WorldWideScience

Sample records for pixel array experiment

  1. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The bump-bonded silicon pixel detector, developed at CERN by the EP-MIC group, is shown here in its ceramic carrier. Both represent the ISPA-tube anode. The chip features between 1024 (called OMEGA-1) and 8196 (ALICE-1) active pixels.

  2. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Application components of ISPA tubes are shown: the CERN-developed anode chip, special windows for gamma and x-ray detection, scintillating crystal and fibre arrays for imaging and tracking of ionizing particles.

  3. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The ISPA tube is a position-sensitive photon detector. It belongs to the family of hybrid photon detectors (HPD), recently developed by CERN and INFN with leading photodetector firms. HPDs confront in a vacuum envelope a photocathode and a silicon detector. This can be a single diode or a pixelized detector. The electrons generated by the photocathode are efficiently detected by the silicon anode by applying a high-voltage difference between them. ISPA tube can be used in high-energy applications as well as bio-medical and imaging applications.

  4. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    On the table, under the scrutiny of some collaboration members, an ISPA tube (upper-left of the table) with some of its application components is shown: they consist of the CERN-developed anode chip, special windows for gamma and x-ray detection, scintillating crystal and fibre arrays for imaging and tracking of ionizing particles.

  5. Pixel Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Augustesen, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Pixel Experiments The term pixel is traditionally defined as any of the minute elements that together constitute a larger context or image. A pixel has its own form and is the smallest unit seen within a larger structure. In working with the potentials of LED technology in architectural lighting...... design it became relevant to investigate the use of LEDs as the physical equivalent of a pixel as a design approach. In this book our interest has been in identifying how the qualities of LEDs can be used in lighting applications. With experiences in the planning and implementation of architectural...... elucidate and exemplify already well-known problems in relation to the experience of vertical and horizontal lighting. Pixel Experiments exist as a synergy between speculative test setups and lighting design in practice. This book is one of four books that is published in connection with the research...

  6. Characterization of novel Hamamatsu Multi Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays for the GlueX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Orlando [Universidad T?cnica Federico Santa Mar?a; Rojas, Rimsky [Universidad T?cnica Federico Santa Mar?a; Kuleshov, Sergey V. [Universidad T?cnica Federico Santa Mar?a; Hakobyan, Hayk [Universidad T?cnica Federico Santa Mar?a; Toro, Alam [Universidad T?cnica Federico Santa Mar?a; Brooks, William K. [Universidad T?cnica Federico Santa Mar?a

    2013-12-01

    The novel Hamamatsu Multi Pixel Photon Counter Array S12045(X) is an array of 16 individual MPPCs (3x3 mm{sup 2}) (further in the paper MPPC array channel) each with 3600 G-APD (Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiodes) pixels (50x50 [{micro}m{sup 2}]). Each MPPC in the array works with its individual reverse bias voltage mode (around 70 V). The paper summarizes the characterization process of MPPC arrays used in GlueX experiment (Hall D, Jefferson Lab). We studied the main features of each MPPC array channel for 2800 MPPC arrays at different temperatures. Two measurement stations were built to extract gain, breakdown voltage, photo detection efficiency (PDE), optical crosstalk and dark rate for each MPPC array channel. The hardware and the data analysis are described, which includes new analytical expressions to obtain the mean number of photo-electrons and optical crosstalk. The dynamical behavior of characterization parameters is presented as well.

  7. Characterization of novel Hamamatsu Multi Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays for the GlueX experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Orlando; Rojas, Rimsky; Kuleshov, Sergey; Hakobyan, Hayk; Toro, Alam; Brooks, William K.

    2013-12-01

    The novel Hamamatsu Multi Pixel Photon Counter Array S12045(X) is an array of 16 individual MPPCs (3×3 mm2) (further in the paper MPPC array channel) each with 3600 G-APD (Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiodes) pixels (50×50 [μm2]). Each MPPC in the array works with its individual reverse bias voltage mode (around 70 V). The paper summarizes the characterization process of MPPC arrays used in GlueX experiment (Hall D, Jefferson Lab). We studied the main features of each MPPC array channel for 2800 MPPC arrays at different temperatures. Two measurement stations were built to extract gain, breakdown voltage, photo detection efficiency (PDE), optical crosstalk and dark rate for each MPPC array channel. The hardware and the data analysis are described, which includes new analytical expressions to obtain the mean number of photo-electrons and optical crosstalk. The dynamical behavior of characterization parameters is presented as well.

  8. Characterization of novel Hamamatsu Multi Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays for the GlueX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Orlando, E-mail: oj.5070@gmail.com; Rojas, Rimsky; Kuleshov, Sergey; Hakobyan, Hayk; Toro, Alam; Brooks, William K.

    2013-12-21

    The novel Hamamatsu Multi Pixel Photon Counter Array S12045(X) is an array of 16 individual MPPCs (3×3 mm{sup 2}) (further in the paper MPPC array channel) each with 3600 G-APD (Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiodes) pixels (50×50 [μm{sup 2}]). Each MPPC in the array works with its individual reverse bias voltage mode (around 70 V). The paper summarizes the characterization process of MPPC arrays used in GlueX experiment (Hall D, Jefferson Lab). We studied the main features of each MPPC array channel for 2800 MPPC arrays at different temperatures. Two measurement stations were built to extract gain, breakdown voltage, photo detection efficiency (PDE), optical crosstalk and dark rate for each MPPC array channel. The hardware and the data analysis are described, which includes new analytical expressions to obtain the mean number of photo-electrons and optical crosstalk. The dynamical behavior of characterization parameters is presented as well.

  9. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  10. Novel Hamamatsu Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) array studies for the GlueX experiment: New results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Orlando; Rojas, Rimsky; Kuleshov, Sergey; Hakobyan, Hayk; Toro, Alam; Brooks, William K.; Rios, Rene

    2014-03-01

    The novel Hamamatsu Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) S12045(X) is an array of 16 individual 3×3 mm2 MPPC devices each with 3600 Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode pixels of 50×50 μm2. Each MPPC in the array operates at a reverse bias of approximately 70 V. This paper summarizes our characterization of MPPC arrays used in the GlueX experiment in Hall D at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). We studied the main features of each of the 16 MPPC array channels for 2800 MPPC arrays at several different temperatures. Two measurement stations were built to extract gain, breakdown voltage, photon detection efficiency, optical crosstalk and dark rate for each of the 44 800 MPPC array channels at each temperature setting. The hardware and the data analysis are described, and new analytical expressions for the mean number of photoelectrons and optical crosstalk are presented, as well as systematic trends of the performance parameters.

  11. Novel Hamamatsu Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) array studies for the GlueX experiment: New results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Orlando; Rojas, Rimsky; Kuleshov, Sergey; Hakobyan, Hayk, E-mail: hayk.hakobyan@usm.cl; Toro, Alam; Brooks, William K.; Rios, Rene

    2014-03-01

    The novel Hamamatsu Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) S12045(X) is an array of 16 individual 3×3 mm{sup 2} MPPC devices each with 3600 Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode pixels of 50×50 μm{sup 2}. Each MPPC in the array operates at a reverse bias of approximately 70 V. This paper summarizes our characterization of MPPC arrays used in the GlueX experiment in Hall D at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). We studied the main features of each of the 16 MPPC array channels for 2800 MPPC arrays at several different temperatures. Two measurement stations were built to extract gain, breakdown voltage, photon detection efficiency, optical crosstalk and dark rate for each of the 44 800 MPPC array channels at each temperature setting. The hardware and the data analysis are described, and new analytical expressions for the mean number of photoelectrons and optical crosstalk are presented, as well as systematic trends of the performance parameters.

  12. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  13. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  14. High-speed x-ray imaging with the Keck pixel array detector (Keck PAD) for time-resolved experiments at synchrotron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Hugh T., E-mail: htp2@cornell.edu; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Chamberlain, Darol; Gruner, Sol M. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Modern storage rings are readily capable of providing intense x-ray pulses, tens of picoseconds in duration, millions of times per second. Exploiting the temporal structure of these x-ray sources opens avenues for studying rapid structural changes in materials. Many processes (e.g. crack propagation, deformation on impact, turbulence, etc.) differ in detail from one sample trial to the next and would benefit from the ability to record successive x-ray images with single x-ray sensitivity while framing at 5 to 10 MHz rates. To this end, we have pursued the development of fast x-ray imaging detectors capable of collecting bursts of images that enable the isolation of single synchrotron bunches and/or bunch trains. The detector technology used is the hybrid pixel array detector (PAD) with a charge integrating front-end, and high-speed, in-pixel signal storage elements. A 384×256 pixel version, the Keck-PAD, with 150 µm × 150 µm pixels and 8 dedicated in-pixel storage elements is operational, has been tested at CHESS, and has collected data for compression wave studies. An updated version with 27 dedicated storage capacitors and identical pixel size has been fabricated.

  15. Two-dimensional pixel array image sensor for protein crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuville, E.; Beche, J.-F.; Cork, C. [and others

    1996-07-01

    A 2D pixel array image sensor module has been designed for time resolved Protein Crystallography. This smart pixels detector significantly enhances time resolved Laue Protein crystallography by two to three orders of magnitude compared to existing sensors like films or phosphor screens coupled to CCDs. The resolution in time and dynamic range of this type of detector will allow one to study the evolution of structural changes that occur within the protein as a function of time. This detector will also considerably accelerate data collection in static Laue or monochromatic crystallography and make better use of the intense beam delivered by synchrotron light sources. The event driven pixel array detectors, based on the column Architecture, can provide multiparameter information (energy discrimination, time), with sparse and frameless readout without significant dead time. The prototype module consists of a 16x16 pixel diode array bump-bonded to the integrated circuit. The detection area is 150x150 square microns.

  16. Next generation sub-millimeter wave focal plane array coupling concepts: an ESA TRP project to develop multichroic focal plane pixels for future CMB polarization experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, N.; Bucher, M.; De Bernardis, P.; Delabrouille, J.; Deo, P.; DePetris, M.; Doherty, S.; Ghribi, A.; Gradziel, M.; Kuzmin, L.; Maffei, B.; Mahashabde, S.; Masi, S.; Murphy, J. A.; Noviello, F.; O'Sullivan, C.; Pagano, L.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Robinson, M.; Stompor, R.; Tartari, A.; van der Vorst, M.; Verhoeve, P.

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this activity is to develop new focal plane coupling array concepts and technologies that optimise the coupling from reflector optics to the large number of detectors for next generation sub millimetre wave telescopes particularly targeting measurement of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). In this 18 month TRP programme the consortium are tasked with developing, manufacturing and experimentally verifying a prototype multichroic pixel which would be suitable for the large focal plane arrays which will be demanded to reach the required sensitivity of future CMB polarization missions. One major development was to have multichroic operation to potentially reduce the required focal plane size of a CMB mission. After research in the optimum telescope design and definition of requirements based on a stringent science case review, a number of compact focal plane architecture concepts were investigated before a pixel demonstrator consisting of a planar mesh lens feeding a backend Resonant Cold Electron Bolometer RCEB for filtering and detection of the dual frequency signal was planned for manufacture and test. In this demonstrator the frequencies of the channels was chosen to be 75 and 105 GHz in the w band close to the peak CMB signal. In the next year the prototype breadboards will be developed to test the beams produced by the manufactured flat lenses fed by a variety of antenna configurations and the spectral response of the RCEBs will also be verified.

  17. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lantzsch, Kerstin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with new service quarter panels to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run 1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. The commissioning, operation and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector will be presented.

  18. Smart pixel imaging with computational-imaging arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Cull, Christy; Tyrrell, Brian M.; D'Onofrio, Richard; Bolstad, Andrew; Lin, Joseph; Little, Jeffrey W.; Blackwell, Megan; Renzi, Matthew; Kelly, Mike

    2014-07-01

    Smart pixel imaging with computational-imaging arrays (SPICA) transfers image plane coding typically realized in the optical architecture to the digital domain of the focal plane array, thereby minimizing signal-to-noise losses associated with static filters or apertures and inherent diffraction concerns. MIT Lincoln Laboratory has been developing digitalpixel focal plane array (DFPA) devices for many years. In this work, we leverage legacy designs modified with new features to realize a computational imaging array (CIA) with advanced pixel-processing capabilities. We briefly review the use of DFPAs for on-chip background removal and image plane filtering. We focus on two digital readout integrated circuits (DROICS) as CIAs for two-dimensional (2D) transient target tracking and three-dimensional (3D) transient target estimation using per-pixel coded-apertures or flutter shutters. This paper describes two DROICs - a SWIR pixelprocessing imager (SWIR-PPI) and a Visible CIA (VISCIA). SWIR-PPI is a DROIC with a 1 kHz global frame rate with a maximum per-pixel shuttering rate of 100 MHz, such that each pixel can be modulated by a time-varying, pseudorandom, and duo-binary signal (+1,-1,0). Combining per-pixel time-domain coding and processing enables 3D (x,y,t) target estimation with limited loss of spatial resolution. We evaluate structured and pseudo-random encoding strategies and employ linear inversion and non-linear inversion using total-variation minimization to estimate a 3D data cube from a single 2D temporally-encoded measurement. The VISCIA DROIC, while low-resolution, has a 6 kHz global frame rate and simultaneously encodes eight periodic or aperiodic transient target signatures at a maximum rate of 50 MHz using eight 8-bit counters. By transferring pixel-based image plane coding to the DROIC and utilizing sophisticated processing, our CIAs enable on-chip temporal super-resolution.

  19. Alternative Optimizations of X-ray TES Arrays: Soft X-rays, High Count Rates, and Mixed-Pixel Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, C. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Smith, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) for imaging spectroscopy telescopes such as the XMS on Constellation-X. While our primary focus has been on arrays that meet the XMS requirements (of which, foremost, is an energy resolution of 2.5 eV at 6 keV and a bandpass from approx. 0.3 keV to 12 keV), we have also investigated other optimizations that might be used to extend the XMS capabilities. In one of these optimizations, improved resolution below 1 keV is achieved by reducing the heat capacity. Such pixels can be based on our XMS-style TES's with the separate absorbers omitted. These pixels can added to an array with broadband response either as a separate array or interspersed, depending on other factors that include telescope design and science requirements. In one version of this approach, we have designed and fabricated a composite array of low-energy and broad-band pixels to provide high spectral resolving power over a broader energy bandpass than could be obtained with a single TES design. The array consists of alternating pixels with and without overhanging absorbers. To explore optimizations for higher count rates, we are also optimizing the design and operating temperature of pixels that are coupled to a solid substrate. We will present the performance of these variations and discuss other optimizations that could be used to enhance the XMS or enable other astrophysics experiments.

  20. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams.

  1. Design, optimization and evaluation of a "smart" pixel sensor array for low-dose digital radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Xinghui; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been widely used to build flat-panel X-ray detectors for digital radiography (DR). As the demand for low-dose X-ray imaging grows, a detector with high signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) pixel architecture emerges. "Smart" pixel is intended to use a dual-gate photosensitive TFT for sensing, storage, and switch. It differs from a conventional passive pixel sensor (PPS) and active pixel sensor (APS) in that all these three functions are combined into one device instead of three separate units in a pixel. Thus, it is expected to have high fill factor and high spatial resolution. In addition, it utilizes the amplification effect of the dual-gate photosensitive TFT to form a one-transistor APS that leads to a potentially high SNR. This paper addresses the design, optimization and evaluation of the smart pixel sensor and array for low-dose DR. We will design and optimize the smart pixel from the scintillator to TFT levels and validate it through optical and electrical simulation and experiments of a 4x4 sensor array.

  2. Digital Pixel Sensor Array with Logarithmic Delta-Sigma Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Alireza; Li, Jing; Joseph, Dileepan

    2013-01-01

    Like the human eye, logarithmic image sensors achieve wide dynamic range easily at video rates, but, unlike the human eye, they suffer from low peak signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratios (PSNDRs). To improve the PSNDR, we propose integrating a delta-sigma analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in each pixel. An image sensor employing this architecture is designed, built and tested in 0.18 micron complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. It achieves a PSNDR better than state-of-the-art logarithmic sensors and comparable to the human eye. As the approach concerns an array of many ADCs, we use a small-area low-power delta-sigma design. For scalability, each pixel has its own decimator. The prototype is compared to a variety of other image sensors, linear and nonlinear, from industry and academia. PMID:23959239

  3. Digital Pixel Sensor Array with Logarithmic Delta-Sigma Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Like the human eye, logarithmic image sensors achieve wide dynamic range easily at video rates, but, unlike the human eye, they suffer from low peak signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratios (PSNDRs. To improve the PSNDR, we propose integrating a delta-sigma analog-to-digital converter (ADC in each pixel. An image sensor employing this architecture is designed, built and tested in 0.18 micron complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology. It achieves a PSNDR better than state-of-the-art logarithmic sensors and comparable to the human eye. As the approach concerns an array of many ADCs, we use a small-area low-power delta-sigma design. For scalability, each pixel has its own decimator. The prototype is compared to a variety of other image sensors, linear and nonlinear, from industry and academia.

  4. Digital pixel sensor array with logarithmic delta-sigma architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Alireza; Li, Jing; Joseph, Dileepan

    2013-08-16

    Like the human eye, logarithmic image sensors achieve wide dynamic range easily at video rates, but, unlike the human eye, they suffer from low peak signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratios (PSNDRs). To improve the PSNDR, we propose integrating a delta-sigma analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in each pixel. An image sensor employing this architecture is designed, built and tested in 0.18 micron complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. It achieves a PSNDR better than state-of-the-art logarithmic sensors and comparable to the human eye. As the approach concerns an array of many ADCs, we use a small-area low-power delta-sigma design. For scalability, each pixel has its own decimator. The prototype is compared to a variety of other image sensors, linear and nonlinear, from industry and academia.

  5. ATLAS Tracker and Pixel Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00222525; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on the silicon and gaseous tracking subsystems that form the ATLAS Inner Detector. Those subsystems have undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered by the LHC during Run2. The key status and performance metrics of the Pixel Detector and the Semi Conductor Tracker, are summarised, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described.

  6. Operational Experience with the ALICE Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mastroserio, A.

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) constitutes the two innermost layers of the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment and it is the closest detector to the interaction point. As a vertex detector, it has the unique feature of generating a trigger signal that contributes to the L0 trigger of the ALICE experiment. The SPD started collecting data since the very first pp collisions at LHC in 2009 and since then it has taken part in all pp, Pb-Pb and p-Pb data taking campaigns. This contribution will present the main features of the SPD, the detector performance and the operational experience, including calibration and optimization activities from Run 1 to Run 2.

  7. The high dynamic range pixel array detector (HDR-PAD): Concept and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanks, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Weiss, Joel T.; Becker, Julian; Tate, Mark W. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M., E-mail: smg26@cornell.edu [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Experiments at storage ring light sources as well as at next-generation light sources increasingly require detectors capable of high dynamic range operation, combining low-noise detection of single photons with large pixel well depth. XFEL sources in particular provide pulse intensities sufficiently high that a purely photon-counting approach is impractical. The High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector (HDR-PAD) project aims to provide a dynamic range extending from single-photon sensitivity to 10{sup 6} photons/pixel in a single XFEL pulse while maintaining the ability to tolerate a sustained flux of 10{sup 11} ph/s/pixel at a storage ring source. Achieving these goals involves the development of fast pixel front-end electronics as well as, in the XFEL case, leveraging the delayed charge collection due to plasma effects in the sensor. A first prototype of essential electronic components of the HDR-PAD readout ASIC, exploring different options for the pixel front-end, has been fabricated. Here, the HDR-PAD concept and preliminary design will be described.

  8. CVD diamond pixel detectors for LHC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedenig, R.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; Blanquart, L.; Breugnion, P.; Charles, E.; Ciocio, A.; Clemens, J.C.; Dao, K.; Einsweiler, K.; Fasching, D.; Fischer, P.; Joshi, A.; Keil, M.; Klasen, V.; Kleinfelder, S.; Laugier, D.; Meuser, S.; Milgrome, O.; Mouthuy, T.; Richardson, J.; Sinervo, P.; Treis, J.; Wermes, N

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the development of CVD diamond pixel detectors. The preparation of the diamond pixel sensors for bump-bonding to the pixel readout electronics for the LHC and the results from beam tests carried out at CERN are described.

  9. A 128 pixel linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Lobato, R.; Marín, J.; Mosquera, J.; Pardo, J.; Pazos, A.; Pena, J.; Pombar, M.; Rodríguez, A.; Saavedra, D.; Sendón, J.; Yañez, A.

    2004-12-01

    New radiotherapy techniques require detectors able to verify and monitor the clinical beam with high spatial resolution and fast response. Room temperature organic liquid ionization detectors are becoming an alternative to standard air ionization chambers, due to their tissue equivalent behavior, their sensibility and small directional dependence. A liquid isooctane filled ionization linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance has been designed, built and tested. The detector consists of 128 pixels, each of them with an area of 1.7 mm×1.7 mm and a gap of 0.5 mm. The small pixel size makes the detector ideal for high gradient beam profiles like those present in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. The gap and the polarization voltage have been chosen in order to guarantee a linear relationship between the dose rate and the readout signal at high dose rates. As readout electronics we use the X-ray Data Acquisition System with the Xchip developed by the CCLRC.In the first device tests we have confirmed linearity up to a 6.7 Gy/min dose rate with a deviation less than 1%. A profile with a signal-to-noise ratio around 500 can be obtained for a 4 Gy/min dose rate with a 10 ms integration time.

  10. A 128 pixel linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, L. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Gomez, F. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]. E-mail: faustgr@usc.es; Iglesias, A. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lobato, R. [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, 15706 Santiago (Spain); Marin, J. [CIEMAT, Laboratorio de Electronica y Automatica, 28040 Madrid Spain (Spain); Mosquera, J. [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, 15706 Santiago (Spain); Pardo, J. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]. E-mail: juanpm@usc.es; Pazos, A. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pena, J. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pombar, M. [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, 15706 Santiago (Spain); Rodriguez, A. [Departmento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, campus sur s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Saavedra, D. [Universidade da Coruna, Dpto. de Enxeneria Industrial II, 15403 Ferrol Spain (Spain); Sendon, J. [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, 15706 Santiago (Spain); Yanez, A. [Universidade da Coruna, Dpto. de Enxeneria Industrial II, 15403 Ferrol Spain (Spain)

    2004-12-11

    New radiotherapy techniques require detectors able to verify and monitor the clinical beam with high spatial resolution and fast response. Room temperature organic liquid ionization detectors are becoming an alternative to standard air ionization chambers, due to their tissue equivalent behavior, their sensibility and small directional dependence. A liquid isooctane filled ionization linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance has been designed, built and tested. The detector consists of 128 pixels, each of them with an area of 1.7mmx1.7mm and a gap of 0.5mm. The small pixel size makes the detector ideal for high gradient beam profiles like those present in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. The gap and the polarization voltage have been chosen in order to guarantee a linear relationship between the dose rate and the readout signal at high dose rates. As readout electronics we use the X-ray Data Acquisition System with the Xchip developed by the CCLRC.In the first device tests we have confirmed linearity up to a 6.7Gy/min dose rate with a deviation less than 1%. A profile with a signal-to-noise ratio around 500 can be obtained for a 4Gy/min dose rate with a 10 ms integration time.

  11. Nano-fabricated pixelated micropolarizer array for visible imaging polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhigang; Cheng, Teng; Qiu, Kang; Zhang, Qingchuan, E-mail: zhangqc@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: wgchu@nanoctr.cn; Wu, Xiaoping [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Dong, Fengliang; Chu, Weiguo, E-mail: zhangqc@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: wgchu@nanoctr.cn [Nanofabrication Laboratory, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Pixelated micropolarizer array (PMA) is a novel concept for real-time visible imaging polarimetry. A 320 × 240 aluminum PMA fabricated by electron beam lithography is described in this paper. The period, duty ratio, and depth of the grating are 140 nm, 0.5, and 100 nm, respectively. The units are standard square structures and the metal nanowires of the grating are collimating and uniformly thick. The extinction ratio of 75 and the maximum polarization transmittance of 78.8% demonstrate that the PMA is suitable for polarization imaging. When the PMA is applied to real-time polarization imaging, the degree of linear polarization image and the angle of linear polarization image are calculated from a single frame image. The polarized target object is highlighted from the unpolarized background, and the surface contour of the target object can be reflected by the polarization angle.

  12. Nano-fabricated pixelated micropolarizer array for visible imaging polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhigang; Dong, Fengliang; Cheng, Teng; Qiu, Kang; Zhang, Qingchuan; Chu, Weiguo; Wu, Xiaoping

    2014-10-01

    Pixelated micropolarizer array (PMA) is a novel concept for real-time visible imaging polarimetry. A 320 × 240 aluminum PMA fabricated by electron beam lithography is described in this paper. The period, duty ratio, and depth of the grating are 140 nm, 0.5, and 100 nm, respectively. The units are standard square structures and the metal nanowires of the grating are collimating and uniformly thick. The extinction ratio of 75 and the maximum polarization transmittance of 78.8% demonstrate that the PMA is suitable for polarization imaging. When the PMA is applied to real-time polarization imaging, the degree of linear polarization image and the angle of linear polarization image are calculated from a single frame image. The polarized target object is highlighted from the unpolarized background, and the surface contour of the target object can be reflected by the polarization angle.

  13. Pixel readout chip for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ackers, M; Blanquart, L; Bonzom, V; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Delpierre, P A; Treis, J; Raith, B A; Wermes, N

    1999-01-01

    Pixel detectors with a high granularity and a very large number of sensitive elements (cells) are a very recent development used for high precision particle detection. At the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN (Geneva) a pixel detector with 1.4*10/sup 8/ individual pixel cells is developed for the ATLAS detector. The concept is a hybrid detector. Consisting of a pixel sensor connected to a pixel electronics chip by bump and flip chip technology in one-to-one cell correspondence. The development and prototype results of the pixel front end chip are presented together with the physical and technical requirements to be met at LHC. Lab measurements are reported. (6 refs).

  14. X-ray imaging and imaging spectroscopy of fusion plasmas and light-source experiments with spherical optics and pixel array detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Zhang, L.

    2012-10-01

    High resolution (λ/Δλ ~10,000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixelarray detector (PAD) is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature (Ti) and plasma flow-velocityprofiles in magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of microns. A new concept of using matched pairs of spherically bent crystals for monochromatic stigmatic 2D x-ray imaging of mm sized sources offers the possibility of spatial resolution of microns and large solid angle, relative to that achieved with pinhole imaging. Other potential applications of the 2D imaging schemes include x-ray lithography and x-ray microscopy for biological and materials science research. Measurements from MFE plasmas, as well as laboratory experiments and ray tracing computations validating the 1D imaging spectroscopy and 2D x-ray imaging techniques will be presented.

  15. Development of Kilo-Pixel Arrays of Transition-Edge Sensors for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Ray, C. A.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Wassell, E. J.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Reintsema, C. D.; Smith, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing kilo-pixel arrays of transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters for future X-ray astronomy observatories or for use in laboratory astrophysics applications. For example, Athena/XMS (currently under study by the european space agency) would require a close-packed 32x32 pixel array on a 250-micron pitch with pixel/second. We present characterization of 32x32 arrays. These detectors will be readout using state of the art SQUID based time-domain multiplexing (TDM). We will also present the latest results in integrating these detectors and the TDM readout technology into a 16 row x N column field-able instrument.

  16. Photonic Heterodyne Pixel for Imaging Arrays at Microwave and MM-Wave Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Á. R. Criado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of photonic heterodyne receivers based on semiconductor optical amplifiers to be used in imaging arrays at several GHz frequencies is evaluated. With this objective, a imaging array based on such photonic pixels has been fabricated and characterized. Each of the receiving optoelectronic pixels is composed of an antipodal linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA that sends the received RF signal directly to the electrical port of a semiconductor opticalamplifier (SOA acting as the optoelectronic mixer. Both the local oscillator (LO and the intermediate frequency (IF signals are directly distributed to/from the array pixels using fiber optics, that allows for remote LO generation and IF processing to recover the image. The results shown in this work demonstrate that the performances of the optoelectronic imaging array are similar to a reference all-electronic array, revealing the possibility of using this photonic architecture in future high-density, scalable, compact imaging arrays in microwave and millimeter wave ranges.

  17. Study of the characteristics of a scintillation array and single pixels for nuclear medicine imaging applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jie; MA Hong-Guang; MA Wen-Yan; ZENG Hui; WANG Zhao-Min; XU Zi-Zong

    2009-01-01

    By using a pixelized Nal(T1) crystal array coupled to a R2486 PSPMT, the characteristics of the array and of a single pixel, such as the light output, energy resolution, peak-to-valley ratio (P/V) and imaging performance of the detector were studied. The pixel size of the NaI(TI) scintillation pixel array is 2 min×2 mm×5 mm. There are in total 484 pixels in a 22~22 matrix. In the pixel spectrum an average peak-to-valley ratio (P/V) of 16 was obtained. In the image of all the pixels, good values for the Peak-to-Valley ratios could be achieved, namely a mean of 17, a maximum of 45 and the average peak FWHM (the average value of intrinsic spatial resolution) of 2.3 mm. However, the PSPMT non-uniform response and the scintillation pixels array inhomogeneities degrade the imaging performance of the detector.

  18. CMOS-compatible PureGaB Ge-on-Si APD pixel arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sammak, Amir; Aminian, Mahdi; Nanver, Lis Karen; Charbon, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Pure gallium and pure boron (PureGaB) Ge-on-Si photodiodes were fabricated in a CMOS compatible process and operated in linear and avalanche mode. Three different pixel geometries with very different area-to-perimeter ratios were investigated in linear arrays of 300 pixels with each a size of 26 × 2

  19. Recent development of ultra small pixel uncooled focal plane arrays at DRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Skidmore, George D.; Howard, Christopher; Han, C. J.; Wood, Lewis; Peysha, Doug; Williams, Eric; Trujillo, Carlos; Emmett, Jeff; Robas, Gary; Jardine, Daniel; Wan, C.-F.; Clarke, Elwood

    2007-04-01

    DRS is a major supplier of the 25μm pixel pitch 640x480 and 320x240 infrared uncooled focal plane arrays (UFPAs) and camera products for commercial and military markets. The state-of-the-art 25μm pixel focal plane arrays currently in production provide excellent performance for soldier thermal weapon sights (TWS), vehicle driver vision enhancers (DVE), and aerial surveillance and industrial thermograph applications. To further improve sensor resolution and reduce the sensor system size, weight and cost, it is highly desired to reduce the UFPA pixel size. However, the 17μm pixel FPA presents significant design and fabrication challenges as compared with 25μm pixel FPAs. The design objectives, engineering trade-offs, and performance goals will be discussed. This paper presents an overview of the 17μm microblometer uncooled focal plane arrays and sensor electronics production and development activities at DRS. The 17 μm pixel performance data from several initial fabrication lots will be summarized. Relevant 25μm pixel performance data are provided for comparison. Thermal images and video from the 17μm pixel 640x480 UFPA will also be presented.

  20. Modelling and 3D optimisation of CdTe pixels detector array geometry - Extension to small pixels

    CERN Document Server

    Zumbiehl, A; Fougeres, P; Koebel, J M; Regal, R; Rit, C; Ayoub, M; Siffert, P

    2001-01-01

    CdTe and CdZnTe pixel detectors offer great interest for many applications, especially for medical and industrial imaging. Up to now, the material, generally, used and investigated for pixel arrays was CZT (Hamel et al., IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 43 (3) (1996) 1422; Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 (1) (1995) 156; Bennett et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 392 (1997) 260; Eskin et al., J. Appl. Phys. 85 (2) (1999) 647; Brunett et al., J. Appl. Phys. 86 (7) (1999) 3926; Luke, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 380 (1996) 232), but cadmium telluride can also be an appropriate choice, as shown here. However, we clearly demonstrate here that the optimal pixel configuration is highly dependent on the electrical transport properties of the material. Depending on the field of primary interest, either energy resolution or counting rate efficiency in the photopeak, the geometry for each case has to be optimised. For that purpose, we have developed a calculation of the signal induced onto the pixel. Two distinct parts are used: af...

  1. Pixel parallel localized driver design for a 128 x 256 pixel array 3D 1Gfps image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Dao, V. T. S.; Etoh, T. G.; Charbon, E.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a 3D 1Gfps BSI image sensor is proposed, where 128 × 256 pixels are located in the top-tier chip and a 32 × 32 localized driver array in the bottom-tier chip. Pixels are designed with Multiple Collection Gates (MCG), which collects photons selectively with different collection gates being active at intervals of 1ns to achieve 1Gfps. For the drivers, a global PLL is designed, which consists of a ring oscillator with 6-stage current starved differential inverters, achieving a wide frequency tuning range from 40MHz to 360MHz (20ps rms jitter). The drivers are the replicas of the ring oscillator that operates within a PLL. Together with level shifters and XNOR gates, continuous 3.3V pulses are generated with desired pulse width, which is 1/12 of the PLL clock period. The driver array is activated by a START signal, which propagates through a highly balanced clock tree, to activate all the pixels at the same time with virtually negligible skew.

  2. A near-infrared 64-pixel superconducting nanowire single photon detector array with integrated multiplexed readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allman, M. S., E-mail: shane.allman@boulder.nist.gov; Verma, V. B.; Stevens, M.; Gerrits, T.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R.; Nam, S. W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3328 (United States); Marsili, F.; Beyer, A.; Shaw, M. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Kumor, D. [Purdue University, 610 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  3. A Near-Infrared 64-pixel Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detector Array with Integrated Multiplexed Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Allman, M S; Stevens, M; Gerrits, T; Horansky, R D; Lita, A E; Marsili, F; Beyer, A; Shaw, M D; Kumor, D; Mirin, R; Nam, S W

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array, as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  4. A 400 KHz line rate 2048-pixel stitched SWIR linear array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchlia, Ankur; Vinella, Rosa M.; Gielen, Daphne; Wouters, Kristof; Vervenne, Vincent; Hooylaerts, Peter; Deroo, Pieter; Ruythooren, Wouter; De Gaspari, Danny; Das, Jo; Merken, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Xenics has developed a family of stitched SWIR long linear arrays that operate up to 400 KHz of line rate. These arrays serve medical and industrial applications that require high line rates as well as space applications that require long linear arrays. The arrays are based on a modular ROIC design concept: modules of 512 pixels are stitched during fabrication to achieve 512, 1024 and 2048 pixel arrays. Each 512-pixel module has its own on-chip digital sequencer, analog readout chain and 4 output buffers. This modular concept enables a long array to run at a high line rates irrespective of the array length, which limits the line rate in a traditional linear array. The ROIC is flip-chipped with InGaAs detector arrays. The FPA has a pixel pitch of 12.5μm and has two pixel flavors: square (12.5μm) and rectangular (250μm). The frontend circuit is based on Capacitive Trans-impedance Amplifier (CTIA) to attain stable detector bias, and good linearity and signal integrity, especially at high speeds. The CTIA has an input auto-zero mechanism that allows to have low detector bias (<20mV). An on-chip Correlated Double Sample (CDS) facilitates removal of CTIA KTC and 1/f noise, and other offsets, achieving low noise performance. There are five gain modes in the FPA giving the full well range from 85Ke- to 40Me-. The measured input referred noise is 35e-rms in the highest gain mode. The FPA operates in Integrate While Read mode and, at a master clock rate of 60MHz and a minimum integration time of 1.4μs, achieves the highest line rate of 400 KHz. In this paper, design details and measurements results are presented in order to demonstrate the array performance.

  5. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Tate, Mark W; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert M; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2015-01-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (EMPAD - electron microscope pixel array detector) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128 x 128 pixel detector consists of a 500 um thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as loc...

  6. Readout of a 176 pixel FDM system for SAFARI TES arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijmering, R. A.; den Hartog, R.; Ridder, M.; van der Linden, A. J.; van der Kuur, J.; Gao, J. R.; Jackson, B.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present the results of our 176-pixel prototype of the FDM readout system for SAFARI, a TES-based focal-plane instrument for the far-IR SPICA mission. We have implemented the knowledge obtained from the detailed study on electrical crosstalk reported previously. The effect of carrier leakage is reduced by a factor two, mutual impedance is reduced to below 1 nH and mutual inductance is removed. The pixels are connected in stages, one quarter of the array half of the array and the full array, to resolve intermediate technical issues. A semi-automated procedure was incorporated to find all optimal settings for all pixels. And as a final step the complete array has been connected and 132 pixels have been read out simultaneously within the frequency range of 1-3.8MHz with an average frequency separation of 16kHz. The noise was found to be detector limited and was not affected by reading out all pixels in a FDM mode. With this result the concept of using FDM for multiplexed bolometer read out for the SAFARI instrument has been demonstrated.

  7. Design and test of pixel sensors for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bölla, G; Rott, C; Roy, A; Kwan, S; Chien, C Y; Cho, H; Gobbi, B; Horisberger, R P; Kaufmann, R

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will have a silicon pixel detector as its innermost tracking device. The pixel system will be exposed to the harsh radiation environment of the LHC. Prototype sensors have been designed to meet the specifications of the CMS experiment. The sensors are n/sup +/-n devices to allow partial depletion operation after bulk type inversion. The isolation of the n/sup +/ pixels is provided through a novel double open p-ring design that allows sensor testing before bump bonding and flip chipping. The prototype wafers contain a variety of p-stop designs and are fabricated by two vendors on different bulk substrates including oxygenated silicon. A study of the static measurement of the prototype sensors before irradiation is presented. (2 refs).

  8. X-ray Characterization of a Multichannel Smart-Pixel Array Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Steve; Haji-Sheikh, Michael; Huntington, Andrew; Kline, David; Lee, Adam; Li, Yuelin; Rhee, Jehyuk; Tarpley, Mary; Walko, Donald A.; Westberg, Gregg; Williams, George; Zou, Haifeng; Landahl, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Voxtel VX-798 is a prototype X-ray pixel array detector (PAD) featuring a silicon sensor photodiode array of 48 x 48 pixels, each 130 mu m x 130 mu m x 520 mu m thick, coupled to a CMOS readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The first synchrotron X-ray characterization of this detector is presented, and its ability to selectively count individual X-rays within two independent arrival time windows, a programmable energy range, and localized to a single pixel is demonstrated. During our first trial run at Argonne National Laboratory's Advance Photon Source, the detector achieved a 60 ns gating time and 700 eV full width at half-maximum energy resolution in agreement with design parameters. Each pixel of the PAD holds two independent digital counters, and the discriminator for X-ray energy features both an upper and lower threshold to window the energy of interest discarding unwanted background. This smart-pixel technology allows energy and time resolution to be set and optimized in software. It is found that the detector linearity follows an isolated dead-time model, implying that megahertz count rates should be possible in each pixel. Measurement of the line and point spread functions showed negligible spatial blurring. When combined with the timing structure of the synchrotron storage ring, it is demonstrated that the area detector can perform both picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements.

  9. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus crucial for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via front-end chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-on-n silicon substrates. In this paper results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including calibration procedures, detector performance and measurements of radiation damage. The detector performance is excellent: more than 95% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the des...

  10. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Hugh T., E-mail: htp2@cornell.edu; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    A high-speed pixel array detector for time-resolved X-ray imaging at synchrotrons has been developed. The ability to isolate single synchrotron bunches makes it ideal for time-resolved dynamical studies. A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed.

  11. Tiled Array of Pixelated CZT Imaging Detectors for ProtoEXIST2 and MIRAX-HXI

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Jaesub; Grindlay, Jonathan; Rodrigues, Barbara; Ellis, Jon Robert; Baker, Robert; Barthelmy, Scott; Mao, Peter; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Apple, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    We have assembled a tiled array (220 cm2) of fine pixel (0.6 mm) imaging CZT detectors for a balloon borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope, ProtoEXIST2. ProtoEXIST2 is a prototype experiment for a next generation hard X-ray imager MIRAX-HXI on board Lattes, a spacecraft from the Agencia Espacial Brasilieira. MIRAX will survey the 5 to 200 keV sky of Galactic bulge, adjoining southern Galactic plane and the extragalactic sky with 6' angular resolution. This survey will open a vast discovery space in timing studies of accretion neutron stars and black holes. The ProtoEXIST2 CZT detector plane consists of 64 of 5 mm thick 2 cm x 2 cm CZT crystals tiled with a minimal gap. MIRAX will consist of 4 such detector planes, each of which will be imaged with its own coded-aperture mask. We present the packaging architecture and assembly procedure of the ProtoEXIST2 detector. On 2012, Oct 10, we conducted a successful high altitude balloon experiment of the ProtoEXIST1 and 2 telescopes, which demonstrates their technolog...

  12. A Sub-pixel Image Processing Algorithm of a Detector Based on Staring Focal Plane Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ya-qiong; JIN Wei-qi; XU Chao; WANG Xia

    2008-01-01

    Optical micro-scanning technology can be used to increase spatial resolution of many optical imaging systems, especially thermal imaging system. One of its key issues is relevant image processing algorithm. A fast reconstruction algo-rithm is proposed for two dimensional 2×2 micro-scanning based on the sub-pixel imaging and reconstruction principle of two-dimensional stating focal plane arrays (FPA). Specifically, three initialization methods are presented and implemented with the simulated data, their performances are compared according to image quality index . Experiment results show that, by the first initialization approach, tirnely over-sampled image can be accurately recovered, although special field diaphragm is needed. In the second initialization, the extrapolation approximation in obtaining reconstruction results is better than either bilinear interpolation or over-sampling reconstruction, without requiting any special process on system. The proposed algorithm has simple structure, low computational cost and can be realized in real-time. A high-resolution image can be obtained by low-resolution detectors. So, the algorithm has potential applications in visible light and infrared imaging area.

  13. Development of CMOS Pixel Sensors with digital pixel dedicated to future particle physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W.; Wang, T.; Pham, H.; Hu-Guo, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Hu, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Two prototypes of CMOS pixel sensor with in-pixel analog to digital conversion have been developed in a 0.18 μm CIS process. The first design integrates a discriminator into each pixel within an area of 22 × 33 μm2 in order to meet the requirements of the ALICE inner tracking system (ALICE-ITS) upgrade. The second design features 3-bit charge encoding inside a 35 × 35 μm2 pixel which is motivated by the specifications of the outer layers of the ILD vertex detector (ILD-VXD). This work aims to validate the concept of in-pixel digitization which offers higher readout speed, lower power consumption and less dead zone compared with the column-level charge encoding.

  14. Study of performance of small gamma camera consisting of crystal pixel array and position sensitive photomultiplier tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jie; LIU Shi-Tao; LEI Xiao-Wen; YAN Tian-Xin; XU Zi-Zong; WANG Zhao-Min

    2005-01-01

    The performance of gamma camera with NaI(T1) array coupled with position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) R2486 has been studied. The pixel size of NaI(T1) crystal is 2mm×2mm and the overall dimension of the array is 48.2mm×48.2mm×5mm. There are 484 pixels in a 22×22 matrix. Because each pixel can produce a much focused light spot and restrict the spread of photons, position resolution of the gamma camera is mainly determined by pixel size. It is shown that crystal array pixel can reduce shrinkage effect and improve intrinsic position resolution greatly via restricting the spread of photons. Experimental results demonstrate that its position resolution and linearity are much improved comparing with the gamma camera using planar crystals coupled with PSPMT.

  15. Operational experience of ATLAS SCT and Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kocian, Martin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector based on silicon sensors is consisting of a strip detector (SCT) and a pixel detector. It is the crucial component for vertexing and tracking in the ATLAS experiment. With the excellent performance of the LHC well beyond the original specification the silicon tracking detectors are facing substantial challenges in terms of data acquisition, radiation damage to the sensors, and SEUs in the readout ASICs. The approaches on how the detector systems cope with the demands of high luminosity operation while maintaining excellent performance through hardware upgrades, software and firmware algorithms, and operational settings, are presented.

  16. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruner, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  17. Parallel pipeline networking and signal processing with field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and VCSEL-MSM smart pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznia, C. B.; Sawchuk, Alexander A.; Zhang, Liping; Hoanca, Bogdan; Hong, Sunkwang; Min, Chris; Pansatiankul, Dhawat E.; Alpaslan, Zahir Y.

    2000-05-01

    We present a networking and signal processing architecture called Transpar-TR (Translucent Smart Pixel Array-Token- Ring) that utilizes smart pixel technology to perform 2D parallel optical data transfer between digital processing nodes. Transpar-TR moves data through the network in the form of 3D packets (2D spatial and 1D time). By utilizing many spatial parallel channels, Transpar-TR can achieve high throughput, low latency communication between nodes, even with each channel operating at moderate data rates. The 2D array of optical channels is created by an array of smart pixels, each with an optical input and optical output. Each smart pixel consists of two sections, an optical network interface and ALU-based processor with local memory. The optical network interface is responsible for transmitting and receiving optical data packets using a slotted token ring network protocol. The smart pixel array operates as a single-instruction multiple-data processor when processing data. The Transpar-TR network, consisting of networked smart pixel arrays, can perform pipelined parallel processing very efficiently on 2D data structures such as images and video. This paper discusses the Transpar-TR implementation in which each node is the printed circuit board integration of a VCSEL-MSM chip, a transimpedance receiver array chip and an FPGA chip.

  18. Multiplexed Readout for 1000-pixel Arrays of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    van Rantwijk, Joris; van Loon, Dennis; Yates, Stephen; Baryshev, Andrey; Baselmans, Jochem

    2015-01-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) are the most attractive radiation detectors for far-infrared and sub-mm astronomy: They combine ultimate sensitivity with the possibility to create very large detector arrays, in excess of 10 000 pixels. This is possible by reading-out the arrays using RF frequency division multiplexing, which allows multiplexing ratios in excess of 1000 pixels per readout line. We describe a novel readout system for large arrays of MKIDs, operating in a 2 GHz band in the 4-8 GHz range. The readout, which is a combination of a digital front- and back-end and an analog up- and down-converter system, can read out up to 4000 detectors simultaneously with 1 kHz datarate. The system achieves a readout noise power spectral density of -98 dBc/Hz while reading 1000 carriers simultaneously, which scales linear with the number of carriers. We demonstrate that 4000 state-of-the-art Aluminium-NbTiN MKIDs can be read out without deteriorating their intrinsic performance.

  19. 64-pixel NbTiN superconducting nanowire single-photon detector array for spatially resolved photon detection

    CERN Document Server

    Miki, Shigehito; Wang, Zhen; Terai, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    We present the characterization of two-dimensionally arranged 64-pixel NbTiN superconducting nanowire single-photon detector array for spatially resolved photon detection. NbTiN films deposited on thermally oxidized Si substrates enabled the high-yield production of high-quality SSPD pixels, and all 64 SSPD pixels showed uniform superconducting characteristics. Furthermore, all of the pixels showed single-photon sensitivity, and 60 of the 64 pixels showed a pulse generation probability higher than 90% after photon absorption. As a result of light irradiation from the single-mode optical fiber at different distances between the fiber tip and the active area, the variations of system detection efficiency in each pixel showed reasonable Gaussian distribution to represent the spatial distributions of photon flux intensity.

  20. Integrated X-ray and charged particle active pixel CMOS sensor arrays using an epitaxial silicon sensitive region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bichsel, Hans; Bieser, Fred; Matis, Howard S.; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Weiman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-07-01

    Integrated CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) arrays have been fabricated and tested using X-ray and electron sources. The 128 by 128 pixel arrays, designed in a standard 0.25 micron process, use a {approx}10 micron epitaxial silicon layer as a deep detection region. The epitaxial layer has a much greater thickness than the surface features used by standard CMOS APS, leading to stronger signals and potentially better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). On the other hand, minority carriers confined within the epitaxial region may diffuse to neighboring pixels, blur images and reduce peak signal intensity. But for low-rate, sparse-event images, centroid analysis of this diffusion may be used to increase position resolution. Careful trade-offs involving pixel size and sense-node area verses capacitance must be made to optimize overall performance. The prototype sensor arrays, therefore, include a range of different pixel designs, including different APS circuits and a range of different epitaxial layer contact structures. The fabricated arrays were tested with 1.5 GeV electrons and Fe-55 X-ray sources, yielding a measured noise of 13 electrons RMS and an SNR for single Fe-55 X-rays of greater than 38.

  1. A single-pixel optical-sectioning programmable array microscope (SP-PAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Ye, P.; Arce, G. R.; Prather, D. W.

    2010-02-01

    Programmable array microscopes (PAMs) use "multi-pinhole" masks in confocal image planes to introduce illumination and block the "out-of-focus light". Compared to traditional confocal microscopes (CM), PAM systems have higher efficiency in utilizing the signal light and faster image acquisition speed. However, these advantages are gained at the cost of using more complicated optics and detectors. Compressive sampling (CS) measurement patterns can be used as pinhole masks in PAM systems. With CS patterns, the light collected after the detector mask can be summed up and used to reconstruct the imaging scene via solving an l1-minimization problem. Only a simple relay-lens and a singlepixel detector are needed to measure the intensity of the summed light. Therefore the optical complexity associated with conventional PAM systems can be reduced. Since only a single-pixel detector is needed, this system can also be called a single-pixel PAM or SP-PAM system. In this work, we introduce the design and fabrication of a prototype SP-PAM system. In this system, scrambled-block Hadamard ensembles (SBHE) are used as CS measurement patterns and a digital micromirror device (DMD) is employed to realize these patterns.

  2. Robustness of Planar Fourier Capture Arrays to Colour Changes and Lost Pixels

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Patrick R; Sivaramakrishnan, Sriram; Molnar, Alyosha

    2011-01-01

    Planar Fourier capture arrays (PFCAs) are optical sensors built entirely in standard microchip manufacturing flows. PFCAs are composed of ensembles of angle sensitive pixels (ASPs) that each report a single coefficient of the Fourier transform of the far-away scene. Here we characterize the performance of PFCAs under the following three non-optimal conditions. First, we show that PFCAs can operate while sensing light of a wavelength other than the design point. Second, if only a randomly-selected subset of 10% of the ASPs are functional, we can nonetheless reconstruct the entire far-away scene using compressed sensing. Third, if the wavelength of the imaged light is unknown, it can be inferred by demanding self-consistency of the outputs.

  3. Development and operation of a pixel segmented liquid-filled linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, J.; Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Pazos, A.; Pena, J.; Lobato, R.; Mosquera, J.; Pombar, M.; Sendón, J.

    2005-04-01

    A liquid isooctane (C8H18) filled ionization linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance has been designed, built and tested. The detector consists of 128 pixels, each of them with an area of 1.7 mm × 1.7 mm and a gap of 0.5 mm. The small pixel size makes the detector ideal for high gradient beam profiles such as those present in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and radiosurgery. As the read-out electronics we use the X-ray Data Acquisition System with the Xchip developed by the CCLRC. Studies concerning the collection efficiency dependence on the polarization voltage and on the dose rate have been made in order to optimize the device operation. In the first tests, we have studied dose rate and energy dependences. Dose rate dependence was found to be lower than 2.1% up to 5 Gy min-1, and energy dependence lower than 2.5% up to 20 cm depth in solid water. Output factors and penumbras for several rectangular fields have been measured with the linear array and were compared with the results obtained with a 0.125 cm3 air ionization chamber and radiographic film, respectively. Finally, we have acquired profiles for an IMRT field and for a virtual wedge. These profiles have also been compared with radiographic film measurements. All the comparisons show a good correspondence. The device has proved its capability to verify on-line therapy beams with good spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio.

  4. Development and operation of a pixel segmented liquid-filled linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, J [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Franco, L [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Gomez, F [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Iglesias, A [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pazos, A [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pena, J [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lobato, R [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago (Spain); Mosquera, J [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago (Spain); Pombar, M [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago (Spain); Sendon, J [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago (Spain)

    2005-04-21

    A liquid isooctane (C{sub 8}H{sub 18}) filled ionization linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance has been designed, built and tested. The detector consists of 128 pixels, each of them with an area of 1.7 mm x 1.7 mm and a gap of 0.5 mm. The small pixel size makes the detector ideal for high gradient beam profiles such as those present in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and radiosurgery. As the read-out electronics we use the X-ray Data Acquisition System with the Xchip developed by the CCLRC. Studies concerning the collection efficiency dependence on the polarization voltage and on the dose rate have been made in order to optimize the device operation. In the first tests, we have studied dose rate and energy dependences. Dose rate dependence was found to be lower than 2.1% up to 5 Gy min{sup -1}, and energy dependence lower than 2.5% up to 20 cm depth in solid water. Output factors and penumbras for several rectangular fields have been measured with the linear array and were compared with the results obtained with a 0.125 cm{sup 3} air ionization chamber and radiographic film, respectively. Finally, we have acquired profiles for an IMRT field and for a virtual wedge. These profiles have also been compared with radiographic film measurements. All the comparisons show a good correspondence. The device has proved its capability to verify on-line therapy beams with good spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. A sub-millimeter resolution PET detector module using a multi-pixel photon counter array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tae Yong; Wu, Heyu; Komarov, Sergey; Siegel, Stefan B; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2010-05-07

    A PET block detector module using an array of sub-millimeter lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals read out by an array of surface-mount, semiconductor photosensors has been developed. The detector consists of a LSO array, a custom acrylic light guide, a 3 x 3 multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) array (S10362-11-050P, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) and a readout board with a charge division resistor network. The LSO array consists of 100 crystals, each measuring 0.8 x 0.8 x 3 mm(3) and arranged in 0.86 mm pitches. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to aid the design and fabrication of a custom light guide to control distribution of scintillation light over the surface of the MPPC array. The output signals of the nine MPPC are multiplexed by a charge division resistor network to generate four position-encoded analog outputs. Flood image, energy resolution and timing resolution measurements were performed using standard NIM electronics. The linearity of the detector response was investigated using gamma-ray sources of different energies. The 10 x 10 array of 0.8 mm LSO crystals was clearly resolved in the flood image. The average energy resolution and standard deviation were 20.0% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and +/-5.0%, respectively, at 511 keV. The timing resolution of a single MPPC coupled to a LSO crystal was found to be 857 ps FWHM, and the value for the central region of detector module was 1182 ps FWHM when +/-10% energy window was applied. The nonlinear response of a single MPPC when used to read out a single LSO was observed among the corner crystals of the proposed detector module. However, the central region of the detector module exhibits significantly less nonlinearity (6.5% for 511 keV). These results demonstrate that (1) a charge-sharing resistor network can effectively multiplex MPPC signals and reduce the number of output signals without significantly degrading the performance of a PET detector and (2) a custom light guide to permit light sharing

  6. Mechanical design and development of TES bolometer detector arrays for the Advanced ACTPol experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Jonathan T; Beall, James A; Choi, Steve K; Crowley, Kevin T; Devlin, Mark J; Duff, Shannon M; Gallardo, Patricio M; Henderson, Shawn W; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D; Page, Lyman A; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmitt, Benjamin L; Simon, Sara M; Staggs, Suzanne T; Thornton, Robert; Ullom, Joel N; Vavagiakis, Eve M; Wollack, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling ~5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline profile leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at t...

  7. A prototype hybrid pixel detector ASIC for the CLIC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Valerio, P; Arfaoui, S; Ballabriga, R; Benoit, M; Bonacini, S; Campbell, M; Dannheim, D; De Gaspari, M; Felici, D; Kulis, S; Llopart, X; Nascetti, A; Poikela, T; Wong, W S

    2014-01-01

    A prototype hybrid pixel detector ASIC specifically designed to the requirements of the vertex detector for CLIC is described and first electrical measurements are presented. The chip has been designed using a commercial 65 nm CMOS technology and comprises a matrix of 64x64 square pixels with 25 μm pitch. The main features include simultaneous 4-bit measure- ment of Time-over-Threshold (ToT) and Time-of-Arrival (ToA) with 10 ns accuracy, on-chip data compression and power pulsing capability.

  8. Running experience with the DELPHI pixel detector reflections on design characteristics and system features

    CERN Document Server

    Heuser, J M

    1999-01-01

    The DELPHI experiment at LEP is the first collider experiment with hybrid pixel detectors contributing to its track reconstruction. The pixel detector has been installed in 1996 with the final DELPHI silicon tracker, an assembly of microstrip, ministrip and pixel detectors optimized for the operation at LEP2. It was completed for the physics period in 1997. The pixel detector comprises 1.2 million detector cells of 330*330 mu m/sup 2/. 152 detector modules are arranged in 4 inclined cone-shaped layers which cover polar angles from 10 degrees to 25 degrees . Experience on the system's features has been gained during three years of operation. The article intends to provide information on positive and critical aspects which might be useful for designers of pixel detector systems in forthcoming experiments. (4 refs).

  9. High-dynamic-range coherent diffractive imaging: ptychography using the mixed-mode pixel array detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.giewekemeyer@xfel.eu [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Philipp, Hugh T. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Wilke, Robin N. [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Aquila, Andrew [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Osterhoff, Markus [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Zozulya, Alexey V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Salditt, Tim [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Gruner, Sol M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Kavli Institute of Cornell for Nanoscience, Ithaca, NY (United States); Mancuso, Adrian P. [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-08-07

    The advantages of a novel wide dynamic range hard X-ray detector are demonstrated for (ptychographic) coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. Coherent (X-ray) diffractive imaging (CDI) is an increasingly popular form of X-ray microscopy, mainly due to its potential to produce high-resolution images and the lack of an objective lens between the sample and its corresponding imaging detector. One challenge, however, is that very high dynamic range diffraction data must be collected to produce both quantitative and high-resolution images. In this work, hard X-ray ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has been performed at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron to demonstrate the potential of a very wide dynamic range imaging X-ray detector (the Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD). The detector is capable of single photon detection, detecting fluxes exceeding 1 × 10{sup 8} 8-keV photons pixel{sup −1} s{sup −1}, and framing at 1 kHz. A ptychographic reconstruction was performed using a peak focal intensity on the order of 1 × 10{sup 10} photons µm{sup −2} s{sup −1} within an area of approximately 325 nm × 603 nm. This was done without need of a beam stop and with a very modest attenuation, while ‘still’ images of the empty beam far-field intensity were recorded without any attenuation. The treatment of the detector frames and CDI methodology for reconstruction of non-sensitive detector regions, partially also extending the active detector area, are described.

  10. Descent of the Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) for ALICE Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) constitutes the two innermost layers of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) at radii of 3.9 cm and 7.6 cm, respectively. It is a fundamental element for the determination of the position of the primary vertex as well as for the measurement of the impact parameter of secondary tracks originating from the weak decays of strange, charm and beauty particles.

  11. High-dynamic-range coherent diffractive imaging: ptychography using the mixed-mode pixel array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus; Philipp, Hugh T.; Wilke, Robin N.; Aquila, Andrew; Osterhoff, Markus; Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S.; Zozulya, Alexey V.; Salditt, Tim; Gruner, Sol M.; Mancuso, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent (X-ray) diffractive imaging (CDI) is an increasingly popular form of X-ray microscopy, mainly due to its potential to produce high-resolution images and the lack of an objective lens between the sample and its corresponding imaging detector. One challenge, however, is that very high dynamic range diffraction data must be collected to produce both quantitative and high-resolution images. In this work, hard X-ray ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has been performed at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron to demonstrate the potential of a very wide dynamic range imaging X-ray detector (the Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD). The detector is capable of single photon detection, detecting fluxes exceeding 1 × 108 8-keV photons pixel−1 s−1, and framing at 1 kHz. A ptychographic reconstruction was performed using a peak focal intensity on the order of 1 × 1010 photons µm−2 s−1 within an area of approximately 325 nm × 603 nm. This was done without need of a beam stop and with a very modest attenuation, while ‘still’ images of the empty beam far-field intensity were recorded without any attenuation. The treatment of the detector frames and CDI methodology for reconstruction of non-sensitive detector regions, partially also extending the active detector area, are described. PMID:25178008

  12. The ultralight DEPFET pixel detector of the Belle II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetticke, Florian

    2017-02-01

    An upgrade of the existing Japanese flavor factory (KEKB in Tsukuba, Japan) is under construction and foreseen for commissioning by the end of 2017. This new e+e- machine (SuperKEKB) will deliver an instantaneous luminosity 40 times higher than the luminosity world record set by KEKB. To fully exploit the increased number of events and provide high precision measurements of B-meson decay vertices in such a harsh environment, the Belle detector will be upgraded to Belle II, featuring a new silicon vertex detector with two pixel layers close to the interaction point based on the DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) technology. This technology combines particle detection together with in-pixel amplification by integrating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted silicon bulk. In Belle II, DEPFET sensors thinned down to 75 μm with low power consumption and low intrinsic noise will be used. The first large thin multi-chip production modules have been produced and characterization results on both large modules as well as small test systems will be presented in this contribution.

  13. The charge pump PLL clock generator designed for the 1.56 ns bin size time-to-digital converter pixel array of the Timepix3 readout ASIC

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Y et al.

    2014-01-01

    Timepix3 is a newly developed pixel readout chip which is expected to be operated in a wide range of gaseous and silicon detectors. It is made of 256×256 pixels organized in a square pixel-array with 55 µm pitch. Oscillators running at 640 MHz are distributed across the pixel-array and allow for a highly accurate measurement of the arrival time of a hit. This paper concentrates on a low-jitter phase locked loop (PLL) that is located in the chip periphery. This PLL provides a control voltage which regulates the actual frequency of the individual oscillators, allowing for compensation of process, voltage, and temperature variations.

  14. Theoretical investigation of the noise performance of active pixel imaging arrays based on polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Liang, Albert K; Zhao, Qihua

    2017-07-01

    Active matrix flat-panel imagers, which typically incorporate a pixelated array with one a-Si:H thin-film transistor (TFT) per pixel, have become ubiquitous by virtue of many advantages, including large monolithic construction, radiation tolerance, and high DQE. However, at low exposures such as those encountered in fluoroscopy, digital breast tomosynthesis and breast computed tomography, DQE is degraded due to the modest average signal generated per interacting x-ray relative to electronic additive noise levels of ~1000 e, or greater. A promising strategy for overcoming this limitation is to introduce an amplifier into each pixel, referred to as the active pixel (AP) concept. Such circuits provide in-pixel amplification prior to readout as well as facilitate correlated multiple sampling, enhancing signal-to-noise and restoring DQE at low exposures. In this study, a methodology for theoretically investigating the signal and noise performance of imaging array designs is introduced and applied to the case of AP circuits based on low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si), a semiconductor suited to manufacture of large area, radiation tolerant arrays. Computer simulations employing an analog circuit simulator and performed in the temporal domain were used to investigate signal characteristics and major sources of electronic additive noise for various pixel amplifier designs. The noise sources include photodiode shot noise and resistor thermal noise, as well as TFT thermal and flicker noise. TFT signal behavior and flicker noise were parameterized from fits to measurements performed on individual poly-Si test TFTs. The performance of three single-stage and three two-stage pixel amplifier designs were investigated under conditions relevant to fluoroscopy. The study assumes a 20 × 20 cm(2) , 150 μm pitch array operated at 30 fps and coupled to a CsI:Tl x-ray converter. Noise simulations were performed as a function of operating conditions, including

  15. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.karellas@umassmed.edu; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pisa 56127, Italy and Pixirad Imaging Counters s.r.l., L. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: High-resolution, photon-counting, energy-resolved detector with fast-framing capability can facilitate simultaneous acquisition of precontrast and postcontrast images for subtraction angiography without pixel registration artifacts and can facilitate high-resolution real-time imaging during image-guided interventions. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the spatial resolution characteristics of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. Methods: A 650 μm thick CdTe Schottky photon-counting detector capable of concurrently acquiring up to two energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include photons of 10 keV or higher. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 μm resulting in pixel pitch of 60 and 51.96 μm along the two orthogonal directions. The detector was characterized at IEC-RQA5 spectral conditions. Linear response of the detector was determined over the air kerma rate relevant to image-guided interventional procedures ranging from 1.3 nGy/frame to 91.4 μGy/frame. Presampled modulation transfer was determined using a tungsten edge test device. The edge-spread function and the finely sampled line spread function accounted for hexagonal sampling, from which the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined. Since detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display, the optimal square pixel size was determined by minimizing the root-mean-squared-error of the aperture functions for the square and hexagonal pixels up to the Nyquist limit. Results: At Nyquist frequencies of 8.33 and 9.62 cycles/mm along the apothem and orthogonal to the apothem directions, the modulation factors were 0.397 and 0.228, respectively. For the corresponding axis, the limiting resolution defined as 10% MTF occurred at 13.3 and 12 cycles/mm, respectively. Evaluation of the aperture functions yielded an optimal square pixel size of 54

  16. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backhaus, M., E-mail: malte.backhaus@cern.ch

    2016-09-21

    During Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the ATLAS Pixel Detector has shown excellent performance. The ATLAS collaboration took advantage of the first long shutdown of the LHC during 2013 and 2014 and extracted the ATLAS Pixel Detector from the experiment, brought it to surface and maintained the services. This included the installation of new service quarter panels, the repair of cables, and the installation of the new Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). Additionally, a completely new innermost pixel detector layer, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), was constructed and installed in May 2014 between a new smaller beam pipe and the existing Pixel Detector. With a radius of 3.3 cm the IBL is located extremely close to the interaction point. Therefore, a new readout chip and two new sensor technologies (planar and 3D) are used in the IBL. In order to achieve best possible physics performance the material budget was improved with respect to the existing Pixel Detector. This is realized using lightweight staves for mechanical support and a CO{sub 2} based cooling system. This paper describes the improvements achieved during the maintenance of the existing Pixel Detector as well as the performance of the IBL during the construction and commissioning phase. Additionally, first results obtained during the LHC Run 2 demonstrating the distinguished tracking performance of the new Four Layer ATLAS Pixel Detector are presented.

  17. GEM400: A front-end chip based on capacitor-switch array for pixel-based GEM detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. S.; Jiang, X. S.; Liu, G.; Wang, N.; Sheng, H. Y.; Zhuang, B. A.; Zhao, J. W.

    2012-03-01

    The upgrade of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) needs two-dimensional position-sensitive detection equipment to improve the experimental performance. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector, in particular, pixel-based GEM detector has good application prospects in the domain of synchrotron radiation. The read-out of larger scale pixel-based GEM detector is difficult for the high density of the pixels (PAD for collecting electrons). In order to reduce the number of cables, this paper presents a read-out scheme for pixel-based GEM detector, which is based on System-in-Package technology and ASIC technology. We proposed a circuit structure based on capacitor switch array circuit, and design a chip GEM400, which is a 400 channels ASIC. The proposed circuit can achieve good stability and low power dissipation. The chip is implemented in a 0.35μm CMOS process. The basic functional circuitry in ths chip includes analog switch, analog buffer, voltage amplifier, bandgap and control logic block, and the layout of this chip takes 5mm × 5mm area. The simulation results show that the chip can allow the maximum amount of input charge 70pC on the condition of 100pF external integrator capacitor. Besides, the chip has good channel uniformity (INL is better than 0.1%) and lower power dissipation.

  18. CMOS pixel development for the ATLAS experiment at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rimoldi, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the rate and radiation environment expected at the HL-LHC new approaches are being developed on CMOS pixel detectors, providing charge collection in a depleted layer. They are based on: HV enabling technologies that allow to use high depletion voltages, high resistivity wafers for large depletion depths; radiation hard processed with multiple nested wells to allow CMOS electronics embedded with sufficient shielding into the sensor substrate and backside processing and thinning for material minimization and backside voltage application. Since 2014, members of more than 20 groups in the ATLAS experiment are actively pursuing CMOS pixel R$\\&$D in an ATLAS Demonstrator program pursuing sensor design and characterizations. The goal of this program is to demonstrate that depleted CMOS pixels are suited for high rate, fast timing and high radiation operation at LHC. For this a number of technologies have been explored and characterized. In this presentation the challenges for the usage of CMOS pixel...

  19. The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment for the Run2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00237659

    2015-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long showdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance will be improved through the reduction of pixel size while, targeting for a low material budget, a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system have been adopted. An overview of the refurbishing of the Pixel Detect or and of the IBL project as...

  20. The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for LHC Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Pernegger, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long showdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance will be improved through the reduction of pixel size while, targeting for a low material budget, a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system have been adopted. An overview of the refurbishing of the Pixel Detector and of the IBL project as ...

  1. Sandia concentrator array testing experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwin, H. J.; Rogers, C. B.; Beavis, L. C.

    An assortment of PV concentrator modules and arrays have been tested and evaluated at the Sandia outdoor test facility. These test items include actively-cooled parabolic reflector and linear Fresnel lens concentrators, and actively- and passively-cooled point focus collectors. Maximum power efficiencies were measured over a range of sunlight intensities and cell temperatures, then a linear equation relating efficiency to cell temperature and insolation was developed for each module and array by using a multiple linear regression analysis technique on the data. An evaluation of the suitability of Polyvinyl-Butyral (PVB) as a material used to laminate solar cells to glass is presented. Some general observations are made on the accuracy of tracking systems, and the maintenance of these systems.

  2. 256-pixel microcalorimeter array for high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy of mixed-actinide materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, R., E-mail: rwinkler@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hoover, A.S.; Rabin, M.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bennett, D.A.; Doriese, W.B.; Fowler, J.W.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Horansky, R.D.; Reintsema, C.D.; Schmidt, D.R.; Vale, L.R.; Ullom, J.N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-01-11

    The application of cryogenic microcalorimeter detectors to γ-ray spectroscopy allows for measurements with unprecedented energy resolution. These detectors are ideally suited for γ-ray spectroscopy applications for which the measurement quality is limited by the spectral overlap of many closely spaced transitions using conventional detector technologies. The non-destructive analysis of mixed-isotope Pu materials is one such application where the precision can be potentially improved utilizing microcalorimeter detectors compared to current state-of-the-art high-purity Ge detectors (HPGe). The LANL-NIST γ-ray spectrometer, a 256-pixel microcalorimeter array based on transition-edge sensors (TESs), was recently commissioned and used to collect data on a variety of Pu isotopic standards to characterize the instrument performance. These measurements represent the first time the simultaneous readout of all 256 pixels for measurements of mixed-isotope Pu materials has been achieved. The LANL-NIST γ-ray spectrometer has demonstrated an average pixel resolution of 55 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 100 keV, nearly an order of magnitude better than HPGe detectors. Some challenges of the analysis of many-channel ultra-high resolution data and the techniques used to produce quality spectra for isotopic analysis will be presented. The LANL-NIST γ-ray spectrometer has also demonstrated stable operation and obtained high resolution measurements at total array event rates beyond 1 kHz. For a total event rate of 1.25 kHz, approximately 5.6 cps/pixel, a 72.2 eV average FWHM for the 103 keV photopeak of {sup 153}Gd was achieved.

  3. Advances in Small Pixel TES-Based X-Ray Microcalorimeter Arrays for Solar Physics and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandler, S. R.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Wassell, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing small-pixel transition-edge-sensor (TES) for solar physics and astrophysics applications. These large format close-packed arrays are fabricated on solid silicon substrates and are designed to accommodate count-rates of up to a few hundred counts/pixel/second at a FWHM energy resolution approximately 2 eV at 6 keV. We have fabricated versions that utilize narrow-line planar and stripline wiring. We present measurements of the performance and uniformity of kilo-pixel arrays, incorporating TESs with single 65-micron absorbers on a 7s-micron pitch, as well as versions with more than one absorber attached to the TES, 4-absorber and 9-absorber "Hydras". We have also fabricated a version of this detector optimized for lower energies and lower count-rate applications. These devices have a lower superconducting transition temperature and are operated just above the 40mK heat sink temperature. This results in a lower heat capacity and low thermal conductance to the heat sink. With individual single pixels of this type we have achieved a FWHM energy resolution of 0.9 eV with 1.5 keV Al K x-rays, to our knowledge the first x-ray microcalorimeter with sub-eV energy resolution. The 4-absorber and 9-absorber versions of this type achieved FWHM energy resolutions of 1.4 eV and 2.1 eV at 1.5 keV respectively. We will discuss the application of these devices for new astrophysics mission concepts.

  4. The Polarbear-2 and the Simons Array Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A.; Ade, P.; Akiba, Y.; Aleman, C.; Arnold, K.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barch, B.; Barron, D.; Bender, A.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; Dobbs, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunner, R.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feeney, S.; Feng, C.; Fujino, T.; Fuller, G.; Gilbert, A.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Groh, J.; Haan, T. De; Hall, G.; Halverson, N.; Hamada, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Holzapfel, W.; Hori, Y.; Howe, L.; Inoue, Y.; Irie, F.; Jaehnig, G.; Jaffe, A.; Jeong, O.; Katayama, N.; Kaufman, J.; Kazemzadeh, K.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Kusaka, A.; Jeune, M. Le; Lee, A.; Leon, D.; Linder, E.; Lowry, L.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N.; Mizukami, K.; Montgomery, J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Puglisi, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Raum, C.; Reichardt, C.; Richards, P.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K.; Segawa, Y.; Sherwin, B.; Shirley, I.; Siritanasak, P.; Stebor, N.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, J.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takakura, S.; Takatori, S.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Westbrook, B.; Whitehorn, N.; Yamashita, T.; Zahn, A.; Zahn, O.

    2016-08-01

    We present an overview of the design and status of the Polarbear-2 and the Simons Array experiments. Polarbear-2 is a cosmic microwave background polarimetry experiment which aims to characterize the arc-minute angular scale B-mode signal from weak gravitational lensing and search for the degree angular scale B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. The receiver has a 365 mm diameter focal plane cooled to 270 mK. The focal plane is filled with 7588 dichroic lenslet-antenna-coupled polarization sensitive transition edge sensor (TES) bolometric pixels that are sensitive to 95 and 150 GHz bands simultaneously. The TES bolometers are read-out by SQUIDs with 40 channel frequency domain multiplexing. Refractive optical elements are made with high-purity alumina to achieve high optical throughput. The receiver is designed to achieve noise equivalent temperature of 5.8 \\upmu K_CMB√{s} in each frequency band. Polarbear-2 will deploy in 2016 in the Atacama desert in Chile. The Simons Array is a project to further increase sensitivity by deploying three Polarbear-2 type receivers. The Simons Array will cover 95, 150, and 220 GHz frequency bands for foreground control. The Simons Array will be able to constrain tensor-to-scalar ratio and sum of neutrino masses to σ (r) = 6× 10^{-3} at r = 0.1 and sum m_{\\upnu } (σ =1) to 40 meV.

  5. New air fluorescence detectors employed in the Telescope Array experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuno, H., E-mail: htokuno@cr.phys.titech.ac.jp [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Tameda, Y.; Takeda, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Kadota, K. [Tokyo City University, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Ikeda, D. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Chikawa, M. [Kinki University, Higashi Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Fujii, T. [Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); University of Tokyo, Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Honda, K. [University of Yamanashi, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Inoue, N. [Saitama University, Saitama, Saitama (Japan); Kakimoto, F. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Kawana, S. [Saitama University, Saitama, Saitama (Japan); Kido, E. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Matthews, J.N. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Nonaka, T. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Ogio, S.; Okuda, S. [Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Ozawa, S. [Waseda University, Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sagawa, H. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Sakurai, N. [Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); and others

    2012-06-01

    Since 2007, the Telescope Array (TA) experiment, based in Utah, USA, has been observing ultra high energy cosmic rays to understand their origins. The experiment includes a surface detector (SD) array and three fluorescence detector (FD) stations. The FD stations, installed surrounding the SD array, measure the air fluorescence light emitted from extensive air showers (EASs) for precise determination of their energies and species. The detectors employed at one of the three FD stations were relocated from the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) experiment. At the other two stations, newly designed detectors were constructed for the TA experiment. An FD consists of a primary mirror and a camera equipped with photomultiplier tube pixels. To obtain the EAS parameters with high accuracy, understanding the FD optical characteristics is important. In this paper, we report the characteristics and installation of the new FDs and the performances of the FD components. The results of the monitored mirror reflectance during the observation time are also described in this report.

  6. Mechanical Design and Development of TES Bolometer Detector Arrays for the Advanced ACTPol Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan T.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Devlin, Mark J.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio M.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling 5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150 mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline pro le leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at the detector array stack assemblies. This experiment will also make use of extensive hardware and software previously developed for ACT, which will be modi ed to incorporate the new AdvACT instruments. Therefore, we discuss the integration of all AdvACT arrays with pre-existing ACTPol infrastructure.

  7. The Upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrere, Didier; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run-2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 at a radius of 3.3 cm between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe. The new detector, built to cope with high radiation and expected occupancy, is the first large scale application of 3D detectors and CMOS 130nm technology. In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run-1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. The commissioning and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector, in particular the IBL, will be presented, using collision data.

  8. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Backhaus, Malte; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Run-2 of the LHC will provide new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 at a radius of 3.3 cm between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed as well as a new read-out chip within CMOS 130nm technology and with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. The new detector is the first large scale application of of 3D detectors and CMOS 130nm technology. An overview of the lessons learned during the IBL project will be presented, focusing on the challenges and highlighting the issues met during the productio...

  9. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment for Run-2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Giordani, MarioPaolo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run-2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 at a radius of 3.3 cm between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe. The new detector, built to cope with high radiation and expected occupancy, is the first large scale application of 3D detectors and CMOS 130nm technology. In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run-1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. The commissioning and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector, in particular the IBL, will be presented, using collision data.

  10. The Upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run-2 at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Giordani, MarioPaolo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run-2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 at a radius of 3.3 cm between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe. The new detector, built to cope with high radiation and expected occupancy, is the first large scale application of 3D detectors and CMOS 130 nm technology. In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run-1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. The commissioning and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector, in particular the IBL, will be presented using collision data.

  11. Operational Experience and Performance with the ATLAS Pixel detector with emphasis on radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Butti, Pierfrancesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on its 4-layer Pixel Detector, that has undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered by the Large Hadron Collider, with record breaking instantaneous luminosities of 1.3 x 10^34 cm-2 s-1 recently surpassed. The key status and performance metrics of the ATLAS Pixel Detector are summarised, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described, with special emphasis to radiation damage experience.

  12. Operational Experience and Performance with the ATLAS Pixel detector with emphasis on radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Pascual, Juan Antonio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on its 4-layer Pixel Detector, that has undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered by the Large Hadron Collider, with record breaking instantaneous luminosities of 1.3 x 10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ recently surpassed. The key status and performance metrics of the ATLAS Pixel Detector are summarised, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described, with special emphasis to radiation damage experience.

  13. Characterization of CdTe sensors with Schottky contacts coupled to charge-integrating pixel array detectors for X-ray science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J.; Tate, M. W.; Shanks, K. S.; Philipp, H. T.; Weiss, J. T.; Purohit, P.; Chamberlain, D.; Ruff, J. P. C.; Gruner, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) consist of an x-ray sensor layer bonded pixel-by-pixel to an underlying readout chip. This approach allows both the sensor and the custom pixel electronics to be tailored independently to best match the x-ray imaging requirements. Here we present characterizations of CdTe sensors hybridized with two different charge-integrating readout chips, the Keck PAD and the Mixed-Mode PAD (MM-PAD), both developed previously in our laboratory. The charge-integrating architecture of each of these PADs extends the instantaneous counting rate by many orders of magnitude beyond that obtainable with photon counting architectures. The Keck PAD chip consists of rapid, 8-frame, in-pixel storage elements with framing periods detector, the MM-PAD, has an extended dynamic range by utilizing an in-pixel overflow counter coupled with charge removal circuitry activated at each overflow. This allows the recording of signals from the single-photon level to tens of millions of x-rays/pixel/frame while framing at 1 kHz. Both detector chips consist of a 128 × 128 pixel array with (150 μm)2 pixels.

  14. High-speed imaging at high x-ray energy: CdTe sensors coupled to charge-integrating pixel array detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Julian; Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Weiss, Joel T.; Purohit, Prafull [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Chamberlain, Darol [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M., E-mail: smg26@cornell.edu [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) consist of an x-ray sensor layer bonded pixel-by-pixel to an underlying readout chip. This approach allows both the sensor and the custom pixel electronics to be tailored independently to best match the x-ray imaging requirements. Here we describe the hybridization of CdTe sensors to two different charge-integrating readout chips, the Keck PAD and the Mixed-Mode PAD (MM-PAD), both developed previously in our laboratory. The charge-integrating architecture of each of these PADs extends the instantaneous counting rate by many orders of magnitude beyond that obtainable with photon counting architectures. The Keck PAD chip consists of rapid, 8-frame, in-pixel storage elements with framing periods <150 ns. The second detector, the MM-PAD, has an extended dynamic range by utilizing an in-pixel overflow counter coupled with charge removal circuitry activated at each overflow. This allows the recording of signals from the single-photon level to tens of millions of x-rays/pixel/frame while framing at 1 kHz. Both detector chips consist of a 128×128 pixel array with (150 µm){sup 2} pixels.

  15. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mullier, Geoffrey Andre; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long showdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), a fourth layer of pixel detectors, installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and increased pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. A new readout chip has been developed within CMOS 130nm technology with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. Dedicated design features in combination with a new composite material were considered and used in order to reduce the material budget of the support structure while keeping the optimal thermo-mechanical performan...

  16. The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment for the Run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Oide, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run 1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long shutdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). The IBL is the fourth layer of the Run 2 Pixel Detector, and it was installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and the new smaller-radius beam pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance will be improved through the reduction of pixel size while, targeting for a low material budget, a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system have been adopted. IBL construction is now completed. An overview of the IBL project...

  17. The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment for the Run2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelli, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long shutdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and will be installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance will be improved through the reduction of pixel size while, targeting for a low material budget, a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system have been adopted. IBL construction is now completed. An overview of the IBL project as well as the ...

  18. The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment for the Run2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Oide, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long showdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and will be installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance will be improved through the reduction of pixel size while, targeting for a low material budget, a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system have been adopted. IBL construction is now completed. An overview of the IBL project as well as the ...

  19. The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for LHC Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Pernegger, Heinz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long shutdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance will be improved through the reduction of pixel size while, targeting for a low material budget, a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system have been adopted. An overview of the refurbishing of the Pixel Detector and of the IBL project as we...

  20. Evaluation of a SiPM array detector coupled to a LFS-3 pixellated scintillator for PET/MR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Stratos; Fysikopoulos, Eleftherios [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Georgiou, Maria [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Department of Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    SiPM arrays are insensitive to magnetic fields and thus good candidates for hybrid PET/MR imaging systems. Moreover, due to their small size and flexibility can be used in dedicated small field of view small animal imaging detectors and especially in head PET/MR studies in mice. Co-doped LFS-3 scintillator crystals have higher light yield and slightly faster response than that of LSO:Ce mainly due to the co-doped activation of emission centers with varying materials such as Ce, Gd, Sc, Y, La, Tb, or Ca distributed at the molecular scale through the lutetium silicate crystal host. The purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of the SensL ArraySL-4 (4x4 element array of 3x3 mm{sup 2} silicon photomultipliers) optical detector coupled to a 6x6 LFS-3 scintillator array, with 2x2x5 mm{sup 3} crystal size elements, for possible applications in small field of view PET/MR imaging detectors. We have designed a symmetric resistive charge division circuit to read out the signal outputs of 4x4 pixel SiPM array reducing the 16 pixel outputs of the photodetector to 4 position signals. The 4 position signals were digitized using free running Analog to Digital Converters. The ADCs sampling rate was 50 MHz. An FPGA (Spartan 6 LX150T) was used for triggering and digital signal processing of the pulses. Experimental evaluation was carried out with {sup 22}Na radioactive source and the parameters studied where energy resolution and peak to valley ratio. The first preliminary results of the evaluation shows a clear visualization of the discrete 2x2x5 mm{sup 3} LFS-3 scintillator elements. The mean peak to valley ratio of the horizontal profiles on the raw image was measured equal to 11 while the energy resolution was calculated equal to 30% at the central pixels.

  1. Transition-edge sensor pixel parameter design of the microcalorimeter array for the x-ray integral field unit on Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. J.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Betancourt-Martinez, G. L.; Chervenak, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Miniussi, A. R.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Sakai, K.; Wakeham, N. A.; Wassell, E. J.; Yoon, W.; Bennett, D. A.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Morgan, K. M.; Pappas, C. G.; Reintsema, C. N.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.; Irwin, K. D.; Akamatsu, H.; Gottardi, L.; den Hartog, R.; Jackson, B. D.; van der Kuur, J.; Barret, D.; Peille, P.

    2016-07-01

    The focal plane of the X-ray integral field unit (X-IFU) for ESA's Athena X-ray observatory will consist of 4000 transition edge sensor (TES) x-ray microcalorimeters optimized for the energy range of 0.2 to 12 keV. The instrument will provide unprecedented spectral resolution of 2.5 eV at energies of up to 7 keV and will accommodate photon fluxes of 1 mCrab (90 cps) for point source observations. The baseline configuration is a uniform large pixel array (LPA) of 4.28" pixels that is read out using frequency domain multiplexing (FDM). However, an alternative configuration under study incorporates an 18 × 18 small pixel array (SPA) of 2" pixels in the central 36" region. This hybrid array configuration could be designed to accommodate higher fluxes of up to 10 mCrab (900 cps) or alternately for improved spectral performance (report on the TES pixel designs that are being optimized to meet these proposed LPA and SPA configurations. In particular we describe details of how important TES parameters are chosen to meet the specific mission criteria such as energy resolution, count-rate and quantum efficiency, and highlight performance trade-offs between designs. The basis of the pixel parameter selection is discussed in the context of existing TES arrays that are being developed for solar and x-ray astronomy applications. We describe the latest results on DC biased diagnostic arrays as well as large format kilo-pixel arrays and discuss the technical challenges associated with integrating different array types on to a single detector die.

  2. Ultra-low material pixel layers for the Mu3e experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, N; Henkelmann, L; Herkert, A; Aeschbacher, F Meier; Ng, Y W; Noehte, L O S; Schöning, A; Wiedner, D

    2016-01-01

    The upcoming Mu3e experiment will search for the charged lepton flavour violating decay of a muon at rest into three electrons. The maximal energy of the electrons is 53 MeV, hence a low material budget is a key performance requirement for the tracking detector. In this paper we summarize our approach to meet the requirement of about 0.1 % of a radiation length per pixel detector layer. This includes the choice of thinned active monolithic pixel sensors in HV-CMOS technology, ultra-thin flexible printed circuits, and helium gas cooling.

  3. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Backhaus, Malte; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    During Run-1 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the ATLAS Pixel Detector has shown excellent performance. The ATLAS collaboration took advantage of the first long shutdown of the LHC during 2013 and 2014 and extracted the ATLAS Pixel Detector from the experiment, brought it to surface and maintained the services. This includes the installation of new service quarter panels, the repair of cables, and the installation of the new Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). Additionally a completely new innermost pixel detector layer, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), was constructed and installed in May 2014 between a new smaller beam pipe and the existing Pixel Detector. With a radius of 3.3 cm the IBL is located extremely close to the interaction point. Therefore a new readout chip and two new sensor technologies (planar and 3D) are used in IBL. In order to achieve best possible physics performance the material budget was improved with respect to the existing Pixel Detector. This is realized using lightweight staves for mechanic...

  4. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Backhaus, M

    2016-01-01

    During Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the ATLAS Pixel Detector has shown excellent performance. The ATLAS collaboration took advantage of the first long shutdown of the LHC during 2013 and 2014 and extracted the ATLAS Pixel Detector from the experiment, brought it to surface and maintained the services. This included the installation of new service quarter panels, the repair of cables, and the installation of the new Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). Additionally, a completely new innermost pixel detector layer, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), was constructed and installed in May 2014 between a new smaller beam pipe and the existing Pixel Detector. With a radius of 3.3 cm the IBL is located extremely close to the interaction point. Therefore, a new readout chip and two new sensor technologies (planar and 3D) are used in the IBL. In order to achieve best possible physics performance the material budget was improved with respect to the existing Pixel Detector. This is realized using lightweight staves for me...

  5. TSV last for hybrid pixel detectors: Application to particle physics and imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, D; Berthelot, A; Cuchet, R; Chantre, C; Campbell, M

    Hybrid pixel detectors are now widely used in particle physics experiments and at synchrotron light sources. They have also stimulated growing interest in other fields and, in particular, in medical imaging. Through the continuous pursuit of miniaturization in CMOS it has been possible to increase the functionality per pixel while maintaining or even shrinking pixel dimensions. The main constraint on the more extensive use of the technology in all fields is the cost of module building and the difficulty of covering large areas seamlessly [1]. On another hand, in the field of electronic component integration, a new approach has been developed in the last years, called 3D Integration. This concept, based on using the vertical axis for component integration, allows improving the global performance of complex systems. Thanks to this technology, the cost and the form factor of components could be decreased and the performance of the global system could be enhanced. In the field of radiation imaging detectors the a...

  6. CMS Pixel Telescope Addition to T-980 Bent Crystal Collimation Experiment at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Ryan; Johnson, Todd; Kwan, Simon; Lundberg, Carl; Still, Dean; Prosser, Alan; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Zagel, Jim; Zvodaya, Viktoriya

    2012-01-01

    An enhancement to the T-980 bent crystal collimation experiment at the Tevatron has been completed. The enhancement was the installation of a pixel telescope inside the vacuum-sealed beam pipe of the Tevatron. The telescope is comprised of six CMS PSI46 pixel plaquettes, arranged as three stations of horizontal and vertical planes, with the CAPTAN system for data acquisition and control. The purpose of the pixel telescope is to measure beam profiles produced by bent crystals under various conditions. The telescope electronics inside the beam pipe initially were not adequately shielded from the image current of the passing beams. A new shielding approach was devised and installed, which resolved the problem. The noise issues encountered and the mitigating techniques are presented herein, as well as some preliminary results from the telescope.

  7. CMOS Pixel Development for the ATLAS Experiment at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Gaudiello, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the rate and radiation environment expected at the HL-LHC new approaches are being developed on CMOS pixel detectors, providing charge collection in a depleted layer. They are based on: HV enabling technologies that allow to use high depletion voltages (HV-MAPS), high resistivity wafers for large depletion depths (HR-MAPS); radiation hard processed with multiple nested wells to allow CMOS electronics embedded with sufficient shielding into the sensor substrate and backside processing and thinning for material minimization and backside voltage application. Since 2014, members of more than 20 groups in the ATLAS experiment are actively pursuing CMOS pixel R&D in an ATLAS Demonstrator program pursuing sensor design and characterizations. The goal of this program is to demonstrate that depleted CMOS pixels, with monolithic or hybrid designs, are suited for high rate, fast timing and high radiation operation at LHC. For this a number of technologies have been explored and characterized. In this pr...

  8. CMOS pixel development for the ATLAS experiment at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Risti{c}, Branislav; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the rate and radiation environment expected at the HL-LHC new approaches are being developed on CMOS pixel detectors, providing charge collection in a depleted layer. They are based on: HV enabling technologies that allow to use high depletion voltages (HV-MAPS), high resistivity wafers for large depletion depths (HR-MAPS); radiation hard processed with multiple nested wells to allow CMOS electronics embedded with sufficient shielding into the sensor substrate and backside processing and thinning for material minimization and backside voltage application. Since 2014, members of more than 20 groups in the ATLAS experiment are actively pursuing CMOS pixel R&D in an ATLAS Demonstrator program pursuing sensor design and characterizations. The goal of this program is to demonstrate that depleted CMOS pixels, with monolithic or hybrid designs, are suited for high rate, fast timing and high radiation operation at LHC. For this a number of technologies have been explored and characterized. In this pr...

  9. CMS Pixel Telescope Addition to T-980 Bent Crystal Collimation Experiment at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, Ryan; Annala, Jerry; Johnson, Todd; Kwan, Simon; Lundberg, Carl; Still, Dean; Prosser, Alan; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Zagel, Jim; Zvodaya, Viktoriya; /Fermilab

    2011-09-14

    An enhancement to the T-980 bent crystal collimation experiment at the Tevatron has been completed. The enhancement was the installation of a pixel telescope inside the vacuum-sealed beam pipe of the Tevatron. The telescope is comprised of six CMS PSI46 pixel plaquettes, arranged as three stations of horizontal and vertical planes, with the CAPTAN system for data acquisition and control. The purpose of the pixel telescope is to measure beam profiles produced by bent crystals under various conditions. The telescope electronics inside the beam pipe initially were not adequately shielded from the image current of the passing beams. A new shielding approach was devised and installed, which resolved the problem. The noise issues encountered and the mitigating techniques are presented herein, as well as some preliminary results from the telescope.

  10. Operational experience with the CMS pixel detector in LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Karancsi, Janos

    2016-01-01

    The CMS pixel detector was repaired successfully, calibrated and commissioned for the second run of Large Hadron Collider during the first long shutdown between 2013 and 2015. The replaced pixel modules were calibrated separately and show the expected behavior of an un-irradiated detector. In 2015, the system performed very well with an even improved spatial resolution compared to 2012. During this time, the operational team faced various challenges including the loss of a sector in one half shell which was only partially recovered. In 2016, the detector is expected to withstand instantaneous luminosities beyond the design limits and will need a combined effort of both online and offline teams in order to provide the high quality data that is required to reach the physics goals of CMS. We present the operational experience gained during the second run of the LHC and show the latest performance results of the CMS pixel detector.

  11. Comparison of three resistor network division circuits for the readout of 4×4 pixel SiPM arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratos, David [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Maria, Georgiou [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical School, University of Thessaly (Greece); Eleftherios, Fysikopoulos [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece); George, Loudos, E-mail: gloudos@teiath.gr [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece)

    2013-02-21

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of a flexible SensL's silicon photomultiplier array (SPMArray4) photodetector for possible applications in PET imaging. We have designed and evaluated three different resistor network division circuits to read out the signal outputs of a 4×4 pixel SiPM array. We have applied firstly (i) a symmetric resistive voltage division circuit, secondly (ii) a symmetric resistive charge division circuit and thirdly (iii) a charge division multiplexing resistor network reducing the 16 pixel outputs to 4 position signals. In the first circuit the SensL SPMArray4-A0 preamplification electronics and a SPMArray4-A1 evaluation board providing the 16 pixels voltage outputs were used, before the symmetric resistive voltage network. We reduced the 16 voltage signals firstly to 4X and 4Y coordinate signals. Then those signals were further reduced to 2X and 2Y position signals connected via a resistor network. In the second readout circuit we have used the same technique but without the preamplification stage. The third circuit is based on a discretized positioning circuit, which multiplexes the 16 signals from the SiPM array to 4 position signals. The 4 position signals (Xa, Xb, Yc and Yd) were digitized using a free running sampling technique. An FPGA (Spartan 6 LX16) was used for triggering and signal processing of the pulses. We acquired raw images and energy histograms of a BGO and a CsI:Na pixilated scintillator under {sup 22}Na excitation. A clear visualization of the discrete 2×2×5 mm{sup 3} pixilated BGO scintillator elements as well as the 1×1×5 mm{sup 3} pixilated CsI:Na crystal array was achieved with all applied readout circuits. The symmetric resistive charge division circuit provides higher peak to valley ratio than the other readout circuits. Τhe sensitivity and the energy resolution remained almost constant for the three circuits.

  12. A 4k-Pixel CTIA Readout for Far IR Photodetector Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design a low noise, two-side buttable, 64x64 readout multiplexer with the following key design features: 1- By far the largest readout array developed...

  13. Fourier transform acousto-optic imaging with a custom-designed CMOS smart-pixels array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barjean, Kinia; Contreras, Kevin; Laudereau, Jean-Baptiste; Tinet, Éric; Ettori, Dominique; Ramaz, François; Tualle, Jean-Michel

    2015-03-01

    We report acousto-optic imaging (AOI) into a scattering medium using a Fourier Transform (FT) analysis to achieve axial resolution. The measurement system was implemented using a CMOS smart-pixels sensor dedicated to the real-time analysis of speckle patterns. This first proof-of-principle of FT-AOI demonstrates some of its potential advantages, with a signal-to-noise ratio comparable to the one obtained without axial resolution, and with an acquisition rate compatible with a use on living biological tissue.

  14. The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for the Run-2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Guescini, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long showdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radial distance of 3.3 cm from the beam axis. The realization of the IBL required the development of several new technologies and solutions in order to overcome the challenges introduced by the extreme environment and working conditions, such as the high radiation levels, the high pixel occupancy and the need of an exceptionally low material budget. Two silicon sensor technologies have been adopted for the IBL modules: planar n-in-n and 3D. Both of these are connected via bump bonding to the new generation 130 nm IBM CMOS FE-I4 ...

  15. Design and numerical simulation of a pixelated full stokes micropolarizer array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changjiang; Hu, Jingpei; Wang, Chinhua

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose and demonstrate numerically a pixelated component for full Stokes polarization imaging by integrating linear polarizers and circular polarizers on a single silicon chip working in near infrared band ( 1.6μm). The micro linear polarizers collect linear polarizing information from different orientations while the circular polarizers collect left-handed or right-handed circular polarization information such that full Stokes polarization imaging can be implemented on a single chip in real time. Numerical results show that the extinction ratio and TM transmission of linearly polarization can reach 45dB and 78%, respectively, with a linear metallic grating of period 300nm, and the dichroism of left-handed and right-handed circular polarization can reach 55% with a plasmonic chiral structure that is compatible with linear gratings in terms of structure and fabrication. The proposed structure is of significance in real-time full Stokes polarization imaging.

  16. Development of a fast pixel array detector for use in microsecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    A large-area pixel x-ray detector is being developed to collect eight successive frames of wide dynamic range two-dimensional images at 200kHz rates. Such a detector, in conjunction with a synchrotron radiation x-ray source, will enable time-resolved x-ray studies of proteins and other materials on time scales which have previously been inaccessible. The detector will consist of an array of fully-depleted 150 micron square diodes connected to a CMOS integrated electronics layer with solder bump-bonding. During each framing period, the current resulting from the x-rays stopped in the diodes is integrated in the electronics layer, and then stored in one of eight storage capacitors underneath the pixel. After the last frame, the capacitors are read out at standard data transmission rates. The detector has been designed for a well-depth of at least 10,000 x-rays (at 20keV), and a noise level of one x-ray. Ultimately, the authors intend to construct a detector with over one million pixels (1024 by 1024). They present the results of their development effort and various features of the design. The electronics design is discussed, with special attention to the performance requirements. The choice and design of the detective diodes, as they relate to x-ray stopping power and charge collection, are presented. An analysis of various methods of bump bonding is also presented. Finally, the authors discuss the possible need for a radiation-blocking layer, to be placed between the electronics and the detective layer, and various methods they have pursued in the construction of such a layer.

  17. The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment for the Run2 at the Large Hadron Collider -- Plot Approval (Pixel, IBL) : This is a submission of plot approval request for Pixel+IBL, facing on a talk at ICHEP 2014 conference

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelli, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long showdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and will be installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance will be improved through the reduction of pixel size while, targeting for a low material budget, a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system have been adopted. IBL construction is now completed. An overview of the IBL project as well as the ...

  18. Irradiation Tests of the Pixel Front-End Readout Electronics for the ALICE Experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Riggi, F; Barbera, R; Palmeri, A; Pappalardo, G S; Di Liberto, S; Meddi, F; Cavagnoli, A; Morando, M; Scarlassara, F; Segato, G F; Soramel, F; Vannucci, Luigi

    2002-01-01

    The problem of radiation damage for the electronics of the pixel detectors in the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment is discussed. Simulations allowed to estimate the cumulated doses andparticle fluences during a ten year operational period. Several irradiation tests have been carried out on the various prototypes of the readout chips. The results obtained so far point out that the recent prototypes will retain their functionality up to doses and neutron fluences well above those expected in ALICE.

  19. replacement of the heart of the CMS experiment - the pixel #detector. Part2

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2017-01-01

    This week, one of the Large Hadron Collider’s experiments gets a “heart transplant”. --- Physicists and engineers are replacing the heart of the CMS experiment - the pixel #detector. This will improve CMS’s ability to make precise measurements on aspects of the Standard Model, including the properties of the #HiggsBoson. The #LHC and its experiments are currently preparing to wake up this spring, when the accelerator will begin to collide particles once more at close to the speed of light. --- Today at 12:15 CET, join us live on #Facebook and ask us anything: https://www.facebook.com/cern/

  20. replacement of the heart of the CMS experiment - the pixel #detector.

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070299

    2017-01-01

    This week, one of the Large Hadron Collider’s experiments gets a “heart transplant”. --- Physicists and engineers are replacing the heart of the CMS experiment - the pixel #detector. This will improve CMS’s ability to make precise measurements on aspects of the Standard Model, including the properties of the #HiggsBoson. The #LHC and its experiments are currently preparing to wake up this spring, when the accelerator will begin to collide particles once more at close to the speed of light. --- Today at 12:15 CET, join us live on #Facebook and ask us anything: https://www.facebook.com/cern/

  1. Silicon Pixel Detector for the PHENIX experiment at the BNL RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Ichimiya, Ryo; Akiba, Yasuyuki; Atomssa, Ermias; Chollet, Simon; Drapier, Olivier; En'yo, Hideto; Fujiwara, Kohei; Gastaldi, Franck; de Cassagnac, Raphael Granier; Kasai, Miki; Kurita, Kazuyosi; Kurosawa, Maki; Mannel, Eric J; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Onuki, Yoshiyuki; Pak, Robart; Pancake, Charles; Sekimoto, Michiko; Shafto, Eugene; Sondheim, Walter; Taketani, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    PHENIX is one of the major experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. It has been exploring the spin structure of the nucleon utilizing polarized proton-proton collisions and characteristics of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) created in heavy ion collisions. The Silicon Vertex Tracker (VTX) will be implemented in 2010 to enhance physics capabilities. It will be installed very close to the collision point and will cover | \\eta | < 1.2 and | \\phi | ~2{\\pi} by four layers of silicon sensors. Inner two layers are silicon pixel detectors and outer two layers are silicon strip layers. In this paper, the inner silicon pixel detector is reported. We used 200 {\\mu}m thick silicon sensor and readout chip developed for ALICE experiment. As a part of PHENIX detector, it needs to be read out by four times faster from ALICE experiment and to be thin in material to minimize the radiation length. To meet the criteria, the PHENIX silicon pixel detector has been designed an...

  2. The POLARBEAR-2 and the Simons Array Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, A; Akiba, Y; Aleman, C; Arnold, K; Baccigalupi, C; Barch, B; Barron, D; Bender, A; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Cukierman, A; Dobbs, M; Ducout, A; Dunner, R; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feeney, S; Feng, C; Fujino, T; Fuller, G; Gilbert, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Groh, J; De Haan, T; Hall, G; Halverson, N; Hamada, T; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Hill, C; Holzapfel, W; Hori, Y; Howe, L; Inoue, Y; Irie, F; Jaehnig, G; Jaffe, A; Jeong, O; Katayama, N; Kaufman, J; Kazemzadeh, K; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Kusaka, A; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A; Leon, D; Linder, E; Lowry, L; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Miller, N; Mizukami, K; Montgomery, J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Rebeiz, G; Raum, C; Reichardt, C; Richards, P; Ross, C; Rotermund, K; Segawa, Y; Sherwin, B; Shirley, I; Siritanasak, P; Stebor, N; Stompor, R; Suzuki, J; Tajima, O; Takada, S; Takakura, S; Takatori, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Westbrook, B; Whitehorn, N; Yamashita, T; Zahn, A; Zahn, O

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of the design and status of the \\Pb-2 and the Simons Array experiments. \\Pb-2 is a Cosmic Microwave Background polarimetry experiment which aims to characterize the arc-minute angular scale B-mode signal from weak gravitational lensing and search for the degree angular scale B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. The receiver has a 365~mm diameter focal plane cooled to 270~milli-Kelvin. The focal plane is filled with 7,588 dichroic lenslet-antenna coupled polarization sensitive Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometric pixels that are sensitive to 95~GHz and 150~GHz bands simultaneously. The TES bolometers are read-out by SQUIDs with 40 channel frequency domain multiplexing. Refractive optical elements are made with high purity alumina to achieve high optical throughput. The receiver is designed to achieve noise equivalent temperature of 5.8~$\\mu$K$_{CMB}\\sqrt{s}$ in each frequency band. \\Pb-2 will deploy in 2016 in the Atacama desert in Chile. The Simons Array is a project ...

  3. SuperCam, a 64-pixel heterodyne imaging array for the 870 micron atmospheric window

    CERN Document Server

    Groppi, C; Kulesa, C; Pütz, P; Golish, D; Gensheimer, P; Hedden, A; Bussmann, S; Weinreb, S; Kuiper, T; Kooi, J; Jones, G; Bardin, J; Mani, H S; Lichtenberger, A; Narayanan, G; Groppi, Christopher; Walker, Christopher; Kulesa, Craig; Puetz, Patrick; Golish, Dathon; Gensheimer, Paul; Hedden, Abigail; Bussmann, Shane; Weinreb, Sander; Kuiper, Thomas; Kooi, Jacob; Jones, Glenn; Bardin, Joseph; Mani, Hamdi; Lichtenberger, Arthur; Narayanan, Gopal

    2006-01-01

    We report on the development of SuperCam, a 64 pixel, superheterodyne camera designed for operation in the astrophysically important 870 micron atmospheric window. SuperCam will be used to answer fundamental questions about the physics and chemistry of molecular clouds in the Galaxy and their direct relation to star and planet formation. The advent of such a system will provide an order of magnitude increase in mapping speed over what is now available and revolutionize how observational astronomy is performed in this important wavelength regime. Unlike the situation with bolometric detectors, heterodyne receiver systems are coherent, retaining information about both the amplitude and phase of the incident photon stream. From this information a high resolution spectrum of the incident light can be obtained without multiplexing. SuperCam will be constructed by stacking eight, 1x8 rows of fixed tuned, SIS mixers. The IF output of each mixer will be connected to a low-noise, broadband MMIC amplifier integrated in...

  4. Development of CMOS pixel sensors for tracking and vertexing in high energy physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070112; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Giles; Cousin, Loic; Dulinski, Wojciech; Goffe, Mathieu; Hippolyte, Boris; Maria, Robert; Molnar, Levente; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Winter, Marc

    2014-01-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) represent a novel technological approach to building charged particle detectors. CMOS processes allow to integrate a sensing volume and readout electronics in a single silicon die allowing to build sensors with a small pixel pitch ($\\sim 20 \\mu m$) and low material budget ($\\sim 0.2-0.3\\% X_0$) per layer. These characteristics make CPS an attractive option for vertexing and tracking systems of high energy physics experiments. Moreover, thanks to the mass production industrial CMOS processes used for the manufacturing of CPS the fabrication construction cost can be significantly reduced in comparison to more standard semiconductor technologies. However, the attainable performance level of the CPS in terms of radiation hardness and readout speed is mostly determined by the fabrication parameters of the CMOS processes available on the market rather than by the CPS intrinsic potential. The permanent evolution of commercial CMOS processes towards smaller feature sizes and high resistivity ...

  5. Experiment on digital CDS with 33-M pixel 120-fps super hi-vision image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonai, J.; Yasue, T.; Kitamura, K.; Hayashida, T.; Watabe, T.; Shimamoto, H.; Kawahito, S.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a CMOS image sensor with 33 million pixels and 120 frames per second (fps) for Super Hi-Vision (SHV:8K version of UHDTV). There is a way to reduce the fixed pattern noise (FPN) caused in CMOS image sensors by using digital correlated double sampling (digital CDS), but digital CDS methods need high-speed analog-to-digital conversion and are not applicable to conventional UHDTV image sensors due to their speed limit. Our image sensor, on the other hand, has a very fast analog-to-digital converter (ADC) using "two-stage cyclic ADC" architecture that is capable of being driven at 120-fps, which is double the normal frame rate for TV. In this experiment, we performed experimental digital CDS using the high-frame rate UHDTV image sensor. By reading the same row twice at 120-fps and subtracting dark pixel signals from accumulated pixel signals, we obtained a 60-fps equivalent video signal with digital noise reduction. The results showed that the VFPN was effectively reduced from 24.25 e-rms to 0.43 e-rms.

  6. Orthogonally-oriented nanotube arrays: experiment I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, D P; Webster, J T; Baird, L M

    2007-10-01

    Recently a new type of self-assembling surface has been proposed that, in theory, possesses a number of desirable tribological, electrical, and thermal characterstics. The surface consists of arrays of carbon nanotubes partially embedded lengthwise in a substrate such that when two arrayed surfaces are brought together orthogonally, the areal contact between them is small, limited to a lattice of nearly point-like contacts. These orthogonally-oriented nanotube arrays (ONAs) are predicted to exhibit: (i) surface adhesion (stiction) 10-100 times less than for Teflon or other advanced perfluorocarbons; (ii) frictional coefficients up to 1000 times less than for conventional solids; (iii) ultra-low wear; and (iv) superior thermal and electrical conductivity. In this paper, laboratory methods are described for embedding nanotubes in trenched substrates. Using microscopically trenched substrates and a custom ultrasonic atomization source, experiments show that individual nanotubes can spontaneously and controllably entrench themselves via interfacial forces (capillary and surface tension). Results indicate ONAs might be relatively simply and inexpensively fabricated. More decisive experiments are proposed.

  7. A silicon pixel readout ASIC with 100 ps time resolution for the NA62 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellacasa, G; Garbolino, S; Marchetto, F; Martoiu, S; Mazza, G; Rivetti, A; Wheadon, R, E-mail: mazza@to.infn.it [INFN sez. di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    The silicon tracker of the NA62 experiment requires the measurement of the particles arrival time with a resolution better than 200 ps rms and a spatial resolution of 300 {mu}m. A time measurement technique based on a Time to Amplitude Converter has been implemented in an ASIC in order to prove the possibility to integrate a TDC with resolution better than 200 ps in a pixel cell. Time-walk problem has been addressed with the use of the Constant Fraction Discriminator technique. The ASIC has been designed in a CMOS 0.13 {mu}m technology with single event upset protection of the digital logic.

  8. Operational Experience of the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker and Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Dave; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on the silicon and gaseous tracking subsystems that form the ATLAS Inner Detector. Those subsystems have undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered by the LHC during Run2. The key status and performance metrics of the Pixel Detector and the Semi Conductor Tracker are summarised, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described.

  9. A per-pixel Log2ADC for high dynamic range, 1000FPS digital focal plane arrays (DFPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petilli, Eugene

    2016-09-01

    Intrinsix has developed a Digital Focal Plane Array (DFPA) architecture based on a novel piecewise linear Log2 ADC (LADC) with "lossless" analog compression which enables ultra-high dynamic range ROICs that use less power than other extended dynamic range technologies. The LADC provides dynamic range of 126dB with a constant 75dB SNR over the entire frame. The companding 13bit mantissa, 3bit radix per pixel LADCs compress the 21bit signals into efficient 16 bit data words. The Read Out IC (ROIC) is compatible with most IR and LWIR detectors including two-color SLS (photodiode) and uBolometers. The DFPA architecture leverages two (staggered frame prime and redundant) MIPI CSI-3 interfaces to achieve full HD DFPA at 1000 frames/sec; an equivalent uncompressed data rate of 100Gb/sec. The LADC uses direct injection into a moderate sized integrating capacitor and several comparators create a stream of multi-bit data values. These values are accumulated in an SRAM based log2ALU and the radix of the ALU is combined with the data to generate a feedback current to the integrating capacitor, closing the delta loop. The integration time and a single pole low pass IIR filter are configurable using control signals to the log2ALU. The feedback current is at least partially generated using PWM for high linearity.

  10. Characterization of CdTe Sensors with Schottky Contacts Coupled to Charge-Integrating Pixel Array Detectors for X-Ray Science

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Julian; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Weiss, Joel T; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Ruff, Jacob P C; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-01-01

    Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) consist of an x-ray sensor layer bonded pixel-by-pixel to an underlying readout chip. This approach allows both the sensor and the custom pixel electronics to be tailored independently to best match the x-ray imaging requirements. Here we present characterizations of CdTe sensors hybridized with two different charge-integrating readout chips, the Keck PAD and the Mixed-Mode PAD (MM-PAD), both developed previously in our laboratory. The charge-integrating architecture of each of these PADs extends the instantaneous counting rate by many orders of magnitude beyond that obtainable with photon counting architectures. The Keck PAD chip consists of rapid, 8-frame, in-pixel storage elements with framing periods $<$150 ns. The second detector, the MM-PAD, has an extended dynamic range by utilizing an in-pixel overflow counter coupled with charge removal circuitry activated at each overflow. This allows the recording of signals from the single-photon level to tens of millions of x-rays/...

  11. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Deptuch, Grzegorz W; Szczygiel, Robert; Sandy, Alec

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. The potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed.

  12. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M.; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Szczygiel, Robert; Sandy, Alec

    2016-04-19

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. The potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed.

  13. Monolithic CMOS pixel detector for international linear collider vertex detection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J E Brau; O Igonkina; N Sinew; D Strom; C Baltay; W Emmet; H Neal; D Rabinowitz

    2007-12-01

    A monolithic CMS pixel detector is under development for an ILC experiment. This chronopixel array provides a time stamp resolution of one bunch crossing, a critical feature for background suppression. The status of this effort is summarized.

  14. Design and performance of large-pixel-size high-fill-fraction TES arrays for future X-ray astrophysics missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)]. E-mail: enectali@mit.edu; Bandler, S.R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Chervenak, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Finkbeiner, F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Iyomoto, N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kelley, R.L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kilbourne, C.A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Porter, F.S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Saab, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sadleir, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); White, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    We have designed, modeled, fabricated and tested a 600{mu}m high-fill-fraction microcalorimeter array that will be a good match to the requirements of future X-ray missions. Our devices use transition-edge sensors coupled to overhanging bismuth/copper absorbers to produce arrays with 97% or higher fill fraction. An extensive modeling effort was undertaken in order to accommodate large pixel sizes (500-1000{mu}m) and maintain the best energy resolution possible. The finite thermalization time of the large absorber and the associated position dependence of the pulse shape on absorption position constrain the time constants of the system given a desired energy-resolution performance. We show the results of our analysis and our new pixel design, consisting of a novel TES-on-the-side architecture which creates a controllable TES-absorber conductance.

  15. Performance of the reconstruction algorithms of the FIRST experiment pixel sensors vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rescigno, R; Juliani, D; Spiriti, E; Baudot, J; Abou-Haidar, Z; Agodi, C; Alvarez, M A G; Aumann, T; Battistoni, G; Bocci, A; Böhlen, T T; Boudard, A; Brunetti, A; Carpinelli, M; Cirrone, G A P; Cortes-Giraldo, M A; Cuttone, G; De Napoli, M; Durante, M; Gallardo, M I; Golosio, B; Iarocci, E; Iazzi, F; Ickert, G; Introzzi, R; Krimmer, J; Kurz, N; Labalme, M; Leifels, Y; Le Fevre, A; Leray, S; Marchetto, F; Monaco, V; Morone, M C; Oliva, P; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Pleskac, R; Quesada, J M; Randazzo, N; Romano, F; Rossi, D; Rousseau, M; Sacchi, R; Sala, P; Sarti, A; Scheidenberger, C; Schuy, C; Sciubba, A; Sfienti, C; Simon, H; Sipala, V; Tropea, S; Vanstalle, M; Younis, H

    2014-01-01

    Hadrontherapy treatments use charged particles (e.g. protons and carbon ions) to treat tumors. During a therapeutic treatment with carbon ions, the beam undergoes nuclear fragmentation processes giving rise to significant yields of secondary charged particles. An accurate prediction of these production rates is necessary to estimate precisely the dose deposited into the tumours and the surrounding healthy tissues. Nowadays, a limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross-section is available. Experimental data are necessary to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations for their use in hadrontherapy. The purpose of the FIRST experiment is to study nuclear fragmentation processes of ions with kinetic energy in the range from 100 to 1000 MeV/u. Tracks are reconstructed using information from a pixel silicon detector based on the CMOS technology. The performances achieved using this device for hadrontherapy purpose are discussed. For each reconstruction step (clustering, tracking and vertexing), different...

  16. Signal dependence of inter-pixel capacitance in hybridized HgCdTe H2RG arrays for use in James Webb space telescope's NIRcam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Kevan; Ninkov, Zoran; Baum, Stefi

    2016-08-01

    Interpixel capacitance (IPC) is a deterministic electronic coupling by which signal generated in one pixel is measured in neighboring pixels. Examination of dark frames from test NIRcam arrays corroborates earlier results and simulations illustrating a signal dependent coupling. When the signal on an individual pixel is larger, the fractional coupling to nearest neighbors is lesser than when the signal is lower. Frames from test arrays indicate a drop in average coupling from approximately 1.0% at low signals down to approximately 0.65% at high signals depending on the particular array in question. The photometric ramifications for this non-uniformity are not fully understood. This non-uniformity intro-duces a non-linearity in the current mathematical model for IPC coupling. IPC coupling has been mathematically formalized as convolution by a blur kernel. Signal dependence requires that the blur kernel be locally defined as a function of signal intensity. Through application of a signal dependent coupling kernel, the IPC coupling can be modeled computationally. This method allows for simultaneous knowledge of the intrinsic parameters of the image scene, the result of applying a constant IPC, and the result of a signal dependent IPC. In the age of sub-pixel precision in astronomy these effects must be properly understood and accounted for in order for the data to accurately represent the object of observation. Implementation of this method is done through python scripted processing of images. The introduction of IPC into simulated frames is accomplished through convolution of the image with a blur kernel whose parameters are themselves locally defined functions of the image. These techniques can be used to enhance the data processing pipeline for NIRcam.

  17. Development of pixel detectors for the IBL and HL-LHC ATLAS experiment upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Baselga Bacardit, Marta

    2016-03-18

    This thesis presents the development of advanced silicon technology detectors fabricated at CNM-Barcelona for High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. The pixel size of the tracking silicon detectors for the upgrade of the HL-LHC will have to decrease in size in order to enhance the resolution in position for the measurements and they need to have lower occupancy for the electronics. The future experiments at CERN will cope with fuences up to 2 x 10^^16 neq/cm2, and the smaller 3D silicon detectors will have less trapping of the electron-holes generated in the bulk leading to a better performance under high radiation environment. This thesis studies silicon detectors fabricated at CNM-Barcelona applied to HEP experiments with two different kinds of novel technologies: 3D and Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD). The 3D detectors make it possible to reduce the size of the depleted region inside the detector and to work at lower voltages, whereas the LGAD detectors have an intrinsic gain which increases the collec...

  18. Development of a large-area monolithic 4x4 MPPC array for a future PET scanner employing pixelized Ce:LYSO and Pr:LuAG crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T., E-mail: katou.frme.8180@asagi.waseda.j [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Miura, T.; Matsuda, H. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Kawabata, N. [Solid State Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K. K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Ikeda, H.; Sato, G. [ISAS/JAXA, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Kamada, K. [Materials Research Laboratory, Furukawa Co., Ltd., 1-25-13, Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan)

    2011-05-11

    We have developed a new type of large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) array consisting of a 4x4 matrix of 3x3 mm{sup 2} pixels. Each pixel comprises 3600 Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs) that achieve an average gain of 9.68x10{sup 5} at 71.9 V at 0 {sup o}C with variations of only {+-}7.2% over 4x4 pixels. Excellent uniformity was also obtained for photon detection efficiencies (PDE) of {+-}6.4%, whilst dark count rates at the single photoelectron (1 p.e.) level amounted to {approx_equal}2Mcps/pixel, measured at 0 {sup o}C. As the first step toward using the device in scintillation photon detectors, we fabricated a prototype gamma-ray camera consisting of an MPPC array optically coupled with a scintillator matrix, namely a 4x4 array of 3x3 x10 mm{sup 3} crystals. Specifically, we tested the performance with Ce-doped (Lu, Y){sub 2}(SiO{sub 4})O (Ce:LYSO), Pr-doped Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (Pr:LuAG) and 'surface coated' Pr:LuAG (Pr:LuAG (WLS)) matrices whereby the emission peak of Pr:LuAG was shifted from 310 to 420 nm via a wavelength shifter (WLS). Average energy resolutions of 13.83%, 14.70% and 13.96% (FWHM) were obtained for 662 keV gamma-rays, as measured at 0 {sup o}C with Ce:LYSO, Pr:LuAG and Pr:LuAG (WLS) scintillator matrices, respectively. We confirmed that the effective PDE for Pr:LuAG (WLS) had improved by more than 30% compared to original, non-coated Pr:LuAG matrix. These results suggest that a large-area monolithic MPPC array developed here could be promising for future medical imaging, particularly in positron emission tomography (PET).

  19. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run-II at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00407702

    2016-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of the LHC. Taking advantage of the detector development period 2013 – 2014, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface to equip it with new service panels and to repair modules furthermore this helped with the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), fourth layer of pixel, installed in between the existing Pixel Detector and a new beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and increased pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been used. A new readout chip has been designed with CMOS 130nm technology with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. Dedicated design features in combination with a new composite material were considered and used in order to reduce the material budget of the support structure while keeping the optimal thermo-mechanical perfor...

  20. Photovoltaic Array Space Power flight experiment plus diagnostics (PASP+) modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, William T.; Adams, Steven F.; Reinhardt, Kitt C.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    1992-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics flight experiment (PASP+) subsumes twelve solar array modules which represent the state of the art in the space photovoltaic array industry. Each of the twelve modules individually feature specific photovoltaic technologies such as advanced semiconductor materials, multi-bandgap structures, lightweight array designs, advanced interconnect technologies, or concentrator array designs. This paper will describe each module in detail including the configuration, components, materials, anticipated on orbit performance, and some of the aspects of each array technology. The layout of each module and the photovoltaic cells or array cross section will be presented graphically. A discussion on the environmental constraints and materials selection will be included as well as a delineation of the differences between the modules and the baseline array configuration in its intended application.

  1. Evaluation of a photon-counting hybrid pixel detector array with a synchrotron X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchut, C.; Visschers, J. L.; Fornaini, A.; Graafsma, H.; Maiorino, M.; Mettivier, G.; Calvet, D.

    2002-05-01

    A photon-counting hybrid pixel detector (Medipix-1) has been characterized using a synchrotron X-ray source. The detector consists of a readout ASIC with 64×64 independent photon-counting cells of 170×170 μm 2 pitch, bump-bonded to a 300 μm thick silicon sensor, read out by a PCIbus-based electronics, and a graphical user interface (GUI) software. The intensity and the energy tunability of the X-ray source allow characterization of the detector in the time, space, and energy domains. The system can be read out on external trigger at a frame rate of 100 Hz with 3 ms exposure time per frame. The detector response is tested up to more than 7×10 5 detected events/pixel/s. The point-spread response shows beam reveals no loss in sensitivity between adjacent pixels as could result from charge sharing in the silicon sensor. Photons down to 6 keV can be detected after equalization of the thresholds of individual pixels. The obtained results demonstrate the advantages of photon-counting hybrid pixel detectors and particularly of the Medipix-1 chip for a wide range of X-ray imaging applications, including those using synchrotron X-ray beams.

  2. Evaluation of 320x240 pixel LEC GaAs Schottky barrier X-ray imaging arrays, hybridized to CMOS readout circuit based on charge integration

    CERN Document Server

    Irsigler, R; Alverbro, J; Borglind, J; Froejdh, C; Helander, P; Manolopoulos, S; O'Shea, V; Smith, K

    1999-01-01

    320x240 pixels GaAs Schottky barrier detector arrays were fabricated, hybridized to silicon readout circuits, and subsequently evaluated. The detector chip was based on semi-insulating LEC GaAs material. The square shaped pixel detector elements were of the Schottky barrier type and had a pitch of 38 mu m. The GaAs wafers were thinned down prior to the fabrication of the ohmic back contact. After dicing, the chips were indium bump, flip-chip bonded to CMOS readout circuits based on charge integration, and finally evaluated. A bias voltage between 50 and 100 V was sufficient to operate the detector. Results on I-V characteristics, noise behaviour and response to X-ray radiation are presented. Images of various objects and slit patterns were acquired by using a standard dental imaging X-ray source. The work done was a part of the XIMAGE project financed by the European Community (Brite-Euram). (author)

  3. Investigating the Inverse Square Law with the Timepix Hybrid Silicon Pixel Detector: A CERN [at] School Demonstration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyntie, T.; Parker, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Timepix hybrid silicon pixel detector has been used to investigate the inverse square law of radiation from a point source as a demonstration of the CERN [at] school detector kit capabilities. The experiment described uses a Timepix detector to detect the gamma rays emitted by an [superscript 241]Am radioactive source at a number of different…

  4. Pixel front-end with synchronous discriminator and fast charge measurement for the upgrades of HL-LHC experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteil, E.; Demaria, N.; Pacher, L.; Rivetti, A.; Da Rocha Rolo, M.; Rotondo, F.; Leng, C.

    2016-03-01

    The upgrade of the silicon pixel sensors for the HL-LHC experiments requires the development of new readout integrated circuits due to unprecedented radiation levels, very high hit rates and increased pixel granularity. The design of a very compact, low power, low threshold analog very front-end in CMOS 65 nm technology is described. It contains a synchronous comparator which uses an offset compensation technique based on storing the offset in output. The latch can be turned into a local oscillator using an asynchronous logic feedback loop to implement a fast time-over-threshold counting. This design has been submitted and the measurement results are presented.

  5. Performance of the reconstruction algorithms of the FIRST experiment pixel sensors vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rescigno, R., E-mail: regina.rescigno@iphc.cnrs.fr [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Finck, Ch.; Juliani, D. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Spiriti, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Roma 3 (Italy); Baudot, J. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Abou-Haidar, Z. [CNA, Sevilla (Spain); Agodi, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy); Alvarez, M.A.G. [CNA, Sevilla (Spain); Aumann, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Battistoni, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Milano (Italy); Bocci, A. [CNA, Sevilla (Spain); Böhlen, T.T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Boudard, A. [CEA-Saclay, IRFU/SPhN, Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Cagliari (Italy); Università di Sassari (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy); Cortes-Giraldo, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, University of Sevilla, 41080-Sevilla (Spain); Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy); Durante, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2014-12-11

    Hadrontherapy treatments use charged particles (e.g. protons and carbon ions) to treat tumors. During a therapeutic treatment with carbon ions, the beam undergoes nuclear fragmentation processes giving rise to significant yields of secondary charged particles. An accurate prediction of these production rates is necessary to estimate precisely the dose deposited into the tumours and the surrounding healthy tissues. Nowadays, a limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross-section is available. Experimental data are necessary to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations for their use in hadrontherapy. The purpose of the FIRST experiment is to study nuclear fragmentation processes of ions with kinetic energy in the range from 100 to 1000 MeV/u. Tracks are reconstructed using information from a pixel silicon detector based on the CMOS technology. The performances achieved using this device for hadrontherapy purpose are discussed. For each reconstruction step (clustering, tracking and vertexing), different methods are implemented. The algorithm performances and the accuracy on reconstructed observables are evaluated on the basis of simulated and experimental data.

  6. Performance of the reconstruction algorithms of the FIRST experiment pixel sensors vertex detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescigno, R.; Finck, Ch.; Juliani, D.; Spiriti, E.; Baudot, J.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Tropea, S.; Vanstalle, M.; Younis, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hadrontherapy treatments use charged particles (e.g. protons and carbon ions) to treat tumors. During a therapeutic treatment with carbon ions, the beam undergoes nuclear fragmentation processes giving rise to significant yields of secondary charged particles. An accurate prediction of these production rates is necessary to estimate precisely the dose deposited into the tumours and the surrounding healthy tissues. Nowadays, a limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross-section is available. Experimental data are necessary to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations for their use in hadrontherapy. The purpose of the FIRST experiment is to study nuclear fragmentation processes of ions with kinetic energy in the range from 100 to 1000 MeV/u. Tracks are reconstructed using information from a pixel silicon detector based on the CMOS technology. The performances achieved using this device for hadrontherapy purpose are discussed. For each reconstruction step (clustering, tracking and vertexing), different methods are implemented. The algorithm performances and the accuracy on reconstructed observables are evaluated on the basis of simulated and experimental data.

  7. Evaluation of a photon-counting hybrid pixel detector array with a synchrotron X-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Ponchut, C; Fornaini, A; Graafsma, H; Maiorino, M; Mettivier, G; Calvet, D

    2002-01-01

    A photon-counting hybrid pixel detector (Medipix-1) has been characterized using a synchrotron X-ray source. The detector consists of a readout ASIC with 64x64 independent photon-counting cells of 170x170 mu m sup 2 pitch, bump-bonded to a 300 mu m thick silicon sensor, read out by a PCIbus-based electronics, and a graphical user interface (GUI) software. The intensity and the energy tunability of the X-ray source allow characterization of the detector in the time, space, and energy domains. The system can be read out on external trigger at a frame rate of 100 Hz with 3 ms exposure time per frame. The detector response is tested up to more than 7x10 sup 5 detected events/pixel/s. The point-spread response shows <2% crosstalk between neighboring pixels. Fine scanning of the detector surface with a 10 mu m beam reveals no loss in sensitivity between adjacent pixels as could result from charge sharing in the silicon sensor. Photons down to 6 keV can be detected after equalization of the thresholds of individu...

  8. CMOS pixel sensor development for the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rimoldi, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced with a fully silicon based detector called Inner Tracker (ITk) before the start of the High Luminosity-LHC project (HL-LHC) in 2026. To cope with the harsh environment expected at the HL-LHC, new approaches are being developed for pixel detector based on CMOS pixel techology. Such detectors provide charge collection, analog and digital amplification in the same silicon bulk. The radiation hardness is obtained with multiple nested wells that have embedded the CMOS electronics with sufficient shielding. The goal of this programme is to demonstrate that depleted CMOS pixels are suitable for high rate, fast timing and high radiation operation at the LHC. A number of alternative solutions have been explored and characterised, and are presented in this document.

  9. Mass test of AdvanSiD model ASD-NUV3S-P SiliconPMs for the Pixel Timing Counter of the MEG II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossella, M.; Bariani, S.; Barnaba, O.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cervi, T.; Menegolli, A.; Nardò, R.; Prata, M. C.; Romano, E.; Scagliotti, C.; Simonetta, M.; Vercellati, F.

    2017-02-01

    The MEG II Timing Counter will measure the positron time of arrival with a resolution of 30 ps relying on two arrays of scintillator pixels read out by 6144 Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) from AdvanSiD. They must be characterized, measuring their breakdown voltage, to assure that the gains of the SiPMs of each pixel are as uniform as possible, to maximize the pixel resolution. To do this an automatic test system that can measure sequentially the parameters of 32 devices has been developed.

  10. Data acquisition for experiments with multi-detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chatterjee; Sushil Kamerkar; A K Jethra; S Padmini; M P Diwakar; S S Pande; M D Ghodgaonkar

    2001-07-01

    Experiments with multi-detector arrays have special requirements and place higher demands on computer data acquisition systems. In this contribution we discuss data acquisition systems with special emphasis on multi-detector arrays and in particular we describe a new data acquisition system, AMPS which we have developed recently which is in regular use in experiments at the Pelletron Laboratory, Mumbai. This includes the in-house development of a dedicated crate controller, PC interface card and software.

  11. Polarisation measurements with a CdTe pixel array detector for Laue hard X-ray focusing telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Caroli, E; Pisa, A; Stephen, J B; Frontera, F; Castanheira, M T D; Sordo, S; Caroli, Ezio; Silva, Rui M. Curado da; Pisa, Alessandro; Stephen, John B.; Frontera, Filippo; Castanheira, Matilde T. D.; Sordo, Stefano del

    2006-01-01

    Polarimetry is an area of high energy astrophysics which is still relatively unexplored, even though it is recognized that this type of measurement could drastically increase our knowledge of the physics and geometry of high energy sources. For this reason, in the context of the design of a Gamma-Ray Imager based on new hard-X and soft gamma ray focusing optics for the next ESA Cosmic Vision call for proposals (Cosmic Vision 2015-2025), it is important that this capability should be implemented in the principal on-board instrumentation. For the particular case of wide band-pass Laue optics we propose a focal plane based on a thick pixelated CdTe detector operating with high efficiency between 60-600 keV. The high segmentation of this type of detector (1-2 mm pixel size) and the good energy resolution (a few keV FWHM at 500 keV) will allow high sensitivity polarisation measurements (a few % for a 10 mCrab source in 106s) to be performed. We have evaluated the modulation Q factors and minimum detectable polaris...

  12. New pixelized Micromegas detector with low discharge rate for the COMPASS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Neyret, D.; Anfreville, M.; Bedfer, Y.; Burtin, E.; Coquelet, C.; d'Hose, N.; Desforge, D.; Giganon, A.; Jourde, D.; Kunne, F.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Marchand, C.; Paul, B.; Platchkov, S.; Thibaud, F.; Usseglio, M.; Vandenbroucke, M.

    2012-01-01

    New Micromegas (Micro-mesh gaseous detectors) are being developed in view of the future physics projects planned by the COMPASS collaboration at CERN. Several major upgrades compared to present detectors are being studied: detectors standing five times higher luminosity with hadron beams, detection of beam particles (flux up to a few hundred of kHz/mm^{2}, 10 times larger than for the present Micromegas detectors) with pixelized read-out in the central part, light and integrated electronics, and improved robustness. Two solutions of reduction of discharge impact have been studied, with Micromegas detectors using resistive layers and using an additional GEM foil. Performance of such detectors has also been measured. A large size prototypes with nominal active area and pixelized read-out has been produced and installed at COMPASS in 2010. In 2011 prototypes featuring an additional GEM foil, as well as an resistive prototype, are installed at COMPASS and preliminary results from those detectors presented very go...

  13. The Gigatracker: An ultra-fast and low-mass silicon pixel detector for the NA62 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, M.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Mapelli, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, E.; Martoiu, S.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Petrucci, F.; Riedler, P.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Rivetti, A.; Tiuraniemi, S.

    2011-02-01

    The Gigatracker is a hybrid silicon pixel detector developed to track the highly intense NA62 hadron beam with a time resolution of 150 ps (rms). The beam spectrometer of the experiment is composed of three Gigatracker stations installed in vacuum in order to precisely measure momentum, time and direction of every traversing particle. Precise tracking demands a very low mass of the detector assembly ( delay-locked loop based TDC placed at the end of each pixel column and a time-over-threshold discriminator with time-walk correction technique. The current status of the R&D program is overviewed and results from the prototype read-out chips test are presented.

  14. 3D silicon pixel detectors for the ATLAS Forward Physics experiment

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00397348; Cavallaro, E.; Grinstein, S.; López Paz, I.

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) project plans to install 3D silicon pixel detectors about 210 m away from the interaction point and very close to the beamline (2-3 mm). This implies the need of slim edges of about 100-200 $\\mu$m width for the sensor side facing the beam to minimise the dead area. Another challenge is an expected non-uniform irradiation of the pixel sensors. It is studied if these requirements can be met using slightly-modified FE-I4 3D pixel sensors from the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer production. AFP-compatible slim edges are obtained with a simple diamond-saw cut. Electrical characterisations and beam tests are carried out and no detrimental impact on the leakage current and hit efficiency is observed. For devices without a 3D guard ring a remaining insensitive edge of less than 15 $\\mu$m width is found. Moreover, 3D detectors are non-uniformly irradiated up to fluences of several 10$^{15}$ n$_{eq}$/cm$^2$ with either a focussed 23 GeV proton beam or a 23 MeV proton beam through holes in Al ma...

  15. A novel gamma-ray detector with submillimeter resolutions using a monolithic MPPC array with pixelized Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T., E-mail: katou.frme.8180@asagi.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Miura, T.; Matsuda, H.; Kishimoto, A. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Nakamura, S.; Kawabata, N. [Solid State Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K. K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Ikeda, H. [ISAS/JAXA, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Yamamoto, S. [Kobe City College of Technology, 8-3, Gakuenhigashimati, Nishi-ku, Kobe-shi, Hyougo 651-2194 (Japan); Kamada, K. [Materials Research Laboratory, Furukawa Co., Ltd., 1-25-13, Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan)

    2013-01-21

    We have developed a large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) array consisting of 4×4 channels with a three-side buttable package. Each channel has a photosensitive area of 3×3 mm{sup 2} and 3600 Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs). For typical operational gain of 7.5×10{sup 5} at +20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ±5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to ≤400kcps per channel. We first fabricated a gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array with one-to-one coupling to a Ce-doped (Lu,Y){sub 2}(SiO{sub 4})O (Ce:LYSO) crystal array (4×4 array of 3×3×10 mm{sup 3} crystals). Energy and time resolutions of 11.5±0.5% (FWHM at 662 keV) and 493±22ps were obtained, respectively. When using the charge division resistor network, which compiles signals into four position-encoded analog outputs, the ultimate positional resolution is estimated as 0.19 mm in both X and Y directions, while energy resolution of 10.2±0.4% (FWHM) was obtained. Finally, we fabricated submillimeter Ce:LYSO and Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 12} (Ce:GGAG) scintillator matrices each consisting of 1.0×1.0, 0.7×0.7 and 0.5×0.5 mm{sup 2} pixels, to further improve the spatial resolution. In all types of Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG matrices, each crystal was clearly resolved in the position histograms when irradiated by a {sup 137}Cs source. The energy resolutions for 662 keV gamma-rays for each Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG scintillator matrix were ≤14.3%. These results suggest excellent potential for its use as a high spatial medical imaging device, particularly in positron emission tomography (PET). -- Highlights: ► We developed a newly designed large-area monolithic MPPC array. ► We obtained fine gain uniformity, and good energy and time resolutions when coupled to the LYSO scintillator. ► We fabricated gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array and submillimeter pixelized LYSO and GGAG scintillators. ► In

  16. New air fluorescence detectors employed in the Telescope Array experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tokuno, H; Takeda, M; Kadota, K; Ikeda, D; Chikawa, M; Fujii, T; Fukushima, M; Honda, K; Inoue, N; Kakimoto, F; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Matthews, J N; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Okuda, T; Ozawa, S; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Shibata, T; Taketa, A; Thomas, S B; Tomida, T; Tsunesada, Y; Udo, S; Abu-zayyad, T; Aida, R; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fukuda, T; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Iguchi, T; Ikuta, K; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Myers, I; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Miyauchi, H; Murano, Y; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Oshima, A; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takita, M; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Troitsky, S; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    Since 2007, the Telescope Array (TA) experiment, based in Utah, USA, has been observing ultra high energy cosmic rays to understand their origins. The experiment involves a surface detector (SD) array and three fluorescence detector (FD) stations. FD stations, installed surrounding the SD array, measure the air fluorescence light emitted from extensive air showers (EASs) for precise determination of their energies and species. The detectors employed at one of the three FD stations were relocated from the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment. At the other two stations, newly designed detectors were constructed for the TA experiment. An FD consists of a primary mirror and a camera equipped with photomultiplier tubes. To obtain the EAS parameters with high accuracies, understanding the FD optical characteristics is important. In this paper, we report the characteristics and installation of new FDs and the performances of the FD components. The results of the monitored mirror reflectance during the observation ti...

  17. Development of an Ultrahigh Resolution Block Detector Based on 0.4 mm Pixel Ce:GAGG Scintillators and a Silicon Photomultiplier Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Yeom, Jung Yeol; Kamada, Kei; Endo, Takanori; Levin, Craig S.

    2013-12-01

    Ce doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (Ce:GAGG) is a newly developed single-crystal scintillator which has a large light output and longer emission light wavelength. The longer wavelength of the scintillation photons will produce a larger signal when coupled to typical silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) as the quantum efficiency of semiconductor based photodetector is generally higher for light with longer wavelength. A block detector with higher spatial resolution may thus be realized by combining Ce:GAGG with Si-PM arrays. To achieve the highest possible spatial resolution for PET and SPECT detectors, we developed an ultrahigh resolution block detector using 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm × 5 mm Ce:GAGG pixels assembled to form a 24 × 24 matrix that is coupled to an Si-PM array and evaluated the performance. All Ce:GAGG pixels were separated in the 2-dimensional position histograms for Cs-137 (662 keV) gamma photons with an average peak-to-valley (P/V) ratio of 2.4. The energy resolution was 21.6% FWHM for Cs-137 (662 keV) and 23.8% for Co-57 (122 keV) gamma photons. Since Ce:GAGG does not contain naturally occurring radioisotope (Lu), beta-gamma true coincidences can be avoided and randoms are reduced when used for PET detectors. Furthermore, this property, together with its high light output and good intrinsic energy resolution, make the scintillator suited for SPECT detectors. An ultrahigh resolution PET/SPECT hybrid system might be an interesting application using Ce:GAGG/Si-PM block detectors.

  18. A novel gamma-ray detector with submillimeter resolutions using a monolithic MPPC array with pixelized Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Miura, T.; Matsuda, H.; Kishimoto, A.; Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Nakamura, S.; Kawabata, N.; Ikeda, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Kamada, K.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) array consisting of 4×4 channels with a three-side buttable package. Each channel has a photosensitive area of 3×3 mm2 and 3600 Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs). For typical operational gain of 7.5×105 at +20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ±5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to ≤400 kcps per channel. We first fabricated a gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array with one-to-one coupling to a Ce-doped (Lu, Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO) crystal array (4×4 array of 3×3×10 mm3 crystals). Energy and time resolutions of 11.5±0.5% (FWHM at 662 keV) and 493±22 ps were obtained, respectively. When using the charge division resistor network, which compiles signals into four position-encoded analog outputs, the ultimate positional resolution is estimated as 0.19 mm in both X and Y directions, while energy resolution of 10.2±0.4% (FWHM) was obtained. Finally, we fabricated submillimeter Ce:LYSO and Ce-doped Gd3Ga3Al2O12 (Ce:GGAG) scintillator matrices each consisting of 1.0×1.0, 0.7×0.7 and 0.5×0.5 mm2 pixels, to further improve the spatial resolution. In all types of Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG matrices, each crystal was clearly resolved in the position histograms when irradiated by a 137Cs source. The energy resolutions for 662 keV gamma-rays for each Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG scintillator matrix were ≤14.3%. These results suggest excellent potential for its use as a high spatial medical imaging device, particularly in positron emission tomography (PET).

  19. The Gigatracker: An ultra-fast and low-mass silicon pixel detector for the NA62 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorini, M; Morel, M; Petrucci, F; Marchetto, F; Garbolino, S; Cortina, E; Tiuraniemi, S; Ceccucci, A; Martin, E; Riedler, P; Martoiu, S; Ramusino, A C; Rinella, G A; Mapelli, A; Mazza, G; Noy, M; Jarron, P; Nuessle, G; Dellacasa, G; Kluge, A; Rivetti, A; Kaplon, J

    2011-01-01

    The Gigatracker is a hybrid silicon pixel detector developed to track the highly intense NA62 hadron beam with a time resolution of 150 ps (rms). The beam spectrometer of the experiment is composed of three Gigatracker stations installed in vacuum in order to precisely measure momentum, time and direction of every traversing particle. Precise tracking demands a very low mass of the detector assembly (<0.5\\% X(O) per station) in order to limit multiple scattering and beam hadronic interactions. The high rate and especially the high timing precision requirements are very demanding: two R\\&D options are ongoing and the corresponding prototype read-out chips have been recently designed and produced in 0.13 mu m CMOS technology. One solution makes use of a constant fraction discriminator and on-pixel analogue-based time-to-digital-converter (TDC); the other comprises a delay-locked loop based TDC placed at the end of each pixel column and a time-over-threshold discriminator with time-walk correction techniq...

  20. The Gigatracker: An ultra-fast and low-mass silicon pixel detector for the NA62 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorini, M., E-mail: Massimiliano.Fiorini@cern.c [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carassiti, V. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Ceccucci, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cortina, E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Cotta Ramusino, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S. [INFN Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mapelli, A. [EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marchetto, F. [INFN Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Martin, E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Martoiu, S.; Mazza, G. [INFN Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Morel, M.; Noy, M. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Nuessle, G. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Petrucci, F. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Riedler, P. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2011-02-01

    The Gigatracker is a hybrid silicon pixel detector developed to track the highly intense NA62 hadron beam with a time resolution of 150 ps (rms). The beam spectrometer of the experiment is composed of three Gigatracker stations installed in vacuum in order to precisely measure momentum, time and direction of every traversing particle. Precise tracking demands a very low mass of the detector assembly (<0.5% X{sub 0} per station) in order to limit multiple scattering and beam hadronic interactions. The high rate and especially the high timing precision requirements are very demanding: two R and D options are ongoing and the corresponding prototype read-out chips have been recently designed and produced in 0.13{mu}m CMOS technology. One solution makes use of a constant fraction discriminator and on-pixel analogue-based time-to-digital-converter (TDC); the other comprises a delay-locked loop based TDC placed at the end of each pixel column and a time-over-threshold discriminator with time-walk correction technique. The current status of the R and D program is overviewed and results from the prototype read-out chips test are presented.

  1. Effect of Pixel's Spatial Characteristics on Recognition of Isolated Pixelized Chinese Character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Wu, Yaowei

    2015-01-01

    The influence of pixel's spatial characteristics on recognition of isolated Chinese character was investigated using simulated prosthestic vision. The accuracy of Chinese character recognition with 4 kinds of pixel number (6*6, 8*8, 10*10, and 12*12 pixel array) and 3 kinds of pixel shape (Square, Dot and Gaussian) and different pixel spacing were tested through head-mounted display (HMD). A captured image of Chinese characters in font style of Hei were pixelized with Square, Dot and Gaussian pixel. Results showed that pixel number was the most important factor which could affect the recognition of isolated pixelized Chinese Chartars and the accuracy of recognition increased with the addition of pixel number. 10*10 pixel array could provide enough information for people to recognize an isolated Chinese character. At low resolution (6*6 and 8*8 pixel array), there were little difference of recognition accuracy between different pixel shape and different pixel spacing. While as for high resolution (10*10 and 12*12 pixel array), the fluctuation of pixel shape and pixel spacing could not affect the performance of recognition of isolated pixelized Chinese Character.

  2. ATLAS pixel IBL modules construction experience and developments for future upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudiello, A.

    2015-10-01

    The first upgrade of the ATLAS Pixel Detector is the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), installed in May 2014 in the core of ATLAS. Two different silicon sensor technologies, planar n-in-n and 3D, are used. Sensors are connected with the new generation 130 nm IBM CMOS FE-I4 read-out chip via solder bump-bonds. Production quality control tests were set up to verify and rate the performance of the modules before integration into staves. An overview of module design and construction, the quality control results and production yield will be discussed, as well as future developments foreseen for future detector upgrades.

  3. The surface detector array of the Telescope Array experiment to explore the highest energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Myers, I; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Miyauchi, H; Murano, Y; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment, located in the western desert of Utah,USA, is designed for observation of extensive air showers from extremely high energy cosmic rays. The experiment has a surface detector array surrounded by three fluorescence detectors to enable simultaneous detection of shower particles at ground level and fluorescence photons along the shower track. The TA surface detectors and fluorescence detectors started full hybrid observation in March, 2008. In this article we describe the design and technical features of the TA surface detector.

  4. Experience in fabrication of multichip-modules for the ATLAS pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsch, T. [Fraunhofer IZM, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, Berlin 13355 (Germany)]. E-mail: thomas.fritzsch@izm.fraunhofer.de; Jordan, R. [Fraunhofer IZM, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, Berlin 13355 (Germany); Toepper, M. [Fraunhofer IZM, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, Berlin 13355 (Germany); Roeder, J. [Fraunhofer IZM, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, Berlin 13355 (Germany); Kuna, I. [Fraunhofer IZM, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, Berlin 13355 (Germany); Lutz, M. [Fraunhofer IZM, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, Berlin 13355 (Germany); Defo Kamga, F. [Fraunhofer IZM, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, Berlin 13355 (Germany); Wolf, J. [Fraunhofer IZM, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, Berlin 13355 (Germany); Ehrmann, O. [Fraunhofer IZM, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, Berlin 13355 (Germany); Oppermann, H. [Fraunhofer IZM, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, Berlin 13355 (Germany); Reichl, H. [Fraunhofer IZM, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, Berlin 13355 (Germany)

    2006-09-01

    About 1100 ATLAS bare modules will be assembled at Fraunhofer IZM. The bumping and assembly technology of these multichip-modules is described in this paper. Pixel contacts and lead-tin interconnection bumps are deposited by electroplating. A high yield manufacturing technology requires electrical test and optical inspection on wafer level as well as on chip level. In this paper, the result of optical inspection of more than 7600 readout chips is presented. Handling mistakes are the main reason for rejection of chips before flip chip assembly. A reliable process technology, the assembly of electrical Known Good Die (KGD), optical inspection after bumping and the development of a single chip repair technology result in 98% of good modules after flip chip assembly. The reliability of the bump interconnections was even checked by thermal cycling and accelerated thermal aging.

  5. Experience from design, prototyping and production of a DC-DC conversion powering scheme for the CMS Phase-1 Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Feld, Lutz Werner; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Rauch, Max Philip; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Wlochal, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The CMS pixel detector will be exchanged during the technical stop 2016/2017. To allow the new pixel detector to be powered with the legacy cable plant and power supplies, a novel powering scheme based on DC-DC conversion is employed. After the successful conclusion of an extensive development and prototyping phase, mass production of 1800 DC-DC converters as well as motherboards and other power PCBs has now been completed. This contribution reviews the lessons learned from the development of the power system for the Phase-1 pixel detector, and summarizes the experience from the production phase.

  6. Experience from design, prototyping and production of a DC-DC conversion powering scheme for the CMS Phase-1 Pixel Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Lutz; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Rauch, Max; Schmitz, Stefan; Wlochal, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The CMS pixel detector will be replaced during the technical stop 2016/2017. To allow the new pixel detector to be powered with the legacy cable plant and power supplies, a novel powering scheme based on DC-DC conversion will be employed. After the successful conclusion of an extensive development and prototyping phase, mass production of 1800 DC-DC converters as well as motherboards and other power PCBs has now been completed. This contribution reviews the lessons learned from the development of the power system for the Phase-1 pixel detector, and summarizes the experience gained from the production phase.

  7. Characterization of silicon 3D pixel detectors for the ATLAS Forward Physics experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Paz, I.; Cavallaro, E.; Lange, J. [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies - IFAE, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Grinstein, S. [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies - IFAE, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies - ICREA, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    The ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) project aims to measure protons scattered under a small angle from the pp collisions in ATLAS. In order to perform such measurements, a new silicon tracker, together with a time-of-flight detector for pile-up removal, are planned to be installed at ∼210 m from the interaction point and at 2-3 mm from the LHC proton beam. To cope with such configuration and maximize the physics outcome, the tracker has to fulfil three main requirements: endure highly non-uniform radiation doses, due to the very inhomogeneous beam profile, have slim and efficient edges to improve the acceptance of the tracker, and provide good position resolution. Recent laboratory and beam test characterization results of AFP prototypes will be presented. Slim-edged 3D pixel detectors down to 100-200 μm were studied and later non-uniformly irradiated (with a peak fluence of several 10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}) to determine the fulfilment of the AFP requirements. (authors)

  8. Scintillator counters with multi-pixel avalanche photodiode readout for the ND280 detector of the T2K experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineev, O. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: oleg@inr.ru; Afanasjev, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bondarenko, G.; Golovin, V. [Center of Perspective Technology and Apparatus, 107076 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gushchin, E.; Izmailov, A.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kudenko, Yu. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kurimoto, Y. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kutter, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Lubsandorzhiev, B. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Mayatski, V. [AO Uniplast, 600016 Vladimir (Russian Federation); Musienko, Yu. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nakaya, T.; Nobuhara, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Shaibonov, B.A.J.; Shaikhiev, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Taguchi, M. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yershov, N. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Yokoyama, M. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2007-07-11

    The Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) experiment is a second generation long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment which aims at a sensitive search for {nu}{sub e} appearance. The main design features of the T2K near neutrino detectors located at 280m from the target are presented, and the scintillator counters are described. The counters are readout via WLS fibers embedded into S-shaped grooves in the scintillator from both ends by multi-pixel avalanche photodiodes operating in a limited Geiger mode. Operating principles and results of tests of photosensors with a sensitive area of 1mm{sup 2} are presented. A time resolution of 1.75ns, a spatial resolution of 9.9-12.4cm, and a detection efficiency for minimum ionizing particles of more than 99% were obtained for scintillator detectors in a beam test.

  9. Pixel Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wermes, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Pixel detectors for precise particle tracking in high energy physics have been developed to a level of maturity during the past decade. Three of the LHC detectors will use vertex detectors close to the interaction point based on the hybrid pixel technology which can be considered the state of the art in this field of instrumentation. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as the very harsh...

  10. Development of a novel pixel-level signal processing chain for fast readout 3D integrated CMOS pixel sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Y.; Torheim, O.; Hu-Guo, C. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), 23 rue du loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Degerli, Y. [CEA Saclay, IRFU/SEDI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Hu, Y., E-mail: yann.hu@iphc.cnrs.fr [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), 23 rue du loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2013-03-11

    In order to resolve the inherent readout speed limitation of traditional 2D CMOS pixel sensors, operated in rolling shutter readout, a parallel readout architecture has been developed by taking advantage of 3D integration technologies. Since the rows of the pixel array are zero-suppressed simultaneously instead of sequentially, a frame readout time of a few microseconds is expected for coping with high hit rates foreseen in future collider experiments. In order to demonstrate the pixel readout functionality of such a pixel sensor, a 2D proof-of-concept chip including a novel pixel-level signal processing chain was designed and fabricated in a 0.13μm CMOS technology. The functionalities of this chip have been verified through experimental characterization.

  11. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.

    2009-03-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF2 scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  12. Comparison of region-of-interest-averaged and pixel-averaged analysis of DCE-MRI data based on simulations and pre-clinical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dianning; Zamora, Marta; Oto, Aytekin; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Fan, Xiaobing

    2017-09-01

    Differences between region-of-interest (ROI) and pixel-by-pixel analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI data were investigated in this study with computer simulations and pre-clinical experiments. ROIs were simulated with 10, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 different pixels. For each pixel, a contrast agent concentration as a function of time, C(t), was calculated using the Tofts DCE-MRI model with randomly generated physiological parameters (K trans and v e) and the Parker population arterial input function. The average C(t) for each ROI was calculated and then K trans and v e for the ROI was extracted. The simulations were run 100 times for each ROI with new K trans and v e generated. In addition, white Gaussian noise was added to C(t) with 3, 6, and 12 dB signal-to-noise ratios to each C(t). For pre-clinical experiments, Copenhagen rats (n  =  6) with implanted prostate tumors in the hind limb were used in this study. The DCE-MRI data were acquired with a temporal resolution of ~5 s in a 4.7 T animal scanner, before, during, and after a bolus injection (over the entire ROI, and (ii) by averaging C(t) over the entire ROI, and then fitting averaged C(t) to extract K trans and v e. The simulation results showed that in heterogeneous ROIs, the pixel-by-pixel averaged K trans was ~25% to ~50% larger (p  <  0.01) than the ROI-averaged K trans. At higher noise levels, the pixel-averaged K trans was greater than the ‘true’ K trans, but the ROI-averaged K trans was lower than the ‘true’ K trans. The ROI-averaged K trans was closer to the true K trans than pixel-averaged K trans for high noise levels. In pre-clinical experiments, the pixel-by-pixel averaged K trans was ~15% larger than the ROI-averaged K trans. Overall, with the Tofts model, the extracted physiological parameters from the pixel-by-pixel averages were larger than the ROI averages. These differences were dependent on the heterogeneity of the ROI.

  13. High-voltage pixel detectors in commercial CMOS technologies for ATLAS, CLIC and Mu3e experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Peric,I et al.

    2013-01-01

    High-voltage particle detectors in commercial CMOS technologies are a detector family that allows implementation of low-cost, thin and radiation-tolerant detectors with a high time resolution. In the R/D phase of the development, a radiation tolerance of 1015 neq=cm2 , nearly 100% detection efficiency and a spatial resolution of about 3 μm were demonstrated. Since 2011 the HV detectors have first applications: the technology is presently the main option for the pixel detector of the planned Mu3e experiment at PSI (Switzerland). Several prototype sensors have been designed in a standard 180 nm HV CMOS process and successfully tested. Thanks to its high radiation tolerance, the HV detectors are also seen at CERN as a promising alternative to the standard options for ATLAS upgrade and CLIC. In order to test the concept, within ATLAS upgrade R/D, we are currently exploring an active pixel detector demonstrator HV2FEI4; also implemented in the 180 nm HV process.

  14. High-voltage pixel detectors in commercial CMOS technologies for ATLAS, CLIC and Mu3e experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Peric, Ivan; Backhaus, Malte; Barbero, Marlon; Benoit, Mathieu; Berger, Niklaus; Bompard, Frederic; Breugnon, Patrick; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Dannheim, Dominik; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feigl, Simon; Fischer, Peter; Fougeron, Denis; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Heim, Timon; Hügging, Fabian; Kiehn, Moritz; Kreidl, Christian; Krüger, Hans; La Rosa, Alessandro; Liu, Jian; Lütticke, Florian; Mariñas, Carlos; Meng, Lingxin; Miucci, Antonio; Münstermann, Daniel; Nguyen, Hong Hanh; Obermann, Theresa; Pangaud, Patrick; Perrevoort, Ann-Kathrin; Rozanov, Alexandre; Schöning, André; Schwenker, Benjamin; Wiedner, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    High-voltage particle detectors in commercial CMOS technologies are a detector family that allows implementation of low-cost, thin and radiation-tolerant detectors with a high time resolution. In the R/D phase of the development, a radiation tolerance of 10 15 n eq = cm 2 , nearly 100% detection ef fi ciency and a spatial resolution of about 3 μ m were demonstrated. Since 2011 the HV detectors have fi rst applications: the technology is presently the main option for the pixel detector of the planned Mu3e experiment at PSI (Switzerland). Several prototype sensors have been designed in a standard 180 nm HV CMOS process and successfully tested. Thanks to its high radiation tolerance, the HV detectors are also seen at CERN as a promising alternative to the standard options for ATLAS upgrade and CLIC. In order to test the concept, within ATLAS upgrade R/D, we are currently exploring an active pixel detector demonstrator HV2FEI4; also implemented in the 180 nm HV process

  15. TANGO ARRAY I: An Air Shower Experiment in Buenos Aires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.; Reguera, A.

    The TANGO Array is an air shower experiment which has been recently constructed in Buenos Aires, Argentina. It became fully operational in September, 2000. The array consists of 4 water ˇCerenkov detector stations enclosing a geometrical area of ˜ 30.000 m2 and its design has been optimized for the observation of EAS produced by cosmic rays near the "knee" energy region. Three of the detectors have been constructed using 12000-liter stainless steel tanks, and the fourth has been mounted in a smaller, 400liter plastic container. The detectors are connected by cables to the data acquisition room, where a fully automatic system, which takes advantage of the features of a 4-channel digital oscilloscope, was set for data collection without the need of operator intervention. This automatic experiment control includes monitoring, data logging, and daily calibration of all stations. This paper describes the detectors and their associated electronics, and details are given on the data acquisition system, the triggering and calibration procedures, and the operation of the array. Examples of air shower traces, recorded by the array, are presented.

  16. Note: application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zhang, Bangmin; Brewe, Dale L; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G M; Venkatesan, T; Heald, Steve M

    2014-04-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  17. A Tracker for the Mu3e Experiment based on High-Voltage Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Niklaus; Bachmann, Sebastian; Kiehn, Moritz; Perić, Ivan; Perrevoort, Ann-Kathrin; Philipp, Raphael; Schöning, André; Stumpf, Kevin; Wiedner, Dirk; Windelband, Bernd; Zimmermann, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The Mu3e experiment searches for the lepton flavour violating decay mu+ -> e+e-e+, aiming for a branching fraction sensitivity of 10^-16. This requires an excellent momentum resolution for low energy electrons, high rate capability and a large acceptance. In order to minimize multiple scattering, the amount of material has to be as small as possible. These challenges can be met with a tracker built from high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors (HV-MAPS), which can be thinned to 50 um and which incorporate the complete read-out electronics on the sensor chip. To further minimise material, the sensors are supported by a mechanical structure built from 25 um thick Kapton foil and cooled with gaseous helium.

  18. A tracker for the Mu3e experiment based on high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Niklaus, E-mail: nberger@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Augustin, Heiko; Bachmann, Sebastian; Kiehn, Moritz [Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Perić, Ivan [Zentralinstitut für technische Informatik, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Perrevoort, Ann-Kathrin; Philipp, Raphael; Schöning, André; Stumpf, Kevin; Wiedner, Dirk; Windelband, Bernd; Zimmermann, Marco [Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-12-21

    The Mu3e experiment searches for the lepton flavour violating decay μ{sup +}→e{sup +}e{sup −}e{sup +}, aiming for a branching fraction sensitivity of 10{sup −16}. This requires an excellent momentum resolution for low energy electrons, high rate capability and a large acceptance. In order to minimise multiple scattering, the amount of material has to be as small as possible. These challenges can be met with a tracker built from high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors (HV-MAPS), which can be thinned to 50μm and which incorporate the complete read-out electronics on the sensor chip. To further minimise material, the sensors are supported by a mechanical structure built from 25μm thick Kapton foil and cooled with gaseous helium.

  19. SAR Experiments Using a Conformal Antenna Array Radar Demonstrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Knott

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Conformal antenna arrays have been studied for several years but only few examples of applications in modern radar or communication systems may be found up to date due to technological difficulties. The objective of the “Electronic Radar with Conformal Array Antenna” (ERAKO demonstrator system which has been developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR is to demonstrate the feasibility of an active electronically scanned antenna for conformal integration into small and medium sized airborne platforms. For practical trials the antenna has been adapted for operation with the Phased Array Multifunctional Imaging Radar (PAMIR system developed at the institute. The antenna in combination with the PAMIR front-end needed to undergo a special calibration procedure for beam forming and imaging post-processing. The present paper describes the design and development of the conformal antenna array of the demonstrator system, its connection to the PAMIR system and results of recently conducted synthetic aperture radar (SAR experiments.

  20. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, V; Solberg, J; Ferriera, T; Tully, L; Stephan, P

    2008-10-02

    We have developed and tested a compact collimated sixteen channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with {approx}mm spatial and sub-{micro}s temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore Fixed Hybrid Armature experiment are presented and compared with 1-D simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  1. The bolometric focal plane array of the Polarbear CMB experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, K; Anthony, A E; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M A; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Flanigan, D; Fuller, G; Ghribi, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Kisner, T; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A T; Linder, E; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Miller, N J; Meng, X; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Quealy, E; Reichardt, C; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Sholl, M; Siritanasak, P; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Tomaru, T; Tucker, C; Zahn, O

    2012-01-01

    The Polarbear Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization experiment is currently observing from the Atacama Desert in Northern Chile. It will characterize the expected B-mode polarization due to gravitational lensing of the CMB, and search for the possible B-mode signature of inflationary gravitational waves. Its 250 mK focal plane detector array consists of 1,274 polarization-sensitive antenna-coupled bolometers, each with an associated lithographed band-defining filter. Each detector's planar antenna structure is coupled to the telescope's optical system through a contacting dielectric lenslet, an architecture unique in current CMB experiments. We present the initial characterization of this focal plane.

  2. A deployable structure and solar array controls experiment for STEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    A candidate configuration for a controls experiment on the Space Technology Experiments Platform (STEP) is described. The elements of the experiment are the mast, the solar array, and an articulation module between the two. The characteristic dimensions are very compatible for integration on a pallet such a STEP's proposed configuration. The controls' objective would be the measurement of orbiter interaction as well as the system identification of the appendages. The flight experiment configuration would also provide a test bed for various active vibration controls concepts. The instrumentation being considered would measure accelerations, strains, displacements, and temperatures. The deployable mast has eight elements defining a structural bay. Uniaxial measurements would be required to define loads at a cross section of the structure. Displacements due to thermal distortion of the mast and the local state of the solar concentrator may be measured by an optical ranging technique from the orbiter aft flight deck.

  3. Pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Passmore, M S

    2001-01-01

    positions on the detector. The loss of secondary electrons follows the profile of the detector and increases with higher energy ions. studies of the spatial resolution predict a value of 5.3 lp/mm. The image noise in photon counting systems is investigated theoretically and experimentally and is shown to be given by Poisson statistics. The rate capability of the LAD1 was measured to be 250 kHz per pixel. Theoretical and experimental studies of the difference in contrast for ideal charge integrating and photon counting imaging systems were carried out. It is shown that the contrast differs and that for the conventional definition (contrast = (background - signal)/background) the photon counting device will, in some cases, always give a better contrast than the integrating system. Simulations in MEDICI are combined with analytical calculations to investigate charge collection efficiencies (CCE) in semiconductor detectors. Different pixel sizes and biasing conditions are considered. The results show charge shari...

  4. Multi-pixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode and wavelength shifting fibre readout of plastic scintillator counters of the EMMA underground experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Akhrameev, E. V.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Dzaparov, I. M.; Davitashvili, I. Sh.; Enqvist, T.; Fynbo, H.; Guliev, Zh. Sh.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Izmaylov, A. O.; Joutsenvaara, J.; Khabibullin, M. M.; KHOTJANTSEV, A.N; Kudenko, Yu. G.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.

    2009-01-01

    The results of a development of a scintillator counter with wavelength shifting (WLS) fibre and a multi-pixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode readout are presented. The photodiode has a metal-resistor-semiconductor layered structure and operates in the limited Geiger mode. The scintillator counter has been developed for the EMMA underground cosmic ray experiment.

  5. Intelsat solar array coupon atomic oxygen flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, S.; King, G.; Dunnet, A.; Kirkendahl, T.; Linton, R.; Vaughn, J.

    1994-05-01

    A Hughes communications satellite (INTELSAT series) belonging to the INTELSAT Organization was marooned in low-Earth orbit (LEO) on March 14, 1990, following failure of the Titan launch vehicle third stage to separate properly. The satellite, INTELSAT 6, was designed for service in geosynchronous orbit and contains several materials that are potentially susceptible to attack by atomic oxygen. Analysis showed that direct exposure of the silver interconnects in the satellite photovoltaic array to atomic oxygen in LEO was the key materials issue. Available data on atomic oxygen degradation of silver are limited and show high variance, so solar array configurations of the INTELSAT 6 type and individual interconnects were tested in ground-based facilities and during STS-41 (Space Shuttle Discovery, October 1990) as part of the ISAC flight experiment. Several materials for which little or no flight data exist were also tested for atomic oxygen reactivity. Dry lubricants, elastomers, and polymeric and inorganic materials were exposed to an oxygen atom fluence of 1.1 x 10(exp 20) atoms cm(exp 2). Many of the samples were selected to support Space Station Freedom design and decision making. This paper provides an overview of the ISAC flight experiment and a brief summary of results. In addition to new data on materials not before flown, ISAC provided data supporting the decision to rescue INTELSAT 6, which was successfully undertaken in May 1992.

  6. The APSEL4D Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor and its Usage in a Single Electron Interference Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alberghi, Gian Luigi

    We have realized a Data Acquisition chain for the use and characterization of APSEL4D, a 32 x 128 Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor, developed as a prototype for frontier experiments in high energy particle physics. In particular a transition board was realized for the conversion between the chip and the FPGA voltage levels and for the signal quality enhancing. A Xilinx Spartan-3 FPGA was used for real time data processing, for the chip control and the communication with a Personal Computer through a 2.0 USB port. For this purpose a firmware code, developed in VHDL language, was written. Finally a Graphical User Interface for the online system monitoring, hit display and chip control, based on windows and widgets, was realized developing a C++ code and using Qt and Qwt dedicated libraries. APSEL4D and the full acquisition chain were characterized for the first time with the electron beam of the transmission electron microscope and with 55Fe and 90Sr radioactive sources. In addition, a beam test was performed at ...

  7. Studies Of Radiation Effects On Pixel Sensors For The Cms Experiment And Design Of Radiation Hard Sensors For Future Upgrades Of Lhc Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, A

    2005-01-01

    The CMS experiment which is currently under construction at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will contain a pixel detector that provides in its final configuration three space points per track close to the interaction point of the colliding beams. The readout chip is expected to survive a particle fluence of 6 × 1014 neq/cm2 and therefore all components of the hybrid pixel detector have to perform well up to at least this fluence. This requires the silicon to operate partially depleted after irradiation and therefore “n in n” concept has been chosen. In order to perform IV tests on wafers to certify the quality of sensors and to hold accidentally unconnected pixels close to ground potential a resistive path between the pixels has been implemented by openings in the p -stop implants surrounding every pixel cell. Prototypes of such sensors have been produced by two different companies and their properties have been extensively tested before and after ir...

  8. The upgraded Pixel detector and the commissioning of the Inner Detector tracking of the ATLAS experiment for Run-2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00019188; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run-2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will provide new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). The IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 at a radius of 3.3 cm between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe. The new detector, built to cope with the high radiation and expected occupancy, is the first large scale application of 3D detectors and CMOS 130~nm technology. In addition, the Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during Run-1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. Complementing detector improvements, many improvements to Inner Detector track and vertex reconstr...

  9. Bump bonding of pixel systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, M. E-mail: manuel.lozano@cnm.es; Cabruja, E.; Collado, A.; Santander, J.; Ullan, M

    2001-11-01

    A pixel detector consists of an array of radiation sensing elements which is connected to an electronic read-out unit. Many different ways of making this connection between these two different devices are currently being used or considered to be used in the next future. Bonding techniques such as flip chip technology can present real advantages because they allow very fine pitch and a high number of I/Os. This paper presents a review of the different flip chip technologies available and their suitability for manufacturing pixel detectors. The particular problems concerning testing of pixel detectors and thermal issues related to them are pointed out.

  10. Bump bonding of pixel systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, M; Collado, A; Santander, J; Ullán, M

    2001-01-01

    A pixel detector consists of an array of radiation sensing elements which is connected to an electronic read-out unit. Many different ways of making this connection between these two different devices are currently being used or considered to be used in the next future. Bonding techniques such as flip chip technology can present real advantages because they allow very fine pitch and a high number of I/Os. This paper presents a review of the different flip chip technologies available and their suitability for manufacturing pixel detectors. The particular problems concerning testing of pixel detectors and thermal issues related to them are pointed out.

  11. Noise Analysis of Array Pixellated CZT Detector%CZT像素阵列核探测器的噪声分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋建; 肖沙里; 蔡欣; 张流强; 陈宇晓; 曹玉琳

    2011-01-01

    碲锌镉(CdZnTe)晶体是一种新型核辐射探测材料,在室温探测环境下对X射线及低能量伽玛射线具有较高的探测效率及能量分辨率.运用低噪声快速前放模块,分析晶体内部性能以及前置放大器对探测系统噪声的影响,建立了2×2碲锌镉像素阵列探测系统.实验结果表明,探测系统输出信号噪声小、脉冲无堆积,读出电路电子学噪声得到明显抑制,能谱低能拖尾减少,电荷收集不完全噪声及漏电流噪声影响得到改善,同时对整个系统以及前置放大器进行了噪声分析并提出相关的改善方式,最后得到系统测试的结果.%As a novel nuclear radiation material, CdZnTe has many advantages of high effi ciency detection and good energy resolution for detection of x-ray and low energy gamma-ray in room temperature. The inner crystal property and effects of preamplifier on the noise is analyzed using low noise preamplifier module, while a 2× 2 array pixellated detection system is built. The results show a low noise of output signal and no pulse stack. The circuit electronic noise is obvi ously restrained. Trails of low power of energy spectrum are decreased. Noise analysis and the factors which produced the noise are given; improvement for the system is also discussed, togeth er with the test result.

  12. Dead pixel replacement in LWIR microgrid polarimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Bradley M; Tyo, J Scott; Boger, James K; Black, Wiley T; Bowers, David L; Fetrow, Matthew P

    2007-06-11

    LWIR imaging arrays are often affected by nonresponsive pixels, or "dead pixels." These dead pixels can severely degrade the quality of imagery and often have to be replaced before subsequent image processing and display of the imagery data. For LWIR arrays that are integrated with arrays of micropolarizers, the problem of dead pixels is amplified. Conventional dead pixel replacement (DPR) strategies cannot be employed since neighboring pixels are of different polarizations. In this paper we present two DPR schemes. The first is a modified nearest-neighbor replacement method. The second is a method based on redundancy in the polarization measurements.We find that the redundancy-based DPR scheme provides an order-of-magnitude better performance for typical LWIR polarimetric data.

  13. 1-D array of perforated diode neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeil, Walter J. [Kansas State University, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)], E-mail: wjm4444@ksu.edu; Bellinger, Steven L.; Unruh, Troy C.; Henderson, Chris M.; Ugorowski, Phil; Morris-Lee, Bryce [Kansas State University, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Taylor, Russell D. [Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); McGregor, Douglas S. [Kansas State University, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)], E-mail: mcgregor@ksu.edu

    2009-06-01

    Performance of a 4 cm long 64-pixel perforated diode neutron detector array is compared with an identical array of thin-film coated diodes. The perforated neutron detector design has been adapted to a 1-D pixel array capable of 120 {mu}m spatial resolution and counting efficiency greater than 12%. Deep vertical trenches filled with {sup 6}LiF provide outstanding improvement in efficiency over thin-film coated diode designs limited to only 4.5%. This work marks the final step towards the construction of a much larger array consisting of 1024 pixels spanning 10 cm. The larger detector array will be constructed with a sub-array of 64-pixel sensors, and will be used for small-angle neutron scattering experiments at the Spallation Neutron Source of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  14. The NUC and blind pixel eliminating in the DTDI application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiao Feng; Chen, Fan Sheng; Pan, Sheng Da; Gong, Xue Yi; Dong, Yu Cui

    2013-12-01

    AS infrared CMOS Digital TDI (Time Delay and integrate) has a simple structure, excellent performance and flexible operation, it has been used in more and more applications. Because of the limitation of the Production process level, the plane array of the infrared detector has a large NU (non-uniformity) and a certain blind pixel rate. Both of the two will raise the noise and lead to the TDI works not very well. In this paper, for the impact of the system performance, the most important elements are analyzed, which are the NU of the optical system, the NU of the Plane array and the blind pixel in the Plane array. Here a reasonable algorithm which considers the background removal and the linear response model of the infrared detector is used to do the NUC (Non-uniformity correction) process, when the infrared detector array is used as a Digital TDI. In order to eliminate the impact of the blind pixel, the concept of surplus pixel method is introduced in, through the method, the SNR (signal to noise ratio) can be improved and the spatial and temporal resolution will not be changed. Finally we use a MWIR (Medium Ware Infrared) detector to do the experiment and the result proves the effectiveness of the method.

  15. Magnetic flux array for spontaneous magnetic reconnection experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesich, A; Bonde, J; Egedal, J; Fox, W; Goodwin, R; Katz, N; Le, A

    2008-06-01

    Experimental investigation of reconnection in magnetized plasmas relies on accurate characterization of the evolving magnetic fields. In experimental configurations where the plasma dynamics are reproducible, magnetic data can be collected in multiple discharges and combined to provide spatially resolved profiles of the plasma dynamics. However, in experiments on spontaneous magnetic reconnection recently undertaken at the Versatile Toroidal Facility at MIT, the reconnection process is not reproducible and all information on the plasma must be collected in a single discharge. This paper describes a newly developed magnetic flux array which directly measures the toroidal component of the magnetic vector potential, A(phi). From the measured A(phi), the magnetic field geometry, current density, and reconnection rate are readily obtained, facilitating studies of the three-dimensional dynamics of spontaneous magnetic reconnection. The novel design of the probe array allows for accurate characterization of profiles of A(phi) at multiple toroidal angles using a relatively small number of signal channels and with minimal disturbance of the plasma.

  16. Pixel Design of Organic Thin Film Transistor Array%有机薄膜晶体管阵列面向电子纸像素设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪梅林; 张其国; 郑永亮; 秦永亮; 郭晓东; 潭莉; 朱棋锋; 韩学斌; 申剑锋

    2012-01-01

    As a switch device of the pixel, the Organic Thin Film Transistor(OTFT) has good IDS-VGS curve. This paper describes the pixel circuit, model parameter for HSPICE simulation and the pixel layout. In order to verify the influence of storage capacitor and TFT structure on the pixel waveform, the pixel waveform was simulated by HSPICE. The OTFT process is studied in this paper. Result shows that OTFT structure is selected according to the storage capacitor for different products. The OTFT process is suitable for flexible display.%讨论了有机薄膜晶体管(Organic Thin Film Transistor,OTFT)作为开关器件来驱动电子纸的像素设计,特别是像素电路结构、HSPICE模拟用模型参数和像素平面结构.讨论了有机薄膜晶体管制造过程,并用HSPIC模拟分析了有机薄膜晶体管结构和存贮电容大小对像素波形的影响,结果表明TFT结构的选择依赖于存贮电容的大小.

  17. Experiments on Inductive Magnetic Levitation with a Circular Halbach Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Ian; Goncz, Doug; Raymer, Austin; Specht, Jason; Zalles, Ricardo; Majewski, Walerian

    2013-03-01

    Using a ring Halbach array, we are investigating a repulsive levitating force and a drag force acting on the magnet from a ring of inductors rotating below the magnet. After measuring induced currents, voltages and magnetic fields in the individual inductors (in the form of short solenoids), we investigated the dependence of lift/drag forces on the speed of relative rotation. The ratio of lift to drag increases with the angular velocity, as expected from a related theory of the induction effects in a linear motion. We are experimenting with the shape and density of inductors, and their material, in an attempt to maximize the lift at a minimal velocity of rotation. Eventually this design could have applications as frictionless bearings or as frictionless gear in a wide range of systems, especially in machinery that cannot be easily accessed.

  18. The Microcalorimeter Arrays for a Rhenium Experiment (MARE): a next-generation calorimetric neutrino mass experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Monfardini, A; Brofferio, C; Capelli, S; Capozzi, F; Cremonesi, O; Enss, C; Fiorini, E; Fleischmann, A; Foggetta, L; Gallinaro, G; Gastaldo, L; Gatti, F; Giuliani, A; Gorla, P; Kelley, R; Kilbourne, C A; Margesin, B; McCammon, D; Nones, C; Nucciotti, A; Pavan, M; Pedretti, M; Pergolesi, D; Pessina, G; Porter, F S; Prest, M; Previtali, E; Repetto, P; Ribeiro-Gomez, M; Sangiorgio, S; Sisti, M

    2006-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have proved that neutrinos are massive particles, but can't determine their absolute mass scale. Therefore the neutrino mass is still an open question in elementary particle physics. An international collaboration is growing around the project of Microcalorimeter Arrays for a Rhenium Experiment (MARE) for directly measuring the neutrino mass with a sensitivity of about 0.2eV/c2. Many groups are joining their experiences and technical expertise in a common effort towards this challenging experiment. We discuss the different scenarios and the impact of MARE as a complement of KATRIN.

  19. Development of a high density pixel multichip module at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, G. [and others

    2001-03-08

    At Fermilab, both pixel detector multichip module and sensor hybridization are being developed for the BTeV experiment. The BTeV pixel detector is based on a design relying on a hybrid approach. With this approach, the readout chip and the sensor array are developed separately and the detector is constructed by flip-chip mating the two together. This method offers maximum flexibility in the development process, choice of fabrication technologies, and the choice of sensor material. This paper presents strategies to handle the required data rate and performance results of the first prototype and detector hybridization.

  20. Measurement results of a 12 μm pixel size microbolometer array based on a novel thermally isolating structure using a 17 μm ROIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muckensturm, K.-M.; Weiler, D.; Hochschulz, F.; Busch, C.; Geruschke, T.; Wall, S.; Heß, J.; Würfel, D.; Lerch, R.; Vogt, H.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a novel concept for the fabrication of highly sensitive uncooled microbolometers is presented. The approach is based on the realization of thermal isolation and simultaneous electrical contacting of the microbolometers by means of sufficiently long and thin coated nanotubes, which can be fabricated by post processing on top of CMOS wafers comprising the ROIC. Thus, the effective area of the absorption layer is maximized at a given pixel size, as lateral legs, which have been the main component of the thermal isolation commonly, are completely omitted. The resulting thermal conductivity can be tuned independently from the pixel size by varying the geometry and structuring of the nanotubes. Based on test structures the nanotube microbolometers are characterized with respect to electro-optical and mechanical properties. The focus in this paper is on nanotube microbolometers with a pixel size of 12 μm.

  1. InAs/GaSb Type-II superlattice photodiode array inter-pixel region blue-shift by femtosecond (fs) laser anneal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sona; Das, Utpal

    2017-09-01

    A post-growth blue-shift in the band gap of an undoped InAs/GaSb Type-II superlattice (5.5 μm cutoff wavelength), as a result of 775 nm, 150 fs laser annealing, is presented. A band gap blue-shift of ∼72 meV in the {{{p}}}+- and p-layer etched inter-pixel region, laser annealed superlattice is achieved. Using an inter-diffusion model, the dominant group-III and group-V diffusion coefficients are found to be 1.33× {10}-21 {{{m}}}2 {{{s}}}-1 and 4.8× {10}-22 {{{m}}}2 {{{s}}}-1 respectively. Confirmation of the unaltered condition of the superlattice in a Ti/Au masked pixel area establishes this blue-shifted superlattice band gap to be the reason behind the improved inter-pixel isolation resulting from the fs laser annealing technique.

  2. Packaging and assembly technologies for the pixel detector upgrade and measurement of $\\tau\\tau$ final states with the CMS experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00380602; Quast, Gunter; Husemann, Ulrich

    The work, performed in the context of the CMS experiment at the LHC, is related to the assembly of the future CMS pixel detector and to improvements in the identification of hadronically decaying tau leptons. The performance of the tau identification has been evaluated in the data collected by CMS in 2015 and a measurement of the inclusive Z production cross section at 13 TeV has been performed.

  3. Pixel detector system development at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, J.; Horswell, I.; Gimenez, E. N.; Tartoni, N.

    2010-10-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors consisting of an array of silicon photodiodes bump-bonded to CMOS read-out chips provide high signal-to-noise ratio and high dynamic range compared to CCD-based detectors and Image Plates. These detector features are important for SAXS experiments where a wide range of intensities are present in the images. For time resolved SAXS experiments, high frame rates are compulsory. The latest CMOS read-out chip developed by the MEDIPIX collaboration provides high frame rate and continuous acquisition mode. A read-out system for an array of MEDIPIX3 sensors is under development at Diamond Light Source. This system will support a full resolution frame rate of 1 kHz at a pixel counter depth of 12-bit and a frame rate of 30 kHz at a counter depth of 1 bit. Details concerning system design and MEDIPIX sensors characterization are presented.

  4. High-contrast X-ray micro-tomography of low attenuation samples using large area hybrid semiconductor pixel detector array of 10 × 5 Timepix chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, J.; Krejci, F.; Bartl, B.; Dudak, J.; Kuba, J.; Kvacek, J.; Zemlicka, J.

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors provide excellent imaging properties such as unlimited dynamic range, high spatial resolution, high frame rate and energy sensitivity. Nevertheless, a limitation in the use of these devices for imaging has been the small sensitive area of a few square centimetres. In the field of microtomography we make use of a large area pixel detector assembled from 50 Timepix edgeless chips providing fully sensitive area of 14.3 × 7.15 cm2. We have successfully demonstrated that the enlargement of the sensitive area enables high-quality tomographic measurements of whole objects with high geometrical magnification without any significant degradation in resulting reconstructions related to the chip tilling and edgeless sensor technology properties. The technique of micro-tomography with the newly developed large area detector is applied for samples formed by low attenuation, low contrast materials such a seed from Phacelia tanacetifolia, a charcoalified wood sample and a beeswax seal sample.

  5. Development of an X-ray pixel detector with multi-port charge-coupled device for X-ray free-electron laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kameshima, Takashi [JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ono, Shun; Kudo, Togo; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Kirihara, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Inubushi, Yuichi [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Yabashi, Makina; Hatsui, Takaki, E-mail: hatsui@spring8.or.jp [JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Horigome, Toshio [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Holland, Andrew; Holland, Karen [XCam, Ltd, 2 Stone Circle Road, Round Spinney Industrial Estate, Northampton NN3 8RF (United Kingdom); Burt, David [e2v, 106 Waterhouse Lane, Chelmsford, Essex CM1 2QU (United Kingdom); Murao, Hajime [Meisei Electric Co. Ltd, Naganuma 2223, Isesaki, Gunma 372-8585 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents development of an X-ray pixel detector with a multi-port charge-coupled device (MPCCD) for X-ray Free-Electron laser experiments. The fabrication process of the CCD was selected based on the X-ray radiation hardness against the estimated annual dose of 1.6 × 10{sup 14} photon/mm{sup 2}. The sensor device was optimized by maximizing the full well capacity as high as 5 Me- within 50 μm square pixels while keeping the single photon detection capability for X-ray photons higher than 6 keV and a readout speed of 60 frames/s. The system development also included a detector system for the MPCCD sensor. This paper summarizes the performance, calibration methods, and operation status.

  6. Development of hybrid photon detectors with integrated silicon pixel readout for the RICH counters of LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Alemi, M; Formenti, F; Gys, Thierry; Piedigrossi, D; Puertolas, D; Rosso, E; Snoeys, W; Wyllie, Ken H

    1999-01-01

    We report on the ongoing work towards a hybrid photon detector with integrated silicon pixel readout for the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The photon detector is based $9 on a cross-focussed image intensifier tube geometry where the image is de-magnified by a factor of 4. The anode consists of a silicon pixel array, bump-bonded to a fast, binary readout chip with matching pixel electronics. The $9 performance of a half-scale prototype is presented, together with the developments and tests of a full-scale tube with large active area. Specific requirements for pixel front-end and readout electronics in LHCb are outlined, and $9 recent results obtained from pixel chips applicable to hybrid photon detector design are summarized.

  7. Ultrahigh Detective Heterogeneous Photosensor Arrays with In-Pixel Signal Boosting Capability for Large-Area and Skin-Compatible Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Kim, Jaekyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Lee, Myungwon; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2016-04-01

    An ultra-thin and large-area skin-compatible heterogeneous organic/metal-oxide photosensor array is demonstrated which is capable of sensing and boosting signals with high detectivity and signal-to-noise ratio. For the realization of ultra-flexible and high-sensitive heterogeneous photosensor arrays on a polyimide substrate having organic sensor arrays and metal-oxide boosting circuitry, solution-processing and room-temperature alternating photochemical conversion routes are applied. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Antenna-coupled bolometer arrays using transition-edgesensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Michael J.; Ade, Peter; Engargiola, Greg; Holzapfel,William; Lee,Adrian T.; O' Brient, Roger; Richards, Paul L.; Smith, Andy; Spieler, Helmuth; Tran, Huan

    2004-06-08

    We describe the development of an antenna-coupled bolometer array for use in a Cosmic Microwave Background polarization experiment. Prototype single pixels using double-slot dipole antennas and integrated microstrip band defining filters have been built and tested. Preliminary results of optical testing and simulations are presented. A bolometer array design based on this pixel will also be shown and future plans for application of the technology will be discussed.

  9. TANGO ARRAY An Air Shower Experiment in Buenos Aires

    CERN Document Server

    Bauleo, P; Filevich, A; Reguera, A

    2004-01-01

    A new Air Shower Observatory has been constructed in Buenos Aires during 1999, and commissioned and set in operation in 2000. The observatory consists of an array of four water \\v{C}erenkov detectors, enclosing a geometrical area of $\\sim$ 30.000 m$^{2}$, and is optimized for the observation of cosmic rays in the ``knee'' energy region. The array detects $\\sim$ 250 to $\\sim$ 1500 showers/day, depending on the selected triggering condition. In this paper, the design and construction of the array, and the automatic system for data adquisition, daily calibration, and monitoring, are described. Also, the Monte Carlo simulations performed to develop a shower database, as well as the studies performed using the database to estimate the response and the angular and energy resolutions of the array, are presented in detail.

  10. Design of equivalent pixel circuit for infrared focal plane array%用于红外焦平面阵列的等效像元电路设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴山彪; 陈力颖; 邢海英; 王健; 杨晓龙

    2015-01-01

    An equivalent pixel circuit for 300 ×400 infrared focal plane array readout circuit structure is presented in this paper.The circuit′s electrical characteristics are equivalent to that of the vanadium oxide (VOx film)micro -mechanical systems (MEMS).It can simulate the variation of the branch current when the MEMS pixel changes.Be-fore the growth of physical structure of MEMS (VOx film),the infrared array detector readout circuit has been fabrica-ted.The equivalent pixel circuit is designed to test the electrical properties of the readout circuit.It can remove the defective products and reduce packaging costs.The circuit has been designed and fabricated with a GlobalFoundry 0.35 μm process.The test results indicate that the equivalent circuit has the same electrical properties as the MEMS pixel when the integrating current is 0 ~200 nA.%提出了一种用于300×400红外焦平面阵列读出电路的等效像元电路结构。该电路与氧化钒(VOx 薄膜)制成的微机械系统(MEMS)的电特性等效,并能够模拟 MEMS 像元改变时支路电流的变化。红外面阵探测器读出电路在流片后,生长 MEMS 物理结构(VOx 薄膜)前,该等效像元电路结构用于读出电路的电性能测试,从而剔除不良品,减少封装成本。该电路采用了 GlobalFoundry 0.35μm 工艺设计并流片。测试结果表明,当积分电流为0~200 nA 时,该等效像元电路的电性能与 MEMS 像元一致。

  11. CMS Barrel Pixel Detector Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Kästli, H C; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Hörmann, C; Horisberger, Roland Paul; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Meier, B; Robmann, P; Rohe, T; Streuli, S

    2007-01-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost tracking device of the CMS experiment at the LHC. It is built from two independent sub devices, the pixel barrel and the end disks. The barrel consists of three concentric layers around the beam pipe with mean radii of 4.4, 7.3 and 10.2 cm. There are two end disks on each side of the interaction point at 34.5 cm and 46.5 cm. This article gives an overview of the pixel barrel detector, its mechanical support structure, electronics components, services and its expected performance.

  12. Mr. Lorenzo Dellai, presidente della provincia Autonoma di Trento and Professor Andrea Zanotti, president dell'Instituto Trentino di Cultura, visit ALICE experiment underground area and Pixel Silicon Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2006-01-01

    Mr. Lorenzo Dellai, presidente della provincia Autonoma di Trento and Professor Andrea Zanotti, president dell'Instituto Trentino di Cultura, visit ALICE experiment underground area and Pixel Silicon Laboratory

  13. Penrose Pixels for Super-Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ezra, M; Lin, Zhouchen; Wilburn, Bennett; Zhang, Wei

    2011-07-01

    We present a novel approach to reconstruction-based super-resolution that uses aperiodic pixel tilings, such as a Penrose tiling or a biological retina, for improved performance. To this aim, we develop a new variant of the well-known error back projection super-resolution algorithm that makes use of the exact detector model in its back projection operator for better accuracy. Pixels in our model can vary in shape and size, and there may be gaps between adjacent pixels. The algorithm applies equally well to periodic or aperiodic pixel tilings. We present analysis and extensive tests using synthetic and real images to show that our approach using aperiodic layouts substantially outperforms existing reconstruction-based algorithms for regular pixel arrays. We close with a discussion of the feasibility of manufacturing CMOS or CCD chips with pixels arranged in Penrose tilings.

  14. CAKE: The Coincidence Array for K600 Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Adsley, P; Papka, P; Dyers, Z; Brümmer, J W; Diget, C Aa; Hubbard, N J; Li, K C W; Long, A; Marin-Lambarri, D J; Pellegri, L; Pesudo, V; Pool, L C; Smit, F D; Triambak, S

    2016-01-01

    The combination of a magnetic spectrometer and ancillary detectors such as silicon detectors is a powerful tool for the study of nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. This paper discusses the recently commissioned silicon array called the CAKE which is designed for use with the K600 magnetic spectrometer at iThemba LABS.

  15. Mars Array Technology Experiment Developed to Test Solar Arrays on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    Solar arrays will be the power supply for future missions to the planet Mars, including landers, rovers, and eventually human missions to explore the Martian surface. Until Mars Pathfinder landed in July 1997, no solar array had been used on the surface. The MATE package is intended to measure the solar energy reaching the surface, characterize the Martian environment to gather the baseline information required for designing power systems for long-duration missions, and to quantify the performance and degradation of advanced solar cells on the Martian surface. To measure the properties of sunlight reaching the Martian surface, MATE incorporates two radiometers and a visible/NIR spectrometer. The radiometers consist of multiple thermocouple junctions using thin-film technology. These devices generate a voltage proportional to the solar intensity. One radiometer measures the global broadband solar intensity, including both the direct and scattered sunlight, with a field of view of approximately 130. The second radiometer incorporates a slit to measure the direct (unscattered) intensity radiation. The direct radiometer can only be read once per day, with the Sun passing over the slit. The spectrometer measures the global solar spectrum with two 256-element photodiode arrays, one Si sensitive in the visible range (300 to 1100 nm), and a second InGaAs sensitive to the near infrared (900 to 1700 nm). This range covers 86 percent of the total energy from the Sun, with approximately 5-nm resolution. Each photodiode array has its own fiber-optic feed and grating. Although the purpose of the MATE is to gather data useful in designing solar arrays for Mars surface power systems, the radiometer and spectrometer measurements are expected to also provide important scientific data for characterizing the properties of suspended atmospheric dust. In addition to measuring the solar environment of Mars, MATE will measure the performance of five different individual solar cell types

  16. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.tosi@polimi.it; Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 μm active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  17. Characterization of a mammographic system based on single photon counting pixel arrays coupled to GaAs x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendolia, S R; Bisogni, M G; Delogu, P; Fantacci, M E; Paternoster, G; Rosso, V; Stefanini, A

    2009-04-01

    The authors report on the imaging capabilities of a mammographic system demonstrator based on GaAs pixel detectors operating in single photon counting (SPC) mode. The system imaging performances have been assessed by means of the transfer functions: The modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) have been measured following the guidelines of the IEC 62220-1-2 protocol. The transfer function analysis has shown the high spatial resolution capabilities of the GaAs detectors. The MTF calculated at the Nyquist frequency (2.94 cycles/mm) is indeed 60%. The DQE, measured with a standard mammographic beam setup (Mo/Mo, 28 kVp, with 4 mm Al added filter) and calculated at zero frequency, is 46%. Aiming to further improve the system's image quality, the authors investigate the DQE limiting factors and show that they are mainly related to system engineering. For example, the authors show that optimization of the image equalization procedure increases the DQE(0) up to 74%, which is better than the DQE(0) of most clinical mammographic systems. The authors show how the high detection efficiency of GaAs detectors and the noise discrimination associated with the SPC technology allow optimizing the image quality in mammography. In conclusion, the authors propose technological solutions to exploit to the utmost the potentiality of GaAs detectors coupled to SPC electronics.

  18. Integrated Lens Antennas for Multi-Pixel Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2011-01-01

    Future astrophysics and planetary experiments are expected to require large focal plane arrays with thousands of detectors. Feedhorns have excellent performance, but their mass, size, fabrication challenges, and expense become prohibitive for very large focal plane arrays. Most planar antenna designs produce broad beam patterns, and therefore require additional elements for efficient coupling to the telescope optics, such as substrate lenses or micromachined horns. An antenna array with integrated silicon microlenses that can be fabricated photolithographically effectively addresses these issues. This approach eliminates manual assembly of arrays of lenses and reduces assembly errors and tolerances. Moreover, an antenna array without metallic horns will reduce mass of any planetary instrument significantly. The design has a monolithic array of lens-coupled, leaky-wave antennas operating in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave frequencies. Electromagnetic simulations show that the electromagnetic fields in such lens-coupled antennas are mostly confined in approximately 12 15 . This means that one needs to design a small-angle sector lens that is much easier to fabricate using standard lithographic techniques, instead of a full hyper-hemispherical lens. Moreover, this small-angle sector lens can be easily integrated with the antennas in an array for multi-pixel imager and receiver implementation. The leaky antenna is designed using double-slot irises and fed with TE10 waveguide mode. The lens implementation starts with a silicon substrate. Photoresist with appropriate thickness (optimized for the lens size) is spun on the substrate and then reflowed to get the desired lens structure. An antenna array integrated with individual lenses for higher directivity and excellent beam profile will go a long way in realizing multi-pixel arrays and imagers. This technology will enable a new generation of compact, low-mass, and highly efficient antenna arrays for use in multi-pixel

  19. Multiplexed readout of MMC detector arrays using non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs

    OpenAIRE

    Kempf, S.; Wegner, M; Gastaldo, L.; Fleischmann, A.; Enss, C.

    2013-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are widely used for various experiments in fields ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to x-ray spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysics or material science. Whereas in previous experiments single pixel detectors or small arrays have been used, for future applications large arrays are needed. Therefore, suitable multiplexing techniques for MMC arrays are currently under development. A promising approach for the readout of large arrays is the microwave SQU...

  20. Development of SOI pixel detector in Cracow

    CERN Document Server

    Bugiel, Szymon; Glab, Sebastian; Idzik, Marek; Moron, Jakub; Kapusta, Piotr Julian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Turala, Michal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a new monolithic Silicon-On-Insulator pixel sensor in $200~nm$ SOI CMOS technology. The main application of the proposed pixel detector is the spectroscopy, but it can also be used for the minimum ionizing particle (MIP) tracking in particle physics experiments. For this reason few different versions of pixel cells are developed: a source-follower based pixel for tracking, a low noise pixel with preamplifier for spectroscopy, and a self-triggering pixel for time and amplitude measurements. In addition the design of a Successive Approximation Register Analog-to-Digital Converter (SAR ADC) is also presented. A 10-bit SAR ADC is developed for spectroscopic measurements and a lower resolution 6-bit SAR ADC is integrated in the pixel matrix as a column ADC, for tracking applications.

  1. Effect of Pixel’s Spatial Characteristics on Recognition of Isolated Pixelized Chinese Character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Wu, Yaowei

    2015-01-01

    The influence of pixel’s spatial characteristics on recognition of isolated Chinese character was investigated using simulated prosthestic vision. The accuracy of Chinese character recognition with 4 kinds of pixel number (6*6, 8*8, 10*10, and 12*12 pixel array) and 3 kinds of pixel shape (Square, Dot and Gaussian) and different pixel spacing were tested through head-mounted display (HMD). A captured image of Chinese characters in font style of Hei were pixelized with Square, Dot and Gaussian pixel. Results showed that pixel number was the most important factor which could affect the recognition of isolated pixelized Chinese Chartars and the accuracy of recognition increased with the addition of pixel number. 10*10 pixel array could provide enough information for people to recognize an isolated Chinese character. At low resolution (6*6 and 8*8 pixel array), there were little difference of recognition accuracy between different pixel shape and different pixel spacing. While as for high resolution (10*10 and 12*12 pixel array), the fluctuation of pixel shape and pixel spacing could not affect the performance of recognition of isolated pixelized Chinese Character. PMID:26628934

  2. Pixelated neutron image plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlapp, M.; Conrad, H.; von Seggern, H.

    2004-09-01

    Neutron image plates (NIPs) have found widespread application as neutron detectors for single-crystal and powder diffraction, small-angle scattering and tomography. After neutron exposure, the image plate can be read out by scanning with a laser. Commercially available NIPs consist of a powder mixture of BaFBr : Eu2+ and Gd2O3 dispersed in a polymer matrix and supported by a flexible polymer sheet. Since BaFBr : Eu2+ is an excellent x-ray storage phosphor, these NIPs are particularly sensitive to ggr-radiation, which is always present as a background radiation in neutron experiments. In this work we present results on NIPs consisting of KCl : Eu2+ and LiF that were fabricated into ceramic image plates in which the alkali halides act as a self-supporting matrix without the necessity for using a polymeric binder. An advantage of this type of NIP is the significantly reduced ggr-sensitivity. However, the much lower neutron absorption cross section of LiF compared with Gd2O3 demands a thicker image plate for obtaining comparable neutron absorption. The greater thickness of the NIP inevitably leads to a loss in spatial resolution of the image plate. However, this reduction in resolution can be restricted by a novel image plate concept in which a ceramic structure with square cells (referred to as a 'honeycomb') is embedded in the NIP, resulting in a pixelated image plate. In such a NIP the read-out light is confined to the particular illuminated pixel, decoupling the spatial resolution from the optical properties of the image plate material and morphology. In this work, a comparison of experimentally determined and simulated spatial resolutions of pixelated and unstructured image plates for a fixed read-out laser intensity is presented, as well as simulations of the properties of these NIPs at higher laser powers.

  3. On site calibration for new fluorescence detectors of the telescope array experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuno, H. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)], E-mail: htokuno@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Murano, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kawana, S. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Tameda, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Taketa, A.; Ikeda, D.; Udo, S. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Ogio, S. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Azuma, R.; Fukuda, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Inoue, N. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kadota, K. [Faculty of Knowledge Engineering, Musashi Institute of Technology, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Kakimoto, F. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Shibata, T.; Takeda, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Tsunesada, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    The Telescope Array experiment is searching for the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using a ground array of particle detectors and three fluorescence telescope stations. The precise calibration of the fluorescence detectors is important for small systematic errors in shower reconstruction. This paper details the process of calibrating cameras for two of the fluorescence telescope stations. This paper provides the operational results of these camera calibrations.

  4. MUST: A silicon strip detector array for radioactive beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenfeld, Y; Sauvestre, J E; Maréchal, F; Ottini, S; Alamanos, N; Barbier, A; Beaumel, D; Bonnereau, B; Charlet, D; Clavelin, J F; Courtat, P; Delbourgo-Salvador, P; Douet, R; Engrand, M; Ethvignot, T; Gillibert, A; Khan, E; Lapoux, V; Lagoyannis, A; Lavergne, L; Lebon, S; Lelong, P; Lesage, A; Le Ven, V; Lhenry, I; Martin, J M; Musumarra, A; Pita, S; Petizon, L; Pollacco, E; Pouthas, J; Richard, A; Rougier, D; Santonocito, D; Scarpaci, J A; Sida, J L; Soulet, C; Stutzmann, J S; Suomijärvi, T; Szmigiel, M; Volkov, P; Voltolini, G

    1999-01-01

    A new and innovative array, MUST, based on silicon strip technology and dedicated to the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams on light particles is described. The detector consists of 8 silicon strip - Si(Li) telescopes used to identify recoiling light charged particles through time of flight, energy loss and energy measurements and to determine precisely their scattering angle through X, Y position measurements. Each 60x60 mm sup 2 double sided silicon strip detector with 60 vertical and 60 horizontal strips yields an X-Y position resolution of 1 mm, an energy resolution of 50 keV, a time resolution of around 1 ns and a 500 keV energy threshold for protons. The backing Si(Li) detectors stop protons up to 25 MeV with a resolution of approximately 50 keV. CsI crystals read out by photo-diodes which stop protons up to 70 MeV are added to the telescopes for applications where higher energy particles need to be detected. The dedicated electronics in VXIbus standard allow us to house the 968 logic and a...

  5. A neighbor pixel communication filtering structure for Dynamic Vision Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Liu, Shiqi; Lu, Hehui; Zhang, Zilong

    2017-02-01

    For Dynamic Vision Sensors (DVS), thermal noise and junction leakage current induced Background Activity (BA) is the major cause of the deterioration of images quality. Inspired by the smoothing filtering principle of horizontal cells in vertebrate retina, A DVS pixel with Neighbor Pixel Communication (NPC) filtering structure is proposed to solve this issue. The NPC structure is designed to judge the validity of pixel's activity through the communication between its 4 adjacent pixels. The pixel's outputs will be suppressed if its activities are determined not real. The proposed pixel's area is 23.76×24.71μm2 and only 3ns output latency is introduced. In order to validate the effectiveness of the structure, a 5×5 pixel array has been implemented in SMIC 0.13μm CIS process. 3 test cases of array's behavioral model show that the NPC-DVS have an ability of filtering the BA.

  6. ATLAS IBL Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    La Rosa, A

    2011-01-01

    The upgrade for ATLAS detector will undergo different phase towards super-LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel detector will consist of the construction of a new pixel layer which will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine (LHC phase-I upgrade). The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing pixel detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. The IBL will require the development of several new technologies to cope with increase of radiation or pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance which will be achieved by reducing the pixel size and of the material budget. Three different promising sensor technologies (planar-Si, 3D-Si and diamond) are currently under investigation for the pixel detector. An overview of the project with particular emphasis on pixel module is presented in this paper

  7. Exploring PV on the Red Planet: Mars Array Technology Experiment and Dust Accumulation and Removal Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Baraona, Cosmo; Brinker, David; Schelman, David

    2004-01-01

    The environment on the surface of Mars is different in several critical ways from the orbital environment in which space solar arrays normally operate. Some important differences are: 1) Low intensity, low temperature operation; 2) Spectrum modified by atmospheric dust, varies with time; 3) Indirect sunlight; 4) Possibility of dust atoms at some times of year; 5) Deposited dust; 6) Wind; 7) Peroxide-rich reactive soil. We are developing two experiments to test operation of solar arrays on the surface of Mars, to be flown on the 2001 Surveyor Lander mission. The Mars Array Technology Experiment (MATE) will test the operation of several types of solar cells under Mars conditions, and determine the direct and scattered solar spectrum at the surface. The Dust Accumulation and Removal Technology (DART) experiment will monitor the amount of dust deposition on a target solar cell, measure the characteristics of the dust, and test the feasibility of dust removal.

  8. The ALICE pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mercado Perez, J

    2002-01-01

    The present document is a brief summary of the performed activities during the 2001 Summer Student Programme at CERN under the Scientific Summer at Foreign Laboratories Program organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica). In this case, the activities were related with the ALICE Pixel Group of the EP-AIT Division, under the supervision of Jeroen van Hunen, research fellow in this group. First, I give an introduction and overview to the ALICE experiment; followed by a description of wafer probing. A brief summary of the test beam that we had from July 13th to July 25th is given as well. (3 refs).

  9. Magnetic properties of ferromagnetic nanowire arrays: Theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaddar, A; Gieraltowski, J [Laboratoire de Magnetisme de Bretagne, UBO, CNRS-FRE 3117, C. S. 93837 Brest Cedex 3 (France); Gloaguen, F, E-mail: abbas.ghaddar@univ-brest.f [Laboratoire de Chimie, Electrochimie Moleculaire et Chimie Analytique, UBO, CNRS-UMR 6521, C. S. 93837 Brest Cedex 3 (France)

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanowires are good candidates for microwave filters, sensors and data storage applications. An investigation of magnetic properties of single-component nanowires as a function of diameter and aspect ratio is performed in this work. Nickel nanowire (with 15 and 100 nm diameter and 6000 nm length) are grown with electrodeposition in polycarbonates templates. Two reversal modes (coherent and curling) are studied versus nanowire diameter. Magnetostatic interaction among wires and its effect on nanowire magnetic properties is also studied. Using vibrating magnetometer (VSM) and X-band ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) experiments at room temperature we infer that the interaction field H{sub c} value may vary significantly and may cause a change of magnetic easy axis orientation along geometrical wire axis (for large diameter) to an easy magnetic plane perpendicular to the nanowire axis (for small diameter).

  10. Offshore wind power fundaments. Practical experience from the projects London Array and Dan Tysk; Offshore Windkraft Fundamente. Praxiserfahrung aus den Projekten London Array und DanTysk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Moritz [Bilfinger Berger Ingenieurbau GmbH, Hamburg (Germany). Ingenieurwasserbau

    2012-11-01

    Based on a collection of diagrams and images the authors of the contribution under consideration report on practical experiences resulting from the project London Array and Dan Tysk with respect to the foundations of offshore wind turbines.

  11. Pixel Vertex Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wermes, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Pixel vertex detectors are THE instrument of choice for the tracking of charged particles close to the interaction point at the LHC. Hybrid pixel detectors, in which sensor and read-out IC are separate entities, constitute the present state of the art in detector technology. Three of the LHC detectors use vertex detectors based on this technology. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as ...

  12. Active Pixel Sensors: Are CCD's Dinosaurs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) are presently the technology of choice for most imaging applications. In the 23 years since their invention in 1970, they have evolved to a sophisticated level of performance. However, as with all technologies, we can be certain that they will be supplanted someday. In this paper, the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology is explored as a possible successor to the CCD. An active pixel is defined as a detector array technology that has at least one active transistor within the pixel unit cell. The APS eliminates the need for nearly perfect charge transfer -- the Achilles' heel of CCDs. This perfect charge transfer makes CCD's radiation 'soft,' difficult to use under low light conditions, difficult to manufacture in large array sizes, difficult to integrate with on-chip electronics, difficult to use at low temperatures, difficult to use at high frame rates, and difficult to manufacture in non-silicon materials that extend wavelength response.

  13. Calibration of the MoNA and LISA Arrays for the LISA Commissioning Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grovom, A.; Kwiatkowski, J.; Rogers, W. F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The new LISA (the Large-area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array) neutron detector array, designed to be used in conjunction with MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) at the NSCL was recently commissioned in an experiment designed to investigate excited states of neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes near the neutron drip-line. In order for the trajectories of neutrons arising from decay to be determined with sufficient precision to allow reconstruction of the invariant mass of the decaying system, all 288 scintillator bars must be precisely position-calibrated and time-synchronized to within a few tenths of a nanosecond, and the time origin for neutron time-of-flight determination must coincide precisely with the secondary beam particle/target interaction. The former was accomplished using cosmic muons passing through the array, and the latter using detection of gamma-rays produced at the target in each of the 18 layers of the MoNA-LISA array. Several Root C++ macros were developed in order to produce these calibrations. Results for the LISA commissioning run experiment will be presented. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  14. Study on simulation and experiment of array micro Faraday cup ion detector for FAIMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An array micro Faraday cup ion detector for FAIMS (High-field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry) was introduced, with which the size of the FAIMS system was reduced. With simple structure, good stability, low noise, large measurements range, this detector can work under the condition of atmospheric pressure. The array micro Faraday cup was composed of gate electrode, sensitive electrode and shielding electrode. The sensitive electrode was made of tens of crossing silicon columns with diameter of 200 μm. It was fabricated through typical MEMS technology, which was compatible completely with plane FAIMS. It was shown from FLUENT simulation result that the resistance to gas motion was low and the flow field distribution was helpful for full absorption of the ion in this array design. Through electricity simulation, the method to reduce interference on the detection signal of the micro Faraday cup was given out. Connecting with KEITHLEY 237 ampere meter, the noise level of the array micro Faraday cup was lower than 0.5 pA. The output signal of the acetone sample measured by experiment was about 210 pA. Through contrast experiment, the design parameter of the micro Faraday cup was obtained primarily. This array micro Faraday cup can meet the requirements of the FAIMS system.

  15. A PFM based digital pixel with off-pixel residue measurement for 15μm pitch MWIR FPAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Shahbaz; Shafique, Atia; Galioglu, Arman; Ceylan, Omer; Yazici, Melik; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2016-05-01

    Digital pixels based on pulse frequency modulation (PFM) employ counting techniques to achieve very high charge handling capability compared to their analog counterparts. Moreover, extended counting methods making use of leftover charge (residue) on the integration capacitor help improve the noise performance of these pixels. However, medium wave infrared (MWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) having smaller pixel pitch are constrained in terms of pixel area which makes it difficult to add extended counting circuitry to the pixel. Thus, this paper investigates the performance of digital pixels employing off-pixel residue measurement. A circuit prototype of such a pixel has been designed for 15μm pixel pitch and fabricated in 90nm CMOS. The prototype is composed of a pixel front-end based on a PFM loop. The frontend is a modified version of conventional design providing a means for buffering the signal that needs to be converted to a digital value by an off-pixel ADC. The pixel has an integration phase and a residue measurement phase. Measured integration performance of the pixel has been reported in this paper for various detector currents and integration times.

  16. Energy spectrum of UHECRs measured by newly constructed fluorescence detectors in Telescope Array experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujii Toshihiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Telescope Array (TA experiment is the largest hybrid detector to observe ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs in the northern hemisphere. In the TA experiment, we newly designed and constructed 24 fluorescence detectors (FDs located at two stations. We report the energy spectrum of UHECRs with energies above 1017.5 eV from analyzing data collected by the new FDs during the first 3.7 years in monocular mode.

  17. Detection of ultra-high energy cosmic ray showers with a single-pixel fluorescence telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, T; Bertaina, M; Casolino, M; Dawson, B; Horvath, P; Hrabovsky, M; Jiang, J; Mandat, D; Matalon, A; Matthews, J N; Motloch, P; Palatka, M; Pech, M; Privitera, P; Schovanek, P; Takizawa, Y; Thomas, S B; Travnicek, P; Yamazaki, K

    2015-01-01

    We present a concept for large-area, low-cost detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with a Fluorescence detector Array of Single-pixel Tele- scopes (FAST), addressing the requirements for the next generation of UHECR experiments. In the FAST design, a large field of view is covered by a few pixels at the focal plane of a mirror or Fresnel lens. We report first results of a FAST prototype installed at the Telescope Array site, consisting of a single 200 mm photomultiplier tube at the focal plane of a 1 m2 Fresnel lens system taken from the prototype of the JEM-EUSO experiment. The FAST prototype took data for 19 nights, demonstrating remarkable operational stability. We detected laser shots at distances of several kilometres as well as 16 highly significant UHECR shower candidates.

  18. ArrayNinja: An Open Source Platform for Unified Planning and Analysis of Microarray Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, B M; Cornett, E M; Ramjan, Z; Rothbart, S B

    2016-01-01

    Microarray-based proteomic platforms have emerged as valuable tools for studying various aspects of protein function, particularly in the field of chromatin biochemistry. Microarray technology itself is largely unrestricted in regard to printable material and platform design, and efficient multidimensional optimization of assay parameters requires fluidity in the design and analysis of custom print layouts. This motivates the need for streamlined software infrastructure that facilitates the combined planning and analysis of custom microarray experiments. To this end, we have developed ArrayNinja as a portable, open source, and interactive application that unifies the planning and visualization of microarray experiments and provides maximum flexibility to end users. Array experiments can be planned, stored to a private database, and merged with the imaged results for a level of data interaction and centralization that is not currently attainable with available microarray informatics tools.

  19. Total x-ray power improvement on recent wire array experiments on the Z machine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Savage, Mark Edward; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Lopez, Mike R.; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments on the refurbished Z-machine were conducted using large diameter stainless steel arrays which produced x-ray powers of 260 TW. Follow-up experiments were then conducted utilizing tungsten wires with approximately the same total mass with the hypothesis that the total x-ray power would increase. On the large diameter tungsten experiments, the x-ray power averaged over 300 TW and the total x-ray energy was greater than 2MJ. Different analysis techniques for inferring the x-ray power will be described in detail.

  20. The pixel hybrid photon detectors for the LHCb-RICH project

    CERN Document Server

    Gys, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid photon detector with integrated silicon pixel readout to be used in the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment. The photon detector is based on a cross-focussed image intensifier tube geometry where the image is de-magnified by a factor of 5. The anode consists of a silicon pixel array, bump-bonded to a binary readout chip with matching pixel electronics. The paper starts with the general specification of the baseline option. Followed by a summary of the main results achieved so far during the R&D phase. It concludes with a description of the remaining work towards the final photon detector. (17 refs).

  1. Design methodology: edgeless 3D ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahim Farah, Fahim Farah [Northwestern U. (main); Deptuch, Grzegorz W. [Fermilab; Hoff, James R. [Fermilab; Mohseni, Hooman [Northwestern U. (main)

    2015-08-28

    The design methodology for the development of 3D integrated edgeless pixel detectors with in-pixel processing using Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools is presented. A large area 3 tier 3D detector with one sensor layer and two ASIC layers containing one analog and one digital tier, is built for x-ray photon time of arrival measurement and imaging. A full custom analog pixel is 65μm x 65μm. It is connected to a sensor pixel of the same size on one side, and on the other side it has approximately 40 connections to the digital pixel. A 32 x 32 edgeless array without any peripheral functional blocks constitutes a sub-chip. The sub-chip is an indivisible unit, which is further arranged in a 6 x 6 array to create the entire 1.248cm x 1.248cm ASIC. Each chip has 720 bump-bond I/O connections, on the back of the digital tier to the ceramic PCB. All the analog tier power and biasing is conveyed through the digital tier from the PCB. The assembly has no peripheral functional blocks, and hence the active area extends to the edge of the detector. This was achieved by using a few flavors of almost identical analog pixels (minimal variation in layout) to allow for peripheral biasing blocks to be placed within pixels. The 1024 pixels within a digital sub-chip array have a variety of full custom, semi-custom and automated timing driven functional blocks placed together. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout. The methodology uses the Cadence design platform, however it is not limited to this tool.

  2. Adaptive bad pixel correction algorithm for IRFPA based on PCNN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Hanbing; Zhou, Zuofeng; Cao, Jianzhong; Yi, Bo; Yan, Aqi; Zhang, Jian

    2013-10-01

    Bad pixels and response non-uniformity are the primary obstacles when IRFPA is used in different thermal imaging systems. The bad pixels of IRFPA include fixed bad pixels and random bad pixels. The former is caused by material or manufacture defect and their positions are always fixed, the latter is caused by temperature drift and their positions are always changing. Traditional radiometric calibration-based bad pixel detection and compensation algorithm is only valid to the fixed bad pixels. Scene-based bad pixel correction algorithm is the effective way to eliminate these two kinds of bad pixels. Currently, the most used scene-based bad pixel correction algorithm is based on adaptive median filter (AMF). In this algorithm, bad pixels are regarded as image noise and then be replaced by filtered value. However, missed correction and false correction often happens when AMF is used to handle complex infrared scenes. To solve this problem, a new adaptive bad pixel correction algorithm based on pulse coupled neural networks (PCNN) is proposed. Potential bad pixels are detected by PCNN in the first step, then image sequences are used periodically to confirm the real bad pixels and exclude the false one, finally bad pixels are replaced by the filtered result. With the real infrared images obtained from a camera, the experiment results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  3. Diamond pixel modules

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, K K; Robichaud, A; Potenza, R; Kuleshov, S; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Wermes, N; Dulinski, W; Eremin, V; Smith, S; Sopko, B; Olivero, P; Gorisek, A; Chren, D; Kramberger, G; Schnetzer, S; Weilhammer, P; Martemyanov, A; Hugging, F; Pernegger, H; Lagomarsino, S; Manfredotti, C; Mishina, M; Trischuk, W; Dobos, D; Cindro, V; Belyaev, V; Duris, J; Claus, G; Wallny, R; Furgeri, A; Tuve, C; Goldstein, J; Sciortino, S; Sutera, C; Asner, D; Mikuz, M; Lo Giudice, A; Velthuis, J; Hits, D; Griesmayer, E; Oakham, G; Frais-Kolbl, H; Bellini, V; D'Alessandro, R; Cristinziani, M; Barbero, M; Schaffner, D; Costa, S; Goffe, M; La Rosa, A; Bruzzi, M; Schreiner, T; de Boer, W; Parrini, G; Roe, S; Randrianarivony, K; Dolenc, I; Moss, J; Brom, J M; Golubev, A; Mathes, M; Eusebi, R; Grigoriev, E; Tsung, J W; Mueller, S; Mandic, I; Stone, R; Menichelli, D

    2011-01-01

    With the commissioning of the LHC in 2010 and upgrades expected in 2015, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond has been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. This material is now being considered as a sensor material for use very close to the interaction region where the most extreme radiation conditions exist Recently the RD42 collaboration constructed, irradiated and tested polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond sensors to the highest fluences expected at the super-LHC. We present beam test results of chemical vapor deposition diamond up to fluences of 1.8 x 10(16) protons/cm(2) illustrating that both polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds follow a single damage curve. We also present beam test results of irradiated complete diamond pixel m...

  4. The calibration system for the photomultiplier array of the SNO+ experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, R; Bradbury, S; Carvalho, J; Chauhan, D; Clark, K; Coulter, I; Descamps, F; Falk, E; Gurriana, L; Kraus, C; Lefeuvre, G; Maio, A; Maneira, J; Mottram, M; Peeters, S; Rose, J; Seabra, L; Sinclair, J; Skensved, P; Waterfield, J; White, R; Wilson, J R

    2014-01-01

    A light injection system using LEDs and optical fibres was designed for the calibration and monitoring of the photomultiplier array of the SNO+ experiment at SNOLAB. Large volume, non-segmented, low-background detectors for rare event physics, such as the multi-purpose SNO+ experiment, need a calibration system that allow an accurate and regular measurement of the performance parameters of their photomultiplier arrays, while minimising the risk of radioactivity ingress. The design implemented for SNO+ uses a set of optical fibres to inject light pulses from external LEDs into the detector. The design, fabrication and installation of this light injection system, as well as the first commissioning tests, are described in this paper. Monte Carlo simulations were compared with the commissioning test results, confirming that the system meets the performance requirements.

  5. The pixelated detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Sutton, C

    1990-01-01

    "Collecting data as patterns of light or subatomic particles is vitally important in all the sciences. The new generation of solid-state detectors called pixel devices could transform experimental research at all levels" (4 pages).

  6. Development of Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array for a new EAS hybrid Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jinsheng; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Ying; Zhai, Liuming; Chen, Xu; Hu, Xiaobin; Lin, Yuhui; Zhang, Xueyao; Feng, Cunfeng; Jia, Huanyu; Zhou, Xunxiu; DanZengLuoBu,; Chen, Tianlu; Li, Haijin; Liu, Maoyuan; Yuan, Aifang

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at the observation of cosmic-ray chemical composition at the "knee" energy region, we have been developinga new type air-shower core detector (YAC, Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array) to be set up at Yangbajing (90.522$^\\circ$ E, 30.102$^\\circ$ N, 4300 m above sea level, atmospheric depth: 606 g/m$^2$) in Tibet, China. YAC works together with the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and an underground water cherenkov muon detector array (MD) as a hybrid experiment. Each YAC detector unit consists of lead plates of 3.5 cm thick and a scintillation counter which detects the burst size induced by high energy particles in the air-shower cores. The burst size can be measured from 1 MIP (Minimum Ionization Particle) to $10^{6}$ MIPs. The first phase of this experiment, named "YAC-I", consists of 16 YAC detectors each having the size 40 cm $\\times$ 50 cm and distributing in a grid with an effective area of 10 m$^{2}$. YAC-I is used to check hadronic interaction models. The second phase of the experiment,...

  7. Pixel-level tunable liquid crystal lenses for auto-stereoscopic display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Robertson, Brian; Pivnenko, Mike; Chu, Daping; Zhou, Jiong; Yao, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Mobile video and gaming are now widely used, and delivery of a glass-free 3D experience is of both research and development interest. The key drawbacks of a conventional 3D display based on a static lenticular lenslet array and parallax barriers are low resolution, limited viewing angle and reduced brightness, mainly because of the need of multiple-pixels for each object point. This study describes the concept and performance of pixel-level cylindrical liquid crystal (LC) lenses, which are designed to steer light to the left and right eye sequentially to form stereo parallax. The width of the LC lenses can be as small as 20-30 μm, so that the associated auto-stereoscopic display will have the same resolution as the 2D display panel in use. Such a thin sheet of tunable LC lens array can be applied directly on existing mobile displays, and can deliver 3D viewing experience while maintaining 2D viewing capability. Transparent electrodes were laser patterned to achieve the single pixel lens resolution, and a high birefringent LC material was used to realise a large diffraction angle for a wide field of view. Simulation was carried out to model the intensity profile at the viewing plane and optimise the lens array based on the measured LC phase profile. The measured viewing angle and intensity profile were compared with the simulation results.

  8. Multiport solid-state imager characterization at variable pixel rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, George J.; Albright, Kevin L.; Turko, Bojan T.

    1993-10-01

    The imaging performance of an 8-port Full Frame Transfer Charge Coupled Device (FFT CCD) as a function of several parameters including pixel clock rate is presented. The device, model CCD-13, manufactured by English Electric Valve (EEV), is a 512 X 512 pixel array designed with four individual programmable bidirectional serial registers and eight output amplifiers permitting simultaneous readout of eight segments (128 horizontal X 256 vertical pixels) of the array. The imager was evaluated in Los Alamos National Laboratory's High-Speed Solid-State Imager Test Station at true pixel rates as high as 50 MHz for effective imager pixel rates approaching 400 MHz from multiporting. Key response characteristics measured include absolute responsivity, Charge-Transfer-Efficiency (CTE), dynamic range, resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and electronic and optical crosstalk among the eight video channels. Preliminary test results and data obtained from the CCD-13 are presented and the versatility/capabilities of the test station are reviewed.

  9. Multifrequency Beam Characterization and Systematics for the Keck Array, BICEP3, and Future CMB Polarization Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkare, Kirit S.; BICEP/Keck Array Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The BICEP/Keck Array cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments located at the South Pole are a series of small-aperture refracting telescopes focused on the degree-scale B-mode signature of inflationary gravitational waves. These highly-targeted experiments have produced the world's deepest maps of CMB polarization, leading to the most stringent constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio to date: sigma(r) = 0.024 and r current instrument and analysis technology will scale with detector count.

  10. Kilopixel X-Ray Microcalorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics: Device Performance and Uniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, M. E.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Porst, J.-P.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing kilopixel arrays of TES microcalorimeters to enable high-resolution x-ray imaging spectrometers for future x-ray observatories and laboratory astrophysics experiments. Our current array design was targeted as a prototype for the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer proposed for the International X-ray Observatory, which calls for a 40×40-pixel core array of 300 micron devices with 2.5 eV energy resolution (at 6 keV). Here we present device characterization of our 32×32 arrays, including x-ray spectral performance of individual pixels within the array. We present our results in light of the understanding that our Mo/Au TESs act as weak superconducting links, causing the TES critical current (I(sub c)) and transition shape to oscillate with applied magnetic field (B). We show I(sub c)(B) measurements and discuss the uniformity of these measurements across the array, as well as implications regarding the uniformity of device noise and response. In addition, we are working to reduce pixel-to-pixel electrical and thermal crosstalk; we present recent test results from an array that has microstrip wiring and an angle-evaporated copper backside heatsinking layer, which provides copper coverage on the four sidewalls of the silicon wells beneath each pixel.

  11. Design Methodology: ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for Pixel Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahim, Farah [Fermilab

    2014-10-31

    The development of Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) for pixel detectors with complex in-pixel processing using Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools that are, themselves, mainly developed for the design of conventional digital circuits requires a specialized approach. Mixed signal pixels often require parasitically aware detailed analog front-ends and extremely compact digital back-ends with more than 1000 transistors in small areas below 100μm x 100μm. These pixels are tiled to create large arrays, which have the same clock distribution and data readout speed constraints as in, for example, micro-processors. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout.

  12. Fabrication and Test of Pixelated CZT Detectors with Different Pixel Pitches and Thicknesses

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Q; Dowkontt, P; Martín, J; Beilicke, M; Jung, I; Groza, M; Bürger, A; De Geronimo, G; Krawczynski, H

    2008-01-01

    The main methods grown Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals with high yield and excellent homogeneity are Modified Horizontal Bridgman (MHB) and High Pressure Bridgman (HPB) processes, respectively. In this contribution, the readout system based on two 32-channel NCI-ASICs for pixellated CZT detector arrays has been developed and tested. The CZT detectors supplied by Orbotech (MHB) and eV products (HPB) are tested by NCI-ASIC readout system. The CZT detectors have an array of 8x8 or 11x11 pixel anodes fabricated on the anode surface with the area up to 2 cm x2 cm and the thickness of CZT detectors ranges from 0.5 cm to 1 cm. Energy spectra resolution and electron mobility-lifetime products of 8x8 pixels CZT detector with different thicknesses have been investigated.

  13. A kilo-pixel imaging system for future space based far-infrared observatories using microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baselmans, J. J. A.; Bueno, J.; Yates, S. J. C.; Yurduseven, O.; Llombart, N.; Karatsu, K.; Baryshev, A. M.; Ferrari, L.; Endo, A.; Thoen, D. J.; de Visser, P. J.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Murugesan, V.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Coiffard, G.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Hargrave, P.; Griffin, M.

    2017-05-01

    Aims: Future astrophysics and cosmic microwave background space missions operating in the far-infrared to millimetre part of the spectrum will require very large arrays of ultra-sensitive detectors in combination with high multiplexing factors and efficient low-noise and low-power readout systems. We have developed a demonstrator system suitable for such applications. Methods: The system combines a 961 pixel imaging array based upon Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) with a readout system capable of reading out all pixels simultaneously with only one readout cable pair and a single cryogenic amplifier. We evaluate, in a representative environment, the system performance in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, optical efficiency, cosmic ray rejection, pixel-pixel crosstalk and overall yield at an observation centre frequency of 850 GHz and 20% fractional bandwidth. Results: The overall system has an excellent sensitivity, with an average detector sensitivity =3×10-19 WHz measured using a thermal calibration source. At a loading power per pixel of 50 fW we demonstrate white, photon noise limited detector noise down to 300 mHz. The dynamic range would allow the detection of 1 Jy bright sources within the field of view without tuning the readout of the detectors. The expected dead time due to cosmic ray interactions, when operated in an L2 or a similar far-Earth orbit, is found to be <4%. Additionally, the achieved pixel yield is 83% and the crosstalk between the pixels is <-30 dB. Conclusions: This demonstrates that MKID technology can provide multiplexing ratios on the order of a 1000 with state-of-the-art single pixel performance, and that the technology is now mature enough to be considered for future space based observatories and experiments.

  14. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getchell Thomas V

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease or absence (Control of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB or cerebellum (CER. In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. Results In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the α-level (αnew = 0.0033 determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD procedure at the level of αnew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER for each gene examined. Conclusions A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  15. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Wood, Constance L; Getchell, Thomas V; Getchell, Marilyn L; Stromberg, Arnold J

    2004-12-30

    Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease) or absence (Control) of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB) or cerebellum (CER). In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH) procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR) at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the alpha-level (alphanew = 0.0033) determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD) procedure at the level of alphanew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER) for each gene examined. A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  16. 毫米波多像元固态阵列接收机系统方案及关键技术%The System Solutions and Key Technology of a Millimeter-Wave Multi-Pixel Solid-State Array Receiver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈翔; 李小军; 陈振华; 葛俊祥

    2016-01-01

    The basic concept and principle of multi-pixel array receivers are introduced in this paper. A G-band multi-pixel array receiver for space application is proposed, of which the structure and performance are presented, and the key technology of the receiver is discussed. Using integrated design method, a 2 × 2 multi-pixel array receiver operating at 183GHz is designed based on solid state nonlinear devices. The input local oscillator is Ku band signal, sideband separating is adopted in this array receiver. The whole receiver is integrated and compact, which can be widely used in many kinds of passive millimeter-wave imaging system.%文章介绍了毫米波多像元阵列接收机原理、技术优势及发展现状。针对空间应用,提出了一种基于固态器件的G波段毫米波多像元阵列接收机结构,并介绍了其关键技术。以固态器件为核心,通过本振变频一体化集成设计思想,设计实现一种中心频率183GHz的2×2像元固态阵列接收机。本振输入为Ku波段信号,接收机采用直接边带分离混频方式。整个接收机模块小型紧凑,可靠性高,可用于各种空间毫米波、亚毫米波无源探测系统中。

  17. Infrared single-pixel imaging utilising microscanning

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Ming-Jie; Phillips, David B; Gibson, Graham M; Padgett, Miles J

    2015-01-01

    Since the invention of digital cameras there has been a concerted drive towards detector arrays with higher spatial resolution. Microscanning is a technique that provides a final higher resolution image by combining multiple images of a lower resolution. Each of these low resolution images is subject to a sub-pixel sized lateral displacement. In this work we apply the microscanning approach to an infrared single-pixel camera. For the same final resolution and measurement resource, we show that microscanning improves the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of reconstructed images by approximately 50%. In addition, this strategy also provides access to a stream of low-resolution 'preview' images throughout each high-resolution acquisition. Our work demonstrates an additional degree of flexibility in the trade-off between SNR and spatial resolution in single-pixel imaging techniques.

  18. A Low-Noise CMOS Pixel Direct Charge Sensor, Topmetal-II-

    CERN Document Server

    An, Mangmang; Gao, Chaosong; Han, Mikyung; Ji, Rong; Li, Xiaoting; Mei, Yuan; Sun, Quan; Sun, Xiangming; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Le; Xu, Nu; Yang, Ping; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and characterization of a CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-, fabricated in a standard 0.35um CMOS Integrated Circuit process. The sensor utilizes exposed metal patches on top of each pixel to directly collect charge. Each pixel contains a low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier to establish the analog signal and a discriminator with tunable threshold to generate hits. The analog signal from each pixel is accessible through time-shared multiplexing over the entire array. Hits are read out digitally through a column-based priority logic structure. Tests show that the sensor achieved a <15e- analog noise and a 200e- minimum threshold for digital readout per pixel. The sensor is capable of detecting both electrons and ions drifting in gas. These characteristics enable its use as the charge readout device in future Time Projection Chambers without gaseous gain mechanism, which has unique advantages in low background and low rate-density experiments.

  19. A low-noise CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Mangmang; Chen, Chufeng; Gao, Chaosong; Han, Mikyung; Ji, Rong; Li, Xiaoting; Mei, Yuan; Sun, Quan; Sun, Xiangming; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Le; Yang, Ping; Zhou, Wei

    2016-02-01

    We report the design and characterization of a CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-, fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS Integrated Circuit process. The sensor utilizes exposed metal patches on top of each pixel to directly collect charge. Each pixel contains a low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier to establish the analog signal and a discriminator with tunable threshold to generate hits. The analog signal from each pixel is accessible through time-shared multiplexing over the entire array. Hits are read out digitally through a column-based priority logic structure. Tests show that the sensor achieved a analog noise and a 200e- minimum threshold for digital readout per pixel. The sensor is capable of detecting both electrons and ions drifting in gas. These characteristics enable its use as the charge readout device in future Time Projection Chambers without gaseous gain mechanism, which has unique advantages in low background and low rate-density experiments.

  20. Characterization of Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Felipe Ferraz

    2017-01-01

    It was commissioned at CERN ATLAS pixel group a fluorescence setup for characterization of pixel sensors. The idea is to measure the energies of different targets to calibrate your sensor. It was measured four matrices (80, 95, 98 and 106) of the Investigator1 sensor with different deep PW using copper, iron and titanium as target materials. The matrix 80 has a higher gain (0.065 ± 0.002) and matrix 106 has a better energy resolution (0.05 ± 0.04). The noise of the setup is around 3.6 mV .

  1. Experience from design, prototyping and production of a DC-DC conversion powering scheme for the CMS Phase-1 Pixel Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Preuten, M.; Rauch, M.; Schmitz, S.; Wlochal, M.

    2016-02-01

    The CMS collaboration has adopted a DC-DC conversion powering scheme for the Phase-1 Upgrade of its pixel detector. DC-DC buck converters with a conversion ratio of around 3 are installed on the support structures, outside of the sensitive tracking region, requiring a re-design of the low and high voltage distribution to the pixel modules. After several years of R&D, the project has entered the production phase. A total of 1800 DC-DC converters are being produced, and rigorous quality assurance and control is being employed during the production process. The testing program is outlined, results from mass production are presented and issues that have been encountered are described. In addition, two system level challenges, namely the choice of output voltage in the presence of large, load-dependent voltage drops, and the thermal management required to remove the heat load caused by the DC-DC converters, are discussed.

  2. LENDA, a Low Energy Neutron Detector Array for experiments with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Perdikakis, G; Austin, Sam M; Bazin, D; Caesar, C; Cannon, S; Deaven, J M; Doster, H J; Guess, C J; Hitt, G W; Marks, J; Meharchand, R; Nguyen, D T; Peterman, D; Prinke, A; Scott, M; Shimbara, Y; Thorne, K; Valdez, L; Zegers, R G T

    2011-01-01

    The Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA) is a neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab- oratory (NSCL) for use in inverse kinematics experiments with rare isotope beams. Its design has been motivated by the need to study the spin-isospin response of unstable nuclei using (p, n) charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies (> 100 MeV/u). It can be used, however, for any reaction study that involves emission of low energy neutrons (150 keV - 10 MeV). The array consists of 24 plastic scintillator bars and is capable of registering the recoiling neutron energy and angle with high detection efficiency. The neutron energy is determined by the time-of-flight technique, while the position of interaction is deduced using the timing and energy information from the two photomultipliers of each bar. A simple test setup utilizing radioactive sources has been used to characterize the array. Results of test measurements are compared with simulations. A neut...

  3. LENDA: A low energy neutron detector array for experiments with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdikakis, G., E-mail: perdikak@nscl.msu.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Sasano, M.; Austin, Sam M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bazin, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Caesar, C. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Cannon, S. [Hastings College, Hastings, NE 68901 (United States); Deaven, J.M.; Doster, H.J.; Guess, C.J.; Hitt, G.W. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Marks, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Meharchand, R. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Nguyen, D.T. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Peterman, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); and others

    2012-09-11

    The Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA) is a neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) for use in inverse kinematics experiments with rare isotope beams. Its design has been motivated by the need to study the spin-isospin response of unstable nuclei using (p,n) charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies (>100MeV/u). It can be used, however, for any reaction study that involves emission of low energy neutrons (150 keV to 10 MeV). The array consists of 24 plastic scintillator bars and is capable of registering the recoiling neutron energy and angle with high detection efficiency. The neutron energy is determined by the time-of-flight technique, while the position of interaction is deduced using the timing and energy information from the two photomultipliers of each bar. A simple test setup utilizing radioactive sources has been used to characterize the array. Results of test measurements are compared with simulations. A neutron energy threshold of <150keV, an intrinsic time (position) resolution of {approx} 400 ps ({approx} 6 cm) and an efficiency >20% for neutrons below 4 MeV have been obtained.

  4. A scintillating bolometer array for double beta decay studies: The LUCIFER experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gironi, L., E-mail: luca.gironi@mib.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    The main goal of the LUCIFER experiment is to study the neutrinoless double beta decay, a rare process allowed if neutrinos are Majorana particles. Although aiming at a discovery, in the case of insufficient sensitivity the LUCIFER technique will be the demonstrator for a higher mass experiment able to probe the entire inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass. In order to achieve this challenging result, high resolution detectors with active background discrimination capability are required. This very interesting possibility can be largely fulfilled by scintillating bolometers thanks to the simultaneous read-out of heat and light emitted by the interactions in the detector or by pulse shape analysis. - Highlights: • The LUCIFER technique will be the demonstrator for a higher mass experiment. • Scintillating bolometers allow high energy resolution and background discrimination. • The first choice for the LUCIFER tower are ZnSe crystals. • The LUCIFER setup will consist of an array of 30 individual single module detectors. • An array of ZnMoO4 crystals allowed the bolometric observation of the 2vDBD of {sup 100}Mo.

  5. Characterization of the column-based priority logic readout of Topmetal-II‑ CMOS pixel direct charge sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, M.; Zhang, W.; Xiao, L.; Gao, C.; Chen, C.; Han, M.; Huang, G.; Ji, R.; Li, X.; Liu, J.; Mei, Y.; Pei, H.; Sun, Q.; Sun, X.; Wang, K.; Yang, P.; Zhou, W.

    2017-03-01

    We present the detailed study of the digital readout of Topmetal-II- CMOS pixel direct charge sensor. Topmetal-II- is an integrated sensor with an array of 72×72 pixels each capable of directly collecting external charge through exposed metal electrodes in the topmost metal layer. In addition to the time-shared multiplexing readout of the analog output from Charge Sensitive Amplifiers in each pixel, hits are also generated through comparators in each pixel with individually adjustable thresholds. The hits are read out via a column-based priority logic structure, retaining both hit location and time information. The in-array column-based priority logic features with a full clock-less circuitry hence there is no continuously running clock distributed in the pixel and matrix logic. These characteristics enable its use as the charge readout device in future Time Projection Chambers without gaseous gain mechanism, which has unique advantages in low background and low rate-density experiments. We studied the detailed working behavior and performance of this readout, and demonstrated its functional validity and potential in imaging applications.

  6. Design and experiment of human hand motion driven electromagnetic energy harvester using dual Halbach magnet array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salauddin, M.; Park, Jae Y.

    2017-03-01

    We present a dual Halbach array electromagnetic energy harvester that generates significant power from hand shaking vibration. The magnetic-spring configuration is employed for generating sufficient power from the hand motion of irregular and low-frequency vibrations. However, significant power generation at low-frequency vibrations is challenging because the power flow decreases as the frequency decreases; moreover, designing a spring-mass system that is suitable for low-frequency-vibration energy harvesting is difficult. In this work, our proposed device overcomes both of these challenges by using a dual Halbach array and magnetic springs. During the experiment, vibration was applied in a horizontal direction to reduce the gravity effect on the Halbach-array structure. To achieve an increased power generation at low-amplitude and low-frequency vibrations, the magnetic structure of the dual Halbach array and the magnetic springs were optimized in terms of the operating frequency and the power density. A prototype was fabricated and tested both using a vibration exciter and by manual hand-shaking. The fabricated device showed resonant behavior during the vibration exciter test. For the vibration exciter test, the prototype device offers a maximum average power of 2.92 mW to a 62 Ω optimum load, at a 6 Hz resonance frequency and under a 0.5 g acceleration. The prototype device is capable of delivering a maximum average power of 2.27 mW from hand shaking. The fabricated device exhibited a normalized power density 0.46 mW cm‑2g‑2 which is very high compared to the current state-of-the-art devices, representing its ability in powering portable and wearable smart devices from extremely low frequency vibration.

  7. ACS/WFC Pixel History, Bringing the Pixels Back to Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borncamp, David; Grogin, Norman; Bourque, Matthew; Ogaz, Sara

    2017-06-01

    Excess thermal energy within a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) results in excess electrical current that is trapped within the lattice structure of the electronics. This excess signal from the CCD itself can be present through multiple exposures, which will have an adverse effect on its science performance unless it is corrected for. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take occasional long-exposure images with the camera shutter closed. These images, generally referred to as ``dark'' images, allow for the measurement of thermal-electron contamination at each pixel of the CCD. This so-called ``dark current'' can then be subtracted from the science images by re-scaling to the science exposure times. Pixels that have signal above a certain value are traditionally marked as ``hot'' and flagged in the data quality array. Many users will discard these pixels as being bad. However, these pixels may not be bad in the sense that they cannot be reliably dark-subtracted; if these pixels are shown to be stable over a given anneal period, the charge can be properly subtracted and the extra Poisson noise from this dark current can be taken into account and put into the error arrays.

  8. Pixel detector insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS

    2015-01-01

    Insertion of the Pixel Tracker, the 66-million-channel device used to pinpoint the vertex of each colliding proton pair, located at the heart of the detector. The geometry of CMS is a cylinder lying on its side (22 meters long and 15 meters high in dia

  9. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  10. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Manzari, V

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the innermost two layers of the 6-layer barrel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The SPD plays a key role in the determination of the position of the primary collision and in the reconstruction of the secondary vertices from particle decays.

  11. bicep2/KECK ARRAY. IV. OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE bicep2 AND KECK ARRAY EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, P. A. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Aikin, R. W.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Filippini, J. P.; Golwala, S. R.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hui, H. [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Barkats, D. [Joint ALMA Observatory, ESO, Santiago (Chile); Benton, S. J. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bischoff, C. A.; Bradford, K. J.; Buder, I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS 42, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bullock, E. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dowell, C. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Duband, L. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CEA INAC-SBT, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Fliescher, S. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hilton, G. C., E-mail: avieregg@kicp.uchicago.edu [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Collaboration: bicep2 and Keck Array Collaborations; and others

    2015-06-20

    bicep2 and the Keck Array are polarization-sensitive microwave telescopes that observe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the South Pole at degree angular scales in search of a signature of inflation imprinted as B-mode polarization in the CMB. bicep2 was deployed in late 2009, observed for three years until the end of 2012 at 150 GHz with 512 antenna-coupled transition edge sensor bolometers, and has reported a detection of B-mode polarization on degree angular scales. The Keck Array was first deployed in late 2010 and will observe through 2016 with five receivers at several frequencies (95, 150, and 220 GHz). bicep2 and the Keck Array share a common optical design and employ the field-proven bicep1 strategy of using small-aperture, cold, on-axis refractive optics, providing excellent control of systematics while maintaining a large field of view. This design allows for full characterization of far-field optical performance using microwave sources on the ground. Here we describe the optical design of both instruments and report a full characterization of the optical performance and beams of bicep2 and the Keck Array at 150 GHz.

  12. ACS/WFC Pixel Stability - Bringing the Pixels Back to the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borncamp, David; Grogin, Norman A.; Bourque, Matthew; Ogaz, Sara

    2016-06-01

    Electrical current that has been trapped within the lattice structure of a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) can be present through multiple exposures, which will have an adverse effect on its science performance. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take an image with the camera shutter closed periodically throughout the lifetime of the instrument. These images, generally referred to as dark images, allow for the characterization of the extra charge that is trapped within the CCD at the time of observation. This extra current can then be subtracted out of science images to correct for the extra charge that was there at this time. Pixels that have a charge above a certain threshold of current are marked as “hot” and flagged in the data quality array. However, these pixels may not be "bad" in the traditional sense that they cannot be reliably dark-subtracted. If these pixels are shown to be stable over an anneal period, the charge can be properly subtracted and the extra noise from this dark current can be taken into account. We present the results of a pixel history study that analyzes every pixel of ACS/WFC individually and allows pixels that were marked as bad to be brought back into the science image.

  13. What's A Pixel Particle Sensor Chip?

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS particle physics experiment aided with collaboration ON Semiconductor was recently honored by the European Council for Nuclear Research (CERN), with an Industrial Award recognizing the company's contribution in supplying complex "Pixel Particle Sensor" chips for use in CERN's ATLAS particle physics experiment.

  14. Design of Experiments: Useful Orthogonal Arrays for Number of Experiments from 4 to 16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorentz Jäntschi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A methodology for the design of an experiment is proposed in order to find asmany schemes as possible with the maximum number of factors with different levels for thesmallest number of experimental runs. An algorithm was developed and homemadesoftware was implemented. The abilities in generation of the largest groups of orthogonalarrays were analyzed for experimental runs of 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 15, and 16. The resultsshow that the proposed method permits the construction of the largest groups of orthogonalarrays with the maximum number of factors.

  15. Dynamic Experiment Design Regularization Approach to Adaptive Imaging with Array Radar/SAR Sensor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Santos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider a problem of high-resolution array radar/SAR imaging formalized in terms of a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem of nonparametric estimation of the power spatial spectrum pattern (SSP of the random wavefield scattered from a remotely sensed scene observed through a kernel signal formation operator and contaminated with random Gaussian noise. First, the Sobolev-type solution space is constructed to specify the class of consistent kernel SSP estimators with the reproducing kernel structures adapted to the metrics in such the solution space. Next, the “model-free” variational analysis (VA-based image enhancement approach and the “model-based” descriptive experiment design (DEED regularization paradigm are unified into a new dynamic experiment design (DYED regularization framework. Application of the proposed DYED framework to the adaptive array radar/SAR imaging problem leads to a class of two-level (DEED-VA regularized SSP reconstruction techniques that aggregate the kernel adaptive anisotropic windowing with the projections onto convex sets to enforce the consistency and robustness of the overall iterative SSP estimators. We also show how the proposed DYED regularization method may be considered as a generalization of the MVDR, APES and other high-resolution nonparametric adaptive radar sensing techniques. A family of the DYED-related algorithms is constructed and their effectiveness is finally illustrated via numerical simulations.

  16. Experiments on Nitrogen Oxide Production of Droplet Arrays Burning under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesl, Klaus; Sattelmayer, Thomas; Kikuchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Shin; Yoda, Shinichi

    The optimization of the combustion process is top priority in current aero-engine and aircraft development, particularly from the perspectives of high efficiency, minimized fuel consumption, and a sustainable exhaust gas production. Aero-engines are exclusively liquid-fueled with a strong correlation between the combustion temperature and the emissions of nitric oxide (NOX ). Due to safety concerns, the progress in NOX reduction has been much slower than in stationary gas turbines. In the past, the mixing intensity in the primary zone of aero-engine combustors was improved and air staging implemented. An important question for future aero-engine combustors, consequently, is how partial vaporization influences the NOX emissions of spray flames? In order to address this question, the combustion of partially vaporized, linear droplet arrays was studied experimentally under microgravity conditions. The influence of fuel pre-vaporization on the NOX emissions was assessed in a wide range. The experiments were performed in a drop tower and a sounding rocket campaign. The microgravity environment provided ideal experiment conditions without the disturbing ef-fect of natural convection. This allowed the study of the interacting phenomena of multi-phase flow, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. This way the understanding of the physical and chemical processes related to droplet and spray combustion could be improved. The Bremen drop tower (ZARM) was utilized for the precursor campaign in July 2008, which was com-prised of 30 drops. The sounding rocket experiments, which totaled a microgravity duration of 6 minutes, were finally performed on the flight of TEXUS-46 in November 2009. On both campaigns the "Japanese Combustion Module" (JCM) was used. It is a cooperative experi-ment on droplet array combustion between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and ESA's (European Space Agency) research team, working on the combustion properties of partially premixed sprays

  17. Pixel Based Off-line Signature Verification System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anik Barua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The verification of handwritten signatures is one of the oldest and the most popular authentication methods all around the world. As technology improved, different ways of comparing and analyzing signatures become more and more sophisticated. Since the early seventies, people have been exploring how computers can fully take over the task of signature verification and tried different methods. However, none of them is satisfactory enough and time consuming too. Therefore, our proposed pixel based offline signature verification system is one of the fastest and easiest ways to authenticate any handwritten signature we have ever found. For signature acquisition, we have used scanner. Then we have divided the signature image into 2D array and calculated the hexadecimal RGB value of each pixel. After that, we have calculated the total percentage of matching. If the percentage of matching is more than 90, the signature is considered as valid otherwise invalid. We have experimented on more than 35 signatures and the result of our experiment is quite impressive. We have made the whole system web based so that the signature can be verified from anywhere. The average execution time for signature verification is only 0.00003545 second only.

  18. Multiplexed readout of MMC detector arrays using non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Kempf, S; Gastaldo, L; Fleischmann, A; Enss, C

    2013-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are widely used for various experiments in fields ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to x-ray spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysics or material science. Whereas in previous experiments single pixel detectors or small arrays have been used, for future applications large arrays are needed. Therefore, suitable multiplexing techniques for MMC arrays are currently under development. A promising approach for the readout of large arrays is the microwave SQUID multiplexer that operates in the frequency domain and that employs non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs to transduce the detector signals into a frequency shift of high $Q$ resonators which can be monitored by using standard microwave measurement techniques. In this paper we discuss the design and the expected performance of a recently developed and fabricated 64 pixel detector array with integrated microwave SQUID multiplexer. First experimental data were obtained characterizing dc-SQUIDs with virtually identical washer design.

  19. Making a trillion pixels dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek; Hu, Bin; Toh, Kenny; Bollepalli, Srinivas; Wagner, Stephan; Borodovsky, Yan

    2008-03-01

    In June 2007, Intel announced a new pixelated mask technology. This technology was created to address the problem caused by the growing gap between the lithography wavelength and the feature sizes patterned with it. As this gap has increased, the quality of the image has deteriorated. About a decade ago, Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) was introduced to bridge this gap, but as this gap continued to increase, one could not rely on the same basic set of techniques to maintain image quality. The computational lithography group at Intel sought to alleviate this problem by experimenting with additional degrees of freedom within the mask. This paper describes the resulting pixelated mask technology, and some of the computational methods used to create it. The first key element of this technology is a thick mask model. We realized very early in the development that, unlike traditional OPC methods, the pixelated mask would require a very accurate thick mask model. Whereas in the traditional methods, one can use the relatively coarse approximations such as the boundary layer method, use of such techniques resulted not just in incorrect sizing of parts of the pattern, but in whole features missing. We built on top of previously published domain decomposition methods, and incorporated limitations of the mask manufacturing process, to create an accurate thick mask model. Several additional computational techniques were invoked to substantially increase the speed of this method to a point that it was feasible for full chip tapeout. A second key element of the computational scheme was the comprehension of mask manufacturability, including the vital issue of the number of colors in the mask. While it is obvious that use of three or more colors will give the best image, one has to be practical about projecting mask manufacturing capabilities for such a complex mask. To circumvent this serious issue, we eventually settled on a two color mask - comprising plain glass and etched

  20. Pixel 2010: A résumé

    CERN Document Server

    Wermes, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    The Pixel 2010 conference focused on semiconductor pixel detectors for particle tracking/vertexing as well as for imaging, in particular for synchrotron light sources and XFELs. The big LHC hybrid pixel detectors have impressively started showing their capabilities. X-ray imaging detectors, also using the hybrid pixel technology, have greatly advanced the experimental possibilities for diffraction experiments. Monolithic or semi-monolithic devices like CMOS active pixels and DEPFET pixels have now reached a state such that complete vertex detectors for RHIC and superKEKB are being built with these technologies. Finally, new advances towards fully monolithic active pixel detectors, featuring full CMOS electronics merged with efficient signal charge collection, exploiting standard CMOS technologies, SOI and/or 3D integration, show the path for the future. This résumé attempts to extract the main statements of the results and developments presented at this conference.

  1. Radiation tolerance of prototype BTeV pixel detector readout chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriele Chiodini et al.

    2002-07-12

    High energy and nuclear physics experiments need tracking devices with increasing spatial precision and readout speed in the face of ever-higher track densities and increased radiation environments. The new generation of hybrid pixel detectors (arrays of silicon diodes bump bonded to arrays of front-end electronic cells) is the state of the art technology able to meet these challenges. We report on irradiation studies performed on BTeV pixel readout chip prototypes exposed to a 200 MeV proton beam at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Prototype pixel readout chip preFPIX2 has been developed at Fermilab for collider experiments and implemented in standard 0.25 micron CMOS technology following radiation tolerant design rules. The tests confirmed the radiation tolerance of the chip design to proton total dose up to 87 MRad. In addition, non destructive radiation-induced single event upsets have been observed in on-chip static registers and the single bit upset cross section has been extensively measured.

  2. Smart trigger logic for focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, James E; Campbell, David V; Holmes, Michael L; Lovejoy, Robert; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kay, Randolph R; Cavanaugh, William S; Gurrieri, Thomas M

    2014-03-25

    An electronic device includes a memory configured to receive data representing light intensity values from pixels in a focal plane array and a processor that analyzes the received data to determine which light values correspond to triggered pixels, where the triggered pixels are those pixels that meet a predefined set of criteria, and determines, for each triggered pixel, a set of neighbor pixels for which light intensity values are to be stored. The electronic device also includes a buffer that temporarily stores light intensity values for at least one previously processed row of pixels, so that when a triggered pixel is identified in a current row, light intensity values for the neighbor pixels in the previously processed row and for the triggered pixel are persistently stored, as well as a data transmitter that transmits the persistently stored light intensity values for the triggered and neighbor pixels to a data receiver.

  3. ATLAS ITk Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) in 2026 will provide new challenge to the ATLAS tracker. The current inner detector will be replaced with a whole silicon tracker which will consist of a five barrel layer Pixel detector surrounded by a four barrel layer Strip detector. The expected high radiation level are requiring the development of upgraded silicon sensors as well as new a front-end chip. The dense tracking environment will require finer granularity detectors. The data rates will require new technologies for high bandwidth data transmission and handling. The current status of the HL-LHC ATLA Pixel detector developments as well as the various layout options will be reviewed.

  4. Alpine Pixel Detector Layout

    CERN Document Server

    Delebecque, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Geffroy, N; Massol, N; Rambure, T; Todorov, T

    2013-01-01

    A description of an optimized layout of pixel sensors based on a stave that combines both barrel and endcap module orientations. The mechanical stiffness of the structure is provided by carbon fiber shells spaced by carbon foam. The cooling of the modules is provided by two-phase $CO_{2}$ flowing in a thin titanium pipe glued inside the carbon fiber foam. The electrical services of all modules are provided by a single stave flex. This layout eliminates the need for separate barrel and endcap detector structures, and therefore the barrel services material in front of the endcap. The transition from barrel to endcap module orientation is optimized separately for each layer in order to minimize the active pixel area and the traversed material. The sparse module spacing in the endcap part of the stave allows for multiple fixation points, and for a stiff overall structure composed only of staves interconnected by stiff disks.

  5. Making and using inexpensive manually constructed tissue micro-array: Experience of a tertiary care hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Deepak

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tissue micro-array enables the analysis of a large number of tissues simultaneously. Widespread use of this technology is hampered by the high cost of commercial array instruments. We describe our experience of constructing tissue micro-array in a simple method using easily available and inexpensive instruments. Materials and Methods: We used an 11-19 gauge (G bone marrow trephine biopsy needle/ small sized slotted screwdriver to punch holes in the wax blocks. Cores were taken from donor tissue blocks using a bone marrow trephine biopsy needle and arrayed into host paraffin wax blocks. A detailed database was constructed for each array constructed. Results: The array blocks were used over a period of one year as internal control for immunohistochemistry (IHC, quality control and research. It took about 10 minutes to construct a nine-dot array and about one hour for a 56-dot array. During IHC, the average loss of control dots was less than one per cent. We did not see any loss of antigenicity in the control sections even after four weeks storage. Discussion: Tissue array construction by the technique described here is inexpensive and reliable alternative to automated instruments. Because it is easy to modify the arrays by varying the core size, it is easy to adapt this to individual labs and requirements. We recommend using blocks with cores in 3 x 3 to 5 x 4 grids as controls in IHC and for standardizing antibodies and array blocks with a larger number of cores for research.

  6. Efficient defect pixel cluster detection and correction for Bayer CFA image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbakhsh, Touraj

    2011-01-01

    Image sensor arrays may have defect pixels, either originating from manufacturing or being developed over the lifetime of the image sensor array. Continuous defect pixel detection and correction performing during camera runtime is desirable. On-the-fly detection and correction is challenging since edges and high-frequency image content might get identified as defect pixel regions and intact pixels become corrupted during defect pixel replacement. We propose a table-based detection and correction method which by and by fills the non-volatile table during normal camera operation. In this work we model defect pixels and pixel clusters to be stuck to fixed values or at least fixed to a narrow value range whereas the local neighborhood of these pixels indicate a normal behavior. The idea is to temporally observe the value ranges of small group of pixels (e.g. 4x4 pixel blocks) and to decide about their defective condition depending on their variability with respect to their neighbor pixels. Our method is computationally efficient, requires no frame buffer, requires modest memory, and therefore is appropriate to operate in line-buffer based image signal processing (ISP) systems. Our results indicate high reliability in terms of detection rates and robustness against high-frequency image content. As part of the defect pixel replacement system we also propose a simple and efficient defect pixel correction method based on the mean of medians operating on the Bayer CFA image domain.

  7. From MAD to SAD: The Italian experience for the low-frequency aperture array of SKA1-LOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolli, P.; Pupillo, G.; Virone, G.; Farooqui, M. Z.; Lingua, A.; Mattana, A.; Monari, J.; Murgia, M.; Naldi, G.; Paonessa, F.; Perini, F.; Pluchino, S.; Rusticelli, S.; Schiaffino, M.; Schillirò, F.; Tartarini, G.; Tibaldi, A.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes two small aperture array demonstrators called Medicina and Sardinia Array Demonstrators (MAD and SAD, respectively). The objectives of these instruments are to acquire experience and test new technologies for a possible application to the low-frequency aperture array of the low-frequency telescope of the Square Kilometer Array phase 1 (SKA1-LOW). The MAD experience was concluded in 2014, and it turned out to be an important test bench for implementing calibration techniques based on an artificial source mounted in an aerial vehicle. SAD is based on 128 dual-polarized Vivaldi antennas and is 1 order of magnitude larger than MAD. The architecture and the station size of SAD, which is along the construction phase, are more similar to those under evaluation for SKA1-LOW, and therefore, SAD is expected to provide useful hints for SKA1-LOW.

  8. bicep2/ KECK ARRAY . IV. OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE bicep2 AND KECK ARRAY EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, P.A.R.; Aikin, R.W.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S.J.; Bischoff, C.A.; Bock, J.J.; Bradford, K.J.; Brevik, J.A.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Dowell, C.D.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J.P.; Fliescher, S.; Golwala, S.R.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hilton, G.C.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K.D.

    2015-06-18

    bicep2/KECK ARRAY. IV. OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE bicep2 AND KECK ARRAY EXPERIMENTS P. A. R. Ade1, R. W. Aikin2, D. Barkats3, S. J. Benton4, C. A. Bischoff5, J. J. Bock2,6, K. J. Bradford5, J. A. Brevik2, I. Buder5, E. Bullock7Show full author list Published 2015 June 18 • © 2015. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. The Astrophysical Journal, Volume 806, Number 2 Article PDF Figures Tables References Citations 273 Total downloads Cited by 6 articles Turn on MathJax Share this article Get permission to re-use this article Article information Abstract bicep2 and the Keck Array are polarization-sensitive microwave telescopes that observe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the South Pole at degree angular scales in search of a signature of inflation imprinted as B-mode polarization in the CMB. bicep2 was deployed in late 2009, observed for three years until the end of 2012 at 150 GHz with 512 antenna-coupled transition edge sensor bolometers, and has reported a detection of B-mode polarization on degree angular scales. The Keck Array was first deployed in late 2010 and will observe through 2016 with five receivers at several frequencies (95, 150, and 220 GHz). bicep2 and the Keck Array share a common optical design and employ the field-proven bicep1 strategy of using small-aperture, cold, on-axis refractive optics, providing excellent control of systematics while maintaining a large field of view. This design allows for full characterization of far-field optical performance using microwave sources on the ground. Here we describe the optical design of both instruments and report a full characterization of the optical performance and beams of bicep2 and the Keck Array at 150 GHz.

  9. Fabrication of a high-density MCM-D for a pixel detector system using a BCB/Cu technology

    CERN Document Server

    Topper, M; Engelmann, G; Fehlberg, S; Gerlach, P; Wolf, J; Ehrmann, O; Becks, K H; Reichl, H

    1999-01-01

    The MCM-D which is described here is a prototype for a pixel detector system for the planned Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva. The project is within the ATLAS experiment. The module consists of a sensor tile with an active area of 16.4 mm*60.4 mm, 16 readout chips, each serving 24*160 pixel unit cells, a module controller chip, an optical transceiver and the local signal interconnection and power distribution buses. The extremely high wiring density which is necessary to interconnect the readout chips was achieved using a thin film copper/photo-BCB process above the pixel array. The bumping of the readout chips was done by PbSn electroplating. All dice are then attached by flip-chip assembly to the sensor diodes and the local buses. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the technologies for the fabrication of this advanced MCM-D. (10 refs).

  10. A support note for the use of pixel hybrid photon detectors in the RICH counters of LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Gys, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    This document is a proposal for the use of a hybrid photon detector with integrated silicon pixel readout in the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment. The photon detector is based on a cross-focussed image intensifier tube geometry where the image is de-magnified by a factor of 5. The anode consists of a silicon pixel array, bump-bonded to a binary readout chip with matching pixel electronics. The document starts with the general specification of the baseline option, followed by a summary of the main results achieved so far during the R&D phase. A future R&D programme and its related time table is also presented. The document concludes with the description of a photon detector production scheme and time schedule.

  11. Reading pixelized paragraphs of Chinese characters using simulated prosthetic vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Lu, Yanyu; Zhao, Ji; Wang, Kaihu; Ren, Qiushi; Wu, Kaijie; Chai, Xinyu

    2011-07-29

    Visual prostheses offer a possibility of restoring useful reading ability to the blind. The psychophysics of simulating reading with a prosthesis using pixelized text has attracted attention recently. This study was an examination of the reading accuracy and efficiency of pixelized Chinese paragraphs after different parameters were altered. Forty native Chinese speakers with normal or corrected visual acuity (20/20) participated in four experiments. Reading accuracy and efficiency were measured after changing the character resolution, character size, pixel dropout percentage, number of gray levels, and luminance. A 5° × 5° character appeared to be the optimal size necessary for accurate pixelized reading. Reading accuracy close to 100% could be achieved with 10 × 10 pixels/character and ∼60% with a 6 × 6 pixel resolution. Pixel dropout adversely affected accuracy, and paragraphs with a 50% dropout were unreadable. Luminance had little effect; however, the number of gray levels significantly affected reading performance. Paragraph reading was at least 5% more accurate at each resolution than was the accuracy of Chinese character recognition. Character size and resolution, pixel dropout, and the number of gray levels clearly affected the reading performance of pixelized Chinese paragraphs. Compared with pixelized character recognition, pixelized Chinese paragraph reading achieved higher accuracy; thus, optimal Chinese reading performance may require prostheses with more electrodes (1000) than are required to read paragraphs in the Latin alphabet (500).

  12. EMSCOPE - Electromagnetic Component of EarthScope Backbone and Transportable Array Experiments 2006-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, G.; Evans, R.; Ingate, S.; Livelybrooks, D.; Mickus, K.; Park, S.; Schultz, A.; Unsworth, M.; Wannamaker, P.

    2007-12-01

    USArray (http://www.iris.edu/USArray) in conjunction with EMSOC (Electromagnetic Studies of the Continents) (http://emsoc.ucr.edu/emsoc) is installing magnetotelluric (MT) stations as part of Earthscope. The MT component of Earthscope consists of permanent (Backbone) and transportable long period stations to record naturally occurring, time varying electric and magnetic fields to produce a regional lithospheric/asthensospheric electrical conductivity map of the United States. The recent arrival of 28 long period MT instruments allows for the final installation of the Backbone stations throughout the US and yearly transportable array studies. The Backbone MT survey consists of 7 stations spaced throughout the continental US with preliminary installation at Soap Creek, Oregon; Parkfield, California; Braden, Missouri and Socorro, New Mexico.Siting and permitting are underway or completed at stations in eastern Montana, northern Wisconsin and Virginia. These stations will be recording for at least five years to determine electrical conductivities at depths that extend into the mantle transition zone. The first transportable array experiment was performed in the summer and fall of 2006 in central and eastern Oregon (Oregon Pilot Project) using equipment loaned from EMSOC. Thirty-one long period MT stations were recorded with 14 to 21 day occupations. Preliminary 3D inverse models indicate several lithospheric electrical conductivity anomalies including a linear zone marked by low-high conductivity transition along the Klamath-Blue Mountain Lineament associated with a linear trend of gravity minima. High electrical conductivity values occur in the upper crust under the accreted terrains in the Blue Mountains region. The second transportable array experiment was performed in the summer and fall of 2007 and completes coverage of the Oregon, Washington, and western Idaho, targeting the Cascadia subduction zone, Precambrian boundaries, and sub-basalt lithologies. The 2008

  13. Tunka-Rex: a Radio Antenna Array for the Tunka Experiment (ARENA 2012)

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, F G; Budnev, N M; Gress, O A; Haungs, A; Hiller, R; Kazarina, Y; Kleifges, M; Konstantinov, A; Korosteleva, E E; Kostunin, D; Krömer, O; Kuzmichev, L A; Mirgazov, R R; Pankov, A; Prosin, V V; Rubtsov, G I; Rühle, C; Savinov, V; Stockham, J; Stockham, M; Svetnitsky, E; Wischnewski, R; Zagorodnikov, A

    2012-01-01

    Tunka-Rex, the Tunka radio extension, is an array of 20 antennas at the Tunka experiment close to Lake Baikal in Siberia. It started operation on 08 October 2012. The antennas are connected directly to the data acquisition of the Tunka main detector, a 1 square-km large array of 133 non-imaging photomultipliers observing the Cherenkov light of air showers in dark and clear nights. This allows to cross-calibrate the radio signal with the air-Cherenkov signal of the same air showers - in particular with respect to the energy and the atmospheric depth of the shower maximum, Xmax. Consequently, we can test whether in rural regions with low radio background the practically achievable radio precision comes close to the precision of the established fluorescence and air-Cherenkov techniques. At a mid-term perspective, due to its higher duty-cycle, Tunka-Rex can enhance the effective observing time of Tunka by an order of magnitude, at least in the interesting energy range above 100 PeV. Moreover, Tunka-Rex is very co...

  14. Development of arrays of Silicon Drift Detectors and readout ASIC for the SIDDHARTA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaglia, R.; Schembari, F.; Bellotti, G.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Ficorella, F.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N.

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the development of new Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) and readout electronics for the upgrade of the SIDDHARTA experiment. The detector is based on a SDDs array organized in a 4×2 format with each SDD square shaped with 64 mm2 (8×8) active area. The total active area of the array is therefore 32×16 mm2 while the total area of the detector (including 1 mm border dead area) is 34 × 18mm2. The SIDDHARTA apparatus requires 48 of these modules that are designed and manufactured by Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK). The readout electronics is composed by CMOS preamplifiers (CUBEs) and by the new SFERA (SDDs Front-End Readout ASIC) circuit. SFERA is a 16-channels readout ASIC designed in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology, which features in each single readout channel a high order shaping amplifier (9th order Semi-Gaussian complex-conjugate poles) and a high efficiency pile-up rejection logic. The outputs of the channels are connected to an analog multiplexer for the external analog to digital conversion. An on-chip 12-bit SAR ADC is also included. Preliminary measurements of the detectors in the single SDD format are reported. Also measurements of low X-ray energies are reported in order to prove the possible extension to the soft X-ray range.

  15. Definition Study for Space Shuttle Experiments Involving Large, Steerable Millimeter-Wave Antenna Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The potential uses and techniques for the shuttle spacelab Millimeter Wave Large Aperture Antenna Experiment (MWLAE) are documented. Potential uses are identified: applications to radio astronomy, the sensing of atmospheric turbulence by its effect on water vapor line emissions, and the monitoring of oil spills by multifrequency radiometry. IF combining is preferable to RF combining with respect to signal to noise ratio for communications receiving antennas of the size proposed for MWLAE. A design approach using arrays of subapertures is proposed to reduce the number of phase shifters and mixers for uses which require a filled aperture. Correlation radiometry and a scheme utilizing synchronous Dicke switches and IF combining are proposed as potential solutions.

  16. Inflationary primordial black holes for the LIGO gravitational wave events and pulsar timing array experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Inomata, Keisuke; Mukaida, Kyohei; Tada, Yuichiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2016-01-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) are one of the candidates to explain the gravitational wave (GW) signals observed by the LIGO detectors. Among several phenomena in the early Universe, cosmic inflation is a major example to generate PBHs. In this paper, we discuss the possibility to interpret the observed GW events as mergers of PBHs which are produced by cosmic inflation. We point out that the current pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments already put severe constraints on GWs generated via the second-order effects. In particular, it is found that the scalar power spectrum should have a very sharp fall-off above $f \\gtrsim 10^{-9}$ Hz to evade these constraints. Simple inflation models that generate PBHs via fluctuations of slowly rolling inflaton could be probed/excluded in the future.

  17. The ALICE pixel detector upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidt, F.

    2016-12-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC is designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma, using proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. The ALICE collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus to be installed during the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2019-2020. A key element of the ALICE upgrade is the new, ultra-light, high-resolution Inner Tracking System. With respect to the current detector, the new Inner Tracking System will significantly enhance the pointing resolution, the tracking efficiency at low transverse momenta, and the read-out rate capabilities. This will be obtained by seven concentric detector layers based on a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor with a pixel pitch of about 30×30 μm2. A key feature of the new Inner Tracking System, which is optimised for high tracking accuracy at low transverse momenta, is the very low mass of the three innermost layers, which feature a material budget of 0.3% X0 per layer. This contribution presents the design goals and layout of the upgraded ALICE Inner Tracking System, summarises the R&D activities focussing on the technical implementation of the main detector components, and the projected detector performance.

  18. Serial powering of pixel modules

    CERN Document Server

    Stockmanns, Tobias; Hügging, Fabian Georg; Peric, I; Runólfsson, O; Wermes, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    Modern pixel detectors for the next generation of high-energy collider experiments like LHC use readout electronics in deep sub- micron technology. Chips in this technology need a low supply voltage of 2-2.5 V alongside high current consumption to achieve the desired performance. The high supply current leads to significant voltage drops in the long and low mass supply cables so that voltage fluctuations at the chips are induced, when the supply current changes. This problem scales with the number of modules when connected in parallel to the power supplies. An alternative powering scheme connects several modules in series resulting in a higher supply voltage but a lower current consumption of the chain and therefore a much lower voltage drop in the cables. In addition the amount of cables needed to supply the detector is vastly reduced. The concept and features of serial powering are presented and studies of the implementation of this technology as an alternative for the ATLAS pixel detector are shown. In par...

  19. Data encoding efficiency in pixel detector readout with charge information

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The minimum number of bits needed for lossless readout of a pixel detector is calculated, in the regime of interest for particle physics where only a small fraction of pixels have a non-zero value per frame. This permits a systematic comparison of the readout efficiency of different encoding implementations. The calculation is compared to the bits used for by the FE-I4 pixel readout chip of the ATLAS experiment.

  20. Data encoding efficiency in pixel detector readout with charge information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice, E-mail: mgs@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wang, Xinkang [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-04-11

    The average minimum number of bits needed for lossless readout of a pixel detector is calculated, in the regime of interest for particle physics where only a small fraction of pixels have a non-zero value per frame. This permits a systematic comparison of the readout efficiency of different encoding implementations. The calculation is compared to the number of bits used by the FE-I4 pixel readout chip of the ATLAS experiment.

  1. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major challenges associated with constructing phased array coils for monkeys are the variation in head size and space constraints. Here, we apply phased array technology to a 4-channel phased array coil capable of improving the resolution and image quality of full brain awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments. The phased array coil is that can adapt to different rhesus monkey head sizes (ages 4-8) and fits in the limited space provided by monkey stereotactic equipment and provides SNR gains in primary visual cortex and anatomical accuracy in conjunction with parallel imaging and improves resolution in fMRI experiments by a factor of 2 (1.25 mm to 1.0 mm isotropic) and diffusion MRI experiments by a factor of 4 (1.5 mm to 0.9 mm isotropic).

  2. Tests of the gated mode for Belle II pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prinker, Eduard [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    DEPFET pixel detectors offer intrinsic amplification and very high signal to noise ratio. They form an integral building block for the vertex detector system of the Belle II experiment, which will start data taking in the year 2017 at the SuperKEKB Collider in Japan. A special Test board (Hybrid4) is used, which contains a small version of the DEPFET sensor with a read-out (DCD) and a steering chip (Switcher) attached, both controlled by a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) as the central interface to the computer. In order to keep the luminosity of the collider constant over time, the particle bunch currents have to be topped off by injecting additional bunches at a rate of 50 Hz. The particles in the daughter bunches produce a high rate of background (noisy bunches) for a short period of time, saturating the occupancy of the sensor. Operating the DEPFET sensor in a Gated Mode allows preserving the signals from collisions of normal bunches while protecting the pixels from background signals of the passing noisy bunches. An overview of the Gated Mode and first results is presented.

  3. Proceedings of PIXEL98 -- International pixel detector workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S. [eds.

    1998-08-01

    Experiments around the globe face new challenges of more precision in the face of higher interaction rates, greater track densities, and higher radiation doses, as they look for rarer and rarer processes, leading many to incorporate pixelated solid-state detectors into their plans. The highest-readout rate devices require new technologies for implementation. This workshop reviewed recent, significant progress in meeting these technical challenges. Participants presented many new results; many of them from the weeks--even days--just before the workshop. Brand new at this workshop were results on cryogenic operation of radiation-damaged silicon detectors (dubbed the Lazarus effect). Other new work included a diamond sensor with 280-micron collection distance; new results on breakdown in p-type silicon detectors; testing of the latest versions of read-out chip and interconnection designs; and the radiation hardness of deep-submicron processes.

  4. The Kepler Pixel Response Function

    CERN Document Server

    Bryson, Stephen T; Jenkins, Jon M; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Klaus, Todd; Caldwell, Douglas A; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Dotson, Jessie L; Koch, David G; Borucki, William J

    2010-01-01

    Kepler seeks to detect sequences of transits of Earth-size exoplanets orbiting Solar-like stars. Such transit signals are on the order of 100 ppm. The high photometric precision demanded by Kepler requires detailed knowledge of how the Kepler pixels respond to starlight during a nominal observation. This information is provided by the Kepler pixel response function (PRF), defined as the composite of Kepler's optical point spread function, integrated spacecraft pointing jitter during a nominal cadence and other systematic effects. To provide sub-pixel resolution, the PRF is represented as a piecewise-continuous polynomial on a sub-pixel mesh. This continuous representation allows the prediction of a star's flux value on any pixel given the star's pixel position. The advantages and difficulties of this polynomial representation are discussed, including characterization of spatial variation in the PRF and the smoothing of discontinuities between sub-pixel polynomial patches. On-orbit super-resolution measurement...

  5. ATLAS-IBL Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    LaRosa, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The upgrade for the ATLAS detector will undergo different phase towards Super-LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel Detector will consist in the construction of a new pixel layer which will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine (SLHC Phase I). The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing pixel detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe at a radius of 3.2 cm. The IBL will require the development of several new technologies to cope with increase of radiation or pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance which will be achieved by reduction of the pixel size and of the material budget. Three different promising sensor technologies (Planar-Si, 3D-Si and Diamond) are currently under investigation for the pixel detector. An overview of the project with particular emphasis on pixel module studies, irradiation and beam test plans will be presented.

  6. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  7. Pixel Stability in HST Advanced Camera for Surveys Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borncamp, David; Grogin, Norman A.; Bourque, Matthew; Ogaz, Sara

    2017-06-01

    Excess thermal energy present in a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) can result in additional electrical current that is propagated into individual pixels in an exposure. This excess signal from the CCD itself can be persistently existent through multiple exposures and can have an adverse effect on the detectors science performance unless properly flagged and corrected for. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take occasional long-exposure images with the camera shutter closed to map the location of these pixels. These images, generally referred to as “dark” images, allow for the measurement of the thermal-electron contamination present in each pixel of the CCD lattice. This "dark current" can then be subtracted from the science images by re-scaling the dark to the science exposure times. Pixels that have signal above a certain threshold are traditionally marked as “hot” and flagged in the data quality array. Many users will discard these pixels as being bad because of this extra current. However, these pixels may not be "bad" in the traditional sense that they cannot be reliably dark-subtracted. If these pixels are shown to be stable over an anneal period, the charge can be properly subtracted and the extra Poisson noise from this hot pixel’s dark current can be taken into account. Here we present the results of a pixel history study that analyzes every individual pixel of the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) CCDs over time and allows pixels that were previously marked as bad to be brought back into the science image as a reliable pixel.

  8. \\title{Low-Cost Bump-Bonding Processes for High Energy Physics Pixel Detectors}

    CERN Document Server

    Caselle, Michele; Colombo, Fabio; Dierlamm, Alexander Hermann; Husemann, Ulrich; Kudella, Simon; Weber, M

    2015-01-01

    In the next generation of collider experiments detectors will be challenged by unprecedented particle fluxes. Thus large detector arrays of highly pixelated detectors with minimal dead area at reasonable costs are required. Bump-bonding of pixel detectors has been shown to be a major cost-driver. KIT is one of the production centers of the CMS barrel pixel detector for the Phase I Upgrade. In this contribution the SnPb bump-bonding process and the production yield is reported. In parallel to the production of the new CMS pixel detector, several alternatives to the expensive photolithography electroplating/electroless metal deposition technologies are developing. Recent progress and challenges faced in the development of bump-bonding technology based on gold-stud bonding by thin ($15\\,\\rm{\\mu m}$) gold wire is presented. This technique allows producing metal bumps with diameters down to $30\\,\\rm{\\mu m}$ without using photolithography processes, which are typically required to provide suitable under bu...

  9. Fabrication and Test of Pixelated CZT Detectors with Different Pixel Pitches and Thicknesses

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Q.; Garson, A.; Dowkontt, P.; Martin, J.; Beilicke, M; Jung, I.; Groza, M.; A. Burger; De Geronimo, G.; Krawczynski, H.; .

    2008-01-01

    The main methods grown Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals with high yield and excellent homogeneity are Modified Horizontal Bridgman (MHB) and High Pressure Bridgman (HPB) processes, respectively. In this contribution, the readout system based on two 32-channel NCI-ASICs for pixellated CZT detector arrays has been developed and tested. The CZT detectors supplied by Orbotech (MHB) and eV products (HPB) are tested by NCI-ASIC readout system. The CZT detectors have an array of 8x8 or 11x11 pi...

  10. Modelling semiconductor pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieson, K

    2001-01-01

    expected after 200 ps in most cases. The effect of reducing the charge carrier lifetime and examining the charge collection efficiency has been utilised to explore how these detectors would respond in a harsh radiation environment. It is predicted that over critical carrier lifetimes (10 ps to 0.1 ns) an improvement of 40 % over conventional detectors can be expected. This also has positive implications for fabricating detectors, in this geometry, from materials which might otherwise be considered substandard. An analysis of charge transport in CdZnTe pixel detectors has been performed. The analysis starts with simulation studies into the formation of contacts and their influence on the internal electric field of planar detectors. The models include a number of well known defect states and these are balanced to give an agreement with a typical experimental I-V curve. The charge transport study extends to the development of a method for studying the effect of charge sharing in highly pixellated detectors. The ...

  11. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented.

  12. Three clinical experiences with SNP array results consistent with parental incest: a narrative with lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Benjamin M; Langley, Katherine; Spangler, Brooke; Vergano, Samantha

    2014-08-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays have the ability to reveal parental consanguinity which may or may not be known to healthcare providers. Consanguinity can have significant implications for the health of patients and for individual and family psychosocial well-being. These results often present ethical and legal dilemmas that can have important ramifications. Unexpected consanguinity can be confounding to healthcare professionals who may be unprepared to handle these results or to communicate them to families or other appropriate representatives. There are few published accounts of experiences with consanguinity and SNP arrays. In this paper we discuss three cases where molecular evidence of parental incest was identified by SNP microarray. We hope to further highlight consanguinity as a potential incidental finding, how the cases were handled by the clinical team, and what resources were found to be most helpful. This paper aims to contribute further to professional discourse on incidental findings with genomic technology and how they were addressed clinically. These experiences may provide some guidance on how others can prepare for these findings and help improve practice. As genetic and genomic testing is utilized more by non-genetics providers, we also hope to inform about the importance of engaging with geneticists and genetic counselors when addressing these findings.

  13. Inflationary primordial black holes for the LIGO gravitational wave events and pulsar timing array experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Mukaida, Kyohei; Tada, Yuichiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2017-06-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) are one of the candidates to explain the gravitational wave (GW) signals observed by the LIGO detectors. Among several phenomena in the early universe, cosmic inflation is a major example to generate PBHs from large primordial density perturbations. In this paper, we discuss the possibility to interpret the observed GW events as mergers of PBHs that are produced by cosmic inflation. The primordial curvature perturbation should be large enough to produce a sizable amount of PBHs, and thus we have several other probes to test this scenario. We point out that the current pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments already put severe constraints on GWs generated via the second-order effects, and that the observation of the cosmic microwave background puts severe restriction on its μ distortion. In particular, it is found that the scalar power spectrum should have a very sharp peak at k ˜1 06 Mpc-1 to fulfill the required abundance of PBHs while evading constraints from the PTA experiments together with the μ distortion. We propose a mechanism that can realize such a sharp peak. In the future, simple inflation models that generate PBHs via almost Gaussian fluctuations could be probed/excluded.

  14. The FE-I4 pixel readout integrated circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sciveres, M., E-mail: mgarcia-sciveres@bl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Arutinov, D.; Barbero, M. [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Beccherle, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Dube, S.; Elledge, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fleury, J. [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Fougeron, D.; Gensolen, F. [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Marseille (France); Gnani, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gromov, V. [Nationaal Instituut voor Subatomaire Fysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hemperek, T.; Karagounis, M. [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Kluit, R. [Nationaal Instituut voor Subatomaire Fysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kruth, A. [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Mekkaoui, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Menouni, M. [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Marseille (France); Schipper, J.-D. [Nationaal Instituut voor Subatomaire Fysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-04-21

    A new pixel readout integrated circuit denominated FE-I4 is being designed to meet the requirements of ATLAS experiment upgrades. It will be the largest readout IC produced to date for particle physics applications, filling the maximum allowed reticle area. This will significantly reduce the cost of future hybrid pixel detectors. In addition, FE-I4 will have smaller pixels and higher rate capability than the present generation of LHC pixel detectors. Design features are described along with simulation and test results, including low power and high rate readout architecture, mixed signal design strategy, and yield hardening.

  15. Architectural modeling of pixel readout chips Velopix and Timepix3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poikela, T.; Plosila, J.; Westerlund, T.; Buytaert, J.; Campbell, M.; Llopart, X.; Plackett, R.; Wyllie, K.; van Beuzekom, M.; Gromov, V.; Kluit, R.; Zappon, F.; Zivkovic, V.; Brezina, C.; Desch, K.; Fang, X.; Kruth, A.

    2012-01-01

    We examine two digital architectures for front end pixel readout chips, Velopix and Timepix3. These readout chips are developed for tracking detectors in future high energy physics experiments. They must incorporate local intelligence in pixels for time-over-threshold measurement and sparse readout.

  16. Pixelated gamma detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolinsky, Sergei Ivanovich; Yanoff, Brian David; Guida, Renato; Ivan, Adrian

    2016-12-27

    A pixelated gamma detector includes a scintillator column assembly having scintillator crystals and optical transparent elements alternating along a longitudinal axis, a collimator assembly having longitudinal walls separated by collimator septum, the collimator septum spaced apart to form collimator channels, the scintillator column assembly positioned adjacent to the collimator assembly so that the respective ones of the scintillator crystal are positioned adjacent to respective ones of the collimator channels, the respective ones of the optical transparent element are positioned adjacent to respective ones of the collimator septum, and a first photosensor and a second photosensor, the first and the second photosensor each connected to an opposing end of the scintillator column assembly. A system and a method for inspecting and/or detecting defects in an interior of an object are also disclosed.

  17. First operation of a hybrid photon detector prototype with electrostatic cross-focussing and integrated silicon pixel readout

    CERN Document Server

    Alemi, M; Gys, Thierry; Mikulec, B; Piedigrossi, D; Puertolas, D; Rosso, E; Schomaker, R; Snoeys, W; Wyllie, Ken H

    2000-01-01

    We report on the first operation of a hybrid photon detector prototype with integrated silicon pixel readout for the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment. The photon detector is based on a cross-focussed image intensifier tube geometry where the image is de-magnified by a factor of 4. The anode consists of a silicon pixel array, bump-bonded to a binary readout chip with matching pixel electronics. The prototype has been characterized using a low-intensity light-emitting diode operated in pulsed mode. Its performance in terms of single-photoelectron detection efficiency and imaging properties is presented. A model of photoelectron detection is proposed, and is shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data. It includes an estimate of the charge signal generated in the silicon detector, and the combined effects of the comparator threshold spread of the pixel readout chip, charge sharing at the pixel boundaries and back-scattering of the photoelectrons at the silicon detector surface...

  18. Modeling Inter-Pixel Crosstalk in Teledyne Imaging Sensors H4RG Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Dudik, R P; Dorland, B N; Veillette, D; Waczynski, A; Lane, B; Loose, M; Kan, E; Waterman, J; Pravdo, S

    2012-01-01

    CMOS-hybrid arrays have recently surfaced as competitive optical detectors for use in ground- and space-based astronomy. One source of error in these detectors that does not appear in more traditional CCD arrays is the inter-pixel capacitance component of crosstalk. In this paper we use a single pixel reset method to model inter-pixel capacitance (IPC). We combine this IPC model with a model for charge diffusion to estimate the total crosstalk on H4RG arrays. Finally, we compare our model results to Fe55 data obtained using an astrometric camera built to test the H4RG-B0 generation detectors.

  19. A Multi-Modality CMOS Sensor Array for Cell-Based Assay and Drug Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Taiyun; Park, Jong Seok; Butts, Jessica C; Hookway, Tracy A; Su, Amy; Zhu, Chengjie; Styczynski, Mark P; McDevitt, Todd C; Wang, Hua

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated multi-modality CMOS cellular sensor array with four sensing modalities to characterize different cell physiological responses, including extracellular voltage recording, cellular impedance mapping, optical detection with shadow imaging and bioluminescence sensing, and thermal monitoring. The sensor array consists of nine parallel pixel groups and nine corresponding signal conditioning blocks. Each pixel group comprises one temperature sensor and 16 tri-modality sensor pixels, while each tri-modality sensor pixel can be independently configured for extracellular voltage recording, cellular impedance measurement (voltage excitation/current sensing), and optical detection. This sensor array supports multi-modality cellular sensing at the pixel level, which enables holistic cell characterization and joint-modality physiological monitoring on the same cellular sample with a pixel resolution of 80 μm × 100 μm. Comprehensive biological experiments with different living cell samples demonstrate the functionality and benefit of the proposed multi-modality sensing in cell-based assay and drug screening.

  20. Planar Pixelations and Image Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Rowekamp, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Any subset of the plane can be approximated by a set of square pixels. This transition from a shape to its pixelation is rather brutal since it destroys geometric and topological information about the shape. Using a technique inspired by Morse Theory, we algorithmically produce a PL approximation of the original shape using only information from its pixelation. This approximation converges to the original shape in a very strong sense: as the size of the pixels goes to zero we can recover important geometric and topological invariants of the original shape such as Betti numbers, area, perimeter and curvature measures.

  1. Trigger electronics of the new Fluorescence Detectors of the Telescope Array Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tameda, Yuichiro [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)], E-mail: tame@cr.phys.titech.ac.jp; Taketa, Akimichi [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Smith, Jeremy D. [Institute for High Energy Astrophysics and Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830 (United States); Tanaka, Manobu [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Fukushima, Masaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Jui, Charles C.H. [Institute for High Energy Astrophysics and Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830 (United States); Kadota, Ken' ichi [Faculty of Knowledge Engineering, Musashi Institute of Technology, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Kakimoto, Fumio [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Matsuda, Takeshi [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Matthews, John N. [Institute for High Energy Astrophysics and Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830 (United States); Ogio, Shoichi [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Tatsunobu; Takeda, Masahiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Thomas, Stanton B. [Institute for High Energy Astrophysics and Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830 (United States); Tokuno, Hisao [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Tsunesada, Yoshiki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)] (and others)

    2009-10-11

    The Telescope Array Project is an experiment designed to observe Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays via a 'hybrid' detection technique utilizing both fluorescence light detectors (FDs) and scintillator surface particle detectors (SDs). We have installed three FD stations and 507 SDs in the Utah desert, and initiated observations from March 2008. The northern FD station reuses 14 telescopes from the High Resolution Fly's Eye, HiRes-I station. Each of the two southern FD stations contains 12 new telescopes utilizing new FADC electronics. Each telescope is instrumented with a camera composed of 256 PMTs. Since the detectors are composed of many PMTs and each PMT detects fluorescence photons together with the vast amount of night sky background, a sophisticated triggering system is required. In this paper, we describe the trigger electronics of these new FD stations. We also discuss performance of the FDs with this triggering system, in terms of efficiencies and apertures for various detector configurations.

  2. Smith-Purcell radiation experiment using a field-emission array cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, H; Yokoo, K; Shimawaki, H; Hosono, A

    2000-01-01

    We have recently started an experiment on visible Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation to examine practical applicability of a field-emission array (FEA) cathode to compact free electron lasers, placing emphasis on safe operation of the cathode as well as beam quality. The electron beam was generated by a 5 cm long triode which employed either a single- or double-gated FEA. Accelerating voltages of up to -40 and -100 kV were applied to the cathode by a regulated power supply and a small Van der Graaff generator, respectively. A 25 mu A beam of up to 45 keV was routinely produced and a 5 mu A 80 keV beam was also attained. The beam passed through a 1 mm wide slit in the anode and grazed the surface of a 2.5 cm long replica grating with a period of either 0.56 or 0.83 mu m. The SP radiation has not been identified owing to irrelevant luminescence caused by the beam at the grating. Still it was confirmed that the FEA cathode is adequately durable and electron beams generated therefrom are sufficiently stable to be used ...

  3. Smith-Purcell experiment utilizing a field-emitter array cathode measurements of radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, H; Yokoo, K; Shimawaki, H; Hosono, A

    2001-01-01

    Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation at wavelengths of 350-750 nm was produced in a tabletop experiment using a field-emitter array (FEA) cathode. The electron gun was 5 cm long, and a 25 mmx25 mm holographic replica grating was placed behind the slit provided in the anode. A regulated DC power supply accelerated electron beams in excess of 10 mu A up to 45 keV, while a small Van de Graaff generator accelerated smaller currents to higher energies. The grating had a 0.556 mu m period, 30 deg. blaze and a 0.2 mu m thick aluminum coating. Spectral characteristics of the radiation were measured both manually and automatically; in the latter case, the spectrometer was driven by a stepping motor to scan the wavelength, and AD-converted signals from a photomultiplier tube were processed by a personal computer. The measurement, made at 80 deg. relative to the electron beam, showed good agreement with theoretical wavelengths of the SP radiation. Diffraction orders were -2 and -3 for beam energies higher than 45 keV, -3 to -5 ...

  4. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Keith; Loudin, James; Goetz, Georges; Huie, Philip; Wang, Lele; Kamins, Theodore I.; Galambos, Ludwig; Smith, Richard; Harris, James S.; Sher, Alexander; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases lead to blindness due to loss of the `image capturing' photoreceptors, while neurons in the `image-processing' inner retinal layers are relatively well preserved. Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight by electrically stimulating the surviving neurons. Most implants are powered through inductive coils, requiring complex surgical methods to implant the coil-decoder-cable-array systems that deliver energy to stimulating electrodes via intraocular cables. We present a photovoltaic subretinal prosthesis, in which silicon photodiodes in each pixel receive power and data directly through pulsed near-infrared illumination and electrically stimulate neurons. Stimulation is produced in normal and degenerate rat retinas, with pulse durations of 0.5-4 ms, and threshold peak irradiances of 0.2-10 mW mm-2, two orders of magnitude below the ocular safety limit. Neural responses were elicited by illuminating a single 70 µm bipolar pixel, demonstrating the possibility of a fully integrated photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density.

  5. Performance assessment of a single-pixel compressive sensing imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Bosq, Todd W.; Preece, Bradley L.

    2016-05-01

    Conventional electro-optical and infrared (EO/IR) systems capture an image by measuring the light incident at each of the millions of pixels in a focal plane array. Compressive sensing (CS) involves capturing a smaller number of unconventional measurements from the scene, and then using a companion process known as sparse reconstruction to recover the image as if a fully populated array that satisfies the Nyquist criteria was used. Therefore, CS operates under the assumption that signal acquisition and data compression can be accomplished simultaneously. CS has the potential to acquire an image with equivalent information content to a large format array while using smaller, cheaper, and lower bandwidth components. However, the benefits of CS do not come without compromise. The CS architecture chosen must effectively balance between physical considerations (SWaP-C), reconstruction accuracy, and reconstruction speed to meet operational requirements. To properly assess the value of such systems, it is necessary to fully characterize the image quality, including artifacts and sensitivity to noise. Imagery of the two-handheld object target set at range was collected using a passive SWIR single-pixel CS camera for various ranges, mirror resolution, and number of processed measurements. Human perception experiments were performed to determine the identification performance within the trade space. The performance of the nonlinear CS camera was modeled with the Night Vision Integrated Performance Model (NV-IPM) by mapping the nonlinear degradations to an equivalent linear shift invariant model. Finally, the limitations of CS modeling techniques will be discussed.

  6. MTF study of planar small pixel pitch quantum IR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravrand, O.; Baier, N.; Ferron, A.; Rochette, F.; Berthoz, J.; Rubaldo, L.; Cluzel, R.

    2014-06-01

    The actual trend in quantum IR detector development is the design of very small pixel pitch large arrays. From previously 30μm pitch, the standard pixel pitch is today 15μm and is expected to decrease to 12μm in the next few years. Furthermore, focal plane arrays (FPA) with pixel pitch as small as small as 10μm has been demonstrated. Such ultra-small pixel pitches are very small compared to the typical length ruling the electrical characteristics of the absorbing materials, namely the minority carrier diffusion length. As an example for low doped N type HgCdTe or InSb material, this diffusion length is of the order of 30 to 50μm, i.e. 3 to 5 times the targeted pixel pitches. This has strong consequences on the modulation transfer function (MTF) for planar structures, where the lateral extension of the photodiode is limited by diffusion. For such aspect ratios, the self-confinement of neighboring diodes may not be efficient enough to maintain optimal MTF. Therefore, this issue has to be addressed in order to take full benefits of the pixel pitch reduction in terms of image resolution. This paper aims at investigating the MTF evolution of HgCdTe and InSb FPAs decreasing the pixel pitch below 15μm. Both experimental measurements and finite element simulations are used to discuss this issue. Different scenarii will be compared, namely deep mesa etch between pixels, internal drift, surface recombination, thin absorbing layers.

  7. Pixel History for Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borncamp, D.; Grogin, N.; Bourque, M.; Ogaz, S.

    2017-06-01

    Excess thermal energy present in a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) can result in additional electrical current. This excess charge is trapped within the silicon lattice structure of the CCD electronics. It can persist through multiple exposures and have an adverse effect on science performance of the detectors unless properly flagged and corrected for. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take occasional long-exposure images with the camera shutter closed. These images, generally referred to as "dark" images, allow for the measurement of the thermal-electron contamination present in each pixel of the CCD lattice. This so-called "dark current" can then be subtracted from the science images by re-scaling the dark to the corresponding exposure times. Pixels that have signal above a certain threshold are traditionally marked as "hot" and flagged in the data quality array. Many users will discard these because of the extra current. However, these pixels may not be unusable because of an unreliable dark subtraction; if we find these pixels to be stable over an anneal period, we can properly subtract the charge and the extra Poisson noise from this dark current will be propagated into the error arrays. Here we present the results of a pixel history study that analyzes every individual pixel of the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) CCDs over time and allows pixels that were previously flagged as unusable to be brought back into the science image as a reliable pixel.

  8. Small pixel CZT detector for hard X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Matthew David, E-mail: Matt.Wilson@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Cernik, Robert [Henry Moseley X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Chen, Henry [Redlen Technologies, Saanichton, British Columbia (Canada); Hansson, Conny [Henry Moseley X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Iniewski, Kris [Redlen Technologies, Saanichton, British Columbia (Canada); Jones, Lawrence L.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    A new small pixel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for hard X-ray spectroscopy. The X-ray performance of four detectors is presented and the detectors are analysed in terms of the energy resolution of each pixel. The detectors were made from CZT crystals grown by the travelling heater method (THM) bonded to a 20x20 application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition (DAQ) system. The detectors had an array of 20x20 pixels on a 250 {mu}m pitch, with each pixel gold-stud bonded to an energy resolving circuit in the ASIC. The DAQ system digitised the ASIC output with 14 bit resolution, performing offset corrections and data storage to disc in real time at up to 40,000 frames per second. The detector geometry and ASIC design was optimised for X-ray spectroscopy up to 150 keV and made use of the small pixel effect to preferentially measure the electron signal. A {sup 241}Am source was used to measure the spectroscopic performance and uniformity of the detectors. The average energy resolution (FWHM at 59.54 keV) of each pixel ranged from 1.09{+-}0.46 to 1.50{+-}0.57 keV across the four detectors. The detectors showed good spectral performance and uniform response over almost all pixels in the 20x20 array. A large area 80x80 pixel detector will be built that will utilise the scalable design of the ASIC and the large areas of monolithic spectroscopic grade THM grown CZT that are now available. The large area detector will have the same performance as that demonstrated here.

  9. Small pixel CZT detector for hard X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Matthew David; Cernik, Robert; Chen, Henry; Hansson, Conny; Iniewski, Kris; Jones, Lawrence L.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C.

    2011-10-01

    A new small pixel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for hard X-ray spectroscopy. The X-ray performance of four detectors is presented and the detectors are analysed in terms of the energy resolution of each pixel. The detectors were made from CZT crystals grown by the travelling heater method (THM) bonded to a 20×20 application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition (DAQ) system. The detectors had an array of 20×20 pixels on a 250 μm pitch, with each pixel gold-stud bonded to an energy resolving circuit in the ASIC. The DAQ system digitised the ASIC output with 14 bit resolution, performing offset corrections and data storage to disc in real time at up to 40,000 frames per second. The detector geometry and ASIC design was optimised for X-ray spectroscopy up to 150 keV and made use of the small pixel effect to preferentially measure the electron signal. A 241Am source was used to measure the spectroscopic performance and uniformity of the detectors. The average energy resolution (FWHM at 59.54 keV) of each pixel ranged from 1.09±0.46 to 1.50±0.57 keV across the four detectors. The detectors showed good spectral performance and uniform response over almost all pixels in the 20×20 array. A large area 80×80 pixel detector will be built that will utilise the scalable design of the ASIC and the large areas of monolithic spectroscopic grade THM grown CZT that are now available. The large area detector will have the same performance as that demonstrated here.

  10. A germanium hybrid pixel detector with 55μm pixel size and 65,000 channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennicard, D.; Struth, B.; Hirsemann, H.; Sarajlic, M.; Smoljanin, S.; Zuvic, M.; Lampert, M. O.; Fritzsch, T.; Rothermund, M.; Graafsma, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors provide high performance through a combination of direct detection, a relatively small pixel size, fast readout and sophisticated signal processing circuitry in each pixel. For X-ray detection above 20 keV, high-Z sensor layers rather than silicon are needed to achieve high quantum efficiency, but many high-Z materials such as GaAs and CdTe often suffer from poor material properties or nonuniformities. Germanium is available in large wafers of extremely high quality, making it an appealing option for high-performance hybrid pixel X-ray detectors, but suitable technologies for finely pixelating and bump-bonding germanium have not previously been available. A finely-pixelated germanium photodiode sensor with a 256 by 256 array of 55μm pixels has been produced. The sensor has an n-on-p structure, with 700μm thickness. Using a low-temperature indium bump process, this sensor has been bonded to the Medipix3RX photoncounting readout chip. Tests with the LAMBDA readout system have shown that the detector works successfully, with a high bond yield and higher image uniformity than comparable high-Z systems. During cooling, the system is functional around -80°C (with warmer temperatures resulting in excessive leakage current), with -100°C sufficient for good performance.

  11. Unlikely Combination of Experiments With a Novel High-Voltage CIGS Photovoltaic Array: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Cueto, J. A.; Sekulic, B. R.

    2006-05-01

    A new high-voltage array comprising bipolar strings of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) modules was inaugurated in 2005. It is equipped with a unique combination of tests, which likely have never before been deployed simultaneously within a single array: full current-voltage (I-V) traces, high-voltage leakage current measurements, and peak-power tracking or temporal stepped-bias profiling. The array nominally produces 1 kW power at 1 sun. The array's electrical characteristics are continuously monitored and controlled with a programmable electronic load interfaced to a data acquisition system (DAS), that also records solar and meteorological data. The modules are mounted with their frames electrically isolated from earth ground, in order to facilitate measurement of the leakage currents that arise between the high voltage bias developed in the series-connected cells and modules and their mounting frames. Because the DAS can perform stepped biasing of the array as a function of time, synchronous detection of the leakage current data with alternating bias is available. Leakage current data and their dependence on temperature and voltage are investigated. Array power data are analyzed across a wide range of varying illuminations and temperatures from the I-V traces. Array performance is also analyzed from an energy output perspective using peak-power tracking data.

  12. Experiments on pumping of liquids using arrays of microelectrodes subjected to travelling wave potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sanchez, P; Ramos, A [Dpto. de Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Green, Nicolas G; Morgan, H [School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: pablogarcia@us.es

    2008-12-01

    Net fluid flow of electrolytes driven on an array of microelectrodes subjected to a travelling-wave potential is presented. Two sizes of platinum microelectrodes have been studied. In both arrays, at low voltages the liquid flows according to the prediction given by ac electroosmotic theory. At voltages above a threshold the fluid flow is reversed. Measurements of the electrical current when the microelectrode array is pumping the liquid are also reported. Transient behaviours in both electrical current and fluid velocity have been observed.

  13. Terahertz spectroscopic polarimetry of generalized anisotropic media composed of Archimedean spiral arrays: Experiments and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschaffenburg, Daniel J; Williams, Michael R C; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A

    2016-05-07

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopic polarimetry has been used to measure the polarization state of all spectral components in a broadband THz pulse upon transmission through generalized anisotropic media consisting of two-dimensional arrays of lithographically defined Archimedean spirals. The technique allows a full determination of the frequency-dependent, complex-valued transmission matrix and eigenpolarizations of the spiral arrays. Measurements were made on a series of spiral array orientations. The frequency-dependent transmission matrix elements as well as the eigenpolarizations were determined, and the eigenpolarizations were found be to elliptically corotating, as expected from their symmetry. Numerical simulations are in quantitative agreement with measured spectra.

  14. Increased space-bandwidth product in pixel super-resolved lensfree on-chip microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Alon; Luo, Wei; Khademhosseinieh, Bahar; Su, Ting-Wei; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-04-01

    Pixel-size limitation of lensfree on-chip microscopy can be circumvented by utilizing pixel-super-resolution techniques to synthesize a smaller effective pixel, improving the resolution. Here we report that by using the two-dimensional pixel-function of an image sensor-array as an input to lensfree image reconstruction, pixel-super-resolution can improve the numerical aperture of the reconstructed image by ~3 fold compared to a raw lensfree image. This improvement was confirmed using two different sensor-arrays that significantly vary in their pixel-sizes, circuit architectures and digital/optical readout mechanisms, empirically pointing to roughly the same space-bandwidth improvement factor regardless of the sensor-array employed in our set-up. Furthermore, such a pixel-count increase also renders our on-chip microscope into a Giga-pixel imager, where an effective pixel count of ~1.6-2.5 billion can be obtained with different sensors. Finally, using an ultra-violet light-emitting-diode, this platform resolves 225 nm grating lines and can be useful for wide-field on-chip imaging of nano-scale objects, e.g., multi-walled-carbon-nanotubes.

  15. An integrating CMOS APS for X-ray imaging with an in-pixel preamplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, M. A.; Fröjdh, C.; Petersson, C. S.

    2001-06-01

    We present in this paper an integrating CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) circuit coated with scintillator type sensors for intra-oral dental X-ray imaging systems. The photosensing element in the pixel is formed by the p-diffusion on the n-well diode. The advantage of this photosensor is its very low direct absorption of X-rays compared to the other available photosensing elements in the CMOS pixel. The pixel features an integrating capacitor in the feedback loop of a preamplifier of a finite gain in order to increase the optical sensitivity. To verify the effectiveness of this in-pixel preamplification, a prototype 32×80 element CMOS active pixel array was implemented in a 0.8 μm CMOS double poly, n-well process with a pixel pitch of 50 μm. Measured results confirmed the improved optical sensitivity performance of the APS. Various measurements on device performance are presented.

  16. CMOS VLSI Active-Pixel Sensor for Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Sun, Chao; Yang, Guang; Heynssens, Julie

    2004-01-01

    An architecture for a proposed active-pixel sensor (APS) and a design to implement the architecture in a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit provide for some advanced features that are expected to be especially desirable for tracking pointlike features of stars. The architecture would also make this APS suitable for robotic- vision and general pointing and tracking applications. CMOS imagers in general are well suited for pointing and tracking because they can be configured for random access to selected pixels and to provide readout from windows of interest within their fields of view. However, until now, the architectures of CMOS imagers have not supported multiwindow operation or low-noise data collection. Moreover, smearing and motion artifacts in collected images have made prior CMOS imagers unsuitable for tracking applications. The proposed CMOS imager (see figure) would include an array of 1,024 by 1,024 pixels containing high-performance photodiode-based APS circuitry. The pixel pitch would be 9 m. The operations of the pixel circuits would be sequenced and otherwise controlled by an on-chip timing and control block, which would enable the collection of image data, during a single frame period, from either the full frame (that is, all 1,024 1,024 pixels) or from within as many as 8 different arbitrarily placed windows as large as 8 by 8 pixels each. A typical prior CMOS APS operates in a row-at-a-time ( grolling-shutter h) readout mode, which gives rise to exposure skew. In contrast, the proposed APS would operate in a sample-first/readlater mode, suppressing rolling-shutter effects. In this mode, the analog readout signals from the pixels corresponding to the windows of the interest (which windows, in the star-tracking application, would presumably contain guide stars) would be sampled rapidly by routing them through a programmable diagonal switch array to an on-chip parallel analog memory array. The

  17. Planar pixel sensors in commercial CMOS technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Macchiolo, Anna [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    For the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the high luminosity LHC, an all-silicon tracker is foreseen to cope with the increased rate and radiation levels. Pixel and strip detectors will have to cover an area of up to 200m2. To produce modules in high number at reduced costs, new sensor and bonding technologies have to be investigated. Commercial CMOS technologies on high resistive substrates can provide significant advantages in this direction. They offer cost effective, large volume sensor production. In addition to this, production is done on 8'' wafers allowing wafer-to-wafer bonding to the electronics, an interconnection technology substantially cheaper than the bump bonding process used for hybrid pixel detectors at the LHC. Both active and passive n-in-p pixel sensor prototypes have been submitted in a 150 nm CMOS technology on a 2kΩ cm substrate. The passive sensor design will be used to characterize sensor properties and to investigate wafer-to-wafer bonding technologies. This first prototype is made of a matrix of 36 x 16 pixels of size compatible with the FE-I4 readout chip (i.e. 50 μm x 250 μm). Results from lab characterization of this first submission are shown together with TCAD simulations. Work towards a full size FE-I4 sensor for wafer-to-wafer bonding is discussed.

  18. Sensor development for the CMS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bölla, G; Horisberger, R P; Kaufmann, R; Rohe, T; Roy, A

    2002-01-01

    The CMS experiment which is currently under construction at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will contain a pixel detector which provides in its final configuration three space points per track close to the interaction point of the colliding beams. Because of the harsh radiation environment of the LHC, the technical realization of the pixel detector is extremely challenging. The readout chip as the most damageable part of the system is believed to survive a particle fluence of 6x10 sup 1 sup 4 n sub e sub q /cm sup 2 (All fluences are normalized to 1 MeV neutrons and therefore all components of the hybrid pixel detector have to perform well up to at least this fluence. As this requires a partially depleted operation of the silicon sensors after irradiation-induced type inversion of the substrate, an ''n in n'' concept has been chosen. In order to perform IV-tests on wafer level and to hold accidentally unconnected pixels close to ground potential, a resistive path between the pixe...

  19. Many-body subradiant excitations in metamaterial arrays: Experiment and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Stewart D; Papasimakis, Nikitas; Savo, Salvatore; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate spatially extended subradiant excitations in planar metamaterial arrays comprising over 1000 metamolecules. By comparing the near- and far-field response in large-scale numerical simulations with those in experimental observations we identify correlated multimetamolecule subradiant states that dominate the total excitation energy. We show that spatially extended many-body subradiance can also exist in plasmonic metamaterial arrays at optical frequencies.

  20. From Pixels to Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownston, Lee; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched in 2009 as NASAs first mission capable of finding Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. Its telescope consists of a 1.5-m primary mirror and a 0.95-m aperture. The 42 charge-coupled devices in its focal plane are read out every half hour, compressed, and then downlinked monthly. After four years, the second of four reaction wheels failed, ending the original mission. Back on earth, the Science Operations Center developed the Science Pipeline to analyze about 200,000 target stars in Keplers field of view, looking for evidence of periodic dimming suggesting that one or more planets had crossed the face of its host star. The Pipeline comprises several steps, from pixel-level calibration, through noise and artifact removal, to detection of transit-like signals and the construction of a suite of diagnostic tests to guard against false positives. The Kepler Science Pipeline consists of a pipeline infrastructure written in the Java programming language, which marshals data input to and output from MATLAB applications that are executed as external processes. The pipeline modules, which underwent continuous development and refinement even after data started arriving, employ several analytic techniques, many developed for the Kepler Project. Because of the large number of targets, the large amount of data per target and the complexity of the pipeline algorithms, the processing demands are daunting. Some pipeline modules require days to weeks to process all of their targets, even when run on NASA's 128-node Pleiades supercomputer. The software developers are still seeking ways to increase the throughput. To date, the Kepler project has discovered more than 4000 planetary candidates, of which more than 1000 have been independently confirmed or validated to be exoplanets. Funding for this mission is provided by NASAs Science Mission Directorate.

  1. PIXELS: Using field-based learning to investigate students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, A.; Tinigin, L.; Petcovic, H. L.; Ormand, C. J.; LaDue, N.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical work over the past decade supports the notion that a high level of spatial thinking skill is critical to success in the geosciences. Spatial thinking incorporates a host of sub-skills such as mentally rotating an object, imagining the inside of a 3D object based on outside patterns, unfolding a landscape, and disembedding critical patterns from background noise. In this study, we focus on sense of scale, which refers to how an individual quantified space, and is thought to develop through kinesthetic experiences. Remote sensing data are increasingly being used for wide-reaching and high impact research. A sense of scale is critical to many areas of the geosciences, including understanding and interpreting remotely sensed imagery. In this exploratory study, students (N=17) attending the Juneau Icefield Research Program participated in a 3-hour exercise designed to study how a field-based activity might impact their sense of scale and their conceptions of pixels in remotely sensed imagery. Prior to the activity, students had an introductory remote sensing lecture and completed the Sense of Scale inventory. Students walked and/or skied the perimeter of several pixel types, including a 1 m square (representing a WorldView sensor's pixel), a 30 m square (a Landsat pixel) and a 500 m square (a MODIS pixel). The group took reflectance measurements using a field radiometer as they physically traced out the pixel. The exercise was repeated in two different areas, one with homogenous reflectance, and another with heterogeneous reflectance. After the exercise, students again completed the Sense of Scale instrument and a demographic survey. This presentation will share the effects and efficacy of the field-based intervention to teach remote sensing concepts and to investigate potential relationships between students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale.

  2. Multiport solid-state imager characterization at variable pixel rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, G.J.; Albright, K.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Turko, B.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The imaging performance of an 8-port Full Frame Transfer Charge Coupled Device (FFT CCD) as a function of several parameters including pixel clock rate is presented. The device, model CCD- 13, manufactured by English Electric Valve (EEV) is a 512 {times} 512 pixel array designed with four individual programmable bidirectional serial registers and eight output amplifiers permitting simultaneous readout of eight segments (128 horizontal {times} 256 vertical pixels) of the array. The imager was evaluated in Los Alamos National Laboratory`s High-Speed Solid-State Imager Test Station at true pixel rates as high as 50 MHz for effective imager pixel rates approaching 400 MHz from multiporting. Key response characteristics measured include absolute responsivity, Charge-Transfer-Efficiency (CTE), dynamic range, resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and electronic and optical crosstalk among the eight video channels. Preliminary test results and data obtained from the CCD-13 will be presented and the versatility/capabilities of the test station will be reviewed.

  3. Characterization of active CMOS sensors for capacitively coupled pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirono, Toko; Gonella, Laura; Janssen, Jens; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn (Germany); Peric, Ivan [Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Active CMOS pixel sensor is one of the most attractive candidates for detectors of upcoming particle physics experiments. In contrast to conventional sensors of hybrid detectors, signal processing circuit can be integrated in the active CMOS sensor. The characterization and optimization of the pixel circuit are indispensable to obtain a good performance from the sensors. The prototype chips of the active CMOS sensor were fabricated in the AMS 180nm and L-Foundry 150 nm CMOS processes, respectively a high voltage and high resistivity technology. Both chips have a charge sensitive amplifier and a comparator in each pixel. The chips are designed to be glued to the FEI4 pixel readout chip. The signals from 3 pixels of the prototype chips are capacitively coupled to the FEI4 input pads. We have performed lab tests and test beams to characterize the prototypes. In this presentation, the measurement results of the active CMOS prototype sensors are shown.

  4. Status of the CMS Phase I pixel detector upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spannagel, S., E-mail: simon.spannagel@desy.de

    2016-09-21

    A new pixel detector for the CMS experiment is being built, owing to the instantaneous luminosities anticipated for the Phase I Upgrade of the LHC. The new CMS pixel detector provides four-hit tracking while featuring a significantly reduced material budget as well as new cooling and powering schemes. A new front-end readout chip mitigates buffering and bandwidth limitations, and comprises a low-threshold comparator. These improvements allow the new pixel detector to sustain and improve the efficiency of the current pixel tracker at the increased requirements imposed by high luminosities and pile-up. This contribution gives an overview of the design of the upgraded pixel detector and the status of the upgrade project, and presents test beam performance measurements of the production read-out chip.

  5. Development of radiation hardened pixel sensors for charged particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Koziel, Michal

    2014-01-01

    CMOS Pixel Sensors are being developed since a few years to equip vertex detectors for future high-energy physics experiments with the crucial advantages of a low material budget and low production costs. The features simultaneously required are a short readout time, high granularity and high tolerance to radiation. This thesis mainly focuses on the radiation tolerance studies. To achieve the targeted readout time (tens of microseconds), the sensor pixel readout was organized in parallel columns restricting in addition the readout to pixels that had collected the signal charge. The pixels became then more complex, and consequently more sensitive to radiation. Different in-pixel architectures were studied and it was concluded that the tolerance to ionizing radiation was limited to 300 krad with the 0.35- m fabrication process currently used, while the targeted value was several Mrad. Improving this situation calls for implementation of the sensors in processes with a smaller feature size which naturally imp...

  6. DC-DC powering for the CMS pixel upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Lutz; Fleck, Martin; Friedrichs, Marcel; Hensch, Richard; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Rittich, David; Sammet, Jan; Wlochal, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The CMS experiment plans to replace its silicon pixel detector with a new one with improved rate capability and an additional detection layer at the end of 2016. In order to cope with the increased number of detector modules the new pixel detector will be powered via DC-DC converters close to the sensitive detector volume. This paper reviews the DC-DC powering scheme and reports on the ongoing R&D program to develop converters for the pixel upgrade. Design choices are discussed and results from the electrical and thermal characterisation of converter prototypes are shown. An emphasis is put on system tests with up to 24 converters. The performance of pixel modules powered by DC-DC converters is compared to conventional powering. The integration of the DC-DC powering scheme into the pixel detector is described and system design issues are reviewed.

  7. DC-DC Powering for the CMS Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Feld, Lutz Werner; Marcel Friedrichs; Richard Hensch; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Rittich, David Michael; Sammet, Jan Domenik; Wlochal, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The CMS experiment plans to replace its silicon pixel detector with a new one with improved rate capability and an additional detection layer at the end of 2016. In order to cope with the increased number of detector modules the new pixel detector will be powered via DC-DC converters close to the sensitive detector volume. This paper reviews the DC-DC powering scheme and reports on the ongoing R and D program to develop converters for the pixel upgrade. Design choices are discussed and results from the electrical and thermal characterisation of converter prototypes are shown. An emphasis is put on system tests with up to24 converters. The performance of pixel modules powered by DC-DC converters is compared to conventional powering. The integration of the DC-DC powering scheme into the pixel detector is described and system design issues are reviewed.

  8. DC–DC powering for the CMS pixel upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feld, Lutz, E-mail: Lutz.Feld@rwth-aachen.de; Fleck, Martin; Friedrichs, Marcel; Hensch, Richard; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Rittich, David; Sammet, Jan; Wlochal, Michael

    2013-12-21

    The CMS experiment plans to replace its silicon pixel detector with a new one with improved rate capability and an additional detection layer at the end of 2016. In order to cope with the increased number of detector modules the new pixel detector will be powered via DC–DC converters close to the sensitive detector volume. This paper reviews the DC–DC powering scheme and reports on the ongoing R and D program to develop converters for the pixel upgrade. Design choices are discussed and results from the electrical and thermal characterisation of converter prototypes are shown. An emphasis is put on system tests with up to 24 converters. The performance of pixel modules powered by DC–DC converters is compared to conventional powering. The integration of the DC–DC powering scheme into the pixel detector is described and system design issues are reviewed.

  9. Neural network based cluster creation in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The read-out from individual pixels on planar semi-conductor sensors are grouped into clusters to reconstruct the location where a charged particle passed through the sensor. The resolution given by individual pixel sizes is significantly improved by using the information from the charge sharing be- tween pixels. Such analog cluster creation techniques have been used by the ATLAS experiment for many years to obtain an excellent performance. How- ever, in dense environments, such as those inside high-energy jets, clusters have an increased probability of merging the charge deposited by multiple particles. Recently, a neural network based algorithm which estimates both the cluster position and whether a cluster should be split has been developed for the ATLAS Pixel Detector. The algorithm significantly reduces ambigui- ties in the assignment of pixel detector measurement to tracks and improves the position accuracy with respect to standard techniques by taking into account the 2-dimensional charge distribution.

  10. Sub-pixel mapping method based on BP neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jiao; WANG Li-guo; ZHANG Ye; GU Yan-feng

    2009-01-01

    A new sub-pixel mapping method based on BP neural network is proposed in order to determine the spatial distribution of class components in each mixed pixel. The network was used to train a model that describes the relationship between spatial distribution of target components in mixed pixel and its neighboring information. Then the sub-pixel scaled target could be predicted by the trained model. In order to improve the performance of BP network, BP learning algorithm with momentum was employed. The experiments were conducted both on synthetic images and on hyperspectral imagery (HSI). The results prove that this method is capable of estimating land covers fairly accurately and has a great superiority over some other sub-pixel mapping methods in terms of computational complexity.

  11. DAQ hardware and software development for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stramaglia, Maria Elena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has been extended by about 12 million pixels thanks to the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Data-taking and tuning procedures have been implemented along with newly designed read-out hardware to support high bandwidth for data readout and calibration. The hardware is supported by an embedded software stack running on the read-out boards. The same boards will be used to upgrade the read-out bandwidth for the two outermost layers of the ATLAS Pixel Barrel (54 million pixels). We present the IBL read-out hardware and the supporting software architecture used to calibrate and operate the 4-layer ATLAS Pixel detector. We discuss the technical implementations and status for data taking, validation of the DAQ system in recent cosmic ray data taking, in-situ calibrations, and results from additional tests in preparation for Run 2 at the LHC.

  12. DAQ Hardware and software development for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stramaglia, Maria Elena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment was extended by about 12 million pixels with the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Data-taking and tuning procedures have been implemented by employing newly designed read-out hardware, which supports the full detector bandwidth even for calibration. The hardware is supported by an embedded software stack running on the read-out boards. The same boards will be used to upgrade the read-out bandwidth for the two outermost layers of the ATLAS Pixel Barrel (54 million pixels). We present the IBL read-out hardware and the supporting software architecture used to calibrate and operate the 4-layer ATLAS Pixel detector. We discuss the technical implementations and status for data taking, validation of the DAQ system in recent cosmic ray data taking, in-situ calibrations, and results from additional tests in preparation for Run 2 at the LHC.

  13. Status of the CMS Phase I Pixel Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083994

    2016-01-01

    A new pixel detector for the CMS experiment is being built, owing to the instantaneous luminosities anticipated for the Phase~I Upgrade of the LHC. The new CMS pixel detector provides four-hit tracking while featuring a significantly reduced material budget as well as new cooling and powering schemes. A new front-end readout chip mitigates buffering and bandwidth limitations, and comprises a low-threshold comparator. These improvements allow the new pixel detector to sustain and improve the efficiency of the current pixel tracker at the increased requirements imposed by high luminosities and pile-up. This contribution gives an overview of the design of the upgraded pixel detector and the status of the upgrade project, and presents test beam performance measurements of the production read-out chip.

  14. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major...

  15. Pixel readout ASIC for an APD based 2D X-ray hybrid pixel detector with sub-nanosecond resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thil, Ch., E-mail: christophe.thil@ziti.uni-heidelberg.d [Heidelberg University, Institute of Computer Engineering, B6, 26, 68161 Mannheim (Germany); Baron, A.Q.R. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Fajardo, P. [ESRF, Polygone Scientifique Louis Neel, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Fischer, P. [Heidelberg University, Institute of Computer Engineering, B6, 26, 68161 Mannheim (Germany); Graafsma, H. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Rueffer, R. [ESRF, Polygone Scientifique Louis Neel, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2011-02-01

    The fast response and the short recovery time of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) in linear mode make those devices ideal for direct X-ray detection in applications requiring high time resolution or counting rate. In order to provide position sensitivity, the XNAP project aims at creating a hybrid pixel detector with nanosecond time resolution based on a monolithic APD sensor array with 32 x32 pixels covering about 1 cm{sup 2} active area. The readout is implemented in a pixelated front-end ASIC suited for the readout of such arrays, matched to pixels of 280{mu}mx280{mu}m size. Every single channel features a fast transimpedance amplifier, a discriminator with locally adjustable threshold and two counters with high dynamic range and counting speed able to accumulate X-ray hits with no readout dead time. Additionally, the detector can be operated in list mode by time-stamping every single event with sub-nanosecond resolution. In a first phase of the project, a 4x4 pixel test module is built to validate the conceptual design of the detector. The XNAP project is briefly presented and the performance of the readout ASIC is discussed.

  16. Challenges of small-pixel infrared detectors: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.; Martyniuk, P.; Kopytko, M.

    2016-04-01

    In the last two decades, several new concepts for improving the performance of infrared detectors have been proposed. These new concepts particularly address the drive towards the so-called high operating temperature focal plane arrays (FPAs), aiming to increase detector operating temperatures, and as a consequence reduce the cost of infrared systems. In imaging systems with the above megapixel formats, pixel dimension plays a crucial role in determining critical system attributes such as system size, weight and power consumption (SWaP). The advent of smaller pixels has also resulted in the superior spatial and temperature resolution of these systems. Optimum pixel dimensions are limited by diffraction effects from the aperture, and are in turn wavelength-dependent. In this paper, the key challenges in realizing optimum pixel dimensions in FPA design including dark current, pixel hybridization, pixel delineation, and unit cell readout capacity are outlined to achieve a sufficiently adequate modulation transfer function for the ultra-small pitches involved. Both photon and thermal detectors have been considered. Concerning infrared photon detectors, the trade-offs between two types of competing technology—HgCdTe material systems and III-V materials (mainly barrier detectors)—have been investigated.

  17. Review of world experience and properties of materials for encapsulation of terrestrial photovoltaic arrays. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, D.C.; Gaines, G.B.; Sliemers, F.A.; Kistler, C.W.; Igou, R.D.

    1976-07-21

    Available information defining the state of the art of encapsulation materials and processes for terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications were collected and analyzed. Based on criteria of properties, processability, availability, and cost, candidate materials were identified which have potential for use in encapsulation systems for low-cost, long-life terrestrial photovoltaic arrays manufactured by automated, high-volume processes. The criteria for consideration of the encapsulation systems were based on the goals for arrays with a lifetime of over 20 years high reliability, an efficiency greater than 10 percent, a total array price less than $500/kW, and a production capacity of 5 x 10/sup 5/ kW/yr. (WDM)

  18. Multi-frequency harmonic arrays: initial experience with a novel transducer concept for nonlinear contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Flemming; Shi, William T; Jadidian, Bahram; Winder, Alan A

    2004-12-01

    Nonlinear contrast imaging modes such as second harmonic imaging (HI) and subharmonic imaging (SHI) are increasingly important for clinical applications. However, the performance of currently available transducers for HI and SHI is significantly constrained by their limited bandwidth. To bypass this constraint, a novel transducer concept termed multi-frequency harmonic transducer arrays (MFHA's) has been designed and a preliminary evaluation has been conducted. The MFHA may ultimately be used for broadband contrast enhanced HI and SHI with high dynamic range and consists of three multi-element piezo-composite sub-arrays (A-C) constructed so the center frequencies are 4f(A) = 2f(B) = f(C) (specifically 2.5/5.0/10.0 MHz and 1.75/3.5/7.0 MHz). In principle this enables SHI by transmitting on sub-array C receiving on B and, similarly, from B to A as well as HI by transmitting on A receiving on B and, likewise, from B to C. Initially transmit and receive pressure levels of the arrays were measured with the elements of each sub-array wired in parallel. Following contrast administration, preliminary in vitro HI and SHI signal-to-noise ratios of up to 40 dB were obtained. In conclusion, initial design and in vitro characterization of two MFHA's have been performed. They have an overall broad frequency bandwidth of at least two octaves. Due to the special design of the array assembly, the SNR for HI and SHI was comparable to that of regular B-mode and better than commercially available HI systems. However, further research on multi-element MFHA's is required before their potential for in vivo nonlinear contrast imaging can be assessed.

  19. A Fast quarter-pixel motion estimation algorithm for H.264/AVC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A fast quarter-pixel motion estimation algorithm is proposed in this paper. The proposed algorithm based on mathematical models of the motion compensated prediction errors. Unlike conventional quarter-pixel accurate motion estimation algorithm,proposed algorithm can avoid fractional-pixel interpolation and subsequent fractional-pixel search after integer-precision motion estimation. Experiments show that the proposed algorithm greatly reduces the computational complexity of quarterpixel motion estimation, while keeping the nearly equal quality of the image.

  20. Intracranial Dual-Mode IVUS and Hyperthermia Using Circular Arrays: Preliminary Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Vivek; Light, Edward; Herickhoff, Carl; Grant, Gerald; Britz, Gavin; Wilson, Christy; Palmeri, Mark; Smith, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using 3.5-Fr (3 Fr = 1 mm) circular phased-array intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) catheters for minimally invasive, image-guided hyperthermia treatment of tumors in the brain. Feasibility was demonstrated in two ways: (1) by inserting a 3.5-Fr IVUS catheter through skull burr holes, for 20 MHz brain imaging in the pig model, and (2) by testing a modified circular array for therapy potential with 18.5-MHz and 9-MHz continuous wave (CW) excitatio...

  1. Applications of pixellated GaAs X-ray detectors in a synchrotron radiation beam

    CERN Document Server

    Watt, J; Campbell, M; Mathieson, K; Mikulec, B; O'Shea, V; Passmore, M S; Schwarz, C; Smith, K M; Whitehill, C

    2001-01-01

    Hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors are being investigated as imaging devices for radiography and synchrotron radiation beam applications. Based on previous work in the CERN RD19 and the UK IMPACT collaborations, a photon counting GaAs pixel detector (PCD) has been used in an X-ray powder diffraction experiment. The device consists of a 200 mu m thick SI-LEC GaAs detector patterned in a 64*64 array of 170 mu m pitch square pixels, bump-bonded to readout electronics operating in single photon counting mode. Intensity peaks in the powder diffraction pattern of KNbO/sub 3/ have been resolved and compared with results using the standard scintillator, and a PCD predecessor (the Omega 3). The PCD shows improved speed, dynamic range, 2-D information and comparable spatial resolution to the standard scintillator based systems. It also overcomes the severe dead time limitations of the Omega 3 by using a shutter based acquisition mode. A brief demonstration of the possibilities of the system for dental radiography and...

  2. Applications of pixellated GaAs X-ray detectors in a synchrotron radiation beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, J. E-mail: j.watt@physics.gla.ac.uk; Bates, R.; Campbell, M.; Mathieson, K.; Mikulec, B.; O' Shea, V.; Passmore, M-S.; Schwarz, C.; Smith, K.M.; Whitehill, C

    2001-03-11

    Hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors are being investigated as imaging devices for radiography and synchrotron radiation beam applications. Based on previous work in the CERN RD19 and the UK IMPACT collaborations, a photon counting GaAs pixel detector (PCD) has been used in an X-ray powder diffraction experiment. The device consists of a 200 {mu}m thick SI-LEC GaAs detector patterned in a 64x64 array of 170 {mu}m pitch square pixels, bump-bonded to readout electronics operating in single photon counting mode. Intensity peaks in the powder diffraction pattern of KNbO{sub 3} have been resolved and compared with results using the standard scintillator, and a PCD predecessor (the {omega}3). The PCD shows improved speed, dynamic range, 2-D information and comparable spatial resolution to the standard scintillator based systems. It also overcomes the severe dead time limitations of the {omega}3 by using a shutter based acquisition mode. A brief demonstration of the possibilities of the system for dental radiography and image processing are given, showing a marked reduction in patient dose and dead time compared with film.

  3. Detailed study of the column-based priority logic readout of Topmetal-II- CMOS pixel direct charge sensor

    CERN Document Server

    An, Mangmang; Gao, Chaosong; Han, Mikyung; Huang, Guangming; Ji, Rong; Li, Xiaoting; Mei, Yuan; Pei, Hua; Sun, Quan; Sun, Xiangming; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Le; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We present the detailed study of the digital readout of Topmetal-II- CMOS pixel direct charge sensor. Topmetal-II- is an integrated sensor with an array of 72X72 pixels each capable of directly collecting external charge through exposed metal electrodes in the topmost metal layer. In addition to the time-shared multiplexing readout of the analog output from Charge Sensitive Amplifiers in each pixel, hits are also generated through comparators with individually DAC settable thresholds in each pixel. The hits are read out via a column-based priority logic structure, retaining both hit location and time information. The in-array column-based priority logic is fully combinational hence there is no clock distributed in the pixel array. Sequential logic and clock are placed on the peripheral of the array. We studied the detailed working behavior and performance of this readout, and demonstrated its potential in imaging applications.

  4. Characterization of the GASP array for quasi-continuum spectroscopy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchan, Edana; Cristancho, Fernando [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia)

    2006-07-15

    The use of sum energy and multiplicity as obtained with the multidetector array GASP is investigated. The analysis focuses on the identification of the spin-energy region from which a given set of {gamma}-cascades originates in a typical fusion-evaporation reaction.

  5. A Center-The Continuous Transverse (CTS) Array: Basic Theory, Experiment, and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    couplers are described. Performance, producibility, and packaging advantages relative to competing technologies are enumerated. Prototype antenna array...procedures and processes. Units can be thermoformed /extruded/injected in a single mioding process, and no additional joining or assentbly is required. Reduced

  6. Cavola experiment site: geophysical investigations and deployment of a dense seismic array on a landslide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Martelli

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical site investigations have been performed in association with deployment of a dense array of 95 3-component seismometers on the Cavola landslide in the Northern Apennines. The aim of the array is to study propagation of seismic waves in the heterogeneous medium through comparison of observation and modelling. The small-aperture array (130 m×56 m operated continuously for three months in 2004. Cavola landslide consists of a clay body sliding over mudstone-shale basement, and has a record of historical activity, including destruction of a small village in 1960. The site investigations include down-hole logging of P- and S-wave travel times at a new borehole drilled within the array, two seismic refraction lines with both P-wave profiling and surface-wave analyses, geo-electrical profiles and seismic noise measurements. From the different approaches a consistent picture of the depths and seismic velocities for the landslide has emerged. Their estimates agree with resonance frequencies of seismic noise, and also with the logged depths to basement of 25 m at a new borehole and of 44 m at a pre-existing borehole. Velocities for S waves increase with depth, from 230 m/s at the surface to 625 m/s in basement immediately below the landslide.

  7. Phased array antenna integrated with a frequency selective surface: Theory and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monni, S.; Llombart Juan, N.; Neto, A.; Gerini, G.

    2003-01-01

    A modeling tool is described to characterize the array antennas integrated with frequency selective surfaces by means of a multimode equivalent network approach applied to infinite periodic structures. The theoretical formulation of the problem is presented in this paper together with the numerical

  8. Monolithic millimeter-wave diode array beam controllers: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, L. B.; Liu, H.-X. L.; Wang, F.; Liu, T.; Wu, W.; Qin, X.-H.; Chung, E.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Maserjian, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the current work, multi-function beam control arrays have been fabricated and have successfully demonstrated amplitude control of transmitted beams in the W and D bands (75-170 GHz). While these arrays are designed to provide beam control under DC bias operation, new designs for high-speed electronic and optical control are under development. These arrays will fill a need for high-speed watt-level beam switches in pulsed reflectometer systems under development for magnetic fusion plasma diagnostics. A second experimental accomplishment of the current work is the demonstration in the 100-170 GHz (D band) frequency range of a new technique for the measurement of the transmission phase as well as amplitude. Transmission data can serve as a means to extract ('de-embed') the grid parameters; phase information provides more complete data to assist in this process. Additional functions of the array beam controller yet to be tested include electronically controlled steering and focusing of a reflected beam. These have application in the areas of millimeter-wave electronic scanning radar and reflectometry, respectively.

  9. Amplitude, phase, location and orientation calibration of an acoustic vector sensor array, part II: Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Wind, J.; Xu, B.; Bree, H.E. de; Druyvesteyn, E.

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic vector sensor array consists of multiple sound pressure microphones and particle velocity sensors. A pressure microphone usually has an omni-directional response, yet a particle velocity sensor is directional and usually has a response pattern as a figure of eight. Currently, acoustic

  10. Amplitude, phase, location and orientation calibration of an acoustic vector sensor array, part II: Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Wind, J.; Xu, B.; Bree, H.E. de; Druyvesteyn, E.

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic vector sensor array consists of multiple sound pressure microphones and particle velocity sensors. A pressure microphone usually has an omni-directional response, yet a particle velocity sensor is directional and usually has a response pattern as a figure of eight. Currently, acoustic ve

  11. Towards third generation pixel readout chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sciveres, M., E-mail: mgarcia-sciveres@lbl.gov; Mekkaoui, A.; Ganani, D.

    2013-12-11

    We present concepts and prototyping results towards a third generation pixel readout chip. We consider the 130 nm feature size FE-I4 chip, in production for the ATLAS IBL upgrade, to be a second generation chip. A third generation chip would have to go significantly further. A possible direction is to make the IC design generic so that different experiments can configure it to meet significantly different requirements, without the need for everybody to develop their own ASIC from the ground up. In terms of target technology, a demonstrator 500-pixel matrix containing analog front ends only (no complex functionality), was designed and fabricated in 65 nm CMOS and irradiated with protons in December 2011 and May 2012.

  12. The TDCpix readout ASIC: A 75ps resolution timing front-end for the NA62 Gigatracker hybrid pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, A; Bonacini, S; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; Morel, M; Noy, M; Perktold, L; Poltorak, K

    2013-01-01

    The TDCpix is a novel pixel readout ASIC for the NA62 Gigatracker detector. NA62 is a new experiment being installed at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. Its Gigatracker detector shall provide on-beam tracking and time stamping of individual particles with a time resolution of 150 ps rms. It will consist of three tracking stations, each with one hybrid pixel sensor. The peak fl ow of particles crossing the detector modules reaches 1.27 MHz/mm 2 for a total rate of about 0.75 GHz. Ten TDCpix chips will be bump-bonded to every silicon pixel sensor. Each chip shall perform time stamping of 100 M particle hits per second with a detection ef fi ciency above 99% and a timing accuracy better than 200 ps rms for an overall three-station-setup time resolution of better than 150 ps. The TDCpix chip has been designed in a 130 nm CMOS technology. It will feature 45 40 square pixels of 300 300 μ m 2 and a complex End of Column peripheral region including an array of TDCs based on DLLs, four high speed serializers, a low...

  13. A 2D 4×4 Channel Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Detectors for Medical Imaging Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Martínez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles

    2015-01-01

    We present a 16-channel readout integrated circuit (ROIC) with nanosecond-resolution time to digital converter (TDC) for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) gamma-ray detectors. The 4 × 4 pixel array ROIC is the proof of concept of the 10 × 10 pixel array readout ASIC for positron-emission tomography (PET) scanner, positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanner, and Compton gamma camera. The electronics of each individual pixel integrates an analog front-end with switchable gain, an analog to dig...

  14. Performance assessment of a compressive sensing single-pixel imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Bosq, Todd W.; Preece, Bradley L.

    2017-04-01

    Conventional sensors measure the light incident at each pixel in a focal plane array. Compressive sensing (CS) involves capturing a smaller number of unconventional measurements from the scene, and then using a companion process to recover the image. CS has the potential to acquire imagery with equivalent information content to a large format array while using smaller, cheaper, and lower bandwidth components. However, the benefits of CS do not come without compromise. The CS architecture chosen must effectively balance between physical considerations, reconstruction accuracy, and reconstruction speed to meet operational requirements. Performance modeling of CS imagers is challenging due to the complexity and nonlinearity of the system and reconstruction algorithm. To properly assess the value of such systems, it is necessary to fully characterize the image quality, including artifacts and sensitivity to noise. Imagery of a two-handheld object target set was collected using an shortwave infrared single-pixel CS camera for various ranges and number of processed measurements. Human perception experiments were performed to determine the identification performance within the trade space. The performance of the nonlinear CS camera was modeled by mapping the nonlinear degradations to an equivalent linear shift invariant model. Finally, the limitations of CS modeling techniques are discussed.

  15. The tissue micro-array data exchange specification: a web based experience browsing imported data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayers Leona W

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The AIDS and Cancer Specimen Resource (ACSR is an HIV/AIDS tissue bank consortium sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD. The ACSR offers to approved researchers HIV infected biologic samples and uninfected control tissues including tissue cores in micro-arrays (TMA accompanied by de-identified clinical data. Researchers interested in the type and quality of TMA tissue cores and the associated clinical data need an efficient method for viewing available TMA materials. Because each of the tissue samples within a TMA has separate data including a core tissue digital image and clinical data, an organized, standard approach to producing, navigating and publishing such data is necessary. The Association for Pathology Informatics (API extensible mark-up language (XML TMA data exchange specification (TMA DES proposed in April 2003 provides a common format for TMA data. Exporting TMA data into the proposed format offers an opportunity to implement the API TMA DES. Using our public BrowseTMA tool, we created a web site that organizes and cross references TMA lists, digital "virtual slide" images, TMA DES export data, linked legends and clinical details for researchers. Microsoft Excel® and Microsoft Word® are used to convert tabular clinical data and produce an XML file in the TMA DES format. The BrowseTMA tool contains Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT scripts that convert XML data into Hyper-Text Mark-up Language (HTML web pages with hyperlinks automatically added to allow rapid navigation. Results Block lists, virtual slide images, legends, clinical details and exports have been placed on the ACSR web site for 14 blocks with 1623 cores of 2.0, 1.0 and 0.6 mm sizes. Our virtual microscope can be used to view and annotate these TMA images. Researchers can readily navigate from TMA block lists to TMA legends and to clinical details for a selected tissue core

  16. FPIX2, the BTeV pixel readout chip

    CERN Document Server

    Christian, D C; Chiodini, G; Hoff, J; Kwan, S; Mekkaoui, A; Yarema, R; 10.1016/j.nima.2005.04.046

    2005-01-01

    A radiation tolerant pixel readout chip, FPIX2, has been developed at Fermilab for use by BTeV. Some of the requirements of the BTeV pixel readout chip are reviewed and contrasted with requirements for similar devices in LHC experiments. A description of the FPIX2 is given, and results of initial tests of its performance are presented, as is a summary of measurements planned for the coming year.

  17. Calibration of the Neutral Current Detection Array in the SNO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, G.A. [University of Washington, Seattle, US (United States); Cleveland, B.T. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Di Marco, M. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); present address: University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Evans, H.C.; Guillian, E.; Hallin, A.L. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); Huang, M. [University of Texas, Austin (United States); Howard, C. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); Jelley, N.A. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Law, J. [University of Guelph, Guelph (Canada); Loach, J.C. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley (United States); O' Keeffe, H.M. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); McGee, S. [present address: University of Geneva, Geneva, Switserland (Switzerland); Peeters, S.J.M., E-mail: s.peeters1@physics.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Prior, G. [University of Texas, Austin (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley (United States); Rielage, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States); Reitzner, D. [University of Guelph, Guelph (Canada); Skensved, P. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); and others

    2011-12-15

    Since November 25th, 2004, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has been taking production data in its third and final phase. For this phase a 'Neutral-Current Detection (NCD) Array', consisting of 36 strings of {sup 3}He proportional counters and 4 strings of {sup 4}He proportional counters, was deployed in SNO's D{sub 2}O volume. It supplements the Cherenkov detector, consisting of 9456 photomultiplier tubes, present in the previous two phases by offering an independent measurement of the solar neutral current rate. The {sup 3}He counters detect neutrons from neutrino-deuteron neutral current interactions in the D{sub 2}O. We describe the calibration of this array.

  18. A 1,000 Frames/s Programmable Vision Chip with Variable Resolution and Row-Pixel-Mixed Parallel Image Processors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjian Wu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A programmable vision chip with variable resolution and row-pixel-mixed parallel image processors is presented. The chip consists of a CMOS sensor array, with row-parallel 6-bit Algorithmic ADCs, row-parallel gray-scale image processors, pixel-parallel SIMD Processing Element (PE array, and instruction controller. The resolution of the image in the chip is variable: high resolution for a focused area and low resolution for general view. It implements gray-scale and binary mathematical morphology algorithms in series to carry out low-level and mid-level image processing and sends out features of the image for various applications. It can perform image processing at over 1,000 frames/s (fps. A prototype chip with 64 × 64 pixels resolution and 6-bit gray-scale image is fabricated in 0.18 mm Standard CMOS process. The area size of chip is 1.5 mm × 3.5 mm. Each pixel size is 9.5 μm × 9.5 μm and each processing element size is 23 μm × 29 μm. The experiment results demonstrate that the chip can perform low-level and mid-level image processing and it can be applied in the real-time vision applications, such as high speed target tracking.

  19. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-15

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2}, which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10{sup 15} particles per cm{sup 2}.

  20. From Single Pixels to Many Megapixels: Progress in Astronomical Infrared Imaging from Space-borne Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipher, Judith

    2017-01-01

    In the 1960s, rocket infrared astronomy was in its infancy. The Cornell group planned a succession of rocket launches of a small cryogenically cooled telescope above much of the atmosphere. Cornell graduate students were tasked with hand-making single pixel detectors for the focal plane at wavelengths ranging from ~5 microns to just short of 1 mm. “Images” could only be constructed from scans of objects such as HII regions/giant molecular clouds, the galactic center, and of diffuse radiation from the various IR backgrounds. IRAS and COBE, followed by the KAO utilized ever more sensitive single IR detectors, and revolutionized our understanding of the Universe. The first IR arrays came onto the scene in the early 1970s - and in 1983 several experiments for the space mission SIRTF (later named Spitzer Space Telescope following launch 20 years later) were selected, all boasting (relatively small) arrays. Europe’s ISO and Herschel also employed arrays to good advantage, as has SOFIA, and now, many-megapixel IR arrays are sufficiently well-developed for upcoming space missions.

  1. Characterization of the CMS Pixel Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Weihua

    2002-01-01

    In 2005 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will start the pp collisions at a high luminosity and at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV. The primary goal of the experimental programme is the search of the Higgs boson(s) and the supersymmetric particles. The programme is also proposed to detect a range of diverse signatures in order to provide guidance for future physics. The pixel detector system makes up the innermost part of the CMS experiment, which is one of the two general purpose detectors at the LHC. The main tasks of the system are vertex detection and flavor tagging. The high luminosity and the high particle multiplicity as well as the small bunch spacing at the LHC impose great challenges on the pixel detectors: radiation hardness of sensors and electronics, fast signal processing and a high granularity are the essential requirements. This thesis concentrates on the study of the suitability of two test stands, which are implemented to characterize the CMS pixel detectors: one is con-cerned with test puls...

  2. High throughput optoelectronic smart pixel systems using diffractive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hao

    1999-12-01

    Recent developments in digital video, multimedia technology and data networks have greatly increased the demand for high bandwidth communication channels and high throughput data processing. Electronics is particularly suited for switching, amplification and logic functions, while optics is more suitable for interconnections and communications with lower energy and crosstalk. In this research, we present the design, testing, integration and demonstration of several optoelectronic smart pixel devices and system architectures. These systems integrate electronic switching/processing capability with parallel optical interconnections to provide high throughput network communication and pipeline data processing. The Smart Pixel Array Cellular Logic processor (SPARCL) is designed in 0.8 m m CMOS and hybrid integrated with Multiple-Quantum-Well (MQW) devices for pipeline image processing. The Smart Pixel Network Interface (SAPIENT) is designed in 0.6 m m GaAs and monolithically integrated with LEDs to implement a highly parallel optical interconnection network. The Translucent Smart Pixel Array (TRANSPAR) design is implemented in two different versions. The first version, TRANSPAR-MQW, is designed in 0.5 m m CMOS and flip-chip integrated with MQW devices to provide 2-D pipeline processing and translucent networking using the Carrier- Sense-MultipleAccess/Collision-Detection (CSMA/CD) protocol. The other version, TRANSPAR-VM, is designed in 1.2 m m CMOS and discretely integrated with VCSEL-MSM (Vertical-Cavity-Surface- Emitting-Laser and Metal-Semiconductor-Metal detectors) chips and driver/receiver chips on a printed circuit board. The TRANSPAR-VM provides an option of using the token ring network protocol in addition to the embedded functions of TRANSPAR-MQW. These optoelectronic smart pixel systems also require micro-optics devices to provide high resolution, high quality optical interconnections and external source arrays. In this research, we describe an innovative

  3. The Belle II DEPFET pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Hans-Günther, E-mail: moser@mpp.mpg.de

    2016-09-21

    The Belle II experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) will explore heavy flavour physics (B, charm and tau) at the starting of 2018 with unprecedented precision. Charged particles are tracked by a two-layer DEPFET pixel device (PXD), a four-layer silicon strip detector (SVD) and the central drift chamber (CDC). The PXD will consist of two layers at radii of 14 mm and 22 mm with 8 and 12 ladders, respectively. The pixel sizes will vary, between 50 μm×(55–60) μm in the first layer and between 50 μm×(70–85) μm in the second layer, to optimize the charge sharing efficiency. These innermost layers have to cope with high background occupancy, high radiation and must have minimal material to reduce multiple scattering. These challenges are met using the DEPFET technology. Each pixel is a FET integrated on a fully depleted silicon bulk. The signal charge collected in the ‘internal gate’ modulates the FET current resulting in a first stage amplification and therefore very low noise. This allows very thin sensors (75 μm) reducing the overall material budget of the detector (0.21% X{sub 0}). Four fold multiplexing of the column parallel readout allows read out a full frame of the pixel matrix in only 20 μs while keeping the power consumption low enough for air cooling. Only the active electronics outside the detector acceptance has to be cooled actively with a two phase CO{sub 2} system. Furthermore the DEPFET technology offers the unique feature of an electronic shutter which allows the detector to operate efficiently in the continuous injection mode of superKEKB.

  4. The Belle II DEPFET pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Hans-Günther

    2016-09-01

    The Belle II experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) will explore heavy flavour physics (B, charm and tau) at the starting of 2018 with unprecedented precision. Charged particles are tracked by a two-layer DEPFET pixel device (PXD), a four-layer silicon strip detector (SVD) and the central drift chamber (CDC). The PXD will consist of two layers at radii of 14 mm and 22 mm with 8 and 12 ladders, respectively. The pixel sizes will vary, between 50 μm×(55-60) μm in the first layer and between 50 μm×(70-85) μm in the second layer, to optimize the charge sharing efficiency. These innermost layers have to cope with high background occupancy, high radiation and must have minimal material to reduce multiple scattering. These challenges are met using the DEPFET technology. Each pixel is a FET integrated on a fully depleted silicon bulk. The signal charge collected in the 'internal gate' modulates the FET current resulting in a first stage amplification and therefore very low noise. This allows very thin sensors (75 μm) reducing the overall material budget of the detector (0.21% X0). Four fold multiplexing of the column parallel readout allows read out a full frame of the pixel matrix in only 20 μs while keeping the power consumption low enough for air cooling. Only the active electronics outside the detector acceptance has to be cooled actively with a two phase CO2 system. Furthermore the DEPFET technology offers the unique feature of an electronic shutter which allows the detector to operate efficiently in the continuous injection mode of superKEKB.

  5. The Energy Spectrum of Telescope Array's Middle Drum Detector and the Direct Comparison to the High Resolution Fly's Eye Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array's Middle Drum fluorescence detector was instrumented with telescopes refurbished from the High Resolution Fly's Eye's HiRes-1 site. The data observed by Middle Drum in monocular mode was analyzed via the HiRes-1 profile-constrained geometry reconstruction technique and utilized the same calibration techniques enabling a direct comparison of the energy spectra and energy scales between the two experiments. The spectrum measured using the Middle Drum telescopes is based on a three-year exposure collected between December 16, 2007 and December 16, 2010. The calculated difference between the spectrum of the Middle Drum observations and the published spectrum obtained by the data collected by the HiRes-1 site allows the HiRes-1 energy scale to be transferred to Middle Drum. The HiRes energy scale is applied to the entire Telescope Array by making a comparison between Middle Drum monocular events and hybrid events that triggered both Middle Drum and the Telescope Array's scintillator Ground Arra...

  6. Initial Operative Experience and Short-term Hearing Preservation Results With a Mid-scala Cochlear Implant Electrode Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svrakic, Maja; Roland, J Thomas; McMenomey, Sean O; Svirsky, Mario A

    2016-12-01

    To describe our initial operative experience and hearing preservation results with the Advanced Bionics (AB) Mid Scala Electrode (MSE). Retrospective review. Tertiary referral center. Sixty-three MSE implants in pediatric and adult patients were compared with age- and sex-matched 1j electrode implants from the same manufacturer. All patients were severe to profoundly deaf. Cochlear implantation with either the AB 1j electrode or the AB MSE. The MSE and 1j electrodes were compared in their angular depth of insertion and pre to postoperative change in hearing thresholds. Hearing preservation was analyzed as a function of angular depth of insertion. Secondary outcome measures included operative time, incidence of abnormal intraoperative impedance and telemetry values, and incidence of postsurgical complications. Depth of insertion was similar for both electrodes, but was more consistent for the MSE array and more variable for the 1j array. Patients with MSE electrodes had better hearing preservation. Thresholds shifts at four audiometric frequencies ranging from 250 to 2000 Hz were 10, 7, 2, and 6 dB smaller for the MSE electrode than for the 1j (p Hearing preservation at low frequencies was worse with deeper insertion, regardless of array. Secondary outcome measures were similar for both electrodes. The MSE electrode resulted in more consistent insertion depth and somewhat better hearing preservation than the 1j electrode. Differences in other surgical outcome measures were small or unlikely to have a meaningful effect.

  7. The Mass Composition of Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays Measured by New Fluorescence Detectors in the Telescope Array Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshihiro

    The longitudinal development of an extensive air shower reaches its maximum at a depth, Xmax, that depends on the species of the primary cosmic ray. Using a technique based on Xmax, we measure the cosmic-ray mass composition from analyses of 3.7 years of monocular mode operations with the newly constructed fluorescence detectors of the Telescope Array experiment. The Xmax analysis shows our data to be consistent with a proton dominant composition at energies above 1018.0 eV.

  8. The atmospheric transparency measured with a LIDAR system at the Telescope Array experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tomida, Takayuki; Arai, Takahito; Benno, Takuya; Chikawa, Michiyuki; Doura, Koji; Fukushima, Masaki; Hiyama, Kazunori; Honda, Ken; Ikeda, Daisuke; Matthews, John N; Nakamura, Toru; Oku, Daisuke; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Tokuno, Hisao; Tameda, Yuichiro; Thomson, Gordon B; Tsunesada, Yoshiki; Udo, Shigeharu; Ukai, Hisashi; 10.1016/j.nima.2011.07.012

    2011-01-01

    An atmospheric transparency was measured using a LIDAR with a pulsed UV laser (355nm) at the observation site of Telescope Array in Utah, USA. The measurement at night for two years in $2007\\sim 2009$ revealed that the extinction coefficient by aerosol at the ground level is $0.033^{+0.016}_{-0.012} \\rm km^{-1}$ and the vertical aerosol optical depth at 5km above the ground is $0.035^{+0.019}_{-0.013}$. A model of the altitudinal aerosol distribution was built based on these measurements for the analysis of atmospheric attenuation of the fluorescence light generated by ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  9. Experiment on fluidelastic instability of loosely supported tube arrays in crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.

    1994-06-01

    A tube array supported by baffle plates in crossflow may be subjected to fluidelastic instability in the tube-support-plate-inactive mode. An experimental study is presented to characterize the tube motion. Three series of tests were performed to measure tube displacements as a function of flow velocity for different clearances. The motion was examined by root-mean-square values of tube displacements, power spectral densities, phase planes, Poincare maps, and Lyapunov exponents. The experimental data agree reasonably well with the analytical model, based on the unsteady flow theory.

  10. Experiment on fluidelastic instability of loosely supported tube arrays in crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.

    1993-06-01

    A tube array supported by baffle plates in crossflow may be subjected to fluidelastic instability in the tube-support-plate-inactive mode. An experimental study is presented to characterize the tube motion. Three series of tests were performed to measure tube displacements as a function of flow velocity for different clearances. The motion was examined by root-mean-square values of tube displacements, power spectral densities, phase planes, Poincare maps, and Lyapunov exponents. The experimental data agree reasonably well with the analytical model, based on the unsteady flow theory.

  11. Performance of silicon pixel detectors at small track incidence angles

    CERN Document Server

    Viel, Simon; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In order to enable the ATLAS experiment to successfully track charged particles produced in high-energy collisions at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, the current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced by the Inner Tracker (ITk), entirely composed of silicon pixel and strip detectors. An extension of the tracking coverage of ITk to very forward pseudorapidity values is proposed, using pixel modules placed in a long cylindrical layer around the beam pipe. The measurement of long pixel clusters, detected when charged particles cross the silicon sensor at small incidence angles, has potential to significantly improve the tracking efficiency, fake track rejection, and resolution of ITk in the very forward region. The performance of state-of-the-art pixel modules at small track incidence angles is studied using test beam data collected at SLAC and CERN, as well as simulated data.

  12. A CMOS active pixel sensor for retinal stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prydderch, Mark L.; French, Marcus J.; Mathieson, Keith; Adams, Christopher; Gunning, Deborah; Laudanski, Jonathan; Morrison, James D.; Moodie, Alan R.; Sinclair, James

    2006-02-01

    Degenerative photoreceptor diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, are the most common causes of blindness in the western world. A potential cure is to use a microelectronic retinal prosthesis to provide electrical stimulation to the remaining healthy retinal cells. We describe a prototype CMOS Active Pixel Sensor capable of detecting a visual scene and translating it into a train of electrical pulses for stimulation of the retina. The sensor consists of a 10 x 10 array of 100 micron square pixels fabricated on a 0.35 micron CMOS process. Light incident upon each pixel is converted into output current pulse trains with a frequency related to the light intensity. These outputs are connected to a biocompatible microelectrode array for contact to the retinal cells. The flexible design allows experimentation with signal amplitudes and frequencies in order to determine the most appropriate stimulus for the retina. Neural processing in the retina can be studied by using the sensor in conjunction with a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) programmed to behave as a neural network. The sensor has been integrated into a test system designed for studying retinal response. We present the most recent results obtained from this sensor.

  13. Intracranial dual-mode IVUS and hyperthermia using circular arrays: preliminary experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vivek; Light, Edward; Herickhoff, Carl; Grant, Gerald; Britz, Gavin; Wilson, Christy; Palmeri, Mark; Smith, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using 3.5-Fr (3 Fr = 1 mm) circular phased-array intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) catheters for minimally invasive, image-guided hyperthermia treatment of tumors in the brain. Feasibility was demonstrated in two ways: (1) by inserting a 3.5-Fr IVUS catheter through skull burr holes, for 20 MHz brain imaging in the pig model, and (2) by testing a modified circular array for therapy potential with 18.5-MHz and 9-MHz continuous wave (CW) excitation. The imaging transducer's performance was superior to our previous 9-MHz mechanical IVUS prototype. The therapy catheter transducer was driven by CW electrical power at 18.5 MHz, achieving temperature changes reaching +8°C at a depth of 2 mm in a human glioblastoma grown on the flank of a mouse with minimal transducer resistive heating of +2°C. Further hyperthermia trials showed that 9-MHz CW excitation produced temperature changes of +4.5°C at a depth of 12 mm-a sufficient temperature rise for our long-term goal of targeted, controlled drug release via thermosensitive liposomes for therapeutic treatment of 1-cm-diameter glioblastomas.

  14. Real-time 3D display system based on computer-generated integral imaging technique using enhanced ISPP for hexagonal lens array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyeong; Erdenebat, Munkh-Uchral; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Jeong, Ji-Seong; Lee, Jae-Won; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Nam; Yoo, Kwan-Hee

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes an open computer language (OpenCL) parallel processing method to generate the elemental image arrays (EIAs) for hexagonal lens array from a three-dimensional (3D) object such as a volume data. Hexagonal lens array has a higher fill factor compared to the rectangular lens array case; however, each pixel of an elemental image should be determined to belong to the single hexagonal lens. Therefore, generation for the entire EIA requires very large computations. The proposed method reduces processing time for the EIAs for a given hexagonal lens array. By using the proposed image space parallel processing (ISPP) method, it can enhance the processing speed that generates the 3D display of real-time interactive integral imaging for hexagonal lens array. In our experiment, we implemented the EIAs for hexagonal lens array in real-time and obtained a good processing time for a large of volume data for multiple cases of lens arrays.

  15. WFC3 Pixel Area Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalirai, J. S.; Cox, C.; Dressel, L.; Fruchter, A.; Hack, W.; Kozhurina-Platais, V.; Mack, J.

    2010-04-01

    We present the pixel area maps (PAMs) for the WFC3/UVIS and WFC3/IR detectors, and discuss the normalization of these images. HST processed flt images suffer from geometric distortion and therefore have pixel areas that vary on the sky. The counts (electrons) measured for a source on these images depends on the position of the source on the detector, an effect that is implicitly corrected when these images are multidrizzled into drz files. The flt images can be multiplied by the PAMs to yield correct and uniform counts for a given source irrespective of its location on the image. To ensure consistency between the count rate measured for sources in drz images and near the center of flt images, we set the normalization of the PAMs to unity at a reference pixel near the center of the UVIS mosaic and IR detector, and set the SCALE in the IDCTAB equal to the square root of the area of this reference pixel. The implications of this choice for photometric measurements are discussed.

  16. VNR CMS Pixel detector replacement

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Joel Butler, spokesperson of the CMS collaboration explains how a team from many different partner institutes installed a new detector in CMS. This detector is the silicon pixel detector and they’ve been working on it for about five years, to replace one of our existing detectors. This detectors measures particles closer to the beam than any of the other components of this huge detector behind me. It gives us the most precise picture of tracks as they come out of the collisions and expand and travel through the detector. This particular device has twice as many pixels, 120 million, as opposed to about 68 million in the old detector and it can take data faster and pump it out to the analysis more quickly. 00’53’’ Images of the descent, insertion and installation of first piece of the Pixel detector on Tue Feb 28. Images of the descent, insertion and installation of second piece of the Pixel and the two cylinders being joined.

  17. Optimizing and Improving the Growth Quality of ZnO Nanowire Arrays Guided by Statistical Design of Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng; Adiga, Nagesh; Ba, Shan; Dasgupta, Tirthankar; Wu, C F Jeff; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2009-07-28

    Controlling the morphology of the as-synthesized nanostructures is usually challenging, and there lacks of a general theoretical guidance in experimental approach. In this study, a novel way of optimizing the aspect ratio of hydrothermally grown ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays is presented by utilizing a systematic statistical design and analysis method. In this work, we use pick-the-winner rule and one-pair-at-a-time main effect analysis to sequentially design the experiments and identify optimal reaction settings. By controlling the hydrothermal reaction parameters (reaction temperature, time, precursor concentration, and capping agent), we improved the aspect ratio of ZnO NWs from around 10 to nearly 23. The effect of noise on the experimental results was identified and successfully reduced, and the statistical design and analysis methods were very effective in reducing the number of experiments performed and in identifying the optimal experimental settings. In addition, the antireflection spectrum of the as-synthesized ZnO NWs clearly shows that higher aspect ratio of the ZnO NW arrays leads to about 30% stronger suppression in the UV-vis range emission. This shows great potential applications as antireflective coating layers in photovoltaic devices.

  18. The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum Observed with the Surface Detector of the Telescope Array Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zhou, X; Zollinger, R R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) collaboration has measured the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays for energies above 1.6x10^(18) eV in its first three years of operation. The spectrum shows a dip at an energy of 5x10^(18) eV and a steepening at 5x10^(19) eV which is consistent with the expectation from the GZK cutoff. Here we use a new technique that involves generating a complete simulation of the TA surface detector. The procedure starts with shower simulations using the CORSIKA Monte Carlo program where we have solved the problems caused by use of the "thinning" approximation. This simulation method allows us to make an accurate calculation of the acceptance of the detector for the energies concerned.

  19. Construction and testing of a pixellated CZT detector and shield for a hard x-ray astronomy balloon flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Narita, Tomohiko; Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2000-12-01

    We report on the construction and laboratory testing of pixellated CZT detectors mounted in a flip-chip, tiled fashion and read out by an ASIC, as required for proposed hard X-ray astronomy missions. Two 10 mm X 10 mm X 5 mm detectors were fabricated, one out of standard eV Products high-pressure Bridgman CZT and one out of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT. Each was fashioned with a 4 X 4 array of gold pixels on 2.5 mm pitch with a surrounding guard ring. The detectors were mounted side by side on a carrier card, such that the pixel pitch was preserved, and read out by a 32-channel VA-TA ASIC from IDE AS Corp. controlled by a PC/104 single-board computer. A passive shield/collimator surrounded by plastic scintillator encloses the detectors on five sides and provides an approximately 40 degree field of view. Thus this experiment tests key techniques required for future hard X-ray survey instruments. The experiment was taken to Ft. Sumner, NM in May 2000 in preparation for a scientific balloon flight aboard the joint Harvard-MSFC EXITE2/HERO payload. Although we did not receive a flight opportunity, and are currently scheduled to fly in September 2000, we present our calibration data in the flight configuration together with data analysis techniques and simulations of the expected flight background spectrum.

  20. Construction and Testing of a Pixellated CZT Detector and Shield for a Hard X-ray Astronomy Balloon Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; Jenkins, J A; Grindlay, J E

    2000-01-01

    We report on the construction and laboratory testing of pixellated CZT detectors mounted in a flip-chip, tiled fashion and read out by an ASIC, as required for proposed hard X-ray astronomy missions. Two 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm detectors were fabricated, one out of standard eV Products high-pressure Bridgman CZT and one out of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT. Each was fashioned with a 4 x 4 array of gold pixels on a 2.5 mm pitch with a surrounding guard ring. The detectors were mounted side by side on a carrier card, such that the pixel pitch was preserved, and read out by a 32-channel VA-TA ASIC from IDE AS Corp. controlled by a PC/104 single-board computer. A passive shield/collimator surrounded by plastic scintillator encloses the detectors on five sides and provides a ~40deg field of view. Thus this experiment tests key techniques required for future hard X-ray survey instruments. The experiment was taken to Ft Sumner, NM in May 2000 in preparation for a scientific balloon flight aboard the joint Harvard-MSFC...

  1. Waveguide piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer array for short-range pulse-echo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Tang, H.; Wang, Q.; Fung, S.; Tsai, J. M.; Daneman, M.; Boser, B. E.; Horsley, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an 8 × 24 element, 100 μm-pitch, 20 MHz ultrasound imager based on a piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer (PMUT) array having integrated acoustic waveguides. The 70 μm diameter, 220 μm long waveguides function both to direct acoustic waves and to confine acoustic energy, and also to provide mechanical protection for the PMUT array used for surface-imaging applications such as an ultrasonic fingerprint sensor. The imager consists of a PMUT array bonded with a CMOS ASIC using wafer-level conductive eutectic bonding. This construction allows each PMUT in the array to have a dedicated front-end receive amplifier, which together with on-chip analog multiplexing enables individual pixel read-out with high signal-to-noise ratio through minimized parasitic capacitance between the PMUT and the front-end amplifier. Finite element method simulations demonstrate that the waveguides preserve the pressure amplitude of acoustic pulses over distances of 600 μm. Moreover, the waveguide design demonstrated here enables pixel-by-pixel readout of the ultrasound image due to improved directivity of the PMUT by directing acoustic waves and creating a pressure field with greater spatial uniformity at the end of the waveguide. Pulse-echo imaging experiments conducted using a one-dimensional steel grating demonstrate the array's ability to form a two-dimensional image of a target.

  2. Status of the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Saavedra Aldo, F

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is currently being constructed and will be installed in 2006 to be ready for commissioning at the Large Hadron Collider. The complete pixel detector is composed of three concentric barrels and six disks that are populated by 1744 ATLAS Pixel modules. The main components of the pixel module are the readout electronics and the silicon sensor whose active region is instrumented with rectangular pixels. The module has been designed to be able to survive 10 years of operation within the ATLAS detector. A brief description of the pixel detector will be presented with results and problems encountered during the production stage.

  3. Three Generations of FPGA DAQ Development for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091916; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hauck, Scott Alan

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) tracks a schedule of long physics runs, followed by periods of inactivity known as Long Shutdowns (LS). During these LS phases both the LHC, and the experiments around its ring, undergo maintenance and upgrades. For the LHC these upgrades improve their ability to create data for physicists; the more data the LHC can create the more opportunities there are for rare events to appear that physicists will be interested in. The experiments upgrade so they can record the data and ensure the event won’t be missed. Currently the LHC is in Run 2 having completed the first LS of three. This thesis focuses on the development of Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-based readout systems that span across three major tasks of the ATLAS Pixel data acquisition (DAQ) system. The evolution of Pixel DAQ’s Readout Driver (ROD) card is presented. Starting from improvements made to the new Insertable B-Layer (IBL) ROD design, which was part of t...

  4. A New Pixels Flipping Method for Huge Watermarking Capacity of the Invoice Font Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Invoice printing just has two-color printing, so invoice font image can be seen as binary image. To embed watermarks into invoice image, the pixels need to be flipped. The more huge the watermark is, the more the pixels need to be flipped. We proposed a new pixels flipping method in invoice image for huge watermarking capacity. The pixels flipping method includes one novel interpolation method for binary image, one flippable pixels evaluation mechanism, and one denoising method based on gravity center and chaos degree. The proposed interpolation method ensures that the invoice image keeps features well after scaling. The flippable pixels evaluation mechanism ensures that the pixels keep better connectivity and smoothness and the pattern has highest structural similarity after flipping. The proposed denoising method makes invoice font image smoother and fiter for human vision. Experiments show that the proposed flipping method not only keeps the invoice font structure well but also improves watermarking capacity.

  5. A new pixels flipping method for huge watermarking capacity of the invoice font image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Hou, Qingzheng; Lu, Jianfeng; Xu, Qishuai; Dai, Junping; Mao, Xiaoyang; Chang, Chin-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Invoice printing just has two-color printing, so invoice font image can be seen as binary image. To embed watermarks into invoice image, the pixels need to be flipped. The more huge the watermark is, the more the pixels need to be flipped. We proposed a new pixels flipping method in invoice image for huge watermarking capacity. The pixels flipping method includes one novel interpolation method for binary image, one flippable pixels evaluation mechanism, and one denoising method based on gravity center and chaos degree. The proposed interpolation method ensures that the invoice image keeps features well after scaling. The flippable pixels evaluation mechanism ensures that the pixels keep better connectivity and smoothness and the pattern has highest structural similarity after flipping. The proposed denoising method makes invoice font image smoother and fiter for human vision. Experiments show that the proposed flipping method not only keeps the invoice font structure well but also improves watermarking capacity.

  6. Design optimization of pixel sensors using device simulations for the phase-II CMS tracker upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, G., E-mail: geetikajain.hep@gmail.com [CDRST, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R. [CDRST, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Eber, R. [Institute fur Experimentelle Kernphysik (Germany); Eichorn, T. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (Germany); Fernandez, M. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (Spain); Lalwani, K. [CDRST, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Messineo, A. [Universita di Pisa & INFN sez. di Pisa (Italy); Palomo, F.R. [Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Peltola, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics (Finland); Printz, M. [Institute fur Experimentelle Kernphysik (Germany); Ranjan, K. [CDRST, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Villa, I. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (Spain); Hidalgo, S. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (Spain)

    2016-07-11

    In order to address the problems caused by the harsh radiation environment during the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), all silicon tracking detectors (pixels and strips) in the CMS experiment will undergo an upgrade. And so to develop radiation hard pixel sensors, simulations have been performed using the 2D TCAD device simulator, SILVACO, to obtain design parameters. The effect of various design parameters like pixel size, pixel depth, implant width, metal overhang, p-stop concentration, p-stop depth and bulk doping density on the leakage current and critical electric field are studied for both non-irradiated as well as irradiated pixel sensors. These 2D simulation results of planar pixels are useful for providing insight into the behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated silicon pixel sensors and further work on 3D simulation is underway.

  7. Level-1 pixel based tracking trigger algorithm for LHC upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, C.-S.; Savoy-Navarro, A.

    2015-10-01

    The Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the tracking system of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . It precisely determines the interaction point (primary vertex) of the events and the possible secondary vertexes due to heavy flavours (b and c quarks); it is part of the overall tracking system that allows reconstructing the tracks of the charged particles in the events and combined with the magnetic field to measure their momentum. The pixel detector allows measuring the tracks in the region closest to the interaction point. The Level-1 (real-time) pixel based tracking trigger is a novel trigger system that is currently being studied for the LHC upgrade. An important goal is developing real-time track reconstruction algorithms able to cope with very high rates and high flux of data in a very harsh environment. The pixel detector has an especially crucial role in precisely identifying the primary vertex of the rare physics events from the large pile-up (PU) of events. The goal of adding the pixel information already at the real-time level of the selection is to help reducing the total level-1 trigger rate while keeping an high selection capability. This is quite an innovative and challenging objective for the experiments upgrade for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) . The special case here addressed is the CMS experiment. This document describes exercises focusing on the development of a fast pixel track reconstruction where the pixel track matches with a Level-1 electron object using a ROOT-based simulation framework.

  8. Fabrication of Pop-up Detector Arrays on Si Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mary J.; Allen, Christine A.; Gordon, Scott A.; Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Mott, David B.; Stahle, Caroline K.; Wang, Liqin L.

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity is a basic requirement for a new generation of thermal detectors. To meet the requirement, close-packed, two-dimensional silicon detector arrays have been developed in NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The goal of the task is to fabricate detector arrays configured with thermal detectors such as infrared bolometers and x-ray calorimeters to use in space fliGht missions. This paper focuses on the fabrication and the mechanical testing of detector arrays in a 0.2 mm pixel size, the smallest pop-up detectors being developed so far. These array structures, nicknamed "PUDS" for "Pop-Up Detectors", are fabricated on I pm thick, single-crystal, silicon membranes. Their designs have been refined so we can utilize the flexibility of thin silicon films by actually folding the silicon membranes to 90 degrees in order to obtain close-packed two-dimensional arrays. The PUD elements consist of a detector platform and two legs for mechanical support while also serving as electrical and thermal paths. Torsion bars and cantilevers connecting the detector platform to the legs provide additional flexures for strain relief. Using micro-electromechanical structure (MEMS) fabrication techniques, including photolithography, anisotropic chemical etching, reactive-ion etching, and laser dicing, we have fabricated PLTD detector arrays of fourteen designs with a variation of four parameters including cantilever length, torsion bar length and width, and leg length. Folding tests were conducted to test mechanical stress distribution for the array structures. We obtained folding yields and selected optimum design parameters to reach minimal stress levels. Computer simulation was also employed to verify mechanical behaviors of PUDs in the folding process. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was utilized to examine the flatness of detectors and the alignment of detector pixels in arrays. The fabrication of thermistors and heaters on the pop-up detectors is under way

  9. Development of novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor on for Si drift detectors and detector arrays for X-ray and nuclear physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-01

    A novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor (SBA) has been developed. A single SBA is used for biasing a Si drift detector (SDD) and SDD array. The use of an SBA reduces the biasing current. This paper shows the calculation of the geometry of an SBA and an SDD to get the best drift field in the SDD and SDD array. Prototype SBAs have been fabricated to verify the concept. Electrical measurements on these SBAs are in agreement with the expectations. The new SDD array with an SBA can be used for X-ray detection and in nuclear physics experiments.

  10. Development of novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor on for Si drift detectors and detector arrays for X-ray and nuclear physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng, E-mail: lizheng@xtu.edu.cn [School of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Chen, Wei [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-11-21

    A novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor (SBA) has been developed. A single SBA is used for biasing a Si drift detector (SDD) and SDD array. The use of an SBA reduces the biasing current. This paper shows the calculation of the geometry of an SBA and an SDD to get the best drift field in the SDD and SDD array. Prototype SBAs have been fabricated to verify the concept. Electrical measurements on these SBAs are in agreement with the expectations. The new SDD array with an SBA can be used for X-ray detection and in nuclear physics experiments.

  11. A High-Speed CMOS Image Sensor with Global Electronic Shutter Pixels Using Pinned Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutomi, Keita; Tamura, Toshihiro; Furuta, Masanori; Itoh, Shinya; Kawahito, Shoji

    This paper describes a high-speed CMOS image sensor with a new type of global electronic shutter pixel. A global electronic shutter is necessary for imaging fast-moving objects without motion blur or distortion. The proposed pixel has two potential wells with pinned diode structure for two-stage charge transfer that enables a global electronic shuttering and reset noise canceling. A prototype high-speed image sensor fabricated in 0.18μm standard CMOS image sensor process consists of the proposed pixel array, 12-bit column-parallel cyclic ADC arrays and 192-channel digital outputs. The sensor achieves a good linearity at low-light intensity, demonstrating the perfect charge transfer between two pinned diodes. The input referred noise of the proposed pixel is measured to be 6.3 e-.

  12. Cosmic ray effects in microcalorimeter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahle, C.K. E-mail: cak@lheapop.gsfc.nasa.gov; Boyce, K.R.; Brown, G.V.; Cottam, J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Galeazzi, M.; Kelley, R.L.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F.S.; Szymkowiak, A.E.; Tillotson, W.A

    2004-03-11

    We have identified signals resulting from cosmic rays and environmental gamma rays depositing energy in the pixels and in the silicon frame of the Astro-E2/X-Ray Spectrometer microcalorimeter array. Coincidences between pixels and between the array and an anti-coincidence detector determined the nature of the events. Pulse shapes and amplitudes from the cosmic ray events helped refine the thermal model of the array chip. We discuss how future arrays can be optimized either for the greatest background rejection or for the highest source count rates.

  13. The Phase1 CMS Pixel detector upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul

    2016-01-01

    The pixel detector of the CMS experiment will be replaced in an extended end-of-year shutdown during winter 2016/2017 with an upgraded one able to cope with peak instantaneous luminosities beyond the nominal LHC instantaneous luminosity of $1 \\times 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. Under the conditions expected in the coming years, which will see an increase of a factor two in instantaneous luminosity, the present system would experience a dynamic inefficiency caused mainly by data losses due to buffer overflows. The Phase I upgrade of the CMS pixel detector, described in this paper, will operate at full efficiency at an instantaneous luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, thanks to a new readout chip. The new detector will feature one additional tracking point both in the barrel and in the forward regions, while reducing the material budget as a result of a new CO$_{2}$ cooling system and optimised layout of the services. In this paper, the design and the technological choices of the Phase I detect...

  14. Search for Anisotropy of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays with the Telescope Array Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zhou, X; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    We study the anisotropy of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) events collected by the Telescope Array (TA) detector in the first 40 months of operation. Following earlier studies, we examine event sets with energy thresholds of 10 EeV, 40 EeV, and 57 EeV. We find that the distributions of the events in right ascension and declination are compatible with an isotropic distribution in all three sets. We then compare with previously reported clustering of the UHECR events at small angular scales. No significant clustering is found in the TA data. We then check the events with E>57 EeV for correlations with nearby active galactic nuclei. No significant correlation is found. Finally, we examine all three sets for correlations with the large-scale structure of the Universe. We find that the two higher-energy sets are compatible with both an isotropic distribution and the hypothesis that UHECR sources follow the matter distribution of the Universe (the LSS hypothesis), while the event set with E>10 EeV is compatibl...

  15. Quantum information experiments with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Kevin; Bohnet, Justin; Sawyer, Brian; Britton, Joseph; Wall, Michael; Foss-Feig, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria; Bollinger, John

    2016-05-01

    We summarize recent experimental work with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped 9 Be+ ions stored in a Penning trap. Penning traps utilize static magnetic and electric fields to confine ions, and enable the trapping and laser cooling of ion crystals larger than typically possible in RF ion traps. We work with single-plane ion crystals where the ions form a triangular lattice through minimization of their Coulomb potential energy. The crystals rotate, and we present numerical studies that determine optimal operating parameters for producing low temperature, stable 2-dimensional crystals with Doppler laser cooling and a rotating wall potential. Our qubit is the electron spin-flip transition in the ground state of 9 Be+ and is sensitive to magnetic field fluctuations. Through mitigation of part-per-billion, vibration-induced magnetic field fluctuations we demonstrate T2 coherence times longer than 50 ms. We engineer long-range Ising interactions with spin-dependent optical dipole forces, and summarize recent measurements that characterize the entanglement generated through single-axis twisting. Supported by: JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PHY-1521080, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  16. The ATLAS Silicon Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, M S; Einsweiler, K F; Emes, J; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; McCormack, F; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Andreazza, A; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Klasen, V; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Ockenfels, W; Raith, B; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Musico, P; Osculati, B; Parodi, F; Rossi, L; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J-C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A; Valin, I; Aleppo, M; Caccia, M; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Brandl, A; Gorfine, G; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, SC; Boyd, GR; Skubic, P L; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; D'Auria, S; del Papa, C; Charles, E; Fasching, D; Becks, K H; Lenzen, G; Linder, C

    2001-01-01

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been developed. The design of the sensors is guided by the need to operate them in the severe LHC radiation environment at up to several hundred volts while maintaining a good signal-to-noise ratio, small cell size, and minimal multiple scattering. The ability to be operated under full bias for electrical characterization prior to the attachment of the readout integrated circuit electronics is also desired.

  17. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  18. Compact and multi-view solid state neutral particle analyzer arrays on National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Tritz, K.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Hao, G. Z.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2016-11-01

    A compact and multi-view solid state neutral particle analyzer (SSNPA) diagnostic based on silicon photodiode arrays has been successfully tested on the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade. The SSNPA diagnostic provides spatially, temporally, and pitch-angle resolved measurements of fast-ion distribution by detecting fast neutral flux resulting from the charge exchange (CX) reactions. The system consists of three 16-channel subsystems: t-SSNPA viewing the plasma mid-radius and neutral beam (NB) line #2 tangentially, r-SSNPA viewing the plasma core and NB line #1 radially, and p-SSNPA with no intersection with any NB lines. Due to the setup geometry, the active CX signals of t-SSNPA and r-SSNPA are mainly sensitive to passing and trapped particles, respectively. In addition, both t-SSNPA and r-SSNPA utilize three vertically stacked arrays with different filter thicknesses to obtain coarse energy information. The experimental data show that all channels are operational. The signal to noise ratio is typically larger than 10, and the main noise is x-ray induced signal. The active and passive CX signals are clearly observed on t-SSNPA and r-SSNPA during NB modulation. The SSNPA data also indicate significant losses of passing particles during sawteeth, while trapped particles are weakly affected. Fluctuations up to 120 kHz have been observed on SSNPA, and they are strongly correlated with magnetohydrodynamics instabilities.

  19. Silicon Micromachined Microlens Array for THz Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, IImran; Gill, John J.; Jung-Kubiak, Cecile D.; Llombart, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    5 5 silicon microlens array was developed using a silicon micromachining technique for a silicon-based THz antenna array. The feature of the silicon micromachining technique enables one to microfabricate an unlimited number of microlens arrays at one time with good uniformity on a silicon wafer. This technique will resolve one of the key issues in building a THz camera, which is to integrate antennas in a detector array. The conventional approach of building single-pixel receivers and stacking them to form a multi-pixel receiver is not suited at THz because a single-pixel receiver already has difficulty fitting into mass, volume, and power budgets, especially in space applications. In this proposed technique, one has controllability on both diameter and curvature of a silicon microlens. First of all, the diameter of microlens depends on how thick photoresist one could coat and pattern. So far, the diameter of a 6- mm photoresist microlens with 400 m in height has been successfully microfabricated. Based on current researchers experiences, a diameter larger than 1-cm photoresist microlens array would be feasible. In order to control the curvature of the microlens, the following process variables could be used: 1. Amount of photoresist: It determines the curvature of the photoresist microlens. Since the photoresist lens is transferred onto the silicon substrate, it will directly control the curvature of the silicon microlens. 2. Etching selectivity between photoresist and silicon: The photoresist microlens is formed by thermal reflow. In order to transfer the exact photoresist curvature onto silicon, there needs to be etching selectivity of 1:1 between silicon and photoresist. However, by varying the etching selectivity, one could control the curvature of the silicon microlens. The figure shows the microfabricated silicon microlens 5 x5 array. The diameter of the microlens located in the center is about 2.5 mm. The measured 3-D profile of the microlens surface has a

  20. Terahertz Array Receivers with Integrated Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Llombart, Nuria; Lee, Choonsup; Jung, Cecile; Lin, Robert; Cooper, Ken B.; Reck, Theodore; Siles, Jose; Schlecht, Erich; Peralta, Alessandro; Thomas, Bertrand; Mehdi, Imran

    2011-01-01

    Highly sensitive terahertz heterodyne receivers have been mostly single-pixel. However, now there is a real need of multi-pixel array receivers at these frequencies driven by the science and instrument requirements. In this paper we explore various receiver font-end and antenna architectures for use in multi-pixel integrated arrays at terahertz frequencies. Development of wafer-level integrated terahertz receiver front-end by using advanced semiconductor fabrication technologies has progressed very well over the past few years. Novel stacking of micro-machined silicon wafers which allows for the 3-dimensional integration of various terahertz receiver components in extremely small packages has made it possible to design multi-pixel heterodyne arrays. One of the critical technologies to achieve fully integrated system is the antenna arrays compatible with the receiver array architecture. In this paper we explore different receiver and antenna architectures for multi-pixel heterodyne and direct detector arrays for various applications such as multi-pixel high resolution spectrometer and imaging radar at terahertz frequencies.

  1. How big is an OMI pixel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Martin; Sihler, Holger; Tilstra, Lieuwe G.; Stammes, Piet

    2016-08-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is a push-broom imaging spectrometer, observing solar radiation backscattered by the Earth's atmosphere and surface. The incoming radiation is detected using a static imaging CCD (charge-coupled device) detector array with no moving parts, as opposed to most of the previous satellite spectrometers, which used a moving mirror to scan the Earth in the across-track direction. The field of view (FoV) of detector pixels is the solid angle from which radiation is observed, averaged over the integration time of a measurement. The OMI FoV is not quadrangular, which is common for scanning instruments, but rather super-Gaussian shaped and overlapping with the FoV of neighbouring pixels. This has consequences for pixel-area-dependent applications, like cloud fraction products, and visualisation.The shapes and sizes of OMI FoVs were determined pre-flight by theoretical and experimental tests but never verified after launch. In this paper the OMI FoV is characterised using collocated MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance measurements. MODIS measurements have a much higher spatial resolution than OMI measurements and spectrally overlap at 469 nm. The OMI FoV was verified by finding the highest correlation between MODIS and OMI reflectances in cloud-free scenes, assuming a 2-D super-Gaussian function with varying size and shape to represent the OMI FoV. Our results show that the OMPIXCOR product 75FoV corner coordinates are accurate as the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a super-Gaussian FoV model when this function is assumed. The softness of the function edges, modelled by the super-Gaussian exponents, is different in both directions and is view angle dependent.The optimal overlap function between OMI and MODIS reflectances is scene dependent and highly dependent on time differences between overpasses, especially with clouds in the scene. For partially clouded scenes, the optimal overlap function was

  2. Angle- and polarization-insensitive, small area, subtractive color filters via a-Si nanopillar arrays (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountaine, Katherine T.; Ito, Mikinori; Pala, Ragip; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-09-01

    Spectrally-selective nanophotonic and plasmonic structures enjoy widespread interest for application as color filters in imaging devices, due to their potential advantages over traditional organic dyes and pigments. Organic dyes are straightforward to implement with predictable optical performance at large pixel size, but suffer from inherent optical cross-talk and stability (UV, thermal, humidity) issues and also exhibit increasingly unpredictable performance as pixel size approaches dye molecule size. Nanophotonic and plasmonic color filters are more robust, but often have polarization- and angle-dependent optical response and/or require large-range periodicity. Herein, we report on design and fabrication of polarization- and angle-insensitive CYM color filters based on a-Si nanopillar arrays as small as 1um2, supported by experiment, simulation, and analytic theory. Analytic waveguide and Mie theories explain the color filtering mechanism- efficient coupling into and interband transition-mediated attenuation of waveguide-like modes—and also guided the FDTD simulation-based optimization of nanopillar array dimensions. The designed a-Si nanopillar arrays were fabricated using e-beam lithography and reactive ion etching; and were subsequently optically characterized, revealing the predicted polarization- and angle-insensitive (±40°) subtractive filter responses. Cyan, yellow, and magenta color filters have each been demonstrated. The effects of nanopillar array size and inter-array spacing were investigated both experimentally and theoretically to probe the issues of ever-shrinking pixel sizes and cross-talk, respectively. Results demonstrate that these nanopillar arrays maintain their performance down to 1um2 pixel sizes with no inter-array spacing. These concepts and results along with color-processed images taken with a fabricated color filter array will be presented and discussed.

  3. Optimization of a mini-gamma camera based on a 2x2 array of Hamamatsu H8500 PSPMTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majewski, Stan [Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Popov, Vladimir [Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Wojcik, Randolph [Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States): Ray Visions, Inc., 317 Blacksmith Arch, Yorktown, VA 23693 (United States)]. E-mail: wojcik@jlab.org; Weisenberger, Andrew [Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2006-12-20

    We present the results of a comparative study between several scintillation sensors with the goal of optimizing the spatial resolution of a practical mini-gamma camera based on a 2x2 array of Hamamatsu H8500 flat panel position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) with 64 anode pads per PSPMT. The readout of this 256 pad imager was achieved by a special in-house designed and optimized pad-decoupling strip readout reducing the number of readout channels to 32. Pixellated NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillator arrays, as well as thin continuous GSO, GSOZ, CsI(Na) and CsI(Tl) scintillator plates were coupled to this PSPMT array to form a compact mini-gamma camera. This round of tests, following extensive prior experience with this type of imager, was intended to investigate the possibility of achieving an intrinsic spatial resolution of under 1.0 mm FWHM across the whole surface of the mini-gamma camera. We confirmed the results of our previous studies that the best overall performance is achieved with pixellated NaI(Tl) arrays. The present resolution limit attainable with the H8500 PSPMT array is approaching 1.2 mm FWHM, which is equivalent to the smallest available pixel pitch of these arrays.

  4. Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Analog-To-Digital Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Mendis, Sunetra K.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nixon, Robert H.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed single-chip integrated-circuit image sensor contains 128 x 128 array of active pixel sensors at 50-micrometer pitch. Output terminals of all pixels in each given column connected to analog-to-digital (A/D) converter located at bottom of column. Pixels scanned in semiparallel fashion, one row at time; during time allocated to scanning row, outputs of all active pixel sensors in row fed to respective A/D converters. Design of chip based on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, and individual circuit elements fabricated according to 2-micrometer CMOS design rules. Active pixel sensors designed to operate at video rate of 30 frames/second, even at low light levels. A/D scheme based on first-order Sigma-Delta modulation.

  5. MONOLITHIC ACTIVE PIXEL MATRIX WITH BINARY COUNTERS IN AN SOI PROCESS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUPTUCH,G.; YAREMA, R.

    2007-06-07

    The design of a Prototype monolithic active pixel matrix, designed in a 0.15 {micro}m CMOS SOI Process, is presented. The process allowed connection between the electronics and the silicon volume under the layer of buried oxide (BOX). The small size vias traversing through the BOX and implantation of small p-type islands in the n-type bulk result in a monolithic imager. During the acquisition time, all pixels register individual radiation events incrementing the counters. The counting rate is up to 1 MHz per pixel. The contents of counters are shifted out during the readout phase. The designed prototype is an array of 64 x 64 pixels and the pixel size is 26 x 26 {micro}m{sup 2}.

  6. Pixel size and pitch measurements of liquid crystal spatial light modulator by optical diffraction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravinder Kumar Banyal; B Raghavendra Prasad

    2005-08-01

    We present a simple technique for the determination of pixel size and pitch of liquid crystal (LC) based spatial light modulator (SLM). The proposed method is based on optical diffraction from pixelated LC panel that has been modeled as a two-dimensional array of rectangular apertures. A novel yet simple, two-plane measurement technique is implemented to circumvent the difficulty in absolute distance measurement. Experimental results are presented for electrically addressed twisted nematic LC-SLM removed from the display projector.

  7. Modulator and VCSEL-MSM smart pixels for parallel pipeline networking and signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.-H.; Hoanca, Bogdan; Kuznia, C. B.; Pansatiankul, Dhawat E.; Zhang, Liping; Sawchuk, Alexander A.

    1999-07-01

    TRANslucent Smart Pixel Array (TRANSPAR) systems perform high performance parallel pipeline networking and signal processing based on optical propagation of 3D data packets. The TRANSPAR smart pixel devices use either self-electro- optic effect GaAs multiple quantum well modulators or CMOS- VCSEL-MSM (CMOS-Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser- Metal-Semiconductor-Metal) technology. The data packets transfer among high throughput photonic network nodes using multiple access/collision detection or token-ring protocols.

  8. CMOS digital pixel sensors: technology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorka, Orit; Joseph, Dileepan

    2014-04-01

    CMOS active pixel sensor technology, which is widely used these days for digital imaging, is based on analog pixels. Transition to digital pixel sensors can boost signal-to-noise ratios and enhance image quality, but can increase pixel area to dimensions that are impractical for the high-volume market of consumer electronic devices. There are two main approaches to digital pixel design. The first uses digitization methods that largely rely on photodetector properties and so are unique to imaging. The second is based on adaptation of a classical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for in-pixel data conversion. Imaging systems for medical, industrial, and security applications are emerging lower-volume markets that can benefit from these in-pixel ADCs. With these applications, larger pixels are typically acceptable, and imaging may be done in invisible spectral bands.

  9. Development and characterization of diamond and 3D-silicon pixel detectors with ATLAS-pixel readout electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathes, Markus

    2008-12-15

    Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2} per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 x 50 {mu}m{sup 2} have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm{sup 2} and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 x 6 cm{sup 2}). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge collection inside a pixel cell as well as the charge sharing between adjacent pixels was studied using a high energy particle beam. (orig.)

  10. Compressive Video Recovery Using Block Match Multi-Frame Motion Estimation Based on Single Pixel Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Bi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing (CS theory has opened up new paths for the development of signal processing applications. Based on this theory, a novel single pixel camera architecture has been introduced to overcome the current limitations and challenges of traditional focal plane arrays. However, video quality based on this method is limited by existing acquisition and recovery methods, and the method also suffers from being time-consuming. In this paper, a multi-frame motion estimation algorithm is proposed in CS video to enhance the video quality. The proposed algorithm uses multiple frames to implement motion estimation. Experimental results show that using multi-frame motion estimation can improve the quality of recovered videos. To further reduce the motion estimation time, a block match algorithm is used to process motion estimation. Experiments demonstrate that using the block match algorithm can reduce motion estimation time by 30%.

  11. Fast IR Array Detector for Transverse Beam Diagnostics at DA{\\Phi}NE

    CERN Document Server

    Bocci, A; Clozza, A; Drago, A; Grilli, A; Marcelli, A; Raco, A; Sorchetti, R; Gambicorti, L; De Sio, A; Pace, E; Piotrowski, J

    2010-01-01

    At the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) an infrared (IR) array detector with fast response time has been built and assembled in order to collect the IR image of e-/e+ sources of the DA{\\Phi}NE collider. Such detector is made by 32 bilinear pixels with an individual size of 50x50 {\\mu}m2 and a response time of ~1 ns. In the framework of an experiment funded by the INFN Vth Committee dedicated to beam diagnostics, the device with its electronic board has been tested and installed on the DA{\\Phi}NE positron ring. A preliminary characterization of few pixels of the array and of the electronics has been carried out at the IR beamline SINBAD at DA{\\Phi}NE. In particular the detection of the IR source of the e- beam has been observed using four pixels of the array acquiring signals simultaneously with a four channels scope at 1 GHz and at 10 Gsamples/s. The acquisition of four pixels allowed monitoring in real time differences in the bunch signals in the vertical d...

  12. A CsI(Tl) detector array used in the experiment of the proton-rich nucleus 17Ne

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Li-Ying; HUA Hui; LU Fei; CHEN Dong; JIANG Xi-Yao; YE Yan-Lin; JIANG Dong-Xing; Qureshi Faisal-Jamil

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the configurations of the valence protons in Borromean nucleus 17Ne, a CsI(Tl) detector array, which consists of 9 CsI crystals (26×26×20mm3) coupled with photodiodes, has been successfully used in the 17Ne experiment to measure the energy of protons. In order to find the optimal working conditions and get the best energy resolutions, several technologies (including various wrapping materials, wrapping and coupling methods) have been used. The testing results showed that the best energy resolution of the CsI(Tl) is about 3.3% using the 241 Am α-source. The primary testing results with the proton beam were also provided.

  13. Feasibility experiment for Active Monitoring of Inter-plate Coupling in Tokai region. ---A dense array measurement---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T.; Ikuta, R.; Soma, T.; Saiga, A.; Miyajima, R.; Fujii, N.; Yamaoka, K.; Tsuruga, K.; Kunitomo, T.; Hasada, Y.; Kasahara, J.; Kumazawa, M.; Satomura, M.

    2005-12-01

    We carried out a long-distance seismic monitoring experiment using ACROSS (Accurately Controlled and Routinely Operated Signal System) for 10 months starting from the end of 2004 in Tokai region central Japan. In this experiment, we attempted to detect reflected phases from the top surface of the subducting Philippine Sea plate and to detect their temporal changes. In the Tokai region, a seismic survey was conducted in 2001. A strong reflected phase was detected and was interpreted as a reflection from the boundary between subducting and overriding plate [Iidaka, 2003]. Yoshida et al. [2004] analyzed the ACROSS signal received by a nationwide seismic network (Hi-net) and identified several phases which may include the direct waves and reflected phases from the plate boundary. The aim of our research is to confirm the reflected phases and also to detect temporal changes in properties of them. The ACROSS source was continuously operated in Toki City, Gifu prefecture by Tono Geoscience Center. The frequency-modulated signal with frequency band from10 to 20 Hz was precisely repeated with an interval of 50 seconds. As the rotation direction of the source reverses once per hour, we can synthesize linear vibration in any direction. Seismometers were deployed on a survey line between 40 and 70 km distance to the southeast from the source. We also deployed an array consisted by 12 seismometers having 2km aperture at 55 km away from the source on the survey line. We acquired seismograms with the array and stacked to improve S/N ratio. In ACROSS data analysis, we can estimate the errors of the received signals quantitatively in the frequency domain. We stacked the received signals weighted by inverse of the estimated errors in order to reduce the effect of the incidental noises such as earthquakes. We converted the stacked spectral signals into a frequency response by dividing them by the source spectra. Through applying an inverse Fourier transform to the frequency response

  14. Digital Power Consumption Estimations for CHIPIX65 Pixel Readout Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Marcotulli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    New hybrid pixel detectors with improved resolution capable of dealing with hit rates up to 3 GHz/cm2 will be required for future High Energy Physics experiments in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Given this, the RD53 collaboration works on the design of the next generation pixel readout chip needed for both the ATLAS and CMS detector phase 2 pixel upgrades. For the RD53 demonstrator chip in 65nm CMOS technology, different architectures are considered. In particular the purpose of this work is estimating the power consumption of the digital architecture of the readout ASIC developed by CHIPIX65 project of the INFN National Scientific Committee. This has been done with modern chip design tools integrated with the VEPIX53 simulation framework that has been developed within the RD53 collaboration in order to assess the performance of the system in very high rate, high energy physics experiments.

  15. SOI pixel circuits with synchronized TMC for time-of-flight stigmatic imaging mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Kaori; Fujita, Youichi; Arai, Yasuo; Hazama, Hisanao

    2015-01-01

    We propose SOI pixel circuits with a synchronized time memory cell (TMC) for time-of-flight stigmatic imaging mass spectrometry. The circuits simultaneously detect the position and the fine/coarse flight time of an ion for the MALDI-ToF mass spectrometer. We discuss the circuit design and present the simulation results of a prototype detector comprised of a 32 x 32 pixel array in which each pixel pitch is 40 um and the time resolution is a minimum of 1 ns. The results of transient analysis demonstrate the fully correct synchronous operation at a 100-MHz clock frequency and simultaneous 32-word SRAM writing.

  16. Production of the new pixel detector for the upgrade of the CMS experiment and study of anomalous couplings in the non-resonant Higgs bosons pair production in p-p collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00367286; Dorigo, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The present Ph.D thesis describes the work done within the CMS collaboration on the pixel detector upgrade and on the search for non-resonant di-Higgs production in p-p collision at LHC. The CMS upgrade project foresees, inter alia, the production of a new pixel detector (CMS Phase 1 Pixel Upgrade) to be commissioned at the beginning of 2017. Crucial part of the upgrade is the new readout chip (ROC) for the silicon sensor, psi46digV2respin, designed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with a 250 nm CMOS technology. The thesis concerns the study and the development of test procedures for this new readout chip. Thanks to a long stay at PSI, I could provide an important contribution to the debug phases of the first version of the ROC and TBM, the chip that handles the various ROCs in the pixel module, and to the development of the software used by the whole collaboration for the ROC and module testing. Furthermore, I managed the ROC wafers test from the early project phases. The ROCs are produced on silicon wa...

  17. CMS has a heart of pixels

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In the immediate vicinity of the collision point, CMS will be equipped with pixel detectors consisting of no fewer than 50 million pixels measuring 150 microns along each side. Each of the pixels, which receive the signal, is connected to its own electronic circuit by a tiny sphere (seen here in the electron microscope image) measuring 15 to 20 microns in diameter.

  18. Silicon Avalanche Pixel Sensor for High Precision Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ascenzo, N; Moon, C S; Morsani, F; Ratti, L; Saveliev, V; Navarro, A Savoy; Xie, Q

    2013-01-01

    The development of an innovative position sensitive pixelated sensor to detect and measure with high precision the coordinates of the ionizing particles is proposed. The silicon avalanche pixel sensors (APiX) is based on the vertical integration of avalanche pixels connected in pairs and operated in coincidence in fully digital mode and with the processing electronics embedded on the chip. The APiX sensor addresses the need to minimize the material budget and related multiple scattering effects in tracking systems requiring a high spatial resolution in the presence of a large occupancy. The expected operation of the new sensor features: low noise, low power consumption and suitable radiation tolerance. The APiX device provides on-chip digital information on the position of the coordinate of the impinging charged particle and can be seen as the building block of a modular system of pixelated arrays, implementing a sparsified readout. The technological challenges are the 3D integration of the device under CMOS ...

  19. Photovoltaic Pixels for Neural Stimulation: Circuit Models and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boinagrov, David; Lei, Xin; Goetz, Georges; Kamins, Theodore I; Mathieson, Keith; Galambos, Ludwig; Harris, James S; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Photovoltaic conversion of pulsed light into pulsed electric current enables optically-activated neural stimulation with miniature wireless implants. In photovoltaic retinal prostheses, patterns of near-infrared light projected from video goggles onto subretinal arrays of photovoltaic pixels are converted into patterns of current to stimulate the inner retinal neurons. We describe a model of these devices and evaluate the performance of photovoltaic circuits, including the electrode-electrolyte interface. Characteristics of the electrodes measured in saline with various voltages, pulse durations, and polarities were modeled as voltage-dependent capacitances and Faradaic resistances. The resulting mathematical model of the circuit yielded dynamics of the electric current generated by the photovoltaic pixels illuminated by pulsed light. Voltages measured in saline with a pipette electrode above the pixel closely matched results of the model. Using the circuit model, our pixel design was optimized for maximum charge injection under various lighting conditions and for different stimulation thresholds. To speed discharge of the electrodes between the pulses of light, a shunt resistor was introduced and optimized for high frequency stimulation.

  20. The TDCpix readout ASIC: A 75 ps resolution timing front-end for the NA62 Gigatracker hybrid pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluge, A., E-mail: alexander.kluge@cern.ch; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Bonacini, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Perktold, L.; Poltorak, K.

    2013-12-21

    The TDCpix is a novel pixel readout ASIC for the NA62 Gigatracker detector. NA62 is a new experiment being installed at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. Its Gigatracker detector shall provide on-beam tracking and time stamping of individual particles with a time resolution of 150 ps rms. It will consist of three tracking stations, each with one hybrid pixel sensor. The peak flow of particles crossing the detector modules reaches 1.27 MHz/mm{sup 2} for a total rate of about 0.75 GHz. Ten TDCpix chips will be bump-bonded to every silicon pixel sensor. Each chip shall perform time stamping of 100 M particle hits per second with a detection efficiency above 99% and a timing accuracy better than 200 ps rms for an overall three-station-setup time resolution of better than 150 ps. The TDCpix chip has been designed in a 130 nm CMOS technology. It will feature 45×40 square pixels of 300×300μm{sup 2} and a complex End of Column peripheral region including an array of TDCs based on DLLs, four high speed serializers, a low-jitter PLL, readout and control circuits. This contribution will describe the complete design of the final TDCpix ASIC. It will discuss design choices, the challenges faced and some of the lessons learned. Furthermore, experimental results from the testing of circuit prototypes will be presented. These demonstrate the achievement of key performance figures such as a time resolution of the processing chain of 75 ps rms with a laser sent to the center of the pixel and the capability of time stamping charged particles with an overall resolution below 200 ps rms. -- Highlights: • Feasibility demonstration of a silicon pixel detector with sub-ns time tagging capability. • Demonstrator detector assembly with a time resolution of 75 ps RMS with laser charge injection; 170 ps RMS with particle beam. • Design of trigger-less TDCpix ASIC with 1800 pixels, 720 TDC channels and 4 3.2 Gbit/s serializers.

  1. Physical Science Informatics: Providing Open Science Access to Microheater Array Boiling Experiment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, John; Green, Robert D.; Henrie, Ben; Miller, Teresa; Chiaramonte, Fran

    2014-01-01

    The Physical Science Informatics (PSI) system is the next step in this an effort to make NASA sponsored flight data available to the scientific and engineering community, along with the general public. The experimental data, from six overall disciplines, Combustion Science, Fluid Physics, Complex Fluids, Fundamental Physics, and Materials Science, will present some unique challenges. Besides data in textual or numerical format, large portions of both the raw and analyzed data for many of these experiments are digital images and video, requiring large data storage requirements. In addition, the accessible data will include experiment design and engineering data (including applicable drawings), any analytical or numerical models, publications, reports, and patents, and any commercial products developed as a result of the research. This objective of paper includes the following: Present the preliminary layout (Figure 2) of MABE data within the PSI database. Obtain feedback on the layout. Present the procedure to obtain access to this database.

  2. Validation of RNAi Silencing Efficiency Using Gene Array Data shows 18.5% Failure Rate across 429 Independent Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyöngyi Munkácsy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available No independent cross-validation of success rate for studies utilizing small interfering RNA (siRNA for gene silencing has been completed before. To assess the influence of experimental parameters like cell line, transfection technique, validation method, and type of control, we have to validate these in a large set of studies. We utilized gene chip data published for siRNA experiments to assess success rate and to compare methods used in these experiments. We searched NCBI GEO for samples with whole transcriptome analysis before and after gene silencing and evaluated the efficiency for the target and off-target genes using the array-based expression data. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to assess silencing efficacy and Kruskal–Wallis tests and Spearman rank correlation were used to evaluate study parameters. All together 1,643 samples representing 429 experiments published in 207 studies were evaluated. The fold change (FC of down-regulation of the target gene was above 0.7 in 18.5% and was above 0.5 in 38.7% of experiments. Silencing efficiency was lowest in MCF7 and highest in SW480 cells (FC = 0.59 and FC = 0.30, respectively, P = 9.3E−06. Studies utilizing Western blot for validation performed better than those with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR or microarray (FC = 0.43, FC = 0.47, and FC = 0.55, respectively, P = 2.8E−04. There was no correlation between type of control, transfection method, publication year, and silencing efficiency. Although gene silencing is a robust feature successfully cross-validated in the majority of experiments, efficiency remained insufficient in a significant proportion of studies. Selection of cell line model and validation method had the highest influence on silencing proficiency.

  3. ASIC Readout Circuit Architecture for Large Geiger Photodiode Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Stefan; Lipson, Jerold

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a new class of readout integrated circuit (ROIC) arrays to be operated with Geiger avalanche photodiode (GPD) arrays, by integrating multiple functions at the pixel level (smart-pixel or active pixel technology) in 250-nm CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) processes. In order to pack a maximum of functions within a minimum pixel size, the ROIC array is a full, custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design using a mixed-signal CMOS process with compact primitive layout cells. The ROIC array was processed to allow assembly in bump-bonding technology with photon-counting infrared detector arrays into 3-D imaging cameras (LADAR). The ROIC architecture was designed to work with either common- anode Si GPD arrays or common-cathode InGaAs GPD arrays. The current ROIC pixel design is hardwired prior to processing one of the two GPD array configurations, and it has the provision to allow soft reconfiguration to either array (to be implemented into the next ROIC array generation). The ROIC pixel architecture implements the Geiger avalanche quenching, bias, reset, and time to digital conversion (TDC) functions in full-digital design, and uses time domain over-sampling (vernier) to allow high temporal resolution at low clock rates, increased data yield, and improved utilization of the laser beam.

  4. Pixel detector modules performance for ATLAS IBL and future pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00355104; Pernegger, Heinz

    2015-11-06

    The ATLAS Detector is one of the four big particle physics experiments at CERN’s LHC. Its innermost tracking system consisted of the 3-Layer silicon Pixel Detector (~80M readout channels) in the first run (2010-2012). Over the past two years it was refurbished and equipped with new services as well as a new beam monitor. The major upgrade, however, was the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). It adds ~12M readout channels for improved vertexing, tracking robustness and b-tagging performance for the upcoming runs, before the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will take place. This thesis covers two main aspects of Pixel detector performance studies: The main work was the planning, commissioning and operation of a test bench that meets the requirements of current pixel detector components. Each newly built ATLAS IBL stave was thoroughly tested, following a specifically developed procedure, and initially calibrated in that setup. A variety of production accompanying measurements as well as preliminary results after integ...

  5. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Fadmar Osmic, FO

    2006-01-01

    The European Organization for Particle Physics (CERN) in Geneva is currently constructing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will allow the study of the subnuclear ranges of physics with an accuracy never achieved before. Within the LHC project, ALICE is to the study of strongly interacting matter at extreme densities and high temperatures. ALICE as many other modern High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments uses silicon pixel detectors for tracking close to the interaction point (IP). The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) will constitute the two innermost layers of ALICE, and will due to its high granularity provide precise tracking information. In heavy ion collisions, the track density could be as high as 80 tracks/cm2 in the first SPD layer. The SPD will provide tracking information at radii of 3.9 and 7.6 cm from the IP. It is a fundamental element for the study of the weak decays of the particles carrying heavy flavour, whose typical signature will be a secondary vertex separated from the primary verte...

  6. optical links for the atlas pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stucci, Stefania Antonia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Optical links are necessary to satisfy the high speed readout over long distances for advanced silicon detector systems. We report on the optical readout used in the newly installed central pixel layer (IBL) in the ATLAS experiment. The off detector readout employs commercial optical to analog converters, which were extensively tested for this application. Performance measurements during installation and commissioning will be shown. With the increasing instantaneous luminosity in the next years, the next layers outwards of IBL of the ATLAS Pixel detector (Layer 1 and Layer 2) will reach their bandwidth limits. A plan to increase the bandwidth by upgrading the off detector readout chain is put in place. The plan also involves new optical readout components, in particular the optical receivers, for which commercial units cannot be used and a new design has been made. The latter allows for a wider operational range in term of data frequency and light input power to match the on-detector sending units on the pres...

  7. Optical links for the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stucci, Stefania Antonia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Optical links are necessary to satisfy the high speed readout over long distances for advanced silicon detector systems. We report on the optical readout used in the newly installed central pixel layer (IBL) in the ATLAS experiment. The off detector readout employs commercial optical to analog converters, which were extensively tested for this application. Performance measurements during installation and commissioning will be shown. With the increasing instantaneous luminosity in the next years, the next layers outwards of IBL of the ATLAS Pixel detector (Layer 1 and Layer 2) will reach their bandwidth limits. A plan to increase the bandwidth by upgrading the off detector readout chain is put in place. The plan also involves new optical readout components, in particular the optical receivers, for which commercial units cannot be used and a new design has been made. The latter allows for a wider operational range in term of data frequency and light input power to match the on-detector sending units on the pres...

  8. The Phase II ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Terzo, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the "ITk" (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m$^2$ , depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as $|\\eta| < 4$. Supporting structures will be ...

  9. The Phase-2 ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Flick, Tobias; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the “ITk” (Inner Tracker). The pixel detector will comprise the five innermost layers, and will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m2, depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Four layout options are being investigated at the moment, two with forward coverage to |eta| < 3.2 and two to |eta| < 4. For each coverage option, a layout with long barrel staves and a layout with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region are considered. All potential layouts include modules mounted on ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions...

  10. The Pixels system: last but not late!

    CERN Multimedia

    Kevin Einsweiler

    The Pixel Detector for ATLAS is one of the smallest, but most challenging components of the experiment. It lives in the dangerous territory directly outside the beampipe, where the radiation environment is particularly fierce, and it must be roughly one million times more radiation-hard than its human designers. Starting at a radius of just 5cm from the interaction point where the proton beams collide, it occupies a volume of slightly more than one meter in length and a half meter in diameter. In this compact region, there are eighty million channels of electronics (most of the electronics channels in ATLAS!), each capable of measuring the charge deposited by a track in a silicon pixel measuring only 50 microns by 400 microns in size (a volume of 0.005 cubic millimeters). A total cooling capacity of 15 KWatts is available to keep it operating comfortably at -5C. This detector is built around, and provides the support for, the central beampipe of ATLAS. It is supported on carbon fiber rails inside of the Pix...

  11. IV and CV curves for irradiated prototype BTeV silicon pixel sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria R. Coluccia et al.

    2002-07-16

    The authors present IV and CV curves for irradiated prototype n{sup +}/n/p{sup +} silicon pixel sensors, intended for use in the BTeV experiment at Fermilab. They tested pixel sensors from various vendors and with two pixel isolation layouts: p-stop and p-spray. Results are based on exposure with 200 MeV protons up to 6 x 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2}.

  12. Hardware architecture of high-performance digital hologram generator on the basis of a pixel-by-pixel calculation scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Hyuk; Yoo, Ji-Sang; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2012-06-20

    In this paper we propose a hardware architecture for high-speed computer-generated hologram generation that significantly reduces the number of memory access times to avoid the bottleneck in the memory access operation. For this, we use three main schemes. The first is pixel-by-pixel calculation, rather than light source-by-source calculation. The second is a parallel calculation scheme extracted by modifying the previous recursive calculation scheme. The last scheme is a fully pipelined calculation scheme and exactly structured timing scheduling, achieved by adjusting the hardware. The proposed hardware is structured to calculate a row of a computer-generated hologram in parallel and each hologram pixel in a row is calculated independently. It consists of and input interface, an initial parameter calculator, hologram pixel calculators, a line buffer, and a memory controller. The implemented hardware to calculate a row of a 1920×1080 computer-generated hologram in parallel uses 168,960 lookup tables, 153,944 registers, and 19,212 digital signal processing blocks in an Altera field programmable gate array environment. It can stably operate at 198 MHz. Because of three schemes, external memory bandwidth is reduced to approximately 1/20,000 of the previous ones at the same calculation speed.

  13. Image pixel device using integrated organic electronic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi, K.; Narayan, K. S.

    2016-11-01

    We report a solution processed, monolithically integrated device similar to an imaging pixel element used in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based cameras. This integrated pixel essentially consists of a pair of organic photodiode (OPD) and organic field effect transistor (OFET). The signal generated by the light responsive OPD drives the OFET to different output states to quantify the light intensity. The prerequisite of a low operating voltage OFET (polymer semiconductor and a self-assembled hybrid dielectric layer. A bulk heterojunction blend was used as the photo-active layer in the OPD along with suitable buffer layers for charge extraction. The material parameters were optimized to realize a suitable structure which clearly demonstrated the interplay of the OPD and OFET operations, thereby forming a roadmap for all-organic CMOS arrays.

  14. Bonding techniques for hybrid active pixel sensors (HAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigas, M.; Cabruja, E.; Lozano, M.

    2007-05-01

    A hybrid active pixel sensor (HAPS) consists of an array of sensing elements which is connected to an electronic read-out unit. The most used way to connect these two different devices is bump bonding. This interconnection technique is very suitable for these systems because it allows a very fine pitch and a high number of I/Os. However, there are other interconnection techniques available such as direct bonding. This paper, as a continuation of a review [M. Lozano, E. Cabruja, A. Collado, J. Santander, M. Ullan, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 473 (1-2) (2001) 95-101] published in 2001, presents an update of the different advanced bonding techniques available for manufacturing a hybrid active pixel detector.

  15. Design Optimization of Pixel Structure for α-Si based Uncooled Infrared Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Gupta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper authors present the design and simulation results achieved for pixel structure of amorphous Si (α-Si based bolometer array. Most uncooled IR detectors in the world are based on VOx material. But this is not a standard material in IC technology and has many inherent disadvantages. The α-Si, an alternative material with high TCR is becoming as popular. However, large TCR values, in this material are achieved only in films of high resistivity. To achieve TCR value more than 2.5%/K, α-Si film resistivity is ~ 80 ohms-cm. This gives rise to very large pixel resistance of the order of 100 Mega ohms depending upon the design of the leg structure. This high pixel resistance causes very large noise and hence lower sensitivity. If leg width or membrane thickness is increased in order to reduce the pixel resistance, then this results in higher thermal conductance which also decreases sensitivity. To overcome this problem, pixel structure is so designed that within a pixel, only part of the electrical conduction is through α-Si and rest is through metal. Simulation using Coventorware software has been done to optimize pixel resistance as well as thermal conductance through legs so that maximum sensitivity could be obtained. Optimization is also carried out in order to reduce sensitivity of pixel resistance to variation in material resistivity.

  16. A new method for the design of slot antenna arrays: Theory and experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Clauzier, Sebastien

    2016-04-10

    The present paper proposes and validates a new general design methodology that can be used to automatically find proper positions and orientations of waveguide-based radiating slots capable of realizing any given radiation beam profile. The new technique combines basic radiation theory and waveguide propagation theory in a novel analytical model that allows the prediction of the radiation characteristics of generic slots without the need to perform full-wave numerical solution. The analytical model is then used to implement a low-cost objective function within a global optimization scheme (here genetic algorithm.) The algorithm is then deployed to find optimum positions and orientations of clusters of radiating slots cut into the waveguide surface such that any desired beam pattern can be obtained. The method is verified using both full-wave numerical solution and experiment.

  17. Self-Recovery Experiments in Extreme Environments Using a Field Programmable Transistor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian; Keymeulen, Didier; Arslan, Tughrul; Duong, Vu; Zebulum, Ricardo; Ferguson, Ian; Guo, Xin

    2004-01-01

    Temperature and radiation tolerant electronics, as well as long life survivability are key capabilities required for future NASA missions. Current approaches to electronics for extreme environments focus on component level robustness and hardening. However, current technology can only ensure very limited lifetime in extreme environments. This paper describes novel experiments that allow adaptive in-situ circuit redesign/reconfiguration during operation in extreme temperature and radiation environments. This technology would complement material/device advancements and increase the mission capability to survive harsh environments. The approach is demonstrated on a mixed-signal programmable chip (FPTA-2), which recovers functionality for temperatures until 28 C and with total radiation dose up to 250kRad.

  18. Experience in applying technical UT phased array inspection pipe semiautomatic; Experiencia en la aplicacion de tecnica UT phased array a la inspeccion semiatomatica de tuberias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Ruiz, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    In the framework of different projects of thickness measurement of Corrosion by Mycobacteria in pipelines of nuclear installations both Erosion/Corrosion phenomena, and in view that works ultrasonically carried out manually extend in time and require several stages of re-verification of the results obtained, it became necessary to develop a semiautomatic system ultrasonic measuring phased array with the aim of increasing the effectiveness of the System measuring both time and interpretation of results. (Author)

  19. Electrochemical ion transfer across liquid/liquid interfaces confined within solid-state micropore arrays--simulations and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutwolf, Jörg; Scanlon, Micheál D; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2009-01-01

    Miniaturised liquid/liquid interfaces provide benefits for bioanalytical detection with electrochemical methods. In this work, microporous silicon membranes which can be used for interface miniaturisation were characterized by simulations and experiments. The microporous membranes possessed hexagonal arrays of pores with radii between 10 and 25 microm, a pore depth of 100 microm and pore centre-to-centre separations between 99 and 986 microm. Cyclic voltammetry was used to monitor ion transfer across arrays of micro-interfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (microITIES) formed at these membranes, with the organic phase present as an organogel. The results were compared to computational simulations taking into account mass transport by diffusion and encompassing diffusion to recessed interfaces and overlapped diffusion zones. The simulation and experimental data were both consistent with the situation where the location of the liquid/liquid (l/l) interface was on the aqueous side of the silicon membrane and the pores were filled with the organic phase. While the current for the forward potential scan (transfer of the ion from the aqueous phase to the organic phase) was strongly dependent on the location of the l/l interface, the current peak during the reverse scan (transfer of the ion from the organic phase to the aqueous phase) was influenced by the ratio of the transferring ion's diffusion coefficients in both phases. The diffusion coefficient of the transferring ion in the gelified organic phase was ca. nine times smaller than in the aqueous phase. Asymmetric cyclic voltammogram shapes were caused by the combined effect of non-symmetrical diffusion (spherical and linear) and by the inequality of the diffusion coefficient in both phases. Overlapping diffusion zones were responsible for the observation of current peaks instead of steady-state currents during the forward scan. The characterisation of the diffusion behaviour is an important requirement

  20. Fabrication of ATLAS pixel detector prototypes at IRST

    CERN Document Server

    Boscardin, M; Gregori, P; Zen, M; Zori, N

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development of a fabrication technology for n-on-n silicon pixel detectors oriented to the ATLAS experiment at LHC. The main processing issues and some selected results from the electrical characterization of detector prototypes and related test structures are presented and discussed. (5 refs).

  1. Performance of a hybrid photon detector prototype with electrostatic cross-focussing and integrated silicon Pixel readout for Cherenkov ring detection

    CERN Document Server

    Alemi, M; Bibby, J H; Campbell, M; Duane, A; Easo, S; Gys, Thierry; Halley, A W; Piedigrossi, D; Puertolas, D; Rosso, E; Simmons, B; Snoeys, W; Websdale, David M; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, Ken H

    1999-01-01

    We report on the first test beam performance of a hybrid photon detector prototype, using binary readout electronics, intended for use in the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The photon detector is based on a cross-focussed image intensifier tube geometry. The anode consists of a silicon pixel array bump-bonded to a binary readout chip with matching pixel electronics. The detector has been installed in a quarter-scale prototype vessel of the LHCb ring imaging Cherenkov system. Focussed ring images produced by 120 GeV/c negative pions traversing an air radiator have been recorded. The observed light yield and Cherenkov angle resolution are discussed.

  2. Performance of a hybrid photon detector prototype with electrostatic cross-focussing and integrated silicon pixel readout for Cherenkov ring detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alemi, M.; Barber, G.; Bibby, J.; Campbell, M.; Duane, A.; Easo, S.; Gys, T.; Halley, A.; Piedigrossi, D.; Puertolas, D.; Rosso, E.; Simmons, B.; Snoeys, W.; Websdale, D.; Wotton, S.; Wyllie, K

    1999-08-01

    We report on the first test beam performance of a hybrid photon detector prototype, using binary readout electronics, intended for use in the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The photon detector is based on a cross-focussed image intensifier tube geometry. The anode consists of a silicon pixel array bump-bonded to a binary readout chip with matching pixel electronics. The detector has been installed in a quarter-scale prototype vessel of the LHCb ring imaging Cherenkov system. Focussed ring images produced by 120 GeV/c negative pions traversing an air radiator have been recorded. The observed light yield and Cherenkov angle resolution are discussed.

  3. Dynamic Efficiency Measurements for Irradiated ATLAS Pixel Single Chip Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Pfaff, Mike; Grosse-Knetter, Jorn

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is the innermost subdetector of the ATLAS experiment. Due to this, the pixel detector has to be particularly radiation hard. In this diploma thesis effects on the sensor and the electronics which are caused by irradiation are examined. It is shown how the behaviour changes between an unirradiated sample and a irradiated sample, which was treated with the same radiation dose that is expected at the end of the lifetime of ATLAS. For this study a laser system, which is used for dynamic efficiency measurements was constructed. Furthermore, the behaviour of the noise during the detection of a particle was evaluated studied.

  4. A CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for Charged Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans George; Singh, Kunal; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Wieman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-12-02

    Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology has shown promise for next-generation vertex detectors. This paper discusses the design and testing of two generations of APS chips. Both are arrays of 128 by 128 pixels, each 20 by 20 {micro}m. Each array is divided into sub-arrays in which different sensor structures (4 in the first version and 16 in the second) and/or readout circuits are employed. Measurements of several of these structures under Fe{sup 55} exposure are reported. The sensors have also been irradiated by 55 MeV protons to test for radiation damage. The radiation increased the noise and reduced the signal. The noise can be explained by shot noise from the increased leakage current and the reduction in signal is due to charge being trapped in the epi layer. Nevertheless, the radiation effect is small for the expected exposures at RHIC and RHIC II. Finally, we describe our concept for mechanically supporting a thin silicon wafer in an actual detector.

  5. Survey of Field Programmable Gate Array Design Guides and Experience Relevant to Nuclear Power Plant Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobrek, Miljko [ORNL; Bouldin, Don [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Killough, Stephen M [ORNL; Smith, Stephen Fulton [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL

    2007-09-01

    From a safety perspective, it is difficult to assess the correctness of FPGA devices without extensive documentation, tools, and review procedures. NUREG/CR-6463, "Review Guidelines on Software Languages for Use in Nuclear Power Plant Safety Systems," provides guidance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on auditing of programs for safety systems written in ten high-level languages. A uniform framework for the formulation and discussion of language-specific programming guidelines was employed. Comparable guidelines based on a similar framework are needed for FPGA-based systems. The first task involves evaluation of regulatory experience gained by other countries and other agencies, and those captured in existing standards, to identify regulatory approaches that can be adopted by NRC. If existing regulations do not provide a sufficient regulatory basis for adopting relevant regulatory approaches that are uncovered, ORNL will identify the gaps. Information for this report was obtained through publicly available sources such as published papers and presentations. No proprietary information is represented.

  6. SNR improvement for hyperspectral application using frame and pixel binning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Sami Ur; Kumar, Ankush; Banerjee, Arup

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging spectrometer systems are increasingly being used in the field of remote sensing for variety of civilian and military applications. The ability of such instruments in discriminating finer spectral features along with improved spatial and radiometric performance have made such instruments a powerful tool in the field of remote sensing. Design and development of spaceborne hyper spectral imaging spectrometers poses lot of technological challenges in terms of optics, dispersion element, detectors, electronics and mechanical systems. The main factors that define the type of detectors are the spectral region, SNR, dynamic range, pixel size, number of pixels, frame rate, operating temperature etc. Detectors with higher quantum efficiency and higher well depth are the preferred choice for such applications. CCD based Si detectors serves the requirement of high well depth for VNIR band spectrometers but suffers from smear. Smear can be controlled by using CMOS detectors. Si CMOS detectors with large format arrays are available. These detectors generally have smaller pitch and low well depth. Binning technique can be used with available CMOS detectors to meet the large swath, higher resolution and high SNR requirements. Availability of larger dwell time of satellite can be used to bin multiple frames to increase the signal collection even with lesser well depth detectors and ultimately increase the SNR. Lab measurements reveal that SNR improvement by frame binning is more in comparison to pixel binning. Effect of pixel binning as compared to the frame binning will be discussed and degradation of SNR as compared to theoretical value for pixel binning will be analyzed.

  7. Segmentation and intensity estimation for microarray images with saturated pixels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray image analysis processes scanned digital images of hybridized arrays to produce the input spot-level data for downstream analysis, so it can have a potentially large impact on those and subsequent analysis. Signal saturation is an optical effect that occurs when some pixel values for highly expressed genes or peptides exceed the upper detection threshold of the scanner software (216 - 1 = 65, 535 for 16-bit images. In practice, spots with a sizable number of saturated pixels are often flagged and discarded. Alternatively, the saturated values are used without adjustments for estimating spot intensities. The resulting expression data tend to be biased downwards and can distort high-level analysis that relies on these data. Hence, it is crucial to effectively correct for signal saturation. Results We developed a flexible mixture model-based segmentation and spot intensity estimation procedure that accounts for saturated pixels by incorporating a censored component in the mixture model. As demonstrated with biological data and simulation, our method extends the dynamic range of expression data beyond the saturation threshold and is effective in correcting saturation-induced bias when the lost information is not tremendous. We further illustrate the impact of image processing on downstream classification, showing that the proposed method can increase diagnostic accuracy using data from a lymphoma cancer diagnosis study. Conclusions The presented method adjusts for signal saturation at the segmentation stage that identifies a pixel as part of the foreground, background or other. The cluster membership of a pixel can be altered versus treating saturated values as truly observed. Thus, the resulting spot intensity estimates may be more accurate than those obtained from existing methods that correct for saturation based on already segmented data. As a model-based segmentation method, our procedure is able to identify inner

  8. A low mass pixel detector upgrade for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kästli, H C

    2010-01-01

    The CMS pixel detector has been designed for a peak luminosity of 10^34cm-2s-1 and a total dose corresponding to 2 years of LHC operation at a radius of 4 cm from the interaction region. Parts of the pixel detector will have to be replaced until 2015. The detector performance will be degraded for two reasons: radiation damage of the innermost layers and the planned increase of the LHC peak luminosity by a factor of 2-3. Based on the experience in planning, constructing and commissioning of the present pixel detector, we intend to upgrade the whole pixel detector in 2015. The main focus is on lowering the material budget and adding more tracking points. We will present the design of a new low mass pixel system consisting of 4 barrel layers and 3 end cap disks on each side. The design comprises of thin detector modules and a lightweight mechanical support structure using CO2 cooling. In addition, large efforts have been made to move material from the services out of the tracking region.

  9. Super pixel density based clustering automatic image classification method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingxing; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Tianxu

    2015-12-01

    The image classification is an important means of image segmentation and data mining, how to achieve rapid automated image classification has been the focus of research. In this paper, based on the super pixel density of cluster centers algorithm for automatic image classification and identify outlier. The use of the image pixel location coordinates and gray value computing density and distance, to achieve automatic image classification and outlier extraction. Due to the increased pixel dramatically increase the computational complexity, consider the method of ultra-pixel image preprocessing, divided into a small number of super-pixel sub-blocks after the density and distance calculations, while the design of a normalized density and distance discrimination law, to achieve automatic classification and clustering center selection, whereby the image automatically classify and identify outlier. After a lot of experiments, our method does not require human intervention, can automatically categorize images computing speed than the density clustering algorithm, the image can be effectively automated classification and outlier extraction.

  10. The pixel tracking telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, Simon; Lei, CM [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Ngadiuba, Jennifer [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Bicocca, and Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Prosser, Alan; Rivera, Ryan [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Terzo, Stefano [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Bicocca, and Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Turqueti, Marcos [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Uplegger, Lorenzo, E-mail: uplegger@fnal.gov [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Vigani, Luigi; Dinardo, Mauro E. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    An all silicon pixel telescope has been assembled and used at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) since 2009 to provide precise tracking information for different test beam experiments with a wide range of Detectors Under Test (DUTs) requiring high resolution measurement of the track impact point. The telescope is based on CMS pixel modules left over from the CMS forward pixel production. Eight planes are arranged to achieve a resolution of less than 8 μm on the 120 GeV proton beam transverse coordinate at the DUT position. In order to achieve such resolution with 100×150 μm{sup 2} pixel cells, the planes were tilted to 25 degrees to maximize charge sharing between pixels. Crucial for obtaining this performance is the alignment software, called Monicelli, specifically designed and optimized for this system. This paper will describe the telescope hardware, the data acquisition system and the alignment software constituting this particle tracking system for test beam users.

  11. The Phase-1 Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Katja

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment features a pixel detector with three barrel layers and two disks per side, corresponding to an active silicon area of 1\\,m$^2$. The detector delivered high-quality data during LHC Run~1. However, the CMS pixel detector was designed for the nominal instantaneous LHC luminosity of $1\\cdot 10^{34}\\,$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. It is expected that the instantaneous luminosity will increase and reach twice the design value before Long Shutdown 3, scheduled for 2023. Under such conditions, the present readout chip would suffer from data loss due to buffer overflow, leading to significant inefficiencies of up to~16\\,\\%. The CMS collaboration is presently constructing a new pixel detector to replace the present device during the winter shutdown 2016/2017. The design of this new detector will be outlined, the construction status summarized and the performance described.

  12. Online calibrations and performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 1744 silicon sensors equipped with approximately 80 M electronic channels, providing typically three measurement points with high resolution for particles emerging from the beam-interaction region, thus allowing measuring particle tracks and secondary vertices with very high precision. The readout system of the Pixel Detector is based on a bi-directional optical data transmission system between the detector and the data acquisition system with an individual link for each of the 1744 modules. Signal conversion components are located on both ends, approximately 80 m apart. The talk will give an overview of the calibration and performance of both the detector and its optical readout. The most basic parameter to be tuned and calibrated for the detector electronics is the readout threshold of the individual pixel channels. These need to be carefully tuned to optimise position resolution a...

  13. The Phase-1 upgrade of the CMS pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Katja

    2017-02-01

    The CMS experiment features a pixel detector with three barrel layers and two discs per side, corresponding to an active silicon area of 1 m2. The detector delivered high-quality data during LHC Run 1. However, the CMS pixel detector was designed for the nominal instantaneous LHC luminosity of 1 ·1034cm-2s-1 . It is expected that the instantaneous luminosity will increase and reach twice the design value before Long Shutdown 3, scheduled for 2023. Under such conditions, the present readout chip would suffer from data loss due to buffer overflow, leading to significant inefficiencies of up to 16%. The CMS collaboration is presently constructing a new pixel detector to replace the present device during the winter shutdown 2016/2017. The design of this new detector will be outlined, the construction status summarized and the performance described.

  14. Image Pixel Fusion for Human Face Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Nasipuri, Mita; Basu, Dipak Kumar; Kundu, Mahantapas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a technique for fusion of optical and thermal face images based on image pixel fusion approach. Out of several factors, which affect face recognition performance in case of visual images, illumination changes are a significant factor that needs to be addressed. Thermal images are better in handling illumination conditions but not very consistent in capturing texture details of the faces. Other factors like sunglasses, beard, moustache etc also play active role in adding complicacies to the recognition process. Fusion of thermal and visual images is a solution to overcome the drawbacks present in the individual thermal and visual face images. Here fused images are projected into an eigenspace and the projected images are classified using a radial basis function (RBF) neural network and also by a multi-layer perceptron (MLP). In the experiments Object Tracking and Classification Beyond Visible Spectrum (OTCBVS) database benchmark for thermal and visual face images have been used. Compar...

  15. Performance Studies of Pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors for the LHCb RICH Counters

    CERN Document Server

    Aglieri Rinella, G; Piedigrossi, D; Van Lysebetten, A

    2004-01-01

    The Pixel Hybrid Photon Detector is a vacuum tube with a multi-alkali photo cathode, high voltage cross-focused electron optics and an anode consisting of a silicon pixel detector bump-bonded to a readout CMOS electronic chip fully encapsulated in the device. The Pixel HPD fulfils the requirements of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov counters of the LHCb experiment at LHC. The performances of the Pixel HPD will be discussed with reference to laboratory measurements, Cherenkov light imaging in recent beam tests, image distortions due to a magnetic field.

  16. Performance studies of pixel hybrid photon detectors for the LHCb RICH counters

    CERN Document Server

    Aglieri-Rinella, G; Piedigrossi, D; Van Lysebetten, A

    2006-01-01

    The Pixel Hybrid Photon Detector is a vacuum tube with a multi-alkali photo cathode, high voltage cross-focused electron optics and an anode consisting of a silicon pixel detector bump-bonded to a readout CMOS electronic chip fully encapsulated in the device. The Pixel HPD fulfils the requirements of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov counters of the LHCb experiment at LHC. The performances of the Pixel HPD will be discussed with reference to laboratory measurements, Cherenkov light imaging in recent beam tests, image distortions due to a magnetic field.

  17. Serial Pixel Analog-to-Digital Converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, E D

    2010-02-01

    This method reduces the data path from the counter to the pixel register of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) from as many as 10 bits to a single bit. The reduction in data path width is accomplished by using a coded serial data stream similar to a pseudo random number (PRN) generator. The resulting encoded pixel data is then decoded into a standard hexadecimal format before storage. The high-speed serial pixel ADC concept is based on the single-slope integrating pixel ADC architecture. Previous work has described a massively parallel pixel readout of a similar architecture. The serial ADC connection is similar to the state-of-the art method with the exception that the pixel ADC register is a shift register and the data path is a single bit. A state-of-the-art individual-pixel ADC uses a single-slope charge integration converter architecture with integral registers and “one-hot” counters. This implies that parallel data bits are routed among the counter and the individual on-chip pixel ADC registers. The data path bit-width to the pixel is therefore equivalent to the pixel ADC bit resolution.

  18. Toward VIP-PIX: A Low Noise Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Use in the Next Generation of PET Scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Puigdengoles, Carles; Lorenzo, Gianluca De; Martínez, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    VIP-PIX will be a low noise and low power pixel readout electronics with digital output for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. The proposed pixel will be part of a 2D pixel-array detector for various types of nuclear medicine imaging devices such as positron-emission tomography (PET) scanners, Compton gamma cameras, and positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanners. Each pixel will include a SAR ADC that provides the energy deposited with 10-bit resolution. Simultaneously, the self-...

  19. Hierarchical Phased Array Antenna Focal Plane for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization and Sub-mm Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Adrian

    We propose to develop planar-antenna-coupled superconducting bolometer arrays for observations at sub-millimeter to millimeter wavelengths. Our pixel architecture features a dual-polarization, log-periodic antenna with a 5:1 bandwidth ratio, followed by a filter bank that divides the total bandwidth into several broad photometric bands. We propose to develop an hierarchical phased array of our basic pixel type that gives optimal mapping speed (sensitivity) over a much broader range of frequencies. The advantage of this combination of an intrinsically broadband pixel with hierarchical phase arraying include a combination of greatly reduced focal-plane mass, higher array sensitivity, and a larger number of spectral bands compared to focal-plane designs using conventional single-color pixels. These advantages have the potential to greatly reduce cost and/or increase performance of NASA missions in the sub-millimeter to millimeter bands. For CMB polarization, a wide frequency range of about 30 to 400 GHz is required to subtract galactic foregrounds. As an example, the multichroic architecture we propose could reduce the focal plane mass of the EPIC-IM CMB polarization mission study concept by a factor of 4, with great savings in required cryocooler performance and therefore cost. We have demonstrated the lens-coupled antenna concept in the POLARBEAR groundbased CMB polarization experiment which is now operating in Chile. That experiment uses a single-band planar antenna that gives excellent beam properties and optical efficiency. POLARBEAR recently succeeded in detecting gravitational lensing B-modes in the CMB polarization. In the laboratory, we have measured two octaves of total bandwidth in the log-periodic sinuous antenna. We have built filter banks of 2, 3, and 7 bands with 4, 6, and 14 bolometers per pixel for two linear polarizations. Pixels of this type are slated to be deployed on the ground in POLARBEAR and SPT-3G and proposed to be used on a balloon by EBEX

  20. 超声相控阵技术的仿真试验%The Simulation Experiment of the Phased Array Ultrasonic Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海涛; 史振; 程继隆; 蒋俊; 梁斌

    2011-01-01

    超声相控阵技术是一种先进的超声无损检测技术.超声相控阵技术通过对超声阵列换能器中各阵元进行精确延时控制,获得灵活可控的合成波束,并可随意控制聚焦点的位置.利用仿真相控阵合成聚焦技术的方法,搭建了一个16阵元、超声信号发射、接收和处理试验系统.利用该系统对缺陷试块进行了检测试验,试验结果与实际试块缺陷情况吻合.通过对试块缺陷的检测试验,对比聚焦与不聚焦的检测效果,证明了相控阵合成聚焦技术可以极大地提高检测的信噪比和灵敏度,验证了相控阵聚焦可以提高检测能力.%Ultrasonic phased array testing technology is an advanced ultrasonic nondestructive testing technology. Ultrasonic phased array technology can achieve flexible, controllable synthesized ultrasound beam and freely control t he focus point position by exciting each element of ultrasonic array transducer with independent phase delay. Based on the synthesis of phased array focusing approach experiment, a 16-element array signal acquisition and processing of experiment system was designed. Test experiments to the piece were carried out with this system. The experiment result fit with the actual defects. Result showed that this method could achieve the effect of phased array focusing, which greatly improved the detection signal noise ratio and sensitivity, also verified the ultrasonic phased array testing method was feasible. Through the experimental test of defect detection, especially with the contrast focusing and non-focusing detection experiment, the results showed that phased array technology could improve the defect detection capability.

  1. The NIKA2 instrument, a dual-band kilopixel KID array for millimetric astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Calvo, M; Catalano, A; Goupy, J; Monfardini, A; Ponthieu, N; Barria, E; Bres, G; Grollier, M; Garde, G; Leggeri, J -P; Pont, G; Triqueneaux, S; Adam, R; Bourrion, O; Macías-Pérez, J -F; Rebolo, M; Ritacco, A; Scordilis, J -P; Tourres, D; Vescovi, C; Désert, F -X; Adane, A; Coiffard, G; Leclercq, S; Doyle, S; Mauskopf, P; Tucker, C; Ade, P; André, P; Beelen, A; Belier, B; Bideaud, A; Billot, N; Comis, B; D'Addabbo, A; Kramer, C; Martino, J; Mayet, F; Pajot, F; Pascale, E; Perotto, L; Revéret, V; Rodriguez, L; Savini, G; Schuster, K; Sievers, A; Zylka, R

    2016-01-01

    NIKA2 (New IRAM KID Array 2) is a camera dedicated to millimeter wave astronomy based upon kilopixel arrays of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID). The pathfinder instrument, NIKA, has already shown state-of-the-art detector performance. NIKA2 builds upon this experience but goes one step further, increasing the total pixel count by a factor $\\sim$10 while maintaining the same per pixel performance. For the next decade, this camera will be the resident photometric instrument of the Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) 30m telescope in Sierra Nevada (Spain). In this paper we give an overview of the main components of NIKA2, and describe the achieved detector performance. The camera has been permanently installed at the IRAM 30m telescope in October 2015. It will be made accessible to the scientific community at the end of 2016, after a one-year commissioning period. When this happens, NIKA2 will become a fundamental tool for astronomers worldwide.

  2. ATLAS Pixel Opto-Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Arms, K E; Gan, K K; Holder, M; Jackson, P; Johnson, M; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Roggenbuck, A; Rush, C; Schade, P; Smith, S; Ter-Antonian, R; Ziolkowski, M; Zoeller, M M

    2005-01-01

    We have developed two radiation-hard ASICs for optical data transmission in the ATLAS pixel detector at the LHC at CERN: a driver chip for a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) diode for 80 Mbit/s data transmission from the detector, and a Bi-Phase Mark decoder chip to recover the control data and 40 MHz clock received optically by a PIN diode. We have successfully implemented both ASICs in 0.25 micron CMOS technology using enclosed layout transistors and guard rings for increased radiation hardness. We present results of the performance of these chips, including irradiation with 24 GeV protons up to 61 Mrad (2.3 x 10e15 p/cm^2).

  3. Fast Imaging Detector Readout Circuits with In-Pixel ADCs for Fourier Transform Imaging Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, D.; Blavier, J-F.; Cunningham, T.; Hancock, B.; Key, R.; Pannell, Z.; Sander, S.; Seshadri, S.; Sun, C.; Wrigley, C.

    2011-01-01

    Focal plane arrays (FPAs) with high frame rates and many pixels benefit several upcoming Earth science missions including GEO-CAPE, GACM, and ACE by enabling broader spatial coverage and higher spectral resolution. FPAs for the PanFTS, a high spatial resolution Fourier transform spectrometer and a candidate instrument for the GEO-CAPE mission are the focus of the developments reported here, but this FPA technology has the potential to enable a variety of future measurements and instruments. The ESTO ACT Program funded the developed of a fast readout integrated circuit (ROIC) based on an innovative in-pixel analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC features 60 ?m pixels, a 14-bit ADC in each pixel and operates at a continuous frame rate of 14 kHz consuming only 1.1 W of power. The ROIC outputs digitized data completely eliminating the bulky, power consuming signal chains needed by conventional FPAs. The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC has been fabricated in CMOS and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The current version is designed to be hybridized with PIN photodiode arrays via indium bump bonding for light detection in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. However, the ROIC design incorporates a small photodiode in each cell to permit detailed characterization of the ROICperformance without the need for hybridization. We will describe the essential features of the ROIC design and present results of ROIC performance measurements.

  4. Fast Imaging Detector Readout Circuits with In-Pixel ADCs for Fourier Transform Imaging Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, D.; Blavier, J-F.; Cunningham, T.; Hancock, B.; Key, R.; Pannell, Z.; Sander, S.; Seshadri, S.; Sun, C.; Wrigley, C.

    2011-01-01

    Focal plane arrays (FPAs) with high frame rates and many pixels benefit several upcoming Earth science missions including GEO-CAPE, GACM, and ACE by enabling broader spatial coverage and higher spectral resolution. FPAs for the PanFTS, a high spatial resolution Fourier transform spectrometer and a candidate instrument for the GEO-CAPE mission are the focus of the developments reported here, but this FPA technology has the potential to enable a variety of future measurements and instruments. The ESTO ACT Program funded the developed of a fast readout integrated circuit (ROIC) based on an innovative in-pixel analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC features 60 ?m pixels, a 14-bit ADC in each pixel and operates at a continuous frame rate of 14 kHz consuming only 1.1 W of power. The ROIC outputs digitized data completely eliminating the bulky, power consuming signal chains needed by conventional FPAs. The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC has been fabricated in CMOS and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The current version is designed to be hybridized with PIN photodiode arrays via indium bump bonding for light detection in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. However, the ROIC design incorporates a small photodiode in each cell to permit detailed characterization of the ROICperformance without the need for hybridization. We will describe the essential features of the ROIC design and present results of ROIC performance measurements.

  5. Advanced pixel architectures for scientific image sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Coath, R; Godbeer, A; Wilson, M; Turchetta, R

    2009-01-01

    We present recent developments from two projects targeting advanced pixel architectures for scientific applications. Results are reported from FORTIS, a sensor demonstrating variants on a 4T pixel architecture. The variants include differences in pixel and diode size, the in-pixel source follower transistor size and the capacitance of the readout node to optimise for low noise and sensitivity to small amounts of charge. Results are also reported from TPAC, a complex pixel architecture with ~160 transistors per pixel. Both sensors were manufactured in the 0.18μm INMAPS process, which includes a special deep p-well layer and fabrication on a high resistivity epitaxial layer for improved charge collection efficiency.

  6. Multiplexed Readout of MMC Detector Arrays Using Non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, S.; Wegner, M.; Gastaldo, L.; Fleischmann, A.; Enss, C.

    2014-08-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are widely used for various experiments in fields ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to X-ray spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysics or material science. Whereas in previous experiments single pixel detectors or small arrays have been used, for future applications large arrays are needed. Therefore, suitable multiplexing techniques for MMC arrays are currently under development. A promising approach for the readout of large arrays is the microwave SQUID multiplexer that employs non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs to create a frequency shift of high resonators that is in accordance with the detector signal and that can be monitored by using standard microwave measurement techniques. In this paper we discuss the design of a recently developed and fabricated 64 pixel detector array with integrated microwave SQUID multiplexer that was produced to test the suitability of this readout technique. The characterization of dc-SQUIDs with virtually identical washer design compared to the rf-SQUIDs of the SQUID multiplexer revealed that the crucial SQUID parameters such as the critical current of the Josephson junctions or the washer inductance are close to the design values and anticipates a successful operation of the SQUID multiplexer.

  7. Camera vibration measurement using blinking light-emitting diode array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Kazuki; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2017-01-23

    We present a new method for measuring camera vibrations such as camera shake and shutter shock. This method successfully detects the vibration trajectory and transient waveforms from the camera image itself. We employ a time-varying pattern as the camera test chart over the conventional static pattern. This pattern is implemented using a specially developed blinking light-emitting-diode array. We describe the theoretical framework and pattern analysis of the camera image for measuring camera vibrations. Our verification experiments show that our method has a detection accuracy and sensitivity of 0.1 pixels, and is robust against image distortion. Measurement results of camera vibrations in commercial cameras are also demonstrated.

  8. AIDA: A 16-channel amplifier ASIC to read out the advanced implantation detector array for experiments in nuclear decay spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, D. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Coleman-Smith, P. J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Davinson, T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I. H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Page, R. D. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Thomas, S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    We have designed a read-out ASIC for nuclear decay spectroscopy as part of the AIDA project - the Advanced Implantation Detector Array. AIDA will be installed in experiments at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in GSI, Darmstadt. The AIDA ASIC will measure the signals when unstable nuclei are implanted into the detector, followed by the much smaller signals when the nuclei subsequently decay. Implant energies can be as high as 20 GeV; decay products need to be measured down to 25 keV within just a few microseconds of the initial implants. The ASIC uses two amplifiers per detector channel, one covering the 20 GeV dynamic range, the other selectable over a 20 MeV or 1 GeV range. The amplifiers are linked together by bypass transistors which are normally switched off. The arrival of a large signal causes saturation of the low-energy amplifier and a fluctuation of the input voltage, which activates the link to the high-energy amplifier. The bypass transistors switch on and the input charge is integrated by the high-energy amplifier. The signal is shaped and stored by a peak-hold, then read out on a multiplexed output. Control logic resets the amplifiers and bypass circuit, allowing the low-energy amplifier to measure the subsequent decay signal. We present simulations and test results, demonstrating the AIDA ASIC operation over a wide range of input signals. (authors)

  9. Constraining Polarized Foregrounds for EoR Experiments I: 2D Power Spectra from the PAPER-32 Imaging Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, S. A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Nunhokee, C. D.; Bernardi, G.; Pober, J. C.; Ali, Z. S.; Bradley, R. F.; Carilli, C. L.; DeBoer, D. R.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Jacobs, D. C.; Klima, P.; MacMahon, D. H. E.; Manley, J. R.; Moore, D. F.; Parsons, A. R.; Stefan, I. I.; Walbrugh, W. P.

    2016-06-01

    Current generation low-frequency interferometers constructed with the objective of detecting the high-redshift 21 cm background aim to generate power spectra of the brightness temperature contrast of neutral hydrogen in primordial intergalactic medium. Two-dimensional (2D) power spectra (power in Fourier modes parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight) that formed from interferometric visibilities have been shown to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth foregrounds (known as the wedge) and spectrally structured 21 cm background emission (the EoR window). However, polarized foregrounds are known to possess spectral structure due to Faraday rotation, which can leak into the EoR window. In this work we create and analyze 2D power spectra from the PAPER-32 imaging array in Stokes I, Q, U, and V. These allow us to observe and diagnose systematic effects in our calibration at high signal-to-noise within the Fourier space most relevant to EoR experiments. We observe well-defined windows in the Stokes visibilities, with Stokes Q, U, and V power spectra sharing a similar wedge shape to that seen in Stokes I. With modest polarization calibration, we see no evidence that polarization calibration errors move power outside the wedge in any Stokes visibility to the noise levels attained. Deeper integrations will be required to confirm that this behavior persists to the depth required for EoR detection.

  10. A Northern Sky Survey for Point-Like Sources of EeV Neutral Particles with the Telescope Array Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R U; Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Chae, M J; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, W R; Fujii, T; Fukushima, M; Goto, T; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Honda, K; Ikeda, D; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kawata, K; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, J H; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, K; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Mukai, K; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nonaka, T; Nozato, A; Ogio, S; Ogura, J; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzawa, T; Takamura, M; Takeda, M; Takeishi, R; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wong, T; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yashiro, K; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2014-01-01

    We report on the search for steady point-like sources of neutral particles around 10$^{18}$ eV between 2008 May and 2013 May with the surface detector of the Telescope Array experiment. We found overall no significant point-like excess above 0.5 EeV in the northern sky. Subsequently, we also searched for coincidence with the Fermi bright Galactic sources. No significant coincidence was found within the statistical error. Hence, we set an upper limit at the 95% confidence level on the neutron flux that corresponds to an averaged flux of 0.07 km$^{-2}$ yr$^{-1}$ above 1 EeV in the northern sky. This is the most stringent flux upper limit in a northern sky survey assuming point-like sources. The upper limit at the 95% confidence level on the neutron flux from Cygnus X-3 is also set to 0.2 km$^{-2}$ yr$^{-1}$ above 0.5 EeV. This is an order of magnitude smaller than previous flux measurements.

  11. An ultrafast front-end ASIC for APD array detectors in X-ray time-resolved experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang-Fan; Li, Qiu-Ju; Liu, Peng; Fan, Lei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Ye; Li, Zhen-Jie

    2017-06-01

    An ultrafast front-end ASIC chip has been developed for APD array detectors in X-ray time-resolved experiments. The chip has five channels: four complete channels and one test channel with an analog output. Each complete channel consists of a preamplifier, a voltage discriminator and an open-drain output driver. A prototype chip has been designed and fabricated using 0.13 μm CMOS technology with a chip size of 1.3 mm × 1.9 mm. The electrical characterizations of the circuit demonstrate a very good intrinsic time resolution (rms) on the output pulse leading edge, with the test result better than 30 ps for high input signal charges (> 75 fC) and better than 100 ps for low input signal charges (30-75 fC), while keeping a low power consumption of 5 mW per complete channel. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11605227), High Energy Photon Source-Test Facility Project, and the State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics. This research used resources of the BSRF.

  12. Constraining Polarized Foregrounds for EoR Experiments I: 2D Power Spectra from the PAPER-32 Imaging Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kohn, S A; Nunhokee, C; Bernardi, G; Pober, J; Ali, Z; Bradley, R; Carilli, C; DeBoer, D; Gugliucci, N; Jacobs, D; Klima, P; MacMahon, D; Manley, J; Moore, D; Parsons, A; Stefan, I; Walbrugh, W

    2016-01-01

    Current-generation low frequency interferometers constructed with the objective of detecting the high-redshift 21 cm background, aim to generate power spectra of the brightness-temperature contrast of neutral hydrogen in primordial intergalactic medium. Two-dimensional power spectra (power in Fourier modes parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight) formed from interferometric visibilities have been shown to delineate a boundary between spectrally-smooth foregrounds (known as the wedge) and spectrally-structured 21 cm background emission (the EoR-window). However, polarized foregrounds are known to possess spectral structure due to Faraday rotation, which can leak into the EoR window. In this work, we create and analyze 2D power spectra from the PAPER-32 imaging array in Stokes I, Q, U and V. These allow us to observe and diagnose systematic effects in our calibration at high signal-to-noise within the Fourier space most relevant to EoR experiments. We observe well-defined windows in the Stokes visibilit...

  13. Group and phase velocities from deterministic and ambient sources measured during the AlpArray-EASI experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolínský, Petr; Zigone, Dimitri; Fuchs, Florian; Bianchi, Irene; Qorbani, Ehsan; Apoloner, Maria-Theresia; Bokelmann, Götz; AlpArray-EASI Working Group

    2016-04-01

    The Eastern Alpine Seismic Investigation (EASI) was a complementary experiment to the AlpArray project. EASI was composed of 55 broadband seismic stations deployed in a winding swath of 540 km length along longitude 13.350 E from the Czech-German border to the Adriatic Sea. Average north-south inter-station distance was 10 km, the distance of each station to either side of the central line was 6 km. Such a dense linear network allows for surface wave dispersion measurements by both deterministic and ambient noise sources along the same paths. During the experiment (July 2014 - August 2015), three earthquakes ML = 2.6, 2.9 and 4.2 occurred in Austria and Northern Italy only several kilometers off the swath. We measure Rayleigh and Love wave group velocities between the source and a single station for the recorded earthquakes, as well as phase velocities between selected pairs of stations using the standard two-station method. We also calculate cross-correlations of ambient noise between selected pairs of stations and we determine the corresponding group velocity dispersion curves. We propose a comparison of phase velocities between two stations measured from earthquakes with group velocities obtained from cross-correlations for the same station pairs. We also compare group velocities measured at single station using earthquakes, which occurred along the swath, with group velocities measured from cross-correlations. That way we analyze velocities of both deterministic and ambient noise reconstructed surface waves propagating along the same path. We invert the resulting dispersion curves for 1D shear wave velocity profiles with depth and we compile a quasi-2D velocity model along the EASI swath.

  14. Image fiber optic space-CDMA parallel transmission experiment using 8 x 8 VCSEL/PD arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Moriya; Kitayama, Ken-ichi; Igasaki, Yasunori; Shamoto, Naoki; Kaneda, Keiji

    2002-11-10

    We experimentally demonstrate space-code-division multiple access (space-CDMA) based twodimensional (2-D) parallel optical interconnections by using image fibers and 8 x 8 vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL)/photo diode (PD) arrays. Two spatially encoded four-bit (2 x 2) parallel optical signals were emitted fiom 2-D VCSEL arrays and transmitted through image fibers. The encoded signals were multiplexed by an image-fiber coupler and detected by a 2-D PD array on the receiver side. The receiver recovered the intended parallel signal by decoding the signal. The transmission speed was 64 Mbps/ch (total throughput: 512 Mbps). Bit-error-rate (BER) measurement with a laterally misaligned PD array showed the array had a misalignment tolerance of 25 microm for a BER performance of 10(-9).

  15. Implementation of TDI based digital pixel ROIC with 15μm pixel pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Omer; Shafique, Atia; Burak, A.; Caliskan, Can; Abbasi, Shahbaz; Yazici, Melik; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2016-05-01

    A 15um pixel pitch digital pixel for LWIR time delay integration (TDI) applications is implemented which occupies one fourth of pixel area compared to previous digital TDI implementation. TDI is implemented on 8 pixels with oversampling rate of 2. ROIC provides 16 bits output with 8 bits of MSB and 8 bits of LSB. Pixel can store 75 M electrons with a quantization noise of 500 electrons. Digital pixel TDI implementation is advantageous over analog counterparts considering power consumption, chip area and signal-to-noise ratio. Digital pixel TDI ROIC is fabricated with 0.18um CMOS process. In digital pixel TDI implementation photocurrent is integrated on a capacitor in pixel and converted to digital data in pixel. This digital data triggers the summation counters which implements TDI addition. After all pixels in a row contribute, the summed data is divided to the number of TDI pixels(N) to have the actual output which is square root of N improved version of a single pixel output in terms of signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR).

  16. Single-pixel 3D imaging with time-based depth resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Ming-Jie; Gibson, Graham M; Sun, Baoqing; Radwell, Neal; Lamb, Robert; Padgett, Miles J

    2016-01-01

    Time-of-flight three dimensional imaging is an important tool for many applications, such as object recognition and remote sensing. Unlike conventional imaging approach using pixelated detector array, single-pixel imaging based on projected patterns, such as Hadamard patterns, utilises an alternative strategy to acquire information with sampling basis. Here we show a modified single-pixel camera using a pulsed illumination source and a high-speed photodiode, capable of reconstructing 128x128 pixel resolution 3D scenes to an accuracy of ~3 mm at a range of ~5 m. Furthermore, we demonstrate continuous real-time 3D video with a frame-rate up to 12 Hz. The simplicity of the system hardware could enable low-cost 3D imaging devices for precision ranging at wavelengths beyond the visible spectrum.

  17. Phase 1 pixel modules production and High Density Interconnect testing

    CERN Document Server

    Still, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    During the first run of the LHC, luminosity peaked at $1 \\times 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ with $ \\approx 50 ns$ bunch spacing a pile-up of about 25, or simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing, occur in the CMS experiment. However after the upgrade of of the LHC during long shut down 1, luminosity, and therefore pile-up. Therefore the CMS pixel tracker has to be upgraded to be able to operate correctly under this news stronger constraints. That is how this CERN Summer Student project, which took place at the CERN Meyrin site, comes within the framework of the pixel detector upgrade in the CMS experiment with a work aimed on the phase 1 of pixel modules production and tests of the HDI. The production and tests of the HDI were held in cleanroom facilities. This included first hand as well as to work on pixel modules building and performing size and flatness tests on them, and on a other hand testing several HDIs. At first, prototypes modules were assembled before real modules building. Another aspect of work...

  18. Cryogenic time-domain multiplexer based on SQUID arrays and superconducting/normal conducting switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beev, N.; Kiviranta, M.; van der Kuur, J.; Bruijn, M.; Brandel, O.; Linzen, S.; Fritzsch, L.; Ahoranta, J.; Penttilä, J.; Roschier, L.

    2014-05-01

    We have demonstrated the operation of a 12-channel Beyer-style SQUID-based time domain multiplexer. It was manufactured using a fabrication process that is cross-compatible between VTT and IPHT-Jena. The multiplexer consists of twelve 12-SQUID series arrays, each shunted by a Zappe-style interferometer array acting as a flux-controlled superconducting/normal conducting switch. By keeping all switches but one in the superconducting state, it is possible to select one active readout channel at a time. A flux feedback coil common to all SQUID arrays allows realization of a flux-locked loop. We present characteristics of the multiplexer and measurement data from experiments with a 25-pixel X-ray calorimeter array operated at T < 100 mK in a dilution refrigerator.

  19. FE-I4 Chip Development for Upgraded ATLAS Pixel Detector at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Barbero, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A new ATLAS pixel chip FE-I4 has been developed for use in upgraded LHC luminosity environments, including the near-term Insertable B-Layer upgrade. FE-I4 is designed in a 130 nm CMOS technology, presenting advantages in terms of radiation tolerance and digital logic density compared to the 0.25 μm CMOS technology used for the current ATLAS pixel IC, FE-I3. FE-I4 architecture is based on an array of 80×336 pixels, each 50×250 μm2, consisting of analog and digital sections. The analog pixel section is designed for low power consumption and compatibility to several sensor candidates. It is based on a two-stage architecture with a pre-amp AC-coupled to a second stage of amplification. It features leakage current compensation circuitry, local 4-bit pre-amp feedback tuning and a discriminator locally adjusted through 5 configuration bits. The digital architecture is based on a 4-pixel unit called Pixel Digital Region (PDR) allowing for local storage of hits in 5-deep data buffers at pixel level for the duratio...

  20. Pixel diamond detectors for excimer laser beam diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, M.; Allegrini, P.; Conte, G.; Salvatori, S.

    2011-05-01

    Laser beam profiling technology in the UV spectrum of light is evolving with the increase of excimer lasers and lamps applications, that span from lithography for VLSI circuits to eye surgery. The development of a beam-profiler, able to capture the excimer laser single pulse and process the acquired pixel current signals in the time period between each pulse, is mandatory for such applications. 1D and 2D array detectors have been realized on polycrystalline CVD diamond specimens. The fast diamond photoresponse, in the ns time regime, suggests the suitability of such devices for fine tuning feedback of high-power pulsed-laser cavities, whereas solar-blindness guarantees high performance in UV beam diagnostics, also under high intensity background illumination. Offering unique properties in terms of thermal conductivity and visible-light transparency, diamond represents one of the most suitable candidate for the detection of high-power UV laser emission. The relatively high resistivity of diamond in the dark has allowed the fabrication of photoconductive vertical pixel-detectors. A semitransparent light-receiving back-side contact has been used for detector biasing. Each pixel signal has been conditioned by a multi-channel read-out electronics made up of a high-sensitive integrator and a Σ-Δ A/D converter. The 500 μs conversion time has allowed a data acquisition rate up to 2 kSPS (Sample Per Second).