor postoperatorio puso de manifiesto valores más elevados en las primeras 24 horas al movimiento y a las 48 horas, tanto en reposo como al movimiento, en el grupo 2 (pObjectives: We have compared results in postoperative analgesia and incidence of side effects between a continuous intersternocleidotnastoid blockade and intravenous analgesia after proximal shoulder surgery. Methods: In a prospective no randomized study on patients scheduled for unilateral shoulder surgery under general anaesthesia with intravenous fentanil as intraoperative analgesia. In group 1, a continuous intersternocleidomastoid blockade was performed with a bolus of ropivacaine 0,5% 0,4 mL/kg before surgery and a postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA infusión pump of 0,2% ropivacaine (5ml/h, PCA bolus 5 mi / 30

  2. Placebo studies and ritual theory: a comparative analysis of Navajo, acupuncture and biomedical healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2011-06-27

    Using a comparative analysis of Navajo healing ceremonials, acupuncture and biomedical treatment, this essay examines placebo studies and ritual theory as mutually interpenetrating disciplines. Healing rituals create a receptive person susceptible to the influences of authoritative culturally sanctioned 'powers'. The healer provides the sufferer with imaginative, emotional, sensory, moral and aesthetic input derived from the palpable symbols and procedures of the ritual process-in the process fusing the sufferer's idiosyncratic narrative unto a universal cultural mythos. Healing rituals involve a drama of evocation, enactment, embodiment and evaluation in a charged atmosphere of hope and uncertainty. Experimental research into placebo effects demonstrates that routine biomedical pharmacological and procedural interventions contain significant ritual dimensions. This research also suggests that ritual healing not only represents changes in affect, self-awareness and self-appraisal of behavioural capacities, but involves modulations of symptoms through neurobiological mechanisms. Recent scientific investigations into placebo acupuncture suggest several ways that observations from ritual studies can be verified experimentally. Placebo effects are often described as 'non-specific'; the analysis presented here suggests that placebo effects are the 'specific' effects of healing rituals.

  3. Aacap 2002 Research Forum: Placebo and Alternatives to Placebo in Randomized Controlled Trials in Pediatric Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, John; Kratochvil, Christopher; Clarke, Gregory; Beardslee, William; Derivan, Albert; Emslie, Graham; Green, Evelyn P.; Heiligenstein, John; Hinshaw, Stephen; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Jensen, Peter; Lavori, Philip; Leonard, Henrietta; McNulty, James; Michaels, M. Alex; Mossholder, Andrew; Osher, Trina; Petti, Theodore; Prentice, Ernest; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wells, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The use of placebo in the pediatric age group has come under increasing scrutiny. At the 2002 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the Academy's Workgroup on Research conducted a research forum. The purpose was to identify challenges and their solutions regarding the use of placebo in randomized…

  4. A PROSPECTIVE, RANDOMIZED, DOUBLE BLIND, CONTROLLED CLINICAL STUDY OF ADJUVANT EFFECT OF FENTANYL (1 µg/kg OR CLONIDINE (2µg / kg TO ROPIVACAINE 0.2% 1ML/KG FOR CAUDAL ANALGESIA IN CHILDREN UNDERGOING LOWER ABDOMINAL SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunath

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ropivacaine having better safety profile and less motor blockade than bupivacaine is well suited for caudal analgesia. Since studies done regarding the effect of fentanyl and clonidine as adjuvants to ropivacaine for prolongation of caudal analgesia are scant and have shown conflicting results, the present study was conducted. METHODS: A total of 90 children aged between 3-6yrs belonging to ASA class I and II undergoing surgical procedures below the umbilicus were randomly allocated to one of two groups: Group R received ropivacaine 0.2%, 1 ml/kg with saline 0.02ml/kg and Group RF received ropivacaine 0.2%, 1 ml/kg with fentanyl 1 μg/kg (0.02ml/kg and Group RC (clonidine received 1ml/kg of 0.2% Ropivacaine plus clonidine 2µg / kg caudally after induction of general endotracheal anaesthesia. The pain score was evaluated using Hannallah pain scale, motor blockade using modified bromage scale and sedation assessed using 4 point sedation score at 30 minutes after extubation and at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 h. The time to awakening, first analgesic requirement time, number of doses of rescue analgesic and side-effects in a 24 hours period were also recorded. The results were evaluated using SPSS 17 statistical method. RESULTS: There were no differences in demographic characteristics between the groups. However, mean duration of caudal analgesia was 659.5 minutes in group R, 784.5 minutes in group RF and 960.5 minutes in group RC which was statistically highly significant (P<0.01.The total dose of rescue analgesic in 24 hours was lower in groups RF and RC. Also the number of children receiving rescue analgesia at 12 hours was higher in placebo group than fentanyl group and clonidine group which was statistically highly significant (P<0.01. Increased incidence of urinary retention and pruritis was noted in group RF which was statistically not significant (P=0.366. CONCLUSION: Addition of inj. Fentanyl 1µg/kg or clonidine 2µg/kg to Ropivacaine 0.2% 1ml

  5. β-arrestins: regulatory role and therapeutic potential in opioid and cannabinoid receptor-mediated analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raehal, Kirsten M; Bohn, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a complex disorder with neurochemical and psychological components contributing to the severity, the persistence, and the difficulty in adequately treating the condition. Opioid and cannabinoids are two classes of analgesics that have been used to treat pain for centuries and are arguably the oldest of "pharmacological" interventions used by man. Unfortunately, they also produce several adverse side effects that can complicate pain management. Opioids and cannabinoids act at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and much of their effects are mediated by the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R), respectively. These receptors couple to intracellular second messengers and regulatory proteins to impart their biological effects. In this chapter, we review the role of the intracellular regulatory proteins, β-arrestins, in modulating MOR and CB1R and how they influence the analgesic and side-effect profiles of opioid and cannabinoid drugs in vivo. This review of the literature suggests that the development of opioid and cannabinoid agonists that bias MOR and CB1R toward G protein signaling cascades and away from β-arrestin interactions may provide a novel mechanism by which to produce analgesia with less severe adverse effects.

  6. Sucrose-induced analgesia in mice: Role of nitric oxide and opioid receptor-mediated system

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    Abtin Shahlaee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanism of action of sweet substance-induced analgesia is thought to involve activation of the endogenous opioid system. The nitric oxide (NO pathway has a pivotal role in pain modulation of analgesic compounds such as opioids. Objectives: We investigated the role of NO and the opioid receptor-mediated system in the analgesic effect of sucrose ingestion in mice. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the effect of intraperitoneal administration of 10 mg/kg of NO synthase inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME and 20 mg/kg of opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone on the tail flick response in sucrose ingesting mice. Results: Sucrose ingestion for 12 days induced a statistically significant increase in the latency of tail flick response which was unmodified by L-NAME, but partially inhibited by naltrexone administration. Conclusions: Sucrose-induced nociception may be explained by facilitating the release of endogenous opioid peptides. Contrary to some previously studied pain models, the NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP pathway had no role in thermal hyperalgesia in our study. We recommend further studies on the involvement of NO in other animals and pain models.

  7. Physiological stress reactivity and empathy following social exclusion: a test of the defensive emotional analgesia hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Ellyn Charlotte; Stednitz, Sarah Josephine; Simonson, Kevin; Shen, Tori; Gahtan, Ethan

    2014-01-01

    Experiences of social exclusion elicit social pain responses. The current study examined the ability of social exclusion to activate physiological stress responses and adaptively modulate affect and empathy consistent with "defensive emotional analgesia." Measures of affect and empathy, and saliva samples for cortisol and alpha-amylase (sAA) analysis, were collected before and after subjects participated in a computer game ("Cyberball") designed to manipulate feelings of social exclusion. Contrary to our hypotheses, social exclusion was associated with a reduction in cortisol, and social inclusion with an increase in cortisol. Both Cyberball groups showed increases in sAA and decreases in both positive and negative affect, with the greatest drop in affect occurring after social exclusion. Empathy did not differ between the social exclusion and inclusion groups and was not correlated with cortisol or sAA levels. These results support the presence of a defensive response to social exclusion in which central stress pathways controlling cortisol release are inhibited. Cortisol and sAA were shown to have distinct patterns of responses to psychological stress, with sAA responding more rapidly. Related methodological concerns for the use of these physiological stress markers and of Cyberball in social neuroscience research are discussed.

  8. Increased sensitivity to cocaine-induced analgesia in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Fabrício A; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2007-02-13

    This study examined the analgesic effect of cocaine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR), which are considered a suitable model for the study of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and in Wistar (WIS) rats of both sexes using the hot-plate test. In addition, we tested whether habituation to the unheated hot-plate apparatus, that "normalizes" the basal hypoalgesic phenotype of SHR, alters the subsequent cocaine-induced analgesia (CIA) in this strain. SHR of both sexes were hypoalgesic compared to WIS rats in the hot-plate test and showed higher sensitivity to CIA. Habituation to the unheated hot-plate reduced the basal nociceptive latency of SHR, suggesting cognitive/emotional modulation of pain in this strain, but did not alter the magnitude of CIA. The present study shows increased sensitivity to CIA in SHR, which may be related to abnormalities in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system. Further studies using SHR strain may reveal new information on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying ADHD and its co-morbidity with drug addiction.

  9. Naltrexone-sensitive analgesia following exposure of mice to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maillefer, R.H.; Quock, R.M. (Univ. of Illinois, Rockford (United States))

    1991-03-11

    This study was conducted to determine whether exposure to RFR might induce sufficient thermal stress to activate endogenous opioid mechanisms and induce analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 10, 15 or 20 mV/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested in the abdominal constriction paradigm. Specific absorption rates (SAR) were 23.7 W/kg at 10 mW/cm{sup 2}, 34.6 W/kg at 15 mW/cm{sup 2} and 45.5 W/kg at 20 mW/cm{sup 2}. Confinement in the exposure chamber alone did not appreciably alter body temperature but did appear to induce a stress-associated analgesia that was insensitive to the opioid receptor blocker naltrexone. Exposure of confined mice to RFR elevated body temperature and further increased analgesia in SAR-dependent manner. The high-SAR RFR-induced analgesia, but not the hyperthermia, was reduced by naltrexone. These findings suggest that (1) RFR produces SAR-dependent hyperthermia and analgesia and (2) RFR-induced analgesia is mediated by opioid mechanisms while confinement-induced analgesia involves non-opioid mechanisms.

  10. Assisting informed decision making for labour analgesia: a randomised controlled trial of a decision aid for labour analgesia versus a pamphlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torvaldsen Siranda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most women use some method of pain relief during labour. There is extensive research evidence available of pharmacological pain relief during labour; however this evidence is not readily available to pregnant women. Decision aids are tools that present evidence based information and allow preference elicitation. Methods We developed a labour analgesia decision aid. Using a RCT design women either received a decision aid or a pamphlet. Eligible women were primiparous, ≥ 37 weeks, planning a vaginal birth of a single infant and had sufficient English to complete the trial materials. We used a combination of affective (anxiety, satisfaction and participation in decision-making and behavioural outcomes (intention and analgesia use to assess the impact of the decision aid, which were assessed before labour. Results 596 women were randomised (395 decision aid group, 201 pamphlet group. There were significant differences in knowledge scores between the decision aid group and the pamphlet group (mean difference 8.6, 95% CI 3.70, 13.40. There were no differences between decisional conflict scores (mean difference -0.99 (95% CI -3.07, 1.07, or anxiety (mean difference 0.3, 95% CI -2.15, 1.50. The decision aid group were significantly more likely to consider their care providers opinion (RR 1.28 95%CI 0.64, 0.95. There were no differences in analgesia use and poor follow through between antenatal analgesia intentions and use. Conclusions This decision aid improves women's labour analgesia knowledge without increasing anxiety. Significantly, the decision aid group were more informed of labour analgesia options, and considered the opinion of their care providers more often when making their analgesia decisions, thus improving informed decision making. Trial Registration Trial registration no: ISRCTN52287533

  11. Stress-induced visceral analgesia assessed non-invasively in rats is enhanced by prebiotic diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muriel Larauche; Agata Mulak; Pu-Qing Yuan; Osamu Kanauchi; Yvette Taché

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of repeated water avoidance stress (rWAS) on the visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD) and the modulation of the response by a prebiotic diet in rats using a novel surgery-free method of solid-state manometry.METHODS: Male Wistar rats fed a standard diet with or without 4% enzyme-treated rice fiber (ERF) for 5 wk were subjected to rWAS (1 h daily x 10 d) or no stress. The VMR to graded phasic CRD was assessed by intraluminal colonic pressure recording on days 0 (baseline), 1 and 10 (45 min) and 11 (24 h) after rWAS and expressed as percentage change from baseline. Cecal content of short chain fatty acids and distal colonic histology were assessed on day 11.RESULTS: WAS on day 1 reduced the VMR to CRD at 40 and 60 mmHg similarly by 28.9% ± 6.6% in both diet groups. On day 10, rWAS-induced reduction of VMR occurred only at 40 mmHg in the standard diet group (36.2% ± 17.8%) while in the ERF group VMR was lowered at 20, 40 and 60 mmHg by 64.9% ± 20.9%, 49.3% ± 11.6% and 38.9% ± 7.3% respectively. The visceral analgesia was still observed on day 11 in ERF- but not in standard diet-fed rats. By contrast the non-stressed groups (standard or ERF diet) exhibited no changes in VMR to CRD. In standard diet-fed rats, rWAS induced mild colonic histological changes that were absent in ERF-fed rats exposed to stress compared to non-stressed rats. The reduction of cecal content of isobutyrate and total butyrate, but not butyrate alone, was correlated with lower visceral pain response. Additionally, ERF diet increased rWAS-induced defecation by 26% and 75% during the first 0-15 min and last 15-60 min, respectively, compared to standard diet, and reduced rats' body weight gain by 1.3 fold independently of their stress status. CONCLUSION: These data provide the first evidence of psychological stress-related visceral analgesia in rats that was enhanced by chronic intake of ERF prebiotic.

  12. Influence of pre-emptive versus preventive analgesia with oral acetaminophen on postoperative pain in painful ophthalmic surgeries: which one is better?

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    Hassanali Soltani

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing certain ophthalmic operation are more likely to experience serious postoperative pain. This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of pre-emptive vs. preventive analgesia with oral acetaminophen on postoperative pain in painful ophthalmic surgeries.

    METHODS: In a double blind clinical trial, 60 patients undergoing strabismus, retinal detachment or deep vitrectomy were randomized into three equal groups. The first group (G1 received oral acetaminophen one hour before induction of general anesthesia and placebo postoperatively. The second group received placebo before induction and acetaminophen after the operation (G2. The third group received placebo at both times (G3. Blood pressure, heart rate and occurrence of oculocardiac reflex (OCR were recorded during the operation. Pain score (VAS: visual analog scale, the time of the first analgesic use (in hours, and total analgesic requirement (acetaminophen: mg were determined until 24 hours postoperatively. Data was analyzed using ANOVA, Chi-2 and Kruskal-Wallis tests.

    RESULTS: The mean pain score was lower in G1 compared with G2 at 2 and 24 hours after the operation (2.1 ± 0.6 vs. 2.7 ± 0.4, P = 0.001 and 1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 1.5 ± 0.5, P = 0, respectively. The pain score at 2, 6 and 24 hours after the operation was greater in G3 compared with G1 (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 2.1 ± 0.6, P = 0, 2.3 ± 0.7 vs. 1.7 ± 0.5, P = 0 and 1.6 ± 0.4 vs. 1.1 ± 0.3, P = 0.001, respectively. There was no significant difference among the three groups with respect to the intraoperative hemodynamic changes, occurrence of OCR, the

  13. [Placebo effect: a contribution of social psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balez, R; Leroyer, C; Couturaud, F

    2014-10-01

    This article reviews the psychosocial variables, which are of interest in the relationship between the patient and the physician. According to a classical model of social psychology, such a relationship might contribute to the placebo/nocebo effects. We develop herein various relational and contextual variables, taking into account four dimensions (intra-individual, interpersonal, positional and ideological) and their potential effects on therapeutic responses. This applies both in the setting of daily clinical practice and of clinical trials. The placebo effect offers an opportunity for collaboration and dialogue between social scientists and physicians.

  14. Energyhealing and the placebo-effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann

    2012-01-01

    and the placebo effect? From a phenomenological perspective and with a point of departure in MUS (medically unexplained symptoms) patients’ experiences of ‘bodily-lived-meaning’ in Danish healing rituals I try to develop an understanding of how bodily experienced images of body and self work to transform...... the patient during a healing ritual, of the process of a bodily founded symbolic ‘re-editing’ of body- and self-image, which I argue is a fundamental art in healing rituals. In conclusion I argue that the placebo is nothing but the effectiveness of bodily sensed symbols....

  15. Placental abruption occurring soon after labor combined spinal-epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, F; Degani, J; Lam, N; Allen, G

    2012-10-01

    We present a case of placental abruption necessitating emergency cesarean section in an otherwise uncomplicated patient soon after initiation of combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor. Administration of spinal opioids has the potential to cause fetal bradycardia due to uterine hypertonicity following rapid onset of analgesia. In this case, a previously bloody show before placement of combined spinal-epidural analgesia may have been evidence of a small abruption. We hypothesize that uterine hypertonicity following administration of spinal opioids may have hastened the development of an existing placental abruption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Epidural analgesia in patients with traumatic rib fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, P; Møller, M H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic rib fractures are a common condition associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Observational studies have suggested improved outcome in patients receiving continuous epidural analgesia (CEA). The aim of the present systematic review of randomised controlled trials...... (RCTs) was to assess the benefit and harm of CEA compared with other analgesic interventions in patients with traumatic rib fractures. METHODS: We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis (TSA). Eligible trials were RCTs comparing CEA with other analgesic...... interventions in patients with traumatic rib fractures. Cumulative relative risks (RRs) and mean differences (MDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated, and risk of systematic and random errors was assessed. The predefined primary outcome measures were mortality, pneumonia and duration...

  17. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorenberg M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Miguel Gorenberg,1,2 Kobi Schwartz31Department of Nuclear Medicine, B'nai Zion Medical Center, Haifa, Israel; 2The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; 3Department of Physical Therapy, B'nai Zion Medical Center, Haifa, IsraelAbstract: Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. "Hyperstimulation analgesia" with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study.Keywords: myofascial, noninvasive, electrical, impedance

  18. Paraplegia following epidural analgesia: A potentially avoidable cause?

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    Jeson R Doctor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological deficit is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of epidural anesthesia. Epidural hematomas and abscesses are the most common causes of such neurological deficit. We report the case of a patient with renal cell carcinoma with lumbar vertebral metastasis who developed paraplegia after receiving thoracic epidural anesthesia for a nephrectomy. Subsequently, on histo-pathological examination of the laminectomy specimen, the patient was found to have previously undiagnosed thoracic vertebral metastases which led to a thoracic epidural hematoma. In addition, delayed reporting of symptoms of neurological deficit by the patient may have impacted his outcome. Careful pre-operative investigation, consideration to using alternative modalities of analgesia, detailed patient counseling and stringent monitoring of patients receiving central neuraxial blockade is essential to prevent such complications.

  19. Intravenous sub-anesthetic ketamine for perioperative analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlin, Andrew W; Rosenfeld, David M; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist, blunts central pain sensitization at sub-anesthetic doses (0.3 mg/kg or less) and has been studied extensively as an adjunct for perioperative analgesia. At sub-anesthetic doses, ketamine has a minimal physiologic impact though it is associated with a low incidence of mild psychomimetic symptoms as well as nystagmus and double vision. Contraindications to its use do exist and due to ketamine's metabolism, caution should be exercised in patients with renal or hepatic dysfunction. Sub-anesthetic ketamine improves pain scores and reduces perioperative opioid consumption in a broad range of surgical procedures. In addition, there is evidence that ketamine may be useful in patients with opioid tolerance and for preventing chronic postsurgical pain.

  20. Intravenous sub-anesthetic ketamine for perioperative analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Gorlin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist, blunts central pain sensitization at sub-anesthetic doses (0.3 mg/kg or less and has been studied extensively as an adjunct for perioperative analgesia. At sub-anesthetic doses, ketamine has a minimal physiologic impact though it is associated with a low incidence of mild psychomimetic symptoms as well as nystagmus and double vision. Contraindications to its use do exist and due to ketamine′s metabolism, caution should be exercised in patients with renal or hepatic dysfunction. Sub-anesthetic ketamine improves pain scores and reduces perioperative opioid consumption in a broad range of surgical procedures. In addition, there is evidence that ketamine may be useful in patients with opioid tolerance and for preventing chronic postsurgical pain.

  1. Continuous Spinal Anesthesia for Obstetric Anesthesia and Analgesia

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    Ivan Veličković

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA in obstetrics has been slow because of the high risk for post-dural puncture headache (PDPH associated with epidural needles and catheters. New advances in equipment and technique have not significantly overcome this disadvantage. However, CSA offers an alternative to epidural anesthesia in morbidly obese women, women with severe cardiac disease, and patients with prior spinal surgery. It should be strongly considered in parturients who receive an accidental dural puncture with a large bore needle, on the basis of recent work suggesting significant reduction in PDPH when intrathecal catheters are used. Small doses of drug can be administered and extension of labor analgesia for emergency cesarean delivery may occur more rapidly compared to continuous epidural techniques.

  2. Controversy of the use of epidural analgesia in labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Ramón Arbués

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available During last years, it was thought that free-pain labour was a big advance for woman. Recently, ideological patrons such as ecofeminism have feed a critical mind in the woman who is going to give birth. In this bibliographic review we don’t approach a reliable and definitive conclusion, due to the bias and lack of scientific rigour of some studies and the doubtful methodological reliability and generalization of others.This way, we conclude the need to make a tolerant effort on the part of everyone, just as researching and assuming on the services portfolio (if needed alternative techniques such as combined spinal-epidural analgesia, sterile water injections, water immersion, acupuncture, hypnosis, etc.

  3. Who responds to placebos? Considering the "placebo personality" via a transactional model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darragh, Margot; Booth, Roger J; Consedine, Nathan S

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is now recognised as a genuine psychobiological phenomenon; however, the question of how it can be systematically harnessed to improve health outcomes is not yet clear. One issue that remains unresolved is why some respond to placebos and others do not. A number of traits have been linked to responding, but findings are scattered. In extending prior work, this paper offers three considerations. First, attempts to describe the placebo responder via a single personality trait may be limiting. A synthesis of findings to date suggests placebo responsiveness may reflect a two-faceted construct, with "inward" and "outward" orientation representing the different but related facets of placebo responsiveness. Second, the lack of theoretically driven research may be hindering progress. Personality measures rather than personality theory appear to be driving research and higher order traits are descriptive tools with limited use in predicting behaviour. A biologically based stimulus-response model of personality that considers how individuals respond to certain environmental cues may be more appropriate. Third, a transactional model of placebo responding in which dispositional characteristics interact with environmental contingencies is presented. Responsiveness may manifest in placebo environments where there is a match between an individual's biological trait-like response systems and environmental contingencies. This type of model may be useful in both research and clinical settings. Systematic consideration of how different individuals might respond to different placebo environments might facilitate identification of stable individual characteristics predictive of responding. The ability to determine who is responsive to placebo treatments, and in what context, may enable the matching of individual to treatment, thereby maximising the effectiveness of treatment and minimising possible iatrogenic harm. In the increasingly overtaxed modern health care

  4. The placebo effect in psychiatry: problem or solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huculak, Susan

    2014-06-01

    This opinion piece aims to situate the placebo effect within the field of psychiatric treatment. To accomplish this, the placebo is explored at the centre of an often heated debate between three discrete perspectives: the clinical trial researcher, the placebo researcher and the clinician. Each occupational perspective has its own vested interests and practical concerns that drive how the placebo concepts are negotiated and applied. It is argued that because the trial and placebo researchers typically represent opposing viewpoints, clinicians are generally uncomfortable or even baffled by placebo concepts, and this three-way tension has crucial implications for the field's progress.

  5. Postoperative pain management with transdermal fentanyl after forefoot surgery: a randomized, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merivirta R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Riika Merivirta,1 Mikko Pitkänen,2 Jouko Alanen,3 Elina Haapoja,1 Mari Koivisto,4 Kristiina Kuusniemi11Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care, Emergency Care and Pain Medicine of Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, 2Department of Anaesthesia, Hospital Orton, Invalid Foundation, Helsinki, 3Terveystalo Clinic Hospital, Helsinki, 4Department of Biostatistics, University of Turku, Turku, FinlandBackground: Quality of life is decreased in patients with hallux valgus deformity, mainly because of pain. Significant improvement is usually achieved by surgery. However, postoperative pain can be moderate to severe for 2–3 days. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of transdermal fentanyl for postoperative pain management after forefoot surgery.Methods: Sixty patients undergoing hallux valgus or hallux rigidus surgery were allocated to receive a patch delivering either fentanyl 12 µg/hour or placebo for postoperative pain. The consumption of rescue opioid oxycodone, the primary outcome measure, was evaluated daily until the fourth postoperative day. Total consumption of oxycodone during the study period was also assessed. Pain scores and possible adverse effects were evaluated every 6 hours during the first 24 hours and on the fourth postoperative day.Results: The use of rescue opioid was low in both groups, the median (range consumption of oxycodone being 10 (0–50 mg on the day of surgery (no difference between the groups, P=0.31 and 0 (0–35 mg thereafter. The total combined consumption was 10 (0–105 mg in the fentanyl group and 20 (0–70 mg in the placebo group (P=0.23. There were no statistically significant differences in pain scores or adverse effects between the groups.Conclusion: As a part of multimodal analgesia with ibuprofen and acetaminophen, a patch delivering fentanyl 12 µg/hour did not significantly decrease the consumption of rescue opioid or pain scores after forefoot surgery

  6. [Comparison of ropivacaine and bupivacaine for epidural analgesia during labor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Conde, P; Nicolás, J; Rodríguez, J; García-Castaño, M; del Barrio, E; Muriel, C

    2001-05-01

    To compare the analgesic efficacy and level of motor block using two local anesthetics, ropivacaine and bupivacaine, during labor. Sixty nulliparous women were enrolled during labor after full-term pregnancies. They were randomly assigned to receive epidural analgesia with ropivacaine (group R) or bupivacaine (group B). Group R patients received 10 ml of 0.18% ropivacaine with 5 microgram/ml of fentanyl followed by continuous epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine with 2 microgram/ml of fentanyl at a rate of 10 ml/h. Group B patients received 10 ml of 0.15% bupivacaine with 5 microgram/ml of fentanyl followed by continuous epidural perfusion of 0.0625% bupivacaine with 2 microgram/ml of fentanyl at the same rate. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale, motor blockade on a Bromage scale, and level of sensory block at different moments. We also recorded total doses of local anesthetic employed during continuous epidural infusion, manner of final delivery, Apgar score, degree of maternal satisfaction and side effects. The demographic and delivery characteristics were similar in both groups. We found no statistically significant differences between the two groups for level of motor blockade, which was nil for 29 patients (96.66%) in group R and 28 patients (93.33%) in group B. No differences in degree of pain or level of sensory block (T8-T10 in both groups) were observed. The total doses of local anesthetic used were similar at 23.7 +/- 11.6 mg in group R and 16.5 +/- 7.3 mg in group B (non-significant difference). Nor did we find differences in manner of delivery, neonatal Apgar scores, degree of maternal satisfaction or side effects. Ropivacaine and bupivacaine are equally effective for epidural analgesia during labor at the doses used and they do not cause a relevant level of motor blockade.

  7. Intrathecal ketorolac enhances intrathecal morphine analgesia following total knee arthroplasty

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    Gabriela R Lauretti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Total knee arthroplasty represents one of the most painful surgeries. The aim of the study was to compare analgesia and adverse effects of intrathecal (IT ketorolac versus IT morphine, versus the combination of IT ketorolac and morphine. Materials and Methods: After ethical approval and patient consent, 80 patients undergoing knee arthroplasty were randomized to one of 4 groups. All groups received 15 mg IT bupivacaine plus IT test drug (2 ml. The control group (CG received saline as IT test drug. The morphine group (MG received IT 200 g morphine, the ketorolac group (KG IT 2 mg ketorolac and the morphine-ketorolac group (MKG 200 g morphine + 2 mg ketorolac as test drugs. Pain and adverse effects were evaluated. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The MG and KG were similar in their times to time to first rescue analgesic (440 ± 38 min and 381 ± 44 min, respectively. Both groups were longer when compared to the CG (170 ± 13 min (P < 0.01. The MG and KG had lesser ketoprofen consumption compared to the CG (P < 0.05. The time to first rescue analgesic was longer to the MKG (926 ± 222 min (15 h compared to CG (P < 0.001 and to the MG and the KG (P < 0.01. MKG displayed lesser ketoprofen consumption compared to MG and KG (P < 0.05 and to the CG (P < 0.02. Conclusions: The data suggest a role for spinal ketorolac and morphine in orthopaedic surgery because this combination of agents provided 15 h of analgesia compared to 7 h after each drug alone, with no significant side-effects.

  8. Randomized comparison of effectiveness of unimodal opioid analgesia with multimodal analgesia in post–cesarean section pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeniji AO

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Adetunji Oladeni Adeniji,1 Oluseyi Olaboyede A Atanda21Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, NigeriaBackground: Postoperative pain leads to patient discomfort, decreased level of satisfaction, prolonged recovery, and higher health costs. Acute pain control therefore improves the overall quality of life in patients undergoing cesarean section. Pain relief is a fundamental human right, but there is no gold standard for post–cesarean section pain management.Objective: To compare the efficacy of pentazocine and tramadol used in unimodal and multimodal (in combination with piroxicam approach, in the management of post–cesarean section pain.Materials and methods: This study employed a random allocation design to compare the effectiveness of intramuscular pentazocine (60 mg or tramadol (100 mg as single analgesic agent and in combination with daily intramuscular piroxicam 20 mg, for the management of post–cesarean section pain during the immediate 12 hours after surgery. The primary outcome measure was control of postoperative pain, while the secondary outcome measures were the analgesic agent onset of action, duration of action, patient satisfaction, and maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes. Data obtained were entered into a predesigned sheet and analyzed with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 17. Means ± standard deviation (SD were calculated for the quantitative variables, and the difference between two independent groups was compared using unpaired Student's t-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05.Results: A total of 120 patients were equally and randomly allocated to four study groups – two that received unimodal analgesia (the pentazocine group and the tramadol group and two that received multimodal analgesia (the pentazocine

  9. Placebo og migrænebehandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Frede

    2015-01-01

    Denne artikel omhandler placebo- og nocebo-effekter ved behandling af migræne. En af de førende forskningsgrupper fra Harvard Universitet i USA har fremlagt et nyt studie, som viser potentiale for smertemodulering. Det nye studie bekræfter den efterhånden ret omfattende viden om, at hjernen kan...

  10. Placebo Acupuncture Devices: Considerations for Acupuncture Research

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    Dan Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining an appropriate control for use in acupuncture research remains one of the largest methodological challenges acupuncture researchers face. In general, acupuncture controls fall under one of two categories: (1 sham acupuncture, in which the skin is punctured with real acupuncture needles either fully at nonacupoint locations or shallowly at acupoint locations or both and (2 placebo acupuncture, which utilizes nonpenetrating acupuncture devices. In this study, we will focus on non-penetrating placebo acupuncture devices (blunted-needle and nonneedle devices that are currently available in acupuncture research. We will describe each device and discuss each device’s validation and application in previous studies. In addition, we will outline the advantages and disadvantages of these devices and highlight how the differences among placebo devices can be used to isolate distinct components of acupuncture treatment and investigate their effects. We would like to emphasize that there is no single placebo device that can serve as the best control for all acupuncture studies; the choice of an acupuncture control should be determined by the specific aim of the study.

  11. Attitudes Toward Placebo Use in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Mrad, Fadi; Tarabey, Lubna

    2015-05-01

    Placebo use, both in clinical trials and patient care, is a problematic ethical issue surrounded by opposing arguments from those who advocate its use versus those who do not. This problematic aspect of placebo is more challenging in Lebanon where religious ideologies dominate people's beliefs, and where laws that guide medical care are vague. This paper aims to highlight the cultural ideologies that dominate medical care and the perspectives of people associated with the field. The method relied on semi-structured interviews with religious leaders, representatives of society and healthcare professionals. Panel discussions incorporating healthcare professionals, academics, scientists and medical researchers were also organized. The legal environment in Lebanon is characterized by lack of an appropriate legislative guideline that categorically clarifies the value of the human person in medical care. There is a lack of a common ethical standard within a society characterized by social and political dissent. The culturally upheld principles and actual application of the principles of ethics surrounding patient autonomy were overviewed. Medical practitioners failed to agree to a general outline that should guide the use of placebo where it became evident that each practitioner adopted a subjective framework which ultimately undermines patient autonomy. The paper proposes that until a new legislative code that clarifies ethical principles properly guiding medical care is coined, the process of placebo use will continue to be subject to the paternalistic assessments of medical professionals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intrapleural analgesia after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy Analgesia intrapleural após simpatectomia videotoracoscópica

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    Patrícia Gomes da Silva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare analgesia traditionally used for thoracic sympathectomy to intrapleural ropivacaine injection in two different doses. METHODS: Twenty-four patients were divided into three similar groups, and all of them received intravenous dipyrone. Group A received intravenous tramadol and intrapleural injection of saline solution. Group B received intrapleural injection of 0.33% ropivacaine, and Group C 0.5% ropivacaine. The following aspects were analyzed: inspiratory capacity, respiratory rate and pain. Pain was evaluated in the immediate postoperative period by means of the visual analog scale and over a one-week period. RESULTS: In Groups A and B, reduced inspiratory capacity was observed in the postoperative period. In the first postoperative 12 hours, only 12.5% of the patients in Groups B and C showed intense pain as compared to 25% in Group A. In the subsequent week, only one patient in Group A showed mild pain while the remainder reported intense pain. In Group B, half of the patients showed intense pain, and in Group C, only one presented intense pain. CONCLUSION: Intrapleural analgesia with ropivacaine resulted in less pain in the late postoperative period with better analgesic outcomes in higher doses, providing a better ventilatory pattern.OBJETIVO: Comparar a analgesia tradicionalmente utilizada para simpatectomia videotoracoscópica à injeção intrapleural de ropivacaína em duas doses diferentes. MÉTODOS: Vinte e quatro pacientes foram distribuídos em três grupos semelhantes, e todos eles receberam dipirona endovenosa. O grupo A recebeu tramadol endovenoso e injeção intrapleural de solução salina. O grupo B recebeu injeção intrapleural de ropivacaína a 0,33%, e Grupo C ropivacaína a 0,5%. Os aspectos analisados foram: capacidade inspiratória, freqüência respiratória e dor. A dor foi avaliada no período pós-operatório por meio da escala visual analógica e durante o período de uma semana. RESULTADOS

  13. Topical versus caudal ketamine/bupivacaine combination for postoperative analgesia in children undergoing inguinal herniotomy

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    Hala Saad Abdel-Ghaffar

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Wound instillation of bupivacaine/ketamine is a simple, noninvasive, and effective technique that could be a safe alternative to CK for postoperative analgesia in children undergoing inguinal hernia repair.

  14. Fentanyl, dexmedetomidine, dexamethasone as adjuvant to local anesthetics in caudal analgesia in pediatrics: A comparative study

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    Elham M. El-Feky

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Both caudal dexmedetomidine and caudal dexamethasone added to local anesthetics are good alternatives in prolongation of postoperative analgesia compared to caudal local anesthetic alone or added to caudal fentanyl. Also they showed less side effects compared to caudal fentanyl.

  15. Dexamethasone prolongs local analgesia after subcutaneous infiltration of bupivacaine microcapsules in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Werner, Mads U; Lacouture, Peter G

    2002-01-01

    randomized to receive simultaneous subcutaneous injections of bupivacaine microcapsules with dexamethasone and bupivacaine microcapsules without dexamethasone in each calf. Local analgesia was assessed with a validated human pain model; main parameters evaluated were thermal, mechanical, and pain detection...... thresholds and suprathreshold responses to heat and mechanical stimulation. Measurements were performed every 2 h for the first 8 h and daily for the week after injection. Primary endpoints were evaluation of maximal analgesic effect, time of onset, and duration of analgesia. Summary measures (area under...... curve [AUC]) were considered best estimate of analgesia. Safety evaluations were performed daily for the first week and at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and 6 months after injection. RESULTS: The addition of dexamethasone significantly prolonged local analgesia of bupivacaine microcapsules without influence...

  16. Labor analgesia with ropivacaine added to clonidine: a randomized clinical trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giane Nakamura; Eliana Marisa Ganem; Norma Sueli Pinheiro Módolo; Ligia Maria Suppo de Souza Rugolo; Yara Marcondes Machado Castiglia

    2008-01-01

    .... We examined the maternal-fetal effects of two pharmacological approaches: a low dose of ropivacaine or a lower dose of ropivacaine plus clonidine for epidural analgesia during labor. DESIGN AND SETTING...

  17. Labor induction just after external cephalic version with epidural analgesia at term

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    Marcos J. Cuerva

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Considering that a high number of cesarean deliveries can be avoided, induction of labor after ECV with epidural analgesia at term can be considered after being discussed in selected patient.

  18. Epidural Labor Analgesia Is Associated with a Decreased Risk of Postpartum Depression: A Prospective Cohort Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ding, Ting; Wang, Dong-Xin; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Qian; Zhu, Sai-Nan

    2014-01-01

    .... The etiology remains unclear, and multiple factors may be involved. In this study, we investigated whether epidural labor analgesia was associated with a decreased risk of postpartum depression development...

  19. Postoperative pain and gastro-intestinal recovery after colonic resection with epidural analgesia and multimodal rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, M U; Gaarn-Larsen, L; Basse, L;

    2005-01-01

    and ten consecutive patients scheduled for elective open colonic resection under general anaesthesia with combined thoracic epidural analgesia were prospectively studied. Postoperative epidural analgesia was maintained for 48 h with bupivacaine 2.5 mg/ml and morphine 50 µg/ml, 4 ml/h. Postoperative pain......The aim of the study was to evaluate initial postoperative pain intensity and the association with recovery of gastrointestinal function and length of stay (LOS) in a multimodal programme with epidural analgesia, early oral nutrition and mobilisation with a 48 h planned hospital stay. One hundred......, respectively. Gastrointestinal recovery and LOS did not differ between patients with high (3-6) versus low (0-2) dynamic pain scores (P > 0.4 and P > 0.1, respectively). It is concluded that a multimodal rehabilitation program including continuous thoracic epidural analgesia leads to early recovery...

  20. [Eutopic parturition: psychoprophylaxis or extradural analgesia. Influence on the endocrine response].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, M S; Iglesias, J; Freire, J; Martín, M L; Marín Santana, A; Cobo, I; García Rendón, A

    1989-01-01

    Prolactin, ACTH, cortisol and HGH levels have been studied on 30 pregnant women in three different periods: during the labour, at the delivery and 24 hours later. They were divided into 3 groups depending on the analgesia: I) no analgesia (n = 10); II) psychoprophylaxis (n = 10), and III) extradural analgesia (n = 10). Prolactin levels increased during delivery and 24 hours later. A significant increase of ACTH levels (p less than 0.01) was observed during the delivery in the 3 groups even though they were under hasal values 24 hours later. Cortisol increased 38% (p less than 0.01) and 52% (p less than 0.02) in II and III groups, respectively during the delivery. No difference was found with HGH. Our results suggest that endocrine response modified by labour and delivery doesn't change with different analgesia techniques.

  1. Fentanyl-midazolam vs. midazolam-ketamine regarding patient sedation analgesia for emergency orthopedic procedures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ali Abdolrazaghnejad; Mohsen Banaie

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate two pharmaceutical groups including fentanyl-midazolam and midazolam-ketamine used as patient seda-tion analgesia for the orthopedic emergency procedures...

  2. Dexamethasone prolongs local analgesia after subcutaneous infiltration of bupivacaine microcapsules in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Werner, Mads U; Lacouture, Peter G;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The addition of small amounts of dexamethasone to extended-release formulations of bupivacaine in microcapsules has been found to prolong local analgesia in experimental studies, but no clinical data are available. METHODS: In a double-blinded study, 12 healthy male volunteers were...... randomized to receive simultaneous subcutaneous injections of bupivacaine microcapsules with dexamethasone and bupivacaine microcapsules without dexamethasone in each calf. Local analgesia was assessed with a validated human pain model; main parameters evaluated were thermal, mechanical, and pain detection...... curve [AUC]) were considered best estimate of analgesia. Safety evaluations were performed daily for the first week and at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and 6 months after injection. RESULTS: The addition of dexamethasone significantly prolonged local analgesia of bupivacaine microcapsules without influence...

  3. Drug No Better Than Placebo for Lower Back, Leg Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_164223.html Drug No Better Than Placebo for Lower Back, Leg Pain Pregabalin, commonly known ... name: Lyrica) may be no better than a placebo when it comes to treating the back and ...

  4. TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyi; Fan, Lu; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Sui, Aiwei; Morris, John B; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2013-10-01

    Menthol, the cooling natural product of peppermint, is widely used in medicinal preparations for the relief of acute and inflammatory pain in sports injuries, arthritis, and other painful conditions. Menthol induces the sensation of cooling by activating TRPM8, an ion channel in cold-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons. Recent studies identified additional targets of menthol, including the irritant receptor, TRPA1, voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors. It remains unclear which of these targets contribute to menthol-induced analgesia, or to the irritating side effects associated with menthol therapy. Here, we use genetic and pharmacological approaches in mice to probe the role of TRPM8 in analgesia induced by L-menthol, the predominant analgesic menthol isomer in medicinal preparations. L-menthol effectively diminished pain behavior elicited by chemical stimuli (capsaicin, acrolein, acetic acid), noxious heat, and inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant). Genetic deletion of TRPM8 completely abolished analgesia by L-menthol in all these models, although other analgesics (acetaminophen) remained effective. Loss of L-menthol-induced analgesia was recapitulated in mice treated with a selective TRPM8 inhibitor, AMG2850. Selective activation of TRPM8 with WS-12, a menthol derivative that we characterized as a specific TRPM8 agonist in cultured sensory neurons and in vivo, also induced TRPM8-dependent analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. L-menthol- and WS-12-induced analgesia was blocked by naloxone, suggesting activation of endogenous opioid-dependent analgesic pathways. Our data show that TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. In contrast to menthol, selective TRPM8 agonists may produce analgesia more effectively, with diminished side effects.

  5. ANAESTHESIA, POSTOPERATIVE ANALGESIA AND EARLY REHABILITATION FOR UPPER EXTREMITY BONE AND MAJOR JOINTS SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kurnosov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method was developed to perform prolonged brachial plexus block with almost 100% effectiveness. It was also shown in 44 patients to be 33 % safer for local complications and 11,3 % safer for general complications than common used supraclavicular Winnie block (42 patients in control group, received opiates and NSAID for post-operative analgesia. This new method of analgesia allows effective rehabilitation after elbow arthroplasty to be started on the first day after the surgery.

  6. Analgesia postoperatoria en cirugía mayor: ¿es hora de cambiar nuestros protocolos?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Esteve Pérez

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available La analgesia postoperatoria es uno de los componentes básicos en la recuperación funcional tras una intervención quirúrgica. No obstante, es difícil aislar los efectos de la analgesia postoperatoria de otros aspectos relacionados con la técnica quirúrgica, la práctica clínica, el tipo de seguimiento analgésico o los factores organizativos del equipo quirúrgico. La introducción de la laparoscopia, la toracoscopia y las técnicas quirúrgicas mínimamente invasivas está modificando los protocolos analgésicos clásicos en la cirugía compleja. La analgesia intravenosa controlada por el paciente e incluso los opioides por vía oral están desplazando a la analgesia epidural en este tipo de técnicas. La evaluación del riesgo/beneficio para la selección de cada tipo de analgesia postoperatoria dependerá de la severidad del dolor dinámico y de los potenciales efectos secundarios de las técnicas y los fármacos analgésicos. Es difícil demostrar el impacto de la analgesia postoperatoria en grandes resultados quirúrgicos como la mortalidad, la morbilidad o la estancia media, que dependen de factores múltiples y heterogéneos. El efecto del tipo de analgesia en el proceso quirúrgico debería investigarse sobre otros resultados orientados al paciente, como la calidad analgésica, los efectos adversos o el bienestar postoperatorio. Otras áreas en las que se plantea el posible impacto de la analgesia postoperatoria son la recurrencia oncológica y el dolor crónico postoperatorio.

  7. Analgesia for pain control during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narmada P Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: The ideal analgesic, offering optimal pain control, minimal side effects, and cost-effectiveness is still elusive. Opioids administered using various techniques, provide effective analgesia, but require active monitoring of patient for potential adverse effects. Combination therapy (oral NSAID and occlusive dressing of EMLA, DMSO with lidocaine offers an effective alternative mode for achieving analgesia with minimal morbidity. This therapy avoids the need for general anesthesia, injectable analgesics, and opioids along with their side effects.

  8. Opioid therapy: a trade-off between opioid-analgesia and opioid-induced respiratory depression

    OpenAIRE

    Boom, Maria Catharina Anna

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions that may be drawn from the data in this thesis: 1. The ideal drug for antagonism of respiratory depression has not yet been found. At present naloxone seems the most appropriate drug although reversal of respiratory depression coincides with loss of analgesia. New reversal agents acting via non-opioidergic pathways are under investigation and are aimed at reversal of opioid-induced respiratory depression without compromising analgesia. 2. Mathematical modelling of the non-steady s...

  9. Analgesia for Older Adults with Abdominal or Back Pain in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills, Angela M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the association between age and analgesia for emergency department (ED patients with abdominal or back pain.Methods: Using a fully electronic medical record, we performed a retrospective cohort study of adults presenting with abdominal or back pain to two urban EDs. To assess differences in analgesia administration and time to analgesia between age groups, we used chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis test respectively. To adjust for potential confounders, we used a generalized linear model with log link and Gaussian error.Results: Of 24,752 subjects (mean age 42 years, 65% female, 69% black, mean triage pain score 7.5, the majority (76% had abdominal pain and 61% received analgesia. The ≥80 years group (n=722; 3%, compared to the 65-79 years group (n=2,080; 8% and to the (n=21,950; 89%, was more often female (71 vs. 61 vs. 65%, black (72 vs. 65 vs. 69%, and had a lower mean pain score (6.6 vs. 7.1 vs. 7.6. Both older groups were less likely to receive any analgesia (48 vs. 59 vs. 62%, p<0.0001 and the oldest group less likely to receive opiates (35 vs. 47 vs. 44%, p<0.0001. Of those who received analgesia, both older groups waited longer for their medication (123 vs. 113 vs. 94 minutes; p<0.0001. After controlling for potential confounders, patients ≥80 years were 17% less likely than the <65 years group to receive analgesia (95% CI 14-20%.Conclusion: Older adults who present to the ED for abdominal or back pain are less likely to receive analgesia and wait significantly longer for pain medication compared to younger adults. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1;43-50.

  10. [Labor epidural analgesia for a woman with a pityriasis versicolor in the lumbar region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubar, G; Omarjee, M; Viguié, C; Barbarot, S; Mignon, A

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is usually contraindicated in case of infection at the site of needle insertion. Tinea versicolor is a benign superficial cutaneous fungal infection caused by the proliferation of a skin commensal yeast of low pathogenicity. We report the case of a pregnant woman with a tinea versicolor in the lumbar region, who benefited from a labor epidural analgesia, realised with reinforced antiseptic measures. No neurological or infectious complication occurred.

  11. Comparison of parenteral tramadol and epidural ropivacaine for labour analgesia: a prospective clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Lamba

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Maternal outcome in labour analgesia is similar with 100 mg I/M tramadol and epidural ropivacaine. There is no significant difference between duration of labour, rate of LSCS, incidence of instrumental delivery and neonatal outcome in the two modes of analgesia. Analgesic efficacy with epidural ropivacaine seems to be better compared to intramuscular tramadol. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 1722-1727

  12. Continuous postoperative analgesia via quadratus lumborum block - an alternative to transversus abdominis plane block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visoiu, Mihaela; Yakovleva, Nataliya

    2013-10-01

    Different transversus abdominis plane blocks techniques cause variations in postoperative analgesia characteristics. We report the use of unilateral quadratus lumborum catheter for analgesia following colostomy closure. The catheter was placed under direct ultrasound visualization and had good outcomes: low pain scores and minimal use of rescue analgesic medication. No complications were reported in this pediatric patient. More studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this regional anesthesia technique.

  13. Ultrasound-guided continuous quadratus lumborum block for postoperative analgesia in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Goswami, Jyotsna; Patro, Viplab

    2015-02-01

    Quadratus lumborum block is a recently introduced variation of transversus abdominis plane block. In this report, we describe the use of ultrasound-guided continuous quadratus lumborum block for postoperative analgesia in a 7-year-old child scheduled to undergo radical nephrectomy (left-sided) for Wilms tumor. The result was excellent postoperative analgesia and minimal requirement for rescue analgesics. The modification described may allow easier placement of a catheter for continuous infusion of local anesthetic.

  14. 内源性大麻素的中枢镇痛位点%Supraspinal sites implicated in cannabinoid-mediated analgesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜鹃; 陈绍洋; 朱正华; 胡博; 王强; 熊利泽

    2010-01-01

    内源性大麻素(endocannabinoids,EC)在机体具有广泛的生理作用,其中EC通过作用于中枢和外周神经系统的CB1受体可产生镇痛效应.现综述内源性大麻素系统(endocannabinoid system,ECS)的特性在慢性痛和应激性镇痛(stressinduced analgesia,SIA)中的作用,以及支持EC在棘上水平导水管周围灰质(periaqueductal graymatter,PAG)、延脑头端腹内侧区(rostral ventromedial medulla,RVM)和杏仁核镇痛的行为学、神经生理学和神经解剖学证据.%Endocannabinoids (ECS) have been implicated in a growing number of physiological functions including pain modulation through acting at CB1 receptors in the central and peripheral nervous system. This review summarizes the biology of endocannabinoids system and its involvement in chronic pain and stress-induced analgesia (SIA), and the behavioral, neurophysiological and neuroanatomical evidence of cannabinoids modulating pain.

  15. Cardiovascular and respiratory correlates of deep nociceptive stimulation, suggestions for analgesia, pain imagery and cognitive load as a function of hypnotizability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, Giulia; Varanini, Maurizio; Balocchi, Rita; Morizzo, Carmela; Palombo, Carlo; Santarcangelo, Enrica L

    2010-04-29

    Hypnotizability is a cognitive trait modulating some physiological responses to cognitive and physical stimulation also in the normal awake state and in the absence of specific suggestions. Aim of the study was the characterization of the cardiovascular correlates of deep pain induced by nociceptive pressor stimulation without (PAIN) and with (AN) suggestions for analgesia, pain imagery/perception (IM) and mental computation (MC) in not hypnotized highly (Highs) and low (Lows) hypnotizable healthy subjects of both genders. The subjective experience of pain intensity, relaxation and task related fatigue were measured through a structured interview. Heart rate, blood pressure, skin blood flow and respiratory activity were monitored throughout the experimental session. Only Highs perceived lower pain intensity during AN with respect to PAIN and were able to perceive pain during IM. Heart rate decreased during PAIN, increased during MC and did not change during AN and IM in both groups. On the whole, the haemodynamic response consisted of decreased systolic/mean blood pressure and maximum skin blood flow together with increased diastolic blood pressure/minimum skin blood flow in both groups during all conditions. Scarce differences were observed between Highs and Lows (in systolic blood pressure during IM and in respiratory amplitude during PAIN, AN and IM, modulated by gender). The results indicate that in not hypnotized subjects hypnotizability is not associated with relevant differences in the autonomic responses to deep pain, suggestions for analgesia, pain imagery/perception and cognitive load.

  16. Comparison of Epidural Analgesia with Transversus Abdominis Plane Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Lower Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Randomized Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Sadasivan Shankar; Bavishi, Harshit; Mohan, Chadalavada Venkataram; Kaur, Navdeep

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anesthesiologists play an important role in postoperative pain management. For analgesia after lower abdominal surgery, epidural analgesia and ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block are suitable options. The study aims to compare the analgesic efficacy of both techniques. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery under spinal anesthesia were randomized to postoperatively receive lumbar epidural catheter (Group E) or ultrasound-guided TAP block (Group T) through intravenous cannulas placed bilaterally. Group E received 10 ml 0.125% bupivacaine stat and 10 ml 8th hourly for 48 h. Group T received 20 ml 0.125% bupivacaine bilaterally stat and 20 ml bilaterally 8th hourly for 48 h. Pain at rest and on coughing, total paracetamol and tramadol consumption were recorded. Results: Analgesia at rest was comparable between the groups in the first 16 h. At 24 and 48 h, Group E had significantly better analgesia at rest (P = 0.001 and 0.004 respectively). Patients in Group E had significantly higher number of patients with nil or mild pain on coughing at all times. Paracetamol consumption was comparable in both groups, but tramadol consumption was significantly higher in Group T at the end of 48 h (P = 0.001). Conclusion: For lower abdominal surgeries, analgesia provided by intermittent boluses of 0.125% is comparable for first 16 h between epidural and TAP catheters. However, the quality of analgesia provided by the epidural catheter is superior to that provided by TAP catheters beyond that both at rest and on coughing with reduced opioid consumption. PMID:28928569

  17. Effects of expectation on the brain metabolic responses to methylphenidate and to its placebo in non-drug abusing subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Ma, Yeming; Fowler, Joanna S; Wong, Christopher; Jayne, Millard; Telang, Frank; Swanson, James M

    2006-10-01

    The response to drugs is affected by expectation, which in turn is sensitive to prior drug experiences. Here, we evaluate the effects of expectation on the responses to intravenous methylphenidate (0.5 mg/kg) in fifteen subjects who had minimal experience with stimulant drugs. We used positron emission tomography to measure brain glucose metabolism, which we used as a marker of brain function and tested them under four randomized conditions (1) expecting placebo and receiving placebo; (2) expecting placebo and receiving methylphenidate; (3) expecting methylphenidate and receiving methylphenidate; (4) expecting methylphenidate and receiving placebo. We show that methylphenidate-induced decreases in striatum were greater when subjects expected to receive methylphenidate than when they were not expecting it. We also show that the subjects' expectations affected their responses to placebo. That is, when subjects expected to receive methylphenidate but received placebo there were significant increases in ventral cingulate gyrus (BA 25) and nucleus accumbens (regions involved with emotional reactivity and reward). The effect was largest in subjects who, because of experimental randomization, had not experienced methylphenidate. Because subjects were told that methylphenidate could be experienced as pleasant, unpleasant or devoid of subjective effects these results suggest the involvement of the ventral cingulate and of the nucleus accumbens in processing expectation for "uncertain drug effects". Thus, the state of expectation needs to be considered as a variable modulating the reinforcing and therapeutic effects of drugs even in subjects who have no prior experience with the drug.

  18. Sedação e analgesia em neonatologia Sedación y analgesia en neonatología Sedation and analgesia in neonatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerkes Pereira e Silva

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A importância do estudo da dor em Neonatologia se deve ao fato de que a sensação de dor e estresse significa sofrimento e desconforto para os recém-nascidos e, apesar desse conhecimento, pouco tem sido feito para minimizá-los. Nessa revisão foram discutidas: a prevenção da dor, as medidas não-farmacológicas e farmacológicas para o seu tratamento e a sedação em recém-nascidos. CONTEÚDO: Várias são as medidas não-farmacológicas que podem ser tomadas com intuito de prevenir a dor nas Unidades de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal e também para tornar o ambiente mais humanizado e menos estressante para os pacientes e seus familiares. O tratamento da dor no recém-nascido consiste em medidas não-farmacológicas (sucção não-nutritiva, glicose e farmacológicas (analgésicos não-opióides, opióides e anestésicos locais. A sedação em recém-nascidos é produzida por fármacos que agem diminuindo a atividade, a ansiedade e a agitação do paciente, podendo levar à amnésia de eventos dolorosos ou não-dolorosos. A sedação pode ser feita pela administração de hidrato de cloral, barbitúricos, propofol e benzodiazepínicos. CONCLUSÕES: A prevenção da dor e a indicação de analgesia devem ser individualizadas e sempre consideradas em todos os recém-nascidos portadores de doenças potencialmente dolorosas e/ou submetidos a procedimentos invasivos, cirúrgicos ou não.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La importancia del estudio del dolor en neonatología se debe al hecho de que la sensación de dolor y de estrés significa sufrimiento e incomodidad para los recién nacidos y, a pesar de ese conocimiento poco se ha hecho para reducirlo. Dentro de esa revisión se discutieron: la prevención del dolor, las medidas no farmacológicas ye farmacológicas para su tratamiento y la sedación en recién nacidos. CONTENIDO: Varias son las medidas no-farmacológicas que pueden ser tomadas con el objetivo de prevenir el

  19. Causal diagrams, the placebo effect, and the expectation effect

    OpenAIRE

    Shahar E; Shahar DJ

    2013-01-01

    Eyal Shahar,1 Doron J Shahar2 1Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, 2Department of Mathematics, College of Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Abstract: Using causal diagrams, a formal research methodology, we analyzed several definitions of placebo and the placebo effect. We conclude that placebo is an ambiguous, redundant term and that the so-called placebo effect conceals far more interesting effects that are attributed t...

  20. Effect of a single dose of lidocaine and ketamine on intraoperative opioids requirements in patients undergoing elective gynecological laparotomies under general anesthesia. A randomized, placebo controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Navia, Jusset Teresa; Tornero López, Javier; Egea-Guerrero, Juan José; Vilches Arenas, Angel; Vázquez Gutiérrez, Tiburcio

    2016-01-01

    Introducción y objetivos del estudio: existe evidencia de que la administracion perioperatoria de ketamina y lidocaina intravenosa reduce el dolor y el consumo de opioides postoperatorio, acorta la estancia hospitalaria y acelera la recuperacion de la funcion intestinal. Sin embargo, no se han estudiado los efectos beneficiosos en el periodo intraoperatorio. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el efecto de una unica dosis de lidocaina y ketamina sobre el consumo intraoperatorio de opioides en pacientes sometidas a cirugia ginecologica electiva bajo anestesia general. Material y métodos: estudio prospectivo, aleatorizado, doble ciego, controlado con placebo en un solo centro. Se incluyeron 33 pacientes (11 en el grupo ketamina, 11 en el grupo lidocaina y 11 en el grupo placebo). Para la analgesia postoperatoria se utilizo una bomba PCA (Analgesia Controlada por el Paciente ) de morfina. Los pacientes fueron asignados al azar a uno de los tres grupos de estudio: 1,5 mg/kg de lidocaina al 2%, 0,5 mg/kg de ketamina al 5% o solucion salina 0.9%. La variable principal del estudio fue el consumo de opioides durante la cirugia. Las variables secundarias fueron: tiempo de educcion de la anestesia, intensidad del dolor, consumo de opioides en las 24 horas posteriores a la cirugia y efectos adversos. Resultados: se observo una disminucion del consumo intraoperatorio de opioides en los grupos ketamina (402,3 } 106,3) y lidocaina (397,7 } 107,5) frente al grupo placebo (561,4 } 97,1); p = 0,001. Se encontro una correlacion positiva entre el consumo intraoperatorio de opioides y el tiempo de despertar (r = 0,864, p.

  1. The effect of epidural analgesia in labour on maternal respiratory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Regli, A; Bucher, E; Reber, A; Schneider, M C

    2004-04-01

    Lumbar epidural analgesia during labour has gained widespread acceptance. The impact of epidural analgesia based on mixtures of low-dose local anaesthetic solutions and lipophilic opioids on most clinically relevant obstetric outcomes is minimal. Since the pregnant state per se is associated with important alterations in respiration, we assessed whether a subtle degree of motor blockade brought about by epidural analgesia might compromise respiratory function as assessed by spirometry. Sixty consenting parturients receiving epidural analgesia were consecutively included in this prospective study. We performed spirometry during the antepartum visit and in labour after effective epidural analgesia was established; at both assessments the women were pain-free. Values were within normal ranges but increased significantly after effective epidural analgesia; median (IQR [range]) increase for vital capacity 7.4 (3.0-13 [-12-27])% (p forced vital capacity 4.4 (1.7-9.8 [-13-26])% (p forced expiratory volume in 1 s 5.5 (1.7-8.6 [-14-28])% (p labour significantly improved respiratory function.

  2. Clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol enhances its effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2016-03-11

    Clonidine prolongs duration of analgesia when used as an adjunct to local anesthetics for infiltrative cutaneous analgesia, and propranolol produces local anesthesia. The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol on the quality and duration of cutaneous analgesia. A rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR) in response to local skin pinprick was employed to evaluate the cutaneous analgesic effect of propranolol combined with clonidine. The long-lasting local anesthetic bupivacaine was used as control. Cutaneous analgesia elicited by propranolol and bupivacaine was dose-dependent, and both propranolol (9.0μmol) and bupivacaine (1.8μmol) produced 100% nociceptive blockade. On an 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potency was bupivacaine [0.48 (0.42-0.55) μmol] greater than propranolol [2.27 (1.98-2.54) μmol] (ppropranolol or bupivacaine) at ED50 or ED95 increased the potency and extended the duration at producing cutaneous analgesia. The resulting data demonstrated that propranolol is less potent than bupivacaine as an infiltrative anesthetic. Clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol or bupivacaine has a significant peripheral action in increasing the depth and duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia.

  3. Bilateral interpleural versus lumbar epidural bupivacaine-morphine analgesia for upper abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demian, Atef D; Wahba, Ashraf M; Atia, Emad M; Hussein, Sami H

    2003-10-01

    This randomized study was designed to compare the effectiveness of bilateral interpleural analgesia with lumbar epidural analgesia, on postoperative pain relief in upper abdominal surgery. The studied patients were randomely allocated into either interpleural group "IP" (n = 15) or epidural group "EP" (n = 15). In "IP" group, preanesthetic bilateral interpleural block was done using a mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (0.8 mg/kg) and 2 mg morphine diluted to 50 ml saline for each side. In "EP" group, the same mixture-diluted in 20 ml saline-was injected in the epidural space (L2-3). The general anesthetic technique was the same in both groups. Hemodynamic, gasometric, verbal pain score (VPS) values and complications were compared in both techniques. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) readings were in the accepted normal range in the perioperative period although significant lower readings were detected in "EP" group. No significant differences were displayed in blood gasometric variables between the two groups. There were considerable level of analgesia in both groups in the postoperative period although "EP" analgesia was superior to "IP". More pain free patients (9 versus 4) and significant lower consumption of nalbuphine were detected in "EP" group. The results of this study indicate that bilateral "IP" analgesia may offer a satisfactory analgesia for upper abdominal surgery when the use of other analgesic techniques may be contraindicated.

  4. Analgesia, sedação e relaxamento neuromuscular no doente ventilado em cuidados intensivos cardíacos: parte I: analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Vilela, H; D. Ferreira

    2006-01-01

    Neste artigo são revistos aspectos clínicos relevantes relacionados com a sedação, analgesia e relaxamento neuromuscular em Cuidados Intensivos Cardíacos, incluindo métodos de monitorização e opções terapêuticas disponíveis. São ainda abordadas as implicações fisiopatológicas da dor, agitação, ansiedade e delírio no doente ventilado. Apesar de terem sido publicadas recentemente normas de orientação para sedação, analgesia e relaxamento neuromuscular em Cuidados Intensi...

  5. A comparison between IV paracetamol and IV metamizol for postoperative analgesia after retinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landwehr, Susanne; Kiencke, Peter; Giesecke, Thorsten; Eggert, Dirk; Thumann, Gabriele; Kampe, Sandra

    2005-10-01

    To assess clinical efficacy of IV paracetamol 1 g and IV metamizol 1 IV metamizol 1 g on a 24-h dosing schedule in this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of 38 ASA physical status I-III patients undergoing retinal surgery. General anaesthesia using remifentanil, propofol, and desflurane was performed for surgery. The patients were randomly allocated to three groups, receiving infusions of paracetamol 1 g/100 mL (Para Group), of metamizol 1 g/100 mL (Meta Group), or of 100 mL of saline solution as placebo control (Plac Group) 30 min before arrival in the recovery area and every 6 h up to 24 h postoperatively. All patients had unrestricted access to intravenous opioid rescue medication. The primary efficacy variables were pain scores at rest over 30 h postoperatively analysed by using repeated ANOVA measurement. Secondary efficacy variables were pain scores on coughing, also analysed by repeated ANOVA measurement. Five patients in the Plac Group and one patient in the Meta Group interrupted the study protocol. Regarding pain scores at rest, Mauchly-test of sphericity was significant (p = 0.03). For the p time effects a significant result was detected (p metamizol (p = 0.025; mean difference 14.4; 95% CI p 1.5-27.4), and no significant difference between the Para Group and the Meta Group (p = 1.0; mean difference 0.4; 95% CI-12.8 to 13.6). Pain scores on coughing showed a significant different main effect between the three treatment groups (p = 0.022). The Bonferroni adjusted pair wise comparisons between the Plac Group and the Para Group showed a significant difference in favour of IV paracetamol (p = 0.032; mean difference 17.9; 95% CI 1.3-34.6), a p difference, though not reaching statistical significance, in favour of IV metamizol between the Plac Group and the Meta Group (p = 0.081; p mean difference 15.0; 95% CI -1.4 to 31.4), and no significant difference between the Para Group and the Meta Group (p = 1.0; p mean difference 2.9; 95% CI -13

  6. Placebo Effects in Developmental Disabilities: Implications for Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Recent clinical trials of secretin in children with autism showed robust placebo effects and no benefit of secretin over placebo. This article explores the reasons for the observed placebo effects, focusing on the heightening of positive expectancy by media attention and by the sensory experiences associated with intravenous injections.…

  7. The role of endocannabinoids in pain modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogopoulos, Panagiotis; Vasileiou, Ioanna; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios E

    2013-02-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ES) is comprised of cannabinoid (CB) receptors, their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism. Endocannabinoids serve as retrograde signaling messengers in GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses, as well as modulators of postsynaptic transmission, that interact with other neurotransmitters. Physiological stimuli and pathological conditions lead to differential increases in brain endocannabinoids that regulate distinct biological functions. Furthermore, endocannabinoids modulate neuronal, glial, and endothelial cell function and exert neuromodulatory, anti-excitotoxic, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilatory effects. Analgesia is one of the principal therapeutic targets of cannabinoids. Cannabinoid analgesia is based on the suppression of spinal and thalamic nociceptive neurons, but peripheral sites of action have also been identified. The chronic pain that occasionally follows peripheral nerve injury differs fundamentally from inflammatory pain and is an area of considerable unmet therapeutic need. Over the last years, considerable progress has been made in understanding the role of the ES in the modulation of pain. Endocannabinoids have been shown to behave as analgesics in models of both acute nociception and clinical pain such as inflammation and painful neuropathy. The framework for such analgesic effects exists in the CB receptors, which are found in areas of the nervous system important for pain processing and in immune cells that regulate the neuro-immune interactions that mediate the inflammatory hyperalgesia. The purpose of this review is to present the available research and clinical data, up to date, regarding the ES and its role in pain modulation, as well as its possible therapeutic perspectives.

  8. Comparison of continuous thoracic epidural and paravertebral block for postoperative analgesia after robotic-assisted coronary artery bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Yatin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive surgery with robotic assistance should elicit minimal pain. Regional analgesic techniques have shown excellent analgesia after thoracotomy. Thus the aim of this study was to compare thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA technique with paravertebral block (PVB technique in these patients with regard to quality of analgesia, complications, and haemodynamic and respiratory parameters. This was a prospective randomised study involving 36 patients undergoing elective robotic-assisted coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. TEA or PVB were administered in these patients. The results revealed no significant differences with regard to demographics, haemodynamics, and arterial blood gases. Pulmonary functions were better maintained in PVB group postoperatively; however, this was statistically insignificant. The quality of analgesia was also comparable in both the groups. We conclude that PVB is a safe and effective technique for postoperative analgesia after robotic-assisted CABG and is comparable to TEA with regard to quality of analgesia.

  9. Placebo Response is Driven by UCS Revaluation: Evidence, Neurophysiological Consequences and a Quantitative Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puviani, Luca; Rama, Sidita

    2016-07-20

    Despite growing scientific interest in the placebo effect and increasing understanding of neurobiological mechanisms, theoretical modeling of the placebo response remains poorly developed. The most extensively accepted theories are expectation and conditioning, involving both conscious and unconscious information processing. However, it is not completely understood how these mechanisms can shape the placebo response. We focus here on neural processes which can account for key properties of the response to substance intake. It is shown that placebo response can be conceptualized as a reaction of a distributed neural system within the central nervous system. Such a reaction represents an integrated component of the response to open substance administration (or to substance intake) and is updated through "unconditioned stimulus (UCS) revaluation learning". The analysis leads to a theorem, which proves the existence of two distinct quantities coded within the brain, these are the expected or prediction outcome and the reactive response. We show that the reactive response is updated automatically by implicit revaluation learning, while the expected outcome can also be modulated through conscious information processing. Conceptualizing the response to substance intake in terms of UCS revaluation learning leads to the theoretical formulation of a potential neuropharmacological treatment for increasing unlimitedly the effectiveness of a given drug.

  10. La sinergia farmacológica aplicada a la analgesia: revisión de la combinación de ibuprofeno con codeína Pharmacological synergy applied to analgesia: review of the combination of ibuprofen with codeine

    OpenAIRE

    J. R. González-Escalada

    2010-01-01

    La analgesia multimodal que participa actualmente en todos los protocolos de analgesia postoperatoria también se utiliza por los especialistas en dolor crónico que manejan la combinación de fármacos como una rutina para optimizar la eficacia de la analgesia; la combinación de fármacos es una práctica bien conocida y muy extendida, gracias a su demostrada rentabilidad terapéutica, y habitualmente se utiliza tanto en anestesia como en analgesia. El concepto del balance adecuado entre efectivida...

  11. Mechanism of Acupuncture Analgesia and Endogenous Cannabinoid System in Integumentum Commune%电针镇痛的外周机制与皮肤内源性大麻素系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈惠君; 李熳; 陈琳

    2011-01-01

    The pain was an unpleased sensation and emotional experience associated with tissue damaged. Nociceptive stimulus induced periphery tissues releasing much inflammatory factors and im-munological cells to deliver various kinds of cytokines. All of them participate in the activation and modulation on nociceptors and accompanied with periphery sensitization at the same time, and neuro-immunifaction microcircuit regulation become the key point of algaesthesis modulation. The conventional view was that acupuncture analgesia was induced majorly by centra analgesia mechanisms and endogenous opioid peptides system, but recent researches manifestated that periphery analgesia mechanisms (include local inflammatory factors, local endogenous opioid peptides system and endogenous cannabinoid system in integumentum commune) could interpretate the focal arrival of acu-esthesia efficacy of acupuncture analgesia better.%疼痛是与组织损伤相关联的不愉快的感觉和情绪体验.伤害性刺激引起外周组织释放多种炎性因子,免疫细胞释放各种细胞因子,参与激活和调制伤害性感受器,同时外周敏感化,致使神经-免疫微环路调节成为痛觉调制的关键环节.传统观念认为,针刺镇痛主要受中枢性镇痛机制以及内源性阿片肽系统调制;最近的研究表明,外周镇痛机制(包括局部炎性因子、内源性阿片肽系统以及皮肤内源性大麻素系统)能更好地解释针刺镇痛取得的"气至病所"的功效.

  12. The placebo effect revisited: lessons learned to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Irving

    2013-04-01

    This article summarizes six lessons that can be learned from over a half century of scientific research on the placebo effect. These lessons are that the placebo response is not the placebo effect, it is meaningless to ask what the magnitude of the placebo effect is, it is easy to be fooled by regression artifacts, expectancy and conditioning are not conflicting processes that can be pitted against each other, some of our questions can be answered by history, and the outcomes of active treatments can be enhanced by attention to placebo components.

  13. Place avoidance learning and stress-induced analgesia in the attacked mouse: role of endogenous opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegfried, B; Frischknecht, H R

    1989-07-01

    In this study, mechanisms of pain inhibition (tail-flick test) and memory (place avoidance paradigm) were investigated in attacked, DBA/2 and C57BL/6, mice. During training, exposure of test animals to 10 or 30 bites by an aggressive, isolated ICR mouse situated in the dark half of a bright/dark conditioning box induced a significantly higher social conflict analgesia in DBA than in C57 mice. Naltrexone (0.5 and 2.0 mg/kg) reduced this response in DBA mice that received 30, but not 10, bites and was ineffective in C57 mice. This points to different, opioid versus naltrexone-insensitive nonopioid, analgesic mechanisms. During place choice testing in the same box 24 h later, DBA mice that had received 30, but not 10, bites showed a significant, naltrexone-reversible, avoidance of the attack place. No place avoidance learning was observed in C57 mice. The data provided unequivocal evidence that place avoidance learning was a result of associative conditioning, in that neither pairing nor social conflict per se significantly changed the preference for the dark side seen in experimentally naive DBA mice. Antagonism of place avoidance conditioning was observed regardless of whether testing was carried out in the drugged or undrugged state, excluding possible state-dependent effects as an explanation for the naltrexone-induced impairment. Individual correlational analysis in saline-injected, attacked DBA mice revealed a negative relationship between the analgesic state immediately after training and the avoidance of attack place during testing. In summary, the results suggest strain-dependent analgesic and learning mechanisms and indicate that endogenous opioids released in attacked DBA mice support pain inhibition and modulate the memorization of attack place by their analgesic effects, as well as by mechanisms independent of pain inhibitory systems.

  14. Withania somnifera root extract prolongs analgesia and suppresses hyperalgesia in mice treated with morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrù, Alessandro; Marchese, Giorgio; Casu, Gianluca; Casu, Maria Antonietta; Kasture, Sanjay; Cottiglia, Filippo; Acquas, Elio; Mascia, Maria Paola; Anzani, Nicola; Ruiu, Stefania

    2014-04-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that Withania somnifera Dunal (WS), a safe medicinal plant, prevents the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine. In the present study, we investigated whether WS extract (WSE) (100 mg/kg, i.p.) may also modulate the analgesic effect induced by acute morphine administration (2.5, 5, 10 mg/kg, s.c.) in the tail-flick and in the hot plate tests, and if it may prevent the development of 2.5 mg/kg morphine-induced rebound hyperalgesia in the low intensity tail-flick test. Further, to characterize the receptor(s) involved in these effects, we studied, by receptor-binding assay, the affinity of WSE for opioid (μ, δ, k), cannabinoid (CB1, CB2), glutamatergic (NMDA), GABAergic (GABAA, GABAB), serotoninergic (5HT2A) and adrenergic (α2) receptors. The results demonstrated that (i) WSE alone failed to alter basal nociceptive threshold in both tests, (ii) WSE pre-treatment significantly protracted the antinociceptive effect induced by 5 and 10 mg/kg of morphine only in tail-flick test, (iii) WSE pre-treatment prevented morphine-induced hyperalgesia in the low intensity tail-flick test, and (iv) WSE exhibited a high affinity for the GABAA and moderate affinity for GABAB, NMDA and δ opioid receptors. WSE prolongs morphine-induced analgesia and suppresses the development of morphine-induced rebound hyperalgesia probably through involvement of GABAA, GABAB, NMDA and δ opioid receptors. This study suggests the therapeutic potential of WSE as a valuable adjuvant agent in opioid-sparing therapies.

  15. Occult Spinal Dysraphism in Obstetrics: A Case Report of Caesarean Section with Subarachnoid Anaesthesia after Remifentanil Intravenous Analgesia for Labour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, A.; Frassanito, L.; Natale, L.; Draisci, G.

    2012-01-01

    Neuraxial techniques of anaesthesia and analgesia are the current choice in obstetrics for efficacy and general low risk of major complications. Concern exists about neuraxial anaesthesia in patients with occult neural tube defects, regarding both labour analgesia and anaesthesia for Caesarean section. Recently, remifentanil infusion has been proposed as an analgesic technique alternative to lumbar epidural, especially when epidural analgesia appears to be contraindicated. Here, we discuss the case of a pregnant woman attending at our institution with occult, symptomatic spinal dysraphism who requested labour analgesia. She was selected for remifentanil intravenous infusion for labour pain and then underwent urgent operative delivery with spinal anaesthesia with no complications. PMID:22844625

  16. Age-related postoperative morphine requirements in children following major surgery--an assessment using patient-controlled analgesia (PCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T G; Henneberg, S W; Hole, P

    1996-01-01

    To investigate if small children require less morphine for postoperative analgesia than do older children and adolescents we analysed the morphine consumption pattern of 28 consecutive children on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) following major surgery. The median age-specific morp......To investigate if small children require less morphine for postoperative analgesia than do older children and adolescents we analysed the morphine consumption pattern of 28 consecutive children on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) following major surgery. The median age...... of this age group may have a higher total postoperative morphine requirement following major surgery than older children and adolescents....

  17. Occult Spinal Dysraphism in Obstetrics: A Case Report of Caesarean Section with Subarachnoid Anaesthesia after Remifentanil Intravenous Analgesia for Labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Valente

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuraxial techniques of anaesthesia and analgesia are the current choice in obstetrics for efficacy and general low risk of major complications. Concern exists about neuraxial anaesthesia in patients with occult neural tube defects, regarding both labour analgesia and anaesthesia for Caesarean section. Recently, remifentanil infusion has been proposed as an analgesic technique alternative to lumbar epidural, especially when epidural analgesia appears to be contraindicated. Here, we discuss the case of a pregnant woman attending at our institution with occult, symptomatic spinal dysraphism who requested labour analgesia. She was selected for remifentanil intravenous infusion for labour pain and then underwent urgent operative delivery with spinal anaesthesia with no complications.

  18. The effect of Hegu acupoint stimulation in dental acupuncture analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fransiskus Andrianto

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In daily life, dental treatments are often related with oral pain sensation which needs anesthesia procedures. Sometimes local anesthetics can not be used because patients have hypersensitive reaction or systemic diseases which may lead to complications. Stimulating acupoint, such as Hegu activates hypothalamus and pituitary gland to release endogenous opioid peptide substances that reduce pain sensitivity. The aim of the study was to determine Hegu acupoint stimulation effect on the pain sensitivity reduction in maxillary central incisor gingiva. The laboratory experimental research was conducted on 12 healthy male Wistar rats (3 months old, weights 150–200 grams. All rat samples received the same treatments and adapted within 1 month. The research was done in pre and post test control group design. 40-Volt electro-stimulation was done once on the maxillary central incisor gingiva prior to the bilateral Hegu acupoint stimulation, then followed by 3 times electro-stimulation with 3 minutes intervals. The pain scores were obtained based on the samples’ contraction in each electro-stimulation. The responses were categorized into 5 pain scores and statistically analyzed using Wilcoxon Test. The results showed that Hegu acupoint stimulation lowered the pain scores significantly (p < 0.05. Hegu acupoint stimulation could reduce the pain sensitivity in maxillary central incisor gingiva. Therefore, the use of acupuncture analgesia in dental pain management can be considered in the future.

  19. Auricular Acupuncture Analgesia in Thoracic Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios S. Papadopoulos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of thoracic trauma (rib fractures with pneumothorax and pulmonary contusions with severe chest pain leading to ineffective ventilation and oxygenation. The patient presented to our emergency department. The patient had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and was completely unable to take deep breaths and clear secretions from his bronchial tree. After obtaining informed consent, we applied auricular acupuncture to ameliorate pain and hopefully improve his functional ability to cough and breathe deeply. Within a few minutes, his pain scores diminished considerably, and his ventilation and oxygenation indices improved to safe limits. Auricular acupuncture analgesia lasted for several hours. Parallel to pain reduction, hemodynamic disturbances and anxiety significantly resolved. A second treatment nearly a day later resulted in almost complete resolution of pain that lasted at least 5 days and permitted adequate ventilation, restored oxygenation, and some degree of mobilization (although restricted due to a compression fracture of a lumbar vertebra. Nonopioid and opioid analgesics were sparsely used in low doses during the entire hospitalization period. Hemodynamic alterations and anxiety also decreased, and the patient was soon ready to be discharged.

  20. Preventive local analgesia in orthopedic and Traumatology surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Jiménez Vázquez

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Fundament: One of the most important aims of modern surgery is the recovery of the ill patients and heir integration to society. Sometimes, this wish has its limitations because of the persistence of pain after surgery. The development of an effective analgesic for after surgery pain is therefore a priority in modern medicine. Objective: To characterize the results obtained with the application of a preventive analgesic by infiltrating without limitations of the use of any other analgesic if necessary. Method: Prospective-descriptive study in a series of 30 patients assisted at the Orthopaedic Service of the ¨Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨ Hospital from Cienfuegos province in the period that covers September 2004- march 2005. Anaesthetic infiltration in the surgical area was applied once the surgery was ended . Bupivacaine 0,125 % in a volume of 20 ml and 2 drops of epinephrine without avoiding the use of any other analgesic. Results: a group of 13 patients presented pain in the first 24-48 hours after surgery followed by another group of 9 patients who alleviated pain in the period between 12 and 23 hours after surgery. Conclusions: In this series of patients it was shown the benefits of anaesthetic infiltration in the surgical area with analgesic purposes, since it causes pain alleviation in a period greater than 24 hours. Bupivacaine shows good results since it causes after surgery analgesia and the early application in the rehabilitation of a great number of patients.

  1. Fetal and maternal analgesia/anesthesia for fetal procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Marc; De Buck, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    For many prenatally diagnosed conditions, treatment is possible before birth. These fetal procedures can range from minimal invasive punctions to full open fetal surgery. Providing anesthesia for these procedures is a challenge, where care has to be taken for both mother and fetus. There are specific physiologic changes that occur with pregnancy that have an impact on the anesthetic management of the mother. When providing maternal anesthesia, there is also an impact on the fetus, with concerns for potential negative side effects of the anesthetic regimen used. The question whether the fetus is capable of feeling pain is difficult to answer, but there are indications that nociceptive stimuli have a physiologic reaction. This nociceptive stimulation of the fetus also has the potential for longer-term effects, so there is a need for fetal analgesic treatment. The extent to which a fetus is influenced by the maternal anesthesia depends on the type of anesthesia, with different needs for extra fetal anesthesia or analgesia. When providing fetal anesthesia, the potential negative consequences have to be balanced against the intended benefits of blocking the physiologic fetal responses to nociceptive stimulation.

  2. Tramadol or fentanyl analgesia for ambulatory knee arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagney, B; Williams, O; Jennings, L; Buggy, D

    1999-03-01

    In a double-blind, randomized, controlled study, 61 patients who received a standardized anaesthetic for day case arthroscopic knee surgery were studied. Group T (n = 31) received tramadol 1.5 mg kg-1, and group F (n = 30) received fentanyl 1.5 micrograms kg-1 at the induction of anaesthesia. All patients also received 20 mL of intra-articular bupivacaine 0.5% at the end of surgery. Assessments were made of pain at rest and on movement, analgesic requirements and side-effects at hourly intervals up to 6 h and by means of a postal questionnaire at 24 h and 48 h post-operatively. Group F had higher pain scores than group T at 4 h only [VAS 3.3 (1.6-5.5) vs. 2.4 (1-4), P = 0.039, respectively; median (interquartile range)]. There were no other significant differences between the groups in terms of pain scores, supplemental analgesic requirements or incidence of side-effects. We conclude that tramadol offers little benefit clinically compared with fentanyl when used at induction of anaesthesia for day case arthroscopic knee surgery. Further studies are indicated in patients with more severe pain to determine the role of tramadol in post-operative analgesia.

  3. Sedations and analgesia in patients undergoing percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatzidakis, A.A.; Charonitakis, E.; Athanasiou, A.; Tsetis, D.; Chlouverakis, G.; Papamastorakis, G.; Roussopoulou, G.; Gourtsoyiannis, N.C

    2003-02-01

    AIM: To present our experience using intravenous sedoanalgesia for percutaneous biliary drainage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study comprised 100 patients, all of whom were continuously monitored [electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, pulse oxymetry] and received an initial dose of 2 mg midazolam followed by 0.02 mg fentanyl. Before every anticipated painful procedure, a maintenance dose of 0.01 mg fentanyl was administered. If the procedure continued and the patient became aware, another 1 mg midazolam was given. This was repeated if patients felt pain. A total dose of 0.08 mg fentanyl and 7 mg midazolam was never exceeded. Immediately after the procedure, the nurse was asked to evaluate patients' pain score. The patients were asked 3 h later to complete a visual 10-degree pain score scale. RESULTS: The average dose of fentanyl and midazolam was 0.042 mg (0.03-0.08 mg) and 4.28 mg (2-7 mg), respectively. Only one patient recorded the procedure as painful. The scores given by the attending nurse (1-7 points, mean 2.9) correlated well with those given by the patients (1-6 points, mean 2.72). No complications were noted. CONCLUSION: According to our experience, interventional radiologists practising biliary procedures can administer low doses of midazolam and minimize the doses of fentanyl, without loss of adequate sedation and analgesia. Hatzidakis, A. A. et al. (2003). Clinical Radiology58, 121-127.

  4. Perioperative analgesia and the effects of dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Andrew; Kaye, Alan David; Gritsenko, Karina; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Adam Marc

    2014-06-01

    With over 50,000 dietary supplements available, resurgence in consumer interest over the past few decades has resulted in an explosion of use of these agents worldwide. Disillusionment with current medications and belief in "natural medicines" has resulted in a multibillion dollar industry. Active ingredients in a number of herbs are being tested for therapeutic potential, and some are efficacious, so herbal medicines cannot be dismissed. The prevalence of herbology is further encouraged by a relatively relaxed policy of the FDA regarding these compounds, which they consider foods. As herbal products are included in the "supplement" category, there is no existing protocol for standardization of these products. There are numerous examples of herbals that can adversely affect patient recovery and outcomes in anesthesia. The prudent anesthesia provider will make sure to obtain correct information as to accurate herbal usage of each patient and attempt to discontinue these products two to three weeks prior to the delivery of an anesthetic. Postoperative analgesia, bleeding, and level of sedation can be negatively impacted related to herbal products and herbal-drug interactions. Over 90 herbal products are associated with bleeding and this can be a specific problem intraoperatively or when considering placement of a regional anesthetic for postoperative pain management.

  5. Kin interaction enhances morphine analgesia in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, F R

    1998-07-01

    The additive effect of social and pharmacological treatments was evaluated in pairs of male mice. Ineffective and effective doses of morphine (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) were tested on pain threshold in dyads of males at different times after pair formation and drug treatment. During the second hour of social interaction after reunion, saline-injected adult sibling male mice showed a decrease in nociception as measured by the tail-flick test. Pairs of unrelated, unfamiliar control mice showed no changes in pain sensitivity during a 2-h social session. An ineffective dose of 2.5 mg/kg of morphine in non-sibling males, significantly increased tail-flick latencies in sibling pairs, before the effect of the social environment (sibling) reached statistical significance. The higher dose of morphine (5.0 mg/kg) produced analgesia in sibling as well as in non-sibling males, but the effect in the latter disappeared 60 min after drug treatment, whereas siblings were still analgesic. These results indicate that an ineffective dose of morphine, combined with the activation of the endogenous opioid system by social factors, can affect nociception.

  6. RESULTS OF THE MEGAVERTEBRATE ANALGESIA SURVEY: ELEPHANTS AND RHINO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottwitz, Jack; Boothe, Matthew; Harmon, Roy; Citino, Scott B; Zuba, Jeffery R; Boothe, Dawn M

    2016-03-01

    An online survey utilizing Survey Monkey linked through the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians listserve examined current practices in megavertebrate analgesia. Data collected included drugs administered, dosing regimens, ease of administration, efficacy, and adverse events. Fifty-nine facilities (38 housing elephants, 33 housing rhinoceroses) responded. All facilities administered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with phenylbutazone (0.25-10 mg/kg) and flunixin meglumine (0.2-4 mg/kg) being most common. Efficacy was reported as "good" to "excellent" for these medications. Opioids were administered to elephants (11 of 38) and rhinoceroses (7 of 33), with tramadol (0.5-3.0 mg/kg) and butorphanol (0.05-1.0 mg/kg) being most common. Tramadol efficacy scores were highly variable in both elephants and rhinoceroses. While drug choices were similar among institutions, substantial variability in dosing regimens and reported efficacy between and within facilities indicates the need for pharmacokinetic studies and standardized methods of analyzing response to treatment to establish dosing regimens and clinical trials to establish efficacy and safety.

  7. Anesthesia and analgesia for caesaren section in dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiljević Maja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a case of a pregnant female dog, of English bulldog breed, three years old, which was brought to Belgrade Faculty of Veterinary Medicine because of inability for normal parturition. Cesarean section is an urgent intervention both in human and in veterinary medicine. Anesthesia of a pregnant dog should be carried out very carefully, because of all the physiological changes that appear during pregnancy, as well as the impact of anesthetics on embryos themselves. Anesthetics, analgesics and sedatives pass through blood brain barrier, but also their transport goes through placenta to embryo, so for that reason it is not possible to anesthetize only mother and to avoid anesthesia effects on the embryo. Therefore, anesthetics with short time of action which metabolize quickly and have minimal negative effect on embryos are recommended. When choosing the right analgesics and anesthetics, there should be known that female dogs in which it is necessary to do Cesarean section belong to the group of high risk patients. Pregnant female dogs are exposed to hypoventilation, hypoxia, hypercapnia, intense heart work, vomiting and regurgitation as well. Reversible anesthetics are recommended to provide shorter duration time of anesthesia, and in accordance, inhalation anesthetics doses are minimal. Application of α2- agonist in premedication, propophol in induction, as well as maintaining general inhalation anesthesia with sevofluran, along with local analgesia, proved to be the ideal combination in this case of cesarean section.

  8. Placebo and nocebo effects in the neurological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Bittar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of placebo and nocebo effects is essential to identify their influence on the results in clinical practice and clinical trials, and thereby properly interpret their results. It is known that the gold standard of clinical trials research is the double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical study. The objective of this review is to distinguish specific from non-specific effects, so that the presence of positive effects in the group that received placebo (placebo effect and the presence of adverse effects in the group receiving placebo (nocebo effect lead to confounding in interpreting the results. Placebo and nocebo effects have been considered in neurological diseases such as depression, pain, headache, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy. As placebo and nocebo effects are also present in clinical practice, the purpose of this review is to draw attention to their influence on neurological practice, calling attention to the development of measures that can minimize them.

  9. Multiple levels paravertebral block versus morphine patient-controlled analgesia for postoperative analgesia following breast cancer surgery with unilateral lumpectomy, and axillary lymph nodes dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summayah Fallatah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain after breast cancer surgery is not uncommon. Narcotic based analgesia is commonly used for postoperative pain management. However, the side-effects and complications of systemic narcotics is a significant disadvantage. Different locoregional anesthetic techniques have been tried including, single and multiple levels paravertebral block (PVB, which seems to have a significant reduction in immediate postoperative pain with fewer side-effects. The aim of this study was to compare unilateral multiple level PVB versus morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA for pain relief after breast cancer surgery with unilateral lumpectomy and axillary lymph nodes dissection. Materials and Methods: Forty patients scheduled for breast cancer surgery were randomized to receive either preoperative unilateral multiple injections PVB at five thoracic dermatomes (group P, 20 patients or postoperative intravenous PCA with morphine (group M, 20 patients for postoperative pain control. Numerical pain scale, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, Time to first analgesic demand, 24-h morphine consumption side-effects and length of hospital stay were recorded. Results: PVB resulted in a significantly more postoperative analgesia, maintained hemodynamic, more significant reduction in nausea and vomiting, and shorter hospital stay compared with PCA patients. Conclusion: Multiple levels PVB is an effective regional anesthetic technique for postoperative pain management, it provides superior analgesia with less narcotics consumption, and fewer side-effects compared with PCA morphine for patients with breast cancer who undergo unilateral lumpectomy, with axillary lymph nodes dissection.

  10. A comparative study of oral tapentadol with thoracic epidural analgesia versus intravenous tramadol and paracetamol combination for postoperative analgesia in off pump CABG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu A. Shah

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: Our study concludes that Tapentadol with Thoracic epidural is very much effective as a multimodal analgesia approach in controlling acute postoperative pain after CABG. Tapentadol is quite a newer drug so its usefulness for other patients and different surgeries is still to be debated. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(6.000: 723-727

  11. Primary Spoken Language and Neuraxial Labor Analgesia Use Among Hispanic Medicaid Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Paloma; Eosakul, Stanley T; Grobman, William A; Feinglass, Joe; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Hispanic women are less likely than non-Hispanic Caucasian women to use neuraxial labor analgesia. It is unknown whether there is a disparity in anticipated or actual use of neuraxial labor analgesia among Hispanic women based on primary language (English versus Spanish). In this 3-year retrospective, single-institution, cross-sectional study, we extracted electronic medical record data on Hispanic nulliparous with vaginal deliveries who were insured by Medicaid. On admission, patients self-identified their primary language and anticipated analgesic use for labor. Extracted data included age, marital status, labor type, delivery provider (obstetrician or midwife), and anticipated and actual analgesic use. Household income was estimated from census data geocoded by zip code. Multivariable logistic regression models were estimated for anticipated and actual neuraxial analgesia use. Among 932 Hispanic women, 182 were self-identified as primary Spanish speakers. Spanish-speaking Hispanic women were less likely to anticipate and use neuraxial anesthesia than English-speaking women. After controlling for confounders, there was an association between primary language and anticipated neuraxial analgesia use (adjusted relative risk: Spanish- versus English-speaking women, 0.70; 97.5% confidence interval, 0.53-0.92). Similarly, there was an association between language and neuraxial analgesia use (adjusted relative risk: Spanish- versus English-speaking women 0.88; 97.5% confidence interval, 0.78-0.99). The use of a midwife compared with an obstetrician also decreased the likelihood of both anticipating and using neuraxial analgesia. A language-based disparity was found in neuraxial labor analgesia use. It is possible that there are communication barriers in knowledge or understanding of analgesic options. Further research is necessary to determine the cause of this association.

  12. Combined spinal epidural (CSE) analgesia: technique, management, and outcome of 300 mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, R E; Baxandall, M L; Srikantharajah, I D; Edge, G; Kadim, M Y; Morgan, B M

    1994-04-01

    Epidural analgesia in labour is commonly associated with some degree of lower limb weakness often severe enough to be described as paralysis by the mother. We aimed to produce rapid reliable analgesia with no motor block throughout labour. We report a pilot survey of 300 consecutive women requesting regional analgesia in labour who received a combined spinal epidural blockade (CSE). The initial dose was given into the subarachnoid space and analgesia maintained via an epidural catheter. A subarachnoid injection of 2.5 mg bupivacaine and 25 mug fentanyl was successfully given in 268 women (89.3%). Completely pain-free contractions within 3 min of this injection occurred in 195 women (65%) and in all 300 within 20 min and there was no associated motor block in 291 (97%). 141 women chose to stand, walk or sit in a rocking chair at some time during labour. Only 38 women (12.6%) were immobile during the first stage of labour. Analgesia was maintained via the epidural catheter with bolus doses of 10-15 ml of 0.1% bupivacaine and 0.0002% fentanyl. The mean bupivacaine requirement was 9.5 mg/h throughout the entire duration of analgesia. The incidence of post lumbar puncture headache was 2.3%. Transient hypotension occurred in 24 women (8%) and was treated with 6 mg intravenous boluses of ephedrine. Complete satisfaction with analgesia and mobility was reported 12-24 h post partum by 95% of mothers. The use of this analgesic technique caused no alteration in obstetric management or post partum care of the women.

  13. Nocifensive behavior-related laser heat-evoked component in the rostral agranular insular cortex revealed using morphine analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Yi; Liu, Chan-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Li; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2016-02-01

    The rostral agranular insular cortex (RAIC), an opioid-responsive site, is essential for modulating nociception in rats. Our previous studies have shown that morphine suppressed long latency laser heat-evoked nociceptive responses in the primary somatosensory cortex (SmI). By contrast, morphine significantly attenuated both short and long latency responses in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The present study assessed the effect of morphine on laser heat-evoked responses in the RAIC. Laser heat irradiation applied to the rat forepaws at graded levels was used as a specific noxious stimulus. In the RAIC, the first part of the long latency component (140-250ms) of the laser heat-evoked response was enhanced by intraperitoneal morphine (5mg/kg). When the laser heat-evoked cortical responses were examined for trials showing strong nocifensive movement (paw licking), moderate nocifensive movement (paw lifting), and no nocifensive movement, a 140-250ms period enhancement was observed in the RAIC only for the paw lifting movement. This enhancement was absent in the SmI. Thus, our data suggest that the RAIC has a pain-related behavior-dependent neuronal component. Furthermore, the RAIC, ACC, and SmI are differentially modulated by morphine analgesia.

  14. Microinjection of orexin-A into the rat locus coeruleus nucleus induces analgesia via cannabinoid type-1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar, Hossein Mohammad-Pour; Azizi, Hossein; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Reza, Mani Ali; Semnanian, Saeed

    2015-10-22

    Locus coeruleus (LC) nucleus is involved in noradrenergic descending pain modulation. LC receives dense orexinergic projections from the lateral hypothalamus. Orexin-A and -B are hypothalamic peptides which modulate a variety of brain functions via orexin type-1 (OX1) and orexin type-2 (OX2) receptors. Previous studies have shown that activation of OX1 receptors induces endocannabinoid synthesis and alters synaptic neurotransmission by retrograde signaling via affecting cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors. In the present study the interaction of orexin-A and endocannabinoids was examined at the LC level in a rat model of inflammatory pain. Pain was induced by formalin (2%) injection into the hind paw. Intra-LC microinjection of orexin-A decreased the nociception score during both phases of formalin test. Furthermore, intra-LC microinjection of either SB-334867 (OX1 receptor antagonist) or AM251 (CB1 receptor antagonist) increased flinches and also the nociception score during phase 1, 2 and the inter-phase of formalin test. The analgesic effect of orexin-A was diminished by prior intra-LC microinjection of either SB-334867 or AM251. This data show that, activation of OX1 receptors in the LC can induce analgesia and also the blockade of OX1 or CB1 receptors is associated with hyperalgesia during formalin test. Our findings also suggest that CB1 receptors may modulate the analgesic effect of orexin-A. These results outline a new mechanism by which orexin-A modulates the nociceptive processing in the LC nucleus.

  15. Assessment of analgesia in human chronic pain. Randomized double-blind crossover study of once daily repro-dose morphine versus MST continus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, S; Sweet, P; Miah, Y; Barklamb, M; Larsen, U

    1999-10-01

    This study evaluated Repro-Dose morphine (RDM; Reliadol from Nycomed Pharma), a new once daily controlled-release morphine formulation, against twice daily MST Continuous (MST) at steady state in patients with chronic opioid responsive pain. A randomized double-blind two-way crossover design was used to evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of RDM once daily or MST twice daily, at the same total daily doses, in patients with chronic stable pain (dose range 20-120 mg per day). During the RDM limb of the study active drug was administered in the evening and placebo in the morning. Dextromoramide was provided as escape analgesia throughout the study. Following a 5-day screening period, during which stability of oral opioid dose was verified, patients underwent two 5-day treatment periods, (one MST, one RDM) in random sequence. Pain scores, escape analgesia requirements and side-effects were compared using data from days 3, 4 and 5 of each treatment period. Any events or medication changes occurring during the study period thought liable to influence analgesia were regarded as protocol violations. Overall assessment and period preference was assessed by direct questioning. RDM treatment was regarded as successful if the amount of escape medication required during the RDM period was equal to or less than that required during the MST period. Forty-seven patients were included in the study, of whom 40 completed both periods [the intention to treat (ITT) population], 31 in strict accordance with the protocol [the per protocol (PP) population]. Results were similar for both populations. There was no significant difference in pain scores or incidence of adverse events occurring during the MST and RDM periods. For the ITT population, requirements for escape medication during the RDM period were less than, equal to or greater than those recorded during the MST period for 14, 15, and 11 patients, respectively. Twenty-nine of 40 patients (72.5%) were therefore RDM treatment

  16. Post operatory analgesia in caesarean surgery. Analgesia posoperatoria en la operación cesárea.

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    Rolando T. Espín González

    Full Text Available Background: Post-operatory pain is a spread and constant problem during the care of the surgical patient. The tendency to find new therapeutic techniques to alleviate pain has lead scientists to make and use a great variety of analgesics which are administered by different vias. The effects of narcotics on the new born are well known and the author´s worries about this problem has been the motivational point to search about the use of epidural and intratecal narcotics in the obstetric patient. Objective: To assess the use of peridural liophilized morphine in the Caesarean Section Method: A study of a series of cases was carried out at the Surgical Unit of the Gynecobstetric service of the University Hospital ¨Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨ from February 2001 to August 2002 . This search included 120 patient who were selected to elective iterative caesarean section The variables under study were blood pressure, pulse and respiration during the pre- trans and post operative phases, onset of the anaesthetic effect and its duration, peri operatory complications , quality of the post operatory analgesia and its effect on the newborn measured by using Apgar values . The statistical procedure was developed by using the statistical package Epi Info 6. Results: The onset of the anesthetic effect and the duration of the anesthesia were not modified with the use of liophilized morphine. Vital signs remained within normal limits in most of the patients during the pre- trans and post operatory phases. The complications were: pruritus, urinary retention, nausea nad vomiting. The quality of the analgesia was satisfactory in most of the patients. The Apgar values were normal in all neonates. Conclusion: The administration of peridural liophilized morphine in elective caesarean sections is a reliable, sure and useful method in our environment.

  17. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of levetiracetam in central pain in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falah, M; Madsen, C; Holbech, J V

    2012-01-01

    Levetiracetam is an anticonvulsant which is assumed to act by modulating neurotransmitter release via binding to the vesicle protein SV2A. This could have an impact on signalling in the pain pathway. The aim of this study was to test the analgesic effect of levetiracetam in central pain in multiple...... sclerosis. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial with levetiracetam 3000 mg/day versus placebo (6-week treatment periods). Patients with multiple sclerosis, symptoms and signs complying with central neuropathic pain and pain symptoms for more than 6 months, as well......-selected patients with central pain in multiple sclerosis, but an effect in subgroups with specific pain symptoms was indicated....

  18. Intravenous remifentanil versus epidural ropivacaine with sufentanil for labour analgesia: a retrospective study.

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    Rong Lin

    Full Text Available Remifentanil with appropriate pharmacological properties seems to be an ideal alternative to epidural analgesia during labour. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of remifentanil intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA compared with epidural analgesia. Medical records of 370 primiparas who received remifentanil IVPCA or epidural analgesia were reviewed. Pain and sedation scores, overall satisfaction, the extent of pain control, maternal side effects and neonatal outcome as primary observational indicators were collected. There was a significant decline of pain scores in both groups. Pain reduction was greater in the epidural group throughout the whole study period (0 ∼ 180 min (P < 0.0001, and pain scores in the remifentanil group showed an increasing trend one hour later. The remifentanil group had a lower SpO2 (P < 0.0001 and a higher sedation score (P < 0.0001 within 30 min after treatment. The epidural group had a higher overall satisfaction score (3.8 ± 0.4 vs. 3.7 ± 0.6, P = 0.007 and pain relief score (2.9 ± 0.3 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4, P < 0.0001 compared with the remifentanil group. There was no significant difference on side effects between the two groups, except that a higher rate of dizziness (1% vs. 21.8%, P < 0.0001 was observed during remifentanil analgesia. And logistic regression analysis demonstrated that nausea, vomiting were associated with oxytocin usage and instrumental delivery, and dizziness was associated to the type and duration of analgesia. Neonatal outcomes such as Apgar scores and umbilical-cord blood gas analysis were within the normal range, but umbilical pH and base excess of neonatus in the remifentanil group were significantly lower. Remifentanil IVPCA provides poorer efficacy on labor analgesia than epidural analgesia, with more sedation on parturients and a trend of newborn acidosis. Despite these adverse effects, remifentanil IVPCA can still be an alternative

  19. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labour: its effects on delivery outcome

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    Suneet Kaur Sra Charanjit Singh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Combined spinal-epidural (CSE has become an increasingly popular alternative to traditional labour epidural due to its rapid onset and reliable analgesia provided. This was a prospective, convenient sampling study to determine the effects of CSE analgesia on labour outcome. METHODS: One hundred and ten healthy primigravida parturients with a singleton pregnancy of ≥37 weeks gestation and in the active phase of labour were studied. They were enrolled to the CSE (n = 55 or Non-CSE (n = 55 group based on whether they consented to CSE analgesia. Non-CSE parturients were offered other methods of labour analgesia. The duration of the first and second stage of labour, rate of instrumental vaginal delivery and emergency cesarean section, and Apgar scores were compared. RESULTS: The mean duration of the first and second stage of labour was not significantly different between both groups. Instrumental delivery rates between the groups were not significantly different (CSE group, 11% versus Non-CSE group, 16%. The slightly higher incidence of cesarean section in the CSE group (16% versus 15% in the Non-CSE group was not statistically significant. Neonatal outcome in terms of Apgar score of less than 7 at 1 and 5 min was similar in both groups. CONCLUSION: There were no significant differences in the duration of labour, rate of instrumental vaginal delivery and emergency cesarean section, and neonatal outcome in parturients who received compared to those who did not receive CSE for labour analgesia.

  20. Advances in patient-controlled analgesia: the role of fentanyl ITS

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    Ian Power

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ian Power, Jon G McCormackDepartment of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, The University of Edinburgh, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, UKAbstract: Effective pain relief is an essential component of a patient’s peri-operative care package. Good analgesia has been shown to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular, respiratory and thrombo-embolic complications following surgery. Satisfactory analgesia facilitates early patient ambulation following surgery, which may reduce in-patient stay. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA systems are a well established standard therapy for acute post-operative pain; however some practical limitations limit their clinical utility. The fentanyl inotophoretic transdermal system (ITS is a novel self-contained needle-free PCA device, which delivers boluses of fentanyl transdermally. This system has been shown to provide analgesia equivalent to conventional PCA modalities, with unique design features that may confer advantages to patients and staff, including facilitating patient mobilization in the post-operative phase. This review will discuss the technology of iontophoretic systems, the pharmacology of transdermal fentanyl delivery, and some practical implications of the fentanyl ITS.Keywords: iontophoresis, transdermal, patient-controlled analgesia, fentanyl, post-operative pain

  1. Obstetrical and perinatal outcomes in patients with or without obstetric analgesia during labor

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    Piedrahíta-Gutiérrez, Dany Leandro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe and compare the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in patients with or without obstetric analgesia during labor, and to determine whether such analgesia is associated with adverse maternal or perinatal outcomes. Methodology: Comparative, retrospective, descriptive study, between January and November 2014, that included 502 healthy patients with normal pregnancies, out of which 250 received obstetric analgesia. The groups were compared as to maternal and perinatal outcomes. Results: Young, single and nulliparous mothers predominated; delivery was vaginal in 86 % of the cases, and by caesarean section in 14 %. Obstetric analgesia was associated with longer duration of the second stage of labor, instrumental delivery and cesarean section due to arrest of dilatation or fetal bradycardia; however, it was not related with higher incidence of postpartum hemorrhage or adverse perinatal outcomes such as meconium-stained amniotic fluid, Apgar under 5 at one minute or under 7 at 5 minutes, the need for neonatal resuscitation or for admission to NICU. Conclusion: Obstetric analgesia increases the duration of the second stage of labor and can increase the rate of caesarean sections and instrumental delivery, but it is not associated with adverse maternal or perinatal outcomes. Therefore, its use in labor is justified.

  2. Is there a placebo problem in antidepressant trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huaiyu; Cusin, Cristina; Fava, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    In psychiatry, particularly in antidepressant clinical studies, placebo-controlled trials often yield results that are very difficult to interpret because of robust placebo responses. Meta-analyses of trials in major depressive disorder (MDD) suggest that drug-placebo differences in response rates range from 11% to 18%. However, in trials of marketed antidepressants present in the FDA databases, antidepressant drugs were superior to placebo in only 45 out of 93 RCTs (48%), and the placebo response overall appears to have increased over time. This gradual increase in placebo response rates may lead to delays in bringing new antidepressant treatments to the market, increased costs of antidepressant drug development and, in some cases, decisions to stop the development of certain compounds, or FDA decisions to not approve new treatments. A number of possible contributing factors to this significant placebo response in MDD have been identified, but further studies are needed. Many of the remedies used by researchers to minimize the placebo response, such as lead-in periods or shortening the duration of study visits, have failed to show consistent benefits. From our analysis of published studies, it appears that expectations about the speed of response may be shaped by the duration of the trial and that most of the placebo response occurs in the first half of the trial, regardless of its duration. These observations have led us to develop a novel approach to the placebo response problem called the Sequential Parallel Comparison Design.

  3. Placebo Trends across the Border: US versus Canada.

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    Cory S Harris

    Full Text Available Physicians around the world report to using placebos in a variety of situations and with varying degrees of frequency. Inconsistent methodologies, however, complicate interpretation and prevent direct comparisons across studies. While US- and Canada-based physicians share similar professional standards, Canada harbours a less-litigious universal healthcare model with no formal placebo-related policy-factors that may impact how physicians view and use placebos.To compare American and Canadian data, we circulated an online survey to academic physicians practicing in Canada, collected anonymous responses, and extracted those of internists and rheumatologists for comparison to US data obtained through parallel methodologies.Whereas our data show overall concordance across the border-from definitions to ethical limitations and therapeutic potential-differences between American- and Canadian-based placebo practices merit acknowledgement. For example, compared to 45%-80% among US-based respondents, only 23±7% of Canada-based respondents reported using placebos in clinical practice. However, 79±7% of Canada-respondents-a figure comparable to US data-professed to prescribing at least one form of treatment without proven or expected efficacy. Placebo interventions including unwarranted vitamins and herbal supplements (impure placebos as well as sugar pills and saline injections (pure placebos appear more common in Canada, where more doctors described placebos as "placebos" (rather than "medications" and used them as a "diagnostic" tool (rather than a means of placating patient demands for treatment.Cross-border variation in the use of clinical placebos appears minor despite substantial differences in health care delivery system, malpractice climate, and placebo-related policy. The prevalence of impure placebos in both Canadian and US clinics raises ethical and practical questions currently unaddressed by policy and warranting investigation.

  4. No evidence of a clinically important effect of adding local infusion analgesia administrated through a catheter in pain treatment after total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Kirsten; Leonhardt, Jane Schwartz; Revald, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Postoperative analgesia after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) using opioids is associated with troublesome side effects such as nausea and dizziness, and epidural analgesic means delayed mobilization. Thus, local infiltration analgesia (LIA) during surgery prolonged...

  5. [Intrapleural catheter analgesia in patients with multiple rib fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, H; Jeckström, W; Maier, C; Winckler, K

    1991-01-01

    Patients with multiple rib fractures often suffer from severe pain that impairs their respiratory performance. The effect of interpleural administration of bupivacaine (20 ml 0.25% every 4 h) for pain management was evaluated in ten patients. The initial interpleural injection resulted in significant pain relief and improvement of arterial oxygen tension. Two patients needed additional i.v. injections of opioids (piritramide 15-22.5 mg/24 h). In one patient a small asymptomatic pneumothorax was observed following placement of the catheter, which resolved spontaneously. No other complications were reported. In an intraindividual comparison, bupivacaine alone and bupivacaine plus epinephrine 1:200,000 were compared with regard to pharmacokinetics of bupivacaine, analgesic effect, side effects, and respiratory performance. The addition of epinephrine yielded only minor advantages from a pharmacokinetic point of view (median peak concentration of bupivacaine 1.8 micrograms/ml vs 2.0 micrograms/ml for bupivacaine alone). The quality and duration of analgesia and the effects on respiration were not influenced by epinephrine. The heart rate was significantly higher and the blood pressure significantly lower when epinephrine was added to the solution. Nevertheless, these differences were too small to be of clinical importance. Even though maximum total plasma concentrations of bupivacaine above 2 micrograms/ml were found in some patients, there were no signs of CNS toxicity, most probably because of the increased protein binding of bupivacaine following trauma. Accordingly, the maximum free plasma concentrations in all patients were below the threshold level of 0.24 micron/ml. We therefore conclude tht interpleural administration of bupivacaine could be a valuable means of pain relief in patients with multiple rib fractures, providing no severe pulmonary contusions or concomitant injuries are present.

  6. Reproducibility of psychophysics and electroencephalography during offset analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, M; Piasco, A; Nissen, T D; Graversen, C; Gazerani, P; Lucas, M-F; Dahan, A; Drewes, A M; Brock, C

    2014-07-01

    Offset analgesia (OA) is a pain-inhibiting mechanism, defined as a disproportionately large decrease in pain perception in response to a discrete decrease in noxious stimulus intensity. Hence, the aims were (1) to investigate whether psychophysics and electroencephalography (EEG) can be assessed simultaneously during OA and (2) to assess whether OA is reproducible within the same day as well as between different days. Two separate studies investigated OA: Study I (13 healthy volunteers; seven men; 25.5 ± 0.65 years) aimed at determining the feasibility of recording psychophysics and EEG simultaneously during OA. Study II (18 healthy volunteers; 12 men; 34 ± 3.15 years) assessed reproducibility of OA in terms of psychophysics and EEG. Subjects were presented to a 30-s OA heat stimulus paradigm on the volar forearm and psychophysics, and EEG recordings were obtained throughout the procedure. Reproducibility was assessed within the same day and between different days, using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Additionally, the reproducible psychophysical parameters were correlated to relevant EEG frequency bands. Simultaneous recording of psychophysics and EEG affects the frequency distribution in terms of alpha suppression. Reproducibility was proven for the psychophysics and EEG frequency bands both within the same day (all ICCs > 0.62) and between different days (all ICCs > 0.66, except for the delta band). Correlations between psychophysics and EEG were found in the theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and gamma (32-80 Hz) bands (all p < 0.01). OA is a robust and reproducible model for experimental pain research, making it suitable for future research. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  7. Intrathecal administration of resiniferatoxin produces analgesia against prostatodynia in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Wei; SONG Bo; ZHOU Zan-song; LU Gen-sheng

    2007-01-01

    Background Prostatodynia remains a difficult clinical problem. Resiniferatoxin (RTX), an ultrapotent vanilloid, can produce a selective and long-lasting desensitization of nociception via C-fiber sensory neurons. Substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from C-fibers are key neurotransmitters in visceral pain. In this study,we evaluated the analgesic effect of intrathecal RTX on rat prostatodynia.Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups for different treatment. In group A, sham operation was preformed. In group B, 100 μl complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the rat's bilateral ventral prostate to induce chronic inflammation. In group C, after prostatitis formed, 50 μl 10 nmol/L RTX was injected into the rat's lumbosacral (L5-S2) vertebral canal. SP and CGRP contents in the spinal cord were investigated by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay (RIA). Their transcriptional levels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, pelvic nerve afferent discharge was recorded to explore the neuro-electrophysiological mechanisms underlying RTX-induced effect.Results SP and CGRP released in the spinal cord and their synthesis in DRG were increased significantly in response to CFA-induced chronic prostatitis, whereas this increase was effectively inhibited by intrathecal RTX. Meanwhile, pelvic nerve afferent electrical activity was enhanced significantly in rats with chronic prostatitis, but it was attenuated markedly in RTX-treated rats paralleled by the change of neuropeptides.Conclusions Intrathecal RTX administration could produce an analgesic effect on rat prostatodynia. Suppression of pelvic nerve afferent electrical activity may be a crucial mechanism underlying RTX-induced analgesia. RTX intrathecal application may present a novel analgesic strategy of prostatodynia.

  8. [Locally administered ropivacaine vs. standard analgesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarría-Pérez, Teresa; Cabrera-Leal, Carlos Fernando; Ramírez-Vargas, Susana; Reynada, José Luis; Arce-Salinas, César Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: se desconoce qué modalidad analgésica brinda mejores resultados después de una colecistectomía laparoscópica. El objetivo de este estudio consistió en valuar la eficacia analgésica de la ropivacaína usada localmente contra la dipirona por vía intravenosa en colecistectomía laparoscópica. Métodos: ensayo clínico al azar, de no inferioridad, en 50 paci