WorldWideScience

Sample records for placarding

  1. 49 CFR 172.554 - POISON placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON placard. 172.554 Section 172.554... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.554 POISON placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON placard must be as follows: EC02MR91.057 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.519, the background on the POISON...

  2. Placarding of road vehicles carrying radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this Code is to give guidance on the placarding requirements for vehicles carrying radioactive materials by road in Great Britain and on the continent of Europe. Additional placards may be required regarding dangerous properties other than radioactivity. The labelling of packages for transport is dealt with in AECP 1030. This Code deals with two aspects of road vehicle placarding:-(a) placarding on the outside of road vehicles in Great Britain and on the continent of Europe, (b) a fireproof placard fixed in the driver's cab. Responsibility for placarding the vehicle rests with the carrier, but in practice the consignor may need to provide the placards. (U.K.)

  3. 49 CFR 172.555 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. 172.555 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.555 POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard must be as follows: ER22JY97.025 (b) In addition to...

  4. 49 CFR 172.540 - POISON GAS placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON GAS placard. 172.540 Section 172.540... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.540 POISON GAS placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON GAS... the POISON GAS placard and the symbol must be white. The background of the upper diamond must be black...

  5. 46 CFR 122.518 - Inflatable survival craft placards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inflatable survival craft placards. 122.518 Section 122... Preparations for Emergencies § 122.518 Inflatable survival craft placards. (a) Every vessel equipped with an inflatable survival craft must have approved placards or other cards containing instructions for launching...

  6. 46 CFR 185.518 - Inflatable survival craft placards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inflatable survival craft placards. 185.518 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.518 Inflatable survival craft placards. (a) Every vessel equipped with an inflatable survival craft must have approved placards or other...

  7. 49 CFR 172.510 - Special placarding provisions: Rail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) White square background. The following must have the specified placards placed on a white square... Hazard Zone A or 6.1 Packing Group I Hazard Zone A which require POISON GAS or POISON placards affixed to... this subchapter) must be placarded EXPLOSIVES 1.1 or EXPLOSIVES 1.2 and POISON GAS or POISON INHALATION...

  8. 33 CFR 151.59 - Placards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION VESSELS... Pertains to Pollution from Ships Garbage Pollution and Sewage § 151.59 Placards. (a) This section applies... following: (1) The discharge of plastic or garbage mixed with plastic into any waters is prohibited. (2) The...

  9. 46 CFR 169.849 - Posting placards containing instructions for launching and inflating inflatable liferafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Inspections § 169.849 Posting placards containing instructions for launching and inflating inflatable... accessible to the ship's company and guests approved placards containing instructions for launching and... determined by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection. ...

  10. 49 CFR 174.83 - Switching placarded rail cars, transport vehicles, freight containers, and bulk packagings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY RAIL Handling of Placarded Rail Cars, Transport... force than is necessary to complete the coupling; or (3) Struck by any car moving under its own momentum... its own momentum may be permitted to strike any placarded flatcar or any flatcar carrying a placarded...

  11. 49 CFR 174.59 - Marking and placarding of rail cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marking and placarding of rail cars. 174.59... RAIL General Handling and Loading Requirements § 174.59 Marking and placarding of rail cars. No person may transport a rail car carrying hazardous materials unless it is marked and placarded as required by...

  12. 49 CFR 174.84 - Position in train of loaded placarded rail cars, transport vehicles, freight containers or bulk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CARRIAGE BY RAIL Handling of Placarded Rail Cars, Transport Vehicles and Freight Containers § 174.84 Position in train of loaded placarded rail cars, transport vehicles, freight containers or bulk packagings... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Position in train of loaded placarded rail cars...

  13. 46 CFR 131.950 - Placard on lifesaving signals and helicopter recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Placard on lifesaving signals and helicopter recovery... SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 131.950 Placard on lifesaving signals and helicopter recovery..., Chapter V, of SOLAS 74/83; and (2) In helicopter recovery. (b) The signals must be employed by vessels or...

  14. 49 CFR 174.85 - Position in train of placarded cars, transport vehicles, freight containers, and bulk packagings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Vehicles and Freight Containers § 174.85 Position in train of placarded cars, transport vehicles, freight... position in a train of each loaded placarded car, transport vehicle, freight container, and bulk packaging..., and other specially equipped cars with tie-down devices for securing vehicles. Permanent bulk head...

  15. 49 CFR 174.82 - General requirements for the handling of placarded rail cars, transport vehicles, freight...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... rail cars, transport vehicles, freight containers, and bulk packages. 174.82 Section 174.82... Placarded Rail Cars, Transport Vehicles and Freight Containers § 174.82 General requirements for the handling of placarded rail cars, transport vehicles, freight containers, and bulk packages. (a) Unless...

  16. Photometric Evaluation of Photo-luminescent Materials for Multi-Egress Guidance Placards: Lighting Environment Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate several photo luminescent (PL) materials being considered for construction of emergency egress placards in the International Space Station (ISS). The use of PL material is intended to allow the placards to be read by ISS crew members in the event of an extensive power failure resulting in the loss of interior illumination.

  17. 9 CFR 73.6 - Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to scabies. 73.6 Section 73.6... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.6 Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to...

  18. Insights in Public Health: Protecting Public Health Through Governmental Transparency: How the Hawai'i Department of Health's New "Stoplight" Placarding Program is Attempting to Influence Behavioral Change in Hawai'i's Food Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Reducing the occurrence of and influencing the rapid correction of food illness risk factors is a common goal for all governmental food regulatory programs nationwide. Foodborne illness in the United States is a major cause of personal distress, preventable illness, and death. To improve public health outcomes, additional workforce was required due to long standing staffing shortages and was obtained partially through consolidation of the Hawai'i Department of Health's (HDOH) two food safety programs, the Sanitation Branch, and the Food & Drug Branch in July 2012, and through legislation that amended existing statutes governing the use of food establishment permit fees. Additionally, a more transparent food establishment grading system was developed after extensive work with industry partners based on three possible placards issued after routine inspections: green, yellow, and red. From late July 2014 to May 2015, there were 6,559 food establishments inspected statewide using the placard system with 79% receiving a green, 21% receiving a yellow, and no red placards issued. Sufficient workforce to allow timely inspections, continued governmental transparency, and use of new technologies are important to improve food safety for the public.

  19. 33 CFR 155.450 - Placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... film or discoloration of the surface of the water or causes a sludge or emulsion beneath the surface of... pump control station, stating the following: Discharge of Oil Prohibited The Federal Water Pollution Control Act prohibits the discharge of oil or oily waste into or upon the navigable waters of the United...

  20. 46 CFR 131.340 - Recommended placard for emergency instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... weathertight door, hatch, and air-port to prevent taking water aboard or further flooding in the vessel. (2) Keep bilges dry to prevent loss of stability from water in bilges. Use power-driven bilge pump, hand... Section 131.340 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1557 - Miscellaneous markings and placards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and... requirements. However, underseat compartments designed for the storage of carry-on articles weighing not more... “fuel”; (ii) For reciprocating engine powered airplanes, the minimum fuel grade; (iii) For turbine...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.61 - Retention of DOT markings, placards and labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 1926.61 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Occupational... requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to those set forth at § 1910.1201...

  3. 78 FR 24041 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... revising the RFM to reduce the V NE indicated airspeed (IAS) limitation. It also requires, before further... EAD placard limited TAS, while the placard in our EAD limited IAS. Actions Since Existing EAD Was... 2012-207-E, changes the airspeed limitation from TAS to IAS, and requires inserting a temporary engine...

  4. 78 FR 51816 - Notice of Applications for Special Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... transportation in Inc. WILMINGTON, commerce of a portable DE. tank that was filled past its required periodic... Independence, MO. and 174.61(a),. Class 1 smokeless powders without complete shipping papers and placarding...

  5. 77 FR 58215 - Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... required labelling and placarding. (modes 1, 2, 4, 5) 15707-N Air Products and 49 CFR 173.240; To authorize the Chemicals, Inc., 173.242; 176.83. transportation in Allentown, PA. commerce of a gas purification...

  6. 16 CFR 307.7 - Requirements for disclosure in print advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... leaflets, pamphlets, coupons, direct mail circulars, or paperback book inserts; and posters and placards..., and the word “WARNING” followed by a colon appears in the neck of the arrow. (c) The required warning...

  7. 21 CFR 1140.30 - Scope of permissible forms of labeling and advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... any other word) or any other indicia of tobacco product identification, in newspapers; in magazines..., posters, and placards; in nonpoint-of-sale promotional material (including direct mail); in point-of-sale...

  8. Shopper marketing nutrition interventions: Social norms on grocery carts increase produce spending without increasing shopper budgets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin R. Payne

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Descriptive and provincial social norm messages (i.e., on grocery cart placards may be an overlooked tool to increase produce demand without decreasing store profitability and increasing shopper budgets.

  9. 78 FR 57822 - Lease and Interchange of Vehicles; Motor Carriers of Passengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... available to Google Android users and Apple iPhone and iPad users from the respective App Stores, or by... placard, sign, or other permanent or removable device on the right (curb) side of the passenger-carrying...

  10. 45 CFR 3.44 - Solicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to display any sign, placard, or other form of advertisement; or to collect private debts; or to solicit business, alms, subscriptions or contributions, except in connection with approved national or...

  11. 78 FR 60186 - Airworthiness Directives; AgustaWestland S.p.A. (Agusta) Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... deactivating the Full Icing Protection System (FIPS) and installing a placard next to the FIPS controller... avionics bay and the baggage compartment resulting from an Auto Transformer Rectifier Unit internal circuit... between the national Government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among...

  12. 77 FR 10352 - Airworthiness Directives; Various Transport Category Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... continue to prevent possible fires that could result from smoking materials being dropped into lavatory.... That AD currently requires installation of placards prohibiting smoking in the lavatory and disposal of... that smoking is prohibited in the lavatories; installation of ashtrays at certain locations; and...

  13. 30 CFR 57.6132 - Magazine requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Magazine requirements. 57.6132 Section 57.6132...-Surface Only § 57.6132 Magazine requirements. (a) Magazines shall be— (1) Structurally sound; (2... magazine; (6) Posted with the appropriate United States Department of Transportation placards or other...

  14. Accelerated Learning and Retention: Literature Review and Workshop Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    formulé des observations qualitatives très instructives sur chacun des quinze sujets traités, tant sur le plan de la façon dont ils définissent ces...displayed as panel and flow drawings, placards, posters , or flipcharts that can be developed by students during a learning program and later used as a

  15. 49 CFR 228.101 - Distance requirement; definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... U.S.C. 61-64b), makes it unlawful for any common carrier engaged in interstate or foreign commerce...) (804 meters) of switching or humping operations as measured from the nearest rail of the nearest..., and the placing of placarded cars for repair. However, the term does not include the moving of rail...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 172 - Trefoil Symbol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trefoil Symbol B Appendix B to Part 172... SECURITY PLANS Pt. 172, App. B Appendix B to Part 172—Trefoil Symbol 1. Except as provided in paragraph 2 of this appendix, the trefoil symbol required for RADIOACTIVE labels and placards and required to be...

  17. 75 FR 50688 - Special Conditions: Erickson Air-Crane Incorporated S-64E and S-64F Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... rotorcraft load combination classes for the special condition requirements concerning placards. (d) Modifying... of weight, altitude, and temperature for which takeoff and landing data are scheduled. The flight... determined at each weight, altitude, and temperature for which certification is sought with one engine...

  18. 76 FR 47424 - Airworthiness Directives; Dassault Aviation Model FALCON 7X Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... installing a placard in the cockpit, 3. Amending the Minimum Equipment List (MEL), and 4. Implementing an... with certain inoperative MEL items, and revising the electronic checklist. You may obtain further... prohibition takes precedence over the FAA master minimum equipment list (MMEL) or any operator's MEL. Air data...

  19. 75 FR 60017 - Hazardous Materials; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... prevent shifting or significant relative motion between the packages; that the consolidation bins be... display of the hazard identity (e.g., labels instead of placards) would support a small, more flexible... direction for all or part of their journey. Dynamic forces may shift an unsecured load or cause lading to...

  20. 75 FR 52069 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations, International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ...) Association of Hazmat Shippers, Inc. (AHS; PHMSA-2009-0126- 0009); (7) U.S. Fuel Cell Council (USFCC; PHMSA... flammability criteria for Class 3, PG II, and toxicity criteria for Division 6.1, PG I, poisonous-by-inhalation... inhalation hazard of each crude oil batch they transport and switch to other placards and shipping papers...

  1. 77 ISLAMIC BANKING AND THE QUESTION OF SECULARISM IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Introduction. More than two decades after the provision of interest-free banking in ... speech titled ―No to Islamic banking‖5. Placards were ...... Bank Islam Malaysia Berhad was later established in 1983 to meet the yearnings of Muslims53.

  2. 29 CFR 1915.11 - Scope, application and definitions applicable to this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... limit of a flammable or combustible substance. Immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) means an...; or (2) The space is flooded with water and the vapor concentration of flammable or combustible... limit for the flammable or combustible material. Labeled means identified with a sign, placard, or other...

  3. 14 CFR 121.303 - Airplane instruments and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane instruments and equipment. 121.303... Airplane instruments and equipment. (a) Unless otherwise specified, the instrument and equipment... airspeed limitation and item of related information in the Airplane Flight Manual and pertinent placards...

  4. Shopper marketing nutrition interventions: Social norms on grocery carts increase produce spending without increasing shopper budgets☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Collin R.; Niculescu, Mihai; Just, David R.; Kelly, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We assessed the efficacy of an easy-to-implement shopper marketing nutrition intervention in a pilot and two additional studies to increase produce demand without decreasing store profitability or increasing shopper budgets. Methods We created grocery cart placards that detailed the number of produce items purchased (i.e., descriptive norm) at particular stores (i.e., provincial norm). The effect of these placards on produce spending was assessed across 971,706 individual person grocery store transactions aggregated by day. The pilot study designated a baseline period (in both control and intervention store) followed by installation of grocery cart placards (in the intervention store) for two weeks. The pilot study was conducted in Texas in 2012. In two additional stores, we designated baseline periods followed by 28 days of the same grocery cart placard intervention as in the pilot. Additional interventions were conducted in New Mexico in 2013. Results The pilot study resulted in a significant difference between average produce spending per day per person across treatment periods (i.e., intervention versus same time period in control) (16%) and the difference between average produce spending per day per person across stores in the control periods (4%); Furthermore, the same intervention in two additional stores resulted in significant produce spending increases of 12.4% and 7.5% per day per person respectively. In all stores, total spending did not change. Conclusions Descriptive and provincial social norm messages (i.e., on grocery cart placards) may be an overlooked tool to increase produce demand without decreasing store profitability and increasing shopper budgets. PMID:26844084

  5. Human Trafficking in Southeast Asia and U.S. National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    social reconstruction. Public places and hotels now have posters and placards in place to warn against sexual tourism involving children. Making... tourism and labor in frequented markets, efforts to reduce trafficking could potentially have negative effects on a state’s tourism economy, if not...emerging technologies against highly mobile dark asymmetrical threats...an ideal nonlethal environment for experimenting with “anything and everything

  6. Advanced Control Systems for Aircraft Powerplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    should have some immediate visual effect. Hence for both psychological and practical reasons the ’GO’ placard was made to flash at about 1/4 sec...2i 1’cpar atar d’ ’n r arose ja rlevelurp_,rrnt su., las graupas A at R. Sorn funutiarnrmnt en tumbs r~E-i r ’aist pds a-jtcris(A p~ r I-i ’JL ,C

  7. Southeast Asia Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-22

    placards, frames campaigning for the elections are hung everywhere. Red scarf pioneers with national flags and flowers in hands marched through the...order to create increasingly larger sources of export goods: first, agricultural products for export (coffee, peanuts, soybeans, pepper, cocoa , and the...skills. With respect to female laborers, it is necessary to start from their psychological and physiological needs and from the fact that outside the

  8. Clostridium difficile infections in patients with severe burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    placards indicating that hand hygiene should involve soap and water. Periodic hand hygiene compliance surveys have indicated relatively consistent...care unit: epidemiology, costs, and colonization pressure. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2007;28:123–30. [6] Marcon AP, Gamba MA, Vianna LA. Nosocomial ...Clostridium difficile infections in patients with severe burns§ Scott J. Crabtree a, Janelle L. Robertson a,b, Kevin K. Chung c, Evan M. Renz b,c

  9. Renforcer l'inclusion financière des femmes : Une situation ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    30 nov. 2017 ... S'il n'est pas emprunté, l'argent est conservé à la maison, à l'abri dans une boîte rangée sous un lit ou dans un placard. D'après Rose, les banques perçoivent des intérêts en prêtant de l'argent aux gens pauvres et ces derniers profitent peu de ces intérêts. Elle et ses amies préfèrent garder leur argent ...

  10. Penser la sollicitude : les Écrits politiques d'Olympe de Gouges ou les Lumières en héritage (1788-1791)

    OpenAIRE

    Sinquin, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Le Siècle des Lumières a produit un grand nombre de bouleversements, non seulement dans le domaine politique, mais aussi les domaines économiques et sociaux. C’est dans ce contexte qu’Olympe de Gouges marque l’histoire. Par le biais de lettres, brochures, articles ou encore affiches placardées, Olympe de Gouges a cherché à influencer non seulement les institutions mais aussi l’opinion publique. En commençant par la dramaturgie, elle s’engage aux côtés des abolitionnistes de l’esclavage et lut...

  11. Radioactive Material (Road Transport) Act 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Act came into force on 27 August 1991. It replaces earlier legislation dating from 1948 and enables the United Kingdom to give effect to the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) latest recommended Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. The new Act clarifies and extends the power of the Secretary of State to make regulations regarding, among other things, the design, labelling, handling, transport and delivery of packages containing radioactive material and the placarding of vehicles transporting such packages. The Act gives the Secretary of State the power to appoint inspectors to assist him in enforcing the regulations. (NEA)

  12. Violence and Democracy in Khayelitsha, Governing Crime through the ‘Community’

    OpenAIRE

    Super, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Waving placards that read “Sonele zizikoli, sanele yicrime (we have had enough of crime and thugs),” more than 60 angry residents protested outside the Khayelitsha Police Station on Tuesday. [ . . . ] Residents’ leader Unathi Mabengwana said: “Given the high crime rate in our area, we are of the view that whatever cops do to fight crime here is not enough. We demand that cops should be more harsh when dealing with criminals.” Greg Wagner, spokesman for community safety department said [Member...

  13. New simulated gas detector offers realistic training for mine rescue teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bealko, S.B.; Alexander, D.; Chasko, L.L. [National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Office of Mine Safety and Health Research; Holtan, J. [LightsOn Safety Solutions, Spring, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, together with LightsOn Safety Solutions, evaluated 2 versions of a multi-gas simulated gas monitor system (GMS) in separate field trials with mine rescue teams. This paper described the GMS wireless simulation tool along with its development and testing. It also described the GMS functions for the initial phase of testing as well as plans for the next phase of research which may introduce tracking and automation features. The GMS requires a personal computer and uses a wireless local area network. The GMS teaches mine rescue members about gas detection and helps them understand the importance of gas concentrations. In addition, it promotes decision-making actions by team members and offers a more realistic method of receiving gas concentration readings using a simulated hand-held gas detector. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine if the electronic placard in the GMS could be used by mine rescue teams instead of the currently used cardboard placards, and if the functionality of the device was suitable, reliable and practical. Results from the second field trial demonstrated improvements with the GMS over the original prototype technology, particularly with regards to wireless and connectivity issues. The GMS was successfully incorporated into the mine rescue exercises as planned, with very few problems encountered. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  14. New simulated gas detector offers realistic training for mine rescue teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bealko, S.B.; Alexander, D.; Chasko, L.L.

    2010-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, together with LightsOn Safety Solutions, evaluated 2 versions of a multi-gas simulated gas monitor system (GMS) in separate field trials with mine rescue teams. This paper described the GMS wireless simulation tool along with its development and testing. It also described the GMS functions for the initial phase of testing as well as plans for the next phase of research which may introduce tracking and automation features. The GMS requires a personal computer and uses a wireless local area network. The GMS teaches mine rescue members about gas detection and helps them understand the importance of gas concentrations. In addition, it promotes decision-making actions by team members and offers a more realistic method of receiving gas concentration readings using a simulated hand-held gas detector. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine if the electronic placard in the GMS could be used by mine rescue teams instead of the currently used cardboard placards, and if the functionality of the device was suitable, reliable and practical. Results from the second field trial demonstrated improvements with the GMS over the original prototype technology, particularly with regards to wireless and connectivity issues. The GMS was successfully incorporated into the mine rescue exercises as planned, with very few problems encountered. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Cool Science: K-12 Climate Change Art Displayed on Buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. F.; Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Thompson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Cool science is an art contest where K12 students create placards (7" x 22") to educate the public about climate change. Students are prompted to create their artwork in response to questions such as: What is the evidence for climate change? How does climate change impact your local community? What can you do to reduce the impacts of climate change? In each of three years, 500-600 student entrees have been submitted from more than 12 school districts across Massachusetts. A panel of judges including scientists, artists, rapid transit representatives, and educators chooses elementary, middle, and high school winners. Winners (6), runners-up (6), and honorable mentions (12) and their families and teachers are invited to an annual Cool Science Award Ceremony to be recognized and view winning artwork. All winning artwork is posted on the Cool Science website. The winning artwork (2 per grade band) is converted into placards (11" x 28") and posters (2.5' x 12') that are placed on the inside (placards) and outside (posters) of buses. Posters are displayed for one month. So far, Cool Science was implemented in Lowell, MA where over 5000 public viewers see the posters daily on the sides of Lowell Rapid Transit Authority (LRTA) buses, making approximately 1,000,000 impressions per year. Cool Science acts to increase climate literacy in children as well as the public, and as such promotes intergenerational learning. Using art in conjunction with science learning about climate change appears to be effective at engaging not just traditionally high achieving science students, but also those interested in the creative arts. Hearing winners' stories about how they created their artwork and what this contest meant to them supports the idea that Cool Science attracts a wide diversity of students. Parents discuss climate change with their children. Multiple press releases announcing the winners further promotes the awareness of climate change throughout school districts and their

  16. “Hindi Bayani/Not a Hero”: The Linguistic Landscape of Protest in Manila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Monje

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the linguistic landscape of Manila during a protest march in November 2016 in response to the burial of deposed president Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (Heroes’ Cemetery. This article is situated among linguistic landscape of protest research (Kasanga, 2014; Seals, 2011; Shiri, 2015 where data is composed of mobile posters, placards, banners, and other ‘unfixed’ signs, including texts on bodies, t-shirts, umbrellas, and rocks. Following Sebba (2010, this article argues that both ‘fixed’ linguistic landscape and ‘mobile’ public texts are indices of the linguistic composition of cities, linguistic diversity, and ethnolinguistic vitality (Landry & Bourhis, 1997. Through a qualitative analysis of selected pictures produced during the protest march and uploaded onto social media, the multilingual nature of Manila is rendered salient and visible, albeit temporarily, and strategies of dissent are reflective of the language of the millennials who populated the protests.

  17. De la preuve à l'épreuve

    OpenAIRE

    Charuty, Giordana

    2007-01-01

    A deux cents mètres de Stazione Termini, la gare centrale de Rome, au cinquième étage d'un immeuble de la bruyante Via Principe Amedeo, entre une modeste pension et une école privée de techniques commerciales, est installé le siège d'un Centre chrétien de parapsychologie. Des affiches placardées dans le quartier en décembre 1986 proposaient des séminaires d'étude et pratique de la « perception extra-sensorielle », mais aussi des consultations privées, sur rendez-vous. Je m'intéressais alors a...

  18. Nuclear materials transportation workshops: USDOE outreach to local governments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    To provide direct outreach to local governments, the Transportation Management Division of the United States Department of Energy asked the Urban Consortium and its Energy Task Force to assemble representatives for two workshops focusing on the transport of nuclear materials. The first session, for jurisdictions east of the Mississippi River, was held in New Orleans on May 5--6, 1988; the second was conducted on June 6--7, 1988 in Denver for jurisdictions to the west. Twenty local government professionals with management or operational responsibility for hazardous materials transportation within their jurisdictions were selected to attend each workshop. The discussions identified five major areas of concern to local government professionals; coordination; training; information resources; marking and placarding; and responder resources. Integrated federal, state, and local levels of government emerged as a priority coordination issue along with the need for expanded availability of training and training resources for first-reponders

  19. Radiation security regulation. 1st revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Established are allowable maximum levels for personnel occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation in the ININ and for the public, in accordance with the international standards; defined are categories of radiation facilities, requirements and operating conditions that must be met. Demarcated are the kinds of placards to be posted in controlled and restricted areas and the signs, symbols and tags to be used, defined and established is environmental dosimetric and medical radiation monitoring. Regulated are methods for handling sealed and unsealed sources of radiation, work clothes, closing of radiation installations, storage, transfer and transport of radioactive material; classified are types of possible radiation accidents, action to be taken upon the occurrence and subsequent clean up. (corporate author)

  20. Vestas and the Indigenous Communities in Oaxaca, Mexico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jacobo

    2014-01-01

    in Mexico and were among the most experienced wind developers in the world, 'their capitalist model' failed to take into account, 'the spiritual and social ties between the indigenous rural communities and the land'. According to local residents, the basic problem was a clash of cultures. This case can...... and 40 indigenous Zapotec and Huave people held rallies in front of the Danish Embassy in Mexico City. With banners and placards, the protestors demanded Vestas’s exit from the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. The indigenous people suggested that although European companies had traditionally been present...... and stakeholder involvement between MNCs, governmental officials and local communities, when implementing large-scale investment projects. The case presents a conflict which involves four actors: 1) Indigenous communities in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec region in Oaxaca, Mexico: Zapotecas, Huaves or Ikoot, 2...

  1. Violence and Democracy in Khayelitsha, Governing Crime through the ‘Community’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Super

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Waving placards that read “Sonele zizikoli, sanele yicrime (we have had enough of crime and thugs,” more than 60 angry residents protested outside the Khayelitsha Police Station on Tuesday. [ . . . ] Residents’ leader Unathi Mabengwana said: “Given the high crime rate in our area, we are of the view that whatever cops do to fight crime here is not enough. We demand that cops should be more harsh when dealing with criminals.” Greg Wagner, spokesman for community safety department said [Member of the Executive Council] Dan Plato will meet with the Western Cape police commissioner, General Arno Lamoer, to discuss the issue next week. Wagner said the meeting would also be a follow up on the recent vigilante attacks, in which three alleged crime suspects were burnt to death at Enkanini squatter camp (Mnyakama 2012.

  2. A common-sense probabilistic approach to assessing inadvertent human intrusion into low-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, P.; Hooten, M.; Black, K.; Moore, B.; Rawlinson, S.; Barker, L.

    1997-01-01

    Each site disposing of low-level radioactive waste is required to prepare and maintain a site-specific performance assessment (1) to determine potential risks posed by waste management systems to the public, and the environment, and (2) to compare these risks to established performance objectives. The DOE Nevada Operations Office, Waste Management Program recently completed a one-year study of site-specific scenarios for inadvertent human intrusion by drilling into buried low-level radioactive waste sites, as part of ongoing performance assessment studies. Intrusion scenarios focus on possible penetration of buried waste through drilling for sources of groundwater. The probability of drilling penetration into waste was judged to be driven primarily by two settlement scenarios: (1) scattered individual homesteaders, and (2) a community scenario consisting of a cluster of settlers that share drilling and distribution systems for groundwater. Management control factors include institutional control, site knowledge, placards and markers, surface barriers, and subsurface barriers. The Subject Matter Experts concluded that institutional control and site knowledge may be important factors for the first few centuries, but are not significant over the evaluation period of 10,000 years. Surface barriers can be designed that would deter the siting of a drill rig over the waste site to an effectiveness of 95%. Subsurface barriers and placards and markers will not as effectively prevent inadvertent human intrusion. Homestead and community scenarios were considered by the panel to render a site-specific probability of around 10% for inadvertent human intrusion. If management controls are designed and implemented effectively, then the probability of inadvertent human intrusion can be reduced to less than 1%

  3. State surveillance of radioactive material transportation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, S.N.

    1984-02-01

    The main objective of this final report on the state surveillance of the transportation of radioactive material (RAM) is to suggest the most cost-effective inspection areas where enforcement actions might be taken by the states during their participation in the State Hazardous Materials Enforcement Development (SHMED) Program. On the basis of the lessons learned from the surveillance program, these actions are enforcement at low-level radioactive burial sites by means of civil penalties and site use suspension; enforcement at airports and at terminals that forward freight; and enforcement of courier companies. More effective and efficient enforcement can be achieved through instrumented police patrol cars and remote surveillance because they require the least amount of time of enforcement personnel. In addition, there is a strong relationship between effective emergency response and enforcement because the appropriate shipping papers, placarding and knowledge of appropriate emergency response procedures lead to improved emergency response. These lessons originate from a ten-state surveillance program from 1977 through 1981 jointly sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and DOT. The states give recommendations in the categories of education, training, expanded surveillance, coordination and enforcement. The topics of special interest covered include low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, airports, cargo terminals, highways, ports, and accidents and incidents. The three most common problems in compliance with RAM transportation regulations reported by the states are incorrect package labeling; improper shipping papers; and incorrect or missing placards. Other common problems reported by the states are summarized. The relationship to other studies, the status of the SHMED Program, a synopsis of state RAM surveillance reports, and NRC/DOT expenditures are given

  4. How Many Pages in a Single Word: Alternative Typo-poetics of Surrealist Magazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Andonovska

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the experimental design, typography and editorial strategies of the rare avant-garde publication Four Pages - Onanism of Death - And So On (1930, published by Oskar Davičo, Đorđe Kostić and Đorđe Jovanović, probably the first Surrealist Edition of the Belgrade surrealist group. Starting from its unconventional format and the way authors (reshape and (misdirect each page in an autonomous fashion, I further analyze the intrinsic interaction between the text, its graphic embodiment and surrounding para-textual elements (illustrations, body text, titles, folding, dating, margins, comments. Special attention is given to the concepts of depersonalization, free association and automatic writing as primary poetical sources for the delinearisation of the reading process and 'emancipation' of the text, its content and syntax as well as its position, direction, and visual materiality on the page. Resisting conventional classifications and simplified distinctions between established print media and genres, this surrealist single-issue placard magazine mixes elements of the poster, magazine, and booklet. Its ambiguous nature leads us toward theoretical discussion of the avant-garde magazine as an autonomous literary genre and original, self-sufficient artwork, as was already suggested by the theory of Russian formalism.

  5. Long-term persistence of quality improvements for an intensive care unit communication initiative using the VALUE strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysham, Nicholas G; Mularski, Richard A; Schmidt, David M; Nord, Shirley C; Louis, Deborah L; Shuster, Elizabeth; Curtis, J Randall; Mosen, David M

    2014-06-01

    Communication in the intensive care unit (ICU) is an important component of quality ICU care. In this report, we evaluate the long-term effects of a quality improvement (QI) initiative, based on the VALUE communication strategy, designed to improve communication with family members of critically ill patients. We implemented a multifaceted intervention to improve communication in the ICU and measured processes of care. Quality improvement components included posted VALUE placards, templated progress note inclusive of communication documentation, and a daily rounding checklist prompt. We evaluated care for all patients cared for by the intensivists during three separate 3 week periods, pre, post, and 3 years following the initial intervention. Care delivery was assessed in 38 patients and their families in the pre-intervention sample, 27 in the post-intervention period, and 41 in follow-up. Process measures of communication showed improvement across the evaluation periods, for example, daily updates increased from pre 62% to post 76% to current 84% of opportunities. Our evaluation of this quality improvement project suggests persistence and continued improvements in the delivery of measured aspects of ICU family communication. Maintenance with point-of-care-tools may account for some of the persistence and continued improvements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Materials Approach to Fuel Efficient Tires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Votruba-Drzal, Peter [PPG Industries, Monroeville, PA (United States); Kornish, Brian [PPG Industries, Monroeville, PA (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The objective of this project was to design, develop, and demonstrate fuel efficient and safety regulation compliant tire filler and barrier coating technologies that will improve overall fuel efficiency by at least 2%. The program developed and validated two complementary approaches to improving fuel efficiency through tire improvements. The first technology was a modified silica-based product that is 15% lower in cost and/or enables a 10% improvement in tread wear while maintaining the already demonstrated minimum of 2% improvement in average fuel efficiency. The second technology was a barrier coating with reduced oxygen transmission rate compared to the state-of-the-art halobutyl rubber inner liners that will provide extended placarded tire pressure retention at significantly reduced material usage. A lower-permeance, thinner inner liner coating which retains tire pressure was expected to deliver the additional 2% reduction in fleet fuel consumption. From the 2006 Transportation Research Board Report1, a 10 percent reduction in rolling resistance can reduce consumer fuel expenditures by 1 to 2 percent for typical vehicles. This savings is equivalent to 6 to 12 gallons per year. A 1 psi drop in inflation pressure increases the tire's rolling resistance by about 1.4 percent.

  7. Arabic word recognizer for mobile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Nitin; Abdollahian, Golnaz; Brame, Ben; Boutin, Mireille; Delp, Edward J.

    2011-03-01

    When traveling in a region where the local language is not written using a "Roman alphabet," translating written text (e.g., documents, road signs, or placards) is a particularly difficult problem since the text cannot be easily entered into a translation device or searched using a dictionary. To address this problem, we are developing the "Rosetta Phone," a handheld device (e.g., PDA or mobile telephone) capable of acquiring an image of the text, locating the region (word) of interest within the image, and producing both an audio and a visual English interpretation of the text. This paper presents a system targeted for interpreting words written in Arabic script. The goal of this work is to develop an autonomous, segmentation-free Arabic phrase recognizer, with computational complexity low enough to deploy on a mobile device. A prototype of the proposed system has been deployed on an iPhone with a suitable user interface. The system was tested on a number of noisy images, in addition to the images acquired from the iPhone's camera. It identifies Arabic words or phrases by extracting appropriate features and assigning "codewords" to each word or phrase. On a dictionary of 5,000 words, the system uniquely mapped (word-image to codeword) 99.9% of the words. The system has a 82% recognition accuracy on images of words captured using the iPhone's built-in camera.

  8. Recycled scrap metal and soils/debris with low radioactive contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriker, A.W.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of large volume bulk shipments of materials with low radioactivity have characteristics that complicate compliance with normal transport regulations. Scrap metal for recycling sometimes contains radioactive material that was not known or identified by the shipper prior to it being offered for transport to a scrap recycle processor. If the radioactive material is not detected before the scrap is processed, radiological and economic problems may occur. If detected before processing, the scrap metal will often be returned to the shipper. Uranium mill-tailings and contaminated soils and debris have created potential public health problems that required the movement of large volumes of bulk material to isolated safe locations. Similarly, old radium processing sites have created contamination problems needing remediation. The US Department of Transportation has issued exemptions to shippers and carriers for returning rejected scrap metal to original shippers. Other exemptions simplify transport of mill-tailings and debris from sites being remediated. These exemptions provide relief from detailed radioassay of the radioactive content in each conveyance as well as relief from the normal requirements for packaging, shipping documents, marking, labelling, and placarding which would be required for some of the shipments if the exemptions were not issued. (Author)

  9. Globalising Aboriginal Reconciliation: Indigenous Australians and Asian (Japanese Migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Hokari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, I have attended several political meetings concerned with the refugee crisis, multiculturalism or Indigenous rights in Australia, meetings at which liberal democratic–minded ‘left-wing’ people came together to discuss, or agitate for change in, governmental policies. At these meetings, I always found it difficult to accept the slogans on their placards and in their speeches: ‘Shame Australia! Reconciliation for a united Australia’, ‘Wake up Australia! We welcome refugees!’ or ‘True Australians are tolerant! Let’s celebrate multicultural Australia!’ My uncomfortable feeling came not only from the fact that I was left out because of my Japanese nationality but also because I had never seen or heard words like ‘shame Japan’, ‘wake up Japan’ or ‘true Japanese are ...’ at Japanese ‘left-wing’ political gatherings. In Japan, these are words used only by right-wing nationalists. Indeed it is difficult to even imagine liberal-left intellectuals in postwar Japan calling for a ‘true Japanese’ political response (as if such a response was positive, such is the extent to which the idea of ‘good nationalism’ is now regarded as an oxymoron. This is my starting point for an essay in which I want to be attentive to the different roles played by national(ism in the Japanese and Australian political environments.

  10. Le carcinome neuro-endocrine cutané primitif: à propos d'un nouveau cas et revue de la littérature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukind, Samira; Elatiqi, Oumkeltoum; Dlimi, Meriem; Elamrani, Driss; Benchamkha, Yassine; Ettalbi, Saloua

    2015-01-01

    Le carcinome neuro- endocrine cutané primitif (CNEC) est une tumeur cutanée rare et agressive du sujet âgé, favorisée par le soleil et l'immunodépression. Elle est caractérisée par une évolution agressive avec un fort taux de récidive, une évolution ganglionnaire régionale et un risque de métastases à distance. Nous rapportons un cas de cette tumeur chez un patient âgé de 67 ans sous forme d'un placard nodulaire hémorragique mesurant 16 /14 cm. Le patient a bénéficié d'une exérèse chirurgicale large avec couverture de la perte de substance par un lambeau musculo-cutané du muscle grand dorsal, un curage ganglionnaire axillaire et une radiothérapie adjuvante. Après un recul de 2 ans et 2 mois, le patient est toujours vivant sans métastase ni récidive. La littérature étant pauvre, la prise en charge diagnostique et thérapeutique est controversée et donc hétérogène. Globalement le pronostic est mauvais, et certains paramètres corrélés au pronostic sont précisés. PMID:26185585

  11. The application of dangerous goods regulations to the transport of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blenkin, J.J.; Darby, W.P.; Heywood, J.D.; Wikinson, H.L.; Carrington, C.K.; Murray, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Some radioactive materials to be transported, including certain radioactive wastes, contain materials that qualify as dangerous goods as defined by the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (United Nations 1997). The regulations governing the transport of radioactive and dangerous goods in the UK are largely based on the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (IAEA 1990) and the UN Recommendations (United Nations 1993). Additional legislation will also apply including the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (Driver Training) Regulations 1996 (UK 1996). The IAEA Transport Regulations are clear that where radioactive materials have other dangerous properties the requirements of other relevant transport regulations for dangerous goods must also be met. They require that consignments are appropriately segregated from other dangerous goods, in accordance with relevant legislation, and that dangerous properties such as explosiveness, flammability etc. are taken into account in packing, labelling, marking, placarding, storage and transport. In practice, however, it requires a clear understanding of the relationship between the IAEA Transport Regulations and other dangerous goods legislation in order to avoid a number of problems in the approval of package design. This paper discusses the regulations applying to the transport of dangerous goods and explores practical problems associated with implementing them. It highlights a number of opportunities for developing the regulations, to make them easier to apply to radioactive materials that also have other potentially dangerous properties. (authors)

  12. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 11 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 11 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  13. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 54 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 54 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated, and can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual release report for each GJO building

  14. The production and operation of the nuclear industry road emergency response plan (NIREP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, J.

    1991-01-01

    For many years, radioactive material, ranging from small sources used for medical and commercial purposes to large consignments of irradiated fuel, has been safely moved by road in Great Britain. All such movements are controlled by law and have to meet clearly specified safety requirements concerning packaging and shielding to ensure that if the transporting vehicle is involved in an accident, there is no increase in the hazards involved because of the nature of its load. There are currently some 40,000 movements by road every year, but over more than 25 years, there has never been an accident which has led to any significant radiological impact to members of the public. A national scheme to provide contingency arrangements in the event of a road accident involving radioactive materials has now been set up by the major users and consignors of radioactive material. Called NIREP (Nuclear Industry Road Emergency Response Plan), the member industries have agreed immediately to despatch, from the nearest organisation to the incident, qualified health physicist personnel to deal with any incident involving radioactive material belonging to (or consigned by) any of the participating companies. With their widespread location of establishments, all parts of the UK mainland are covered. Vehicles covered by the scheme will display a NIREP placard, thus giving the Police, or other emergency services, an emergency telephone number of a coordinating centre and information on the site responsible for the load. (author)

  15. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 30B at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauland, P.A.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 30B and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  16. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 29 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailing during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 29 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  17. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 19 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 19 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  18. The role of post-earthquake structural safety in pre-earthquake retrof in decision: guidelines and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzurro, P.; Telleen, K.; Maffei, J.; Yin, J.; Cornell, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Critical structures such as hospitals, police stations, local administrative office buildings, and critical lifeline facilities, are expected to be operational immediately after earthquakes. Any rational decision about whether these structures are strong enough to meet this goal or whether pre-empitive retrofitting is needed cannot be made without an explicit consideration of post-earthquake safety and functionality with respect to aftershocks. Advanced Seismic Assessment Guidelines offer improvement over previous methods for seismic evaluation of buildings where post-earthquake safety and usability is a concern. This new method allows engineers to evaluate the like hood that a structure may have restricted access or no access after an earthquake. The building performance is measured in terms of the post-earthquake occupancy classifications Green Tag, Yellow Tag, and Red Tag, defining these performance levels quantitatively, based on the structure's remaining capacity to withstand aftershocks. These color-coded placards that constitute an established practice in US could be replaced by the standard results of inspections (A to E) performed by the Italian Dept. of Civil Protection after an event. The article also shows some applications of these Guidelines to buildings of the largest utility company in California, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PGE). [it

  19. Hazardous Material Packaging and Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-04

    This is a student training course. Some course objectives are to: recognize and use standard international and US customary units to describe activities and exposure rates associated with radioactive material; determine whether a quantity of a single radionuclide meets the definition of a class 7 (radioactive) material; determine, for a given single radionuclide, the shipping quantity activity limits per 49 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 173.435; determine the appropriate radioactive material hazard class proper shipping name for a given material; determine when a single radionuclide meets the DOT definition of a hazardous substance; determine the appropriate packaging required for a given radioactive material; identify the markings to be placed on a package of radioactive material; determine the label(s) to apply to a given radioactive material package; identify the entry requirements for radioactive material labels; determine the proper placement for radioactive material label(s); identify the shipping paper entry requirements for radioactive material; select the appropriate placards for a given radioactive material shipment or vehicle load; and identify allowable transport limits and unacceptable transport conditions for radioactive material.

  20. Poussée de maladie de Kaposi et élévation du CA 19-9: penser à la tuberculose!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajili, Faida; Hariz, Héla; Souissi, Asmahen; Abid, Rim; Boussetta, Najeh; Laabidi, Besma; Battikh, Riadh; Louzir, Bassem; Othmani, Salah

    2013-01-01

    La maladie de Kaposi (MK) est une entité pathologique qui peut survenir chez les patients VIH positifs et dans le cadre d'une immunodépression, d'origine tuberculeuse très rarement. On décrit le cas d'une MK chez un patient VIH négatif au décours d'une tuberculose. Nous rapportons le cas d'un patient âgé de 81 ans, VIH négatif, ayant présenté deux nodules angiomateux de l'avant bras gauche dont la biopsie cutanée était en faveur d'une MK. L’évolution était marquée 2 mois plus tard, par l'apparition de placards angiomateux extensifs des deux membres supérieurs et d'adénopathies cervicales jugulo-carotidiennes bilatérales. La biopsie ganglionnaire était en faveur d'une tuberculose ganglionnaire. Par ailleurs, il avait un taux sérique élevé des CA 19-9. La régression de l’étendue des lésions au niveau des membres supérieurs et la normalisation du taux sérique des CA 19-9 ont été obtenues sous traitement anti-tuberculeux. Chez les patients atteints d'une MK avec une élévation des CA 19-9, il faut penser à la tuberculose. PMID:24711871

  1. ScienceToGo.org: The Strengths and Weaknesses of Communicating Climate Change through Mass Transit Advertising Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Wilson, R.; Rabkin, D.; Thompson, S. R.

    2016-02-01

    Engaging urban populations with climate change science is a difficult challenge since cities can seem so removed from the `natural environment.' However, mass transit provides an inherent means of communicating environmental messages with a cross section of the urban population. The Out of Home Media (OHM) spaces found on platforms and inside train cars provide a potentially effective means of bringing informal science learning opportunities directly to an underserved STEM audience. Our team felt that any messaging curriculum for a coastal urban subway system must complement the scary reality of the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. rising sea levels) with current examples of how the city is preparing for a more sustainable future. Urban areas such as Boston must develop adaptation and mitigation strategies that will help them not only survive, but thrive in a changing environment. In 2013-14, ScienceToGo.org ran a series of 12 engaging posters and placards staring `Ozzie the Ostrich' on the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority's Red and Orange subway lines targeting an audience of more than 400,000 riders per day. The 12 month curriculum was divided into three phases: reality, relevance, and hope. During the presentation, we will present the results of our quasi-experimental research which identifies, quantifies, and explains the observed impacts of the campaign on adult riders. The strengths and weaknesses of the communication strategy will be discussed. Finally, we will conclude with some recommendations for how this work could improve and inform other urban informal science learning initiatives.

  2. Boccioni's coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Sergio; Teja, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The Ardito was a fighter as well as a competitor whose status as a 'warrior' was based on courage and superior physical performance: a superior man. In addition, his exuberant conduct, both on and off the battlefield, introduced a significant new sub-culture into post-war Italian society, contributing to the attachment of notable value to virility and Mussolini's cult of the 'strong man'. The purpose of this research is to analyse the impact of this 'arditismo' (spirit of daring) on the early post-war period in particular, including the different 'male image' of the Italian citizen, and to study the sense of virility in the transition from the liberal, easy-going 'Little Italy' of Giovanni Giolitti (1842-1928) to a manly, combative, and ambitious nation. Together with some of the vitalistic tendencies in the Futurist movement, the main characteristics and mentality of the ex-Ardito (former Special Forces) would thus be significantly influential in the ideology of nascent Fascism. Indeed, the 'arditismo' influence, together with the article and social movement known as Futurism would constitute the two most highly structured foundations of early Fascist culture, bringing a political and social revolution necessary to create a 'new man'. It was as if the Arditi and the new method of military training had transferred their experience from the military into civilian life, contributing to a renewal of the image of the Italian male in the collective imagination. Indirectly, the image of women would also begin to absorb and adapt to new sports models imported from abroad, which would create for the Italian Ardito, a grudgingly tolerated rival. The main sources for this paper are the archives of the Historical Office of the Army, advertising and manuals from the late nineteenth to the early twentieth century, placards and graphic publicity from books and journals or private collections, and exhibition catalogues.

  3. Transport of Cobalt 60 from the Argentine Nuclear Power Plant in Embalse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Vietri, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    out the Type B(U) package tiedown system to the vehicle, and the proper placards of the loaded vehicle ready to dispatch. (authors)

  4. Cool Science: Year 2 of Using Children's Artwork about Climate Change to Engage Riders on Mass Transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    A team of educators and scientists from the University of Massachusetts Lowell and the University of Massachusetts Boston will report on the second year of an informal science learning research project using mass transit spaces in Lowell, MA. Cool Science (CS) conducts a statewide art competition for K-12 students in the fall challenging them to express climate science understanding through the visual arts. An inter-disciplinary panel of judges evaluates entries and identifies the top 24 works of art. The best six student works of art are then put on public display throughout the spring on the Lowell Regional Transit Authority (LRTA). Displaying student artwork in Out of Home Multi-Media (OHMM) such as bus placards and posters is intended to engage riders with opportunities to learn informally. CS aims to promote and evaluate learning about climate change science among the general public and k-12 students/teachers. The goals of CS are: 1) Engage teachers, students, and parents in a climate change science communication competition. 2) Display the winning 6 artworks from K-12 students throughout the LRTA. 3) Assess the impact of Cool Science on the teaching and learning of climate science in K-12 formal education. 4) Assess the impact of Cool Science artwork on attitudes, awareness, and understanding of climate change among adult bus riders. A naturalistic inquiry employing a mixed methodology approach best describes our research design. The evaluation focuses on providing feedback regarding the potential learning outcomes for the K-12 students who create the media for the project and the general riding public who engage with the student artwork. To identify possible outcomes, data was collected in the several forms: survey, interviews, and online analytics. We see an urgent need to improve both the public's engagement with climate change science and to the profile of climate change science in formal education settings. The Cool Science (CS) project is an opportunity

  5. ScienceToGo.org: Using 'Ozzie the Ostrich' to Build Local Partnerships around Climate Change Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Wilson, R.; Rabkin, D.; Thompson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    How can an informal science learning project about climate change facilitate alliances among unlikely parties? We found a sweet spot of collaboration among private, public, and the non-profit sectors by borrowing strength and leveraging common interests. Using mass transit and out of home media, we created a diverse community around a learning campaign that starred an ostrich named "Ozzie." In 2013-14, ScienceToGo.org ran a series of 12 engaging posters and placards staring 'Ozzie the Ostrich' on the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority's Red and Orange subway lines targeting a daily audience of 400,000+ riders. The curriculum was divided into three phases: reality, relevance, and hope. Phase I established the reality of climate change (3 months). Phase II helped T-riders appreciate the relevancy of climate change to the local environment of Boston (4 months). Phase III engaged Bostonians with an array of hopeful examples of how people, companies, and organizations are effectively creating a more sustainable future (5 months). The focus of this presentation will be on the relationships that emerged from the work that went into Phase III. Engaging urban populations with climate change science is a difficult challenge since cities seem so removed from the 'natural environment.' However, mass transit provides an inherent means of communicating environmental messages with a cross section of the urban population. Our team felt that any messaging curriculum for an urban subway system must complement the scary reality of a changing climate with hopeful solutions that exist for dealing with it effectively. Urban areas such as Boston must develop adaptation and mitigation strategies that will help them not only survive, but thrive in a changing environment. Making our audience aware of the amazing efforts in this area was the goal of Phase III. There were three parts to our efforts: the signage on the subway, above ground ostriches, and social events. During the presentation

  6. Sciencetogo.Org: Using Humor to Engage a Public Audience with the Serious Issue of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Rabkin, D.; Wilson, R.

    2014-12-01

    A team of educators, scientists, and communication experts from multiple universities as well as a Science museum will report on the impact of ScienceToGo.org, which is an Out of Home Multi-Media (OHMM) exhibit targeting adults riding a major subway system. The campaign's goal is to design, implement, and study the efficacy of an OHMM model for free choice science learning about our changing climate. Subway riders represent a diverse and captive audience with most of them spending an average of one hour a day in the subway system. Through the use of specially designed OHMM such as train placards, platform posters, and virtual resources the campaign engages a potential audience of 500,000 riders/day with opportunities to learn climate change science informally. The primary goal of the ScienceToGo.org campaign is to engage, entertain, and educate the adult subway riding community in major U.S. city about climate change as a real, relevant, and solvable local challenge. A naturalistic quasi-experimental inquiry employing a mixed methodology approach best describes our research design with half of the subway system exposed to the project signage (experimental group) and the other half not being exposed to the project signage (control group). To identify possible outcomes, data was collected in the several forms: survey, analytic data associated with website, social media, web app, focus groups, and observations. This campaign is an example of how an individual's daily routine may be enhanced with an informal science learning opportunity. We see an urgent need to improve both the public's engagement with climate change science and to the profile of climate change science in formal education settings. The campaign makes deliberate use of humor and fun to engage a public and diverse audience with the serious issue of climate change. The research that will be presented will reveal some of the strengths and weaknesses of this strategy when communicating science to a diverse

  7. Application of radiation protection programmes to transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Vietri, Jorge; Capadona, Nancy; Barenghi, Leonardo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The principles for implementing radiation protection programmes (RPP) are detailed in the draft IAEA safety guide TS-G-1.5 'Radiation protection programmes for transport of radioactive material'. The document is described in this paper and analysis is made for typical applications to current operations carried out by consignors, carriers and consignees. Systematic establishment and application of RPPs is a way to control radiological protection during different steps of transport activity. The most widely transported packages in the world are radiopharmaceuticals by road. It is described an application of RPP for an organization involved in road transport of Type A packages containing radiopharmaceuticals. Considerations based on the radionuclides, quantities and activities transported are the basis to design and establish the scope of the RPP for the organizations involved in transport. Next stage is the determination of roles and responsibilities for each activity related to transport of radioactive materials. An approach to the dose received by workers is evaluated considering the type, category and quantity of packages, the radionuclides, the frequency of consignments and how long are the storages. The average of transports made in the last years must be taken into account and special measures intended to optimize the protection are evaluated. Tasks like monitoring, control of surface contamination and segregation measures, are designed based on the dose evaluation and optimization. The RPP also indicates main measures to follow in case of emergency during transport taking account of radionuclides, activities and category of packages for different accident scenarios. Basis for training personnel involved in handling of radioactive materials to insure they have appropriate knowledge about preparing packages, measuring dose rates, calculating transport index, labelling, marking and placarding, transport documents, etc, are considered. The RPP is a part

  8. How Can Museum Exhibits Enhance Earthquake and Tsunami Hazard Resiliency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Creating a natural disaster-ready community requires interoperating scientific, technical, and social systems. In addition to the technical elements that need to be in place, communities and individuals need to be prepared to react when a natural hazard event occurs. Natural hazard awareness and preparedness training and education often takes place through informal learning at science centers and formal k-12 education programs as well as through awareness raising via strategically placed informational tsunami warning signs and placards. Museums and science centers are influential in raising science literacy within a community, however can science centers enhance earthquake and tsunami resiliency by providing hazard science content and preparedness exhibits? Museum docents and informal educators are uniquely situated within the community. They are transmitters and translators of science information to broad audiences. Through interaction with the public, docents are well positioned to be informants of the knowledge beliefs, and feelings of science center visitors. They themselves are life-long learners, both constantly learning from the museum content around them and sharing this content with visitors. They are also members of a community where they live. In-depth interviews with museum informal educators and docents were conducted at a science center in coastal Pacific Northwest. This region has a potential to be struck by a great 9+ Mw earthquake and subsequent tsunami. During the interviews, docents described how they applied learning from natural hazard exhibits at a science visitor center to their daily lives. During the individual interviews, the museum docents described their awareness (knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors) of natural hazards where they live and work, the feelings evoked as they learned about their hazard vulnerability, the extent to which they applied this learning and awareness to their lives, such as creating an evacuation plan, whether

  9. Cool Science: Engaging Adult and K-16 Audiences in Climate Change Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustick, D.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    A team of educators and scientists from the University of Massachusetts Lowell and the University of Massachusetts Boston will report on an informal science learning research project using mass transit spaces in Lowell, MA. Cool Science (CS) uses advertising spaces on buses and terminals to engage the public with an Out of Home Multi-Media (OHMM) learning experience. K-16 classrooms throughout Massachusetts will submit original artwork that conveys a scientific concept central to understanding climate change. The best 6 works submitted will be printed and placed on every bus in the city over a 6 month period during the first half of 2013. CS aims to promote and evaluate learning about climate change science among the general adult public and k-16 students/teachers. Cool Science offers teachers an efficient and effective means of seamlessly bringing the study of climate change into classroom learning both within science and across disciplines. The products of this effort are then used to improve public engagement with the science of climate change in mass transit environments. Cool Science is an example of Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math education (STEAM). The goals of CS are: 1) Engage professors, teachers, and their respective students in a climate change science communication competition. 2) Run the winning 6 selected placards and posters throughout the LRTA. 3) Identify how different communities of risk among the riding public approach and understand climate change. 4) Identify the advantages and disadvantages of using buses as a context for research on informal science learning. 5) Determine the extent to which student artwork serves as a trusted source of information. As advances in technology allow for more scientific knowledge to be generated, the role of informal education to improve adult understanding of science has never been greater. We see the convergence of circumstances (ISE, climate change, OHMM, mobile technology) as an enormous

  10. Tinea on a Tattoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oanţă, Alexandru; Irimie, Marius

    2016-08-01

    In the last twenty years, the prevalence of individuals with tattoos in the general population has increased in Europe (1) as well as in Australia (2) and the United States of America (3). A series of complications such as acute inflammatory reactions, allergic contact dermatitis (4,5), photoinduced, lichenoid, and granulomatous reactions (6, 7), pseudolymphoma (8), pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia (9), skin infections (6), and skin cancers (10) may occur on tattoos. Infectious complications on tattoos include bacterial infections (pyoderma, leprosy, syphilis, cutaneous tuberculosis, mycobacteriosis) (11-14), viral infections (molluscum contagiosum, warts, herpes simplex, hepatitis B and C) (15-17), and fungal infections (sporotrichosis, dermatophytosis) (18,19). We present the case of a 29-year-old immunocompetent female patient who was consulted for the development of an erythematous-squamous placard that appeared on a tattoo about 18 days after tattooing. Dermatological examination revealed a circular, erythematous, scaly plaque, with centrifugal growth and central resolution, presenting an active, raised, erythematous, vesiculopustular edge, giving the appearance of tinea corporis. The lesion's starting point was on the tattoo in two colors located on the middle third of the left calf and subsequently evolved to beyond the surface of tattoo (Figure 1). No other skin, scalp, or nail lesions were observed. Mycological examination of the material obtained by scraping of the scales and the vesicles from the edges and the surface of the plaque revealed numerous hyphae on direct microscopy examination, and white, flat colonies with a cottony surface and radial grooves developed in Sabouraud dextrose agar culture (Figure 2). Spindle-shaped, thick-walled macroconidia and a few pyriform microconidia were observed on microscopic examinations of the colonies. Based on macroscopic and microscopic characteristics, Microsporum canis was identified. Gram stain and bacterial

  11. SU-CD-PinS Room/Hall E-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, R.

    2016-01-01

    excepted packages and Type A packages will be emphasized. The program is designed to meet the function specific DOT training requirements for shippers of medical radioactive materials. General awareness training and security awareness training can be obtained from two free DOT training CDs. Safety training and security awareness training is generally satisfied by the training required under the institution’s radioactive material license. For shippers of radioactive Yellow III labeled packages an in-depth written security plan and training are no longer required as of April 8, 2010. In general almost all shippers of medical radioactive material are now not required to have an in-depth security plan. Contents of general awareness training, security awareness training and in-depth security plans will be briefly outlined. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to ensure that each hazmat employee is properly trained. No third party can fulfill that requirement. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to determine the degree to which this course meets the employer’s requirements, including contents of the course and the examination. Participants will gain sufficient knowledge to prepare hazmat training programs for others in their institutions. A handout will be posted which should be printed out and brought to the course for reference during the presentation. The handout will also satisfy part of the training documentation required by DOT. A feature handout section is a composite table which provides A1, A2, RQ, Exempt Concentration, and Exempt Consignment values in a single table in both Becquerel and Curie units. Course attendance will be certified through the AAPM CEU documentation system. Learning Objectives: Understand the regulatory requirements for shipping radioactive materials. Understand the regulatory requirements for training of hazmat employees. Comprehend how to classify, package, mark, label, document, placard, and transport radioactive materials.

  12. SU-G-PinS Room/Hall E-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, R.

    2016-01-01

    excepted packages and Type A packages will be emphasized. The program is designed to meet the function specific DOT training requirements for shippers of medical radioactive materials. General awareness training and security awareness training can be obtained from two free DOT training CDs. Safety training and security awareness training is generally satisfied by the training required under the institution’s radioactive material license. For shippers of radioactive Yellow III labeled packages an in-depth written security plan and training are no longer required as of April 8, 2010. In general almost all shippers of medical radioactive material are now not required to have an in-depth security plan. Contents of general awareness training, security awareness training and in-depth security plans will be briefly outlined. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to ensure that each hazmat employee is properly trained. No third party can fulfill that requirement. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to determine the degree to which this course meets the employer’s requirements, including contents of the course and the examination. Participants will gain sufficient knowledge to prepare hazmat training programs for others in their institutions. A handout will be posted which should be printed out and brought to the course for reference during the presentation. The handout will also satisfy part of the training documentation required by DOT. A feature handout section is a composite table which provides A1, A2, RQ, Exempt Concentration, and Exempt Consignment values in a single table in both Becquerel and Curie units. Course attendance will be certified through the AAPM CEU documentation system. Learning Objectives: Understand the regulatory requirements for shipping radioactive materials. Understand the regulatory requirements for training of hazmat employees. Comprehend how to classify, package, mark, label, document, placard, and transport radioactive materials.

  13. SU-CD-PinS Room/Hall E-00: HAZMAT Training for the Medical Physicist - Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    excepted packages and Type A packages will be emphasized. The program is designed to meet the function specific DOT training requirements for shippers of medical radioactive materials. General awareness training and security awareness training can be obtained from two free DOT training CDs. Safety training and security awareness training is generally satisfied by the training required under the institution’s radioactive material license. For shippers of radioactive Yellow III labeled packages an in-depth written security plan and training are no longer required as of April 8, 2010. In general almost all shippers of medical radioactive material are now not required to have an in-depth security plan. Contents of general awareness training, security awareness training and in-depth security plans will be briefly outlined. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to ensure that each hazmat employee is properly trained. No third party can fulfill that requirement. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to determine the degree to which this course meets the employer’s requirements, including contents of the course and the examination. Participants will gain sufficient knowledge to prepare hazmat training programs for others in their institutions. A handout will be posted which should be printed out and brought to the course for reference during the presentation. The handout will also satisfy part of the training documentation required by DOT. A feature handout section is a composite table which provides A1, A2, RQ, Exempt Concentration, and Exempt Consignment values in a single table in both Becquerel and Curie units. Course attendance will be certified through the AAPM CEU documentation system. Learning Objectives: Understand the regulatory requirements for shipping radioactive materials. Understand the regulatory requirements for training of hazmat employees. Comprehend how to classify, package, mark, label, document, placard, and transport radioactive materials.

  14. SU-G-PinS Room/Hall E-00: HAZMAT Training for the Medical Physicist - Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    excepted packages and Type A packages will be emphasized. The program is designed to meet the function specific DOT training requirements for shippers of medical radioactive materials. General awareness training and security awareness training can be obtained from two free DOT training CDs. Safety training and security awareness training is generally satisfied by the training required under the institution’s radioactive material license. For shippers of radioactive Yellow III labeled packages an in-depth written security plan and training are no longer required as of April 8, 2010. In general almost all shippers of medical radioactive material are now not required to have an in-depth security plan. Contents of general awareness training, security awareness training and in-depth security plans will be briefly outlined. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to ensure that each hazmat employee is properly trained. No third party can fulfill that requirement. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to determine the degree to which this course meets the employer’s requirements, including contents of the course and the examination. Participants will gain sufficient knowledge to prepare hazmat training programs for others in their institutions. A handout will be posted which should be printed out and brought to the course for reference during the presentation. The handout will also satisfy part of the training documentation required by DOT. A feature handout section is a composite table which provides A1, A2, RQ, Exempt Concentration, and Exempt Consignment values in a single table in both Becquerel and Curie units. Course attendance will be certified through the AAPM CEU documentation system. Learning Objectives: Understand the regulatory requirements for shipping radioactive materials. Understand the regulatory requirements for training of hazmat employees. Comprehend how to classify, package, mark, label, document, placard, and transport radioactive materials.

  15. Programas de reabilitação auditiva para idosos: uma proposta alternativa de avaliação de eficácia Hearing rehabilitation programs for elderly: an alternative proposal for effectiveness evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Mara Lombardi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar a eficácia de um programa de reabilitação auditiva para idosos. MÉTODOS: participaram deste estudo 30 sujeitos com perda auditiva de grau moderado a severo, na faixa etária de 70 a 92 anos, usuários de auxiliar auditivo com adaptação uni e bilateral e participantes do Grupo de Apoio ao Usuário de Auxiliar Auditivo - GAUAA - desenvolvido durante quatro encontros mensais. Foi aplicado o questionário QI-AASI (Questionário Internacional-Aparelho De Amplificação Sonora Individual, antes do início e ao final do programa, para avaliar o grau de satisfação do usuário. Os achados foram submetidos ao método de análise dos Testes dos Postos Sinalizados de Wilcoxon. RESULTADOS: os achados, embora estatisticamente significantes, não indicaram o fator que provocou as respostas positivas dos idosos sobre o GAUAA, ou seja, se os feitos encontrados derivam do conteúdo do programa, da didática das aulas, do trabalho em grupo, do coordenador ou mesmo da interação entre todos esses aspectos. CONCLUSÃO: conclui-se que o programa é eficaz, mas houve dificuldade em avaliar o que promoveu a eficácia. Acredita-se que este abre um espaço de identificação entre os participantes, o que favorece o uso sistemático do Auxiliar Auditivo.PURPOSE: to analyze the effectiveness of an auditory rehabilitation program for elderly. METHODS: the study was conducted with thirty subjects with moderate to severe degree hearing loss, 70 to 92-year old, hearing aid users with auditory monaural and bilateral adaptation. They were engaged at Hearing Aid User Support Group (Grupo de Apoio ao Usuário de Auxiliar Auditivo - GAUAA, comprised by four monthly meetings. The QI-AASI questionnaire was applied before the beginning and at the end of the program, in order to assess user's satisfaction degree. The findings were submitted to Wilcoxon tests of placarded posts. RESULTS: the findings, although statistically significant, did not indicate the

  16. SU-G-PinS Room/Hall E-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, R. [Department of Transportation Hazmat Employee Training for Shippers of Radioactive Materials (United States)

    2016-06-15

    excepted packages and Type A packages will be emphasized. The program is designed to meet the function specific DOT training requirements for shippers of medical radioactive materials. General awareness training and security awareness training can be obtained from two free DOT training CDs. Safety training and security awareness training is generally satisfied by the training required under the institution’s radioactive material license. For shippers of radioactive Yellow III labeled packages an in-depth written security plan and training are no longer required as of April 8, 2010. In general almost all shippers of medical radioactive material are now not required to have an in-depth security plan. Contents of general awareness training, security awareness training and in-depth security plans will be briefly outlined. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to ensure that each hazmat employee is properly trained. No third party can fulfill that requirement. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to determine the degree to which this course meets the employer’s requirements, including contents of the course and the examination. Participants will gain sufficient knowledge to prepare hazmat training programs for others in their institutions. A handout will be posted which should be printed out and brought to the course for reference during the presentation. The handout will also satisfy part of the training documentation required by DOT. A feature handout section is a composite table which provides A1, A2, RQ, Exempt Concentration, and Exempt Consignment values in a single table in both Becquerel and Curie units. Course attendance will be certified through the AAPM CEU documentation system. Learning Objectives: Understand the regulatory requirements for shipping radioactive materials. Understand the regulatory requirements for training of hazmat employees. Comprehend how to classify, package, mark, label, document, placard, and transport radioactive materials.

  17. SU-CD-PinS Room/Hall E-00: HAZMAT Training for the Medical Physicist - Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    excepted packages and Type A packages will be emphasized. The program is designed to meet the function specific DOT training requirements for shippers of medical radioactive materials. General awareness training and security awareness training can be obtained from two free DOT training CDs. Safety training and security awareness training is generally satisfied by the training required under the institution’s radioactive material license. For shippers of radioactive Yellow III labeled packages an in-depth written security plan and training are no longer required as of April 8, 2010. In general almost all shippers of medical radioactive material are now not required to have an in-depth security plan. Contents of general awareness training, security awareness training and in-depth security plans will be briefly outlined. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to ensure that each hazmat employee is properly trained. No third party can fulfill that requirement. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to determine the degree to which this course meets the employer’s requirements, including contents of the course and the examination. Participants will gain sufficient knowledge to prepare hazmat training programs for others in their institutions. A handout will be posted which should be printed out and brought to the course for reference during the presentation. The handout will also satisfy part of the training documentation required by DOT. A feature handout section is a composite table which provides A1, A2, RQ, Exempt Concentration, and Exempt Consignment values in a single table in both Becquerel and Curie units. Course attendance will be certified through the AAPM CEU documentation system. Learning Objectives: Understand the regulatory requirements for shipping radioactive materials. Understand the regulatory requirements for training of hazmat employees. Comprehend how to classify, package, mark, label, document, placard, and transport radioactive materials.

  18. SU-CD-PinS Room/Hall E-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, R.

    2016-06-15

    excepted packages and Type A packages will be emphasized. The program is designed to meet the function specific DOT training requirements for shippers of medical radioactive materials. General awareness training and security awareness training can be obtained from two free DOT training CDs. Safety training and security awareness training is generally satisfied by the training required under the institution’s radioactive material license. For shippers of radioactive Yellow III labeled packages an in-depth written security plan and training are no longer required as of April 8, 2010. In general almost all shippers of medical radioactive material are now not required to have an in-depth security plan. Contents of general awareness training, security awareness training and in-depth security plans will be briefly outlined. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to ensure that each hazmat employee is properly trained. No third party can fulfill that requirement. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to determine the degree to which this course meets the employer’s requirements, including contents of the course and the examination. Participants will gain sufficient knowledge to prepare hazmat training programs for others in their institutions. A handout will be posted which should be printed out and brought to the course for reference during the presentation. The handout will also satisfy part of the training documentation required by DOT. A feature handout section is a composite table which provides A1, A2, RQ, Exempt Concentration, and Exempt Consignment values in a single table in both Becquerel and Curie units. Course attendance will be certified through the AAPM CEU documentation system. Learning Objectives: Understand the regulatory requirements for shipping radioactive materials. Understand the regulatory requirements for training of hazmat employees. Comprehend how to classify, package, mark, label, document, placard, and transport radioactive materials.

  19. SU-G-PinS Room/Hall E-00: HAZMAT Training for the Medical Physicist - Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    excepted packages and Type A packages will be emphasized. The program is designed to meet the function specific DOT training requirements for shippers of medical radioactive materials. General awareness training and security awareness training can be obtained from two free DOT training CDs. Safety training and security awareness training is generally satisfied by the training required under the institution’s radioactive material license. For shippers of radioactive Yellow III labeled packages an in-depth written security plan and training are no longer required as of April 8, 2010. In general almost all shippers of medical radioactive material are now not required to have an in-depth security plan. Contents of general awareness training, security awareness training and in-depth security plans will be briefly outlined. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to ensure that each hazmat employee is properly trained. No third party can fulfill that requirement. It is the hazmat employer’s responsibility to determine the degree to which this course meets the employer’s requirements, including contents of the course and the examination. Participants will gain sufficient knowledge to prepare hazmat training programs for others in their institutions. A handout will be posted which should be printed out and brought to the course for reference during the presentation. The handout will also satisfy part of the training documentation required by DOT. A feature handout section is a composite table which provides A1, A2, RQ, Exempt Concentration, and Exempt Consignment values in a single table in both Becquerel and Curie units. Course attendance will be certified through the AAPM CEU documentation system. Learning Objectives: Understand the regulatory requirements for shipping radioactive materials. Understand the regulatory requirements for training of hazmat employees. Comprehend how to classify, package, mark, label, document, placard, and transport radioactive materials.

  20. Lésions bulleuses et purpuriques unilatérales: pathomimie cutanée

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinoun, Mouna; Chiheb, Soumia; Marnissi, Farida; Kadiri, Nadia; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2015-01-01

    La pathomimie cutanée est une forme particulière de troubles factices relativement rare, et constitue l'un des problèmes les plus complexes pour le dermatologue. Nous rapportons un cas de pathomimie révélée par des lésions cutanées unilatérales, mimant une brûlure. Une jeune femme de 27 ans, était suivie depuis 4 ans pour une dépression. Elle a présenté 15j avant sa 1ère hospitalisation un placard inflammatoire du sein gauche compliqué de lésions bulleuses et d’érosions superficielles. La biopsie cutanée avait montré une dermite non spécifique. Une cicatrisation rapide sous traitement local a été notée. Elle a présenté 10 jours plus tard de nouvelles lésions similaires étagées au membre inférieur gauche, évoluant vers le décollement bulleux spontané. La biopsie cutanée avait montré un décollement bulleux jonctionnel et des foyers de nécrose ischémique. L'IFD était négative. Devant les données anamnestiques, cliniques, la négativité du bilan paraclinique, et la guérison des lésions sous pansements occlusifs seuls, le diagnostic de pathomimie a été évoqué et retenu. La patiente a été adressée en psychiatrie où une thérapie cognitivo-comportementale a été préconisée. Notre observation correspond à un tableau de pathomimie de présentation clinique particulière par sa localisation unilatérale et son caractère bulleux. Chez notre patiente qui est droitière, la localisation unilatérale gauche sur des zones accessibles, l'absence de lésions spécifiques à l'examen histologique, la cicatrisation rapide des lésions sous traitement local occlusif seul et leur récurrence malgré des soins adaptés étaient en faveur d'une pathologie factice. Néanmoins, la localisation au niveau des seins peut être très déroutante. Le caractère bulleux des lésions dans le cadre d'une pathomimie a été rarement rapporté. Dans notre cas, la pathomimie s'associe à des troubles anxieux et dépressifs très importants

  1. "Projeto Rios" (Rivers Project) a methodology of classroom of the future (northern Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Ana

    2013-04-01

    in a placard at school, in the school website and in local parish council. With this project we promote scientific curiosity and implements to the experimental scientific method, with the collection and recording of data and its discussion. Also, it appears that the happiness, the well-being, the interest, the spirit of cooperation and commitment shown by the students was a constant in all outputs and performed work. The young people were very receptive to all proposals and they were the first to saying "We want to go to the river". They have the responsibility of the vigilance and protection of their selected river section and they will realize that the future will be so much better if we preserve our natural heritage, as rivers are.

  2. La couleur à Lille au xviie siècle, de Philippe IV à Louis XIV The colour of Lille in the seventeenth century, from Philippe IV to Louis XIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Étienne Poncelet

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Pays polychrome, de pierres blanches ou bleues et de briques roses, jaunes ou noires, la Flandre manie depuis le Moyen Âge les jeux colorés de matériaux. Sa capitale wallonne, Lille, est la ville méridionale des Pays‑Bas catholiques où s’acclimatent les plantes de la compagnie des Indes néerlandaises et où se déroulent les « joyeuses entrées » des comtes, ducs de Bourgogne, archiducs et autres rois d’Espagne. Cette tradition de luxuriance se traduit à l’âge d'or bourguignon par une efflorescence de couleurs sur les édifices qui durera jusqu’à la prise de Lille par Louis XIV en 1667. Les portes « espagnoles » affichent leurs briques émaillées de couleur. L’hospice Comtesse placarde son retable de pierres peintes sur sa façade d’entrée. La Vieille Bourse colore ses façades au modèle d’un cabinet d’ébénisterie avec ses incrustations de pierres nacrées et de brique luisantes comme les écailles de tortue. Le style franco‑lillois transmettra ce goût pour la couleur à travers la reconstitution du centre ville au xviie siècle, ce dont témoigne le plan-relief de 1743. Les restaurations depuis une dizaine d’années retrouvent cette tradition de joie urbaine dans les autres « grand-places » des villes du Nord.A polychromatic land of white and blue stone and pink, yellow and black brick, Flanders has sought colour combinations in building materials since the Middle Ages. Its French-speaking capital, Lille, was the city in the south of the Catholic Netherlands where plants imported by the Dutch East Indies Company acclimatized and where the ‘Joyous Entry’ celebrations of the counts, Dukes of Burgundy, archdukes and kings of Spain took place. During the golden age of Burgundy, this tradition of luxuriance was reflected in the increasing use of colours on buildings, a trend that would endure until the siege of Lille by Louis XIV in 1667. The ‘Spanish’ gates display brickwork enamelled in

  3. Radiological safety and GMP in the bulk batch manufacturing, formulation and dispensing of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thulasidhasan, A.; Tiwary, Bikash; Kumar, Uma Sheri; Kale, Pooja; Tiwary, Richa; Gaurav, Ananad; Shah, B.K.; Topale, P.D.; Prabhakar, G.; Sachdev, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    labs of the RPL facility on timely basis and on real time basis where ever required. Daily radiation field checks carried on all the Production Plants, Fume Hoods and Glove boxes displayed on the placards with date and time (μSv/hr). Air monitoring is done continuously and also in exhaustively at the beginning and at the end of working hours. Air samples from all work places are collected and counted in GM counter and recorded. Also air sample from the exhaust filter house of the RPh Program facility, is checked on daily basis and exhaust air released (through the stack to environment) is monitored and recorded. Contamination monitoring of all areas (swipes) on daily basis. For personnel, TLD badges are provided to all Occupational Workers (OW) and DRD during any production processes/formulations for bulk batch processes. Dose monitoring by whole body counting, Thyroid and bio assay for all Occupational workers is being done as per regulations

  4. Romania non-proliferation policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, Lucian; Grama, Viviana

    2001-01-01

    is a component of the National Development Strategy for Romania, presented to the European Union, as a main step in the accession process. Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 is in commercial operation from 1996 and assures 10% of the overall national electricity production. Cernavoda Unit 2 is now about 40% complete, and the Government of Romania has declared its completion as a national priority. The national participation in this project planned to be completed by the year 2005 comprises important contribution of the nuclear infrastructure developed in Romania for the CANDU power plants. Physical Protection of Nuclear Material is also regarded as a fundamental element of the non-proliferation regime. Physical Protection comprises those measures that Romania apply to prevent or deter illegal actions taken against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials, are transported across the country. Romania received IAEA assistance to enhance its efforts to prevent unclear material and other radioactive sources from being use illegally and to detect and respond to trafficking cases, should they occur. This assistance included an IPASS Mission and training for staff involved in physical protection for nuclear material and nuclear installations. In 1993 Romania ratified the Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and has following requirements for nuclear material transport: the material must be classified according to its characteristics, the material may be transported only in approved containers, containers must be marked with safety labels or placards to indicate their contents, for certain radioactive material the shipper must have in place an emergency response assistance plan. CNCAN coordinates at national level the activities regarding preventing and combating illicit trafficking with nuclear materials. From 1993 when the IAEA database was installed, Romania reported 22 incidents involving nuclear material and radioactive sources. In