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Sample records for pituitary neoplasms

  1. A pilot case of hypopituitarism after surgical treatment of pituitary neoplasm and literature review%飞行员垂体瘤术后垂体功能减退症一例并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晶; 徐先荣; 郑军; 王铃; 王露今

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨垂体瘤及其术后并发垂体功能减退的临床特征及飞行员的医学鉴定原则.方法 分析1例飞行员垂体瘤术后并发垂体功能减退症的临床资料,并复习国内外相关文献.结果 患者有不规律头痛发作,头颅MRI发现垂体肿瘤,行经蝶窦垂体瘤切除术,术后出现垂体功能低下,予以激素替代治疗,最终做停飞结论.结论 垂体瘤早期无特异性临床表现,影像学检查是明确诊断的重要方法,术后并发症将影响预后.飞行员患垂体瘤应根据临床特征、治疗效果、飞行机种和飞行任务个别评定.%Objective To discuss the clinical features and post-operative complications of pituitary neoplasms and aeromedical determination principles. Methods The clinical data of a pilot with hypopituitarism after surgery for pituitary neoplasm were analyzed,and the related literatures were reviewed. Results The patient had an irregular headache and pituitary neoplasm was found on MRI.After transsphenoidal surgery,the patient had symptoms of hypopituitarism and began to have hormone replacement therapy.The pilot was gounded permanently. Conclusions Pituitary neoplasm has no characteristic clinical features in early stage.Imaging examinations are valuable methods in diagnosis.Postoperative complications will impair prognosis.Aeromedical assessment of flying personnel with pituitary neoplasm should be evaluated according to clinical features,therapy effects,aircraft types and flight duties.

  2. Pituitary adenoma: a radiotherapeutic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platta, Christopher S; Mackay, Christopher; Welsh, James S

    2010-08-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise approximately 10% to 20% of all central nervous system neoplasms whereas autopsy series have suggested that the incidence of pituitary adenoma in the general population may approach 25%. Several treatment modalities are used in the treatment of pituitary adenomas, including observation, surgery, medical intervention, and radiotherapy. The treatment modality employed depends greatly on the type of pituitary adenoma and presenting symptoms. This review will discuss the biology of pituitary adenomas and the current management principles for the treatment of prolactinomas, Cushing disease, acromegaly, and nonsecretory adenomas, with an emphasis on the published radiotherapeutic literature.

  3. Pituitary Adenoma Segmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Egger, Jan; Kuhnt, Daniela; Freisleben, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Sellar tumors are approximately 10-15% among all intracranial neoplasms. The most common sellar lesion is the pituitary adenoma. Manual segmentation is a time-consuming process that can be shortened by using adequate algorithms. In this contribution, we present a segmentation method for pituitary adenoma. The method is based on an algorithm we developed recently in previous work where the novel segmentation scheme was successfully used for segmentation of glioblastoma multiforme and provided an average Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 77%. This scheme is used for automatic adenoma segmentation. In our experimental evaluation, neurosurgeons with strong experiences in the treatment of pituitary adenoma performed manual slice-by-slice segmentation of 10 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cases. Afterwards, the segmentations were compared with the segmentation results of the proposed method via the DSC. The average DSC for all data sets was 77.49% +/- 4.52%. Compared with a manual segmentation that took, on the...

  4. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Pituitary Gland Mimicking a Pituitary Adenoma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Da Mi; Yu, In Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Han Kyu [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Son Hyun Jin [Dept. of Pathology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    A 38-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with diplopia. The patient had a relatively well-defined pituitary mass with high cellularity as well as weaker enhancement on imaging modalities including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), than a typical pituitary adenoma. The distinction between a pseudotumor and an invasive neoplasm is very difficult before biopsy. In this case report, we discuss the characteristic imaging features of a fibrosing inflammatory pseudotumor of the pituitary gland

  5. Reversible pituitary hyperplasia at birth in a macrosomic full-term baby boy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipoff, Jennifer; Wilson, Thomas A. [State University of New York, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Peyster, Robert [Stony Brook University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Pituitary hyperplasia is generally associated with end-organ failure such as primary hypothyroidism, physiological changes such as puberty and pregnancy, or neoplasms secreting releasing factors. We present a full-term infant with an enlarged pituitary height of 8 mm at age 3 days despite a normal endocrinological evaluation. Repeat imaging at 5 months of age revealed a normal-size pituitary gland. To our knowledge, pituitary hyperplasia has not been described in a neonate with normal pituitary function. (orig.)

  6. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research related to brain tumors, including pituitary tumors, in their laboratories at ... institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research related to brain tumors, including pituitary tumors, in their laboratories at ...

  7. Familial pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeva, S; Vasilev, V; Vroonen, L; Naves, L; Jaffrain-Rea, M-L; Daly, A F; Zacharieva, S; Beckers, A

    2010-12-01

    Pituitary adenomas are benign intracranial neoplasms that present a major clinical concern because of hormonal overproduction or compression symptoms of adjacent structures. Most arise in a sporadic setting with a small percentage developing as a part of familial syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), Carney complex (CNC), and the recently described familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and MEN-4. While the genetic alterations responsible for the formation of sporadic adenomas remain largely unknown, considerable advances have been made in defining culprit genes in these familial syndromes. Mutations in MEN1 and PRKAR1A genes are found in the majority of MEN1 and CNC patients, respectively. About 15% of FIPA kindreds present with mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene. Mutations in the CDKN1B gene, encoding p27(Kip)¹ were identified in MEN4 cases. Familial tumours appear to differ from their sporadic counterparts not only in genetic basis but also in clinical characteristics. Evidence suggests that, especially in MEN1 and FIPA, they are more aggressive and affect patients at younger age, therefore justifying the importance of early diagnosis. In this review, we summarize the genetic and clinical characteristics of these familial pituitary adenomas.

  8. Contemporary issues in the evaluation and management of pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekic, S; Stojanovic, M; Popovic, V

    2015-12-01

    Pituitary adenomas are common benign monoclonal neoplasms accounting for about 15% of intracranial neoplasms. Data from postmortem studies and imaging studies suggest that 1 of 5 individuals in the general population may have pituitary adenoma. Some pituitary adenomas (mainly microadenomas which have a diameter of less than 1 cm) are exceedingly common and are incidentally diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed for an unrelated reason (headache, vertigo, head trauma). Most microadenomas remain clinically occult and stable in size, without an increase in tumor cells and without local mass effects. However, some pituitary adenomas grow slowly, enlarge by expansion and become demarcated from normal pituitary (macroadenomas have a diameter greater than 1 cm). They may be clinically silent or secrete anterior pituitary hormones in excess such as prolactin, growth hormone (GH), or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) causing diseases like prolactinoma, acromegaly, Cushing's disease or rarely thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) or gonadotropins (LH, FSH). The incidence of the various subtypes of pituitary adenoma varies but the most common is prolactinoma. Clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs), which do not secrete hormones often cause local mass symptoms and represent one-third of pituitary adenomas. Given the high prevalence of pituitary adenomas and their heterogeneity (different tumor subtypes), it is critical that clinicians have a thorough understanding of the potential abnormalities in pituitary function and prognostic factors for behavior of pituitary adenomas in order to timely implement specific treatment modalities. Regarding pathogenesis of these tumors genetics, epigenetics and signaling pathways are the focus of current research yet our understanding of pituitary tumorigenesis remains incomplete. Although several genes and signaling pathways have been identified as important factors in the development of pituitary tumors, current

  9. A 23-Year-Old Female with a Mixed Germ Cell Tumor of the Pituitary Infundibulum: The Challenge of Differentiating Neoplasm from Lymphocytic Infundibuloneurohypophysitis—A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Sann Yu Mon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathologic spectrum of diseases that infiltrate the pituitary infundibulum includes a broad variety of clinical entities. There are significant differences in the prevalence of these etiologies depending on the age of presentation. Lymphocytic infundibuloneurohypophysitis (LINH predominates over other causes of infundibular disease in adults over age 21. Differentiating LINH from other causes of infundibular disease can be difficult because the various etiologies often have similar clinical presentations and radiologic imaging characteristics. We report the first case in an adult of a mixed germ cell tumor comprised of germinoma and embryonal cell carcinoma infiltrating the pituitary infundibulum. In our case, a 23-year-old female was initially misdiagnosed as having LINH. She presented with panhypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus, which is the most common initial presentation in both entities. The two diagnoses are difficult to distinguish based on MRI imaging, CSF findings, and histopathological examination. Our case demonstrates the need for close follow-up of patients with isolated lesions of the pituitary infundibulum and reinforces the need for biopsy of an infundibular lesion when progression of disease is demonstrated. In our case, biopsy with comprehensive immunohistochemical staining was the sole means of making a definitive diagnosis.

  10. Coexisting intracranial tumors with pituitary adenomas: Genetic association or coincidence?

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    Furtado Sunil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The co-occurrence of two or more brain tumors with different histological features is rare. The authors report three rare cases of intracranial tumors associated with pituitary adenomas. Two of the pituitary tumors were functioning adenomas: a prolactinoma and a thyrotropin secreting adenoma. Two of the associated intracranial neoplasms were gliomas and one was a meningioma. Radiological and clinical examination for syndromal association was negative in all cases. We briefly discuss the presentation and treatment options of these cases and review the 19 previous publications in the literature of pituitary tumors occurring in association with other neoplasms and explore the possible links underlying these co-occurring neoplasms. Our three cases represent 0.86% of all pituitary tumors operated at our institute over a 9-year period.

  11. Pituitary tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enough of its hormones. This condition is called hypopituitarism . The causes of pituitary tumors are unknown. Some ... Cyst Endocrine glands Gigantism Growth hormone test Hyperthyroidism Hypopituitarism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Prolactin blood test ...

  12. Pituitary infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... during or right after childbirth, it is called Sheehan syndrome . This is a very rare condition. Risk factors ... commonly, pituitary dysfunction may appear more slowly. In Sheehan syndrome, for example, the first symptom may be a ...

  13. Pituitary apoplexy

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    Salam Ranabir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy is rare endocrine emergency which can occur due to infarction or haemorrhage of pituitary gland. This disorder most often involves a pituitary adenoma. Occasionally it may be the first manifestation of an underlying adenoma. There is conflicting data regarding which type of pituitary adenoma is prone for apoplexy. Some studies showed predominance of non-functional adenomas while some other studies showed a higher prevalence in functioning adenomas amongst which prolactinoma have the highest risk. Although pituitary apoplexy can occur without any precipitating factor in most cases, there are some well recognizable risk factors such as hypertension, medications, major surgeries, coagulopathies either primary or following medications or infection, head injury, radiation or dynamic testing of the pituitary. Patients usually present with headache, vomiting, altered sensorium, visual defect and/or endocrine dysfunction. Hemodynamic instability may be result from adrenocorticotrophic hormone deficiency. Imaging with either CT scan or MRI should be performed in suspected cases. Intravenous fluid and hydrocortisone should be administered after collection of sample for baseline hormonal evaluation. Earlier studies used to advocate urgent decompression of the lesion but more recent studies favor conservative approach for most cases with surgery reserved for those with deteriorating level of consciousness or increasing visual defect. The visual and endocrine outcomes are almost similar with either surgery or conservative management. Once the acute phase is over, patient should be re-evaluated for hormonal deficiencies.

  14. MicroRNAs in Human Pituitary Adenomas

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    Xu-Hui Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of recently identified noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level. Due to the large number of genes regulated by miRNAs, miRNAs play important roles in many cellular processes. Emerging evidence indicates that miRNAs are dysregulated in pituitary adenomas, a class of intracranial neoplasms which account for 10–15% of diagnosed brain tumors. Deregulated miRNAs and their targets contribute to pituitary adenomas progression and are associated with cell cycle control, apoptosis, invasion, and pharmacological treatment of pituitary adenomas. To provide an overview of miRNAs dysregulation and functions of these miRNAs in pituitary adenoma progression, we summarize the deregulated miRNAs and their targets to shed more light on their potential as therapeutic targets and novel biomarkers.

  15. A STUDY OF PITUITARY GLAND TUMOURS

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    Rame

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pituitary gland is known as the “Master Gland” of the body as it controls majority of the endocrine glands of the body. Embryologically, they are formed by two parts. There are two types of malignancies encountered namely adenomas and carcinomas. Vast majority of the neoplasms located in the sella turcica are benign pituitary adenomas derived from adenohypophyseal cells. The aim is to study the pituitary malignancies. METHODS The sample size included 100 cases of intra-cranial neoplasms that turned in the Department of Medicine in KVG Medical College, Sullia and different local private hospitals of Sullia and Mangalore. RESULTS Pituitary tumours comprised 6(6% of all the tumour studies. They occurred maximally in the age above 14 years. Tumours showed a male predominance. All the tumours were located in pituitary fossa. Principal presenting complaint was visual disturbance. Microscopically, the tumour was composed of small polyhedral to round cells with a uniform darkly staining round nucleus and scant eosinophilic cytoplasm. The cells formed papillary structures or were arranged in a trabecular pattern. CONCLUSION There is a male predominance in this study and the percentage of cases was found to be less in this region of Karnataka

  16. [Rol of pituitary tumour-transforming gene (PTTG) in the pituitary adenomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ortiga, Ruth; Sánchez Tejada, Laura; Peiró Cabrera, Gloria; Moreno-Pérez, Oscar; Arias Mendoza, Nieves; Aranda López, F Ignacio; Picó Alfonso, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pituitary tumours is far to be understood. Pituitary transforming tumour gene (PTTG), a gen that induces aneuploidy, genetic instability, cellular proliferation and to stimulate angiogenesis, has been involved in neoplasic transformation and shown overexpressed in many neoplasm as lung, breast, endometrium, thyroid and colon malignant tumours. On the other hand, PTTG has been inconsistently studied in pituitary tumours. The majority of studies have been performed in animals and there is a great variability in the methods used in its determination. The goal of this review is to resume the role of PTTG in tumourogenesis and critically to revise the studies published in humans in order to advance in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas and to find clinical useful predictors of the behavior of these tumours.

  17. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

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    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  18. Acute pituitary apoplexy complicating a pituitary macroadenoma

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    Febin Joseph

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition caused by either haemorrhage or infarction of the pituitary gland. In most cases, a pre-existing pituitary macroadenoma is present. Patients present with the clinical syndrome of headache, visual defects or ophthalmoplegia, altered state of consciousness and variable endocrine deficits.

  19. Morphologic effects of hGRH gene expression on the pituitary, liver, and pancreas of MT-hGRH transgenic mice. An in situ hybridization analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, R. V.; Jin, L; A.; Chang; Kulig, E.; Camper, S A; Ross, B. D.; Downs, T. R.; Frohman, L A

    1992-01-01

    Morphologic changes in the pituitary, liver, and pancreas of mice with the metallothionein-human growth hormone--releasing hormone (MT-hGRH) transgene were analyzed by in situ hybridization histochemistry (ISH). There was progression from somatotroph hyperplasia to neoplasia in pituitaries of transgenic mice. Pituitary neoplasms were present between 9 to 12 months of age in some mice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) readily identified enlarged pituitaries in MT-hGRH transgenic mice. Serum mo...

  20. Myeloid neoplasms with eosinophilia.

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    Reiter, Andreas; Gotlib, Jason

    2017-02-09

    Molecular diagnostics has generated substantial dividends in dissecting the genetic basis of myeloid neoplasms with eosinophilia. The family of diseases generated by dysregulated fusion tyrosine kinase (TK) genes is recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) category, "Myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and rearrangement of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or FGFR1, or with PCM1-JAK2" In addition to myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), these patients can present with myelodysplastic syndrome/MPN, as well as de novo or secondary mixed-phenotype leukemias or lymphomas. Eosinophilia is a common, but not invariable, feature of these diseases. The natural history of PDGFRA- and PDGFRB-rearranged neoplasms has been dramatically altered by imatinib. In contrast, patients with FGFR1 and JAK2 fusion TK genes exhibit a more aggressive course and variable sensitivity to current TK inhibitors, and in most cases, long-term disease-free survival may only be achievable with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Similar poor prognosis outcomes may be observed with rearrangements of FLT3 or ABL1 (eg, both of which commonly partner with ETV6), and further investigation is needed to validate their inclusion in the current WHO-defined group of eosinophilia-associated TK fusion-driven neoplasms. The diagnosis chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified (CEL, NOS) is assigned to patients with MPN with eosinophilia and nonspecific cytogenetic/molecular abnormalities and/or increased myeloblasts. Myeloid mutation panels have identified somatic variants in patients with a provisional diagnosis of hypereosinophilia of undetermined significance, reclassifying some of these cases as eosinophilia-associated neoplasms. Looking forward, one of the many challenges will be how to use the results of molecular profiling to guide prognosis and selection of actionable therapeutic targets. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Peroxiredoxins in colorectal neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, X.Y.; Fu, X.Z.; Wang, X. H.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are novel group proteins with efficient antioxidant capacity, and some of them also have effects on cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance. Altogether six distinct Prxs expressions were investigated in histological samples of colorectal neoplasm and the distant normal tissues and investigated associatedly with parameters such as clinical stage and lymphnodes metastasis. Normal colorectal tis...

  2. Pituitary tumors containing cholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, J F; Lindholm, J; Andersen, B N

    1987-01-01

    We found small amounts of cholecystokinin in the normal human adenohypophysis and therefore examined pituitary tumors from 87 patients with acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome, prolactinoma, or inactive pituitary adenomas. Five adenomas associated with Nelson's syndrome contained...

  3. Pituitary Tumors: Condition Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and metabolism. Thyroid-stimulating hormone is involved in growth, body temperature, and heart rate. Nonfunctioning pituitary tumors (also called nonsecretory tumors) do not produce hormones. They can press on or damage the pituitary ...

  4. Pituitary tumors containing cholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, J F; Lindholm, J; Andersen, B N

    1987-01-01

    We found small amounts of cholecystokinin in the normal human adenohypophysis and therefore examined pituitary tumors from 87 patients with acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome, prolactinoma, or inactive pituitary adenomas. Five adenomas associated with Nelson's syndrome contained......'s disease and 7 acromegaly with adenomas containing ACTH. The cholecystokinin peptides from the tumors were smaller and less sulfated than cholecystokinin from normal pituitary glands. We conclude that ACTH-producing pituitary cells may also produce an altered form of cholecystokinin....

  5. CT of pituitary abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, T.C.; Johns, R.D.; Long, M.; Myles, S.T.

    1985-06-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition, with only 50 cases reported in the literature. Of those, 29 cases were well documented for analysis. Preoperative diagnosis of pituitary abscess is difficult. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of pituitary abscess was first described in 1983; the abscess was depicted by axial images with coronal reconstruction. The authors recently encountered a case of pituitary abscess documented by direct coronal CT of the sella turcica.

  6. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative ...

  7. Hemorrhagic chondroid chordoma mimicking pituitary apoplexy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.J.; Kalnin, A.J.; Holodny, A.I. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital, Newark, NJ (United States); Schulder, M.; Grigorian, A. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Newark, NJ (United States); Sharer, L.R. [Dept. of Pathology, University Hospital, Newark, NJ (United States)

    1998-11-01

    We describe a hemorrhagic chondroid chordoma involving the sella turcica with suprasellar extension. The CT and MRI appearances mimiked a hemorrhagic pituitary adenoma. Chondroid chordoma is a variant composed of elements of both chordoma and cartilaginous tissue. An uncommon bone neoplasm, located almost exclusively in the spheno-occipital region, it is usually not considered in the differential diagnosis of a tumor with acute hemorrhage in the sellar region. We discuss the clinical and radiological characteristics which may allow one to differentiate chondroid chordoma from other tumors of this area. (orig.) With 3 figs., 9 refs.

  8. Familial pituitary tumor syndromes.

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    Elston, Marianne S; McDonald, Kerrie L; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Robinson, Bruce G

    2009-08-01

    The vast majority of pituitary tumors are benign and occur sporadically; however, they can still result in significant morbidity and even premature mortality through mass effects and hormone dysfunction. The etiology of sporadic tumors is still poorly understood; by contrast, advances have been made in our understanding of familial pituitary adenoma syndromes in the past decade. Currently, four genes are known to be associated with familial pituitary tumor syndromes: MEN1, CDKN1B, PRKAR1A and AIP. The first three genes are associated with a variety of extrapituitary pathologies, for example, primary hyperparathyroidism with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, which might aid identification of these syndromes. By contrast, AIP mutations seem to occur in the setting of isolated familial pituitary adenomas, particularly of the growth-hormone-secreting subtype. Awareness and identification of familial pituitary tumor syndromes is important because of potential associated pathologies and important implications for family members. Here, we review the current knowledge of familial pituitary tumor syndromes.

  9. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in Pituitary Adenomas by Integrating Analysis of Microarray Data

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    Peng Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenomas, monoclonal in origin, are the most common intracranial neoplasms. Altered gene expression as well as somatic mutations is detected frequently in pituitary adenomas. The purpose of this study was to detect differentially expressed genes (DEGs and biological processes during tumor formation of pituitary adenomas. We performed an integrated analysis of publicly available GEO datasets of pituitary adenomas to identify DEGs between pituitary adenomas and normal control (NC tissues. Gene function analysis including Gene Ontology (GO, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway enrichment analysis, and protein-protein interaction (PPI networks analysis was conducted to interpret the biological role of those DEGs. In this study we detected 3994 DEGs (2043 upregulated and 1951 downregulated in pituitary adenoma through an integrated analysis of 5 different microarray datasets. Gene function analysis revealed that the functions of those DEGs were highly correlated with the development of pituitary adenoma. This integrated analysis of microarray data identified some genes and pathways associated with pituitary adenoma, which may help to understand the pathology underlying pituitary adenoma and contribute to the successful identification of therapeutic targets for pituitary adenoma.

  10. A rare case of pituitary chromophobe carcinoma in a dog: clinical, tomographic and histopathological findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, M.; Binanti, D.; Zagarella, P.G.; Iocca, F.; Zani, D. De; Ravasio, G.; Giancamillo, M. Di; Zani, D.D.

    2016-01-01

    A 9 year old male mixed-breed dog was presented for progressive aggressiveness towards the owner. The neurological evaluation was consistent with a forebrain syndrome. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed enlargement of the third ventricle and presence of a large spheroidal neoplasm in the sellar/parasellar region suggestive of a pituitary macroadenoma. On the owner request, the dog was euthanized. Histopathological examination revealed the presence of a pituitary chromophobe carcinoma. To the author’s knowledge, pituitary carcinomas have been rarely described in dogs, especially the chromophobe subtype. PMID:27800300

  11. Obesity and gastrointestinal neoplasms

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    Izabela Binkowska-Borgosz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Being overweight or obese is a significant public health problem in the 21st century due to its scale, common existence and its cause-effect association with multiple diseases. Excessive accumulation of adipose tissue in humans is regarded as a major risk factor for development of cardiovascular and skeletal diseases. However, data from recent years have revealed that obesity is also strongly associated with increased risk of the majority of cancers in humans, including those originating from the gastrointestinal tract. During the last few year this association has been thoroughly proven and supported by several epidemiological analyses. The authors present i the current state of knowledge regarding key (pathomechanisms that link metabolism of human adipose tissue to development/progression of neoplasms (especially in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as ii the results of selected clinical studies in which the influence of obesity on risk of gastrointestinal cancer development has been addressed.

  12. Obesity and gastrointestinal neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Binkowska-Borgosz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Being overweight or obese is a significant public health problem in the 21st century due to its scale, common existence and its cause-effect association with multiple diseases. Excessive accumulation of adipose tissue in humans is regarded as a major risk factor for development of cardiovascular and skeletal diseases. However, data from recent years have revealed that obesity is also strongly associated with increased risk of the majority of cancers in humans, including those originating from the gastrointestinal tract. During the last few year this association has been thoroughly proven and supported by several epidemiological analyses. The authors present i the current state of knowledge regarding key (pathomechanisms that link metabolism of human adipose tissue to development/progression of neoplasms (especially in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as ii the results of selected clinical studies in which the influence of obesity on risk of gastrointestinal cancer development has been addressed.

  13. Temozolomide in aggressive pituitary adenomas and carcinomas

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    Leon D. Ortiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temozolomide is an alkylating agent used in the treatment of gliomas and, more recently, aggressive pituitary adenomas and carcinomas. Temozolomide methylates DNA and, thereby, has antitumor effects. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, a DNA repair enzyme, removes the alkylating adducts that are induced by temozolomide, thereby counteracting its effects. A Medline search for all of the available publications regarding the use of temozolomide for the treatment of pituitary tumors was performed. To date, 46 cases of adenohypophysial tumors that were treated with temozolomide, including 30 adenomas and 16 carcinomas, have been reported. Eighteen of the 30 (60% adenomas and 11 of the 16 (69% carcinomas responded favorably to treatment. One patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and an aggressive prolactin-producing adenoma was also treated and demonstrated a good response. No significant complications have been attributed to temozolomide therapy. Thus, temozolomide is an effective treatment for the majority of aggressive adenomas and carcinomas. Evidence indicates that there is an inverse correlation between levels of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase immunoexpression and therapeutic response. Alternatively, high-level O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase immunoexpression correlates with an unfavorable response. Here, we review the use of temozolomide for treating pituitary neoplasms.

  14. Genomics of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms.

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    Zoi, Katerina; Cross, Nicholas C P

    2017-03-20

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a group of related clonal hematologic disorders characterized by excess accumulation of one or more myeloid cell lineages and a tendency to transform to acute myeloid leukemia. Deregulated JAK2 signaling has emerged as the central phenotypic driver of BCR -ABL1-negative MPNs and a unifying therapeutic target. In addition, MPNs show unexpected layers of genetic complexity, with multiple abnormalities associated with disease progression, interactions between inherited factors and phenotype driver mutations, and effects related to the order in which mutations are acquired. Although morphology and clinical laboratory analysis continue to play an important role in defining these conditions, genomic analysis is providing a platform for better disease definition, more accurate diagnosis, direction of therapy, and refined prognostication. There is an emerging consensus with regard to many prognostic factors, but there is a clear need to synthesize genomic findings into robust, clinically actionable and widely accepted scoring systems as well as the need to standardize the laboratory methodologies that are used.

  15. What Are Pituitary Tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grow and to make steroid hormones (such as cortisol). Too much ACTH from the pituitary causes Cushing’s ... Cancer Atlas Press Room Cancer Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook Instagram Cancer Information, ...

  16. Pituitary Gland Disorders Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reducing the amount of water lost in urine Oxytocin – causes milk to flow from the breasts in breastfeeding women, and may also help labor to progress Pituitary Tumors The most frequent type ...

  17. The FGFR4-G388R Polymorphism Promotes Mitochondrial STAT3 Serine Phosphorylation to Facilitate Pituitary Growth Hormone Cell Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Toru Tateno; Asa, Sylvia L.; Lei Zheng; Thomas Mayr; Axel Ullrich; Shereen Ezzat

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are common intracranial neoplasms, yet few germline abnormalities have been implicated in their pathogenesis. Here we show that a single nucleotide germline polymorphism (SNP) substituting an arginine (R) for glycine (G) in the FGFR4 transmembrane domain can alter pituitary cell growth and hormone production. Compared with FGFR4-G388 mammosomatotroph cells that support prolactin (PRL) production, FGFR4-R388 cells express predominantly growth hormone (GH). Growth promoting eff...

  18. MR imaging of pituitary dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashimada, Akio; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari; Mamiya, Toshio; Takahashi, Taku; Kamano, Tsuyoshi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Inoue, Yusuke (Saitama Medical School, Kawagoe (Japan). Medical Center)

    1993-02-01

    Pituitary MR imaging was performed in 32 patients with clinically diagnosed pituitary dwarfism and 12 normal controls. The patients were divided into two groups according to the severity of pituitary dwarfism based on endocrinological data. The two patients with severe dwarfism showed transection of the pituitary stalk, ectopic posterior lobe and atrophy of the anterior lobe on MR imaging, while the 27 patients with mild dwarfism showed no abnormal MR findings of the pituitary gland. The former group corresponds to typical pituitary dwarfism and the latter to partial GH deficiency, which was recently proposed as another type of pituitary dwarfism. In conclusion, pituitary MR imaging may differentiate partial GH deficiency from typical (stalk-transected) pituitary dwarfism. (author).

  19. The role of temozolomide in the treatment of aggressive pituitary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, James K; Patel, Jimmy; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2015-06-01

    Pituitary tumors are amongst the most common intracranial neoplasms and are generally benign. However, some pituitary tumors exhibit clinically aggressive behavior that is characterized by tumor recurrence and continued progression despite repeated treatments with conventional surgical, radiation and medical therapies. More recently, temozolomide, a second generation oral alkylating agent, has shown therapeutic promise for aggressive pituitary adenomas and carcinomas with favorable clinical and radiographic responses. Temozolomide causes DNA damage by methylation of the O(6) position of guanine, which results in potent cytotoxic DNA adducts and consequently, tumor cell apoptosis. The degree of MGMT expression appears to be inversely related to therapeutic responsiveness to temozolomide with a significant number of temozolomide-sensitive pituitary tumors exhibiting low MGMT expression. The presence of high MGMT expression appears to mitigate the effectiveness of temozolomide and this has been used as a marker in several studies to predict the efficacy of temozolomide. Recent evidence also suggests that mutations in mismatch repair proteins such as MSH6 could render pituitary tumors resistant to temozolomide. In this article, the authors review the development of temozolomide, its biochemistry and interaction with O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), its role in adjuvant treatment of aggressive pituitary neoplasms, and future works that could influence the efficacy of temozolomide therapy.

  20. General Information about Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Treatment Pituitary Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pituitary Tumors Go to Health Professional ... by many other glands in the body. Enlarge Anatomy of the inside of the brain, showing the ...

  1. Ganglion cell tumours in the sella turcica in close morphological connection with pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyja, Ewa; Maksymowicz, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Zieliński, Grzegorz; Kunicki, Jacek; Bonicki, Wiesław; Witek, Przemysław; Naganska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Ganglion cell tumours in the sellar region are uncommon. They are usually associated with pituitary adenomas, while isolated ganglion cell neoplasms are extremely rare. We report the clinicopathological studies of five cases diagnosed as ganglion cell tumours located in the intrasellar region: four mixed/collision tumours composed of gangliocytoma and pituitary adenoma, and one isolated ganglioglioma unrelated to adenoma. Clinically, two patients presented with acromegaly, while three others were initially diagnosed as non-functioning adenomas. In four cases, the histopathological examination of surgical specimens revealed intermixed lesions composed of pituitary adenoma and ganglion cell elements. The adenomas appeared to secrete growth hormone. Electron microscopy enabled identification of the sparsely granulated somatotroph cells. Neoplastic neuronal lesions were composed of mature ganglion cells, including binucleate or multinucleate cells. In all cases, boundaries between adenomatous and gangliocytic components were not clearly demarcated, and numerous gangliocytic cells were closely intermingled with adenomatous tissue. One case lacked endocrine symptoms, and no pituitary adenoma was identified in the surgically excised material; it was finally diagnosed as low-grade ganglioglioma. The etiopathogenesis of ganglion cell neoplasms in the sellar region is not clearly defined. Our study revealed that if ganglion cell neoplasms were combined with adenoma, both neoplastic components were closely related to each other, and numerous neuronal elements were strictly intermingled with adenoma cells. Such a tissue pattern indicates that these neoplastic changes, including their common respective etiopathogeneses, are closely related. The identification of both components in sellar regions may have some nosological implications.

  2. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myeloproliferative neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Progress in the diagnosis and classification of pituitary adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis V Syro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenomas are common neoplasms. Their classification is based upon size, invasion of adjacent structures, sporadic or familial cases, biochemical activity, clinical manifestations, morphological characteristics, response to treatment and recurrence. Although they are considered benign tumors, some of them are difficult to treat due to their tendency to recur, despite standardized treatment. Functional tumors present other challenges for normalizing their biochemical activity. Novel approaches for early diagnosis as well as different perspectives on classification may help to identify subgroups of patients with similar characteristics, creating opportunities to match each patient with the best personalized treatment option. In this paper we present the progress in the diagnosis and classification of different subgroups of patients with pituitary tumors that may be managed with specific considerations according to their tumor subtype.

  4. Molecular Imaging of Pituitary Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2016-01-01

    The presence of large numbers and/or the high affinity of dopamine D2 and/or somatostatin receptors on pituitary adenomas may enable their visualization with radionuclide-coupled receptor agonists or antagonists. However, the role of these imaging modalities in the differential diagnosis of or therapeutic purposes for pituitary lesions is very limited. Only in very specific cases might these molecular imaging techniques become helpful. These include the differential diagnosis of pituitary lesions, ectopic production of pituitary hormones, such as adrenocorticotrophic hormone, growth hormone (GH) or their releasing hormones (corticotropin-releasing hormone and GH-releasing hormone), and the localization of metastases from pituitary carcinomas.

  5. IMAGING IN PITUITARY APOPLEXY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy is an acute clinical condition characterized by sudden onset of headache, vomiting, visual disturbance, ophthalmoplegia and altered sensorium occurring due to infarction or haemorrhage of pituitary gland and often involving the pituita ry adenoma. Predominantly seen in non - functional adenomas and in functioning adenomas with prolactinomas having the highest risk. Patients usually present with headache, vomiting, altered sensorium, visual defect and/or endocrine dysfunction. Hemodynamic i nstability may result from adrenocorticotrophic hormone deficiency. Imaging with either CT scan or MRI is performed in suspected cases. On CT, a recent hemorrhage appears as a single or multiple hyperdense lesions with no or little contrast enhancement. MR I is useful in estimating the onset of bleeding and to show the relationship between the tumor and the surrounding structures. CT or MR Angiography is done to rule out aneurysm. Treatment is conservative and surgery is reserved for those cases with deterio rating level of consciousness or increasing visual defect. Here we present a 47 year old male who presented with history of headache and visual disturbances for 6 weeks and was evaluated with radiograph, CT and MRI. A 47 year old male patient presented to the Neurosurgical Department of Vydehi Medical College and Research Centre with history of gradual blurring of vision in the left eye for 2 months. History of diabetes or hypertension was present. The man was hemodynamically stable. Radiograph of the skull showed widening of sella with erosion of the floor. He was advised CT. CT showed widening of sella and a pituitary lesion with fluid level. MRI was advocated for further evaluation. MRI axial and coronal showed sellar and suprasellar mass with figure of e ight appearance mass suggesting pituitary mass. Hyper intense fluid level was seen suggesting bleed within the mass. Contrast MRI showed peripheral enhancement. Diagnosis of

  6. CT diagnosis of hyperdense intracranial neoplasms. Review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikura, Reiichi; Ando, Kumiko; Tominaga, Satoru; Nakao, Norio [Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan); Ikeda, Jouta; Takemura, Yuriko; Morikawa, Tsutomu

    1999-03-01

    In contrast to typical astrocytic tumors that show hypodense areas on computed tomographic images, some intracranial tumors show hyperdense areas on CT images. The major reasons for hyperdensity on CT images are hypercellular lesions, intratumoral calcification, and intratumoral hemorrhage. Malignant lymphomas, germinomas, and medulloblastomas show homogenous hyperdensity on CT images because of their hypercellularity. Tumorous lesions such as subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, central neurocytomas, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas often present with hyperdense calcified lesions on CT images. Intratumoral hemorrhage also causes hyperdensity on CT images, and is often associated with metastatic brain tumors, glioblastomas, pituitary adenomas, and rarely with any of the other intracranial tumors. Although magnetic resonance imaging is now the major diagnostic tool for diseases of the central nervous system, the first imaging studies for patients with neurologic symptoms are still CT scans. Hyperdense areas on CT images are a clue to making an accurate diagnosis of intracranial neoplasms. (author)

  7. ACTH-producing carcinoma of the pituitary with refractory Cushing's Disease and hepatic metastases: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sippel Rebecca

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pituitary carcinomas are rare neuroendocrine tumors affecting the adenohypophysis. The hallmark of these lesions is the demonstration of distant metastatic spread. To date, few well-documented cases have been reported in the literature. Case presentation Here, we report the case of a fatal pituitary carcinoma evolving within two years from an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH-secreting macroadenoma and review the global literature regarding this rare neuroendocrine tumor. Conclusion Pituitary carcinomas are extremely rare neoplasms, representing only 0.1% to 0.2% of all pituitary tumors. To date, little is understood about the molecular basis of malignant transformation. The latency period between initial presentation of a pituitary adenoma and the development of distal metastases marking carcinoma is extremely variable, and some patients may live well over 10 years with pituitary carcinoma.

  8. Non-pituitary origin sellar tumours mimicking pituitary macroadenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abele, T.A., E-mail: travaus@gmail.com [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Yetkin, Z.F.; Raisanen, J.M.; Mickey, B.E.; Mendelsohn, D.B. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Although the large majority of sellar tumours are pituitary adenomas, several other pituitary and non-pituitary origin tumours arise in the sellar and parasellar regions. Given their location, non-adenomatous lesions frequently mimic pituitary macroadenomas and can pose a diagnostic challenge for the radiologist. Distinguishing rare sellar lesions from the common macroadenoma helps to direct the correct surgical approach and reduce the risk of incomplete resection and/or complications such as cerebrospinal fluid leak with the potential for meningitis. The purpose of this article is to review the imaging features of non-pituitary-origin sellar tumours, focusing on characteristics that may distinguish them from pituitary macroadenomas. Lesions include meningioma, metastatic disease, epidermoid cyst, germinoma, chondrosarcoma, giant cell tumour, and giant aneurysm.

  9. Imaging of pediatric ovarian neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelman, Monica; Chikwava, Kudakwashe R; Chauvin, Nancy; Servaes, Sabah

    2011-09-01

    We review the clinical and imaging characteristics of the most common ovarian neoplasms in children and adolescents. Because of the widespread use of diagnostic imaging, incidental ovarian neoplasms might be encountered during the evaluation of abdominal pain, trauma or other indications and might pose a diagnostic dilemma. Conducting adequate imaging studies under these conditions is important, as management strategies differ according to the size and appearance of the lesion as well as the age of the patient. US dominates in gynecological imaging because of its excellent visualization, absence of ionizing radiation and sedation risks and comparatively low cost. For further examination of indeterminate lesions found using US, MRI is being used more progressively in this field, particularly for the evaluation of complex pelvic masses with the aim of distinguishing benign and malignant conditions and conditions requiring surgical intervention. CT is reserved primarily for tumor staging and follow-up and for emergency situations.

  10. MR angiography in abdominal neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squillaci, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Rome-2 Univ., Hospital S. Eugenio, Rome (Italy); Crecco, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Inst. (Regina Elena), Rome (Italy); Grandinetti, M.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Inst. (Regina Elena), Rome (Italy); Maspes, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Rome-2 Univ., Hospital S. Eugenio, Rome (Italy); Lo Presti, G. [Dept. of Radiology, Rome-2 Univ., Hospital S. Eugenio, Rome (Italy); Squillaci, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Inst. (Regina Elena), Rome (Italy); Simonetti, G. [Dept. of Radiology, Rome-2 Univ., Hospital S. Eugenio, Rome (Italy)

    1994-10-01

    The role of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the evaluation of vascular involvement was studied in 55 patients with abdominal neoplasms. A 2-D time-of-flight (TOF) technique was used in all patients. All patients underwent CT and MR examinations before MRA. Also, MR angiograms were compared with digital subtraction angiography in 22 cases, with Doppler US in 13 cases, and with surgical findings in 20 cases. In all patients with liver neoplasms (n=29) MRA demonstrated the absence of flow in the infiltrated segments. Pericapsular neovascularization was observed in 12 patients. Portal vein involvement was correctly detected in 27 patients. In all cases MRA demonstrated in relationship between the tumor and venous structures. Portosystemic shunts were visualized in 20 of 21 patients with portal hypertension. Vena cava thrombosis (3 cases), compression (5 cases), and displacement (2 cases) were correctly demonstrated. In renal (n=6) and adrenal gland (n=3) tumors renal vein compression was correctly detected in 2 cases, displacement in 1 case, and thrombosis in 3 cases, with only 1 false-positive finding. In 7 patients with pancreatic tumors MRA demonstrated splenic vein thrombosis in 2 cases and compression in 2 cases, with one false-positive finding. Our results indicate that MRA provides precise information regarding venous vascular involvement in abdominal neoplasms, but preoperative arterial mapping is still problematic. (orig.)

  11. [Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlauf, M; Neumann, M; Bomberg, S; Luczak, K; Heikaus, S; Gustmann, C; Antke, C; Ezziddin, S; Fottner, C; Pavel, M; Pape, U-F; Rinke, A; Lahner, H; Schott, M; Cremer, B; Hörsch, D; Baum, R P; Groh, U; Alkatout, I; Rudlowski, C; Scheler, P; Zirbes, T K; Hoffmann, J; Fehm, T; Gabbert, H E; Baldus, S E

    2015-05-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the breast are specific tumor entities. According to the literature up to 5% of breast neoplasms are malignant epithelial neoplasms of the breast. They are defined by a neuroendocrine (NE) architecture and cytology combined with an expression of the neuroendocrine vesicle markers chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin. The diagnosis is supplemented by the receptor status and the proliferative activity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of 2012 the following groups of NEN are distinguished: (1) invasive breast carcinoma with NE differentiation, (2) well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and (3) poorly differentiated small cell carcinoma (NEC). This review article focuses on (1) the definition and basic principles of diagnostics, (2) the history, nomenclature and WHO classification from 2003 and 2012, (3) the frequency of breast NEN, (4) the hereditary background and functional activity, (5) the expression of receptors and (6) the possible clinical implications. In addition, the first results of a retrospective single center study (n = 465 patients with breast cancer over a time period of 4 years) on the frequency of NEN of the breast at the Breast Center of the University Hospital Düsseldorf are presented. In this study a frequency of 4.5% of NEN was found based on a diagnostic cut-off of > 50% Chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin positive tumor cells.

  12. Primary hypothyroidism masquerading pituitary macroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Amit

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse and reactive pituitary gland enlargement secondary to primary hypothyroidism is an uncommon occurrence and that can masquerade many pituitary disorders. In present article, we report a case of 19 year female severe hypothyroidism presenting with diffuse enlargement of pituitary gland and hyperprolactinemia and review the clinical importance of this entity. Knowledge of this entity is very important to avoid unnecessary surgery and irreversible complications in this sub-group of patients.

  13. Pituitary gland tumors; Hypophysentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesser, J.; Schlamp, K.; Bendszus, M. [Radiologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15 % of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65 % of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50 % secrete prolactin, 10 % secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6 % secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10 % of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland. (orig.) [German] Diese Arbeit ist eine Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten Hypophysentumoren und deren Differenzialdiagnosen mit Augenmerk auf die

  14. MR findings in pituitary haemosiderosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosetto, P. [Institute of Neurology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Zucchini, S.; Cicognani, A. [First Paediatric Clinic, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Cacciari, E. [First Paediatric Clinic, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)]|[Clinica Pediatrica 1, Bologna (Italy)

    1998-05-01

    A girl with Diamond-Blackfan syndrome and hypopituitarism was suspected of having pituitary haemosiderosis because of the clinical picture and the long history of blood transfusions. On T1-weighted MR images the pituitary exhibited a markedly hypointense anterior lobe (mimicking the empty sella), suggesting iron deposition, while on T2W MRI the low signal of the pituitary was surrounded by the high signal of the CSF. MR may be considered the examination of choice for detecting iron overload in the pituitary. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  15. Three cases of ectopic sphenoid sinus pituitary adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Jan Bobeff

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Ectopic sphenoid sinus pituitary adenoma is a rare tumour originating from embryologic remnants of Rathke’s pouch. Although it is considered a clinically benign neoplasm, necrosis is encountered in 25% of cases and it can invade adjacent bone structures. Aims : To establish clinical, radiological and histopathological features of ectopic sphenoid sinus pituitary adenoma. Material and methods: Analysis of three cases: two females and one man, aged 61-70. Results : One patient presented with a unilateral hearing loss, the other two with headache and vertigo. They all suffered from type 2 diabetes mellitus. Neurological examination revealed no abnormality. Radiological imaging showed a sphenoid sinus space-occupying soft-tissue lesion with bone erosion in 2 cases and empty sella in 2 patients whereas one had a normal pituitary gland. All were operated on via the transnasal approach. Total resection was achieved in one patient and subtotal in two; in two cases we observed intact sellar dura and in one intact sellar floor. Histopathology showed immunoreactivity for synaptophysin in all cases and cytokeratin in two. The Ki-67 index was less than 2%. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated growth hormone cells in all cases whereas prolactin and adrenocorticotropin in two. The patients were discharged home in good condition with no neurological deficits. Conclusions : Ectopic sphenoid sinus pituitary adenoma should always be considered in differential diagnosis of sphenoid sinus lesion in the elderly, especially in coexistence with empty sella or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Since ectopic sphenoid sinus pituitary adenoma is a benign lesion, surgical removal is an effective treatment.

  16. The pathophysiology of pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworakowska, Dorota; Grossman, Ashley B

    2009-10-01

    The pathogenesis of tumour formation in the anterior pituitary has been intensively studied, but the causative mechanisms involved in pituitary cell transformation and tumourigenesis remain elusive. Most pituitary tumours are sporadic, but some arise as a component of genetic syndromes such as the McCune-Albright syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex and, the most recently described, a MEN1-like phenotype (MEN4) and pituitary adenoma predisposition syndromes. Some specific genes have been identified that predispose to pituitary neoplasia (GNAS, MEN1, PRKAR1A, CDKN1B and AIP), but these are rarely involved in the pathogenesis of sporadic tumours. Mutations of tumour suppressor genes or oncogenes, as seen in more common cancers, do not seem to play an important role in the great majority of pituitary adenomas. The pituitary tumour transforming gene (PTTG; securin) was the first transforming gene found to be highly expressed in pituitary tumour cells, and seems to play an important role in the process of oncogenesis. Many tumour suppressor genes, especially those involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, are under-expressed, most often by epigenetic modulation - usually promoter hypermethylation - but the regulator of these co-ordinated series of methylations is also unclear. Cell signalling abnormalities have been identified in pituitary tumours, but their genetic basis is unknown. Both Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways are over-expressed and/or over-activated in pituitary tumours: these pathways share a common root, including initial activation related to the tyrosine kinase receptor, and we speculate that a change to these receptors or their relationship to membrane matrix-related proteins may be an early event in pituitary tumourigenesis.

  17. NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    2003172 Impact of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 on resistance of ovarian cancer multicellular spheroids to taxol. XING Hui(刑辉), et al. Dept Ob-stetr Gynecol.Tongji Hosp.Tongiji Med Coll, Huazhong Univ Sci & Technol, Wuhan 430030. Nad Med J China 2003;83(1):37-43.

  18. NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950253 The characteristics of bone metastatic tumorsin the elderly-a report of 163 cases.LI Xiaoying(李小鹰),et al.General Hosp,PLA,Beijing,100853.ChinJ Geriatr 1994;13(6):333-334.A study of bone metastatic tumors(BMT) was car-ried out in 163 cases with age of 60 years and over.The characteristics of BMT in the elderly were as fol-lows:1.the elderly patients with BMT made up 7.9percent of all the patients with primary malignant tu-

  19. NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    2004193 Quantitation and detection of deletion in tumor mitochondrial DNA by microarray technique.HAN Chengbo (韩琤波), et al. Tumor Instit, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Univ, Shenyang 110001. Chin J Oncol 2004;26(1):10-13.Objective: To develop a method to rapidly quanti-tate and detect deletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtD-

  20. NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970246 Detection of point mutations of p53 gene bynon-isotopic PCR-SSCP in paraffin-embedded malig-nant mesothelioma tissue. LUO Suqiong(罗素琼), etal. Pneumoconiosis Res Unit, Public Health Sch,West-China Med Univ, Chengdu, 610041. Chin J Ind

  1. NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920632 Phenotypic analysis of T lympho-cytes from the patient with thymoma com-plicated with pure red cell aplasia. LIUBai(刘白), et al. Beijing Med Univ. Chin J Hema-tol 1992; 13(5): 244-246. The thymocytes in thymoma tissue and mono-nuclear cells in peripheral blood and bone marrowwere obtained from a patient with thymomacomplicated with pure red cell aplasia. The

  2. NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    2003034 NOEY2 gene mRNA expression in breast cancer tissue and its relation to clinicopathological parameters. SHI Zonggao ( 施宗高 ), et al. Molec Pathol Lab, Fudan Univ Cancer Hosp, Shanghai 200032. Chin J Oncol 2002;24(5) :475 - 478.Objective: To investigate the expression of NOEY2 gene in breast cancer tissue and its relation to clinico-

  3. Gastrointestinal Surgery of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carsten Palnæs; Olsen, Ingrid Marie Holst; Knigge, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Surgery is the only treatment that may cure the patient with gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) and should always be considered as the first-line treatment if radical resection can be achieved. Even in cases where radical surgery is not possible, palliative resection may...... be performed to reduce local or hormone-induced symptoms and to improve quality of life. The surgical procedures for GEP-NENs are accordingly described below. In most patients life-long follow-up is required, even following radical surgery, as recurrence may occur several years later....

  4. Less common neoplasms of the pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abby L Mulkeen; Peter S Yoo; Charles Cha

    2006-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increased recognition of neoplasms of the pancreas other than ductal adenocarcinoma. Although not as well studied or characterized as pancreatic adenocarcinoma there are many distinct lesions which exhibit diverse biological behaviors and varying degrees of malignancy. These lesions include: endocrine neoplasms, cystic tumors, solid pseudopapillary tumors, acinar cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, primary lymphoma of the pancreas, and metastatic lesions to the pancreas. These less common neoplasms are being diagnosed more frequently as the number and sensitivity of diagnostic imaging studies increase. This review article discusses the clinical course,diagnosis, and treatment of these less common, but quite relevant, neoplasms of the pancreas.

  5. Complications Following Primary and Revision Transsphenoidal Surgeries for Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krings, James G.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Wineland, Andre; Nepple, Kenneth G.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Getz, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to determine the incidence of major complications following both primary and revision transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. Major complications included endocrinopathic, skull base, orbital, hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications, respiratory failure, and death. Secondarily, this study aimed to examine factors associated with the occurrence of complications. Study Design Retrospective cohort analysis of California and Florida all-payer databases from 2005-2008. Methods The major complication rate following both primary and revision transsphenoidal pituitary surgery was calculated. Bivariate analyses were performed to investigate the relationship of patient characteristics with complication occurrence, and a multivariate model was constructed to determine risk factors associated with these complications. Results 5,277 primary cases and 192 revision cases met inclusion criteria. There was a non-significant absolute difference of 3.09% (95% CI −11.00 to 16.14) between the rate of complications following primary (n=443; 8.39%) and revision (n=22; 11.46%) surgeries. Multivariate analyses showed that patients with Medicare (OR=1.74; 95% CI 1.17 to 2.61), Medicaid (OR=2.13; 95% CI 1.59 to 2.86), or a malignant neoplasm (OR=3.10; 95% CI 1.62 to 5.93) were more likely to have complications. Conclusions The rate of major complications following transsphenoidal pituitary surgery is lower than earlier retrospective reports. The overall complication rate following revision surgery was not significantly different from primary surgery. Insurance status and a diagnosis of a malignant neoplasm were associated with a higher rate of complications. PMID:25263939

  6. Intrasellar pituitary mucocele: diagnostic dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ing Ping; Chai, Chun Kian; Kumar, Gnana; Prepageran, Narayanan; Waran, Vicknes

    2014-06-01

    Isolated intrasellar pituitary mucocele following transsphenoidal sinus surgery is extremely rare. The clinical features resemble a pituitary tumor, therefore careful radiological interpretation is crucial to reach the correct diagnosis. We report a case of intrasellar mucocele who had transsphenoidal sinus surgery performed 15 years prior.

  7. Human pituitary adenoma proteomics: new progresses and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianquan eZhan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenoma (PA is a commonly intracranial neoplasm that impacts on human health through interfering hypothalamus-pituitary-target organ axis systems. The development of proteomics gives great promises in clarification of molecular mechanisms of a pituitary adenoma and discovery of effective biomarkers for prediction, prevention, early-stage diagnosis and treatment of a PA. A great progress in the field of PA proteomics has been made in the past ten years, including (i the use of laser capture microdissection, (ii proteomics analyses of functional PAs (FPAs, such as prolactinoma, invasive and noninvasive nonfunctional PAs (NFPAs, protein post-translational modifications (PTMs including phosphorylation and tyrosine nitration, NFPA heterogeneity, and hormone isoforms, (iii the use of protein antibody array, (iv serum proteomics and peptidomics, (v integration of proteomics and other omics data, and (vi proposal of multi-parameter systematic strategy for a PA. This review will summarize those progresses of proteomics in PAs, point out the existing drawbacks, propose the future research directions, and address the clinical relevance of PA proteomics data, in order to achieve our long-term goal that is use of proteomics to clarify molecular mechanisms, construct molecular networks, and discover effective biomarkers.

  8. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Metastatic to the Pituitary: A Case Report and Discussion of Potential Diagnostic Value of Magnetic Resonance Elastography in Pituitary Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D Hughes, Joshua; Retzlaff, Amber; Sims, John; O'Brien, Erin; Giannini, Caterina; Huston, John; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2016-07-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is an exocrine gland tumor accounting for approximately 10%-15% of all epithelial salivary neoplasms and occurs most often in the parotid and submandibular glands. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare, and there is only 1 previously reported case of parotid ACC metastatic to the pituitary. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based technique that measures the propagation of mechanically induced shear waves through a particular tissue to determine stiffness and offers a method to evaluate tissue consistency. We present the case of a 72-year-old woman with a remote history of parotid gland ACC and subsequent lung metastases presented after a fall that resulted in facial trauma. A non-contrast head computed tomography scan revealed a sellar/suprasellar mass, and follow-up MRI revealed a well-defined, enhancing 3.8-cm lesion. MRE showed the tumor to be firm. The tumor was resected through a transsphenoidal approach and was consistent with the MRE findings. Pathology returned as metastatic ACC. We report the second case of ACC metastatic to pituitary and the first firm pituitary tumor found by MRE and discuss the potential diagnostic value of MRE in pituitary lesions.

  9. Shift of the pituitary stalk in intrasellar pituitary adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Jusuke; Tokiguchi, Susumu; Nakamori, Akitoshi (Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Watanabe, Akira; Yokoyama, Motoharu

    1982-08-01

    Fifty-one patients from a group of 344 patients undergoing the evaluation of intrasellar or parasellar tumors were diagnosed on CT as having an intrasellar pituitary adenoma. Axial transverse sections were performed at -10/sup 0/ to Reid's basal line, using 1.5-mm-thick slices and sagittal and coronal reformation. Of these 51 patients, 17 showed a shift of the pituitary stalk. The area where a tumor was thought to be located within the sella turcica on preoperative CT became defective on CT after transsphenoidal surgery in all cases. Histological verification was obtained in all cases. Also, the shift of the pituitary stalk was normalized or markedly improved after surgery in all cases. In functioning tumors, all cases except two showed an endocrinologically normal state or a marked improvement after transsphenoidal surgery. On the basis of the above-mentioned facts, it was concluded that the shift of the pituitary stalk in intrasellar pituitary adenomas indicated the evidence of a mass and its location in the sella turcica. However, a shift of the pituitary stalk was also observed under other conditions, such as empty sella and tuberculum sellae meningioma, and so it is not a pathognomonic finding in intrasellar pituitary adenomas.

  10. Dural enhancement in pituitary macroadenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cattin, F. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Besancon (France); Dept. of Neuroradiology, Jean Minjoz Hospital, Besancon (France); Bonneville, F.; Andrea, I.; Barrali, E.; Bonneville, J.F. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Besancon (France)

    2000-07-01

    We describe the normal dural enhancement patterns of the sellar region and determine whether the duramater is affected by pituitary macroadenomas. Dural enhancement appeared to be usually abnormal in 20 patients with pituitary macroadenoma compared with 20 control patients, mainly at the planum sphenoidale and carotid sulcus. However dural changes are subtle and their recognition requires knowledge of the normal enhancement patterns. Dural changes, reported in a variety of inflammatory and infectious dural diseases and after surgery, are not specific and may be also seen in pituitary macroadenomas. (orig.)

  11. Successful treatment of pituitary carcinoma with concurrent radiation, temozolomide, and bevacizumab after resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touma, Waseem; Hoostal, Spencer; Peterson, Richard A; Wiernik, Andres; SantaCruz, Karen S; Lou, Emil

    2017-03-11

    The optimal treatment of pituitary carcinomas (PC) is unknown. Treatment includes surgical resection, radiation, and more recently, temozolomide (TMZ). Pituitary adenomas have relatively high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor; therefore, bevacizumab, an antiangiogenic agent, has been used in a small number of aggressive or malignant pituitary tumors after recurrence. However, it has not been administered concurrently with other chemotherapeutic agents or combined with radiation therapy in PC. We present a 63-year-old man with an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting PC, causing visual loss. It was resected transsphenoidally. There were several notable factors placing the patient at high risk for recurrence including distant metastasis in the form of a pulmonary nodule. Morphologically, his tumor was a pituitary neoplasm with malignant histopathologic features. It had abundant mitotic figures and zones of necrosis. Six weeks post-surgery, the patient started concurrent chemoradiation, using combination therapy with TMZ and bevacizumab. TMZ was continued for 12 cycles in the adjuvant setting. The ACTH was effective as a serum-based tumor marker and normalized during treatment. The patient is alive, five years after diagnosis, with no recurrence to date. This is the first case of pituitary carcinoma treated successfully with concurrent chemoradiation therapy that combined TMZ and bevacizumab with a long-term follow up.

  12. Risk of malignant neoplasms in acromegaly: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, K; Stangierski, A; Dyrda, K; Nowicka, K; Pelka, M; Iqbal, A; Car, A; Lazizi, M; Bednarek, N; Czarnywojtek, A; Gurgul, E; Ruchala, M

    2017-03-01

    Acromegaly is a chronic disease resulting from pathological oversecretion of growth hormone and subsequently insulin growth factor-1. Several complications of the disease have been reported, including cardiovascular diseases, respiratory disorders but also increased risk of benign and malignant neoplasms. The aim of the study was to evaluate the risk of malignant neoplasms in the patients with acromegaly in comparison with the control group. Medical documentation of acromegalic patients treated in one medical center between 2005 and 2016 has been analyzed. Results were compared with sex- and age-matched group of subjects with prolactinomas and hormonally inactive pituitary lesions hospitalized in the same department. Two hundred patients with acromegaly were included. Control group was composed of 145 patients. Any malignant neoplasm in anamnesis was present in 27 (13.5 %) patients with acromegaly and six (4.1 %) subjects from control group (p = 0.003). Thyroid cancer was present in 14 (7.0 %) patients with acromegaly and two (1.4 %) in control group (p = 0.02). Breast cancer was present in seven women (5.4 % of women) in acromegaly group but none of subjects in control group (p = 0.02). Colon cancer-4 (2.0 %) patients in acromegaly group and 0 in control group (p = 0.14). Malignant neoplasms are significantly more common in patients with acromegaly. Particularly, risk of thyroid cancer was increased over fivefold. Systematic screening for neoplastic diseases should be important part of follow-up in these patients. Further case-control studies are strongly indicated to evaluate which neoplasms are more common in acromegalic patients and what is the exact risk of malignancy.

  13. Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms of Pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveed, Shah; Qari, Hasina; Banday, Tanveer; Altaf, Asma; Para, Mah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual management of mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas. A systematic review was performed in December 2009 by consulting PubMed MEDLINE for publications and matching the key words “pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic tumor”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic mass”, “pancreatic cyst” and “pancreatic cystic neoplasm” to identify English language articles describing the diagnosis and treatment of the MCN of the pancreas. In total, 16,322 references ranging from January 1969 to December 2009 were analyzed and 77 articles were identified. No articles published before 1996 were selected because MCNs were not previously considered to be a completely autonomous disease. Definition, epidemiology, anatomopathological findings, clinical presentation, preoperative evaluation, treatment and prognosis were reviewed. MCNs are pancreatic mucin-producing cysts with a distinctive ovarian-type stroma localized in the body-tail of the gland and occurring in middle-aged females. The majority of MCNs are slow growing and asymptomatic. The prevalence of invasive carcinoma varies between 6% and 55%. Preoperative diagnosis depends on a combination of clinical features, tumor markers, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound with cyst fluid analysis and positron emission tomography-CT. Surgery is indicated for all MCNs.

  14. Cytokeratins in epithelia of odontogenic neoplasms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crivelini, MM; de Araujo, VC; de Sousa, SOM; de Araujo, NS

    Neoplasms and tumours related to the odontogenic apparatus may be composed only of epithelial tissue or epithelial tissue associated with odontogenic ectomesenchyme. The immunohistochemical detection of different cytokeratins (CKs) polypeptides and vimentin has made it easier to explain the

  15. Premalignant cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudeja, Vikas; Allen, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Due to increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, asymptomatic pancreatic cysts are frequently being diagnosed. Many of these cysts have premalignant potential and offer a unique opportunity for cancer prevention. Mucinous cystic neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm are the major premalignant cystic neoplasms of pancreas. The prediction of the risk of malignancy (incidental and future risk of malignant transformation) and balancing the risks of watchful waiting with that of operative management with associated mortality and morbidity is the key to the management of these lesions. We review the literature that has contributed to the development of our approach to the management of these cystic neoplasms. We provide an overview of the key features used in diagnosis and in predicting malignancy. Particular attention is given to the natural history and management decision making.

  16. Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    present two cases in young female patients. Both tumours were surgically ... cases was consistent with solid pseudopapillary neoplasm. .... study and literature review. BMJ Case Rep. 2012 ... Orlando CA, Bowman RL, Loose JH. Multicentric ...

  17. WHO classification 2008 of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madelung, Ann B; Bondo, Henrik; Stamp, Inger

    2015-01-01

    We examined the learning effect of a workshop for Danish hematopathologists led by an international expert regarding histological subtyping of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Six hematopathologists evaluated 43 bone marrow (BM) biopsies according to the WHO description (2008), blinded...

  18. Cytokeratins in epithelia of odontogenic neoplasms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crivelini, MM; de Araujo, VC; de Sousa, SOM; de Araujo, NS

    2003-01-01

    Neoplasms and tumours related to the odontogenic apparatus may be composed only of epithelial tissue or epithelial tissue associated with odontogenic ectomesenchyme. The immunohistochemical detection of different cytokeratins (CKs) polypeptides and vimentin has made it easier to explain the histogen

  19. Computerized tomography in evaluation of hepatic neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, R.F.; Resende, C.; Tishler, J.M.A.; Aldrete, J.S.; Shin, M.S.; Rubin, E.; Rahn, N.H.

    1984-08-01

    The authors reviewed their experience with computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen in 212 patients with histologically documented liver neoplasms seen during a 30-month period. The CT findings in cavernous hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia were specific, and permitted accurate diagnosis of this lesion before biopsy. The CT appearance of all other lesions was variable. CT is useful in providing an accurate evaluation of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic extent of the neoplasm.

  20. [Primary nontransitional neoplasms of the bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varo Solís, C; Soto Delgado, M; Hens Pérez, A; Baez Perea, J M; Estudillo González, F; Juárez Soto, A; Bachiller Burgos, J; Beltrán Aguilar, V

    1999-01-01

    Revision of all primitive tumours of the bladder diagnosed in our Service between July 1990 and July 1998. Among a total of 703 neoplasms of the bladder only 14 were non-transitional primitive tumours, accounting for just 1.98%. Eleven were malignant neoplasms with a diagnosis of epidermoid carcinoma in nine cases, one adenocarcinoma and one bladder adenocarcinoma. The other three were benign tumours: one haemangioma and two leiomyomas. From a clinical perspective, the predominant symptom was haematuria, followed by irritative symptoms. The two leiomyomas were accidental findings during a gynaecological examination (ultrasound) and a diagnostic examination for a nephritic colic (urography). The diagnostic means used and the extension studies were the same as used for transitional neoplasms. In general, treatment of benign neoplasms was partial cystectomy or transurethral resection while it was radical surgery for the malignant tumours when the existing criteria were an indication for that type of surgery (cystoprostatectomy with bypass), since there are no definite criteria with regards to therapy due to the low incidence of these tumours. Only three of the 11 patients with malignant neoplasms are still alive. All the others died within one year of diagnosis, an evidence of the aggressiveness of these tumours. These cases were considered primitive bladder tumours once it was concluded that there was no relation with any previous or simultaneous transitional neoplasms and that there had been no primitive tumour in a different organ.

  1. Neoplasms derived from plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchetti, Fabio; Cigognetti, Marta; Fisogni, Simona; Rossi, Giuseppe; Lonardi, Silvia; Vermi, William

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms manifest in two clinically and pathologically distinct forms. The first variant is represented by nodular aggregates of clonally expanded plasmacytoid dendritic cells found in lymph nodes, skin, and bone marrow ('Mature plasmacytoid dendritic cells proliferation associated with myeloid neoplasms'). This entity is rare, although likely underestimated in incidence, and affects predominantly males. Almost invariably, it is associated with a myeloid neoplasm such as chronic myelomonocytic leukemia or other myeloid proliferations with monocytic differentiation. The concurrent myeloid neoplasm dominates the clinical pictures and guides treatment. The prognosis is usually dismal, but reflects the evolution of the associated myeloid leukemia rather than progressive expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. A second form of plasmacytoid dendritic cells tumor has been recently reported and described as 'blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm'. In this tumor, which is characterized by a distinctive cutaneous and bone marrow tropism, proliferating cells derive from immediate CD4(+)CD56(+) precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The diagnosis of this form can be easily accomplished by immunohistochemistry, using a panel of plasmacytoid dendritic cells markers. The clinical course of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is characterized by a rapid progression to systemic disease via hematogenous dissemination. The genomic landscape of this entity is currently under intense investigation. Recurrent somatic mutations have been uncovered in different genes, a finding that may open important perspectives for precision medicine also for this rare, but highly aggressive leukemia.

  2. Purification of pituitary autoantigen by column liquid chromatography and chromatofocusing

    OpenAIRE

    Gut, Paweł; Fischbach, Jakub; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Bączyk, Maciej; Baszko-Błaszyk, Daria; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pituitary autoantibodies can be determined both in patients with pituitary disease as well as patients with autoimmune endocrine diseases. The purpose of the study was to isolate and purify pituitary autoantigen using sera of patients and the microsomal fraction of the pituitary. Material and methods To isolate a pituitary autoantigen, patient sera were used, which showed a strong immune response to pituitary antigens. Pituitary microsomal fractions were prepared from pituitary t...

  3. Delayed sequelae of pituitary irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, K.H.; Lyman, J.T.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.; Born, J.L.; Fabrikant, J.I.

    1984-01-01

    Since 1958, 781 patients at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have received helium-particle stereotactic radiosurgery to the adenohypophysis. Autopsy findings in 15 of these patients are reported. Ten patients received pituitary radiation (average dose, 116 Gy in six fractions) for progressive neovascularization retinopathy due to diabetes mellitus. Evidence of a time-dependent course of progressive fibrosis in their pituitary glands was found. Five patients were treated for eosinophilic adenomas. Although they had lower average doses of radiation (56 Gy in six fractions), their pituitary glands showed cystic cavitation of the adenomas. The adenomas thus appeared more radiosensitive than the normal pars anterior, which, in turn, was more radiosensitive than the adjacent neurohypophysis. No significant radiation changes were found in the surrounding brain or cranial nerves. The endocrine organs under pituitary control showed varying degrees of atrophy, and clinical tests revealed progressive hypofunction. It was concluded that charged-particle therapy produced a sharply delineated focal ral tests revealed progressive hypofunction. It was concluded that charged-particle therapy produced a sharply delineated focal radiation lesion confined to the pituitary gland but did not cause injury to the critical structures of the surrounding central nervous system.

  4. Transcranial surgery for pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, A Samy; Agazzi, Siviero; van Loveren, Harry R

    2005-07-01

    Although the transsphenoidal approach is the preferred approach to the vast majority of pituitary tumors with or without suprasellar extension, the transcranial approach remains a vital part of the neurosurgical armamentarium for 1 to 4% of these tumors. The transcranial approach is effective when resection becomes necessary for a portion of a pituitary macroadenoma that is judged to be inaccessible from the transsphenoidal route because of isolation by a narrow waist at the diaphragma sellae, containment within the cavernous sinus lateral to the carotid artery, projection anteriorly onto the planum sphenoidale, or projection laterally into the middle fossa. The application of a transcranial approach in these circumstances may still be mitigated by response to prolactin inhibition of prolactinomas, the frequent lack of necessity to remove asymptomatic nonsecretory adenomas from the cavernous sinus, and the lack of evidence that sustained chemical cures can be reliably achieved by removal of secretory adenomas (adrenocorticotropic hormone, growth hormone) from the cavernous sinus. Cranial base surgical techniques have refined the surgical approach to pituitary adenomas but have had less effect on actual surgical indications than anticipated. Because application of the transcranial approach to pituitary adenomas is and should be rare in clinical practice, it is useful to standardize the technique to a default mode with which the surgical team is most experienced and, therefore, most comfortable. Our default mode for transcranial pituitary surgery is the frontotemporal-orbitozygomatic approach.

  5. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Lavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review.

  6. Pituitary aspergillosis abscess in an immunocompetent black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pituitary aspergillosis abscess in an immunocompetent black woman. ... female patient showed up with amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome with infertility for several years. The CT Findings and hormonal studies strongly suggested pituitary ...

  7. Human Pituitary Adenoma Proteomics: New Progresses and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianquan; Wang, Xiaowei; Cheng, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenoma (PA) is a common intracranial neoplasm that impacts on human health through interfering hypothalamus–pituitary–target organ axis systems. The development of proteomics gives great promises in the clarification of molecular mechanisms of a PA and discovery of effective biomarkers for prediction, prevention, early-stage diagnosis, and treatment for a PA. A great progress in the field of PA proteomics has been made in the past 10 years, including (i) the use of laser-capture microdissection, (ii) proteomics analyses of functional PAs (such as prolactinoma), invasive and non-invasive non-functional pituitary adenomas (NFPAs), protein post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and tyrosine nitration, NFPA heterogeneity, and hormone isoforms, (iii) the use of protein antibody array, (iv) serum proteomics and peptidomics, (v) the integration of proteomics and other omics data, and (vi) the proposal of multi-parameter systematic strategy for a PA. This review will summarize these progresses of proteomics in PAs, point out the existing drawbacks, propose the future research directions, and address the clinical relevance of PA proteomics data, in order to achieve our long-term goal that is use of proteomics to clarify molecular mechanisms, construct molecular networks, and discover effective biomarkers. PMID:27303365

  8. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in pituitary tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashis Patnaik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is the bleeding into the subarachnoid space containing cerebrospinal fluid. The most common cause of SAH is trauma. Rupture of aneurysms, vascular anomalies, tumor bleeds and hypertension are other important etiologies. SAH in the setting of pituitary tumor can result from various causes. It can be due to intrinsic tumor related pathology, injury to surrounding the vessel during the operative procedure or due to an associated aneurysm. We discuss the pathological mechanisms and review relevant literature related to this interesting phenomenon. Early and accurate diagnosis of the cause of the SAH in pituitary tumors is important, as this influences the management.

  9. INTRAOPERATIVE ULTRASOUND FOR HEPATIC NEOPLASM DURING SURGERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Objective.Th purpose of this study was to determine the impact of intraoperative ultrasound(IOUS)on the management of patients with neoplasms of the liver.Methods.Forty-nine patients operated on for liver or other pathologic processes were examined intraopertively with 5.0 MHz special ultrasound transducers during surgical exploration of the abdomen.Subjects were evaluated because of known or suspected disease of the liver.Preoperative imaging studies included percutaneous ultrasound(n=49),magnetic resonance imaging(n=11),and computed tomography(n=34).Intraoperative evaluation on all patients included inspection,bimanual palpation,and ultrasnography.Comparison between preoperative imagings and IOUS were analysed.Results.Sensitivity for detection of hepatic neoplasms showed in intraoperative ultrasound,percutaneous ultrasound,magnetic resonance imaging andcomputed tomography as 100%(23/23),74%(17/23),74%(14/19) and 75%(6/8).Specificity showed 100%(26/26),100%(26/26),93%(14/15) and 67(2/3).In seven patients(14%),the neoplasms were not found by inspection,bimanual palpation,and identified only by IOUS.Conclusions.Intraoperative ultrasound is the most sensitive and specific method for detection and surgery of liver neoplasms,especially the occult neoplasms and small size lesion(<2cm).

  10. Pituitary gigantism: Causes and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Acromegaly and pituitary gigantism are very rare conditions resulting from excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH), usually by a pituitary adenoma. Pituitary gigantism occurs when GH excess overlaps with the period of rapid linear growth during childhood and adolescence. Until recently, its etiology and clinical characteristics have been poorly understood. Genetic and genomic causes have been identified in recent years that explain about half of cases of pituitary gigantism. We describe these recent discoveries and focus on some important settings in which gigantism can occur, including familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and the newly described X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome.

  11. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF THE PITUITARY METASTASES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    连伟; 任祖渊; 苏长保

    2004-01-01

    Thee cases of pituitary metastases were reported. They all had operations and the pathological examination confirming the diagnosis. The clinical features of diabetes insipidus and extraocular nerve palsy were presented. In two cases, the original tumors were bronchioloalveolar carcinoma; in the other one, the original tumor was unknown. All three cases had poor outcome. These cases illustrate the fact that a pituitary metastasis can closely mimic a pituitary benign tumor, such as pituitary adenoma. Especially in the presence of suggestive symptoms such as diabetes insipidus and/or cranical nerve paralysis, the possibility of metastatic disease in the differential diagnosis of a pituitary mass should always be considered.

  12. Imaging of the pituitary and sella turcica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Avi

    2006-09-01

    The pituitary gland is housed in the sella turcica and has vital endocrinologic functions. It lies in close proximity to numerous vital structures, including the optic chiasm, sphenoid sinus, cavernous sinus and hypothalamus. An understanding of the function, anatomy and embryology of the pituitary gland and its surrounding structures is vital to understanding its normal appearance, as well as in evaluating the broad spectrum of pathology that can involve the pituitary gland. Imaging of pathology in the sellar region, including pituitary adenomas, meningiomas, craniopharyngiomas and aneurysms, plays an important role in guiding treatment decisions. Modern imaging techniques are also important in evaluating the pituitary gland after surgery.

  13. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallen, Michael E; Naini, Bita V

    2016-09-01

    Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms (IOPNs) are cystic neoplasms with intraductal growth and complex papillae composed of oncocytic cells. IOPNs have been reported both in the pancreas and biliary tree, and are most likely closely related in these 2 locations. In the pancreas, these rare tumors are now considered 1 of the 4 histologic subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Significant differences in histology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetics have been reported between IOPNs and other IPMN subtypes. However, there are limited data regarding the clinical behavior and prognosis of IOPNs in comparison to other subtypes of IPMN. We review features of pancreatic IOPNs and discuss the differential diagnosis of other intraductal lesions in the pancreas.

  14. Conventional radiological strategy of common gastrointestinal neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Zhuo; Li; Pei-Hong; Wu

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the clinical characteristics and imaging features of common gastrointestinal(GI) neoplasms in terms of conventional radiological imaging methods. Barium studies are readily available for displaying primary malignancies and are minimallyor not at all invasive. A neoplasm may be manifested as various imaging findings, including mucosal disruption, soft mass, ulcer, submucosal invasion and lumen stenosis on barium studies. Benign tumors typically appear as smoothly marginated intramural masses. Malignant neoplasms most often appear as irregular infiltrative lesions on barium examination. Tumor extension to adjacent GI segments may be indistinct on barium images. Cross-sectional images such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may provide more accurate details of the adjacent organ invasion, omental or peritoneal spread.

  15. Computed tomography in pituitary abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, W.; Scharphuis, T.; Distelmaier, P.

    1986-06-01

    This is a report on a rare case of a recurring abscess in the pituitary gland. Diagnosis was extremely difficult to establish preoperatively. This is demonstrated via various radiological methods. Anamnesis and clinical disease pattern are important assisting factors in diagnosis.

  16. Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm of the pancreas: a case of a second neoplasm in a pancreas cancer survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Mrinal S; Schuerle, Theresa; Liu, Yulin; Thakkar, Shyam J

    2015-01-31

    Cystic neoplasms, which are less common forms of exocrine pancreatic neoplasms, consist of mainly intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) and mucinous cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasms, unlike IPMN, are not associated with ductal growth, are usually multilocular in nature, and have ovarian type stroma. Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is a type of mucinous cystic neoplasm more commonly found in women. Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms of the pancreas are the least common variant of IPMN. Despite this classification, intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms have been compared to mucinous cystic neoplasms in previous studies and the classification is still questioned. We report a rare case of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm of the pancreas occurring in a 52-year-old male with a prior history of surgically excised mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. This is the first known case of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm occurring after a prior pancreatic neoplasm. As the diagnosis of intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms are rare, having only a few case reports and small series on which to understand its disease process, it is imperative to discuss each case and detail possible correlations with other pancreatic cystic neoplasms as well as distinctions from its current association within IPMN.

  17. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas: A Case of a Second Neoplasm in a Pancreas Cancer Survivor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal S Garg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Cystic neoplasms, which are less common forms of exocrine pancreatic neoplasms, consist of mainly intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN and mucinous cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasms, unlike IPMN, are not associated with ductal growth, are usually multilocular in nature, and have ovarian type stroma. Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is a type of mucinous cystic neoplasm more commonly found in women. Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms of the pancreas are the least common variant of IPMN. Despite this classification, intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms have been compared to mucinous cystic neoplasms in previous studies and the classification is still questioned. Case report We report a rare case of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm of the pancreas occurring in a 52-year-old male with a prior history of surgically excised mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. This is the first known case of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm occurring after a prior pancreatic neoplasm. Conclusion As the diagnosis of intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms are rare, having only a few case reports and small series on which to understand its disease process, it is imperative to discuss each case and detail possible correlations with other pancreatic cystic neoplasms as well as distinctions from its current association within IPMN.

  18. Aryl‐hydrocarbon receptor activity modulates prolactin expression in the pituitary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Tyler B.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Raetzman, Lori T., E-mail: raetzman@life.illinois.edu

    2012-11-15

    Pituitary tumors account for 15% of intracranial neoplasms, however the extent to which environmental toxicants contribute to the proliferation and hormone expression of pituitary cells is unknown. Aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) interacting protein (AIP) loss of function mutations cause somatotrope and lactotrope adenomas in humans. AIP sequesters AhR and inhibits its transcriptional function. Because of the link between AIP and pituitary tumors, we hypothesize that exposure to dioxins, potent exogenous ligands for AhR that are persistent in the environment, may predispose to pituitary dysfunction through activation of AhR. In the present study, we examined the effect of AhR activation on proliferation and endogenous pituitary hormone expression in the GH3 rat somatolactotrope tumor cell line and the effect of loss of AhR action in knockout mice. GH3 cells respond to nM doses of the reversible AhR agonist β-naphthoflavone with a robust induction of Cyp1a1. Although mRNA levels of the anti-proliferative signaling cytokine TGFbeta1 are suppressed upon β-naphthoflavone treatment, we did not observe an alteration in cell proliferation. AhR activation with β-naphthoflavone suppresses Ahr expression and impairs expression of prolactin (PRL), but not growth hormone (GH) mRNA in GH3 cells. In mice, loss of Ahr similarly leads to a reduction in Prl mRNA at P3, while Gh is unaffected. Additionally, there is a significant reduction in pituitary hormones Lhb and Fshb in the absence of Ahr. Overall, these results demonstrate that AhR is important for pituitary hormone expression and suggest that environmental dioxins can exert endocrine disrupting effects at the pituitary. -- Highlights: ► AhR signaling suppresses Prl mRNA expression. ► AhR signaling does not influence pituitary proliferation in culture. ► AhR is necessary for Prl, Lhb and Fshb expression at postnatal day 3.

  19. [Two autopsy cases of primary pituitary carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, K; Suzuki, T; Masuda, Y; Masugi, Y; Teramoto, A; Ohama, E

    1988-05-01

    We studied two autopsy cases of primary pituitary carcinoma. Case-1. A 45 year old female was admitted on Oct. 4 1978, with a complaint of right homonymous hemianopsia. And diagnosis was pituitary adenoma. Partial removal of pituitary tumor was performed on Oct. 23 1978. She died on Dec. 5 1978 due to bleeding of gastrointestinal tract. Autopsy disclosed a pituitary carcinoma invading the left hypothalamus, mamillary body, optic and V cranial nerves, and mid brain as well as sphenoid bone. No extracranial metastasis was noted. Case-2. A 44 year old female with a history of acromegaly for 6 years was admitted with a complaint of headache on May 8 1976. She was diagnosed as having pituitary adenoma. The subtotal removal of pituitary tumor was performed on May 21 1976 and followed by 4500 rad irradiation. At this time, pathological diagnosis was eosinophilic adenoma. Seven years later, she complained of progressive right hearing disturbance, dysarthria and ataxic gait 1983. The second subtotal removal of pituitary tumor was performed with a diagnosis of recurrence of pituitary adenoma on Oct. 7 1983. After the operation, she complicated sepsis and died on Jan. 14 1984. An autopsy disclosed a pituitary carcinoma from residual pituitary gland, continuously extending to the subarachnoid space of the pons, and invading right cerebello-pontine angle and cerebellum. The histological examination revealed pituitary carcinoma with high pleomorphism and glioblastoma multiform-like feature were within the tumor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Recently described neoplasms of the sinonasal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Justin A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical pathology of the sinonasal region (i.e., nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses) is notoriously difficult, due in part to the remarkable diversity of neoplasms that may be encountered in this area. In addition, a number of neoplasms have been only recently described in the sinonasal tract, further compounding the difficulty for pathologists who are not yet familiar with them. This manuscript will review the clinicopathologic features of some of the recently described sinonasal tumor types: NUT midline carcinoma, HPV-related carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features, SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, and adamantinoma-like Ewing family tumor.

  1. Pituitary apoplexy presenting with anorexia and hyponatraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yosuke; Nakata, Kenji; Suzuki, Kenichi; Ando, Yasuyo

    2015-04-09

    Pituitary apoplexy, a syndrome caused by haemorrhage into the pituitary gland, typically manifests as sudden severe headache, visual symptoms and hypopituitarism, including adrenal insufficiency. We report a case of a 65-year-old man with adrenal insufficiency due to pituitary apoplexy presenting with anorexia following temporal headache and diagnosed through evaluation for hyponatraemia. MRI focusing on the pituitary gland helped to confirm the diagnosis. Our experience serves as a useful reminder of this atypical presentation of pituitary apoplexy, also known as 'subclinical pituitary apoplexy,' and underscores the importance of careful evaluation for hyponatraemia using serial urine osmolality, which is useful to distinguish hypovolaemic hyponatraemia from euvolaemic hyponatraemia. Clinicians should consider pituitary apoplexy as a differential diagnosis in cases of anorexia, loss of energy or hyponatraemia, following headache even when the patient is lacking classical symptoms such as severe headache or visual symptoms.

  2. General Information about Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  3. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  4. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  6. INTRACRANIAL NEOPLASMS IN IBADAN, NIGERIA B.J. OLASODE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-01-01

    Jan 1, 2000 ... The definitive neurons, glial cells and ... indicate neoplasms arising from these primitive cells(1). .... adults, there was an equal sex distribution. All eight .... of the total number of secondary intracranial neoplasms. Burkitt's ...

  7. Clinical experience in appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelik, Caglar K.; Bozdogan, Nazan; Dibekoglu, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To analyse the incidence of appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasms in appendectomy specimens and establish the epidemiological and histopathological features, treatment, and clinical course. Material and methods Between 2004 and 2013, 975 patients who underwent appendectomy in Ankara Oncology Education and Research Hospital were retrospectively analysed. Results Neuroendocrine neoplasm was detected in the nine of 975 (0.9%) patients. Neuroendocrine neoplasms were diagnosed in eight patients by appendectomy, which was performed because of the prediagnosis of acute appendicitis, and in one patient by the suspicious mass detection during surgical procedures that were done in the appendix for a different reason. Eight of the patients’ tumours were in the tip of the appendix, and one of the patients’ tumours was at the base of appendix. Tumour size in 77.8% of patients was equal or less than 1 cm, in 22.2% patients it was 1–2 cm. There was tumour invasion in the muscularis propria layer in four patients, in the serosa layer in three patients, and in the deep mesoappendix in two patients. Patients were followed for a median of 78 months. In the follow-up of patients who were operated because of colon cancer, metachronous colon tumour evolved. This patient died due to progressive disease. Other patients are still disease-free. Conclusions The diagnosis of neuroendocrine neoplasm is often incidentally done after appendectomy. Tumour size is important in determining the extent of disease and in the selection of the surgical method during operation. PMID:26793027

  8. Myeloproliferative neoplasms in five multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2013-01-01

    The concurrence of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) is unusual. We report five patients from a localized geographic area in Denmark with both MS and MPN; all the patients were diagnosed with MPNs in the years 2007-2012. We describe the patients' history and treatment...

  9. The new WHO nomenclature: lymphoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Susan J; Rodak, Bernadette F

    2002-01-01

    The development of the WHO classification of lymphoid neoplasms is a remarkable example of cooperation and communication between pathologists and oncologists from around the world. Joint classification committees of the major hematopathology societies will periodically review and update this classification, facilitating further progress in the understanding and treatment of hematologic malignancies.

  10. Delusional Disorder Arising From a CNS Neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupinski, John; Kim, Jihye; Francois, Dimitry

    2017-01-01

    Erotomania arising from a central nervous system (CNS) neoplasm has not been previously described. Here, we present the first known case, to our knowledge, of erotomania with associated persecutory delusions arising following diagnosis and treatment of a left frontal lobe brain tumor.

  11. Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Isabel Bittencourt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloproliferative diseases without the Philadelphia chromosome marker (Ph-, although first described 60 years ago, only became the subject of interest after the turn of the millennium. In 2001, the World Health Organization (WHO defined the classification of this group of diseases and in 2008 they were renamed myeloproliferative neoplasms based on morphological, cytogenetic and molecular features. In 2005, the identification of a recurrent molecular abnormality characterized by a gain of function with a mutation in the gene encoding Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 paved the way for greater knowledge of the pathophysiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms. The JAK2 mutation is found in 90-98% of polycythemia vera and in about 50% essential thrombocytosis and primary myelofibrosis. In addition to the JAK2 mutation, other mutations involving TET2 (ten-eleven translocation, LNK (a membrane-bound adaptor protein; IDH1/2 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 enzyme; ASXL1 (additional sex combs-like 1 genes were found in myeloproliferative neoplasms thus showing the importance of identifying molecular genetic alterations to confirm diagnosis, guide treatment and improve our understanding of the biology of these diseases. Currently, polycythemia vera, essential thrombocytosis, myelofibrosis, chronic neutrophilic leukemia, chronic eosinophilic leukemia and mastocytosis are included in this group of myeloproliferative neoplasms, but are considered different situations with individualized diagnostic methods and treatment. This review updates pathogenic aspects, molecular genetic alterations, the fundamental criteria for diagnosis and the best approach for each of these entities.

  12. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinming Song

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH/uniparental disomy (UPD that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants.

  13. Isolation of tumor suppressor genes from MEN-1 related neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavari, R.; Kinder, B.; Bale, A.E. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is a cancer predisposition syndrome marked by the development of tumors in specific endocrine tissues such as the pituitary, parathyroid and pancreatic islets. Genetic linkage studies have mapped the MEN 1 gene to 11q13, and allelic loss in related tumors suggests that the gene is a tumor suppressor. Because inactivation of tumor suppressors may be accompanied by underexpression, subtractive hybridization was used to isolate potential candidate genes underexpressed in MEN 1 tumors. cDNA was synthesized from tumor and normal parathyroid tissue by RT-PCR. Biotinylated tumor cDNA was used as a driver and normal cDNA as a tester in subtractive hybridization. Following annealing of the driver and tester amplicons, the biotinylated strands were removed with streptavidin. The subtracted material was then used as a probe to isolate clones from a normal pancreatic islet library. Screening 2 x 10{sup 5} plaques yielded 14 positive clones. Of 6 clones analyzed, 3 were confirmed to be underexpressed in parathyroid tumors. Sequence analysis identified 2 clones as human ribosomal protein S10 (RPS10, chromosome 6) and 1 as the islet amyloid polypeptide (1AP, chromosome 12). The precise function of human RPS10 is not known but the related RPS6 functions as a tumor suppressor in Drosophila. 1AP has been implicated in modulation of G protein activity. The remaining positive clones will be mapped to determine if any fall on chromosome 11q13, and additional subtractions with parathyroid and pancreatic islet neoplasms are underway.

  14. The FGFR4-G388R polymorphism promotes mitochondrial STAT3 serine phosphorylation to facilitate pituitary growth hormone cell tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Tateno

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary tumors are common intracranial neoplasms, yet few germline abnormalities have been implicated in their pathogenesis. Here we show that a single nucleotide germline polymorphism (SNP substituting an arginine (R for glycine (G in the FGFR4 transmembrane domain can alter pituitary cell growth and hormone production. Compared with FGFR4-G388 mammosomatotroph cells that support prolactin (PRL production, FGFR4-R388 cells express predominantly growth hormone (GH. Growth promoting effects of FGFR4-R388 as evidenced by enhanced colony formation was ascribed to Src activation and mitochondrial serine phosphorylation of STAT3 (pS-STAT3. In contrast, diminished pY-STAT3 mediated by FGFR4-R388 relieved GH inhibition leading to hormone excess. Using a knock-in mouse model, we demonstrate the ability of FGFR4-R385 to promote GH pituitary tumorigenesis. In patients with acromegaly, pituitary tumor size correlated with hormone excess in the presence of the FGFR4-R388 but not the FGFR4-G388 allele. Our findings establish a new role for the FGFR4-G388R polymorphism in pituitary oncogenesis, providing a rationale for targeting Src and STAT3 in the personalized treatment of associated disorders.

  15. The FGFR4-G388R polymorphism promotes mitochondrial STAT3 serine phosphorylation to facilitate pituitary growth hormone cell tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, Toru; Asa, Sylvia L; Zheng, Lei; Mayr, Thomas; Ullrich, Axel; Ezzat, Shereen

    2011-12-01

    Pituitary tumors are common intracranial neoplasms, yet few germline abnormalities have been implicated in their pathogenesis. Here we show that a single nucleotide germline polymorphism (SNP) substituting an arginine (R) for glycine (G) in the FGFR4 transmembrane domain can alter pituitary cell growth and hormone production. Compared with FGFR4-G388 mammosomatotroph cells that support prolactin (PRL) production, FGFR4-R388 cells express predominantly growth hormone (GH). Growth promoting effects of FGFR4-R388 as evidenced by enhanced colony formation was ascribed to Src activation and mitochondrial serine phosphorylation of STAT3 (pS-STAT3). In contrast, diminished pY-STAT3 mediated by FGFR4-R388 relieved GH inhibition leading to hormone excess. Using a knock-in mouse model, we demonstrate the ability of FGFR4-R385 to promote GH pituitary tumorigenesis. In patients with acromegaly, pituitary tumor size correlated with hormone excess in the presence of the FGFR4-R388 but not the FGFR4-G388 allele. Our findings establish a new role for the FGFR4-G388R polymorphism in pituitary oncogenesis, providing a rationale for targeting Src and STAT3 in the personalized treatment of associated disorders.

  16. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nangalia, J.; Massie, C.E.; Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Loo, P. Van; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O'Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS: We performed exome sequencing

  17. Addison's Disease and Pituitary Enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Stephen J; Vitaz, Todd; Nowacki, Michael R; Craddock, Durrett C; Silverman, Craig

    2015-06-01

    A 60-year-old man with Addison's disease, primary hypothyroidism and type 2 diabetes mellitus who was treated with stable doses of hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone developed increasing skin pigmentation and a bitemporal hemianopia. The plasma ACTH level was 14,464 pg/mL, and an invasive pituitary macroadenoma with suprasellar extension was found on magnetic resonance imaging leading to transnasal-transsphenoidal adenomectomy. The tumor demonstrated features of an eosinophilic adenoma and stained uniformly for ACTH. Residual tumor was treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. This case and the 13 cases published previously indicate that primary adrenal failure may predispose to corticotroph hyperplasia, and in some patients to the development of an invasive corticotroph adenoma. The ACTH level should be measured, and a pituitary magnetic resonance imaging is indicated when skin pigmentation increases in a patient with primary adrenal failure who is receiving customary treatment with glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids.

  18. Computed tomography of pituitary microadenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung-Il; Katto, Keiichi; Tanaka, Teruhiko; Kosaka, Shiro; Kaimori, Mitsuhiro (Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital (Japan))

    1983-08-01

    Thirteen pituitary microadenomas detected by Delta Scan 2020 are presented, and their CT findings are analyzed in points of size, shape, limit, density and contrast enhancement. All are demonstrated as a round, well defined and homogeneous mass, and are enhanced by contrast medium. The average size is 6.2 by 7.6 mm in diameter. Two of them are prolactinoma, and are treated by Bromocriptine. The prolactinomas vanished on CT scan, 6 months after administration of Bromocriptine. Eleven of them are nonfunctioning. Five are operated and the others are followed by CT scan. In detection of pituitary microadenoma, overlapping scanning with thin-slice is necessary and coronal scanning is often helpful. The adenoma greater than 5 mm in diameter may be detectable.

  19. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasm Having Clinical Characteristics of Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm and a Benign Histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takatomi Oku

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Context An intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm is a rare pancreatic tumor which was first described by Adsay et al. in 1996. It has been defined as a new subgroup of IPMN. Case report We report the case of a 76-year-old woman who presented with nausea. Imaging studies revealed a cystic mass in the body of the pancreas. She underwent a successful distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, and has subsequently remained well. Microscopically, the cyst was lined by columnar epithelium similar to pancreatic duct epithelium, and the nodular projection consisted of arborizing papillary structures, lined by plump cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. These eosinophilic cells were immunohistochemically positively stained with anti-mitochondrial antibody. The cellular atypism was mild and the proliferating index was low, compatible with adenoma of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm. Although no ovarian type stroma was identified, in our case, no communication to main pancreatic duct (located in the pancreatic body and rapid growth by intracystic hemorrhage were clinical characteristics of a mucinous cystic neoplasm, but not IPMN. Conclusion With only 17 cases reported to date, the clinical and pathological details of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm are still unclear. We herein add one case with different characteristics from those of the past reports. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm with the clinical characteristics of a mucinous cystic neoplasm.

  20. Management of nonfunctioning pituitary incidentaloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Françoise; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Cazabat, Laure; Boulin, Anne; Cotton, François; Bonneville, Jean-François; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Vidal-Trécan, Gwénaelle; Chanson, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Prevalence of pituitary incidentaloma is variable: between 1.4% and 27% at autopsy, and between 3.7% and 37% on imaging. Pituitary microincidentalomas (serendipitously discovered adenoma 1cm in diameter) show increased size in 20-24% and 34-40% of cases at respectively 4 and 8years' follow-up. Radiologic differential diagnosis requires MRI centered on the pituitary gland. Initial assessment of nonfunctioning (NF) microincidentaloma is firstly clinical, the endocrinologist looking for signs of hypersecretion (signs of hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly or Cushing's syndrome), followed up by systematic prolactin and IGF-1 assay. Initial assessment of NF macroincidentaloma is clinical, the endocrinologist looking for signs of hormonal hypersecretion or hypopituitarism, followed up by hormonal assay to screen for hypersecretion or hormonal deficiency and by ophthalmologic assessment (visual acuity and visual field) if and only if the lesion is near the optic chiasm (OC). NF microincidentaloma of less than 5mm requires no surveillance; those of≥5mm are not operated on but rather monitored on MRI at 6months and then 2years. Macroincidentaloma remote from the OC is monitored on MRI at 1year, with hormonal exploration (for anterior pituitary deficiency), then every 2years. When macroincidentaloma located near the OC is managed by surveillance rather than surgery, MRI is recommended at 6months, with hormonal and visual exploration, then annual MRI and hormonal and visual assessment every 6months. Surgery is indicated in the following cases: evolutive NF microincidentaloma, NF macroincidentaloma associated with hypopituitarism or showing progression, incidentaloma compressing the OC, possible malignancy, non-compliant patient, pregnancy desired in the short-term, or context at risk of apoplexy.

  1. Rheumatic manifestations of pituitary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, S; Kleinberg, D L

    2001-10-01

    Pituitary tumors may cause rheumatologic problems as a result of under production or overproduction of one pituitary hormone. Excessive growth hormone causes destruction of cartilage by a direct action. Facial and acral changes and arthralgias may be some of the first symptoms of acromegaly. The arthritis associated with acromegaly is often devastating. Carpal tunnel syndrome is very common in patients with acromegaly. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) has indirect effects via the action of glucocorticoid on bones, muscles, and the immune system. Proximal muscle weakness is a characteristic feature of Cushing's syndrome. Patients with Cushing's syndrome commonly have osteopenia and osteoporosis that lead to an increase in bone fractures. Avascular necrosis is associated with exogenous steroid administration. The effects of too much glucocorticoid or too rapid withdrawal can be severe. Gonadotropins act via the gonadal steroids and protect bone mass from loss. Prolactin is less involved in rheumatologic disease; the data for which are limited in humans. Pituitary tumors can have manifestations similar to rheumatologic disorders and should be included in the differential diagnosis of these diseases.

  2. Pituitary Apoplexy After Thyrotropin-releasing Hormone Stimulation Test in a Patient with Pituitary Macroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Fang Wang

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy is a rare complication of pituitary tumors. We report a case of a 41-year-old female with acromegaly due to a pituitary macroadenoma, who developed pituitary apoplexy after a thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH 200 mg intravenous injection stimulation test. Neither emergency computed tomography (CT scans nor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, performed 6 hours and 12 hours, respectively, after the active episode, disclosed the evidence of acute hemorrhage or infarction. Two days later, the pituitary mass, removed by transsphenoidal approach, showed ischemic necrosis and acute hemorrhage. The TRH test is generally safe for evaluating pituitary function, but pituitary apoplexy may occur after the procedure. CT and MRI may miss the diagnosis of pituitary apoplexy, especially if performed immediately after the acute episode.

  3. Sellar lesion: Not always a pituitary adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Shalinee

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory lesions of the hypophysis account for 0.5% of all symptomatic diseases of the pituitary, which include lymphocytic hypophysitis, granulomatous hypophysitis with or without specific etiology and pituitary abscess. Sellar tuberculoma is a rare type of granulomatous hypophysitis. We document a case of a postmenopausal lady who presented with galactorrhea, headache and blurring of vision. Based on preliminary investigations, a clinical diagnosis of pituitary adenoma was made and the pituitary gland was surgically excised. Histopathological examination showed caseating granulomas, along with normal areas of preserved pituitary gland and a final diagnosis of tuberculous hypophysitis was made. This case is being documented due to the extremely rare involvement of the pituitary gland by granulomatous lesions such as tuberculosis and to emphasize the role of intraoperative consultation to obviate the need for radical surgery in such lesions.

  4. Dynamic computed tomography of the pituitary gland using a single slice scanner in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Magno, Sara; Grinwis, Guy C M; Voorhout, George; Meij, Björn P.

    2016-01-01

    Selective removal of the pituitary adenoma has not been advocated in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism because the pituitary adenoma is usually not visualized on routine computed tomography (CT).Dynamic pituitary CT scanning is aimed at the detection of the pituitary flush and, indirect

  5. Temozolomide treatment of a pituitary carcinoma and two pituitary macroadenomas resistant to conventional therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, C; Schroeder, H D; Hansen, S

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Aggressive pituitary tumours may be difficult to treat. Temozolomide (TMZ) is an alkylating cytostaticum. In a small number of cases, TMZ therapy has been reported to reduce pituitary tumour size and hormone hypersecretion. DESIGN: We present three patients with pituitary tumours treat...

  6. A Rare Cause of Hypopituitarism: Pituitary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şazi İmamoğlu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary tuberculosis is a rare condition that can present with hypopituitarism even without any evidence of systemic tuberculosis and is easily confused with pituitary adenomas. Headache and hypopituitarism are the most common presenting symptoms. We report the case of pituitary tuberculosis in a 39-year-old male patient who presented with panhypopituitarism. Although it is rare and difficult to diagnose, pituitary tuberculosis should be considered in every nonfunctional sellar masses, especially in fairly small ones with unexpected hypopituitarism. Turk Jem 2012; 16: 26-8

  7. Light bodies in human pituitary adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, S; Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1987-01-01

    Light bodies are large cytoplasmic granules originally described in the gonadotrophic cells of the rat pituitary gland. In order to determine whether similar bodies occur in the human anterior pituitary gland, 89 pituitary adenomas and periadenomatous tissue from 20 cases were examined by transmi......Light bodies are large cytoplasmic granules originally described in the gonadotrophic cells of the rat pituitary gland. In order to determine whether similar bodies occur in the human anterior pituitary gland, 89 pituitary adenomas and periadenomatous tissue from 20 cases were examined...... by transmission electron microscopy. Double membrane bound bodies with filamentous internal structure identical to rodent light bodies were identified in 10 hormone-producing adenomas: 5 PRL, 1 PRL-GH, 2 GH, and 2 ACTH-producing tumours. No light bodies were found in the remaining 79 tumours nor in the pituitary...... cells in periadenomatous tissue from 20 cases. These results show that some human pituitary adenomas may contain light bodies identical to those seen in gonadotrophs of rat pituitary....

  8. [Old phenotype and new genotypes. Pituitary adenomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, C; Jedidi, H; Petrossians, P; Krzesinski, F; Daly, A; Beckers, A

    2015-11-01

    Gigantism and acromegaly, usually caused by a pituitary adenoma linked inappropriate secretion of growth hormone (GH), are generally considered as very rare diseases, even if, according to some authors, their cumulative prevalence is about 1/5000. Starting from the historical case of a giant from Liège we shall describe the different types of GH pituitary adenomas and their pathophysiology. We shall particularly discuss rare forms of inherited GH secreting pituitary adenomas like the FIPA (familial inherited isolated pituitary adenomas) and the X-LAG (X linked acrogigantism), both described for the first time in Liège, in 2000 and 2014, respectively.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: familial isolated pituitary adenoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (6 links) Encyclopedia: Acromegaly Encyclopedia: Gigantism Encyclopedia: Pituitary Tumor Encyclopedia: Prolactinoma Health Topic: Endocrine ...

  10. Hormonal and morphological study of the pituitaries in reeler mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lombardero, Matilde; Kovacs, Kalman; Horvath, Eva; Salazar, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    .... Since the brain is one of the main regulator of pituitary hormone secretion and no information was reported regarding pituitary function and structure in these mutant mice, we studied pituitary...

  11. Pathobiology and oncogenesis of pituitary corticotroph adenomas in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) or Cushing's disease is a common endocrinopathy in the elderly dog caused by a pituitary adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) producing tumor (corticotroph adenoma) of unknown pathogenesis. Surgical removal of the pituitary tumor is applied as routine

  12. Intrathoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Very little is known regarding the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in companion animals. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms. Most studies of thoracic neoplasia have focused on the pathology of primary and metastatic neoplasms of the lung with little attention given to diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Although the cited incidence rate for primary respiratory tract neoplasia is low, 8.5 cases per 100,000 dogs and 5.5 cases per 100,000 cats, intrathoracic masses often attract attention out of proportion to their actual importance since they are often readily visualized on routine thoracic radiographs.

  13. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastrointestinal neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naomi Kakushima; Mitsuhiro Fujishiro

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an advanced technique of therapeutic endoscopy for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms. Three steps characterize it:injecting fluid into the submucosa to elevate the lesion,cutting the surrounding mucosa of the lesion, and dissecting the submucosa beneath the lesion. The ESD technique has rapidly permeated in Japan for treatment of early gastric cancer, due to its excellent results of enbloc resection compared to endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Although there is still room for improvement to lessen its technical difficulty, ESD has recently been applied to esophageal and colorectal neoplasms.Favorable short-term results have been reported, but the application of ESD should be well considered by three aspects: (1) the possibility of nodal metastases of the lesion, (2) technical difficulty such as location, ulceration and operator's skill, and (3) organ characteristics.

  14. Primary bone neoplasms in dogs: 90 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Trost

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of necropsy and biopsy cases of 90 primary bone tumors (89 malignant and one benign in dogs received over a period of 22 years at the Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, was performed. Osteosarcoma was the most prevalent bone tumor, accounting for 86.7% of all malignant primary bone neoplasms diagnosed. Most cases occurred in dogs of large and giant breeds with ages between 6 and 10-years-old. The neoplasms involved mainly the appendicular skeleton, and were 3.5 times more prevalent in the forelimbs than in the hindlimbs. Osteoblastic osteosarcoma was the predominant histological subtype. Epidemiological and pathological findings of osteosarcomas are reported and discussed.

  15. Acquired uniparental disomy in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Score, Joannah; Cross, Nicholas C P

    2012-10-01

    The finding of somatically acquired uniparental disomy, where both copies of a chromosome pair or parts of chromosomes have originated from one parent, has led to the discovery of several novel mutated genes in myeloproliferative neoplasms and related disorders. This article examines how the development of single nucleotide polymorphism array technology has facilitated the identification of regions of acquired uniparental disomy and has led to a much greater understanding of the molecular pathology of these heterogeneous diseases.

  16. MR appearance of skeletal neoplasms following cryotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, M.L. [Dept. of Radiology SB-05, Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States); Lough, L.R. [Pitts Radiological Associates, Columbia, SC (United States); Shuman, W.P. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Lazerte, G.D. [Dept. of Pathology RC-72, Washington Univ., Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Conrad, E.U. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery RK-10, Washington Univ., Medical Center of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Cryotherapy is an increasingly popular mode of therapy adjunctive to surgical curettage in the treatment of certain skeletal neoplasms, such as giant cell tumors or chondrosarcomas. The magnetic resonance (MR) findings following cryotherapy have not been previously reported. We reviewed the MR findings in seven patients with skeletal neoplasms following curettage and cryotherapy. In six cases we found a zone of varying thickness extending beyond the surgical margins, corresponding to an area of cryoinjury to medullary bone. This zone displayed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, consistent with the presence of marrow edema. This zone of edema almost certainly reflects underlying thermal osteonecrosis. This zone may vary in size and intensity over time as the area of cryoinjury evolves or resolves. MR is currently the imaging procedure of choice for follow-up of most musculoskeletal neoplasms. Knowledge of the MR findings following cryotherapy should help prevent confusion during the interpretation of follow-up MR examinations. (orig.)

  17. Pituitary Gigantism: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Bhattacharjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present a rare case of gigantism. Case Report: A 25-year-old lady presented with increased statural growth and enlarged body parts noticed since the age of 14 years, primary amenorrhea, and frontal headache for the last 2 years.She has also been suffering from non-inflammatory low back pain with progressive kyphosis and pain in the knees, ankles, and elbows for the last 5 years. There was no history of visual disturbance, vomiting, galactorrhoea, cold intolerance. She had no siblings. Family history was non-contributory.Blood pressure was normal. Height 221 cm, weight 138 kg,body mass index (BMI28. There was coarsening of facial features along with frontal bossing and prognathism, large hands and feet, and small goitre. Patient had severe kyphosis and osteoarthritis of knees. Confrontation perimetry suggested bitemporal hemianopia. Breast and pubic hair were of Tanner stage 1. Serum insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF1 was 703 ng/ml with all glucose suppressedgrowth hormone (GHvalues of >40 ng/ml. Prolactin was 174 ng/ml. Basal serum Lutenising Hormone (LH, follicle stimulating Hormone (FSH was low. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, liver and renal function tests, basal cortisol and thyroid profile, Calcium, phosphorus and Intact Parathyroid hormone (iPTH were normal.Computed tomographyscan of brain showed large pituitary macroadenoma. Automated perimetry confirmed bitemporal hemianopia. A diagnosis of gigantism due to GH secreting pituitary macroadenoma with hypogonadotrophichypogonadism was made. Debulking pituitary surgery followed by somatostatin analogue therapy with gonadal steroid replacement had been planned, but the patient refused further treatment.

  18. Radiation Therapy of Pituitary Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Moon Baik; Hong, Seong Eong [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Radiation treatment results were analyzed in a retrospective analysis of 47 patients with pituitary adenoma treated with radiation alone or combined with surgery from 1974 through 1987 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Kyung Hee University. The 5-year overall survival rates for all patients was 80.4%. Radiation therapy was effective for improving visual symptoms and headache, but could not normalize amenorrhea and galactorrhoea. There was no difference of survival rate between radiation alone and combination with surgery. Prognostic factors such as age, sex, disease type, visual field, headache and surgical treatment were statistically no significant in survival rates of these patients.

  19. Pituitary gigantism causing diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, N S; Kirk, J M

    1999-01-01

    Although growth hormone excess (acromegaly) in association with glucose intolerance and diabetes mellitus is well documented in adult medicine, it is much less common in the paediatric age group. We report the case of a 13 year-old boy who presented with tall stature secondary to a large growth hormone secreting adenoma of the pituitary gland. Random growth hormone was 630 mIU/l and did not suppress during an oral glucose tolerance test. Following debulking of the tumour, he developed diabetic ketoacidosis requiring insulin treatment, but after further surgery glucose handling returned to normal. He has been started on testosterone to arrest further increase in height.

  20. The Enigma behind Pituitary and Sella Turcica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umarevathi Gopalakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pituitary gland’s role as a functional matrix for sella turcica has not been suggested in orthodontic literature. This paper is an attempt to correlate the role of pituitary gland in the development of sella turcica. A case report of dwarfism associated with hypopituitarism is presented to highlight the above hypothesis.

  1. Shedding light on canine pituitary dwarfism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorbij, A.M.W.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary dwarfism, associated with growth hormone deficiency, is an autosomal, recessively inherited disorder in shepherd dogs. Due to the serious nature of pituitary dwarfism and lack of efficient treatment, it is preferable to prevent dwarfs from being born by applying a correct breeding policy.

  2. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Tortora, Fabio; Baldelli, Roberto; Cocchiara, Francesco; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Sbardella, Emilia; Simeoli, Chiara; Caranci, Ferdinando; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria

    2017-03-01

    Adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary tumor represents about 10 % of pituitary adenomas and at the time of diagnosis most of them are microadenomas. Transsphenoidal surgery is the first-line treatment of Cushing's disease and accurate localization of the tumor within the gland is essential for selectively removing the lesion and preserving normal pituitary function. Magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging modality for the detection of pituitary tumors, but adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary microadenomas are not correctly identified in 30-50 % of cases, because of their size, location, and enhancing characteristics. Several recent studies were performed with the purpose of better localizing the adrenocorticotropin-secreting microadenomas through the use in magnetic resonance imaging of specific sequences, reduced contrast medium dose and high-field technology. Therefore, an improved imaging technique for pituitary disease is mandatory in the suspect of Cushing's disease. The aims of this paper are to present an overview of pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease and to provide a magnetic resonance imaging protocol to be followed in case of suspicion adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma.

  3. Pituitary volume in patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartalci, Sukru; Dogan, Metin; Unal, Suheyla; Ozcan, A Cemal; Ozdemir, Serdal; Atmaca, Murad

    2011-01-15

    Panic patients have many functional deficiencies in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Previous studies have shown changed pituitary gland volume in some psychiatric disorders that have functional deficiencies in the HPA axis. However, to date no study has evaluated the pituitary gland volume in patients with panic disorder (PD). We investigated the pituitary gland volume in patients with PD (n=27) and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=27), using 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging in this study. Analysis showed that patients with PD had significantly smaller pituitary volume compared to healthy subjects. Patients with agoraphobia especially had a significantly smaller pituitary volume than patients without agoraphobia. There was a significant relationship between the pituitary volume and both the severity of symptoms and the illness duration in the patient group. The results show that patients with PD have reduced pituitary volume, which may reflect the functional abnormalities seen in this disorder. These findings may help us better understand the pathology of PD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hypothalamic functions in patients with pituitary insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, A.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to increase our understanding of hypothalamic (dys)function in patients with pituitary insufficiency. This goal is driven by the clinical experience of persisting symptoms in patients adequately treated for pituitary insufficiency. We focus primarily on patients

  5. Angioscan exploration of morphology of pituitary adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabarin, A.; David, J.P.; Drouillard, J. and others

    1987-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the morphologic study of pituitary due to the availability of angioscan programs. An exceptional case is presented of a persistent intrasellar trigeminal artery associated with prolactinoma. Based on technological progress in CT scan imaging the place of angiographic explorations in the investigation of pituitary adenoma is reconsidered.

  6. Shedding light on canine pituitary dwarfism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorbij, A.M.W.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary dwarfism, associated with growth hormone deficiency, is an autosomal, recessively inherited disorder in shepherd dogs. Due to the serious nature of pituitary dwarfism and lack of efficient treatment, it is preferable to prevent dwarfs from being born by applying a correct breeding policy.

  7. The Enigma behind Pituitary and Sella Turcica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Umarevathi; Mahendra, Lodd; Rangarajan, Sumanth; Madasamy, Ramasamy; Ibrahim, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The pituitary gland's role as a functional matrix for sella turcica has not been suggested in orthodontic literature. This paper is an attempt to correlate the role of pituitary gland in the development of sella turcica. A case report of dwarfism associated with hypopituitarism is presented to highlight the above hypothesis.

  8. The Enigma behind Pituitary and Sella Turcica

    OpenAIRE

    Umarevathi Gopalakrishnan; Lodd Mahendra; Sumanth Rangarajan; Ramasamy Madasamy; Mohammad Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The pituitary gland’s role as a functional matrix for sella turcica has not been suggested in orthodontic literature. This paper is an attempt to correlate the role of pituitary gland in the development of sella turcica. A case report of dwarfism associated with hypopituitarism is presented to highlight the above hypothesis.

  9. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease involving the pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriden, Zina; Bullock, Grant C; Bagg, Adam; Bonatti, Hugo; Cousar, John B; Lopes, M Beatriz; Robbins, Mark K; Cathro, Helen P

    2010-11-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are heterogeneous lesions with variable morphology, immunophenotype, and molecular characteristics. Multiple distinct primary lesions can occur in PTLD, rarely with both B-cell and T-cell characteristics. Lesions can involve both grafted organs and other sites; however, PTLD involving the pituitary gland has not been previously reported. We describe a patient who developed Epstein-Barr virus-negative PTLD 13 years posttransplantation involving the terminal ileum and pituitary, which was simultaneously involved by a pituitary adenoma. Immunohistochemistry of the pituitary lesion showed expression of CD79a, CD3, and CD7 with clonal rearrangements of both T-cell receptor gamma chain (TRG@) and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH@) genes. The terminal ileal lesion was immunophenotypically and molecularly distinct. This is the first report of pituitary PTLD and illustrates the potentially complex nature of PTLD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of pituitary adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville, Jean-Francois; Bonneville, Fabrice; Cattin, Francoise [University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Besancon (France)

    2005-03-01

    Today, MR is the only method needed for the morphological investigation of endocrine-active pituitary adenomas. In acromegaly and Cushing's syndrome, the therapeutic attitude is directly dictated by MR data. We present the MR aspect of pituitary adenomas according to size, sex, age, endocrine activity and a few particular conditions such as hemorrhagic pituitary adenomas, pituitary adenomas during pregnancy, cavernous sinus invasion and postsurgical changes. When an intrasellar mass extending out of the sella turcica is detected, the goal of the MR examination is to indicate precisely the origin of the tumor, its extension in relation to the various surrounding structures, its structure and its enhancement in order to help in the differential diagnosis. Demonstration of very small pituitary adenomas remains a challenge. When SE T1- and Turbo SE T2-weighted sequences are non-diagnostic, enhanced imaging becomes mandatory; half-dose gadolinium injection, delayed sequence, dynamic imaging can be of some help. (orig.)

  11. Molecular screening of pituitary adenomas for gene mutations and rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, V.; Drazin, N.Z.; Gonskey, R.; Melmed, S. (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Although pituitary tumors arise as benign monoclonal neoplasms, genetic alterations have not readily been identified in these adenomas. The authors studied restriction fragment abnormalities involving the GH gene locus, and mutations in the p53 and H-, K-, and N-ras genes in 22 human GH cell adenomas. Twenty two nonsecretory adenomas were also examined for p53 and ras gene mutations. Seven prolactinoma DNA samples were tested for deletions in the multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 (MEN-1) locus, as well as for rearrangements in the hst gene, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family. In DNA from GH-cell adenomas, identical GH restriction patterns were detected in both pituitary and lymphocyte DNA in all patients and in one patient with a mixed GH-TSH cell adenoma. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, no mutations were detected in exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 of the p53 gene in GH cell adenomas nor in 22 nonsecretory adenomas. Codons 12/13 and 61 of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras genes were also intact on GH cell adenomas and in nonsecretory adenomas. Site-specific probes for chromosome 11q13 including, PYGM, D11S146, and INT2 were used in 7 sporadic PRL-secreting adenomas to detect deletions of the MEN-1 locus on chromosome 11. One patient was identified with a loss of 11p, and the remaining 6 patients did not demonstrate loss of heterozygosity in the pituitary 11q13 locus, compared to lymphocyte DNA. None of these patients demonstrated hst gene rearrangements which also maps to this locus. These results show that p53 and ras gene mutations are not common events in the pathogenesis of acromegaly and nonsecretory tumors. Although hst gene rearrangements and deletions of 11q13 are not associated with sporadic PRl-cell adenoma formation, a single patient was detected with a partial loss of chromosome 11, including the putative MEN-1 site. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbui, T.; Barosi, G.; Birgegard, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a review of critical concepts and produce recommendations on the management of Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms, including monitoring, response definition, first- and second-line therapy, and therapy for special issues. Key questions were selected according......, with the addition of cytogenetics evaluation and transfusion status. High-risk patients with PV should be managed with phlebotomy, low-dose aspirin, and cytoreduction, with either hydroxyurea or interferon at any age. High-risk patients with ET should be managed with cytoreduction, using hydroxyurea at any age...

  13. Four types of neoplasms in Asian sea bass (Lates calcarifer)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramalingam Vijayakumar; Kuzhanthaivel Raja; Vijayapoopathi Singaravel; Ayyaru Gopalakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To describe and observe four types of neoplasms on different parts (external and internal organs) of an Asian sea bass (Lates calcarifer). Methods:The sample was collected from local fish landing center (south east coast of India). Histopathology of normal and tumour tissues were analyzed. Results:A total of 83 tumour masses (neoplasm) were recorded on the fish skin, also the neoplasms were recorded in internal organs of fish such as liver, stomach and ovary. Conclusions:Aetiology of such neoplasm’s are unknown, further more researches need to confirm the causative agent for this type of neoplasm.

  14. Clusterin expression in non-neoplastic adenohypophyses and pituitary adenomas: cytoplasmic clusterin localization in adenohypophysis is related to aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, A Işin Doğan; Eren, Bülent; Türkmen, Nursel; Comunoğlu, Nil; Fedakar, Recep

    2008-01-01

    Clusterin is a circulating multifunctional glycoprotein produced in several kinds of epithelial and neuronal cells. Clusterin is upregulated during different physiological and pathological states, such as senescence, type-2 diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer disease, and in various neoplasms. Herein, we investigated the immunohistochemical expression of clusterin in non-neoplastic adenohypophysis of human autopsy subjects and pituitary adenomas. We also investigated the association of clusterin increase with age in adenohypophysis of autopsy subjects. Immunohistochemically, clusterin was found positive in the cytoplasm of all adenoma cases, and in the cytoplasm of parenchymal cells, stellate cells, mixed cell follicles and in colloidal material inside of the follicles of non-neoplastic adenohypophysis as well. Clusterin expression in pituitary adenomas was found significantly higher than in non-neoplastic adenohypophyses. In addition, in non-neoplastic adenohypophysis, a significant increase in clusterin expression levels between young (or=61 years) subjects (p adenohypophysis. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that clusterin expression was found in non-neoplastic adenohypophysis and in upregulated amounts in pituitary adenomas. This study also demonstrated that in non-neoplastic adenohypophyses, increase of clusterin positive cells; histopathological findings of calcification or presence colloidal material accumulation in large follicles were associated with age. To our knowledge, immunohistochemical localization of clusterin in pituitary adenomas was not reported previously.

  15. Diagnosis of pituitary microadenomas by CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakoda, K.; Gen, M.; Yonezawa, M.; Ohta, M.; Matsumura, S. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-10-01

    The presence of pituitary microadenomas can be established by the detection of minor changes on polytomograms of the sella turcica. However, as this method is a procedure for detecting secondary changes due to adenoma, it is understandable that microadenomas which fail to present secondary changes cannot be picked up. From this point of view, we investigated the possibility detecting changes in the pituitary itself by means of CT. An axial scan of pituitary microadenomas by EMI-1010 showed that some of the PRL secreting adenomas and all of the GH secreting adenomas showed areas of high density, and that some of PRL secreting adenomas and all the ACTH secreting adenomas showed areas of low density at the site of the adenomas. On a coronal scan with GE/X2, the normal pituitary is highly enhanced, and an absorption coefficient of 70 - 80 is demonstrated, but on an axial scan the coefficient becomes 25 - 35 due to the partial-volume effect. On a coronal scan pituitary microadenomas are shown as hypodense-lucent or isodense as a normal pituitary. However, the absorption coefficient of the hypodense-lucent area was 50 - 60; this is not low, but is, rather, a high density. At present, it is our belief that it is most effective to use a coronal angle with a high-resolution scanner in the diagnosis of pituitary microadenomas.

  16. Serotonin, ATRX, and DAXX Expression in Pituitary Adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casar-Borota, Olivera; Botling, Johan; Granberg, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Differential diagnosis based on morphology and immunohistochemistry between a clinically nonfunctioning pituitary neuroendocrine tumor (NET)/pituitary adenoma and a primary or secondary NET of nonpituitary origin in the sellar region may be difficult. Serotonin, a frequently expressed marker...... of the pituitary tumors expressed serotonin, suggesting that serotonin immunoreactive sellar tumors represent primary or secondary NETs of nonpituitary origin. Normal expression of ATRX and DAXX in pituitary tumors suggests that ATRX and DAXX do not play a role in the pathogenesis of pituitary endocrine tumors...... on a larger cohort of pituitary carcinomas are needed to clarify whether ATRX mutations may contribute to the metastatic potential in a subset of pituitary NETs....

  17. Hypopituitarism following pituitary irradiation for acromegaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aloia, J.F.; Archambeau, J.O.

    1978-01-01

    Endocrine evaluation is reported in 8 acromegalic patients who received 5500 rad to the pituitary from a linear accelerator. There was a mean decrease in hGH levels of 72%. Plasma testosterone levels were low in 1 of the 6 male patients prior to pituitary irradiation and were below normal in all male patients on the final evaluation (3.1 +- 0.2 SD years postirradiation). Deficiency of TSH secretion developed in 2 patients following irradiation. This rather high incidence of postirradiation partial hypopituitarism was not anticipated and is thought to be related to radiation necrosis of the normal pituitary tissue which surrounds the adenoma.

  18. Malignant neoplasms of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Paxton V; Davidoff, Andrew M

    2006-05-01

    Head and neck masses represent a common clinical entity in children. In general, these masses are classified as developmental, inflammatory, or neoplastic. Having a working knowledge of lesions within this region and conducting a thorough history and physical examination generally enables the clinician to facilitate an appropriate workup and establish a diagnosis. The differential diagnosis is broad, and expeditiously distinguishing benign from malignant masses is critical for instituting a timely multidisciplinary approach to the management of malignant lesions. Neoplasms of the head and neck account for approximately 5% of all childhood malignancies. A diagnosis of malignancy may represent a primary tumor or metastatic foci to cervical nodes. In this review, we discuss the general approach to evaluating suspicious masses and adenopathy in the head and neck region and summarize the most common malignant neoplasms of the head and neck with regard to their incidence, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, staging, and management. Thyroid, parathyroid, and salivary gland tumors are discussed elsewhere in this issue of Seminars in Pediatric Surgery.

  19. Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms; Neuroendokrine Neoplasien des Pankreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiderwellen, K.; Lauenstein, T.C. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Essen (Germany); Sabet, A.; Poeppel, T.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Essen (Germany); Lahner, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Endokrinologie und Stoffwechselerkrankungen, Essen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2 % of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. (orig.) [German] Neuroendokrine Neoplasien (NEN) des Pankreas stellen mit einem Anteil von 1-2 % aller pankreatischen Tumoren eine seltene Differenzialdiagnose dar. Ein Teil der Tumoren ist hormonell aktiv und faellt klinisch durch charakteristische Symptome auf, wohingegen der ueberwiegende Anteil hormonell inaktiv ist. Bildgebende Verfahren wie Sonographie, Computertomographie (CT), Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) und nicht zuletzt Positronenemissionstomographie (PET oder kombiniert als PET/CT) spielen eine zentrale Rolle fuer Erstdiagnose, Therapieplanung und -kontrolle. Die Endosonographie und die multiphasische CT stellen die Referenzmethoden zur Lokalisation des Primaertumors dar. Fuer die Differenzierung insbesondere kleiner Leberlaesionen bietet die MRT die hoechste Aussagekraft. Fuer das Ganzkoerperstaging und bestimmte Aspekte der Therapieplanung lassen sich die Somatostatinrezeptorszintigraphie und v. a. die Somatostatinrezeptor-PET/CT heranziehen. (orig.)

  20. Topical treatment options for conjunctival neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan W Kim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan W Kim, David H AbramsonOphthalmic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Topical therapies offer a nonsurgical method for treating conjunctival tumors by delivering high drug concentrations to the ocular surface. Over the past ten years, topical agents have been used by investigators to treat various premalignant and malignant lesions of the conjunctiva, such as primary acquired melanosis with atypia, conjunctival melanoma, squamous intraepithelial neoplasia and squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva, and pagetoid spread of the conjunctiva arising from sebaceous cell carcinoma. Despite the enthusiasm generated by the success of these agents, there are unanswered questions regarding the clinical efficacy of this new nonsurgical approach, and whether a single topical agent can achieve cure rates comparable with traditional therapies. Furthermore, the long-term consequences of prolonged courses of topical chemotherapeutic drugs on the ocular surface are unknown, and the ideal regimen for each of these agents is still being refined. In this review, we present specific guidelines for treating both melanocytic and squamous neoplasms of the conjunctiva, utilizing the available data in the literature as well as our own clinical experience at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.Keywords: topical therapies, conjunctival neoplasms melanosis, Mitomycin-C, 5-Fluorouracil

  1. Management of incidental pituitary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas F. Marko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary incidentalomas are common lesions for which neurosurgical referrals may become progressively more frequent, given the increasing application of neuroimaging. The initial evaluation of a patient with radiographic evidence of an incidentaloma should focus on addressing two questions: (1 is the lesion causing neurological symptoms, and (2 is the lesion hormonally active? The answers to these two questions provide a framework for subsequent clinical management. The initial patient assessment should include a detailed history and physical examination, including the bedside assessment of visual fields. High-quality MRI imaging is essential, and formal visual field testing should be obtained in patients where the lesion abuts or compresses the optic apparatus. The initial biochemical workup is intended to assess potential pituitary hypo- or hyperfunction and should include measurement of serum levels of prolactin, insulin-like growth factor type-1, free thyroxine, testosterone, and an assessment of axis hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis function. Additional testing may include serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone levels. Neurologically-asymptomatic patients without endocrine dysfunction can be managed with observation at regular intervals, including MRI imaging at 6 months and 1 year and then annually for a period of 3 years. Follow-up biochemical assessment is not necessary in the absence of clinical symptoms or radiographic enlargement of the lesion. After 3 years the follow-up interval may be prolonged, although closer follow-up may be indicated for patients with lesions C1 cm. Most patients who either present with or who subsequently develop neurologic or endocrinologic symptoms should be considered for surgery as the first-line therapy.

  2. Computed tomographic findings in the pituitary gland and brain of horses with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, A P; Schott, H C; Howey, E B; Patterson, J S

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) is the most common endocrinologic disorder of aged horses. Pituitary glands of PPID-affected horses are larger than those of aged horses without signs of PPID, and the size difference can be detected using computed tomography (CT) imaging. Eight horses with clinical signs of PPID and supportive endocrinologic test results and 3 aged control (PPID-negative) horses. Computed tomography examination of the brain and pituitary gland was performed twice in 10 of the 11 horses, approximately 6 months apart. Six PPID-affected horses were treated with pergolide for 6 months between CT scans. The second CT scan was followed by euthanasia and pathologic examination of 6 PPID-affected horses (4 treated horses). On initial examination, pituitary glands of PPID-affected horses were larger in height (P pituitary gland length increased (P pituitary gland measurements made at the terminal CT scans and necropsy. Furthermore, pituitary gland volume calculated from the measurements was highly correlated to pituitary gland weight. Additional CT findings were bilaterally symmetrical mineralization in the thalamus and cholesterol granulomas adjacent to the lateral and fourth ventricles. CT is a useful imaging modality to determine pituitary gland size of PPID-affected horses,and CT measurements are similar to gross pathologic measurements. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. What Happens After Treatment for Pituitary Tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop pituitary hormone deficiencies after surgery or radiation therapy. These people will need hormone replacement. Thyroid hormone and adrenal steroids can be taken as pills. In men, testosterone can be given to restore sex drive and ...

  4. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide and migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zagami, Alessandro S; Edvinsson, Lars; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) is found in human trigeminocervical complex and can trigger migraine. PACAP levels were measured using a sensitive radioimmunoassay. Stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in cat elevated PACAP levels in cranial blood. Patients...

  5. Pituitary prolactin adenoma with Toxoplasma gondii infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓晖; 李青; 程虹; 阎庆国; 黄高昇

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To report two recent cases of pituitary adenoma associated with Toxoplasma gondii (T.Gondii) infection.Methods: Histological changes were observed in H & E and PAS staining sections microscopically.Immunohistochemistry was performed to classify the pituitary tumors and to confirm the diagnosis of T.gondii.Results: The cases were 43- and 19-year-old females, in which the latter one was a recurring case, and radiology examination showed that tumors existed in sellar region.Microscopically, the tumors consisted of small homogenous polygonal or round cells with abundant eosinophilic granular cytoplasm.Immunohistochemistry revealed they were prolactin-producing adenomas.Interestingly, we found toxoplasma infection in the tumor tissues, being confirmed by T.gondii sepicific antibody immunohistochemistry.Conclusion: The association of pituitary adenoma with toxoplasma raises the possibility that T.gondii may be involved in the development of certain cases of pituitary adenoma.

  6. Pituitary diseases : long-term clinical consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaauw, Agatha Apolonia van der

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes various studies during the long-term follow-up of patients after treatment for pituitary diseases. The focus of this thesis is acromegaly, growth hormone deficiency, sleep and quality of life. Various aspects are described.

  7. Pituitary diseases : long-term clinical consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaauw, Agatha Apolonia van der

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes various studies during the long-term follow-up of patients after treatment for pituitary diseases. The focus of this thesis is acromegaly, growth hormone deficiency, sleep and quality of life. Various aspects are described.

  8. Intrasellar tuberculoma presenting as pituitary apoplexy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunkumar M

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The combination of apoplectic symptoms and a sellar mass most often points to a diagnosis of a pituitary adenoma. Sellar tuberculomas are not considered as a cause of ′pituitary apoplexy′ and there has been no radiological documentation of haemorrhage associated with them. We report a 27 years old man who presented with 3 previous episodes of pituitary apoplexy. CT scan showed evidence of a sellar mass with haemorrhage. Transsphenoidal biopsy of the intrasellar mass was reported as ′tuberculoma′. The patient had marked reduction in the size of the lesion following antituberculous therapy with no recurrence of symptoms. Intrasellar tuberculomas must be considered as one of the differential diagnosis when patients present with a pituitary apoplexy.

  9. What Are the Symptoms of Pituitary Tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What are the symptoms of pituitary tumors? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Symptoms of Functioning Tumors The symptoms of functioning tumors ...

  10. Diagnostic criteria in invasive pituitary adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldovan Ioana-Maria

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenomas are benign pituitary primary tumors, the most frequent type of tumor in the pituitary fossa. An important part, around 1/3 of the pituitary adenomas manifests an aggressive behavior, growing faster and invading into parasellar areas (cavernous sinus, neural tissues and bones. Objectives: the first aim of this paper is to review the last findings about invasiveness diagnostic criteria, imagistic and biomarkers, which can be used in the classification of pituitary tumors and also to predict the probability of invasiveness, tumor recurrence and suspicion of malignancy. The second aim is to highlight the morphological and clinic types of invasive pituitary adenomas. Materials and methods: we performed a systematic review and analysis of the published articles, searching PubMed between January 1985 and December 2015. There were selected articles published in English, reviews and abstracts. During the advanced search type in PubMed, combinations of the following keywords were used: “pituitary adenoma”, “invasive”, “aggressive”, “biomarkers”, “classification”, “histological subtypes”, ‘”immunohistochemical markers”. Results: 215 articles were selected, regarding diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic aspects. There were some histological subtypes of pituitary adenomas known as having an aggressive clinical behavior. Several biomarkers were identified as being associated with the invasive feature: proliferation markers (Ki-67 index, number of mitoses, p53 & p27 expression, microvascularization density, telomerase, topoisomerase 2 Alpha, matrix metalloproteinases, protein kinase C, cyclooxygenase-2, E-cadherin, transcription Factors, genetic alterations (PTTG gene, Galectin-3 protein/ LGALS3 gene, apoptosis markers. Based on their invasion and proliferation characteristics, pituitary tumors are proposed to be classified into five grades (1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3, the grade 2b tumor with high risk of recurrence

  11. Primary cardiac neoplasms:a clinicopathologic analysis of 81 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王继纲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the disease spectrum,clinical and pathologic features of primary cardiac neoplasms at asingle medical in stitution during a period of eight years.Methods The clinical and pathologic features of 81 cases of primary cardiac neoplasms encountered at the Affiliated

  12. Temozolomide in aggressive pituitary adenomas and carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Leon D. Ortiz; Luis V. Syro; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Fabio Rotondo; Humberto Uribe; Camilo E Fadul; Eva Horvath; Kalman Kovacs

    2012-01-01

    Temozolomide is an alkylating agent used in the treatment of gliomas and, more recently, aggressive pituitary adenomas and carcinomas. Temozolomide methylates DNA and, thereby, has antitumor effects. O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, a DNA repair enzyme, removes the alkylating adducts that are induced by temozolomide, thereby counteracting its effects. A Medline search for all of the available publications regarding the use of temozolomide for the treatment of pituitary tumors was perf...

  13. Double pituitary adenomas: six surgical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, T; Horiguchi, H; Xu, B; Li, C; Hino, A; Sakaki, M; Kannuki, S; Yamada, S

    1999-05-01

    While double pituitary adenomas have been found in approximately 1% of autopsy pituitaries, those in surgically resected material have been only rarely reported. We report herein 6 cases of double pituitary adenomas, which consisted of two histologically and/or immunohistochemically different areas among approximately 450 surgical specimens. Five out of 6 patients were men and the age was ranged between 18 and 61 years old. All these 6 patients presented acromegaly or acrogigantism and hyperprolactinemia was noted in 3 patients. In 2 patients (cases 1 and 2) the two adenomas belonged to different adenoma groups (GH-PRL-TSH group and FSH/LH group), while in the remaining 4 patients (cases 3-6) the two adenomas belonged to the same group (GH-PRL-TSH group). Thus, in all patients at least one of the two adenomas was GH-producing adenoma. Reasons for a high incidence of GH-producing adenomas in surgically resected double pituitary adenomas may include the presence of a variety of histologic subtypes among GH-producing adenomas and the advantage of cytokeratin immunostaining to distinguish these subtypes. In regard to pathogenesis of double pituitary adenomas, adenomas in cases 1 and 2 may be of multicentric occurrence, while those in cases 3-6 may occur through different clonal proliferation within originally one adenoma, resulting in diverse phenotypic expressions. Since there were patients with familial MEN 1 (case 2) and familial pituitary adenoma unrelated MEN 1 (case 3), genetic background should be also considered. Double pituitary adenomas in surgically resected material may not be so infrequent. Further molecular analysis will provide new insights into understanding the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas and their mechanisms of multidirectional phenotypic diffrentiation.

  14. Pituitary Apoplexy Presented with Optic Neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Owji

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The patient is a 40-years-old woman presented with visual loss in the right eye since two days ago. The patient complained of headache with gradual onset in the right parietal area since 2 years ago. The headache pattern did not alter.The left eye was normal but the vision in the right eye was 50 cm finger counting. Marcus Gunn pupil could be observed during swinging-flashlight test in the right eye. According to these findings, the first diagnosis was optic neuritis which was corroborated with visual evoked potential (the latency of P100 was 122. According to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, there was a big cystic tumor in sella turcica extended to the suprasellar region (Figure 1-A. It had a large liquid component. Optic chiasm was under pressure and was displaced (Figure 1-B. A faint enhancement was seen after the injection (Figure 1-C.The patient was operated with the transnasal-transsphenoidal approach. Blood and fibrin were among the small monomorphic round cells andfibro-connective tissue of the pituitary gland. Considering the bleeding inside the pituitary tumor, the final diagnosis was pituitary apoplexy. After recovery from the operation the symptoms were removed.Pituitary apoplexy presents with headache, loss of vision, ophthalmoplegia, and mental alterations which is caused by infarction or sudden bleeding inside the pituitary tumor.1In our review of literature, 3 patients afflicted with pituitary apoplexy presented with optic neuritis were reported.In a study conducted by Petersen et al., all three patients referred to them suffered from unilateral visual loss and headache. They were examined with the early diagnosis of optic neuritis. After taking a Brain Computerized tomography (CT scan, pituitary adenoma together with the formation of cyst were detected in patients. After transsphenoidal adenomectomy, the patient regained full vision. Therefore, the correct diagnosis of these patients, who had been incorrectly diagnosed with

  15. File list: Unc.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Jafar Memon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic neoplasms are rare in children and have a different histo-logic spectrum and prognosis than those in adults. Pancreatoblastoma is the most common pancreatic neoplasm in young children. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm occurs in adolescent girls. It is heterogeneous in internal architecture, with a mixture of solid and cystic hemorrhagic and necrotic elements. All pancreatic neoplasms in children are capable of producing metastases, usually to the liver and lymph nodes; however, on the whole, these tumors have a better clinical outcome than most pancreatic tumors in adults. We present a case of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm with a liver metastasis in a 13 year old male patient. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(7.000: 3090-3093

  4. The various MRI patterns of pituitary apoplexy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotin, M. [Department of Radiology, Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute (Canada)]|[Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital (Switzerland); Tampieri, D.; Garant, M.; Melanson, D. [Department of Radiology, Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute (Canada); Ruefenacht, D.A.; Delavelle, J. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital (Switzerland); Mohr, G. [Department of Neurosurgery, Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Del Carpio, R. [Department of Radiology, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Robert, F. [Department of Pathology, Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital, H3T 1E2 Montreal (Canada)

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the various MRI features, in correlation to surgical and pathological findings, in patients who presented with pituitary apoplexy (PA). Eleven patients presenting with PA, were evaluated with various MR protocols including spin-echo (SE) T1-weighted sequences in 9 of 11 patients, post gadolinium SE T1-weighted sequences in only 8 of 11 patients, and with T2-weighted SE sequences in 2 of 11 patients. All patients had transsphenoidal pituitary surgery after MR studies. The severity of presenting symptoms ranged from headaches to coma. Ten patients had pituitary macroadenoma; one had a non-hemorrhagic metastatic lesion into a non-adenomatous pituitary gland. Of the 11 patients, one was studied at the acute stage of PA (1 day after onset), 9 at the subacute period (3-15 days after onset), and one at the late stage (5 months after onset). Images compatible with intratumoral hemorrhage were found in all macroadenomas, whereas the metastatic pituitary lesion did not show evidence of bleeding. All gadolinium-enhanced studies showed partial tumoral enhancement. The SE T2-weighted studies demonstrated areas of low and high signal intensities in keeping with the presence of blood degradation contents. Pituitary apoplexy present with different MR features, including hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic characteristics on T1-weighted images. Gadolinium-enhanced images do not provide complementary diagnostic information when the presence of blood is assessed on plain images. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 27 refs.

  5. Cholesteryl esters in human malignant neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, M R; Bottura, G; Lucchi, P; Reggiani, A; Trinchero, A; Tugnoli, V

    2003-01-01

    Cholesteryl esters (CholE) were detected in human malignant neoplasms by means of in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectroscopic analysis of the total lipid extracts obtained from cerebral tumors revealed appreciable amount of esterified cholesterol in high grade gliomas such as glioblastomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, characterized by prominent neovascularity. The finding that no CholE were detected in the healthy brain and in low grade and benign tumors supports a possible correlation between this class of lipids and histological vascular proliferation. Compared with high grade gliomas, renal cell carcinomas show higher levels of CholE, absent in the healthy renal parenchyma and in benign oncocytomas. In nefro-carcinomas, cytoplasmic lipid inclusions and prominent vascularization contribute to the increased levels of CholE present mainly as oleate. CholE are discussed as potential biochemical markers of cancer and as a target for new therapeutic strategies.

  6. Clinical photodynamic therapy of malignant neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Skobelkin, Oleg K.; Litwin, Gregory; Astrakhankina, Tamara A.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of the results of treatment of 379 malignant neoplasms with PDT in 89 patients has been made. Photogem (hematoporphyrin derivative) and Photosense (aluminum sulfonated derivative) -- both produced in Russia -- were used as photosensitizers. An argon-pumped dye- laser called `Innova 200' (Coherent USA), a Russian dye laser with copper vapor pumping (Yakhroma 2), a gold vapor laser (630 nm and 627.8 nm, accordingly) for Photogem, and a solid aluminate ittrium laser (672 nm) for Photosense were used. Up to now we have had follow-up control of 75 patients for the period of 2 months to 2.5 years. Positive effect of PDT was seen in 90.7% (68 out of 75); including complete regression -39 (52%), partial (50 - 100%), -in 29 (38.7%).

  7. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for stomach neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mitsuhiro Fujishiro

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in techniques of therapeutic endoscopy for stomach neoplasms are rapidly achieved. One of the major topics in this field is endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). ESD is a new endoscopic technique using cutting devices to remove the tumor by thefollowing three steps: injecting fluid into the submucosa to elevate the tumor from the muscle layer, pre-cutting the surrounding mucosa of the tumor, and dissecting the connective tissue of the submucosa beneath the tumor. So the tumors are resectable in an en bloc fashion, regardless of the size, shape, coexisting ulcer,and location. Indication for ESD is strictly confined by two aspects: the possibility of nodal metastases and technical difficulty, which depends on the operators. Although long-term outcome data are still lacking, short-term outcomes of ESD are extremely favourable and laparotomy with gastrectomy is replaced with ESD in some parts of therapeutic strategy for early gastric cancer.

  8. Cytogenetically unrelated clones in hematological neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, S; Mitelman, F

    1989-01-01

    We have reviewed literature data on 6,306 cases of hematological neoplasia--acute and chronic lymphatic and myeloid leukemias (CML excepted), myelodysplastic and chronic lymphoproliferative and myeloproliferative disorders, and malignant lymphomas--with the goal of quantitatively ascertaining how often cytogenetically unrelated clones occur in these diseases. Unexpectedly wide variations were found: in ANLL, unrelated clones were present in 1.1% of the 2,506 known cases with chromosome abnormalities characterized with banding technique; in the various myelodysplastic (MDS) and chronic myeloproliferative (CMD) disorders (total number of cases 1,299) the frequency was 4.3% and in lymphatic malignancies 1.3% (total case number 2,501). In the latter group the proportions varied between 0.4% and 0.6% in ALL and malignant lymphoma (ML) to as much as 6.2% in CLD and 7.3% in CLL. Some karyotypic abnormalities were encountered more often than would be expected from their general frequency in the various diseases. This discrepancy was particularly evident in MDS and CMD, where 5q- was found in slightly less and +8 in somewhat more than half of the 56 cases. Furthermore, these two aberrations were found as the only changes in the two coexisting clones in one-fourth of the material. Although if viewed in isolation these data would undoubtedly be best explained by assuming a multicellular origin of the neoplasm, it is entirely possible that what are cytogenetically perceived as unrelated clones could be subclones with some invisible aberration in common. If so, this interpretation indicates that changes like +8 and 5q-, both of which are common rearrangements in bone marrow neoplasms, are actually secondary changes that develop during tumor progression.

  9. Incidence of colorectal neoplasms among male pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Toledano, Ohad; Galazan, Lior; Hallak, Aharon; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2014-07-21

    To assess the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms (adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers) among Israeli military and commercial airline pilots. Initial screening colonoscopy was performed on average-risk (no symptoms and no family history) airline pilots at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center (ICPC) in the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Visualized polyps were excised and sent for pathological examination. Advanced adenoma was defined as a lesion >10 mm in diameter, with high-grade dysplasia or villous histology. The results were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched random sample of healthy adults undergoing routine screening at the ICPC. There were 270 pilots (mean age 55.2 ± 7.4 years) and 1150 controls (mean age 55.7 ± 7.8 years). The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was 15.9% among the pilots and 20.6% among the controls (P = 0.097, χ (2) test). There were significantly more hyperplastic polyps among pilots (15.5% vs 9.4%, P = 0.004) and a trend towards fewer adenomas (14.8% vs 20.3% P = 0.06). The prevalence of advanced lesions among pilots and control groups was 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively (P = 0.49), and the prevalence of cancer was 0.7% and 0.69%, respectively (P = 0.93). There tends to be a lower colorectal adenoma, advanced adenoma and cancer prevalence but a higher hyperplastic polyp prevalence among pilots than the general population.

  10. Somatic mutations of calreticulin in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klampfl, Thorsten; Gisslinger, Heinz; Harutyunyan, Ashot S; Nivarthi, Harini; Rumi, Elisa; Milosevic, Jelena D; Them, Nicole C C; Berg, Tiina; Gisslinger, Bettina; Pietra, Daniela; Chen, Doris; Vladimer, Gregory I; Bagienski, Klaudia; Milanesi, Chiara; Casetti, Ilaria Carola; Sant'Antonio, Emanuela; Ferretti, Virginia; Elena, Chiara; Schischlik, Fiorella; Cleary, Ciara; Six, Melanie; Schalling, Martin; Schönegger, Andreas; Bock, Christoph; Malcovati, Luca; Pascutto, Cristiana; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Cazzola, Mario; Kralovics, Robert

    2013-12-19

    Approximately 50 to 60% of patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis carry a mutation in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2), and an additional 5 to 10% have activating mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor gene (MPL). So far, no specific molecular marker has been identified in the remaining 30 to 45% of patients. We performed whole-exome sequencing to identify somatically acquired mutations in six patients who had primary myelofibrosis without mutations in JAK2 or MPL. Resequencing of CALR, encoding calreticulin, was then performed in cohorts of patients with myeloid neoplasms. Somatic insertions or deletions in exon 9 of CALR were detected in all patients who underwent whole-exome sequencing. Resequencing in 1107 samples from patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms showed that CALR mutations were absent in polycythemia vera. In essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, CALR mutations and JAK2 and MPL mutations were mutually exclusive. Among patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis with nonmutated JAK2 or MPL, CALR mutations were detected in 67% of those with essential thrombocythemia and 88% of those with primary myelofibrosis. A total of 36 types of insertions or deletions were identified that all cause a frameshift to the same alternative reading frame and generate a novel C-terminal peptide in the mutant calreticulin. Overexpression of the most frequent CALR deletion caused cytokine-independent growth in vitro owing to the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) by means of an unknown mechanism. Patients with mutated CALR had a lower risk of thrombosis and longer overall survival than patients with mutated JAK2. Most patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis that was not associated with a JAK2 or MPL alteration carried a somatic mutation in CALR. The clinical course in these patients was more indolent than that in patients with the JAK2 V617F

  11. Neuroanatomy and physiology of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis: clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Midge

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the anatomy of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the somatotrophic axis, and neurohypophysis.

  12. CT findings of intrathoricic neoplasm associated with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hee Sung; Choe, Kyu Ok; Chung, Jin Il; Oh, Sei Chung [College of Medicine Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy(HOA) is a clinical syndrome consisting of clubbing, periostitis and synovitis. Most frequent causes of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy are intrathoracic neoplasms, among which the bronchogenic carcinoma ranks the highest. But computed tomographic evaluation of intrathoracic neoplasm associated with HOA has been seldom reported. The purpose of this study is to evaluate CT findings of intrathoracic neoplasm associated with HOA, and to infer possible mechanism. Seven cases of intrathoracic neoplasm associated with HOA were included in our study. Diagnoses of HOA were made by Tc99m bone scintigraphy or plain radiography. The findings of chest CT scans were reviewed retrospectively, with main interests on their size, location and internal characteristics, ect. Seven cases of intrathoracic neoplasm consisted of five bronchogenic carcinomas and two thymic tumors. The size of intrathoracic tumors were relatively large ranging from 6cm to 13cm(average 8.0cm). All thoracic neoplasms showed wide pleural contact, and one of them invaded thoracic wall. The range of length of pleural contact was 5-18cm(average 9.9cm). All of seven patients had internal necrosis, and one of them showed cavitation in thoracic mass. Intrathoracic neoplasms associated with HOA had a tendency to be large, to contain internal necrosis, and to widely abut the thoracic pleura.

  13. Lymphocytic hypophysitis masquerading as pituitary adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Mittal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pituitary hypophysitis (PH is characterized by pituitary infiltration of lymphocytes, macrophages, and plasma cells that could lead to loss of pituitary function. Hypophysitis may be autoimmune or secondary to systemic diseases or infections. Based on the histopathological findings PH is classified into lymphocytic, granulomatous, xanthomatous, mixed forms (lymphogranulomatous, xanthogranulomatous, necrotizing and Immunoglobulin- G4 (IgG4 plasmacytic types. Objective: To report a case of lymphocytic hypophysitis (LH. Case Report: A 15-year-old girl presented with history of headache, amenorrhea, and history of polyuria for past 4 months. Initial evaluation had suppressed follicular stimulating hormone (<0.01 mIU/ml, high prolactin levels (110.85 ng/ml and diabetes insipidus (DI. Magnetic resonance imaging of sella was suggestive of pituitary macroadenoma with partial compression over optic chiasma. Patient underwent surgical decompression. Yellowish firm tissue was evacuated and xanthochromic fluid was aspirated. Histopathology was suggestive of LH. She resumed her cycles postoperatively after 4 months, prolactin levels normalized, however, she continues to have DI and is on desmopressin spray. This case has been presented here for its rare presentation in an adolescent girl because it is mostly seen in young females and postpartum period and its unique presentation as an expanding pituitary mass with optic chiasma compression. Conclusion: Definitive diagnosis of LH is based on histopathological evaluation. Therapeutic approach should be based on the grade of suspicion and clinical manifestations of LH.

  14. Headache and pituitary disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitschmann-Andermahr, I; Siegel, S; Weber Carneiro, R; Maubach, J M; Harbeck, B; Brabant, G

    2013-12-01

    Headache is very common in pituitary disease and is reported to be present in more than a third of all patients with pituitary adenomas. Tumour size, cavernous sinus invasion, traction or displacement of intracranial pain-sensitive structures such as blood vessels, cranial nerves and dura mater, and hormonal hypersecretion are implicated causes. The present review attempts to systematically review the literature for any combination of headache and pituitary or hormone overproduction or deficiency. Most data available are retrospective and/or not based on the International Headache Society (IHS) classification. Whereas in pituitary apoplexy a mechanical component explains the almost universal association of the condition with headaches, this correlation is less clear in other forms of pituitary disease and a positive impact of surgery on headaches is not guaranteed. Similarly, invasion into the cavernous sinus or local inflammatory changes have been linked to headaches without convincing evidence. Some studies suggest that oversecretion of GH and prolactin may be important for the development of headaches, and treatment, particularly with somatostatin analogues, has been shown to improve symptoms in these patients. Otherwise, treatment rests on general treatment options for headaches based on an accurate clinical history and a precise classification which includes assessment of the patient's psychosocial risk factors.

  15. Mortality in patients with pituitary disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sherlock, Mark

    2010-06-01

    Pituitary disease is associated with increased mortality predominantly due to vascular disease. Control of cortisol secretion and GH hypersecretion (and cardiovascular risk factor reduction) is key in the reduction of mortality in patients with Cushing\\'s disease and acromegaly, retrospectively. For patients with acromegaly, the role of IGF-I is less clear-cut. Confounding pituitary hormone deficiencies such as gonadotropins and particularly ACTH deficiency (with higher doses of hydrocortisone replacement) may have a detrimental effect on outcome in patients with pituitary disease. Pituitary radiotherapy is a further factor that has been associated with increased mortality (particularly cerebrovascular). Although standardized mortality ratios in pituitary disease are falling due to improved treatment, mortality for many conditions are still elevated above that of the general population, and therefore further measures are needed. Craniopharyngioma patients have a particularly increased risk of mortality as a result of the tumor itself and treatment to control tumor growth; this is a key area for future research in order to optimize the outcome for these patients.

  16. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Oneil Machado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs of the pancreas are neoplasms that are characterized by ductal dilation, intraductal papillary growth, and thick mucus secretion. This relatively recently defined pathology is evolving in terms of its etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and treatment guidelines. A PubMed database search was performed. All the relevant abstracts in English language were reviewed and the articles in which cases of IPMN could be identified were further scrutinized. Information of IPMN was derived, and duplication of information in several articles and those with areas of persisting uncertainties were excluded. The recent consensus guidelines were examined. The reported incidence of malignancy varies from 57% to 92% in the main duct-IPMN (MD-IPMN and from 6% to 46% in the branch duct-IPMN (BD-IPMN. The features of high-risk malignant lesions that raise concern include obstructive jaundice in a patient with a cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, the findings on radiological imaging of a mass lesion of >30 mm, enhanced solid component, and the main pancreatic duct (MPD of size ≥10 mm; while duct size 5-9 mm and cyst size <3 mm are considered as "worrisome features." Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS are primary investigations in diagnosing and following up on these patients. The role of pancreatoscopy and the analysis of aspirated cystic fluid for cytology and DNA analysis is still to be established. In general, resection is recommended for most MD-IPMN, mixed variant, and symptomatic BD-IPMN. The 5-year survival of patients after surgical resection for noninvasive IPMN is reported to be at 77-100%, while for those with invasive carcinoma, it is significantly lower at 27-60%. The follow-up of these patients could vary from 6 months to 1 year and would depend on the risk stratification for invasive malignancy and the pathology of the resected specimen. The

  17. Growth hormone receptor expression and function in pituitary adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lene R; Kristiansen, Mikkel T; Rasmussen, Lars M

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: Hypopituitarism, in particular GH deficiency, is prevalent in patients with clinically nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) both before and after surgery. The factors regulating the growth of pituitary adenomas in general and residual tumour tissue in particular...

  18. Radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: an endocrinologist`s perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Halloran, D.J.; Shalet, S.M. [Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1996-10-01

    A brief review is given of the clinical management of patients with pituitary adenomas such as prolactinomas, adenomasin acromegoly and Leushin`s disease, and non-functioning pituitary adenomas. In particular the complications of radiotherapy are explored. (UK).

  19. A pediatric case of pituitary macroadenoma presenting with pituitary apoplexy and cranial nerve involvement: case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özçetin, Mustafa; Karacı, Mehmet; Toroslu, Ertuğ; Edebali, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas usually arise from the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and are manifested with hormonal disorders or mass effect. Mass effect usually occurs in nonfunctional tumors. Pituitary adenomas may be manifested with visual field defects or rarely in the form of total oculomotor palsy. Visual field defect is most frequently in the form of bitemporal hemianopsia and superior temporal defect. Sudden loss of vision, papilledema and ophthalmoplegia may be observed. Pituitary apoplexy is defined as an acute clinical syndrome characterized with headache, vomiting, loss of vision, ophthalmoplegia and clouding of consciousness. The problem leading to pituitary apoplexy may be decreased blood supply in the adenoma and hemorrhage following this decrease or hemorrhage alone. In this article, we present a patient who presented with fever, vomiting and sudden loss of vision and limited outward gaze in the left eye following trauma and who was found to have pituitary macroadenoma causing compression of the optic chiasma and optic nerve on the left side on cranial and pituitary magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. A case of pituitary abscess presenting without a source of infection or prior pituitary pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derick Adams

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary abscess is a relatively uncommon cause of pituitary hormone deficiencies and/or a suprasellar mass. Risk factors for pituitary abscess include prior surgery, irradiation and/or pathology of the suprasellar region as well as underlying infections. We present the case of a 22-year-old female presenting with a spontaneous pituitary abscess in the absence of risk factors described previously. Her initial presentation included headache, bitemporal hemianopia, polyuria, polydipsia and amenorrhoea. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of her pituitary showed a suprasellar mass. As the patient did not have any risk factors for pituitary abscess or symptoms of infection, the diagnosis was not suspected preoperatively. She underwent transsphenoidal resection and purulent material was seen intraoperatively. Culture of the surgical specimen showed two species of alpha hemolytic Streptococcus, Staphylococcus capitis and Prevotella melaninogenica. Urine and blood cultures, dental radiographs and transthoracic echocardiogram failed to show any source of infection that could have caused the pituitary abscess. The patient was treated with 6 weeks of oral metronidazole and intravenous vancomycin. After 6 weeks of transsphenoidal resection and just after completion of antibiotic therapy, her headache and bitemporal hemianopsia resolved. However, nocturia and polydipsia from central diabetes insipidus and amenorrhoea from hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism persisted.

  1. A pediatric case of pituitary macroadenoma presenting with pituitary apoplexy and cranial nerve involvement: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özçetin, Mustafa; Karacı, Mehmet; Toroslu, Ertuğ; Edebali, Nurullah

    2016-09-01

    Pituitary adenomas usually arise from the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and are manifested with hormonal disorders or mass effect. Mass effect usually occurs in nonfunctional tumors. Pituitary adenomas may be manifested with visual field defects or rarely in the form of total oculomotor palsy. Visual field defect is most frequently in the form of bitemporal hemianopsia and superior temporal defect. Sudden loss of vision, papilledema and ophthalmoplegia may be observed. Pituitary apoplexy is defined as an acute clinical syndrome characterized with headache, vomiting, loss of vision, ophthalmoplegia and clouding of consciousness. The problem leading to pituitary apoplexy may be decreased blood supply in the adenoma and hemorrhage following this decrease or hemorrhage alone. In this article, we present a patient who presented with fever, vomiting and sudden loss of vision and limited outward gaze in the left eye following trauma and who was found to have pituitary macroadenoma causing compression of the optic chiasma and optic nerve on the left side on cranial and pituitary magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Polymicrobial Pituitary Abscess Predominately Involving Escherichia coli in the Setting of an Apoplectic Pituitary Prolactinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Norman; Medina-Garcia, Luis; Al Mohajer, Mayar; Zangeneh, Tirdad T.

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare intracranial infection that can be life-threatening if not appropriately diagnosed and treated upon presentation. The most common presenting symptoms include headache, anterior pituitary hypofunction, and visual field disturbances. Brain imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals intra- or suprasellar lesion(s). Diagnosis is typically confirmed intra- or postoperatively when pathological analysis is done. Clinicians should immediately start empiric antibiotics and request a neurosurgical consult when pituitary abscess is suspected. Escherichia coli (E. coli) causing intracranial infections are not well understood and are uncommon in adults. We present an interesting case of an immunocompetent male with a history of hypogonadism presenting with worsening headache and acute right eye vision loss. He was found to have a polymicrobial pituitary abscess predominantly involving E.   coli in addition to Actinomyces odontolyticus and Prevotella melaninogenica in the setting of an apoplectic pituitary prolactinoma. The definitive etiology of this infection was not determined but an odontogenic process was suspected. A chronic third molar eruption and impaction in close proximity to the pituitary gland likely led to contiguous spread of opportunistic oral microorganisms allowing for a polymicrobial pituitary abscess formation. PMID:27006841

  3. Polymicrobial Pituitary Abscess Predominately Involving Escherichia coli in the Setting of an Apoplectic Pituitary Prolactinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Beatty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary abscess is a rare intracranial infection that can be life-threatening if not appropriately diagnosed and treated upon presentation. The most common presenting symptoms include headache, anterior pituitary hypofunction, and visual field disturbances. Brain imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals intra- or suprasellar lesion(s. Diagnosis is typically confirmed intra- or postoperatively when pathological analysis is done. Clinicians should immediately start empiric antibiotics and request a neurosurgical consult when pituitary abscess is suspected. Escherichia coli (E. coli causing intracranial infections are not well understood and are uncommon in adults. We present an interesting case of an immunocompetent male with a history of hypogonadism presenting with worsening headache and acute right eye vision loss. He was found to have a polymicrobial pituitary abscess predominantly involving E.   coli in addition to Actinomyces odontolyticus and Prevotella melaninogenica in the setting of an apoplectic pituitary prolactinoma. The definitive etiology of this infection was not determined but an odontogenic process was suspected. A chronic third molar eruption and impaction in close proximity to the pituitary gland likely led to contiguous spread of opportunistic oral microorganisms allowing for a polymicrobial pituitary abscess formation.

  4. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: Part I. Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the field of medicine. In this article, the first of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to neoplasms, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Future therapies for the myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherber, Robyn; Mesa, Ruben A

    2011-03-01

    Ever since their description as "myeloproliferative syndromes" by William Dameshek in 1951, the myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) have been managed by the selective use of rather mundane, nonspecific therapies that rely on either antiplatelet effects or myelosuppression. The year 2005 ushered in a new era of drug development and discovery for the MPNs after the description of the JAK2 V617F mutation and the role this constitutively active tyrosine kinase has in MPN pathogenesis. Subsequently, multiple pharmacologic agents have begun (or are about to begin) testing for the inhibition of JAK2 in an attempt to improve the treatment of MPNs. Both primary myelofibrosis and myelofibrosis following essential thrombocythemia or polycythemia vera have been the targets of the most extensive testing of these agents to date. Responses to these oral JAK2 inhibitors have been primarily intended to reduce splenomegaly and meaningfully improve symptoms; effects on the JAK2 V617F allele burden or marrow histology are limited. Toxicities have ranged from myelosuppression to significant diarrhea. Additional agents with other mechanisms of action are also targeting JAK2, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors. The results of preliminary trials of JAK2 inhibitors in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia have been mixed but are premature. Many questions remain as to the optimal JAK2 inhibitory strategy and the full extent of the benefit of single-agent JAK2 inhibition.

  6. Origin and Molecular Pathology of Adrenocortical Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielinska, M.; Parviainen, H.; Kiiveri, S.; Heikinheimo, M.; Wilson, D.B.

    2008-01-01

    Neoplastic adrenocortical lesions are common in humans and several species of domestic animals. Although there are unanswered questions about the origin and evolution of adrenocortical neoplasms, analysis of human tumor specimens and animal models indicates that adrenocortical tumorigenesis involves both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Chromosomal changes accumulate during tumor progression, and aberrant telomere function is one of the key mechanisms underlying chromosome instability during this process. Epigenetic changes serve to expand the size of the uncommitted adrenal progenitor population, modulate their phenotypic plasticity (i.e., responsiveness to extracellular signals), and increase the likelihood of subsequent genetic alterations. Analyses of heritable and spontaneous types of human adrenocortical tumors have documented alterations in either cell surface receptors or their downstream effectors that impact neoplastic transformation. Many of the mutations associated with benign human adrenocortical tumors result in dysregulated cyclic AMP signaling, whereas key factors/signaling pathways associated with adrenocortical carcinomas include dysregulated expression of the IGF2 gene cluster, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. A better understanding of the factors and signaling pathways involved in adrenal tumorigenesis is necessary to develop targeted pharmacologic and genetic therapies. PMID:19261630

  7. The Hematopoietic Niche in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette H. Schmitt-Graeff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialized microanatomical areas of the bone marrow provide the signals that are mandatory for the maintenance and regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and progenitor cells. A complex microenvironment adjacent to the marrow vasculature (vascular niche and close to the endosteum (endosteal niche harbors multiple cell types including mesenchymal stromal cells and their derivatives such as CAR cells expressing high levels of chemokines C-X-C motif ligand 12 and early osteoblastic lineage cells, endothelial cells, and megakaryocytes. The characterization of the cellular and molecular networks operating in the HSC niche has opened new perspectives for the understanding of the bidirectional cross-talk between HSCs and stromal cell populations in normal and malignant conditions. A structural and functional remodeling of the niche may contribute to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN. Malignant HSCs may alter the function and survival of MSCs that do not belong to the neoplastic clone. For example, a regression of nestin+ MSCs by apoptosis has been attributed to neuroglial damage in MPN. Nonneoplastic MSCs in turn can promote aggressiveness and drug resistance of malignant cells. In the future, strategies to counteract the pathological interaction between the niche and neoplastic HSCs may offer additional treatment strategies for MPN patients.

  8. Pituitary abscess during pregnancy: Management dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Chaitanya Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary abscess is a rare disorder and only one case of pituitary abscess in pregnancy has been reported in the literature. Since, its presenting manifestations are non-specific; the diagnosis is usually made per-operatively. A 35-year-old pregnant lady, with a sellar mass was managed successfully with trans-sphenoidal drainage of the abscess and antibiotic therapy. We discuss the unique set of problems faced in diagnosis and management. Choice of antibiotics, management of intra-operative cerebrospinal fluid leak and absence of any growth on cultures made the overall management challenging. Although, it can present with a dramatic course suggestive of central nervous system infection or a pituitary mass, but more often it mimics an indolent lesion, which can pose as a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

  9. Breast Cancer Metastasis to Pituitary Infandibulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Poursadegh Fard

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis from breast cancer to other parts of the body is very common, but the spread of the tumor to pituitary gland, especially to infandibulum, is a rare presentation. At the time of pituitary metastasis, a majority of the patients have clinical and radiological evidence of the disease. It seems that the posterior area of the gland is the most common site of metastasis, probably due to highly rich blood supply through the hypophyseal artery. The present report introduces a case of a 55-years-old woman presented with diabetes insipidus resulting from metastasis of the tumor to pituitary infandibulum, which is a rare site for metastasis, without significant complaint resulting from metastasis to other part of the body, or other primary diseases. Further evaluation revealed that in spite of previous reports, which metastasis usually happens in end stage of cancer, the patients had primary breast cancer. In subsequent evaluations of the case, hypofunction of adenohypophysis was also detected

  10. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  11. MRI of pituitary adenomas in acromegaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marro, B. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Batiment Babinsky, Hopital Salpetriere, 47, Bd de l`Hopital, F-75013 Paris (France); Zouaoui, A. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Batiment Babinsky, Hopital Salpetriere, 47, Bd de l`Hopital, F-75013 Paris (France); Sahel, M. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Batiment Babinsky, Hopital Salpetriere, 47, Bd de l`Hopital, F-75013 Paris (France); Crozat, N. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Batiment Babinsky, Hopital Salpetriere, 47, Bd de l`Hopital, F-75013 Paris (France); Gerber, S. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Batiment Babinsky, Hopital Salpetriere, 47, Bd de l`Hopital, F-75013 Paris (France); Sourour, N. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Batiment Babinsky, Hopital Salpetriere, 47, Bd de l`Hopital, F-75013 Paris (France); Sag, K. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Batiment Babinsky, Hopital Salpetriere, 47, Bd de l`Hopital, F-75013 Paris (France); Marsault, C. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Batiment Babinsky, Hopital Salpetriere, 47, Bd de l`Hopital, F-75013 Paris (France)

    1997-06-01

    Adenomas causing acromegaly represent at least a quarter of pituitary adenomas. We studied 12 patients presenting with active acromegaly due to a pituitary adenoma with a 1.5 T superconductive MRI unit. All had T1-weighted sagittal and coronal sections before and after Gd-DTPA; six had coronal T2-weighted images. Surgical correlation was obtained in seven patients. Histologically, there were eight growth hormone (GH)-secreting and three mixed [GH and prolactin (PRL) secreting] adenomas, and one secreting GH, PRL and follicle-stimulating hormone. Macroadenomas (10) were more frequent than microadenomas (2). No correlation was found between serum GH and tumour size. There were nine adenomas in the lateral part of the pituitary gland; seven showed lateral or infrasellar invasion. Homogeneous, isointense signal on T1- and T2-weighted images was observed in six cases. Heterogeneous adenomas had cystic or necrotic components. (orig.). With 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Recent advances in pituitary tumor management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Mark J; Mayberg, Marc R

    2011-08-01

    Advances in the neurosurgical management of pituitary tumors have included the refinement of surgical access and significant progress in navigation technology to help further reduce morbidity and improve outcome. Similarly, stereotactic radiosurgery has evolved to become an integral part in pituitary tumors not amenable to medical or surgical treatment. The evolution of minimally invasive surgery has evolved toward endoscopic versus microscopic trans-sphenoidal approaches for pituitary tumors. Debate exists regarding each approach, with advocates for both championing their cause. Stereotactic and fractional radiosurgery have been shown to be a safe and effective means of controlling tumor growth and ensuring hormonal stabilization, with longer-term data available for GammaKnife compared with CyberKnife. The advances in trans-sphenoidal surgical approaches, navigation technological improvements and the current results of stereotactic radiosurgery are discussed.

  13. [Preservation of the pituitary stalk and the gland in transsphenoidal microsurgery for pituitary adenomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoyu; Yuan, Xianrui; Liao, Yiwei; Xie, Yuanyang; Zhang, Chi; Li, Juan; Su, Jun; Wang, Xiangyu; Chen, Xiaoyu; Liu, Qing

    2014-02-01

    To improve the surgical outcome of pituitary adenomas by identifying and preserving the pituitary stalk and the gland during surgery. From October 2010 to September 2012, the author from the Department of Neurosurgery of Xiangya Hospital, Central South University operated on 51 patients with pituitary adenoma. During the operations, we carefully identified the normal adenohypophysis, pituitary stalk, neurohypophysis and the abnormal tissues either by direct observation or by medical images, aiming to excise the tumor thoroughly, protect the pituitary function and reduce the postoperative complications. Totally 37 patients (72.5%, 37/51) had total resection of the tumor, 12 (23.5%, 12/51) had subtotal tumor resection and the other 2 had major removal. The gland and the pituitary stalk were well identified and reserved. Detection of hormone content proved that the operation had little effect on the free triiodothyronine (FT3) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), while for free tetraiodothyronine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and postoperative followup significant alleviation was found. There was no significant fluctuation for the testosterone in the men preoperatively and postoperatively (all the above results were obtained without hormone replacement therapy). The main postoperative complications were as follows: temporary diabetes insipidus in 5 patients (9.8%, 5/51); electrolyte disorder (the appearance of hyponatremia) in 17 (33.3%, 17/51); and cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea and postoperative intracranial infection in 1 (2%, 1/51). No one died during the perioperation period. Microscopic transsphenoidal surgery is effective for pituitary adenomas including tumors violating the cavernous sinus. Accurate identification of the pituitary stalk, the gland and the abnormal tissue during the microscopic transsphenoidal operation plays a critical role in preserving the pituitary function and promoting postoperative rehabilitation.

  14. Synchronous esthesioneuroblastoma and growth-hormone-secreting pituitary macroadenoma: combined open and endoscopic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Costanza J; Tewfik, Marc A; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Di Maio, Salvatore

    2014-12-01

    Background Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon malignant neoplasm that arises from the olfactory neuroepithelium. In this article we report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma presenting concomitantly with a growth-hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary macroadenoma. Results A 52 year old woman underwent surgery for suspected nasal polyps. Intralesional debulking of an intranasal tumor disclosed a low-grade esthesioneuroblastoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large nasal and intracranial tumor, in addition to a separate sellar and suprasellar tumor. The patient was frankly acromegalic. She underwent a first-stage gross total resection of the esthesioneuroblastoma via a combined extended subfrontal and extended endonasal approach, followed by focused radiation therapy. She then returned for endoscopic removal of the GH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma. Conclusion The combined open and endoscopic management of this patient is described and a review of the literature presented. To our knowledge this is the first case of synchronous esthesioneuroblastoma and macroadenoma, in this case GH secreting, described in the literature.

  15. Manifestation of a sellar hemangioblastoma due to pituitary apoplexy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahli Rahel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemangioblastomas are rare, benign tumors occurring in any part of the nervous system. Most are found as sporadic tumors in the cerebellum or spinal cord. However, these neoplasms are also associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease. We report a rare case of a sporadic sellar hemangioblastoma that became symptomatic due to pituitary apoplexy. Case presentation An 80-year-old, otherwise healthy Caucasian woman presented to our facility with severe headache attacks, hypocortisolism and blurred vision. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed an acute hemorrhage of a known, stable and asymptomatic sellar mass lesion with chiasmatic compression accounting for our patient's acute visual impairment. The tumor was resected by a transnasal, transsphenoidal approach and histological examination revealed a capillary hemangioblastoma (World Health Organization grade I. Our patient recovered well and substitutional therapy was started for panhypopituitarism. A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scan performed 16 months postoperatively showed good chiasmatic decompression with no tumor recurrence. Conclusions A review of the literature confirmed supratentorial locations of hemangioblastomas to be very unusual, especially within the sellar region. However, intrasellar hemangioblastoma must be considered in the differential diagnosis of pituitary apoplexy.

  16. Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasm presenting with Cushing's syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabayegit Ozlem

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oncocytic neoplasms occur in several organs and are most commonly found in the thyroid, kidneys and salivary glands. Oncocytic neoplasms of the adrenal cortex are extremely rare and are usually non-functioning. Case presentation We report the case of an adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasm with uncertain malignant potential in a 31-year-old man with Cushing's syndrome. The patient had been operated on following diagnosis of a 7 cm adrenal mass. Following surgery, the Cushing's syndrome resolved. The patient is still alive with no metastases one year after the surgery. Conclusion Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms must be considered in the differential diagnosis of both functioning and non-functioning adrenal masses.

  17. Pituitary autoimmunity in patients with Sheehan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Ravinder; Kochupillai, Narayana; Crock, Patricia A; Jaleel, Abdul; Gupta, Nandita

    2002-09-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a frequent complication of pregnancy in India. Sheehan's description of postpartum hypopituitarism promoted the belief that PPH leads to necrosis of the enlarged pituitary gland of pregnancy and hypopituitarism. However, slow clinical progression suggests factors other than ischemia in its pathogenesis. Tissue necrosis could release sequestered antigens, triggering autoimmunity of the pituitary and delayed hypopituitarism in Sheehan's syndrome. Twenty-six consecutive patients with postpartum hypopituitarism were studied, 19 with Sheehan's syndrome based on a history of PPH and hormone profile suggesting pituitary failure [mean (SD) age 32.7 +/- 6.4 yr, duration of illness 5.5 +/- 3.1 yr], and seven patients with no history of PPH, categorized as "Other." Pituitary imaging and basal T(4), TSH, cortisol, LH, FSH, 17beta-estradiol, and autoantibodies against pituitary (PitAb) and thyroid (TMA) were evaluated. Controls included 28 healthy females without prior conception (22 +/- 5 yr) and 28 with prior conception (26 +/- 5 yr). Twelve of 19 (63.1%) patients with Sheehan's syndrome and one of seven in the Other group had PitAb against the 49-kDa autoantigen; neuron-specific enolase. Four of 28 (14.2%) controls without prior conception and 5 of 28 (17.8%) controls with prior conception had PitAb positivity (P Sheehan's syndrome, respectively). There was no significant difference in the mean serum hormone values and TMA positivity between patients with Sheehan's syndrome and the Other group as well as patients with or without PitAb positivity. Pituitary autoimmunity may play a role in the cause of hypopituitarism following PPH.

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  10. ACTH-secreting pancreatic neoplasms associated with Cushing syndrome: clinicopathologic study of 11 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragliano, Roberta; Vanoli, Alessandro; Albarello, Luca; Milione, Massimo; Basturk, Olca; Klimstra, David S; Wachtel, Antonio; Uccella, Silvia; Vicari, Emanuela; Milesi, Marina; Davì, Maria Vittoria; Scarpa, Aldo; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo; La Rosa, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs), although rare, are responsible for about 15% of ectopic Cushing syndrome (CS). They represent a challenging entity because their preoperatory diagnosis is frequently difficult, and clear-cut morphologic criteria useful to differentiate them from other types of PanNETs have not been defined. Ectopic ACTH secretion associated with CS can also be rarely due to pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) and pancreatoblastoma, rare tumor types with morphologic features sometimes overlapping those of PanNETs and, for this reason, representing a diagnostic challenge for pathologists. We herein describe the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of 10 PanNETs and 1 ACC secreting ACTH and associated with CS together with an extensive review of the literature to give the reader a comprehensive overview on ACTH-producing pancreatic neoplasms. ACTH-secreting PanNETs are aggressive neoplasms with an immunohistochemical profile that partially overlaps that of pituitary corticotroph adenomas. They are generally large and well-differentiated neoplasms without distinctive histologic features but with signs of aggressiveness including vascular and perineural invasion. They are more frequent in female individuals with a mean age of 42 years. At 5 and 10 years after diagnosis, 35% and 16.2% of patients, respectively, were alive. ACTH-secreting ACCs and pancreatoblastomas are very aggressive pediatric tumors with a poor prognosis. Using an appropriate immunohistochemical panel including ACTH, β-endorphin, trypsin, and BCL10 it is possible to recognize ACTH-secreting PanNETs and to distinguish them from the very aggressive ACTH-secreting ACCs.

  11. Plurihormonal Cosecretion by a Case of Adrenocortical Oncocytic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Corrales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms (oncocytomas are extremely rare; only approximately 159 cases have been described so far. The majority are nonfunctional and benign. We describe an unusual case of a functional oncocytoma secreting an excess of glucocorticoids (cortisol and androgens (androstenedione and DHEAS, a pattern of plurihormonal cosecretion previously not reported in men, presenting with endocrine manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome. The neoplasm was considered to be of uncertain malignant potential (borderline according to the Lin-Weiss-Bisceglia criteria.

  12. Nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms: gender differences in prevalence and malignant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondagh, Eveline J A; Masclee, Ad A M; van der Valk, Mirthe E; Winkens, Bjorn; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Soetikno, Roy M; Sanduleanu, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Colonoscopy may fail to prevent colorectal cancer, especially in the proximal colon and in women. Nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms may potentially explain some of these post-colonoscopy cancers. In the present study, we aimed to examine the prevalence and malignant potential of nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms in a large population, with special attention to gender and location. We performed a cross-sectional study of all consecutive patients undergoing elective colonoscopy at a single academic medical center. The endoscopists were familiarized on the detection and treatment of nonpolypoid lesions. Advanced histology was defined by the presence of high-grade dysplasia or early cancer. We included 2310 patients (53.9% women, mean age 58.4 years) with 2143 colorectal polyps. Prevalences of colorectal neoplasms and nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms were lower in women than in men (20.9% vs. 33.7%, p colorectal neoplasms were significantly more likely to contain advanced histology than polypoid ones (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.24-6.74, p = 0.01), while this was not the case in men (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.40-2.06, p = 0.83). Proximal neoplasms with advanced histology were more likely to be nonpolypoid than distal ones (OR 4.68, 95% CI 1.54-14.2, p = 0.006). Nonpolypoid mechanisms may play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis, in both women and men. Although women have fewer colorectal neoplasms than men, they have nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms, which frequently contain advanced histology.

  13. Morbidity and mortality of malignant neoplasms in Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vukovikj, Viktorija; Markovski, Velo

    2015-01-01

    Introductions: Malignant neoplasms are the second cause of death among the population in Republic of Macedonia with representation of and represent 19.0% in the structure of total deaths. Objective: To analyze the morbidity and mortality of the most common malignant neoplasms in Republic of Macedonia. Material and methods: Were used a data from the Institute of Public Health of the Republic of Macedonia, National institute for statistic of Republic Macedonia. Results and discussions:...

  14. High dose radiotherapy for pituitary tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mead, K.W. (Queensland Radium Inst., Herston (Australia))

    1981-11-01

    The results of treatment of 120 pituitary tumours are presented. Based on this experience operable chromophobe adenomas are now treated with 5,000 rads in 4 weeks and inoperable ones receive an additional central dose to 7,500 rads. Pituitary Cushing's tumours are given 10,000 rads in 5 weeks using small fields and acromegalics 5,000 rads to the whole sella and 7,500 to its lower half. The absence of complications at these dose levels is attributed to the use of small fields and the precise application of treatment.

  15. Diagnostic imaging of the pituitary gland in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt-Meijer, R.H. van der

    2006-01-01

    Pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) is a frequently encountered endocrinopathy in dogs. Transsphenoidal hypophysectomy is an effective treatment of PDH in dogs. However, for pituitary surgery to be successful information about the size of the pituitary gland and the exact location of the

  16. CT characteristics of primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yufeng; Wang Jichen [Department of Radiology, Peking University First Hospital, No. 8, Xishike Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100034 (China); Peng Yun [Imaging Center, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China); Zeng Jinjin, E-mail: jzeng5567@yahoo.co [Imaging Center, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China)

    2010-09-15

    Primary retroperitoneal neoplasms are uncommon in children. Retroperitoneal neoplasms are either mesodermal, neurogenic, germ cell ectodermal or lymphatic in origin. In general, primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children have different spectrum and prevalence compared to those in adults. Neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, benign teratoma and lymphoma are the common retroperitoneal neoplasms. In this review, the clinical and CT futures of common retroperitoneal neoplasms in children are described. Coarse, amorphous, and mottled calcification are very common in neuroblastoma. Paraganglioma tends to show marked and early enhancement and may present with clinical symptoms associated with the excess catecholamine. Sarcomas are often very large and have heterogeneous appearance. Imaging cannot be reliably used to identify the type of retroperitoneal sarcomas due to overlapped radiographic features. In children, lipoblastoma is the most common lipomatous tumor in the retroperitoneum. The percentage of visible fat in tumor varies depending on the cellular composition of the lesion. The CT characteristics of teratoma are quite variable, which may be cystic, solid, on a combination of both. Typically teratoma appears as a large complex mass containing fluid, fat, fat-fluid level, and calcifications. Lymphoma is often homogeneous on both enhanced and unenhanced CT scans. Necrosis and calcification are rare on CT. In conclusion, making a final histological diagnosis of retroperitoneal tumor base on CT features is not often possible; however, CT can help to develop a differential diagnosis and determine the size and extent of the retroperitoneal neoplasms.

  17. Second neoplasms following megavoltage radiation in a pediatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselow, R.E.; Nesbit, M.; Dehner, L.P.; Khan, F.M.; McHugh, R.; Levitt, S.H.

    1978-09-01

    Previous reports of radiation-related neoplasia have relied primarily upon patients treated by orthovoltage to low doses for benign disease. This survey is believed to be the first to assess the incidence of second neoplasms following megavoltage therapy. The source was the records of all long-term pediatric survivors (88 patients) who were treated with megavoltage radiation (cobalt 60) at the University of Minnesota. There was an average follow-up period of 14 years during which 7 second neoplasms were discovered (8%). Five were not associated with prior radiation. Both radiation-related neoplasms were associated with low doses and one was without significant morbidity. Two of the seven neoplasms were malignant; one was not associated with radiation while the other was associated with prolonged chemotherapy and low dose radiation (1%). The only fatal second neoplasm was not associated with radiation but developed 5 years after prolonged chlorambucil treatment. This review reveals the tendency of childhood cancer victims to develop other neoplasms regardless of radiation. The finding of neoplasia induction only at low radiation doses supports the Gray hypothesis of decreased tumor induction at high doses through increased cell killing.

  18. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Hemminki

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis. By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation.

  19. Mucins in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic neoplasms: report of 40 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yuan; TAN Yun-shan; XU Jian-fang; QI Wei-dong; LI Xiao-ping; SU-JIE Ake-su; ZHU Xiong-zeng

    2006-01-01

    @@ Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas account for 10% to 15% of all cystic pancreatic lesions.The majority (85% to 90%) of cystic lesions of the pancreas are pseudocysts. Although cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are rare, they range from benign to malignant neoplasms. The clinical challenge is the differential diagnosis and management of the cystic neoplasms, which represent 10% to 25% of primary pancreatic neoplasms. Pancreatic neoplasms and tumour like lesions with cystic features have been recently reviewed. The incidence of pancreatic cystic neoplasms reported is variable. Because there is no large, systematic study on tne cases from China comparing the incidence and biology of cystic neoplasms of pancreas to that of Western series, we reviewed all the cases of cystic neoplasms from Zhongshan Hospital over 6 years. Most of the neoplasms in our series were classified according to the recent World Health Organization (WHO)classification.1,2

  20. Hyperprolactinaemia is associated with a higher prevalence of pituitary-adrenal dysfunction in non-functioning pituitary macroadenoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjeerdsma, Geert; Sluiter, WJ; Hew, JM; Molenaar, WM; deLange, WE; Dullaart, RPF

    1996-01-01

    In non-functioning pituitary macroadenoma (NFMA), hyperprolactinaemia (hyperPRL) is considered to be a sign of hypothalamic-pituitary dysregulation, but it is unknown whether hyperPRL is associated with an increased frequency of pituitary hormone deficiencies. Forty consecutive patients with histolo

  1. Secondary malignant neoplasms in testicular cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, Stephanie A; Fung, Chunkit; Beard, Clair J

    2015-09-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer among men aged 15 to 40 years, and the incidence of testicular cancer is steadily increasing. Despite successful treatment outcomes and the rate of survival at 5 to 10 years being 95%, survivors can experience late effects of both their cancer and the treatment they received, including secondary malignant neoplasms (SMNs). We discuss the development of non-germ cell SMNs that develop after diagnosis and treatment of testicular cancer and their effect on mortality. Patients diagnosed with testicular cancer frequently choose postoperative surveillance if they are diagnosed with clinical stage I disease. These patients may experience an increased risk for developing SMNs following radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging. Similarly, radiotherapy for testicular cancer is associated with increased risks of developing both solid tumors and leukemia. Studies have reported that patients exposed to higher doses of radiation have an increased risk of developing SMNs when compared with patients who received lower doses of radiation. Patients treated with chemotherapy also experience an increased risk of developing SMNs following testicular cancer, though the risk following chemotherapy and radiation therapy combined is not well described. A large population-based study concluded that the rate ratios for both cancer-specific and all-cause mortality for SMNs among testicular cancer survivors were not significantly different from those of matched first cancers. Although it is known that patients who receive adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy or who undergo routine diagnostic or follow-up imaging for a primary testicular cancer are at an increased risk for developing SMNs, the extent of this risk is largely unknown. It is critically important that research be conducted to determine this risk and its contributing factors as accurately as possible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Health-related quality of life in pituitary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Iris; Valassi, Elena; Santos, Alicia; Webb, Susan M

    2015-03-01

    In the last 15 years, worse health-related quality of life (QoL) has been reported in patients with pituitary diseases compared with healthy individuals. Different QoL questionnaires have shown incomplete physical and psychological recovery after therapy. Residual impairments often affect QoL even long-term after successful treatment of pituitary adenomas. In this article, knowledge of factors that affect QoL in pituitary diseases is reviewed. The focus is on 5 pituitary diseases: Cushing syndrome, acromegaly, prolactinomas, nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas, and hypopituitarism.

  3. Impaired Pituitary Axes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Scranton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury (TBI is significant and rarely considered by clinicians. This topic has received much more attention in the last decade. The incidence of post TBI anterior pituitary dysfunction is around 30% acutely, and declines to around 20% by one year. Growth hormone and gonadotrophic hormones are the most common deficiencies seen after traumatic brain injury, but also the most likely to spontaneously recover. The majority of deficiencies present within the first year, but extreme delayed presentation has been reported. Information on posterior pituitary dysfunction is less reliable ranging from 3%–40% incidence but prospective data suggests a rate around 5%. The mechanism, risk factors, natural history, and long-term effect of treatment are poorly defined in the literature and limited by a lack of standardization. Post TBI pituitary dysfunction is an entity to recognize with significant clinical relevance. Secondary hypoadrenalism, hypothyroidism and central diabetes insipidus should be treated acutely while deficiencies in growth and gonadotrophic hormones should be initially observed.

  4. Pituitary and mammary growth hormone in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatti, Sofie Fatima Mareyam

    2006-01-01

    Several pathological (e.g. obesity and chronic hypercortisolism) and non-pathological (e.g. ageing) states in humans are characterized by a reduction in pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion. Chronic hypercortisolism in humans is also associated with an impaired GH response to various stimuli. Pit

  5. HYPONATREMIA AFTER TRANSSPHENIODAL SURGERY OF PITUITARY ADENOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶蔚; 任祖渊; 苏长保; 王任直; 杨义; 马文斌

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To clarify the frequency, presentation, associated factors, treatment and outcome of hy-ponatremia after transsphenoidal surgery of pituitary adenomas.Methods. Retrospectively reviewed the database of 183 patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgeryof pituitary adenomas between January 1999 and June 2000 in our department.Result.s. 38.8% (71/183) had postoperative hyponatremia. Among them, 59.2% (42/71) appeared onthe 4th to 7th day postoperatively. 59.2% (42/71) presented with nausea, vomiting, headache, dizzi-ness, confusion and weakness. Hyponatremia was related to age, tumor size and adenoma type, but notrelated to sex and degree of resection. Treatment consisted of salt replacement and mild fluid restrictionin 4 patients and salt and fluid replacement in 67 patients. Hyponatremia resolved within 16 days in allthe patients.Conclusions. Hyponatremia often appeared about 7 days after transsphenoidal surgery of pituitary ade-nomas, especially in elderly and patients with macroadenomas and huge pituitary adenomas. The principleof treatment was salt and fluid replacement.

  6. MRI of pituitary adenomas following treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouliamos, A. [Dept. of Radiology, CT and MRI Section, Areteion Hospital, Univ. of Athens (Greece); Athanassopoulou, A. [Dept. of Radiology, CT and MRI Section, Areteion Hospital, Univ. of Athens (Greece); Rologis, D. [Neurosurgical Clinic, Athens General Hospital (Greece); Kalovidouris, A. [Dept. of Radiology, CT and MRI Section, Areteion Hospital, Univ. of Athens (Greece); Kotoulas, G. [Dept. of Radiology, CT and MRI Section, Areteion Hospital, Univ. of Athens (Greece); Vlahos, L. [Dept. of Radiology, CT and MRI Section, Areteion Hospital, Univ. of Athens (Greece); Papavassiliou, C. [Dept. of Radiology, CT and MRI Section, Areteion Hospital, Univ. of Athens (Greece)

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess pituitary adenomas following surgical and/or medical treatment in 28 patients. All patients were evaluated with both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The results were correlated with the clinical findings. Apart from the visualization of the adenoma itself (either residual or recurrent) other findings and in particular, morphological changes of the optic chiasm, the pituitary stalk and the sellar floor were evaluated with both imaging modalities. By comparing the two imaging modalities it was found that MRI was superior to CT in demonstrating residual/recurrent adenoma as well as evaluating the morphological changes of the optic chiasm and optic nerves. CT was superior or equal to MR in demonstrating the sellar floor changes. The intra-operatively implanted fat was equally seen by CT and MR. In conclusion, the anatomical variations of the optic chiasm and pituitary stalk are better visualized by MRI and allow a more precise evaluation of changes attributed to surgical or medical treatment of pituitary adenomas. (orig.)

  7. Chorioretinopathy and pituitary dysfunction. The CPD syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judisch, G F; Lowry, R B; Hanson, J W; McGillivary, B C

    1981-02-01

    Four reports of a rare syndrome characterized by severe, early-onset chorioretinopathy, trichosis, and evidence of pituitary dysfunction are reviewed. Recently obtained follow-up information about these four patients is presented. A new example of this disease, the fifth case to be reported, to our knowledge, is described.

  8. Pituitary diseases : long-term psychological consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemensma, Jitske

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, pituitary adenomas can be appropriately treated, but patients continue to report impaired quality of life (QoL) despite long-term remission or cure. In patients with Cushing’s disease, Cushing’s syndrome or acromegaly, doctors should be aware of subtle cognitive impairments and the

  9. [Pituitary tumors manifesting with amenorrhea-galactorrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartal, A; Razon, N

    1976-05-16

    The amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome which occurs at a time other than the post-partum period is most often seen in association with a tumor of the pituitary gland; the symptoms are caused by a hypersecretion of prolactin. Among a series of 19 patients in Tel Aviv who underwent surgery for treatment of pituitary tumors, 2 presented with the amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome. The first patient, a 16 year old, presented with headaches, nausea, and diplopia; she underwent a series of 3 surgical procedures and died of a respiratory arrest in the third post-operative period. The second patient was a 39 year old woman who had borne 5 children; she presented with loss of vision, underwent surgery, and did well post-operatively. The authors point out that whereas either amenorrhea or galactorrhea alone may be associated with a number of disorders, the combination of the two symptoms is characteristic of pituitary tumors. Both patients who were presented in this article had chromophobe adenomas of the pituitary. The authors also discuss the various biologic actions of prolactin and its interrelationships with other hormones.

  10. Pituitary tuberculoma--a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manghani D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary tuberculomas, mimicking adenomas are very unusual. We describe a rare case of a patient with an exclusively intrasellar mass, and who presented with severe headaches and loss of libido. The lesion was approached trans-sphenoidally and pathological examination revealed a tuberculoma. Complete removal was achieved and the patient followed on anti-tuberculous therapy.

  11. Expression of orexin receptors in the pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Tadeusz; Smolinska, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Orexin receptors type 1 (OX1R) and type 2 (OX2R) are G protein-coupled receptors whose structure is highly conserved in mammals. OX1R is selective for orexin A, and OX2R binds orexin A and orexin B with similar affinity. Orexin receptor expression was observed in human, rat, porcine, sheep as well as Xenopus laevis pituitaries, both in the adenohypophysis and in the neurohypophysis. The expression level is regulated by gonadal steroid hormones and GnRH. The majority of orexins reaching the pituitary originate from the lateral hypothalamus, but due to the presence of the receptors and the local production of orexins in the pituitary, orexins could deliver an auto/paracrine effect within the gland. Cumulative data indicate that orexins are involved in the regulation of LH, GH, PRL, ACTH, and TSH secretion by pituitary cells, pointing to orexins' effect on the functioning of the endocrine axes. Those hormones may also serve as a signal linking metabolic status with endocrine control of sleep, arousal, and reproduction processes.

  12. How effective is external pituitary irradiation for growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feek, C.M.; McLelland, J.; Seth, J.; Toft, A.D.; Irvine, W.J.; Padfield, P.L.; Edwards, C.R.W. (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (UK); Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh (UK))

    1984-04-01

    Forty-six patients with GH-secreting pituitary tumours were treated with external pituitary irradiation through two opposed fields to a total dose of 3750 cGy over 15 fractions. Thirty-patients received external radiotherapy as primary treatment; 16 received radiotherapy combined with pituitary surgery. The mean (+- SD) serum GH in the former group was 74.3 +- 74.8 mU/l before treatment, falling by 28% per year over 0-5 years and by 16% per year over 0-20 years. The mean (+- SD) serum GH in the latter group was 265.4 +- 209.3 mU/l before treatment, falling by 76% in the first year-a direct result of surgery-then by 30% per year over 1-5 years and 16% per year over 1-20 years. Progressive failure of normal anterior pituitary function developed by 10 years, with variable loss of gonadotrophin, corticotrophin and thyrotrophin function. The respective figures for patients treated with radiotherapy alone were 47.4, 29.6 and 16.0% and for the combined group 70.2, 53.9 and 38.1%. Whilst external pituitary irradiation appears to reduce serum GH concentrations in patients with GH-secreting pituitary tumours the major disadvantages are the time taken to achieve a cure and the high incidence of hypopituitarism.

  13. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) mutations in pituitary tumors: could this be a new role for mitochondrial complex II and/or Krebs cycle defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xekouki, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-12-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) or mitochondrial complex II is a multimeric enzyme that is bound to the inner membrane of mitochondria and has a dual role as it serves both as a critical step of the tricarboxylic acid or Krebs cycle and as a member of the respiratory chain that transfers electrons directly to the ubiquinone pool. Mutations in SDH subunits have been implicated in the formation of familial paragangliomas (PGLs) and/or pheochromocytomas (PHEOs) and in Carney-Stratakis syndrome. More recently, SDH defects were associated with predisposition to a Cowden disease phenotype, renal, and thyroid cancer. We recently described a kindred with the coexistence of familial PGLs and an aggressive GH-secreting pituitary adenoma, harboring an SDHD mutation. The pituitary tumor showed loss of heterozygosity at the SDHD locus, indicating the possibility that SDHD's loss was causatively linked to the development of the neoplasm. In total, 29 cases of pituitary adenomas presenting in association with PHEOs and/or extra-adrenal PGLs have been reported in the literature since 1952. Although a number of other genetic defects are possible in these cases, we speculate that the association of PHEOs and/or PGLs with pituitary tumors is a new syndromic association and a novel phenotype for SDH defects.

  14. Somatic CALR Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with Nonmutated JAK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Van Loo, P.; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O’Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.-Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.P.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.P.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. RESULTS Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. CONCLUSIONS Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with

  15. Pituitary abscess: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos K A Karagiannis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary abscess is a rare life-threating entity that is usually misdiagnosed as a pituitary tumor with a definite diagnosis only made postoperatively. Over the last several decades, advances in healthcare have led to a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality due to pituitary abscess. We report a case of a 34-year-old woman who was admitted to our department for investigation of a pituitary mass and with symptoms of pituitary dysfunction, headaches and impaired vision. During her admission, she developed meningitis-like symptoms and was treated with antibiotics. She eventually underwent transsphenoidal surgery for excision of the pituitary mass. A significant amount of pus was evident intraoperatively; however, no pathogen was isolated. Six months later, the patient was well and had full recovery of the anterior pituitary function. Her menses returned, and she was only on treatment with desmopressin for diabetes insipidus that developed postoperatively.

  16. Regulation of pituitary cell function by adiponectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Martinez-Fuentes, Antonio J; Tovar, Sulay; Pinilla, Leonor; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Dieguez, Carlos; Castaño, Justo P; Malagon, María M

    2007-01-01

    Adiponectin is a member of the family of adipose tissue-related hormones known as adipokines, which exerts antidiabetic, antiatherogenic, antiinflammatory, and antiangiogenic properties. Adiponectin actions are primarily mediated through binding to two receptors expressed in several tissues, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Likewise, adiponectin expression has been detected in adipocytes as well as in a variety of extra-adipose tissues, including the chicken pituitary. Interestingly, adiponectin secretion and adiponectin receptor expression in adipocytes have been shown to be regulated by pituitary hormones. These observations led us to investigate whether adiponectin, like the adipokine leptin, regulates pituitary hormone production. Specifically, we focused our analysis on somatotrophs and gonadotrophs because of the relationship between the control of energy metabolism, growth and reproduction. To this end, the effects of adiponectin on both GH and LH secretion as well as its interaction with major stimulatory regulators of somatotrophs (ghrelin and GHRH) and gonadotrophs (GnRH) and with their corresponding receptors (GHS-R, GHRH-R, and GnRH-R), were evaluated in rat pituitary cell cultures. Results show that adiponectin inhibits GH and LH release as well as both ghrelin-induced GH release and GnRH-stimulated LH secretion in short-term (4 h) treated cell cultures, wherein the adipokine also increases GHRH-R and GHS-R mRNA content while decreasing that of GnRH-R. Additionally, we demonstrate that the pituitary expresses both adiponectin and adiponectin receptors under the regulation of the adipokine. In sum, our data indicate that adiponectin, either locally produced or from other sources, may play a neuroendocrine role in the control of both somatotrophs and gonadotrophs.

  17. Molecular biology of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Vidal Campregher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms are clonal diseases of hematopoietic stem cells characterized by myeloid hyperplasia and increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Myeloproliferative neoplasms are caused, as any other malignancy, by genetic defects that culminate in the neoplastic phenotype. In the past six years, since the identification of JAK2V617F, we have experienced a substantial increase in our knowledge about the genetic mechanisms involved in the genesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Mutations described in several genes have revealed a considerable degree of molecular homogeneity between different subtypes of myeloproliferative neoplasms. At the same time, the molecular differences between each subtype have become clearer. While mutations in several genes, such as JAK2, myeloproliferative leukemia (MPL and LNK have been validated in functional assays or animal models as causative mutations, the roles of other recurring mutations in the development of disease, such as TET2 and ASXL1 remain to be elucidated. In this review we will examine the most prevalent recurring gene mutations found in myeloproliferative neoplasms and their molecular consequences.

  18. Increased risk of lymphoid neoplasms in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Masala, Giovanna; Antonioli, Elisabetta; Chiara Susini, Maria; Guglielmelli, Paola; Pieri, Lisa; Maggi, Laura; Caini, Saverio; Palli, Domenico; Bogani, Costanza; Ponziani, Vanessa; Pancrazzi, Alessandro; Annunziato, Francesco; Bosi, Alberto

    2009-07-01

    Association of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) with lymphoproliferative neoplasm (LPN) has been occasionally reported. The aim of this study, which included 353 patients with polycythemia vera and 467 with essential thrombocythemia, was to assess whether the risk of developing LPN is increased in MPN patients. Expected numbers of LPN incident cases were calculated based on 5-year age group, gender, and calendar time-specific cancer incidence rates in the general population of the same area. Standardized incidence ratios were computed to estimate the relative risk of developing LPN. Analyses were carried out for the whole series and then separately for essential thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera, gender, and JAK2V617F genotype. With 4,421 person-years, we found 11 patients developing LPN, including four chronic lymphocytic leukemias, five non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and two plasma cell disorders, after a median interval time of 68 months from MPN diagnosis. Cumulative risk to develop LPN at 5 and 10 years was 0.93% (95% confidence interval, 0.39-2.22) and 2.96% (95% confidence interval, 1.52-5.72), respectively. There was a 3.44-fold increased risk of LPN compared with the general population, ranging from 2.86 for plasma cell disorder to 12.42 for chronic lymphocytic leukemia; the risk was significantly increased in JAK2V617F mutated patients (5.46-fold) and in males (4.52-fold). The JAK2V617F mutation was found in lymphoid tumor cells in two of three cases evaluated, indicating that, in some patients, LPN originated in a JAK2V617F mutated common lymphoid-myeloid hematopoietic progenitor cell. We conclude that the risk of developing LPN is significantly increased in MPN patients compared with the general population.

  19. Hepatic small vessel neoplasm, a rare infiltrative vascular neoplasm of uncertain malignant potential☆,☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ryan M.; Buelow, Benjamin; Mather, Cheryl; Joseph, Nancy M.; Alves, Venancio; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Makhlouf, Hala; Marginean, Celia; Nalbantoglu, ILKe; Sempoux, Christine; Snover, Dale C.; Thung, Swan N.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Ferrell, Linda D.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Characteristic but rare vascular neoplasms in the adult liver composed of small vessels with an infiltrative border were collected from an international group of collaborators over a 5-year period (N = 17). These tumors were termed hepatic small vessel neoplasm (HSVN), and the histologic differential diagnosis was angiosarcoma (AS). The average age of patients was 54 years (range, 24–83 years). HSVN was more common in men. The average size was 2.1 cm (range, 0.2–5.5 cm). Diagnosis was aided by immunohistochemical stains for vascular lineage (CD31, CD34, FLI-1), which were uniformly positive in HSVN. Immunohistochemical stains (p53, c-Myc, GLUT-1, and Ki-67) for possible malignant potential are suggestive of a benign/low-grade tumor. Capture-based next-generation sequencing (using an assay that targets the coding regions of more than 500 cancer genes) identified an activating hotspot GNAQ mutation in 2 of 3 (67%) tested samples, and one of these cases also had a hotspot mutation in PIK3CA. When compared with hepatic AS (n = 10) and cavernous hemangioma (n = 6), the Ki-67 proliferative index is the most helpful tool in excluding AS, which demonstrated a tumor cell proliferative index greater than 10% in all cases. Strong p53 and diffuse c-Myc staining was also significantly associated with AS but not with HSVN or cavernous hemangioma. There have been no cases with rupture/hemorrhage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, or Kasabach-Merritt syndrome. Thus far, there has been no metastasis or recurrence of HSVN, but complete resection and close clinical follow-up are recommended because the outcome remains unknown. PMID:27090685

  20. Harvey Cushing and pituitary Case Number 3 (Mary D.): the origin of this most baffling problem in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, José María; Prieto, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    From the very beginning of his career, Harvey Williams Cushing (1869-1939) harbored a deep interest in a complex group of neoplasms that usually developed at the infundibulum. These were initially known as "interpeduncular" or "suprasellar" cysts. Cushing introduced the term "craniopharyngioma" for these lesions, which he believed represented one of the most baffling problems faced by neurosurgeons. The patient who most influenced Cushing's thinking was a 16-year-old seamstress named "Mary D.," whom he attended in December 1901, exactly the same month that Alfred Fröhlich published his seminal article describing an adiposogenital syndrome in a young boy with a pituitary cyst. Both Cushing's and Fröhlich's patients showed similar symptoms caused by the same type of tumor. Notably, Cushing and Fröhlich had met one another and became good friends in Liverpool the summer before these events took place. Their fortunate relationship led Cushing to realize that Fröhlich's syndrome represented a state of hypopituitarism and provided a useful method of diagnosing interpeduncular cysts. It is noteworthy that Cushing's very first neurosurgical procedure on a pituitary tumor was performed in the case of Mary D.'s "interpeduncular cyst," on February 21, 1902. Cushing failed to remove this lesion, which was later found during the patient's autopsy. This case was documented as Pituitary Case Number 3 in Cushing's masterpiece, The Pituitary Body and Its Disorders, published in 1912. This tumor was considered "a teratoma"; however, multiple sources of evidence suggest that this lesion actually corresponded to an adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma. Unfortunately, the pathological specimens of this lesion were misplaced, and this prompted Cushing's decision to retain all specimens and documents of the cases he would operate on throughout his career. Accordingly, Mary D.'s case crystallized the genesis of the Cushing Brain Tumor Registry, one of Cushing's major legacies to

  1. Thin-section CT scan of the pituitary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, T.; Inoue, Y.; Taniguchi, S. (Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1982-02-01

    Topographic anatomy of the pituitary fossa was studied by 2 mm thin-section CT scan (Somatom II). Nineteen with normal pituitary (control group) and 20 with suspected pituitary abnormality were selected. Plain and contrast CT were performed in all cases. Contrast CT was carried out immediately after the rapid infusion of 220 ml of 30% iodinated contrast medium. In all of control group but two, pituitary gland was detected as homogeneous density and its density was the same as the density of normal brain tissues, and was enhanced in degree of about 25 CT number. In 2 cases, small low density was visualized in the pituitary gland. Pituitary gland was differentiated from cavernous sinus was usually higher than the pituitary gland. In the abnormal group, microadenoma of the pituitary gland was diagnosed in 5 cases and 3 out of 5 cases was proved by surgery. All 3 microadenomas proved slightly dense by plain CT and enhanced higher than normal pituitary gland by contrast CT. Polytomograms showed no abnormality of the sella turcica in one of these 3 cases. Although 3 microadenomas were detected by the abnormal enhancement, we are not sure whether all microadenoma can be detected by CT alone. Arachnoid herniation into the pituitary fossa was diagnosed in 7 of the control group and 2 of the abnormal group. Four out of these 9 cases were verified by using Metrizamide CT. By plain thin-section CT, the diagnosis of arachnoid herniation seems to be possible without Metrizamide CT.

  2. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and other pancreatic cystic lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic neoplasms are being increasingly recognized, even in the absence of symptoms, in large part, due to markedly improved imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance cholangio pancreatography (MRCP) and computer tomography (CT) scanning. During the past 2 decades, better imaging of these cystic lesions has resulted in definition of different types, including pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). While IPMN represent only a distinct minority of all pancreatic cancers, they appear to be a relatively frequent neoplastic form of pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Moreover, IPMN have a much better outcome and prognosis compared to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. Therefore, recognition of this entity is exceedingly important for the clinician involved in diagnosis and further evaluation of a potentially curable form of pancreatic cancer.

  3. Interdisciplinary Management of Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are increasingly recognized due to the frequent use of abdominal imaging. It is reported that up to 20% of abdominal cross-sectional scans identify incidental asymptomatic pancreatic cysts. Proper characterization of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is important not only to recognize premalignant lesions that will require surgical resection, but also to allow nonoperative management of many cystic lesions that will not require resection with its inherent morbidity. Though reliable biomarkers are lacking, a wide spectrum of diagnostic modalities are available to evaluate pancreatic cystic neoplasms, including radiologic, endoscopic, laboratory, and pathologic analysis. An interdisciplinary approach to management of these lesions which incorporates recent, specialty-specific advances in the medical literature is herein suggested.

  4. Synchronous laparoscopic resection of colorectal and renal/adrenal neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Simon S M; Lee, Janet F Y; Yiu, Raymond Y C; Li, Jimmy C M; Leung, Ka Lau

    2007-08-01

    Synchronous laparoscopic resections of coexisting abdominal diseases are shown to be feasible without additional postoperative morbidity. We report our experience with synchronous laparoscopic resection of colorectal carcinoma and renal/adrenal neoplasms with an emphasis on surgical and oncologic outcomes. Five patients diagnosed to have synchronous colorectal carcinoma and renal/adrenal neoplasms (renal cell carcinoma in 2 patients, adrenal cortical adenoma in 2 patients, and adrenal metastasis in 1 patient) underwent synchronous laparoscopic resection. The median operative time was 420 minutes and the median operative blood loss was 1000 mL. Three patients developed minor complications, including wound infection in 2 patients and retention of urine in 1 patient. There was no operative mortality. The median duration of hospital stay was 11 days. At a median follow-up of 17.6 months, no patient developed recurrence of disease. Synchronous laparoscopic resection of colorectal and renal/adrenal neoplasms is technically feasible and safe.

  5. Colorectal cancer manifesting with metastasis to prolactinoma: report of a case involving symptoms mimicking pituitary apoplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewjitcharoen, Yotsapon; Shuangshoti, Shanop; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Siwanuwatn, Rungsak; Sunthornyothin, Sarat

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary metastasis is an uncommon first presentation of systemic malignancy. The most common presenting symptom of pituitary metastasis is diabetes insipidus reflecting involvement of the stalk and/or posterior pituitary. We herein present a unique case of the coexistence of both a functioning pituitary adenoma (prolactinoma) and pituitary metastasis of advanced colorectal cancer with pituitary apoplexy as the first manifestation of underlying malignancy. The present case emphasizes the need to consider pituitary metastasis as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with pituitary lesions and be aware that tumor-to-tumor metastasis can occur unexpectedly in those with pituitary metastases.

  6. Canine Central Nervous System Neoplasm Phenotyping Using Tissue Microarray Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzbarth, I; Heinrich, F; Herder, V; Recker, T; Wohlsein, P; Baumgärtner, W

    2017-05-01

    Tissue microarrays (TMAs) represent a useful technique for the simultaneous phenotyping of large sample numbers and are particularly suitable for histopathologic tumor research. In this study, TMAs were used to evaluate semiquantitatively the expression of multiple antigens in various canine central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms and to identify markers with potential discriminative diagnostic relevance. Ninety-seven canine CNS neoplasms, previously diagnosed on hematoxylin and eosin sections according to the World Health Organization classification, were investigated on TMAs, with each tumor consisting of 2 cylindrical samples from the center and the periphery of the neoplasm. Tumor cells were phenotyped using a panel of 28 monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, and hierarchical clustering analysis was applied to group neoplasms according to similarities in their expression profiles. Hierarchical clustering generally grouped cases with similar histologic diagnoses; however, gliomas especially exhibited a considerable heterogeneity in their positivity scores. Multiple tumor groups, such as astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, significantly differed in the proportion of positive immunoreaction for certain markers such as p75(NTR), AQP4, GFAP, and S100 protein. The study highlights AQP4 and p75(NTR) as novel markers, helping to discriminate between canine astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma. Furthermore, the results suggest that p75(NTR) and proteolipid protein may represent useful markers, whose expression inversely correlates with malignant transformation in canine astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, respectively. Tissue microarray was demonstrated to be a useful and time-saving tool for the simultaneous immunohistochemical characterization of multiple canine CNS neoplasms. The present study provides a detailed overview of the expression patterns of different types of canine CNS neoplasms.

  7. A case report of pituitary gland metastasis from breast carcinoma%乳腺癌垂体转移1例报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宫丹; 王铭宏; 迟明远

    2012-01-01

    Objective To prove the diagnostic accuracy of neoplasm metastasis of pituitary gland.Methods To report a case of pituitary gland metastasis from breast carcinoma and review the interrelated articles.Results Neoplasm metastasis of pituitary gland was rare.The original tumors from breast or lung were in the majority.Diabetes inspidus,impairment of optic nerves and hypopituitarism were often seen in the cases,without specific images on CT or MRI.The main point of identification between pituitary gland metastasis and pituitary adenoma is invasiveness.Conclusion Pituitary tumor should be discriminated with metastasis tumor,which has characteristic in rapid growth,strong invasiveness as well as involvement in both anterior lobe and posterior lobe.%目的 通过报道1例乳腺癌垂体转移病例,结合相关文献,总结垂体转移癌的临床特点,以提高对垂体转移癌的认识和诊断水平.方法 分析解放军第222医院1例确诊为乳腺癌垂体转移患者的临床资料,整理近期国内外关于垂体转移癌的相关文献.结果 垂体转移癌十分罕见,多来源于乳腺癌和肺癌,缺乏特征性影像学表现,以尿崩症、视神经损害和垂体前叶功能障碍为主要临床表现,与腺瘤的主要鉴别要点是具有侵袭性.结论 对于生长迅速、侵袭性强、同时影响垂体前后叶功能的鞍区肿瘤需注意和垂体转移癌相鉴别.

  8. Temozolomide treatment in aggressive pituitary tumors and pituitary carcinomas: a French multicenter experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raverot, Gérald; Sturm, Nathalie; de Fraipont, Florence; Muller, Marie; Salenave, Sylvie; Caron, Philippe; Chabre, Olivier; Chanson, Philippe; Cortet-Rudelli, Christine; Assaker, Richard; Dufour, Henry; Gaillard, Stephan; François, Patrick; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Passagia, Jean-Guy; Bernier, Michèle; Cornélius, Aurélie; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Brue, Thierry

    2010-10-01

    To date only 18 patients with aggressive pituitary tumors or carcinomas treated with temozolomide have been reported. Increased expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltranferase (MGMT) has been suggested to predict resistance to temozolomide. The objective of the study was to describe the antitumoral efficacy and toxicity of temozolomide in patients with aggressive pituitary tumors or carcinomas and evaluate the possible prognostic value of MGMT promoter methylation and protein expression. Eight patients, five with pituitary carcinomas (three prolactin (PRL) and two ACTH) and three with aggressive pituitary tumors (one PRL and two ACTH), all treated with temozolomide administered orally for four to 24 cycles, were included in our French multicenter study. MGMT expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry and MGMT promoter methylation by pyrosequencing. Three of the eight patients (two ACTH adenomas and one PRL carcinoma) responded to temozolomide as demonstrated by significant tumor shrinkage and reduced hormone secretion. Three cycles of temozolomide were sufficient to identify treatment-responsive patients. Additional cycles did not improve treatment efficacy in those not responding, even when associated with carboplatin and vepeside. MGMT expression did not predict tumoral response to temozolomide because it was positive in one responder and negative in two nonresponders. Similarly, MGMT promoter methylation (three of seven tumors) did not predict clinical response. Toxicity remained mild in all patients. Temozolomide treatment may be an effective option for some aggressive pituitary tumors or carcinomas. Response to a trial of three cycles of treatment seems sufficient to identify responders and more reliable than patient MGMT status.

  9. Progression of an Invasive ACTH Pituitary Macroadenoma with Cushing’s Disease to Pituitary Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Groberio Borba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary carcinomas are very rare tumors that in most cases produce prolactin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH. It is a challenge to diagnosis of a pituitary carcinoma before disclosed symptomatic metastasis. We report the case of a female patient with Cushing’s disease who underwent three transsphenoidal surgeries, with pathological findings of common ACTH pituitary adenoma including Ki-67 expression <3%. She achieved hypocortisolism after the 3rd surgery although ACTH levels remained slightly elevated. The patient returned some time later with fast worsening of hypercortisolism. Magnetic resonance imaging showed clivus invasion, which led to a fourth surgery and radiation. This time, immunohistochemistry revealed strong Ki-67 (10% to 15% and p53 expression. Liver and lumbar spine metastases were found on workup. The patient died after few months due to lung infection. Pituitary carcinomas are rare, and the transformation of an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma into a carcinoma is exceptional. The difficulty of defining markers for the diagnosis of carcinoma, before metastasis diagnosis, in order to change the management of the disease, is a challenge.

  10. Oxytocin and hypothalamo-pituitary- adrenal axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrak Ç. Yeğen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available BSTRACT: Upon exposure to different types of stressors, neuroendocrine and behavioral responses that include the activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis are given to allow the individuals to cope with stress conditions. It was proven that oxytocin, anonapeptide released from the posterior pituitary, has behavioral and stress-attenuating effects by dampening HPA activity. On the other hand, the neuropeptide was also shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects through the modulation of immune and inflammatory processes in several experimental models of tissue injury. The findings of recent studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of oxytocin depends on its role on HPA axis activity and subsequent release of cortisol. Thus, oxytocin seems to restrain the activity within the HPA-axis, which becomes overactive during many inflammatory processes

  11. PATIENTS WITH METASTATIC GESTATIONAL TROPHOBLASTIC NEOPLASMS AND NO GYNECOLOGICAL SYMPTOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ghaemmaghami T. Ashraf Ganjoie

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Early recognition of Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasm (GTN will maximize the chances of cure with chemotherapy but some patients present with many different symptoms months or even years after the causative pregnancy making diagnosis difficult. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of GTN in any reproductive age woman with bizarre central nervous system, gastrointestinal, pulmonary symptoms or radiographic evidence of metastatic tumor of unknown primary origin. We reported five cases of metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasms with bizarre pulmonary symptoms, acute abdomen, neurologic symptoms presenting without gynecological symptoms.

  12. Disseminated encephalomyelitis-like central nervous system neoplasm in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhui; Bao, Xinhua; Fu, Na; Ye, Jintang; Li, Ting; Yuan, Yun; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Yuehua; Qin, Jiong; Wu, Xiru

    2014-08-01

    A malignant neoplasm in the central nervous system with diffuse white matter changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is rare in children. It could be misdiagnosed as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. This report presents our experience based on 4 patients (3 male, 1 female; aged 7-13 years) whose MRI showed diffuse lesions in white matter and who were initially diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. All of the patients received corticosteroid therapy. After brain biopsy, the patients were diagnosed with gliomatosis cerebri, primitive neuroectodermal tumor and central nervous system lymphoma. We also provide literature reviews and discuss the differentiation of central nervous system neoplasm from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  13. CD4~+CD56~+ hematodermic neoplasm in a child

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xia; LI Qiang; ZHOU Chen-yan

    2010-01-01

    @@ CD4~+CD56~+ hematodermic neoplasm (HN) is a rare, highly aggressive systemic neoplasm, which had been described under various names including lymphoblastic lymphoma of natural killer (NK) phenotype, blastic NK cell lymphoma (BNK), leukemic lymphoma of immature NK lineage and CD4~+CD56~+ HN. This malignancy is mainly involved in elderly people and usually a rapidly fatal disease, since consistently effective treatments have not yet been developed. It is relatively rare in children.~(1-6) Herein we report a boy with CD4~+CD56~+ HN.

  14. Unicentric Castleman’s Disease Masquerading Pancreatic Neoplasm

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    Saurabh Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s disease is a rare nonclonal proliferative disorder of the lymph nodes with an unknown etiology. Common locations of Castleman’s disease are mediastinum, neck, axilla, and abdomen. Castleman’s disease of a peripancreatic location masquerading as pancreatic neoplasm is an even rarer entity. On search of published data, we came across about 17 cases published on peripancreatic Castleman’s disease until now. Here we are reporting a case of retropancreatic Castleman's disease masquerading as retroperitoneal neoplasm in a 46-year-old male patient.

  15. Pituitary apoplexy presenting as myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a male patient who presented with sudden onset severe headache and right sided ptosis that was diagnosed to be secondary to pituitary apoplexy on the background of diabetes mellitus. This was complicated by left ventricular failure and acute coronary syndrome. The case highlights the importance of considering hypocortisolism/hypopituitarism as an important and rare precipitant of an acute coronary event as occurred in the case.

  16. Pituitary gland volumes in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ian A; Mackay, Clare E; Goodwin, Guy M

    2014-12-01

    Bipolar disorder has been associated with increased Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis function. The mechanism is not well understood, but there may be associated increases in pituitary gland volume (PGV) and these small increases may be functionally significant. However, research investigating PGV in bipolar disorder reports mixed results. The aim of the current study was twofold. First, to assess PGV in two novel samples of patients with bipolar disorder and matched healthy controls. Second, to perform a meta-analysis comparing PGV across a larger sample of patients and matched controls. Sample 1 consisted of 23 established patients and 32 matched controls. Sample 2 consisted of 39 medication-naïve patients and 42 matched controls. PGV was measured on structural MRI scans. Seven further studies were identified comparing PGV between patients and matched controls (total n; 244 patients, 308 controls). Both novel samples showed a small (approximately 20mm(3) or 4%), but non-significant, increase in PGV in patients. Combining the two novel samples showed a significant association of age and PGV. Meta-analysis showed a trend towards a larger pituitary gland in patients (effect size: .23, CI: -.14, .59). While results suggest a possible small difference in pituitary gland volume between patients and matched controls, larger mega-analyses with sample sizes greater even than those used in the current meta-analysis are still required. There is a small but potentially functionally significant increase in PGV in patients with bipolar disorder compared to controls. Results demonstrate the difficulty of finding potentially important but small effects in functional brain disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction in respiratory hypoxia.

    OpenAIRE

    Semple, P D; Beastall, G H; Watson, W S; Hume, R

    1981-01-01

    Eight hypoxic male patients with stable chronic obstructive airways disease were submitted for combined anterior pituitary function testing. All subjects showed normal growth hormone and essentially normal cortisol responses to adequate hypoglycaemia, two subjects showed delayed responses of thyroid stimulating hormone to administered thyrotrophin releasing hormone and all had basal prolactin levels within normal limits. Basal levels of luteinising hormone were significantly lower than in the...

  18. Advances in trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, D; Cavallo, L M; De Angelis, M; Villa, A; Somma, T; Esposito, F; Del Basso De Caro, M; Cappabianca, P

    2012-12-01

    Pituitary surgery is a continuous evolving speciality of the neurosurgeons' armamentarium, requiring precise anatomical knowledge, technical skills and integrated appreciation of the pituitary pathophysiology. Actually, it could be considered the result of a close cooperation between different specialists, i.e. the ophthalmologist, the neuroradiologist, the endocrinologist, the neurosurgeon, the pathologist, etc. In this teamwork environment each member plays his own role, offering his contribute to the final result; every effort is performed to provide patients with the best possible procedure, individually measured. The endoscopic pituitary surgery performed by means of a transsphenoidal approach perfectly fits this scenario, being though advocated as the result of an evolutionary process rather than a revolutionary one. The "pure" endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery - consisting of a whole procedure performed with the endoscope alone and without the use of any transsphenoidal retractor - offers some advantages due to the endoscope itself: a superior close-up view of the relevant anatomy, very important at the tumor/gland interface and an enlarged working angle are provided with an increased panoramic vision inside the surgical area. Results in terms of mass removal, relief of clinical symptoms, cure of the underlying disease and complication rate are similar to those reported in the major microsurgical series but patient compliance is by far better.

  19. Autocrine IL-6 mediates pituitary tumor senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Mariana; Ajler, Pablo; Carrizo, Guillermo; Cervio, Andrés; Sevlever, Gustavo; Stalla, Günter K.; Arzt, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stable proliferative arrest state. Pituitary adenomas are frequent and mostly benign, but the mechanism for this remains unknown. IL-6 is involved in pituitary tumor progression and is produced by the tumoral cells. In a cell autonomous fashion, IL-6 participates in oncogene-induced senescence in transduced human melanocytes. Here we prove that autocrine IL-6 participates in pituitary tumor senescence. Endogenous IL-6 inhibition in somatotroph MtT/S shRNA stable clones results in decreased SA-β-gal activity and p16INK4a but increased pRb, proliferation and invasion. Nude mice injected with IL-6 silenced clones develop tumors contrary to MtT/S wild type that do not, demonstrating that clones that escape senescence are capable of becoming tumorigenic. When endogenous IL-6 is silenced, cell cultures derived from positive SA-β-gal human tumor samples decrease the expression of the senescence marker. Our results establish that IL-6 contributes to maintain senescence by its autocrine action, providing a natural model of IL-6 mediated benign adenoma senescence. PMID:27902467

  20. Pituitary transplantation: Part 1. Successful reconstitution of pituitary-dependent hormone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipan, N B; Zacur, H A; Allen, G S

    1985-03-01

    Neonatal or adult pituitary glands were transplanted to the median eminence of adult rats of the same or a histoincompatible inbred strain. The hormonal status of 39 transplanted rats and of control animals was evaluated by serial determination of serum prolactin and thyroxine. Grafts of neonatal tissue to adults of the same strain resulted in normal postoperative hormone levels. This indicates not only that pituitary grafts had survived, but also that the transplants were under hypothalamic control. Grafts of adult tissue were less successful. The prolactin value was lower, but still within the normal range, whereas the thyroxine value was lower than normal, suggesting that viable pituitary tissue had survived but was not under hypothalamic control. Transplantation across a histocompatibility barrier was uniformly unsuccessful. Postoperative prolactin levels were low and thyroxine levels were not significantly different from those in hypophysectomized controls.

  1. Pituitary oncocytoma presenting as Cushing′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M K Garg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old girl presented with classical features of Cushing′s syndrome. Endocrinal evaluation was consistent with pituitary source of ACTH; but imaging showed normal pituitary. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling confirmed the diagnosis. A successful remission was achieved after adenomectomy by transphenoidal route. Histopathological examination was consistent with pituitary oncocytoma and immunohistochemistry was positive for synaptophysin, chromogranin, neuron specific enolase, S-100, ACTH, prolactin, and GH.

  2. [Impact of pregnancy on pituitary disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, J

    2013-06-01

    In pregnancy, the volume of pituitary increases by multiplication of lactotopic and gonadotropic cells and developing placenta is the source of numerous hormones and enzymes that significantly affect and alter the function of the endocrine system. This naturally has an impact on the course of pituitary disorders and their treatment. The most common disorders of pituitary gland, which we can meet in pregnancy, are adenomas, particularly prolactinomas, and functionless adenomas. During pregnancy we avoid the treatment of microprolactinomas, but in macroprolactinomas where there is the risk of their enlargement by stimulation of placental estrogens, we administer preventively the dopaminergic agonists. Patients with acromegaly usually do not need the treatment during pregnancy, unless there is a danger to damage the visual pathway or heavy headaches occur. ACTH secreting adenomas (Cushings disease) in pregnancy are rare, they are difficult to diagnose but existing hypercortisolism is very dangerous to fetus and may damage even mother. Large functionless adenomas, unless treated before pregnancy, may damage the visual pathway. The volume of the enlarged pituitary gland in pregnancy and sometimes even of the functionless adenoma adenoma, may be reduced by cabergoline, so that the urgent neurosurgery in pregnancy is very rare. A typical disease that occurs primarily in pregnant women is autoimmune lymphocytic hypophysitis. Diagnosis is established on the basis of headaches and symptoms and signs of the deficits of adrenocorticotropic and thyreotropic function usually in the last third of pregnancy or in the first six months after birth, using a specific image in magnetic resonance. Treatment is limited to hormone replacement. It is also possible to meet pregnant women with deficient pituitary functions. In hypocortical women with exception of strains like as pregnancy vomiting, doses of hydrocortisone replacement usually do not change until birth. Childbirth, however

  3. The Continuing Value of Ultrastructural Observation in Central Nervous System Neoplasms in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Rae Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS neoplasms are the second most common childhood malignancy after leukemia and the most common solid organ neoplasm in children. Diagnostic dilemmas with small specimens from CNS neoplasms are often the result of multifactorial etiologies such as frozen or fixation artifact, biopsy size, or lack of knowledge about rare or unfamiliar entities. Since the late 1950s, ultrastructural examination has been used in the diagnosis of CNS neoplasms, though it has largely been replaced by immunohistochemical and molecular cytogenetic studies. Nowadays, pathologic diagnosis of CNS neoplasms is achieved through intraoperative cytology, light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and molecular cytogenetic results. However, the utility of electron microscopy (EM in the final diagnosis of CNS neoplasms and investigation of its pathogenetic origin remains critical. Here, we reviewed the distinguishing ultrastructural features of pediatric CNS neoplasms and emphasize the continuing value of EM in the diagnosis of CNS neoplasms.

  4. The molecular pathogenesis of pituitary tumors: implications for clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworakowska, D; Grossman, A B

    2012-06-01

    Pituitary adenomas are unique in several ways, and while they are rarely malignant they may be invasive and/or recurrent. Several attempts have been made to determine the growth potential of pituitary adenomas. Pituitary tumors predominantly arise in a sporadic setting or more rarely as part of hereditary genetic syndromes. Molecular analysis of these familial pituitary adenomas has provided significant insight into pituitary tumorigenesis. Some specific genes have been identified that predispose to pituitary neoplasia, but these are rarely involved in the pathogenesis of sporadic tumors. The number of genes or molecular alterations involved in pituitary tumorigenesis is progressively increasing, providing a hope for development of new predictive and prognostic markers. The aim of this review is to focus on the molecular pathology of pituitary adenomas in the context of their implications on management and targeted therapy. We have summarized our current knowledge on the molecular biology in familial and sporadic pituitary adenomas, and we subsequently focus on prognostic factors as well as specific predictive markers for new promising targeted therapies.

  5. MRI of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Kiortsis, Dimitrios Nikiforos [University of Ioannina, Department of Physiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2005-11-01

    In childhood, the MR characteristics of the normal pituitary gland are well established. During the first 2 months of life the adenohypophysis demonstrates high signal. Pituitary gland height (PGH) decreases during the 1st year of life and then increases, reaching a plateau after puberty. The magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) increases in both sexes up to the age of 20 years. On dynamic contrast-enhanced studies, the posterior pituitary lobe enhances simultaneously with the straight sinus, and the adenohypophysis later, but within 30 s. In genetically determined dysfunctional states, the adenohypophysis may be normal, hypoplastic, or enlarged. Pituitary enlargement, observed in Prop 1 gene mutations, is characterized by a mass interposed between the anterior and posterior lobes. An ectopic posterior lobe (EPP), associated with a hypoplastic or absent pituitary stalk, may be observed in patients with hypopituitarism. Tumors of the hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis may be the origin of adenohypophyseal deficiencies. A small hypointense adenohypophysis is found in iron overload states and is often associated with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Absence of the posterior lobe bright signal, with or without a thick pituitary stalk or a mass at any site from the median eminence to the posterior pituitary lobe, may be found in diabetes insipidus. Hydrocephalus, suprasellar arachnoid cysts, hypothalamic hamartomas and craniopharyngiomas may result in central precocious puberty (CPP). Increased PGH in girls with idiopathic CPP is useful for its differential diagnosis from premature thelarche (PT). Pituitary adenomas, observed mainly in adolescents, present the same MR characteristics as those in adults. (orig.)

  6. Aspergillosis of the sphenoid sinus simulating a pituitary tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larranaga, J.; Fandino, J.; Gomez-Bueno, J.; Botana, C.; Rodriguez, D.; Gonzalez-Carrero, J.

    1989-09-01

    Sphenoidal aspergillosis is an unusual cause of sella turcica enlargement. Pituitary abscess secondary to Aspergillus had been reported. In the present case, a woman with sphenoid sinus aspergillosis mimiced a pituitary tumor. This patient survived her infection with intact pituitary function following a transsphenoidal approach. No postoperative amphotericine-B and 5-fluorocytosine were necessary. CT scan revealed a mass occupying the sphenoid sinus extending to the sella turcica. Factors that should alert the clinican to the presence of a sphenoidal and pituitary abscess in a patient with sella turcica enlargement are prior episodes of sinusitis, meningitis and immunosuppression and, as in the present case, hyperglycemia. (orig.).

  7. Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas: A diagnostic challenge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grant F Hutchins; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are increasingly recognized due to the expanding use and improved sensitivity of cross-sectional abdominal imaging. Major advances in the last decade have led to an improved understanding of the various types of cystic lesions and their biologic behavior. Despite significant improvements in imaging technology and the advent of endoscopic-ultrasound (EUS)-guided fineneedle aspiration, the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cystic lesions remains a significant clinical challenge. The first diagnostic step is to differentiate between pancreatic pseudocyst and cystic neoplasm.If a pseudocyst has been effectively excluded, the cornerstone issue is then to determine the malignant potential of the pancreatic cystic neoplasm. In the majority of cases, the correct diagnosis and successful management is based not on a single test but on incorporating data from various sources including patient history, radiologic studies, endoscopic evaluation, and cyst fluid analysis. This review will focus on describing the various types of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas, their malignant potential, and will provide the clinician with a comprehensive diagnostic approach.

  8. Pattern of metastatic deposits of malignant neoplasms to the chest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of metastatic deposits of malignant neoplasms to the chest seen on plain ... chest x-ray (CXR) is a veritable tool in the survey of metastases to the lung. ... from breast, prostate, thyroid and cervix Rare from osteosarcoma and melanoma.

  9. Mucin profile of the pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yuan; XU Jian-fang; KUANG Tian-tao; ZHOU Yan-nan; LU Shao-hua; TAN Yun-shan

    2006-01-01

    @@ Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) of the pancreas are a distinct entity, account for 1% of pancreatic exocrine tumors. MCNs can be classified histologically as adenomas, borderline tumors, or carcinomas. Because several evidences showing that mucinous cystadenomas are poten- tially malignant and may transform into cystadeno- carcinomas, particularly if treated by drainage, these tumors should be identified accurately.1

  10. Confocal Endomicroscopy Characteristics of Different Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Amrit K; Dewitt, John M; Modi, Rohan M; Conwell, Darwin L; Krishna, Somashekar G

    2017-05-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are classified into gastric, intestinal, pancreatobiliary, and oncocytic subtypes where morphology portends disease prognosis. The study aim was to demonstrate EUS-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy imaging features of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes. Four subjects, each with a specific intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtype were enrolled. An EUS-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy miniprobe was utilized for image acquisition. The mean cyst size from the 4 subjects (2 females; mean age = 65.3±12 years) was 36.8±12 mm. All lesions demonstrated mural nodules and focal dilation of the main pancreatic duct. EUS-nCLE demonstrated characteristic finger-like papillae with inner vascular core for all subtypes. The image patterns of the papillae for the gastric, intestinal, and pancreatobiliary subtypes were similar. However, the papillae in the oncocytic subtype were thick and demonstrated a fine scale-like or honeycomb pattern with intraepithelial lumina correlating with histopathology. There was significant overlap in the needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy findings for the different intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes; however, the oncocytic subtype demonstrated distinct patterns. These findings need to be replicated in larger multicenter studies.

  11. Cutaneous epithelioid angiosarcoma: a neoplasm with potential pitfalls in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Narciss

    2009-03-01

    Angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare neoplasm. Cutaneous AS is the most common form of AS. The epithelioid variant of the disease, however, is a rare entity. This subset can histologically mimic non-vascular neoplasms and impose serious challenges in reaching the correct diagnosis. We present five patients with cutaneous epithelioid angiosarcoma (EAS); in none, the clinical diagnosis included a vascular lesion. Three patients had history of breast conservation surgery with/without radiation therapy. Other patients had no previous radiation, and there was no lymphedema in any of the cases. The histopathological examination of the biopsy specimens by hematoxylin and eosin method was not suggestive of a malignant vascular neoplasm initially and the differential diagnoses included carcinoma, malignant melanoma and atypical lymphoid infiltrate. Only after performing immunohistochemical studies that included vascular markers, a definitive diagnosis was possible. Some cases showed unusual histopathological features. Cutaneous EAS is a rare variant of cutaneous AS that can mimic a variety of more common, non-vascular neoplasms, creating a major pitfall in the diagnosis. A careful and thorough histopathological examination and a high index of suspicion, along with appropriate immunohistochemical evaluation, can help reach a correct diagnosis and provide optimal patient care.

  12. Secondary neoplasms of the larynx from a colonic adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dadkhah, Naser; Hahn, Christoffer

    2015-01-01

    Secondary neoplasms of the larynx are rare and account for 0.09-0,4% of all laryngeal tumours. Cutaneous melanomas are the preponderant primaries metastasizing to the larynx, fol-lowed by renal cell carcinomas, breast and lung carcinomas. Colonic adenocarcinoma metastases to the larynx...

  13. Age-specific incidence of all neoplasms after colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Fabio; Randimbison, Lalao; Blanc-Moya, Rafael; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    Patients diagnosed with a specific neoplasm tend to have a subsequent excess risk of the same neoplasm. The age incidence of a second neoplasm at the same site is approximately constant with age, and consequently the relative risk is greater at younger age. It is unclear whether such a line of reasoning can be extended from a specific neoplasm to the incidence of all neoplasms in subjects diagnosed with a defined neoplasm. We considered the age-specific incidence of all non-hormone-related epithelial neoplasms after a first primary colorectal cancer (n = 9542) in the Vaud Cancer Registry data set. In subjects with a previous colorectal cancer, the incidence rate of all other epithelial non-hormone-related cancers was stable around 800 per 100,000 between age 30 and 60 years, and rose only about twofold to reach 1685 at age 70 to 79 years and 1826 per 100,000 at age 80 years or older. After excluding synchronous cancers, the rise was only about 1.5-fold, that is, from about 700 to 1000. In the general population, the incidence rate of all epithelial non-hormone-related cancers was 29 per 100,000 at age 30 to 39 years, and rose 30-fold to 883 per 100,000 at age 70 to 79 years. Excluding colorectal cancers, the rise of all non-hormone-related cancers was from 360 per 100,000 at age 40 to 49 years to 940 at age 70 to 79 years after colorectal cancer, and from 90 to 636 per 100,000 in the general population (i.e., 2.6- vs. 7.1-fold). The rise of incidence with age of all epithelial non-hormone-related second cancers after colorectal cancer is much smaller than in the general population. This can possibly be related to the occurrence of a single mutational event in a population of susceptible individuals, although alternative models are plausible within the complexity of the process of carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MR imaging in children with ectopic pituitary gland and anterior hypopituitarism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patkar D

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Posterior pituitary ectopia refers to an absent normal posterior pituitary bright spot within the sella with ectopic bright signal at another site (such as the median eminence on a weighted magnetic resonance. We describe two children with idiopathic anterior hypopituitarism who showed an ectopic posterior pituitary and absent pituitary stalk on imaging. We emphasize the association of the absent pituitary stalk in ectopic pituitary gland and low growth hormone levels.

  15. Hypopituitarism as the presenting feature of bronchogenic carcinoma with metastases to the pituitary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip C Johnston

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumours metastasizing to the pituitary gland are uncommon. Symptomatic patients with pituitary metastases can present with diabetes insipidus, headache, visual field defects and/or anterior pituitary hormonal dysfunction. Treatment options for pituitary metastases include, surgical resection, cranial or parasellar irradiation and/or chemotherapy, and hormonal replacement if indicated. The overall prognosis of pituitary metastases is poor. We present a case of hypopituitarism as the presenting feature of bronchogenic carcinoma with metastases to the pituitary gland.

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  12. Quantitative evaluation of indium-111 (In-111) octreotide pituitary activity: Comparison in patient with and without pituitary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, P.; Waxman, A.; Nguyen, K. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Indium 111 Octreotide is known to detect pituitary tumors. Variable low level pituitary activity has been reported in pts. with no demonstrable pituitary tumors. To our knowledge, there have been no studies which quantitatively categorize pituitary activity with respect to distinguishing normal subject from pts. with pituitary tumors. 13 pts. with proven, treated acromegaly were included, as well as 15 pts. with no history of pituitary disorder. Both groups underwent SPECT In-111 scintigraphy 24 hours post-injection Average count per pixel ratios were obtained for the pituitary/calvarium (P/C) and pituitary/brain (P/B) regions. 10 pts. with acromegaly underwent growth hormone (GH) measurements 2 hours post-glucose load. Statistical correlation between growth hormone levels using P/C and P/B ratios were obtained. P/C ratios, as well as P/B ratios demonstrated high correlation with serum GH levels correlation coefficient(r)= .717 for P/C p<0.05, and correlation coefficient(r) = 0.828 for P/B ratios p<0.005. P/C ratios and P/B ratios for controls correlated closely with the upper level of normal predicted by P/C or P/B ratios as a function of serum growth hormone found in patients with acromegaly. Somatostatin receptor SPECT scintigraphy of the pituitary and appropriate quantitation can predict patients with growth hormone secreting tumors.

  13. Mucin-hypersecreting bile duct neoplasm characterized by clinicopathological resemblance to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN of the pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harimoto Norifumi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN of the pancreas is acceptable as a distinct disease entity, the concept of mucin-secreting biliary tumors has not been fully established. Case presentation We describe herein a case of mucin secreting biliary neoplasm. Imaging revealed a cystic lesion 2 cm in diameter at the left lateral segment of the liver. Duodenal endoscopy revealed mucin secretion through an enlarged papilla of Vater. On the cholangiogram, the cystic lesion communicated with bile duct, and large filling defects caused by mucin were observed in the dilated common bile duct. This lesion was diagnosed as a mucin-secreting bile duct tumor. Left and caudate lobectomy of the liver with extrahepatic bile duct resection and reconstruction was performed according to the possibility of the tumor's malignant behavior. Histological examination of the specimen revealed biliary cystic wall was covered by micropapillary neoplastic epithelium with mucin secretion lacking stromal invasion nor ovarian-like stroma. The patient has remained well with no evidence of recurrence for 38 months since her operation. Conclusion It is only recently that the term "intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN," which is accepted as a distinct disease entity of the pancreas, has begun to be used for mucin-secreting bile duct tumor. This case also seemed to be intraductal papillary neoplasm with prominent cystic dilatation of the bile duct.

  14. Purification of pituitary autoantigen by column liquid chromatography and chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Paweł; Fischbach, Jakub; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Bączyk, Maciej; Baszko-Błaszyk, Daria; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary autoantibodies can be determined both in patients with pituitary disease as well as patients with autoimmune endocrine diseases. The purpose of the study was to isolate and purify pituitary autoantigen using sera of patients and the microsomal fraction of the pituitary. To isolate a pituitary autoantigen, patient sera were used, which showed a strong immune response to pituitary antigens. Pituitary microsomal fractions were prepared from pituitary tissue homogenates. In the study, sera of patients with pituitary disease, Addison and Graves' disease were used. The initial stages were carried out by affinity chromatography on CN -Br sepharose column whereas purification was continued by column liquid chromatography on AcA54 Ultrogel. Chromatofocusing was performed by Polybuffer exchanger PBE 94. (125)I-labeled pituitary antigens after isolation appeared in column chromatography in three peaks. The first peak contained 50-70 kDa proteins, the second peak - 17 to 22 kDa proteins and the third peak contains (125)-iodides. Three fractions obtained from filtration on Ultrogel were separated in a polyacrylamide gel. In the first peak two bands 67 and 55 kDa appeared. The second peak contained low molecular weight substances, and the third peak contained (125)I. The first peak from Ultrogel was isolated by chromatofocusing - the first peak with pH 5.9 and the second one with pH 4.9. Isolation and purification of pituitary autoantigen with the use of column liquid chromatography and chromatofocusing resulted in obtainment of two antigenic proteins of specific gravity of 67 and 55 kDa.

  15. Pituitary imaging findings in male patients with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Dania; Benbassat, Carlos; Toledano, Yoel; S'chigol, Irena; Tsvetov, Gloria; Shraga-Slutzky, Ilana; Eizenberg, Yoav; Shimon, Ilan

    2015-08-01

    Data on pituitary imaging in adult male patients presenting with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HH) and no known pituitary disease are scarce. To assess the usefulness of pituitary imaging in the evaluation of men presenting with HH after excluding known pituitary disorders and hyperprolactinemia. A historical prospective cohort of males with HH. Men who presented for endocrine evaluation from 2011 to 2014 with testosterone levels pituitary disease. Seventy-five men were included in the analysis. Their mean age and BMI were 53.4 ± 14.8 years and 30.7 ± 5.2 kg/m2, respectively. Mean total testosterone, LH, and FSH were 6.2 ± 1.7 nmol/L, 3.4 ± 2 and 4.7 ± 3.1 mIU/L, respectively. Prolactin level within the normal range was obtained in all men (mean 161 ± 61, range 41-347 mIU/L). Sixty-two men had pituitary MRI and 13 performed CT. In 61 (81.3%) men pituitary imaging was normal. Microadenoma was found in 8 (10.7%), empty sella and thickened pituitary stalk in one patient (1.3%) each. In other four patients (5.3%) a small or mildly asymmetric pituitary gland was noted. No correlation was found between testosterone level and the presence of pituitary anomalies. This study suggests that the use of routine hypothalamic-pituitary imaging in the evaluation of IHH, in the absence of clinical characteristics of other hormonal loss or sellar compression symptoms, will not increase the diagnostic yield of sellar structural abnormalities over that reported in the general population.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, P; Salenave, S

    2004-12-01

    Pituitary tumors cause symptoms by secreting hormones (prolactin, PRL, responsible for amenorrhea-galactorrhea in women and decreased libido in men; growth hormone, GH, responsible for acromegaly; adrenocorticotropic hormone, ACTH, responsible for Cushing's syndrome; thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH, responsible for hyperthyroidism), depressing the secretion of hormones (hypopituitarism), or by mass-related effects (headaches, visual field abnormalities...). All patients with pituitary tumors should be evaluated for gonadal, thyroid and adrenal function as well as PRL and GH secretion. Specific stimulation and suppression tests for pituitary hormones are performed in selected situations for detecting the type of hypersecretion or the response to treatment. Imaging procedures (mainly magnetic resonance imaging, MRI, nowadays) determine the presence, size and extent of the lesion. The classification of pituitary tumors is based on the staining properties of the cell cytoplasm viewed by light microscopy and immunocytochemistry revealing the secretory pattern of the adenoma. Treatment of pituitary adenomas consists of surgery (performed in more than 99% of cases via a transphenoidal route) and radiotherapy, generally fractionated or, in selected cases, using stereotactic techniques such as gamma-knife. The availability of medical treatment (dopamine, DA, agonists, somatostatin analogs, GH-receptor antagonists...) has profoundly modified the indications of radiotherapy, drugs being now generally used as a second-line treatment, after surgery (or even as first-line treatment). Based on the results of the different treatment modalities for each type of pituitary adenoma, recommendations will be proposed. They may be summarized as follows. For treatment of GH-secreting adenomas, trans-sphenoidal surgery is the first-line therapy except when the macroadenoma is giant or if surgery is contra-indicated; postoperative radiation therapy (fractionated, or by gamma-knife) is

  17. Non-functioning pituitary tumors: 2012 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cámara Gómez, Rosa

    2014-03-01

    Non-functioning pituitary adenomas are the most common pituitary macroadenomas in adults, accounting for approximately 14%-28% of all clinically relevant pituitary tumors. They are a heterogeneous group of tumors that cause symptoms by compression and/or hormone deficiencies. The possibility of tumor growth is increased in macroadenomas and solid tumors as compared to microadenomas and cystic tumors. Diagnosis is based on imaging procedures (magnetic resonance imaging), but there are studies reporting promising potential biomarkers. Transsphenoidal surgery remains the first therapeutic option for large tumors with compressive symptoms. There is no evidence that endoscopic procedures improve outcomes, but they decrease morbidity. There is no unanimity in finding prognostic predictors of recurrence. Radiosurgery achieves tumor control and, sometimes, adenoma size reduction. Its adverse effects increase with higher doses and tumor sizes>4cm(3). Drug treatment is of little value. In aggressive non-functioning tumors, temozolomide (TMZ) may be used with caution because no controlled studies are available. TMZ achieves tumor control in 38%-40% of aggressive non-functioning tumors. The optimal treatment regimen and duration have not been defined yet. Lack of response to TMZ after 3 cycles predicts for treatment resistance, but initial response does not ensure optimal mid or long-term results. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase expression has a limited predictive value of response to treatment with TMZ in aggressive non-functioning tumors. It should therefore not be a determinant factor in selection of patients to be treated with TMZ. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the human pituitary gland: expression and splicing pattern in adenomas versus normal pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhi, G; Albiger, N; Berlucchi, S; Gardiman, M; Scanarini, M; Scienza, R; Fassina, A; Mantero, F; Scaroni, C

    2007-07-01

    Pituitary adenomas are slow-growing tumours arising within the pituitary gland. If secreting, they give rise to well-known syndromes such as Cushing's disease or acromegaly; when hormonally inactive, they come to clinical attention often with local mass effects or pituitary deficiency. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a nuclear hormone receptor with a key role in fat and glucose metabolism, but also involved in several neoplasia, has recently been detected in pituitary adenomas. In the present study, we evaluated the occurrence and splicing profile of PPARgamma in 43 cases of pituitary adenoma of different subtypes and compared it to 12 normal pituitary glands. By real-time polymerase chain reaction, PPARgamma was expressed as much in adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and ACTH-silent adenomas as in controls, with a moderate underexpression in somatotrophinomas and prolactinomas and overexpression in 54% of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA). There was no apparent qualitative change in the splicing profile of pathological pituitary glands, nor was the presence of specific isoforms with dominant negative effects against PPARgamma detected. Western blotting revealed similar expression levels in the different subgroups of pituitary adenomas and normal glands. Immunohistochemistry confirmed PPARgamma expression in approximately one-half of analysed samples. The intra- and intergroup differences observed in pituitary adenomas may represent new elements in the process of understanding the different clinical responses of Cushing's and Nelson patients to PPARgamma-ligand treatment. Moreover, the higher level of PPARgamma expression detected in the NFPA subgroup may suggest its possible role as a molecular target in these pituitary adenomas, paving the way for investigations on the effectiveness of treatment with thiazolidinediones in such patients.

  19. Dynamic computed tomography of the pituitary gland using a single slice scanner in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Magno, Sara; Grinwis, Guy C M; Voorhout, George; Meij, Björn P

    2016-08-01

    Selective removal of the pituitary adenoma has not been advocated in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism because the pituitary adenoma is usually not visualized on routine computed tomography (CT). Dynamic pituitary CT scanning is aimed at the detection of the pituitary flush and, indirectly, at the presence and position of the adenoma. The first aim of this retrospective study was to compare findings of a multiple slice dynamic scanning protocol with those of a single slice dynamic protocol using a single slice CT scanner. The second aim was to compare the CT findings with surgical findings, and surgical findings with histopathological findings. Computed tomography with single and multiple slice dynamic scanning protocols was performed in 86 dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism. Thirty dogs underwent transsphenoidal hypophysectomy and pituitary specimens were collected as tumor, normal, mixed and neurohypophyseal samples and processed for histology. The pituitary flush was not detected more frequent in multiple slice dynamic scanning series than in single slice dynamic scanning series. However, in non-enlarged pituitaries, the flush was seen significantly more frequently than in enlarged pituitaries. Prediction of the nature of the tissue during hypophysectomy by the surgeon was inconclusive. In conclusion, when using a single slice CT scanner, both single or multiple slice dynamic scanning protocols can be used for localization of the neurohypophyseal flush, and, indirectly, the adenoma. However, based on this study, the aim of surgery in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism remains total adenohypophysectomy, and when the neurophypophysis is recognized, it may be left in situ.

  20. Dynamic pituitary hormones change after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the dynamic changes of pituitary hormones in traumatic brain injury (TBI and to correlate the severity and neurological outcome. Patients and Methods: Dynamic changes in the pituitary hormones were evaluated in 164 patients with TBI on day-1, day-7, day-14, day-21, and day-28 post injury. Admission TBI severity and long-term outcome were assessed with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS score. The pituitary hormonal changes were correlated with TBI severity and outcome. Results: Of the 164 patients included in the study, pituitary dysfunction was found in 84 patients and in the remaining 80 patients pituitary function was normal. Most of the pituitary hormone deficiencies observed resolved over time; however, a significant proportion of patients had pituitary dysfunction at one month post injury. The hormones associated with poor outcome included growth hormone, thyrotropic hormone, and gonadotropic hormone. Conclusion: Dynamic changes of pituitary hormones in patients with TBI may reflect the severity of injury and also determine the outcome. Deficiency of growth hormone, gonadotropic hormone, and thyrotropic hormone can adversely affect neurological outcome.

  1. Volume of the adrenal and pituitary glands in depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Willer, Inge Stoel; Knorr, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is hyperactive in some depressed patients. It is unclear whether such hyperactivity results in changed volumes of the adrenal glands, pituitary gland and hypothalamus. We systematically reviewed all controlled studies ...

  2. Pituitary Volume Prospectively Predicts Internalizing Symptoms in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipursky, Amy R.; Whittle, Sarah; Yucel, Murat; Lorenzetti, Valentina; Wood, Stephen J.; Lubman, Dan I.; Simmons, Julian G.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Early adolescence is a critical time for the development of both internalizing and externalizing disorders. We aimed to investigate whether pituitary volume, an index of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, represents a vulnerability factor for the emergence of internalizing and externalizing symptoms during adolescence…

  3. Pituitary Volume Prospectively Predicts Internalizing Symptoms in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipursky, Amy R.; Whittle, Sarah; Yucel, Murat; Lorenzetti, Valentina; Wood, Stephen J.; Lubman, Dan I.; Simmons, Julian G.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Early adolescence is a critical time for the development of both internalizing and externalizing disorders. We aimed to investigate whether pituitary volume, an index of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, represents a vulnerability factor for the emergence of internalizing and externalizing symptoms during adolescence…

  4. Hyperprolactinemia associated to calcification of the pituitary stalk: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVEIRA MIRIAM DA COSTA

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the authors report the case of a female patient with 24 years of age with hyperprolactinemia, who presented a pituitary stalk calcification as seen by CT scan. Once other possible etiologies were excluded, we concluded that the calcification was probably related to hyperprolactinemia caused by interruption of the input of dopamine to the pituitary gland.

  5. Mechanism of neuroadenolysis of the pituitary for cancer pain control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trouwborst, A.; Yanagida, H.; Erdmann, W.; Kok, A.

    1984-01-01

    Studied whether neuronal activity of the pituitary gland, as related to the primary somatosensory cortex, may be involved in the pain perception pathway influenced by neuroadenolysis of the pituitary. EEG and tooth-pulp EPs (TPEPs) were examined in 3 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Findings

  6. Mechanism of neuroadenolysis of the pituitary for cancer pain control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trouwborst, A.; Yanagida, H.; Erdmann, W.; Kok, A.

    1984-01-01

    Studied whether neuronal activity of the pituitary gland, as related to the primary somatosensory cortex, may be involved in the pain perception pathway influenced by neuroadenolysis of the pituitary. EEG and tooth-pulp EPs (TPEPs) were examined in 3 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Findings indicat

  7. Xanthomatosis, pituitary gland, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Sella turcica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seok Jin; Kim, Eui Jong; Choi, Woo Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Kyunghee Medical Center, Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bong Jin [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Kyunghee Medical Center, Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Xanthomatous hypophysitis is a rare inflammatory disorder of the pituitary gland of unknown prevalence that causes pituitary dysfunction and a mass-like lesion. The authors report a case of 40-year-old man with a visual disturbance and a confirmed diagnosis of xanthomatous hypophysitis.

  8. Expression of growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor gene in GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, I; Inokuchi, K; Hasegawa, O; Sugihara, H; Minami, S

    1992-02-01

    Pituitary cells synthesize various neuropeptides that influence pituitary hormone secretion. GH-releasing factor (GRF) may also be produced by normal or pituitary tumor cells. We examined GRF gene expression in pituitary tumors. Standard techniques for the analysis of GRF gene expression did not appear to be suitable. Highly sensitive reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction was used. Specimens of pituitary adenoma were obtained by transsphenoidal adenomectomy from six patients with acromegaly and three patients with no clinical evidence of pituitary hormone overproduction; non-functioning adenoma. Pituitary glands were collected at autopsy from three patients who died from nonendocrine disorders. A specific GRF gene transcript was detected in five out of six GH-producing pituitary adenomas, whereas this was not found in three separate specimens of nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma or anterior and posterior pituitary tissue. The data suggest that GRF is synthesized as an intrinsic product in human GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

  9. Sudden and unexpected death from pituitary tumor apoplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Lisa B E; Balko, M Gregory; Hunsaker, John C

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary tumor apoplexy refers to a clinical syndrome precipitated by the expansion of a pituitary adenoma by hemorrhage or infarction. Individuals may present with myriad signs, including sudden onset of severe headache, visual changes, altered mental status, cranial nerve palsies, and hormonal dysfunction. This disorder constitutes a medical emergency and warrants an expedited evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment to prevent the potential sequelae of permanent visual loss, endocrine abnormalities, or death. We report a case of sudden death from undiagnosed pituitary tumor apoplexy. The decedent was evaluated by medical personnel on three occasions in the week prior to her death for severe headache, nausea, vomiting, and photophobia. Postmortem examination demonstrated a hemorrhagic infarction of a pituitary adenoma with necrosis and expansion out of the sella turcica. The recognition of and treatment for a patient with pituitary tumor apoplexy requires a rapid multidisciplinary effort. Failure of prompt diagnosis may be fatal and require a medico-legal death investigation for sudden and unexpected death.

  10. Unusual Complication of Pituitary Macroadenoma: A Case Report and Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohamed Said; AlBerawi, Mohamad Najm; Bozom, Issam Al; Shaikh, Nissar F.; Salem, Khalid Yacout

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 48 Final Diagnosis: Pituitary apoplexy complicated by cerebral infarction Symptoms: Disturbed conscious level • loss of vision Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Radiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Pituitary macroadenoma is a common benign tumor that usually presents with visual field defects or hormonal abnormalities. Cerebral infarction can be a complication of a large pituitary adenoma. We report a rare case of bilateral anterior cerebral arteries infarcts by a large pituitary macroadenoma with apoplexy. Case Report: A 48-year-old male patient presented with altered conscious level and sudden loss of vision for one-day duration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large seller and suprasellar hemorrhagic mass of pituitary origin, with associated bilateral areas of diffusion restriction in the frontal parasagittal regions, consistent with infarctions. Magnetic resonance angiography showed elevation and compression of A1 segment of both anterior cerebral arteries by the hemorrhagic pituitary macroadenoma. The patient underwent trans-sphenoidal resection of the pituitary adenoma, but unfortunately, ischemia was irreversible. Computed tomography (CT) done post-operatively showed hypodensity in the frontal and parietal parasagittal areas, which was also persistent in the follow up CT scans. The patient’s neurological function remained poor, with GCS of 8/15, in vegetative state. Conclusions: Vascular complications of the pituitary apoplexy, although uncommon, can be very severe and life threatening. Early detection of vascular compromise caused by hemorrhagic pituitary macroadenoma can prevent delay in intervention. Clinicians should also consider pituitary adenoma as a possible cause of stroke. PMID:27708253

  11. Pituitary hyperplasia: an uncommon presentation of a common disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massolt, E T; Peeters, R P; Neggers, S J; de Herder, W W

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 21-year-old woman presented with amenorrhea, bilateral galactorrhea and fatigue. Visual acuity and visual fields were normal. Laboratory examination demonstrated hyperprolactinemia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pituitary showed a 19×17×12-mm sellar mass with supra- and parasellar extension, causing compression of the pituitary stalk and optic chiasm. Further examinations confirmed mild hyperprolactinemia, strongly elevated TSH (>500 mU/l), low free thyroxine (FT4), hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and secondary adrenal insufficiency. Hydrocortisone and l-T4 replacement therapy was started. Three months later, the galactorrhea had disappeared, thyroid function was normalized and MRI revealed regression of the pituitary enlargement, confirming the diagnosis of pituitary hyperplasia (PH) due to primary hypothyroidism. Subsequently, the menstrual cycle returned and the hypocortisolism normalized. This case demonstrates that severe primary hypothyroidism may have an unusual presentation and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pituitary enlargement associated with moderate hyperprolactinemia. Learning points One should always try to find one etiology as the common cause of all the clinical findings in a pathologic process.Amenorrhea, galactorrhea and fatigue may be the only presenting clinical manifestations of primary hypothyroidism.Not every patient with galactorrhea, hyperprolactinemia and a pituitary mass has a prolactinoma.Primary hypothyroidism should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia associated with pituitary enlargement and pituitary hormone(s) deficiency(ies).When PH due to primary hypothyroidism is suspected, thyroid hormone replacement should be started and only regression of pituitary enlargement on MRI follow-up can confirm the diagnosis.Examination of thyroid function in patients with a pituitary mass may avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26279852

  12. Pituitary infiltration by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aral Ferihan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pituitary adenomas represent the most frequently observed type of sellar masses; however, the presence of a rapidly growing sellar tumor, diabetes insipidus, ophthalmoplegia and headaches in an older patient strongly suggests metastasis to the pituitary. Since the anterior pituitary has a great reserve capacity, metastasis to the pituitary and pituitary involvement in lymphoma are usually asymptomatic. Whereas diabetes insipidus is the most frequent symptom, patients can present with headaches, ophthalmoplegia and bilateral hemianopsia. Case presentation A 70-year-old woman with no previous history of malignancy presented with headaches, right oculomotor nerve palsy and diabetes insipidus. As magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sellar mass involving the pituitary gland and infundibular stalk, which also extended into the right cavernous sinus and sphenoid sinus, the patient underwent an immediate transsphenoidal decompression surgery. Her prolactin was 102.4 ng/ml, whereas her gonadotropic hormone levels were low. A low level of urine osmolality after overnight water deprivation, along with normal plasma osmolality suggested diabetes insipidus. Histological examination revealed that the mass had been the infiltration of a high grade B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving respiratory system epithelial cells. Paranasal sinus computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging of the thorax and abdomen were performed. Since magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any abnormality, after paranasal sinus computed tomography was performed, we concluded that the primary lymphoma originated from the sphenoid sinus and infiltrated the pituitary. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the sellar area were planned, but the patient died and her family did not permit an autopsy. Conclusion Lymphoma infiltration to the pituitary is difficult to differentiate from pituitary adenoma, meningioma and other sellar lesions. To plan the

  13. Preoperative preparation of patients with pituitary gland disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenković, Vesna; Gvozdenović, Ljiljana; Milaković, Branko; Sabljak, Vera; Ladjević, Nebojsa; Zivaljević, Vladan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the most common disorders of pituitary function: acromegaly, hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus and syndrome similar to diabetes insipidus, in terms of their importance in preoperative preparation of patients. Pituitary function manages almost the entire endocrine system using the negative feedback mechanism that is impaired by these diseases. The cause of acromegaly is a pituitary adenoma, which produces growth hormone in adults. Primary therapy of acromegaly is surgical, with or without associated radiotherapy. If a patient with acromegaly as comorbidity prepares for non-elective neurosurgical operation, then it requires consultation with brain surgeons for possible delays of that operation and primary surgical treatment of pituitary gland. If operative treatment of pituitary gland is carried out, the preoperative preparation (for other surgical interventions) should consider the need for perioperative glucocorticoid supplementation. Panhypopituitarism consequences are different in children and adults and the first step in diagnosis is to assess the function of target organs. Change of electrolytes and water occurs in the case of pituitary lesions in the form of central or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus as a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Preoperative preparation of patients with pituitary dysfunction should be multidisciplinary, whether it is a neurosurgical or some other surgical intervention. The aim is to evaluate the result of insufficient production of pituitary hormones (hypopituitarism), excessive production of adenohypophysis hormones (acromegaly, Cushing's disease and hyperprolactinemia) and the influence of pituitary tumours in surrounding structures (compression syndrome) and to determine the level of perioperative risk. Pharmacological suppressive therapy of the hyperfunctional pituitary disorders can have significant interactions with drugs used in the perioperative period.

  14. Lymphocitic infundibuloneurohypophysitis mimicking a pituitary adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubertus Maximilian Mehdorn

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of infundibulo-neurohypophysitis mimicking a pituitary adenoma is presented. A 69-years-old female patient developed polyuria and polydipsia. Laboratory analysis revealed central diabetes insipidus. No hormonal abnormalities. Cranial-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a left sided mass in the adenohypophysis presuming a pituitary adenoma. The mass had contact to both internal carotids. Admission to our department for neurosurgical treatment followed. Ophthalmo - logic examination and neurological examination yielded normal findings. A second MRI focussing on the sellar-region showed a leftsided (T2-MRI.hyperintense, distended adenohypophysis, without contrast enhancement in T1. The stalk appeared thickened. T1- weighted sequences of the neurohypophysis showed loss of signal intensity. We diagnosed an infundibulo-neurohypophysitis and abstai - ned from surgical removal. The patient was discharged under treatment with corticosteroids and desmopressin. Hypophysitis is rare and shows special clinical characteristics. Despite defined radiological features to differentiate between hypophysitis and adenoma the possibility of misdiagnosis, and unnecessary surgical procedures, should always kept in mind.

  15. Respiration rate in human pituitary tumor explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anniko, M; Bagger-Sjöbäck, D; Hultborn, R

    1982-01-01

    Studies on the respiration rate of human pituitary tumor tissue have so far been lacking in the literature. This study presents the results from four adenomas causing acromegaly, all with different clinical degrees of the disease. Determination of oxygen uptake was performed in vitro with a spectrophotorespirometric system. Pieces of the tumors were explanted to an organ culture system with a high degree of stability. The secretion rate of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) was determined. After 4-8 days in vitro, specimens were analyzed for respiration rate. This was approximately 1-1.5 microliters O2/h/micrograms dry weight. The activity of the pituitary tumor tissue was characterized by both the hormone secretion rate and the respiration rate. Particularly active foci were found to occur in the adenoma tissue. Depending on the individual tumor, the GH secretion rate was approximately 0.1-100 pmol/micrograms dry weight/h and PRL secretion rate approximately 0.4-18 micrograms/micrograms dry weight/h. The respiration rate--as is also the hormone secretion rate--is dependent on the time in vitro prior to analysis. The respiration rate in individual tumors is a parameter which does not reflect GH or PRL serum levels or clinical activity of the disease.

  16. Endoscopic transnasal approach for removing pituitary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Cabral Moreira de Castro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To describe a series of 129 consecutive patients submitted to the resection of pituitary tumors using the endoscopic transsphenoidal approach in a public medical center. Method: Retrospective analysis based on the records of patients submitted to the resection of a pituitary tumor through the endoscopic transsphenoidal approach between 2004 and 2009. Results: One hundred and twenty-nine records were analyzed. The tumor was non-secreting in 96 (74.42% and secreting in 33 patients (22.58%. Out of the secretory tumors, the most prevalent was the growth hormone producer (7.65%, followed by the prolactinoma, (6.98%. Eleven patients developed cerebral spinal fluid (CSF fistulas, and four of them developed meningitis. One patient died due to intracerebral hemorrhage in the postoperative period. Conclusion: The endoscopic transsphenoidal approach to sellar tumors proved to be safe when the majority of the tumors were non-secreting. The most frequent complication was CSF. This technique can be done even in a public hospital with financial limits, since the health professionals are integrated.

  17. GROWTH HORMONE-, ALPHA-SUBUNIT AND THYROTROPIN-COSECRETING PITUITARY-ADENOMA IN FAMILIAL SETTING OF PITUITARY-TUMOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LINKS, TP; MONKELBAAN, JF; DULLAART, RPF; VANHAEFTEN, TW

    1993-01-01

    A patient with acromegaly and hyperthyroidism due to a growth hormone-, thyrotrophin- and alpha-subunit-secreting pituitary adenoma is described. His deceased father had suffered from a pituitary tumour, and was likely to have had acromegaly as well. Plasma growth hormone and insulin-like growth fac

  18. [Precursors of acute leukemia: myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreipe, H H

    2011-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) represent neoplastic proliferations of hematopoietic stem cells, which may progress to loss of differentiation and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Transitions between MDSs and MPNs as well as combinations between both disorders occur and MPNs may acquire dysplastic features combined with cytopenia. Myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms show dysplastic and myeloproliferative properties and have in common genetic aberrations at the stem cell level (TET2, ASXL 1, CBL, IDH 1, IDH 2, EZH2, p53, Runx1), which may be found in one cell or may affect different hematopoietic stem cells, expanding in parallel. Progress to AML follows a linear clonal evolution only in a subset of cases. Alternatively AML derives from secondary clones, devoid of any marker mutation or originates from a common aberrant progenitor cell which shares other but not the JAK2 ( V617F ) mutation.

  19. Central Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Primary Odontogenic or Osseous Neoplasm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, central cemento-ossifying fibroma is classified by the World Health Organization as a primary bone-forming tumor of the jaws. However, histopathologically, it is often indistinguishable from cemento-osseous dysplasias in that it forms osteoid and cementicles (cementum droplets) in varying proportions. It is believed that pluripotent cells within the periodontal membrane can be stimulated to produce either osteoid or woven bone and cementicles when stimulated. If this is true, cemento-ossifying fibroma would be better classified as a primary odontogenic neoplasm arising from the periodontal ligament. Cemento-ossifying fibromas also do not occur in the long bones. The present report compares several entities that fall within the diagnostic realm of benign fibro-osseous lesions and reviews the evidence for reclassifying central cemento-ossifying fibroma as a primary odontogenic neoplasm. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Lesions and Neoplasms of the Penis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Debra S

    2016-01-01

    In addition to practitioners who care for male patients, with the increased use of high-resolution anoscopy, practitioners who care for women are seeing more men in their practices as well. Some diseases affecting the penis can impact on their sexual partners. Many of the lesions and neoplasms of the penis occur on the vulva as well. In addition, there are common and rare lesions unique to the penis. A review of the scope of penile lesions and neoplasms that may present in a primary care setting is presented to assist in developing a differential diagnosis if such a patient is encountered, as well as for practitioners who care for their sexual partners. A familiarity will assist with recognition, as well as when consultation is needed.

  1. Primary Intracranial Myoepithelial Neoplasm: A Potential Mimic of Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Bonnie; Pytel, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Myoepithelial neoplasms were originally described in the salivary glands but their spectrum has been expanding with reports in other locations, including soft tissue. Intracranial cases are exceptionally rare outside the sellar region where they are assumed to be arising from Rathke pouch rests. Two cases of pediatric intracranial myoepithelial neoplasm in the interhemispheric fissure and the right cerebral hemisphere are reported here. Imaging studies suggest that the second case was associated with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination. Both cases showed typical variation in morphology and immunophenotype between more epithelioid and more mesenchymal features. The differential diagnosis at this particular anatomic location includes meningioma, which can show some overlap in immunophenotype since both tumors express EMA as well as GLUT1. One case was positive for EWSR1 rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization. One patient is disease free at last follow-up while the other succumbed to the disease within days illustrating the clinical spectrum of these tumors.

  2. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  3. Pancreatic endocrine neoplasms: Epidemiology and prognosis of pancreatic endocrine tumors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine neoplasms (PETs) are uncommon tumors with an annual incidence less than 1 per 100,000 persons per year in the general population. PETs that produce hormones resulting in symptoms are designated as functional. The majority of PETs are nonfunctional. Of the functional tumors, insulinomas are the most common, followed by gastrinomas. The clinical course of patients with PETs is variable and depends on the extent of the disease and the treatment rendered. Patients with comple...

  4. SCHWANNOMA OF TONGUE, A RARE INTRAORAL NEOPLASM: CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas are truly encapsulated neoplasms of the human body and are always solitary. Only 1-2% occur intraorally with tongue being the most common site. A 20yr old male presented with a painless, slow growing swelling on the left side of the tongue for the past 1 year. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done and a benign mesenchymal lesion, possibility of Schwannoma was given. Biopsy of the tumour was performed and sent for histopathological examination which confirmed the diagnosis of Sc...

  5. Primary duodenal neoplasms: A retrospective clinico-pathological analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Amanjit; Joshi, Kusum; Vaiphei, Kim; Wig, JD

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinico-pathological spectrum of primary duodenal neoplasms. METHODS: A total of 55 primary duodenal neoplasms reported in the last 10 years after excluding ampullary and periampullary tumors were included in the study. Clinical details were noted and routine hematoxylin and eosin stained paraffin sections were studied for histological subtyping of the tumors. RESULTS: On histopathological examination primary duodenal neoplasms were categorized as: epithelial tumor in 27 cases (49.0%) including 10 cases of adenoma, 15 cases of adenocarcinoma, and 2 cases of Brunner gland adenoma; mesenchymal tumor in 9 cases (16.3%) consisting of 4 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor, 4 cases of smooth muscle tumor and I case of neurofibroma; lymphoproliferative tumor in 12 cases (21.8%), and neuroendocrine tumor in 7 cases (12.7%). CONCLUSION: Although non-ampullary/periampullary duodenal adenocarcinomas are rare, they constitute the largest group. Histopathological examination of primary duodenal tumors is important for correct histological subtyping. PMID:17373748

  6. Primary duodenal neoplasms:A retrospective clinico-pathological analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amanjit Bal; Kusum Joshi; Kim Vaiphei; JD Wig

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To analyze the clinico-pathological spectrum of primary duodenal neoplasms.METHODS:A total of 55 primary duodenal neoplasms reported in the last 10 years after excluding ampullary and periampullary tumors were included in the study.Clinical details were noted and routine hematoxylin and eosin stained paraffin sections were studied for histological subtyping of the tumors.RESULTS:On histopathological examination primary duodenal neoplasms were categorized as:epithelial tumor in 27 cases(49.0%)including 10 cases of adenoma,15 cases of adenocarcinoma,and 2 cases of Brunner gland adenoma;mesenchymal tumor in 9 cases (16.3%)consisting of 4 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor,4 cases of smooth muscle tumor and I case of neurofibroma;lymphoproliferative tumor in 12 cases (21.8%),and neuroendocrine tumor in 7 cases(12.7%).CONCLUSION:Although non-ampullary/periampullary duodenal adenocarcinomas are rare,they constitute the largest group.Histopathological examination of primary duodenal tumors is important for correct histological subtyping.

  7. THYROID NEOPLASMS AND PERITUMORAL MORPHOLOGY IN THYROIDECTOMY SPECIMENS

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    Padmavathi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid neoplasms represent the most common malignancies of the endocrine system. They are known to occur in association with benign lesions of the thyroid, like multinodular goitre and Hashimoto thyroiditis. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : To study the neoplasms of thyroid and their peritumoral morphology. MATERIALS AND METHODS : All thyroidectomy specimens received in the Department of Pathology, RRMCH over a period of three years from June 2011 to May 2014 were included in the study. Thyro idectomies for non - neoplastic lesions were also extensively sampled and morphologically studied, with focus on peritumoral morphology, in neoplasms. RESULTS : Of the one hundred and fifty four thyroidectomy specimens received over three years, one hundred a nd thirteen (73.4% were non - neoplastic, and forty one were neoplastic (26.6%. Colloid goitre and lymphocytic infiltrate were the most common features in the peritumoral thyroid tissue, followed by multinodular goitre . Hashimoto thyroiditis and Hurthle cell change were noted in 11.5% of cases. Tumors were multicentric in 11.5% of cases. Malignancy was detected in eight of the fifty nine thyroidectomies performed for multinodular goitre . Of the thirty four surgeries for Hashimoto thyroiditis, four were reported as malignant on histopathology. CONCLUSION : All thyroidectomies, including those operated for benign lesions, need to be extensively sampled and morphology studied due to the possibility of occult malignancy. Larger series need to be st udied to find a causal association between the two.

  8. Expression of Neuropeptide Y in Human Pituitary Adenoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laizhao Chen; Jingjian Ma; Anchao Zheng; Honggang Zheng

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Neuropeptid e Y (NPY) acts as a neuroendocrine modulator in the anterior pituitary, and NPY mRNA and NPY-immunoreactivity have been detected in normal human anterior pituitaries. However, only a few studies of NPY expression in human pituitary adenomas have been published. Our study was conducted to determine whether or not adenomatous cells express NPY, to investigate the relationship between NPY expression and the subtypes of pituitary adenoma and to explore the clinical significance of NPY.METHODS The study included tissues from 58 patients with pituitary adenomas who underwent surgery because of their clinical diagnosis.Using a highly specific anti-NPY polyclonal antibody, immunohistochemical analysis was performed on the surgically removed pituitary adenomas. Six fresh specimens also were examined using immuno-electron microscopy. NPY was labeled with colloidal gold in order to study the distribution of NPY at the subcellular level.RESULTS The NPY expression level was significantly different among subgroups of pituitary adenomas (P<0.05). NPY was immuno-detected in 58.6% of all adenomas, in 91.7% of gonadotrophic adenomas and in 14.3% of prolactinomas. NPY expression was slightly lower in invasive pituitary adenomas compared to noninvasive adenomas, but the difference was not significant (t=1.81, P>0.05). Of particular interest was the finding that vascular endothelial cells showed positive NPY expression in some pituitary adenomas. Parts of strongly positive tumor cells were seen in channels formed without endothelial cells, but which contained some red blood cells in a formation similar to so-called vasculogenic mimicry. Immuno-electron microscopy demonstrated that 4 of the 6 fresh specimens displayed positive NPY staining with a high density of gold particles located mainly in the secretory granulas. In addition, gold particles were sparsely detected in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and cell matrix.CONCLUSION NPY exists in pituitary adenomas

  9. Primary hypothyroidism mimicking a pituitary macroadenoma: regression after thyroid hormone replacement therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Ki Seong; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Tae Young [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Iksan (Korea); See-Sung, Choi [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Iksan (Korea); Kim, Jong Duck [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Iksan (Korea)

    2009-02-15

    We report a 9-year-old girl with pituitary hyperplasia due to primary hypothyroidism. She presented with growth arrest, abnormal thyroid function studies, and a pituitary mass on MRI. With thyroxine therapy, the pituitary mass regressed and her symptoms resolved. Primary hypothyroidism should be considered in the differential diagnosis of solid mass lesions of the pituitary gland. (orig.)

  10. Sequential pituitary MR imaging in Sheehan syndrome: report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplun, J; Fratila, C; Ferenczi, A; Yang, W C; Lantos, G; Fleckman, A M; Schubart, U K

    2008-05-01

    We present the evolution of pituitary changes in the cases of 2 patients with Sheehan syndrome as assessed by MR imaging. Both patients had severe postpartum hemorrhage, symptoms of pituitary gland apoplexy, and hypopituitarism. Sequential MR imaging demonstrated evidence of ischemic infarct in the pituitary gland with enlargement followed by gradual shrinkage during several months, to pituitary atrophy.

  11. The pathology of pituitary adenomas from a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworakowska, Dorota; Korbonits, Marta; Aylwin, Simon; McGregor, Alan; Grossman, Ashley B

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas present with a variety of clinical endocrine manifestations and arise in a sporadic setting or rarely as part of hereditary genetic syndromes. Molecular analysis of familial pituitary adenomas has provided significant insight into pituitary tumorigenesis. Some specific genes have been identified that predispose to pituitary neoplasia, but these are rarely involved in the pathogenesis of sporadic tumors. The number of identified genes involved in pituitary tumorigenesis is progressively increasing. The possible resulting mechanisms of action involve abnormalities in signal transduction pathways, cell cycle regulators, growth factors, chromosome stability and others. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance of genetic alterations and their implications for patient prognosis, as well as to identify targets for existing and new therapeutic options. The aim of this review is to focus on the molecular pathology of pituitary adenomas from a practical perspective and discuss the possible clinical implications which may relate to particular molecular alterations. We have summarised familial syndromes related to pituitary adenomas and considered the prognostic value of selected molecular alterations in these tumors.

  12. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

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    Fergus Keane

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour.

  13. HMGA1-pseudogene expression is induced in human pituitary tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Francesco; De Martino, Marco; D'Angelo, Daniela; Mussnich, Paula; Raverot, Gerald; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Fraggetta, Filippo; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Fusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have established that High Mobility Group A (HMGA) proteins play a pivotal role on the onset of human pituitary tumors. They are overexpressed in pituitary tumors, and, consistently, transgenic mice overexpressing either the Hmga1 or the Hmga2 gene develop pituitary tumors. In contrast with HMGA2, HMGA1 overexpression is not related to any rearrangement or amplification of the HMGA1 locus in these tumors. We have recently identified 2 HMGA1 pseudogenes, HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7, acting as competitive endogenous RNA decoys for HMGA1 and other cancer related genes. Here, we show that HMGA1 pseudogene expression significantly correlates with HMGA1 mRNA levels in growth hormone and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas likely inhibiting the repression of HMGA1 through microRNAs action. According to our functional studies, these HMGA1 pseudogenes enhance the proliferation and migration of the mouse pituitary tumor cell line, at least in part, through their upregulation. Our results point out that the overexpression of HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7 could contribute to increase HMGA1 levels in human pituitary tumors, and then to pituitary tumorigenesis. PMID:25894544

  14. Pituitary null cell adenoma in a domestic llama (Lama glama).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, M D; Kiupel, M; Draper, A C E

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary gland neoplasia has been reported rarely in camelids. A 12-year-old neutered male llama (Lama glama) presented with lethargy, inappetence and neurological signs. On physical examination, the llama was mentally dull and exhibited compulsive pacing and circling to the left. Complete blood count and serum biochemistry revealed haemoconcentration, mild hypophosphataemia, hyperglycaemia, hypercreatininaemia and hyperalbuminaemia. Humane destruction was elected due to rapid clinical deterioration and poor prognosis. Post-mortem examination revealed a pituitary macroadenoma and bilateral internal hydrocephalus. Microscopically, the pituitary tumour was composed of neoplastic chromophobic pituitary cells. Ultrastructural studies revealed similar neoplastic cells to those previously described in human null cell adenomas. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were strongly immunoreactive for neuroendocrine markers (synaptophysin and chromogranin A), but did not exhibit immunoreactivity for epithelial, mesenchymal, neuronal and all major pituitary hormone markers (adrenocorticotropic hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, melanocyte-stimulating hormone, prolactin and thyroid stimulating hormone), consistent with the diagnosis of a pituitary null cell adenoma. This is the first report of pituitary neoplasia in a llama.

  15. Development and sexual dimorphism of the pituitary gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMaster, Frank P.; Keshavan, Matcheri; Mirza, Yousha; Carrey, Normand; Upadhyaya, Ameet R.; El-Sheikh, Rhonda; Buhagiar, Christian J; Taormina, S. Preeya; Boyd, Courtney; Lynch, Michelle; Rose, Michelle; Ivey, Jennifer; Moore, Gregory J.; Rosenberg, David R.

    2007-01-01

    The pituitary gland plays a central role in sexual development and brain function. Therefore, we examined the effect of age and gender on pituitary volume in a large sample of healthy children and adults. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was conducted in one hundred and fifty four (77 males and 77 females) healthy participants. Males were between the ages of 7 to 35 years (16.91 ± 5.89 years) and females were 7 to 35 years of age (16.75 ± 5.75 years). Subjects were divided into subgroups of age (7 to 9, 10 to 13, 14 to 17, 18 to 21, 22 and older) and sex (male/female). Pituitary gland volume differed between sexes when comparing the age groups (F = 3.55, df = 2, 143, p = 0.03). Females demonstrated larger pituitary glands than males in the age 14 to 17 year old groups (p = 0.04). Young (19 years and under) and old (20 years and older) females demonstrated a correlation between pituitary volume and age. Males did not show this relationship. These findings provide additional evidence for gender differences in the normative anatomy of the pituitary and may have relevance for the study of various childhood onset neuropsychiatric disorders in which pituitary dysfunction has been implicated. PMID:17174342

  16. Pituitary volumes are changed in patients with conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Murad; Baykara, Sema; Mermi, Osman; Yildirim, Hanefi; Akaslan, Unsal

    2016-03-01

    Our study group previously measured pituitary volumes and found a relationship between somatoform disoders and pituitary volumes. Therefore, in conversion disorder, another somatoform disorder, we hypothesized that pituitary gland volumes would be reduced. Twenty female patients and healthy controls were recruited to the present investigation. The volumes of the pituitary gland were determined by using a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner. We found that the pituitary gland volumes of the patients with conversion disorder were significantly smaller than those of healthy control subjects. In the patients with conversion disorder but not in the healthy control group, a significant negative correlation between the duration of illness and pituitary gland volume was determined. In summary, in the present study, we suggest that the patients with conversion disorder have smaller pituitary volumes compared to those of healthy control subjects. Further studies should confirm our data and ascertain whether volumetric alterations determined in the patients with conversion disorder can be changed with treatment or if they change over time.

  17. Relationship Between Histopathology and Clinical Prognosis of Invasive Pituitary Adenoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIYong; SHUKai; DONGFangyong; WANFeng; LEITing; LILing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between histopathology and clinical prognosis of invasive pituitary adenoma subjected to transsphenoidal surgery. Methods: The enrolled were 82 patients with invasive pituitary adenomas undergoing transsphenoidal surgery during Jan. 2000 May 2003 in our department with full MR imaging findings, pathology data and follow-up information. The follow-up duration was 5-30 months. Results: MR imaging findings of invasive pituitary adenoma included: depression of the sellar floor, involvement of sphenoid sinus and cavernous sinus, breakthrough of diaphragma sellae,encasement of internal carotid artery, etc. Pathological examination revealed that the invasion rate of dura in sella turcica was the highest among the structures around tumor. Pituitary adenoma apoplexy was found in 20 cases (24.4%). The total removal rate for PRL-secreting adenomas was significantly lower than that for non-secreting adenomas (P<0.01), but non-, GH-, ACTH-secreting adenomas had no significant differences. The recurrence rate of PRL-secreting adenornas was higher than that of non- and GH-secreting adenomas (P<0.05). Conclusion: Among invasive pituitary adenomas, the therapeutic effects of nonand GH-secreting pituitary adenomas are better than that of PRL-secreting adenomas. Invasive biological behaviors of invasive pituitary adenomas result in radical operation failure and postoperative recurrence.

  18. Cushing-type ectopic pituitary adenoma with unusual pathologic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher T. Kimmell, MD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic pituitary adenomas comprise, by varying reports, approximately 1-2% of all pituitary adenomas. They are often located in the nasopharyngeal region associated with the pharyngeal pituitary. The location and pathologic features of these masses make them atypical when compared with intrasellar pituitary adenomas. A 54-year-old man presented with vertebral compression fracture and physical stigmata of Cushing’s disease. Biochemical testing confirmed hypercortisolemia responsive to high dose dexamethasone suppression. MRI of the head demonstrated an enhancing mass in the posterior aspect of the sphenoid sinus not involving the sella turcica. Endoscopic biopsy followed by resection confirmed this mass to be a pituitary adenoma with unusual pathologic features. Most notably, the tumor cells demonstrated large, eosinophilic, vacuolated cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical profile of the tumor was typical of an ACTH secreting tumor, notably with positivity for ACTH. The patient did well from his surgery. Post-operatively his serum cortisol level normalized and he remains in chemical remission one year after surgery. Ectopic pituitary adenomas are an unusual manifestation of hormonally active pituitary neoplastic disease. Their atypical clinical presentations, location, and pathologic features can make them a diagnostic challenge. Clinicians should be aware of these entities, especially when considering differential diagnosis for a mass in the sphenoid sinus and nasopharyngeal region.

  19. Blood, pituitary, and brain renin-angiotensin systems and regulation of secretion of anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    1993-07-01

    In addition to increasing blood pressure, stimulating aldosterone and vasopressin secretion, and increasing water intake, angiotensin II affects the secretion of anterior pituitary hormones. Some of these effects are direct. There are angiotensin II receptors on lactotropes and corticotropes in rats, and there may be receptors on thyrotropes and other secretory cells. Circulating angiotensin II reaches these receptors, but angiotensin II is almost certainly generated locally by the pituitary renin-angiotensin system as well. There are also indirect effects produced by the effects of brain angiotensin II on the secretion of hypophyseotropic hormones. In the anterior pituitary of the rat, the gonadotropes contain renin, angiotensin II, and some angiotensin-converting enzyme. There is debate about whether these cells also contain small amounts of angiotensinogen, but most of the angiotensinogen is produced by a separate population of cells and appears to pass in a paracrine fashion to the gonadotropes. An analogous situation exists in the brain. Neurons contain angiotensin II and probably renin, but most angiotensin-converting enzyme is located elsewhere and angiotensinogen is primarily if not solely produced by astrocytes. Angiotensin II causes secretion of prolactin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) when added to pituitary cells in vitro. Paracrine regulation of prolactin secretion by angiotensin II from the gonadotropes may occur in vitro under certain circumstances, but the effects of peripheral angiotensin II on ACTH secretion appear to be mediated via the brain and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). In the brain, there is good evidence that locally generated angiotensin II causes release of norepinephrine that in turn stimulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone-secreting neurons, increasing circulating luteinizing hormone. In addition, there is evidence that angiotensin II acts in the arcuate nuclei to increase the secretion of dopamine into the portal

  20. Pregnancy in patients with pituitary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husami, N; Jewelewicz, R; Vande Wiele, R L

    1977-09-01

    Thirteen patients with pituitary tumors had a total of seventeen pregnancies. Nine of these patients were treated prior to conception (four by radiation therapy, four by hypophysectomy, and one with lergotrile); four patients received no treatment. The untreated group had a total of six pregnancies, two of which were complicated by visual symptoms which regressed spontaneously after delivery. One of the hypophysectomized patients developed diabetes insipidus at 34 weeks' gestation which resolved spontaneously after delivery. Of the four irradiated patients, one had a child with Down's syndrome and another had a child with multiple congenital anomalies who died. The clinical course and various modes of treatment of these patients are discussed and the pertinent literature is reviewed.

  1. Painful vertical diplopia as a presentation of a pituitary mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Kaveri

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pituitary tumours may present with a variety of neurological and endocrinological signs and symptoms. It is very rare however for them to present with sudden onset painful diplopia. The current literature and possible mechanisms for this are discussed. Case presentation We describe a case of a pituitary mass which presented with sudden onset painful diplopia with an associated restricted pattern on Lees Chart testing. This led to an initial working diagnosis of orbital myositis. Conclusion Awareness of different modes of presentation of pituitary lesions is important so that appropriate imaging may be requested and delay in diagnosis prevented.

  2. Addison's disease and ACTH-producing pituitary microadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Ortega

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old man diagnosed with primary adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease in 2002. Following diagnosis, replacement therapy with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone was indicated. Hydrocortisone replacement therapy was unsuccessful, and increased ACTH levels as high as 996 pg/dl were observed on outpatient follow-up. A pituitary MRI revealed a pituitary microadenoma. These findings raised three possibilities: (1 treatment is insufficient; (2 there is no relationship between Addison's disease and pituitary microadenoma; and (3 the microadenoma is similar to Nelson's syndrome. This latter is the most satisfactory explanation of this patient's clinical picture.

  3. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The maintainance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro was studied. The primary approach was the testing of agents which may be expected to increase the release of the human growth hormone (hGH). A procedure for tissue procurement is described along with the methodologies used to dissociate human pituitary tissue (obtained either at autopsy or surgery) into single cell suspensions. The validity of the Biogel cell column perfusion system for studying the dynamics of GH release was developed and documented using a rat pituitary cell system.

  4. Early hyponatraemia after pituitary surgery: cerebral salt-wasting syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, R; Pumar, A; Soto, A; Pomares, M A; Palma, S; Mangas, M A; Leal, A; Villamil, F

    2007-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is a common complication in patients undergoing neurosurgery. It can be caused either by the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone or by the cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS). CSWS frequently occurs in patients suffering from subarachnoid haemorrhage and brain injury, but it is rare after pituitary tumour surgery. However, this diagnostic possibility should be considered as these disorders require specific treatment and have different prognoses. In this article, we present a case of acute and early hyponatraemia caused by CSWS after pituitary tumour surgery. We also revise the aetiology, mechanisms, differential diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia after pituitary surgery.

  5. Follicle stimulating hormone secreting pituitary adenoma: a challenging diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Alap Mehendale

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available FSH secreting pituitary adenomas are relatively uncommon brain tumours and usually non-functioning. But in rare cases they produce ovarian hyperstimulation. We report a case of a 32 year old female P2L2, with amenorrhoea of 1 year, pain in abdomen and galactorrhoea since 6 months. Initially thought to be a simple prolactinoma with multicystic ovaries, but after thorough investigations to our surprise diagnosed to be a rare case of gonadotropin secreting pituitary adenoma. Patient was successfully managed by excision of the pituitary adenoma. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 493-496

  6. Ectopic Neurohypophysis in Patient with Pituitary Dwarfism: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhan Kılınç

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic neurohypophysis is an anomaly of the Pituitary gland whichmay be associated with short stature due to Growth hormone deficiency.MRI is the modality of choice in diagnosing this condition. We present acase of pituitary dwarfism and ectopic neurohypophysis with clinical andradiological findings. 21 year-old male admitted with short stature. Allhormones, except prolactin, of anterior hypophysis were low. Bright spotwas ectopically located at level of median eminence on enhanced MRI ofhypophysis and stalk of hypophysis was not observed. Ectopicneurohypophysis may be present with pituitary dwarfism. Cranial MRI maybe useful to investigate related pathologies in such cases.

  7. Nonadenomatous tumors of the pituitary and sella turcica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Benjamin Y; Castillo, Mauricio

    2005-07-01

    While pituitary adenomas make up over 90% of all sellar masses, there are a number of less known tumors, both malignant and benign, which may arise within the sella turcica. These include relatively common tumors such as meningiomas and craniopharyngiomas, as well as extremely rare tumors such as pituitary astrocytomas and granular cell tumors. Unfortunately, many of these tumors lack characteristic imaging features, often making it extremely difficult to distinguish them by imaging alone from the more common pituitary adenoma. In this article, we review several nonadenomatous tumors of the sella, with a focus on their clinical features and typical MR imaging characteristics.

  8. Pituitary gland height evaluated by MR in patients with {beta}-thalassemia major: a marker of pituitary gland function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyropoulou, M.I.; Metafratzi, Z.; Efremidis, S.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Ioannina (Greece); Kiortsis, D.N. [Dept. of Physiology, Univ. of Ioannina (Greece); Bitsis, S.; Tsatoulis, A. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. of Ioannina (Greece)

    2001-12-01

    In transfusion-dependent {beta}-thalassemia major, increased iron deposition in the pituitary gland has a cytotoxic effect leading mainly to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Our purpose was to assess in these patients the height of the pituitary gland and to evaluate whether it represents a marker of pituitary gland function. In 29 patients with {beta}-thalassemia major and 35 age- and gender-matched controls the pituitary gland height was evaluated in a midline sagittal scan using a spin echo T1-weighted (500/20 TR/TE) sequence. In all patients, an extensive endocrine evaluation was performed, including measurements of spontaneous and stimulated levels of gonadotropins, thyroid hormones, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor, and adrenal hormones. The pituitary gland height was lower in thalassemic patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (n=15) (mean 3.48; SD 0.46) than in the age- and gender-matched controls (mean 6.29; SD 0.77), (P<0.001). No statistically significant difference was found between thalassemic patients without hormone dysfunction (n=14) (mean 5.34; SD 1.52) and age- and gender-matched controls (mean 5.91; SD 1.06). We conclude that in thalassemic patients the pituitary gland height is an additional marker of pituitary gland function and might be useful in clinical management. (orig.)

  9. Persistent expression of activated notch in the developing hypothalamus affects survival of pituitary progenitors and alters pituitary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujla, Paven K; Bogdanovic, Vedran; Naratadam, George T; Raetzman, Lori T

    2015-08-01

    As the pituitary gland develops, signals from the hypothalamus are necessary for pituitary induction and expansion. Little is known about the control of cues that regulate early signaling between the two structures. Ligands and receptors of the Notch signaling pathway are found in both the hypothalamus and Rathke's pouch. The downstream Notch effector gene Hes1 is required for proper pituitary formation; however, these effects could be due to the action of Hes1 in the hypothalamus, Rathke's pouch, or both. To determine the contribution of hypothalamic Notch signaling to pituitary organogenesis, we used mice with loss and gain of Notch function within the developing hypothalamus. We demonstrate that loss of Notch signaling by conditional deletion of Rbpj in the hypothalamus does not affect expression of Hes1 within the posterior hypothalamus or expression of Hes5. In contrast, expression of activated Notch within the hypothalamus results in ectopic Hes5 expression and increased Hes1 expression, which is sufficient to disrupt pituitary development and postnatal expansion. Taken together, our results indicate that Rbpj-dependent Notch signaling within the developing hypothalamus is not necessary for pituitary development, but persistent Notch signaling and ectopic Hes5 expression in hypothalamic progenitors affects pituitary induction and expansion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Multiple neoplasms among cervical cancer patients in the material of the lower Silesian cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmajłowicz, Barbara; Kornafel, Jan; Błaszczyk, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    According to the definition by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), primary multiple neoplasms are two or more neoplasms of different histopathological build in one organ, or two or more tumors occurring in one patient, regardless of the time of their occurrence (synchronic - up to 6 months, metachronous - after 6 months), coming from an organ or a tissue and not being an infiltration from another neoplasm, a relapse or a metastasis. It was the aim of the study to analyze the frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasms among patients suffering from uterine cervix cancer, with a special interest in coexistent neoplasms, the time of their occurrence and total 5-year survivals. The data from the Lower Silesian Cancer Registry concerning the years 1984-2009 formed the material of the present study. 5.3% of all cervix neoplasms occurred as multiple cancers. Cervix neoplasms were 13.4% of multiple neoplasms. On average, cervical cancer occurred as a subsequent cancer in 6 patients yearly (60.7% of the occurrences of cervical cancer were in the period of 5 years following treatment for the first neoplasm). 5-year survival in patients suffering from primarily multiple cervix neoplasms constituted 57% and was convergent with the results for all patients suffering from cervical cancer. Cervical cancer as the first neoplasm occurred in 287 patients, on average in 11 patients annually. In the period of the first 5 years after the treatment of cervical cancer, there were 42.8% occurrences of other cancers. Cervical neoplasms most frequently coexisted with cancers of the breast, lung and large intestine. The frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasm among cervical cancer patients is increasing. Most frequently they coexist with other tobacco-related neoplasms, those related to HPV infections and with secondary post-radiation neoplasms. These facts should be taken into consideration during post-treatment observation and when directing diagnostic

  11. Long-Term Outcome and MGMT as a Predictive Marker in 24 Patients With Atypical Pituitary Adenomas and Pituitary Carcinomas Given Treatment With Temozolomide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Daniel; Schrøder, Henrik Daa; Andersen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT/OBJECTIVE: Locally aggressive pituitary tumors (LAPT) and pituitary carcinomas respond poorly to conventional therapy and cytotoxic drugs. Temozolomide (TMZ) is an oral alkylating drug with good tolerability, approved for treatment of malignant gliomas. The experience of its use...

  12. Pareidolia in Neuroendocrinology: A Pituitary Macroadenoma Resembling "Big Bird".

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2016-04-01

    The MRI picture of a pituitary macroadenoma with supra- and perisellar expansion resembled a famous character from a children's television series demonstrating that pareidolia is also observed in neuro-endocrinology and -radiology.

  13. Pituitary stalk lesion in a 13-year-old female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilbermint, Mihail; Ramnitz, Mary S; Lodish, Maya B; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Kattamis, Antonis; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Patronas, Nicholas J; Quezado, Martha M; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2014-03-01

    Germinomas presenting with a pituitary stalk lesion and panhypopituitarism are rare in children, and their definite diagnosis is challenging. An invasive diagnostic approach, such as a transsphenoidal biopsy, is often required prior to establishing a treatment regimen. A 13-year-old female presented with 1 year of secondary amenorrhea, fatigue, and progressive thirst with polyuria. Laboratory work-up revealed panhypopituitarism (central hypothyroidism, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, adrenal insufficiency and central diabetes insipidus). α-Fetoprotein and β-human chorionic gonadotropin were not elevated in serum nor in cerebrospinal fluid. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pituitary region showed an enhancing infundibular lesion, extending into the hypothalamus, and infiltrating the pituitary gland. A transsphenoidal biopsy of the infundibular lesion confirmed the diagnosis of germinoma (germ-cell tumor). After appropriate hormone replacement therapy, chemotherapy and low-dose radiation therapy, the patient achieved complete resolution of the pituitary stalk lesion on the MRI.

  14. Volume of the adrenal and pituitary glands in depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Willer, Inge Stoel; Knorr, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is hyperactive in some depressed patients. It is unclear whether such hyperactivity results in changed volumes of the adrenal glands, pituitary gland and hypothalamus. We systematically reviewed all controlled studies...... on the adrenal or pituitary glands or hypothalamus volume in unipolar depressive disorder published in PubMed 1966 to December 2009. We identified three studies that investigated the volume of the adrenal glands and eight studies that examined the volume of the pituitary gland, but no studies on hypothalamus...... identified such as small population samples, different subtypes of depression and insufficient matching of patients and controls. Due to large heterogeneity of study designs and data, it was futile to make a meta-analysis. It is concluded that it remains unclear whether hyperactivity of the HPA axis results...

  15. Pituitary stalk lesion in a 13-year-old female

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilbermint, Mihail; Ramnitz, Mary S.; Lodish, Maya B.; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Kattamis, Antonis; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Quezado, Martha M.

    2016-01-01

    Germinomas presenting with a pituitary stalk lesion and panhypopituitarism are rare in children, and their definite diagnosis is challenging. An invasive diagnostic approach, such as a transsphenoidal biopsy, is often required prior to establishing a treatment regimen. A 13-year-old female presented with 1 year of secondary amenorrhea, fatigue, and progressive thirst with polyuria. Laboratory work-up revealed panhypopituitarism (central hypothyroidism, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, adrenal insufficiency and central diabetes insipidus). α-Fetoprotein and β-human chorionic gonadotropin were not elevated in serum nor in cerebrospinal fluid. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pituitary region showed an enhancing infundibular lesion, extending into the hypothalamus, and infiltrating the pituitary gland. A transsphenoidal biopsy of the infundibular lesion confirmed the diagnosis of germinoma (germ-cell tumor). After appropriate hormone replacement therapy, chemotherapy and low-dose radiation therapy, the patient achieved complete resolution of the pituitary stalk lesion on the MRI. PMID:24129100

  16. Ectopic pituitary adenoma presenting as midline nasopharyngeal mass.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, R

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ectopic pituitary adenomas are extremely rare. We report a case of ectopic pituitary adenoma in the midline of the nasopharynx. This adenoma probably arose from the pharyngeal remnant of Rathke\\'s pouch. METHODS: We discuss a case of a lady who presented to our unit with 2 months history of dryness and sensation of lump in her throat and a long standing history of hypothyroidism. Examination of nasopharynx revealed a smooth and fluctuant midline mass. CT scan of nose and paranasal sinuses confirmed the midline mass with small defect communicating with the sphenoid sinus. An initial diagnosis of Thornwaldt\\'s cyst was made and she underwent upper aerodigestive tract endoscopy and marsupialization of the mass. Histopathological examination revealed ectopic pituitary adenoma. CONCLUSION: Ectopic pituitary adenoma is an important differential diagnosis for a midline nasopharyngeal mass. It is recommended that prior to surgical resection of midline nasopharyngeal mass biopsy is taken and MRI is performed.

  17. Preoperative preparation of patients with pituitary gland disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malenković, Vesna; Gvozdenović, Ljiljana; Milaković, Branko; Sabljak, Vera; Ladjević, Nebojsa; Zivaljević, Vladan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the most common disorders of pituitary function: acromegaly, hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus and syndrome similar to diabetes insipidus, in terms of their importance in preoperative preparation of patients...

  18. Immediate postoperative complications in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumul Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the important role of pituitary gland in regulating various endocrine axes and its unique anatomical location, various postoperative complications can be anticipated resulting from surgery on pituitary tumors. We examined and categorized the immediate postoperative complications according to various tumor pathologies. Materials and Methods: We carried out a prospective study in 152 consecutive patients and noted various postoperative complications during neurosurgical intensive care unit stay (within 48 hrs of hospital stay in patients undergoing transsphenoidal removal of pituitary tumors. Results: In our series, various groups showed different postoperative complications out of which, cerebrospinal fluid leak was the commonest followed by diabetes insipidus, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and hematoma at operation site. Conclusion: Various immediate postoperative complications can be anticipated in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery even though, it is considered to be relatively safe.

  19. Pregnancy and pituitary disorders: Challenges in diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir A Laway

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is associated with normal physiological changes in endocrine system that assists fetal survival as well as preparation of labor. The pituitary gland is one of the most affected organs in which major changes in anatomy and physiology take place. Due to overlapping clinical and biochemical features of pregnancy, sometimes the diagnosis of pituitary disorders may be challenging. It is important to know what normal parameters of changes occur in endocrine system in order to diagnose and manage complex endocrine problems in pregnancy. In our present review, we will focus on pituitary disorders that occur exclusively during pregnancy like Sheehan′s syndrome and lymphocytic hypophysitis and pre-existing pituitary disorders (like prolactinoma, Cushing′s disease and acromegaly, which poses significant challenge to endocrinologists.

  20. Pregnancy and pituitary disorders: Challenges in diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laway, Bashir A.; Mir, Shahnaz A.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with normal physiological changes in endocrine system that assists fetal survival as well as preparation of labor. The pituitary gland is one of the most affected organs in which major changes in anatomy and physiology take place. Due to overlapping clinical and biochemical features of pregnancy, sometimes the diagnosis of pituitary disorders may be challenging. It is important to know what normal parameters of changes occur in endocrine system in order to diagnose and manage complex endocrine problems in pregnancy. In our present review, we will focus on pituitary disorders that occur exclusively during pregnancy like Sheehan's syndrome and lymphocytic hypophysitis and pre-existing pituitary disorders (like prolactinoma, Cushing's disease and acromegaly), which poses significant challenge to endocrinologists. PMID:24381874

  1. Flattened sella turcica and CT appearence of normal pituitary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, T.; Ueno, I.; Miki, Y.; Fuchinoue, T.; Kobayashi, N.

    1984-01-01

    A flattened sella turcica, not previously reported, was found incidentally in a 21-year-old male. Various neuroradiological and hormonal examinations have proved it to be a normal varient. Subsequently a normal pituitary gland was shown by CT.

  2. Small-bowel neoplasms in patients undergoing video capsule endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondonotti, E; Pennazio, M; Toth, E

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIM: Small-bowel tumors account for 1% - 3% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Recent studies with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) suggest that the frequency of these tumors may be substantially higher than previously reported. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency...... findings. 55 patients underwent VCE as the third procedure after negative bidirectional endoscopy. The lesions were single in 89.5% of cases, and multiple in 10.5%. Retention of the capsule occurred in 9.8% of patients with small-bowel tumors. After VCE, 54/124 patients underwent 57 other examinations...

  3. [Celiac disease as a risk factor for digestive neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurano, A; Cirillo, L C; Noviello, A; Fabbrocini, P; Valente, T

    1987-03-01

    Coeliac disease is a primary malabsorption syndrome, whose gastrointestinal symptomatology regresses following a gluten-free diet. Several authors report an increased incidence of intestinal lymphoma in patients with longstanding coeliac disease; on the other hand the association of this malabsorption syndrome with malignant tumors of the esophagus, stomach or large bowel is not very common. The authors describe three cases of coeliac disease complicated after 5, 12 and 18 years by neoplasms of the esophagus, stomach and small bowel. It is stressed that in this disease patients must be monitored with periodic radiologic examinations, in the hope of detecting any malignancy at an early and perhaps treatable stage.

  4. Serum hyaluronic acid in patients with disseminated neoplasm.

    OpenAIRE

    Manley, G.; Warren, C

    1987-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid concentrations were measured by a laser nephelometric assay in serum samples from 50 patients with advanced disseminated neoplasm and 50 healthy controls matched for age and sex. The identity of hyaluronic acid was confirmed by a combination of electrophoretic and enzymatic techniques. The mean serum hyaluronic acid concentration for the control group was 1.09 mg/l, with a range of 0-4 mg/l. The mean concentration for patients with neoplastic disease was 10.38 mg/l, with a ran...

  5. Cellular schwannoma: a benign neoplasm sometimes overdiagnosed as sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberghini, M. [Dept. of Surgical Pathology, Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy); Anatomia Patologica, Istituto Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Zanella, L.; Bacchini, P.; Bertoni, F. [Dept. of Surgical Pathology, Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy)

    2001-06-01

    A case of cellular schwannoma originating in the left lumbar paraspinal region is described. The diagnosis was originally made on needle biopsy material. The histological examination is usually not sufficient to correctly diagnose this benign neoplasm. Bone erosion, neurological symptoms, caused by compression of the spinal roots, together with hypercellularity, pleomorphism and an occasional increase in mitotic activity, may lead to an erroneous diagnosis of malignancy. Immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural analysis are helpful in confirming the diagnosis. The recognition of this entity avoids unnecessary overtreatment of these patients. (orig.)

  6. Histologic and Immunohistochemical classification of 41 bovine adrenal gland neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Anette Blak; Leifsson, Páll S.; Jensen, Henrik Elvang;

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of the adrenal glands are among the most frequent tumors in cattle; however, few studies have been conducted to describe their characteristics. The aim of this study was to classify 41 bovine adrenal neoplasms from 40 animals based on macroscopic and histologic examination, including....... An immunohistochemistry panel consisting of antibodies against melan A, synaptophysin, and CNPase was considered most useful to classify bovine adrenal tumors. However, the distinction between benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors was based on histologic features as in human medicine....

  7. [Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas, IPMN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirén, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    With the development and increasing use of imaging techniques, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is being detected with increasing frequency. Two forms of the disease are distinguished, the rare main duct form and the common accessory pancreatic duct form. The former often progresses to malignancy, the latter only seldom. The mixed form of IPMN exhibits features of both forms. In main duct IPMN, mucin production obstructs the pancreatic duct causing its dilatation and often symptoms typical of chronic pancreatitis. Main duct IPMN is always an indication for surgery, whereas monitoring is often sufficient for side duct IPMN.

  8. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980...... and 2007. RESULTS: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 186), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 69), and nonmeningioma brain tumor (n = 116) were the most common types of SMNs and had the poorest outcome (5-year survival rate, 18.1% ± 2.9%, 31.1% ± 6.2%, and 18.3% ± 3.8%, respectively). Five-year survival...

  9. Distinct molecular features of different macroscopic subtypes of colorectal neoplasms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Konda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal adenoma develops into cancer with the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes. We studied the underlying molecular and clinicopathological features to better understand the heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasms (CRNs. METHODS: We evaluated both genetic (mutations of KRAS, BRAF, TP53, and PIK3CA, and microsatellite instability [MSI] and epigenetic (methylation status of nine genes or sequences, including the CpG island methylator phenotype [CIMP] markers alterations in 158 CRNs including 56 polypoid neoplasms (PNs, 25 granular type laterally spreading tumors (LST-Gs, 48 non-granular type LSTs (LST-NGs, 19 depressed neoplasms (DNs and 10 small flat-elevated neoplasms (S-FNs on the basis of macroscopic appearance. RESULTS: S-FNs showed few molecular changes except SFRP1 methylation. Significant differences in the frequency of KRAS mutations were observed among subtypes (68% for LST-Gs, 36% for PNs, 16% for DNs and 6% for LST-NGs (P<0.001. By contrast, the frequency of TP53 mutation was higher in DNs than PNs or LST-Gs (32% vs. 5% or 0%, respectively (P<0.007. We also observed significant differences in the frequency of CIMP between LST-Gs and LST-NGs or PNs (32% vs. 6% or 5%, respectively (P<0.005. Moreover, the methylation level of LINE-1 was significantly lower in DNs or LST-Gs than in PNs (58.3% or 60.5% vs. 63.2%, P<0.05. PIK3CA mutations were detected only in LSTs. Finally, multivariate analyses showed that macroscopic morphologies were significantly associated with an increased risk of molecular changes (PN or LST-G for KRAS mutation, odds ratio [OR] 9.11; LST-NG or DN for TP53 mutation, OR 5.30; LST-G for PIK3CA mutation, OR 26.53; LST-G or DN for LINE-1 hypomethylation, OR 3.41. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that CRNs could be classified into five macroscopic subtypes according to clinicopathological and molecular differences, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal

  10. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Endocrine System in the Hagfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumi eNozaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates. Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrate known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates, the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTH mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  11. Gigantism caused by growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Noorisaem; Jeong, Kumi; Yang, Eun Mi; Kim, Chan Jong

    2014-06-01

    Gigantism indicates excessive secretion of growth hormones (GH) during childhood when open epiphyseal growth plates allow for excessive linear growth. Case one involved a 14.7-year-old boy presented with extreme tall stature. His random serum GH level was 38.4 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was noted during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; nadir serum GH, 22.7 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a 12-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed and a pituitary adenoma displaying positive immunohistochemical staining for GH was reported. Pituitary MRI scan was performed 4 months after surgery and showed recurrence/residual tumor. Medical treatment with a long-acting somatostatin analogue for six months was unsuccessful. As a result, secondary surgery was performed. Three months after reoperation, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor 1 was 205 ng/mL. Case two involved a 14.9-year-old boy, who was referred to our department for his tall stature. His basal GH level was 9.3 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was reported during OGTT (nadir GH, 9.0 ng/mL). Pituitary MRI showed a 6-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Surgery was done and histopathological examination demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with positive staining for GH. Three months after surgery, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and nadir GH during OGTT was less than 0.1 ng/mL. Pituitary MRI scans showed no residual tumor. We present two cases of gigantism caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with clinical and microscopic findings.

  12. Thyroxine 5'-deiodinase in human anterior pituitary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Y; Yoshida, K; Ikeda, H; Kaise, K; Kaise, N; Yamamoto, M; Sakurada, T; Yoshinaga, K

    1990-08-01

    The activity of T4 5'-monodeiodinase (5'D) in the pituitary was measured in 12 patients with pituitary adenoma (3 patients with acromegaly, 2 with prolactinoma, 1 with Cushing's disease, 1 with TSH-producing tumor, and 5 with nonfunctioning tumor) and, as a control, in a patient who died of parotid cancer. The pituitaries, obtained at operation or autopsy, were homogenized in 0.1 mol/L potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, and centrifuged at 800 x g. Supernatants were incubated with [125I]T4 and 20 mmol/L dithiothreitol (DTT) at 37C for 90 min. T4 5'-D was measured by the release of 125I- with the ion exchange method. The activity of T4 5'-D in the pituitaries from patients with prolactinoma and parotid cancer was dependent on protein concentration, incubation time, incubation temperature, and T4 concentration, and was labile to prior heating at 70 C for 30 min. T4 5'-D was not inhibited by 1 mmol/L propylthiouracil, but was inhibited 95% by 0.1 mmol/L iopanoic acid. The apparent Km and maximum velocity for T4 5'-D in homogenates of prolactinoma at 20 mmol/L DTT were 11 nmol/L and 1.54 pmol/mg protein.h, respectively. This reaction followed sequential-type reaction kinetics when the DTT concentration was varied. All other homogenates of pituitary tumors, except two nonfunctioning tumors, also demonstrated T4 5'-D activity. These results indicate that 1) the human pituitary express a low Km and PTU-insensitive T4 5'-D activity which is very similar to the type II enzyme activity in the rat pituitary; and 2) various types of pituitary tumor cells contain T4 5'-D activity.

  13. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Masumi

    2013-12-30

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates). Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrates known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates), the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol) feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir) GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTHβ mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  14. Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery of pituitary adenoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Y. R.; Sachdev, S.; Parihar, V.; H Namdev; P R Bhatele

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery (EETS) is increasingly used for pituitary lesions. Pre-operative CT and MRI scans and peroperative endoscopic visualization can provide useful anatomical information. EETS is indicated in sellar, suprasellar, intraventricular, retro-infundibular, and invasive tumors. Recurrent and residual lesions, pituitary apoplexy and empty sella syndrome can be managed by EETS. Modern neuronavigation techniques, ultrasonic aspirators, ultrasonic bone curette can...

  15. Acromegaly with sleep disturbances relieved by yttrium-90 pituitary implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenstock, J.; Doyle, F.H.; Joplin, G.F.; Jung, R.T.; Mashiter, K. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). Postgraduate Medical School)

    1982-03-01

    A brief case history is presented of a patient, who, after yttrium-90 implantation, showed a complete clinical and hormonal remission of her acromegaly, maintaining normal pituitary function. The remarkable feature was the rapid disappearance of her attacks of somnolence within 96 hours of pituitary implantation, despite persistence of nocturnal snoring and well before any remodelling of soft tissues could have occurred. This response suggests that her daytime somnolence had a narcoleptic component.

  16. Unusual Presentation of Hypothyroidism in a Pregnant Woman, Mimicking Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Karisani, Narmin; Mazloomi, Maryam; Rahimi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    .... We report a woman who experienced an incomplete abortion and undiagnosed hypothyroidism who was referred to the oncologist with the suspicion of metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasm (GTN...

  17. Mammaglobin-A immunohistochemistry in primary central nervous system neoplasms and intracranial metastatic breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Patrick J; Perrin, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Metastases represent the most common type of intracranial neoplasm. In women, 30% of such tumors derive from breast carcinoma. In neurosurgical cases with ambiguous cellular morphology and/or limited biopsy material, immunohistochemistry (IHC) is often performed to distinguish metastases from primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms. IHC for mammaglobin-A (MGA), a protein expressed in a majority of breast carcinomas, is commonly applied in this setting, but its utility for distinguishing primary CNS neoplasms from metastatic breast carcinoma is unknown; the reactivity of MGA in primary and metastatic CNS neoplasms has never been described. Here, we describe the frequency and patterns of IHC reactivity for MGA in metastatic and primary CNS neoplasms from patients with well-documented histories of breast carcinoma. Following a published protocol previously applied to non-CNS neoplasms, MGA staining of moderate to strong intensity within 5% or more of a neoplasm was considered positive. On the basis of these criteria, 3 of 12 (25.0%) glioblastomas, 1 of 10 (10.0%) meningiomas, and 47 of 95 (49.5%) metastases were positive. Importantly, the cytoarchitectural staining characteristics among all 4 MGA-positive primary CNS neoplasms (cytoplasmic and nuclear) differed from those of the metastases (cytoplasmic and membranous). These findings suggest that MGA IHC staining intensity and distribution can distinguish metastases from primary CNS neoplasms (P=0.0086) in women with a history of breast carcinoma but also indicate that cytologic staining patterns must be interpreted for more accurate tumor classification.

  18. Current perspectives on pancreatic serous cystic neoplasms: Diagnosis, management and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Peng Zhang; Zhong-Xun Yu; Yu-Pei Zhao; Meng-Hua Dai

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic neoplasms have been increasingly recognized recently. Comprising about 16% of all resected pancreatic cystic neoplasms, serous cystic neoplasms are uncommon benign lesions that are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. Despite overall low risk of malignancy, these pancreatic cysts still generate anxiety, leading to intensive medical investigations with considerable financial cost to health care systems. This review discusses the general background of serous cystic neoplasms, including epidemiology and clinical characteristics, and provides an updated overview of diagnostic approaches based on clinical features, relevant imaging studies and new findings that are being discovered pertaining to diagnostic evaluation. We also concisely discuss and propose management strategies for better quality of life.

  19. The Influence of Pituitary Size on Outcome After Transsphenoidal Hypophysectomy in a Large Cohort of Dogs with Pituitary-Dependent Hypercortisolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Sarah; Galac, S.; Tryfonidou, M. A.; Hesselink, J. W.; Penning, L. C.; Kooistra, H. S.; Meij, B. P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transsphenoidal hypophysectomy is one of the treatment strategies in the comprehensive management of dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism (PDH). OBJECTIVES To describe the influence of pituitary size at time of pituitary gland surgery on long-term outcome. ANIMALS Three-hundred-

  20. Emerging tumor entities and variants of CNS neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenacchi, Giovanna; Giangaspero, Felice

    2004-03-01

    Since the appearance in 2000 of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification for central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms, numerous descriptions of new entities or variants have appeared in the literature. In the group of neuronal and mixed glioneuronal neoplasms are lesions with distinctive morphological features that are still not included in a precise classification, including extraventricular neurocytoma, papillary glioneuronal tumor, rosette-forming glioneuronal of the fourth ventricle, glioneuronal with neuropil-like rosette, and DNT-like tumor of the septum pellucidum. The glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like rosette and oligodendroglioma with neurocytic differentiation represent morphological variants of genetically proven diffuse gliomas. The lipoastrocytoma and the pilomixoid astrocytoma enlarge the group of astrocytic lesions. Rare, low-grade gliomas of the spinal cord with extensive leptomeningeal dissemination associated with unusual neuroimaging are described. The chordoid glioma of the third ventricle and the papillary tumor of the pineal region seem to be correlated by a common histogenesis from the specialized ependyma of the subcommissural organ. An embryonal tumor with neuropil and true rosettes combining features of neuroblastoma and ependymoblastoma is discussed. These new, recently described lesions indicate that the complex morphologic spectrum of CNS tumors is far from being completely delineated.

  1. Frequency of heterozygous TET2 deletions in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Tripodi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Tripodi1, Ronald Hoffman1, Vesna Najfeld2, Rona Weinberg31The Myeloproliferative Disorders Program, Tisch Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine and 2Department of Medicine and Pathology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 3The Myeloproliferative Disorders Program, Cellular Therapy Laboratory, The New York Blood Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: The Philadelphia chromosome (Ph-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs, including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and primary myelofibrosis, are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders with overlapping clinical and cytogenetic features and a variable tendency to evolve into acute leukemia. These diseases not only share overlapping chromosomal abnormalities but also a number of acquired somatic mutations. Recently, mutations in a putative tumor suppressor gene, ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2 on chromosome 4q24 have been identified in 12% of patients with MPN. Additionally 4q24 chromosomal rearrangements in MPN, including TET2 deletions, have also been observed using conventional cytogenetics. The goal of this study was to investigate the frequency of genomic TET2 rearrangements in MPN using fluorescence in situ hybridization as a more sensitive method for screening and identifying genomic deletions. Among 146 MPN patients, we identified two patients (1.4% who showed a common 4q24 deletion, including TET2. Our observations also indicated that the frequency of TET2 deletion is increased in patients with an abnormal karyotype (5%.Keywords: TET2, myeloproliferative neoplasms, fluorescence in situ hybridization, cytogenetics

  2. Endoscopic approach for a laryngeal neoplasm in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Maia Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal and tracheal tumors are rare in pets; some piece of information on their disease behavior, therapy and evolution are limited. Neoplasms in this area are a diagnostic challenge. In many cases, they can be biopsied and excised using endoscopic instruments, but there is no report of this in canines. The goal of this study is to report a successful case of a laryngeal neoplasm removal through endoscopy. A head and neck radiogram revealed a mass in the laryngeal lumen protruding into the trachea. The patient then underwent an endoscopy to confirm the radiographic diagnosis and to surgically remove the tumor. The histopathological diagnosis was poorly differentiated carcinoma. The most appropriate treatment for laryngeal tumors is the resection of the submucosa or a partial laryngectomy however, partial and total laryngectomies are associated with many postoperative complications. In contrast, the endoscopic approach allows for highly magnified visualization of the lesion in situ, which facilitates the surgical removal of the mass through videosurgery. With little manipulation of the affected area, the chances of postoperative complications are reduced, leading to a more rapid recovery.

  3. [Contemporary management of neuroendocrine neoplasms of the female genital organs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuc-Rajca, Małgorzata; Dańska-Bidzińska, Anna

    2011-09-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms are a rare and heterogeneous group of diseases that account for only 2% of all gynecologic malignancies. The most common types are ovarian carcinoid tumor and small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the cervix. The tumors are staged according to FIGO clinical staging system. The diagnosis is usually made retrospectively after obtaining the results of histopathological evaluation of the primary tumor They rarely cause syndromes related to hormone overexpression. Neuroendocrine neoplasms are characterized by aggressive behaviour Even at an early stage there is high incidence of nodal and distant metastases. Survival is poor regardless of stage at diagnosis. The most important is to diagnose the neuroendocrine tumor accurately and treat it in multimodal, aggressive approach to control the disease better and reduce the incidence of reccurences. Apart from typical therapeutic approach, treatment may encompass isotope therapy using radiolabeled somatostatin analogs. This method should be reserved for patients with expression of somatostatin receptors detected by the somatostatin receptor scyntygraphy. Data concerning the management of neuroendocrin tumors are based mainly on retrospective studies and clinical case series. Lack of randomized trials makes it impossible to select the best treatment option. Better understanding of the biology of neuroendocrine tumors, especially the molecular genetics, will in the future help to determine the optimal treatment strategies for these tumors.

  4. [Cytopathological alterations and risk factors for uterine cervical neoplasm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Simone Cristina Castanho Sabaini; Prates, Letícia; Carvalho, Maria Dalva de Barros; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Pelloso, Sandra Marisa

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify the occurrence of citopathological alterations and risk factors of Uterine Cervical Neoplasm in women attended by SUS--the Public Healthcare System--in a district situated in the North of Paraná State, Brazil from 2001 to 2006. It was a descriptive transversal observational study. The data collection consisted in collection of test results from medical records and interviews. It was achieved 6.356 tests and, 1.02% (65) of the women examined presented alterations. From the tests made 4.869 (70,8%) were from women aged between 25 and 59 years. And 38,5% of the tests presented Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasm (CIN) I, 32,3% CIN II, 18,5% CIN I and Human Papiloma Virus (HPV). It was interviewed 25 women from the total sample. Most of them presented a risk factor as: smoking habits, sexually transmitted diseases, use of hormonal contraceptive, number of sexual partners, early sexual intercourse. This study concludes that is required educative and more effective actions in order to reduce the alterations, meanly among teenagers.

  5. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal neoplasms: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Taku; Mori, Genki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kinjo, Yuzuru; So, Eriko; Abe, Seiichiro; Otake, Yosuke; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has expanded the application of endoscopic treatment, which can be used for lesions with a low metastatic potential regardless of their size. ESD has the advantage of achieving en bloc resection with a lower local recurrence rate compared with that of piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection. Moreover, in the past, surgery was indicated in patients with large lesions spreading to almost the entire circumference of the rectum, regardless of the depth of invasion, as endoscopic resection of these lesions was technically difficult. Therefore, a prime benefit of ESD is significant improvement in the quality of life for patients who have large rectal lesions. On the other hand, ESD is not as widely applied in the treatment of colorectal neoplasms as it is in gastric cancers owing to the associated technical difficulty, longer procedural duration, and increased risk of perforation. To diversify the available endoscopic treatment strategies for superficial colorectal neoplasms, endoscopists performing ESD need to recognize its indications, the technical issues involved in its application, and the associated complications. This review outlines the methods and type of devices used for colorectal ESD, and the training required by endoscopists to perform this procedure. PMID:25473168

  6. Studies of pituitary function in lactating ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restall, B J; Kearins, R D; Starr, B G

    1977-03-01

    The release of LH from the pituitary of lactating ewes was studied. In Exp. 1, ewes were injected with 50 microng oestradiol benzoate (OB), 2-0 mg testosterone propionate (TP) or oil only (control) on days 5, 10, or 20 after lambing. LH was measured in peripheral plasma samples obtained 20-38 h after treatment, and the ovulations were recorded. The number of ewes in which an LH release was detected, and the amount released, declined between Day 5 and 20 after OB treatment but increased after TP treatment. The releases of LH were not always accompanied by ovulation and the incidence of ovulation was higher in ewes treated with TP. In Exp. 2, lactating ewes were injected with 1 or 5 (at 2-h intervals) doses of 50 microng Gn-RH, on Days 12 or 25 after lambing. LH was measured in peripheral plasma samples collected every 2 h for 10 h and every 3 h for a further 70 h. Release of LH occurred in all ewes, the amount being greater in ewes receiving multiple injections and in ewes treated on Day 25. The incidence of ovulation was higher after treatment on Day 25. Multiple injections of Gn-RH appeared to reduce the incidence of abnormal corpora lutea.

  7. Gamma knife radiosurgery for secreting pituitary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noren, G. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Rhode Island Hospital; Jackson, I.M.D.; Chougule, P.; Zheng, Z.; Epstein, M.H.

    1998-09-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery usually represents first line treatment for pituitary adenomas with the aim of removing the tumor, decompressing the optic apparatus and, in secreting tumors, eliminating the hypersecretion. Gamma Knife radiosurgery is indicated for tumor remnants or recurrences in or above the sella including those invading the cavernous sinus and also as initial treatment in patients who are unable to tolerate an open surgical procedure and where medication has failed. In this study, the target definition was retrospectively studied and when necessary corrected in 10 acromegalic patients, 8 with Cushing`s disease, and 12 with prolactinomas undergoing Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The dose plan was analyzed and the volume of the target covered by a minimum of 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 Gy was estimated. A dose/volume profile for each treatment was created and correlated to the endocrinological and clinical outcome. Cure, according to strict endocrinological criteria, was seen in 6 of the acromegalic patients, in 2 of the patients with ACTH hypersecretion, and in 2 of the patients with prolactinomas. Analysis of these profiles, also for the patients with partial effect, show that a minimum radiation dose of 20 Gy may be adequate to eliminate the hypersecretion in acromegalic patients whereas a dose of at least 25 Gy may be required in patients with Cushing`s disease and prolactinoma. (author)

  8. Pathologic evaluation and reporting of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas and other tumoral intraepithelial neoplasms of pancreatobiliary tract: Recommendations of verona consensus meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Adsay (Volkan); M. Mino-Kenudson (Mari); T. Furukawa (Toru); O. Basturk (Olca); G. Zamboni (Giuseppe); G. Marchegiani (Giovanni); C. Bassi (Claudio); R. Salvia (Roberto); G. Malleo (Giuseppe); S. Paiella (Salvatore); C.L. Wolfgang (Christopher L.); H. Matthaei (Hanno); G.J.A. Offerhaus; I.M. Adham; M.J. Bruno (Marco); M.D. Reid (Michelle D.); A. Krasinskas (Alyssa); G. Kloppel (Günter); N. Ohike (Nobuyuki); T. Tajiri (Takuma); K.-T. Jang (Kee-Taek); J.C. Roa (Juan Carlos); P.J. Allen (Peter J.); C. Fernández-Del Castillo (Carlos); J.-Y. Jang (Jin-Young); D.S. Klimstra (David); R.H. Hruban (Ralph)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: There are no established guidelines for pathologic diagnosis/reporting of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Design: An international multidisciplinary group, brought together by the Verona Pancreas Group in Italy-2013, was tasked to devise recommendations. Res

  9. Pathologic evaluation and reporting of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas and other tumoral intraepithelial neoplasms of pancreatobiliary tract : Recommendations of verona consensus meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adsay, Volkan; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Furukawa, Toru; Basturk, Olca; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Marchegiani, Giovanni; Bassi, Claudio; Salvia, Roberto; Malleo, Giuseppe; Paiella, Salvatore; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Matthaei, Hanno; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Adham, Mustapha; Bruno, Marco J.; Reid, Michelle D.; Krasinskas, Alyssa; Klöppel, Günter; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Tajiri, Takuma; Jang, Kee Taek; Roa, Juan Carlos; Allen, Peter; Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos; Jang, Jin Young; Klimstra, David S.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are no established guidelines for pathologic diagnosis/reporting of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Design: An international multidisciplinary group, brought together by the Verona Pancreas Group in Italy-2013, was tasked to devise recommendations. Results: (1) Cr

  10. MR imaging of pituitary hyperplasia in a child with growth arrest and primary hypothyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papakonstantinou, O.; Bakantaki, A.; Papadaki, E.; Gourtsoyiannis, N. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Bitsori, M.; Mamoulakis, D. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of pituitary hyperplasia has been rarely described in children with primary hypothyroidism. We report a case of pituitary hyperplasia in a child presented with significant growth arrest and laboratory evidence of hypothyroidism. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed symmetrical pituitary enlargement simulating macroadenoma. After thyroid hormone replacement therapy, the child's height increased and pituitary enlargement regressed to normal. Awareness of MRI appearance of pituitary hyperplasia in children with laboratory evidence of hypothyroidism might avoid misdiagnosis for pituitary tumor, which may also manifest as growth disorder, obviating unnecessary surgery. (orig.)

  11. Expression pattern of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavropoulou, Maria P; Maladaki, Anna; Topouridou, Konstantina; Kotoula, Vasiliki; Poulios, Chris; Daskalaki, Emily; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Karkavelas, George; Yovos, John G

    2016-01-12

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of Wnt and Notch signaling in the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas, but data are scarce regarding the role of Hedgehog signaling. In this study we investigated the differential expression of gene targets of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens from adult patients who underwent transphenoidal resection and normal human pituitary tissues that were obtained from autopsies were used. Clinical information and data from pre-operative MRI scan (extracellular tumor extension, tumor size, displacement of the optic chiasm) were retrieved from the Hospital's database. We used a customized RT(2) Profiler PCR Array, to investigate the expression of genes related to Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways (PTCH1, PTCH2, GLI1, GLI3, NOTCH3, JAG1, HES1, and HIP). A total of 52 pituitary adenomas (32 non-functioning adenomas, 15 somatotropinomas and 5 prolactinomas) were used in the final analysis. In non-functioning pituitary adenomas there was a significant decrease (approximately 75%) in expression of all Hedgehog related genes that were tested, while Notch3 and Jagged-1 expression was found significantly increased, compared with normal pituitary tissue controls. In contrast, somatotropinomas demonstrated a significant increase in expression of all Hedgehog related genes and a decrease in the expression of Notch3 and Jagged-1. There was no significant difference in the expression of Hedgehog and Notch related genes between prolactinomas and healthy pituitary tissues. Hedgehog signalling appears to be activated in somatotropinomas but not in non-functioning pituitary adenomas in contrast to the expression pattern of Notch signalling pathway.

  12. Changes of pituitary gland volume in Kennedy disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, C C; Teismann, I K; Konrad, C; Heindel, W L; Schiffbauer, H

    2013-12-01

    Kennedy disease is a rare X-linked neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the first exon of the androgen-receptor gene. Apart from neurologic signs, this mutation can cause a partial androgen insensitivity syndrome with typical alterations of gonadotropic hormones produced by the pituitary gland. The aim of the present study was therefore to evaluate the impact of Kennedy disease on pituitary gland volume under the hypothesis that endocrinologic changes caused by partial androgen insensitivity may lead to morphologic changes (ie, hypertrophy) of the pituitary gland. Pituitary gland volume was measured in sagittal sections of 3D T1-weighted 3T-MR imaging data of 8 patients with genetically proven Kennedy disease and compared with 16 healthy age-matched control subjects by use of Multitracer by a blinded, experienced radiologist. The results were analyzed by a univariant ANOVA with total brain volume as a covariant. Furthermore, correlation and linear regression analyses were performed for pituitary volume, patient age, disease duration, and CAG repeat expansion length. Intraobserver reliability was evaluated by means of the Pearson correlation coefficient. Pituitary volume was significantly larger in patients with Kennedy disease (636 [±90] mm(3)) than in healthy control subjects (534 [±91] mm(3)) (P = .041). There was no significant difference in total brain volume (P = .379). Control subjects showed a significant decrease in volume with age (r = -0.712, P = .002), whereas there was a trend to increasing gland volume in patients with Kennedy disease (r = 0.443, P = .272). Gland volume correlated with CAG repeat expansion length in patients (r = 0.630, P = .047). The correlation coefficient for intraobserver reliability was 0.94 (P pituitary volume that correlated with the CAG repeat expansion length. This could reflect hypertrophy as the result of elevated gonadotropic hormone secretion caused by the androgen receptor mutation with partial

  13. PITUITARY ADENOMA- VISUAL FIELDS, RETINAL NERVE FIBRE LAYER AND GANGLION CELL-INNER PLEXIFORM LAYER THICKNESS ANALYSIS- A CORRELATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Shetty

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pituitary adenoma is a benign and most common tumour of the pituitary gland. It is also the most common parachiasmal tumour and accounts for approximately 10-15% of primary intracranial neoplasms. It has an annual incidence rate of 0.8–8 per 1,00,000 population. Pituitary adenomas are classified as functional and non-functional based on their hormonal activity. Functional adenomas are usually detected earlier due to clinical manifestations produced by excess of hormones. The aim of the study is to analyse visual acuity, visual fields, RNFL thickness and GCIPL thickness on optical coherence tomography (OCT and to find a correlation between these parameters and tumour volume in patients diagnosed with pituitary adenoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS 48 patients diagnosed with pituitary adenoma confirmed by MRI scan underwent complete ophthalmic evaluation (visual acuity, slit-lamp examination, fundus evaluation, perimetry using 30-2 SITA FAST strategy, (Humphrey Field Analyzer; Carl-Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA, and OCT of disc (for retinal nerve fibre layer- RNFL thickness and macula (for ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL thickness using Cirrus HD-OCT (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA at Bangalore West Lions Super Speciality Eye Hospital, between June 2014 to June 2016. Various parameters like Mean Deviation (MD, Pattern Standard Deviation (PSD and RNFL and GCIPL thickness on OCT were analysed and correlated with each other. RESULTS Mean tumour volume in patients was 12.26 ± 15.8 cm3 . Most of the patients had visual acuity 6/18 or better. Bitemporal hemianopia was seen in only 5 (12.2% patients. Superotemporal quadrantanopia, arcuate defects, tubular fields and homonymous hemianopia were the other field defects seen. Total and pattern deviation plot of visual fields correlated well with tumour volume and visual acuity. On visual field analysis, the MD (-8.18 ± 8.65 dB was depressed compared to the control group (-2.0 ± 1.8 dB, and

  14. MRI of the liver and the pituitary gland in patients with {beta}-thalassemia major: Does hepatic siderosis predict pituitary iron deposition?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyropoulou, Maria I.; Efremidis, Stavros C. [Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kiortsis, Dimitrios N. [Laboratory of Physiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to study, in thalassemic patients, if hepatic siderosis evaluated by MRI could predict the pituitary iron overload. In 36 thalassemic patients (age range 6-44 years, mean age 21.7 years) the liver/fat ratio (L/F), the pituitary/fat ratio (P/F), the liver and pituitary T2 relaxation times were evaluated, by using a multiecho spin-echo sequence. Serum ferritin levels were measured and an extensive endocrine evaluation was performed. The L/F, the P/F and pituitary T2 showed a good correlation with serum ferritin (r=-0.55, r=-0.55 and r=-0.53, respectively; p<0.01). Liver T2 did not show significant correlation with serum ferritin. The variability of L/F explained only the 10.8% of the variability of pituitary T2 and of the P/F. When ferritin was added to the model it predicted only the 26.85% and the 30.8% of the variability of pituitary T2 and of the P/F, respectively. The P/F and pituitary T2 were lower in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (group 1) compared with those without pituitary dysfunction (group 2). No significant differences of L/F were found between the two groups. Hepatic iron overload evaluated by MR is a poor predictor of pituitary siderosis. The MR studies of the pituitary gland might be necessary to evaluate the pituitary iron overload. (orig.)

  15. Interferon-alpha in the treatment of Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch

    2011-01-01

    The Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms encompass essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). A major break-through in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these neoplasms occurred in 2005 by the discovery of the JAK2 V617F mu...

  16. Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis as a risk factor for colonic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Izumi; Kato, Jun; Tamai, Hideyuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Maekita, Takao; Yoshimura, Noriko; Ichinose, Masao

    2014-02-14

    To summarize the current views and insights on associations between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related chronic gastritis and colorectal neoplasm, we reviewed recent studies to clarify whether H. pylori infection/H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal neoplasm. Recent studies based on large databases with careful control for confounding variables have clearly demonstrated an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm associated with H. pylori infection. The correlation between H. pylori-related chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and colorectal neoplasm has only been examined in a limited number of studies. A recent large study using a national histopathological database, and our study based on the stage of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis as determined by serum levels of H. pylori antibody titer and pepsinogen, indicated that H. pylori-related CAG confers an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm, and more extensive atrophic gastritis will probably be associated with even higher risk of neoplasm. In addition, our study suggested that the activity of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is correlated with colorectal neoplasm risk. H. pylori-related chronic gastritis could be involved in an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm that appears to be enhanced by the progression of gastric atrophy and the presence of active inflammation.

  17. 78 FR 740 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Gene Expression Signatures of Neoplasm...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... Gene Expression Signatures of Neoplasm Responsiveness to mTOR and HDAC Inhibitor Combination Therapy... entitled, ``Gene Expression Signatures of Neoplasm Responsiveness to Therapy'' , and all continuing... multiple myeloma, breast cancer, melanoma, lymphoma, and prostate cancer. DATES: Only written comments or...

  18. Photodynamic therapy of early stage oral cavity and oropharynx neoplasms: an outcome analysis of 170 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. karakullukcu (Baris); K. Oudenaarde (Kim); M.P. Copper (Marcel); W.M.C. Klop; R. van Veen (Robert); M. Wildeman (Maarten); I. Bing Tan

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe indications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of oral cavity and oropharynx neoplasms are not well defined. The main reason is that the success rates are not well established. The current paper analyzes our institutional experience of early stage oral cavity and oropharynx neoplasms (Tis

  19. [Heterogenous abnormality polymorphism of gene PDGFRB in myeloid neoplasms and its clinical characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan-Shun; Gao, Li; Jing, Yu; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Yang, Hua; Yu, Li

    2012-04-01

    Myeloid neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRB gene are a new kind of myeloid disorders in the revised 2008 WHO classification. Out of detected 2000 cases of myeloid cell abnormalities in our hospital, 12 cases of myeloid neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRB were found. This study was purposed to summarize and analyze the clinical and laboratorial characteristics of the 12 cases with PDGFRB gene abnormalities. The results indicated that among 12 cases of myeloid neoplasms with PDGFRB abnormalities, 5 cases with TEL/PDGFRB fusion gene, 2 cases with HEPI/PDGFRB, 1 case with PDGFRB mutation, 1 case with RABAPTIN-5/PDGFRB, 1 case with GIT2/PDGFRB, 1 case with TP53/PDGFRB, 1 case with WDR43/PDGFRB fusion gene were detected, showing the polymorphism of PDGFRB gene abnormalities. Among this kind of myeloid neoplasm patients, almost all patients manifested monocytosis and eosinophilia in different degree, the thrombocytosis mainly was observed in atypical myeloid neoplasms, acute leukemia, chromic myelo-monocytic leukemia patients. The treatment with imatinib mesylate for this kind of patients was effective in some cases. It is concluded that the myeloid neoplasms with PDGFRB gene abnormalities are a kind of heterogenetic myeloid neoplasms, their gene abnormal types and clinical manifestations show polymorphism too. The monocytosis and eosinophilia appear in this kind myeloid neoplasms which may be treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib mesylate.

  20. Targeting angiogenesis-dependent calcified neoplasms using combined polymer therapeutics.

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    Ehud Segal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an immense clinical need for novel therapeutics for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent calcified neoplasms such as osteosarcomas and bone metastases. We developed a new therapeutic strategy to target bone metastases and calcified neoplasms using combined polymer-bound angiogenesis inhibitors. Using an advanced "living polymerization" technique, the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT, we conjugated the aminobisphosphonate alendronate (ALN, and the potent anti-angiogenic agent TNP-470 with N-(2-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide (HPMA copolymer through a Glycine-Glycine-Proline-Norleucine linker, cleaved by cathepsin K, a cysteine protease overexpressed at resorption sites in bone tissues. In this approach, dual targeting is achieved. Passive accumulation is possible due to the increase in molecular weight following polymer conjugation of the drugs, thus extravasating from the tumor leaky vessels and not from normal healthy vessels. Active targeting to the calcified tissues is achieved by ALN's affinity to bone mineral. METHODS AND FINDING: The anti-angiogenic and antitumor potency of HPMA copolymer-ALN-TNP-470 conjugate was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. We show that free and conjugated ALN-TNP-470 have synergistic anti-angiogenic and antitumor activity by inhibiting proliferation, migration and capillary-like tube formation of endothelial and human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Evaluation of anti-angiogenic, antitumor activity and body distribution of HPMA copolymer-ALN-TNP-470 conjugate was performed on severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID male mice inoculated with mCherry-labeled MG-63-Ras human osteosarcoma and by modified Miles permeability assay. Our targeted bi-specific conjugate reduced VEGF-induced vascular hyperpermeability by 92% and remarkably inhibited osteosarcoma growth in mice by 96%. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report to describe a new concept of a narrowly-dispersed combined

  1. Familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and the pituitary adenoma predisposition due to mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene.

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    Beckers, Albert; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Daly, Adrian F; Karhu, Auli

    2013-04-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most frequent intracranial tumors and occur with a prevalence of approximately 1:1000 in the developed world. Pituitary adenomas have a serious disease burden, and their management involves neurosurgery, biological therapies, and radiotherapy. Early diagnosis of pituitary tumors while they are smaller may help increase cure rates. Few genetic predictors of pituitary adenoma development exist. Recent years have seen two separate, complimentary advances in inherited pituitary tumor research. The clinical condition of familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) has been described, which encompasses the familial occurrence of isolated pituitary adenomas outside of the setting of syndromic conditions like multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Carney complex. FIPA families comprise approximately 2% of pituitary adenomas and represent a clinical entity with homogeneous or heterogeneous pituitary adenoma types occurring within the same kindred. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene has been identified as causing a pituitary adenoma predisposition of variable penetrance that accounts for 20% of FIPA families. Germline AIP mutations have been shown to associate with the occurrence of large pituitary adenomas that occur at a young age, predominantly in children/adolescents and young adults. AIP mutations are usually associated with somatotropinomas, but prolactinomas, nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas, Cushing disease, and other infrequent clinical adenoma types can also occur. Gigantism is a particular feature of AIP mutations and occurs in more than one third of affected somatotropinoma patients. Study of pituitary adenoma patients with AIP mutations has demonstrated that these cases raise clinical challenges to successful treatment. Extensive research on the biology of AIP and new advances in mouse Aip knockout models demonstrate multiple pathways by which AIP may contribute to tumorigenesis. This review assesses

  2. Signaling pathway networks mined from human pituitary adenoma proteomics data

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    Zhan Xianquan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We obtained a series of pituitary adenoma proteomic expression data, including protein-mapping data (111 proteins, comparative proteomic data (56 differentially expressed proteins, and nitroproteomic data (17 nitroproteins. There is a pressing need to clarify the significant signaling pathway networks that derive from those proteins in order to clarify and to better understand the molecular basis of pituitary adenoma pathogenesis and to discover biomarkers. Here, we describe the significant signaling pathway networks that were mined from human pituitary adenoma proteomic data with the Ingenuity pathway analysis system. Methods The Ingenuity pathway analysis system was used to analyze signal pathway networks and canonical pathways from protein-mapping data, comparative proteomic data, adenoma nitroproteomic data, and control nitroproteomic data. A Fisher's exact test was used to test the statistical significance with a significance level of 0.05. Statistical significant results were rationalized within the pituitary adenoma biological system with literature-based bioinformatics analyses. Results For the protein-mapping data, the top pathway networks were related to cancer, cell death, and lipid metabolism; the top canonical toxicity pathways included acute-phase response, oxidative-stress response, oxidative stress, and cell-cycle G2/M transition regulation. For the comparative proteomic data, top pathway networks were related to cancer, endocrine system development and function, and lipid metabolism; the top canonical toxicity pathways included mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative-stress response, and ERK/MAPK signaling. The nitroproteomic data from a pituitary adenoma were related to cancer, cell death, lipid metabolism, and reproductive system disease, and the top canonical toxicity pathways mainly related to p38 MAPK signaling and cell-cycle G2/M transition regulation. Nitroproteins from a

  3. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of pituitary adenomas

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    Kopp, C.; Theodorou, M.; Poullos, N.; Astner, S.T.; Geinitz, H.; Molls, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Stalla, G.K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Psychiatrie, Muenchen (Germany). Klinische Neuroendokrinologie; Meyer, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik; Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Medicine; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Grosu, A.L [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in the management of residual or recurrent pituitary adenomas. Patients and methods: We report on 37 consecutive patients with pituitary adenomas treated with FSRT at our department. All patients had previously undergone surgery. Twenty-nine patients had nonfunctioning, 8 had hormone-producing adenoma. The mean total dose delivered by a linear accelerator was 49.4 Gy (range 45-52.2 Gy), 5 x 1.8 Gy weekly. The mean PTV was 22.8 ccm (range 2.0-78.3 ccm). Evaluation included serial imaging tests, endocrinologic and ophthalmologic examination. Results: Tumor control was 91.9 % for a median follow-up time of 57 months (range 2-111 months). Before FSRT partial hypopituitarism was present in 41 % of patients, while 35 % had anterior panhypopituitarism. After FSRT pituitary function remained normal in 22 %, 43 % had partial pituitary dysfunction, and 35 % had anterior panhypopituitarism. Visual acuity was stable in 76 % of patients, improved in 19 %, and deteriorated in 5 %. Visual fields remained stable in 35 patients (95 %), improved in one and worsened in 1 patient (2.7 %). Conclusion: FSRT is an effective and safe treatment for recurrent or residual pituitary adenoma. Good local tumor control and preservation of adjacent structures can be reached, even for large tumors. (orig.)

  4. MJA Practice Essentials--Endocrinology. 9: Pituitary disease in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, David M; Ho, Ken K Y

    2004-04-19

    Pituitary adenomas are found in 10%-25% of unselected autopsy series and are evident in about 10% of asymptomatic individuals by magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis of pituitary disorders is often delayed by lack of awareness and the subtlety of symptoms and signs. Hypopituitarism is suspected when peripheral hormone concentrations are low without an elevation in the corresponding pituitary tropic hormone(s). Severe adult-onset growth-hormone deficiency results in reduced muscle mass, increased fat mass and diminished quality of life, which are reversed by growth hormone replacement therapy. While trans-sphenoidal surgery remains first-line treatment for acromegaly, drug treatment has an important role in controlling residual growth-hormone excess and, in some circumstances, as first-line treatment. Dopamine-agonist therapy (cabergoline or bromocriptine) is the treatment of choice for micro- and macroprolactinomas. In patients with suggestive clinical features, elevated 24-hour urine free cortisol level is usually sufficient to diagnose endogenous Cushing's syndrome; careful additional investigation is needed to determine whether the cause is Cushing's disease (pituitary adenoma secreting adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH]), ectopic ACTH secretion or adrenal disease. Heightened awareness is needed to detect the sometimes subtle symptoms and signs of pituitary disease

  5. Reformatted CT diagnosis of pituitary microadenomas in hyperprolactinemic women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Kikuchi, Kenji; Kowada, Masayoshi; Hariu, Mineko; Miyauchi, Koji (Akita Univ. (Japan))

    1983-06-01

    The CT diagnosis of pituitary microadenomas was made in 13 among 20 female sterile patients with hyperprolactinemia, utilizing sagittal- and coronal-sectioned reformation on the basis of 1.5 mm-sliced high-resolution axial CT scanning. The pituitary stalk was found to have been shifted in 10 patients, and in all of them adenomas were verified. This was in contrast to the findings that, among another 10 patients with no definite evidence of the stalk shifting, only 3 patients had adenomas. Pituitary adenomas were present in 11 of the 12 patients demonstrating the pituitary surface in a ''convex'' fashion. In contrast, 2 among 6 patients with a ''flat'' surface demonstrated the presence of pituitary adenomas. Enhancement patterns in the sella could be classified as of four types: homogeneous, diffuse-low, punched-out, and nodular types. The adenomas tended to occur in either the nodular or diffuse-low type; they were less frequently seen in the punched-out or homogeneous type. With regard to the correlation between the patterns of contrast enhancement and the serum concentrations of prolactin, it may be of note that the nodular type corresponded well to the higher prolactin serum level, and the homogeneous type to the lower level.

  6. GENETIC PATHWAYS LEADING TO THERAPY-RELATED MYELOID NEOPLASMS

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    Angela Stoddart

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Therapy-related myeloid neoplasm (t-MN is a distinctive clinical syndrome occurring after exposure to chemotherapy or radiotherapy.  t-MN arises in most cases from a multipotential hematopoietic stem cell or, less commonly, in a lineage committed progenitor cell.  The prognosis for patients with t-MN is poor, as current forms of therapy are largely ineffective.  Cytogenetic analysis, molecular analysis and gene expression profiling analysis of t-MN has revealed that there are distinct subtypes of the disease; however, our understanding of the genetic basis of t-MN is incomplete.  Elucidating the genetic pathways and molecular networks that are perturbed in t-MNs, may facilitate the identification of therapeutic targets that can be exploited for the development of urgently-needed targeted therapies.

  7. Imaging spectrum of primary malignant renal neoplasms in children

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    Rama Anand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilms′ tumor (WT is the most common abdominal tumor in children. Many pediatric renal tumors in the past were categorized as WT; however, in recent years, several specific renal tumors have been recognized as distinct pathological entities. The age and clinical presentation of the child and distinctive imaging features may help in reaching a specific diagnosis in most cases. This is important as it has implications on the pre-operative diagnostic work-up and prognosis of the child. However, it is often not possible to differentiate one from the other pediatric renal tumor on the basis of imaging alone, and the final diagnosis is often made at histological examination of the surgical specimen. This article reviews the imaging features of primary malignant renal neoplasms in children along with their clinical presentation and pathological features.

  8. Dermoscopy of benign and malignant neoplasms in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliasos, Helen C; Zalaudek, Iris; Malvehy, Josep; Lanschuetzer, Christoph; Hinter, Helmut; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Braun, Ralph; Marghoob, Ashfaq A

    2010-12-01

    Dermoscopy is a noninvasive technique that enables visualization of subsurface colors and structures within the skin that are imperceptible to the naked eye. The dermatoscope allows the physician to examine both the macroscopic and microscopic primary morphology of skin lesions, identify subtle clinical clues, confirm naked-eye clinical diagnoses, and monitor treatment progress while posing little threat to the young patient. Dermoscopic findings have been formulated into diagnostic criteria that assist experienced clinicians in differentiating benign and malignant neoplasms. In this review, clinical morphology of melanocytic nevi and melanoma in the pediatric population is examined and the relevant dermoscopic findings and histopathologic correlates that aid in the diagnosis and management of these lesions are described.

  9. Myxoma of the temporal bone: A rare neoplasm

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    Kapil Sikka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myxomas of the temporal bone are rare mesenchymal tumors. We present a case of a 16-year-old girl who presented with complaint of mass lesion protruding from the right ear canal and from behind the ear for last 2 years. Biopsy of the mass was suggestive of benign mesenchymal lesion with prominent myxoid changes. Radiology of the temporal bone showed soft tissue density involving right side external auditory canal, middle ear, mastoid antrum and both lobes of the parotid gland. Tumour excision along with total parotidectomy was performed. Postoperative histopatholgy was consistent with myxoma. The patient is on regular follow-up for last 5months with no recurrence till date. Temporal bone myxomas are rare neoplasms which are surgically treatable but have a strong tendency to recur, necessiating long-term follow-up.

  10. Large mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas associated with pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) of the pancreas occur mostly in females and are potentially sex hormone-sensitive. However, a MCN occurring during pregnancy is quite rare. A 30-year-old woman in the tenth week of pregnancy was referred to us because of a rapid increase in lett hypochondrial distending pain. On ultrasound, the patient had a large intra-abdominal cystic lesion. She was thereafter diagnosed with missed abortion and a computed tomography scan showed that the lesion was a cystic tumor 18 cm in diameter originating from the pancreatic tail. The patient subsequently underwent tumor resection with distal pancreatectomy, sparing the spleen. Histopathological analysis of the specimen revealed a pancreatic MCN with moderate dysplasia. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for both estrogen and progesterone receptors. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of pancreatic MCN with moderate zysplasia in association with pregnancy. Our case strongly indicates that pancreatic MCN is female-hormone dependent.

  11. A VERY RARE CASE OF SKIN ADNEXAL NEOPLASM: HIDRADENOMA

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    Sunil

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available DEFINITION: Hidradenoma is a form of benign adnexal neoplasm that is a close relative of poroma, but is characterized by cells with ample cytoplasm1-4. Here we present a very rare and interesting case of a 35 year old female patient who presented to surgical opd with the complaints of swelling in front of the middle of the neck since two years. Swelling was not associated with any other complaints like pain, difficulty in swallowing, difficulty in speaking and difficulty in pronunciation of words. With adequate pre-operative preparation and normal routine blood investigations, patient was posted for surgery under monitored anesthesia care {ie.MAC}. A wide local excision was performed and specimen was sent for histopathological examination. HPR revealed an eccrine clear cell hidradenoma of neck. On follow-up for 2 year there has been no recurrence

  12. Uterine Rupture Due to Invasive Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasm

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    David I Bruner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While complete molar pregnancies are rare, they are wrought with a host of potential complications to include invasive gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. Persistent gestational trophoblastic disease following molar pregnancy is a potentially fatal complication that must be recognized early and treated aggressively for both immediate and long-term recovery. We present the case of a 21-year-old woman with abdominal pain and presyncope 1 month after a molar pregnancy with a subsequent uterine rupture due to invasive gestational trophoblastic neoplasm. We will discuss the complications of molar pregnancies including the risks and management of invasive, metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:444–447.

  13. JAK2 GGCC haplotype in MPL mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms.

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    Pietra, Daniela; Casetti, Ilaria; Da Vià, Matteo C; Elena, Chiara; Milanesi, Chiara; Rumi, Elisa

    2012-07-01

    JAK2 (V617F) is associated with a genetic predisposition to its acquisition,as it is preferentially found in subjects with a common constitutional JAK2 haplotype known as 46/1 or GGCC. A recent study suggests that a genetic predisposition to acquisition of MPL mutation may exist in sporadic patients, since an association was found with the JAK2 46/1 haplotype. We genotyped 509 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), 7% of which carrying a somatic mutation of MPL Exon 10. We found that the JAK2 GGCC haplotype was closely associated with JAK2 (V617F) (OR 1.84, P < 0.001) but not with MPL mutations (OR 0.98), suggesting a different genetic background for these molecular lesions.

  14. Lack of BRAF mutations in hyalinizing trabecular neoplasm

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    Brose Marcia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hyalinizing trabecular neoplasm (HTN of the thyroid is an unusual and controversial lesion. Some consider it a peculiar type of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC because of its nuclear features and presence of psammoma bodies. Others consider it an adenoma. Molecular studies have found RET/PTC translocations in some examples, supporting HTN as a PTC; however mutations in BRAF (another marker for PTC have not been found. We report two cases of classic HTN and a case of trabecular PTC and show BRAF mutations in the latter and not in HTN. Trabecular growth pattern is insufficient for a diagnosis of HTN and lesions with such a pattern and nuclear features of PTC are cancers. Morphologically classic HTN are not associated with metastatic potential and should be considered adenomas.

  15. Mouse models of myeloproliferative neoplasms: JAK of all grades

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    Juan Li

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, several groups identified a single gain-of-function point mutation in the JAK2 kinase that was present in the majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. Since this discovery, much effort has been dedicated to understanding the molecular consequences of the JAK2V617F mutation in the haematopoietic system. Three waves of mouse models have been produced recently (bone marrow transplantation, transgenic and targeted knock-in, which have facilitated the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of JAK2V617F-positive MPNs, providing potential platforms for designing and validating novel therapies in humans. This Commentary briefly summarises the first two types of mouse models and then focuses on the more recently generated knock-in models.

  16. Clinical significance of colonoscopy in patients with upper gastrointestinal polyps and neoplasms: a meta-analysis.

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    Zhen-Jie Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Some authors have studied the relationship between the presence of polyps, adenomas and cancers of upper gastrointestinal tract (stomach and duodenum and risk of colorectal polyps and neoplasms; however, the results are controversial, which may be due to study sample size, populations, design, clinical features, and so on. No meta-analysis, which can be generalized to a larger population and could provide a quantitative pooled risk estimate of the relationship, of this issue existed so far. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate risk of colorectal polyps or neoplasms in patients with polyps, adenomas or cancers in upper gastrointestinal tract comparing with controls. A search was conducted through PubMed, EMBASE, reference lists of potentially relevant papers, and practice guidelines up to 27 November 2013 without languages restriction. Odd ratios (ORs were pooled using random-effects models. RESULTS: The search yielded 3 prospective and 21 retrospective case-control studies (n = 37152 participants. The principal findings included: (1 OR for colorectal polyps was 1.15 (95% CI, 1.04-1.26 in the gastric polyps group comparing with control groups; (2 Patients with gastric polyps and neoplasms have higher risk (OR, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.06-1.62], and 1.72 [95% CI, 1.42-2.09], respectively of colorectal neoplasms comparing with their controls; and (3 Positive association was found between the presence of colorectal neoplasms and sporadic duodenal neoplasms (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.64-4.11. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from present meta-analysis of 24 case-control studies suggest that the prevalence of colorectal polyps was higher in patients with gastric polyps than in those without gastric polyps, and the risk of colorectal neoplasms increases significantly in patients with gastric polyps, neoplasms, and duodenal neoplasms. Therefore, screening colonoscopy should be considered for patients with upper gastrointestinal polyps and neoplasms.

  17. Subsequent neoplasms of the CNS among survivors of childhood cancer: a systematic review.

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    Bowers, Daniel C; Nathan, Paul C; Constine, Louis; Woodman, Catherine; Bhatia, Smita; Keller, Karen; Bashore, Lisa

    2013-07-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are at risk for development of subsequent neoplasms of the CNS. Better understanding of the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of subsequent neoplasms of the CNS among survivors of childhood cancer could lead to more informed screening guidelines. Two investigators independently did a systematic search of Medline and Embase (from January, 1966, through March, 2012) for studies examining subsequent neoplasms of the CNS among survivors of childhood cancer. Articles were selected to answer three questions: what is the risk of CNS tumours after radiation to the cranium for a paediatric cancer, compared with the risk in the general population; what are the outcomes in children with subsequent neoplasms of the CNS who received CNS-directed radiation for a paediatric cancer; and, are outcomes of subsequent neoplasms different from primary neoplasms of the same histology? Our search identified 72 reports, of which 18 were included in this Review. These studies reported that childhood cancer survivors have an 8·1-52·3-times higher incidence of subsequent CNS neoplasms compared with the general population. Nearly all cancer survivors who developed a CNS neoplasm had been exposed to cranial radiation, and some studies showed a correlation between radiation dose and risk of subsequent CNS tumours. 5-year survival ranged from 0-19·5% for subsequent high-grade gliomas and 57·3-100% for meningiomas, which are similar rates to those observed in patients with primary gliomas or meningiomas. The quality of evidence was limited by variation in study design, heterogeneity of details regarding treatment and outcomes, limited follow-up, and small sample sizes. We conclude that survivors of childhood cancer who received cranial radiation therapy have an increased risk for subsequent CNS neoplasms. The current literature is insufficient to comment about the potential harms and benefits of routine screening for subsequent CNS neoplasms.

  18. Preliminary study on MR colonography with air enema in detection of colorectal neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Ming-yue; LIU Li; YAN Fu-hua; SHEN Ji-zhang; YAO Li-qing; ZHOU Kang-rong

    2010-01-01

    Background The few studies on MR colonography with air enema involved feasibility of bowel distention and imaging quality and lacked detection sensitivity of colorectal neoplasms. The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the detection sensitivity of colorectal neoplasms with the three-dimensional Fourier transform fast spoiled gradient-recalled MR colonography with air enema.Methods A total of 30 patients scheduled for optical colonoscopy due to rectal bleeding, positive fecal occult blood test results or altered bowel habits were recruited and successfully underwent entire colorectal examinations with three-dimensional Fourier transform fast spoiled gradient-recalled MR colonography and subsequent optical colonoscopy on the same day. Detection sensitivity of colorectal neoplasms with MR colonography was statistically analyzed on a per-neoplasm size basis by using findings from optical colonoscopy and histopathological examinations as the reference standards.Results Seventy-six neoplasms were detected with optical colonoscopy, consisting of 1 mm-5 mm (n=11), 6 mm-9 mm (n=29) and >10 mm (n=36) in diameter. Detection sensitivities of 1 mm-5 mm, 6 mm-9 mm, ≥10 mm and >6 mm colorectal neoplasms with MR colonography were 9.1%, 75.9%, 100% and 89.2%, respectively; overall detection sensitivity for all sizes colorectal neoplasms was 77.6%.Conclusions Detection sensitivity of three-dimensional Fourier transform fast spoiled gradient-recalled MR colonography with air enema is low for 1 mm-5 mm colorectal neoplasms, but the detection sensitivity is 89.2% for ≥6 mm neoplasms, and all ≥10 mm neoplasms could be detected.

  19. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms; Perkutane Thermoablation von Nierentumoren

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    Tacke, J. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie/Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Passau (Germany); Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  20. Hepatic neoplasms associated with contraceptive and anabolic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, K G

    1979-01-01

    This paper evaluates the differences between HCA (hepatocellular adenoma) and FNH (focal nodular hyperplasia) and the association of HCA and FNH with OC (oral contraceptives). FNH occurs at least twice as frequent in females as in males. A study conducted by the author revealed that only 20% of patients with FNH had symptoms and signs related to their neoplasms; in the rest, FNH was accidentally discovered during surgery for diseases of the gallbladder or at necropsy. The highly characteristic gross appearance of FNH is discribed in detail. The etiologic relationship between FNH and OC was cited in the light of frequent findings of FNH in infants and children, and of suggestions by other authors that FNH could be a direct result on OC therapy or that contraceptive steroids or conjugated estrogens accelerate the growth of FNH, a very slow growing neoplasm. Simple excision is the treatment of choice for FNH; in some cases, hepatic artery ligation is indicated. In the case of HCA, statistics show that the incidence of HCA has been increasing since 1960. Majority of patients with HCA have normal tests of hepatic function. Radiographic studies and hepatic scans may reveal HCA, but the best diagnostic method so far is angiography. Although gross appearance of HCA is variable, the features are clearly distinguishable from that of FNH. Other topics discussed include the occasional occurence of nodular regenerative hyperplasia in patients on OC or anabolic steroids (AS), and malignant liver tumors in patients using OC or AS. Further research should be done to clarify the etiologic relationship between androgenic-anabolic steroids and hepatocellular tumors and tumorlike lesions.

  1. [Spontaneous hemorrhage in liver neoplasms. Experience at an institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ojeda, A; Medina-Franco, H; Aldrete, J S

    1998-01-01

    Retrospective review of a single Institution experience with the management of hepatic neoplasms complicated with spontaneous bleeding. In a 11 years period from 1980 to 1990 we reviewed the medical charts of patients treated at our Institution with the diagnosis of hepatic neoplasms complicated with sudden bleeding. We recorded demographic information, clinical manifestations, treatment and outcome. A review of the world literature was done. We found six patients with the diagnosis of liver tumors complicated with sudden bleeding. Five patients were female with a age range from 30 to 67 years old. Four of them had an adenoma (three of them single and one multiple) and the fifth had a non-parasitic cyst. Seventy-five per cent of the patients with the diagnosis of adenoma had used in the past oral contraceptives for at least three years. The sixth patient was a male with a ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma. Three patients were admitted in shock. Successful transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization was performed in two patients; the third required operative hemostasis. Major hepatic resections were performed in three patients including a total hepatectomy and liver transplant. All patients recovered satisfactorily. The spontaneous rupture of benign and malignant tumors of the liver is not a common phenomenon, but is a serious complication. The experience of our Institution and the reports of literature favor CT scan and arteriogram as the most effective diagnostic methods in this group of patients, but arteriogram has the advantage of its therapeutic potential. The long term prognosis of this patients depends of their pathological diagnosis.

  2. Spectrum of Intestinal Neoplasms: A study of 400 cases

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    Aminder Singh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study is a five-year analysis of all the tumors of small and large intestine received in the Pathology Department of Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana. Methods: All the cases were grossly and microscopically examined and were staged according to Astler Coller Staging and classified and subtyped according to WHO classification. The important differences between the small and large intestine tumors were also analyzed. Results: There were 400 cases out of which 356 were in large intestine while 44 were in the small intestine. There were only 56 benign neoplasms while 344 were malignant tumors. Adenomas were the most common benign tumors while majority of malignant tumors were adenocarcinomas. Lymphomas, mesenchymal tumors, and carcinoid tumors were much more common in a small intestine as compared to large intestine. Majority of adenocarcinomas were located in the large intestine with most of them being moderately differentiated having Astler Coller Stage B II. Mucinous carcinomas had the worst prognosis as compared to adenocarcinomas. Anal canal had mainly squamous cell carcinomas. Conclusions: Tumors of large intestine were much commoner than of small intestine. There was a higher incidence of tumor in males with M:F ratio of 2.2:1. Mean age of presentation of benign tumor was younger, i.e., 32.6 years when compared to 54.5 years for malignant tumors. Tubular adenoma was the most common benign tumor and adenocarcinoma the commonest malignant neoplasm. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2015; 3(1.000: 19-23

  3. Pituitary cell differentiation from stem cells and other cells: toward restorative therapy for hypopituitarism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Christophe; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary gland, key regulator of our endocrine system, produces multiple hormones that steer essential physiological processes. Hence, deficient pituitary function (hypopituitarism) leads to severe disorders. Hypopituitarism can be caused by defective embryonic development, or by damage through tumor growth/resection and traumatic brain injury. Lifelong hormone replacement is needed but associated with significant side effects. It would be more desirable to restore pituitary tissue and function. Recently, we showed that the adult (mouse) pituitary holds regenerative capacity in which local stem cells are involved. Repair of deficient pituitary may therefore be achieved by activating these resident stem cells. Alternatively, pituitary dysfunction may be mended by cell (replacement) therapy. The hormonal cells to be transplanted could be obtained by (trans-)differentiating various kinds of stem cells or other cells. Here, we summarize the studies on pituitary cell regeneration and on (trans-)differentiation toward hormonal cells, and speculate on restorative therapies for pituitary deficiency.

  4. Intra and latero-sellar carotid aneurysm mimicking a pituitary adenoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... ago, without functional signs of anterior pituitary deficiency or signs of intracranial ... Hypothalamic-pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows a round ... The magnetic resonance angiography is in favor of an unruptured aneurysm ...

  5. Prevalence of hypopituitarism after intracranial operations not directly associated with the pituitary gland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fleck, Steffen Kristian; Wallaschofski, Henri; Rosenstengel, Christian; Matthes, Marc; Kohlmann, Thomas; Nauck, Matthias; Schroeder, Henry Werner Siegfried; Spielhagen, Christin

    2013-01-01

    ...) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has steadily increased. Moreover, recent studies have found that a clinically relevant number of patients develop pituitary insufficiency after intracranial operations and radiation treatment for non-pituitary tumors...

  6. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. Heterogeneity of secretory granules of silent pituitary adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, S; Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1988-01-01

    Silent pituitary adenomas were compared with hormonally active tumors taking into account the size, number, and ultrastructural characteristics of secretory granules (SG). The study group (a total of 79 primary pituitary adenomas) comprised 27 silent, 21 growth hormone (GH)-producing-, 16 prolactin...... (PRL)-producing-, 5 GH-PRL-producing- and 10 adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing adenomas. The SG of silent adenomas were significantly smaller than SG in endocrine active adenomas. All hormonally inactive tumors also contained small (mean, 94 nm) specific cytoplasmic granules, designated...... approximately 10 to 50% of the granules in each cell. These granules were not seen in hormonally active tumors and considered therefore diagnostic of silent pituitary adenomas....

  15. Pituitary tumor apoplexy Apoplexia em tumor hipofisário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia V. Chang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary tumor apoplexy is a medical emergency due to acute infarction or hemorrhage in the pituitary gland. In this review, the authors discuss the sellar anatomy, the pituitary gland and adenomas' vascularization and the general aspects of the syndrome such as its ethiopatogenesis, predisposing factors, clinical features, treatment and prognosis.A apoplexia em tumor hipofisário é uma emergência médica decorrente do infarto agudo ou hemorrágico na glândula hipófise. Nesta revisão os autores discutem a anatomia da região selar, a vascularização da hipófise e adenomas hipofisários, e demais aspectos da síndrome como etiopatogenia, fatores predisponentes, quadro clínico, tratamento e prognóstico.

  16. [Image-guided endoscopic transsphenoidal removal of pituitary adenoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qui-Hang; Liu, Hai-Sheng; Yang, Da-Zhang; Cheng, Jing-Yu

    2005-01-01

    To assess the role of neuronavigation in assisting endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas. Ten endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal reoperations for pituitary adenomas were selected. Clinical records were reviewed retrospectively. Five of 10 patients had gigantic adenoma, 3 microadenoma, 2 large adenoma. The mean setup time was 5 minutes, and the operative time was 50 minutes in image-guided procedures. In all cases, the system worked well without malfunction. Continuous information regarding instrument location and trajectory was provided to the surgeon. Measurements of intraoperative accuracy in the axial, coronal, and.sagittal planes indicated a mean verified system error of 1.5 mm. for pituitary adenomas. After operation, the symptoms relieved in all patients. Neuronavigation can be applied during endonasal transsphenoidal endoscopic surgery and requires a minimal amount of time. It makes reoperation easier, faster, and safer.

  17. Spontaneous remission of pituitary macroadenomas in women:report of two cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhe-bao; SU Zhi-peng; WU Jin-sen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Spontaneous regression of pituitary macroadenomas is rare. It is generally thought that absorption of the necrotic tissue after pituitary apoplexy may cause the spontaneous healing of the tumor. However, such cases are often accompanied by hypopituitarism, which sould be treated with hormone replacement therapy. Here we report two cases of spontaneous remission of pituitary macroadenomas in women, who had complete tumor disappearance with preserved pituitary function.

  18. Is IGSF1 involved in human pituitary tumor formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucz, Fabio R; Horvath, Anelia D; Azevedo, Monalisa F; Levy, Isaac; Bak, Beata; Wang, Ying; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Gourgari, Evgenia; Manning, Allison D; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Lodish, Maya; Hofman, Paul; Anderson, Yvonne C; Holdaway, Ian; Oldfield, Edward; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nesterova, Maria; Biermasz, Nienke R; Wit, Jan M; Bernard, Daniel J; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-02-01

    IGSF1 is a membrane glycoprotein highly expressed in the anterior pituitary. Pathogenic mutations in the IGSF1 gene (on Xq26.2) are associated with X-linked central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement in males. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IGSF1 is involved in the development of pituitary tumors, especially those that produce growth hormone (GH). IGSF1 was sequenced in 21 patients with gigantism or acromegaly and 92 healthy individuals. Expression studies with a candidate pathogenic IGSF1 variant were carried out in transfected cells and immunohistochemistry for IGSF1 was performed in the sections of GH-producing adenomas, familial somatomammotroph hyperplasia, and in normal pituitary. We identified the sequence variant p.N604T, which in silico analysis suggested could affect IGSF1 function, in two male patients and one female with somatomammotroph hyperplasia from the same family. Of 60 female controls, two carried the same variant and seven were heterozygous for other variants. Immunohistochemistry showed increased IGSF1 staining in the GH-producing tumor from the patient with the IGSF1 p.N604T variant compared with a GH-producing adenoma from a patient negative for any IGSF1 variants and with normal control pituitary tissue. The IGSF1 gene appears polymorphic in the general population. A potentially pathogenic variant identified in the germline of three patients with gigantism from the same family (segregating with the disease) was also detected in two healthy female controls. Variations in IGSF1 expression in pituitary tissue in patients with or without IGSF1 germline mutations point to the need for further studies of IGSF1 action in pituitary adenoma formation.

  19. Dissociated hypopituitarism after spontaneous pituitary apoplexy in acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Ahmad Mir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pituitary apoplexy is an uncommon event and usually occurs in non-functioning pituitary tumors. Among the functioning tumors, prolactinomas are the ones most likely to apoplexy. Apoplexy in growth hormone (GH producing adenomas is a very rare event with less than thirty cases reported worldwide. Objective: To describe a case of spontaneous pituitary apoplexy in acromegaly. Case Report: A 55 year old smoker male presented to the our outpatient clinic in 2004 with complaints of gradual onset increase in the size of hands and feet, bilateral knee pain, increased sweating and blurring of vision. Investigations uncovered diabetes mellitus by a casual blood glucose of 243 mg/dl and HbA1c of 8.5%. Growth hormone suppression test using 75 gram oral glucose showed a 60 minute growth hormone of 105 ng/ml. Magnetic resonance imaging of the sellar region showed a 12.0 mm × 10.0 mm pituitary adenoma. The patient was planned for transsphenoidal tumor decompression. However, the patient was lost to follow up. Eight-years later, he presented in the emergency department of our institute with sudden onset headache, vomiting and decreased level of consciousness of one day duration. CT scan of the head with focus on the sella was suggestive of apoplexy which was later confirmed by the MRI of the sellar region. Conclusion: Although acromegaly can remit following apoplexy of the responsible pituitary adenoma, long term follow up is needed for early detection of the development of deficiency of pituitary hormones which may occur over years following the event as well as to detect tumor regrowth which again may occur several years later.

  20. Hypothalamo-pituitary disconnection in the fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolovich, G C; Clarke, I J; McMillen, I C; Perry, R A; Robinson, P M; Silver, M; Young, R

    1990-01-01

    In this study we have applied the technique of hypothalamo-pituitary disconnection (HPD) to the fetal sheep at 108-112 days of gestation. The pituitary is surgically disconnected from the hypothalamus by the removal of the neural component of the median eminence above the level of the portal circulation. This procedure results in the complete disconnection of the pituitary from the hypothalamus. After HPD, the lactotroph response to the dopamine antagonist chlorpromazine was significantly reduced (p less than 0.005) indicating the functional isolation of the pituitary gland from the hypothalamus. The increase in plasma prolactin in response to exogenous thyrotrophin-releasing factor was maintained following HPD. HPD resulted in the complete atrophy of the pars nervosa. At 132-135 days of gestation after HPD there was no change in the volume or appearance of the pars distalis; small infarcts were observed in the pars distalis of some HPD fetuses, but these occupied less than 1% of the volume of the anterior lobe of the pituitary. There was a significant increase (p less than 0.05) in the volume of the pars intermedia after HPD. Gestation was prolonged for at least 8 days beyond normal term following HPD, indicating that the processes integral to the initiation of parturition at term had been disrupted. We conclude that HPD provides a good in vivo model for the investigation of the activity of the isolated pituitary gland, and for the examination of the role of neuroendocrine mechanisms in fetal sheep development in the latter third of gestation.

  1. Is IGSF1 involved in human pituitary tumor formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucz, Fabio R.; Horvath, Anelia D.; Azevedo, Monalisa F.; Levy, Isaac; Bak, Beata; Wang, Ying; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Gourgari, Evgenia; Manning, Allison D.; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Lodish, Maya; Hofman, Paul; Anderson, Yvonne C; Holdaway, Ian; Oldfield, Edward; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nesterova, Maria; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Wit, Jan M.; Bernard, Daniel J.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2014-01-01

    IGSF1 is a membrane glycoprotein highly expressed in the anterior pituitary. Pathogenic mutations in the IGSF1 gene (on Xq26.2) are associated with X-linked central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement in males. In this study we tested the hypothesis that IGSF1 is involved in the development of pituitary tumors, especially those that produce growth hormone (GH). IGSF1 was sequenced in 21 patients with gigantism or acromegaly and 92 healthy individuals. Expression studies with a candidate pathogenic IGSF1 variant were carried out in transfected cells and immunohistochemistry for IGSF1 was performed in sections from GH-producing adenomas, familial somatomammotroph hyperplasia and in normal pituitary. In two male patients, and in one female, with somatomammotroph hyperplasia from the same family, we identified the sequence variant p.N604T, which in silico analysis suggested could affect IGSF1 function. Of 60 female controls, two carried the same variant, and seven were heterozygous for other variants. Immunohistochemistry showed increase IGSF1 staining in the GH-producing tumor from the patient with the IGSF1 p.N604T variant compared to a GH-producing adenoma from a patient negative for any IGSF1 variants and to normal control pituitary tissue. The IGSF1 gene appears polymorphic in the general population. A potentially pathogenic variant identified in the germline of three patients with gigantism from the same family (segregating with the disease) was also detected in two healthy female controls. Variations in IGSF1 expression in pituitary tissue in patients with or without IGSF1 germline mutations point to the need for further studies of IGSF1 action in pituitary adenoma formation. PMID:25527509

  2. Pituitary hyperplasia: a complication of the pseudomalabsorption of thyroxine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doyle MA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mary-Anne Doyle, Heather A Lochnan Division of Endocrinology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Objective: “The pseudomalabsorption of thyroxine” has been used to describe patients with hypothyroidism who fail to comply with their treatment. We describe a unique case of a 32-year-old with hypothyroidism who developed pituitary hyperplasia and hyperprolactinemia secondary to the pseudomalabsorption of thyroxine. Investigations and treatment: After baseline thyroid-function tests were performed, the patient was administered levothyroxine 0.5 mg under the supervision of a registered nurse. Thyroid function testing was repeated at 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes. Arrangements were made for further daily supervised loading of levothyroxine 0.1 mg. Results: With the administration of 0.5 mg levothyroxine, free thyroxine levels increased by 120 minutes, and with daily supervised dosing of 0.1 mg there was normalization of the thyroid hormone levels and a reduction of thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. Maintenance of thyroid-stimulating hormone < 15 mU/L for 2 weeks led to a reduction in prolactin levels and regression in the size of the pituitary on magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion: If left untreated, these patients face significant morbidity and are at risk of developing pituitary hyperplasia, complications from an increase in pituitary size, hyperprolactinemia, and potentially myxedema coma. Recognizing pituitary hyperplasia and hyperprolactinemia as a complication from the pseudomalabsorption of levothyroxine may prevent the potential of a misdiagnosis of a prolactinoma leading to unnecessary investigations and inappropriate treatment. Patient awareness of this serious complication and the rapid, demonstrable resolution with adequate thyroid hormone replacement may provide motivation to comply with supervised dosing of levothyroxine. It has also been suggested that supervised treatment enables the individual to maintain their patient

  3. RT-01FRACTIONATED STEREOTACTIC RADIOTHERAPY FOR PITUITARY ADENOMA WITH NOVALIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Ogura, Kengo; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Hojo, Masato; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Murata, Daiki

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiation therapy is an available treatment modality for pituitary adenoma. In particular, it is effective for the case unable to be removed with surgery or repeating recurrence. However, hypopituitarism and optic nerve injury associated with radiation therapy become a problem. Novalis® (Brain Lab) is an equipment of radiation to establish the detailed irradiation area, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (fSRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Retrospectively, we review local control and morbidity following fSRT with Novalis in pituitary adenoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 2007 and 2012, 29 patients with pituitary adenoma (9 functioning, 20 non-functioning) received fSRT with Novalis in our institute. Total radiation dose was 50.4-54Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction) and prescribed to the gross target volume + 2 mm. The effectiveness of fSRT was evaluated by tumor volume and clinical symptoms on pre- fSRT, and every 1-year. RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 59.1 months (20 to 83 months). Tumor regrowth was observed in 2 cases. Progression free survival rate was 93%. New visual field deficit was observed in 1 case, and new pituitary dysfunction were not observed in all patients. CONCLUSION: fSRT with Novalis is safe and effective in the treatment for pituitary adenoma. Although follow-up time is short, any problematic complications were not observed. In the future, fSRT is expected to make for safe and effective treatment in pituitary adenoma impossible to cure surgically.

  4. Hypopituitarism after gamma knife radiosurgery for pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibar Tomšić, Karin; Dušek, Tina; Kraljević, Ivana; Heinrich, Zdravko; Solak, Mirsala; Vučinović, Ana; Ozretić, David; Mihailović Marasanov, Sergej; Hršak, Hrvoje; Kaštelan, Darko

    2017-05-24

    The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence of and risk factors for hypopituitarism after gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for pituitary adenoma. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the pituitary function of 90 patients who underwent GKRS for pituitary adenoma at the University Hospital Centre Zagreb between 2003 and 2014. Twenty seven of them met the inclusion criteria and the others were excluded from the study due to pituitary insufficiency which was present before GKRS. Eighteen patients had non-functioning and 9 patients had secretory adenomas. Median patients' age was 56 years (24-82). GKRS was performed using the Leksell gamma knife Model C. The median prescription radiation dose was 20 Gy (15-25) and the median tumor volume size was 3.4 cm(3) (0.06-16.81). New onset hypopituitarism was defined as a new deficit of one of the three hormonal axes (corticotroph, thyreotroph, or gonadotroph) ≥3 months following GKRS. SPSS was used for statistical analysis, with the significance level at P<0.05. During the median follow-up period of 72 months (range 6-144), 30% of patients developed new hypopituitarism after GKRS. This corresponds to incidence of one new case of hypopituitarism per 15 patient-years. Age, gender, tumor function, tumor volume, suprasellar extension, prescription dose of radiation, as well as dose-volume to the pituitary gland, stalk and hypothalamus were not predictive factors for the development of hypopituitarism. In our cohort of patients with pituitary tumors who underwent GKRS, 30% developed new hypopituitarism during the follow-up period.

  5. Prevalence of pituitary incidentaloma in the Iranian cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Aghakhani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Although one-fourth of the pituitary tumors are inactive and silent, increased total volume of the pituitary gland exerts pressure on sella turcica and corrodes the clinoid processes, resulting in several problems. Therefore, determination of the prevalence of the concealed pituitary tumors is of major concern among clinical practitioners. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of these tumors in cadavers referred to the Iranian Legal Medicine Organization (Kahrizak, Tehran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed between June 2007 and February 2008. A total of 485 cadavers were selected by simple random sampling method. Pituitary glands were removed and then horizontally cut and four slides were prepared from each of them, stained by hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated by a light microscope. For statistical analysis, SPSS software (version 16, Mann-Whitney U test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov nonparametric test (K-S test, and Chi-square test were used. Results: Of the 485 investigated cadavers, 365 (75.3% were males with an average age of 42 ± 20.5 years and 120 (24.7% were females with an average age of 44 ± 22 years. A total of 61 (12.6% had concealed pituitary masses. No statistically significant difference was found between the mean age, sex, and body mass index (BMI of the cadavers with and without concealed tumors (P=0.380 P=0.450, and P=0.884, respectively. Conclusions: In the present study, the prevalence of the concealed pituitary adenomas was 12.6%. There was no correlation between age, sex, and BMI and the prevalence of the concealed masses.

  6. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Efforts were directed towards maintenance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro. The production of human growth hormone (hGH) by this means would be of benefit for the treatment of certain human hypopituitary diseases such as dwarfism. One of the primary approaches was the testing of agents which may logically be expected to increase hGH release. The progress towards this goal is summarized. Results from preliminary experiments dealing with electrophoresis of pituitary cell for the purpose of somatotroph separation are described.

  7. MR of pituitary micro-adenomas; IRM des microadenomes hypophysaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Marec, E.; Ait Ameur, A.; David, H.; Pharaboz, C. [Hopital d`Instruction des Armees Begin, 94 - Saint-Mande (France)

    1997-12-31

    Most of the time, rationales to look for pituitary micro-adenomas are based on endocrinal disorder. MRI is often helpful to confirm diagnosis. It gives information about micro-adenomas size and localisation. If conventional sequence are inadequate, a dynamic sequence has then to be performed after Gadolinium injection. Any disorder observed from the pituitary gland must be correlated with the clinical observation and results from biochemistry analysis. False positive happens quite open because of gland morphological variation, incidentalomas and partial volumes. MRI offers the possibility to follow-up treated micro-adenomas evolution especially to detect recurrence. (author)

  8. Water and Salt Metabolism Disorders Following Transsphenoidal Pituitary Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap Cakir

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Transsphenoidal pituitary surgery is frequently complicated with mild to severe water and electrolyte disturbances in the postoperative period. These disorders are: transient diabetes insipidus, early or delayed hyponatremia, diabetes insipidus followed by hyponatremia (biphasic pattern, diabetes insipidus-hyponatremia-diabetes insipidus (triphasic pattern, permanent diabetes insipidus, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome. Close monitoring of water intake, urine output, thirst, volume status and serum electrolytes is imperative, and a dynamic treatment plan according to the changing status of the patient is mandatory. This review will focus on the types, course and treatment of water and electrolyte disturbances observed after transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. Turk Jem 2011; 15: 28-32

  9. Long-term consequences of growth hormone replacement and cranial radiation on pituitary function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelman-Dijkstra, Natasha Mireille

    2015-01-01

    This thesis covers the consequences of cranial irradiation of non-pituitary tumors, eg nasopharyngeal carcinoma, on pituitary function. In chapter 2 we have performed a meta-analysis of available data reported in literature on pituitary function after cranial radiotherapy for head and neck and non-p

  10. Postpartum pituitary apoplexy with isolated oculomotor nerve palsy: A rare medical emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeet Raina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome characterized by sudden onset headache, visual deficits, ophthalmoplegia, altered mental status, and hormonal dysfunction due to an expanding mass within the sella turcica resulting from hemorrhage or infarction of pituitary gland. We report a case of pituitary apoplexy that developed in postpartum period following postpartum hemorrhage and presented with isolated third cranial nerve palsy.

  11. Diagnosis of pituitary microadenomas by CT scan. Detection of the microadenoma by high resolution coronal scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakoda, K.; Uozumi, T. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-10-01

    Following a detection of abnormality of pituitary hormone, it is very important to know whether the abnormality is due to pituitary microadenoma for deciding treatment methods. To diagnose pituitary microadenoma, polytomography of the sella turcica has been used. The recently developed high resolution coronal CT scan is prone to be more valuable in diagnosing microadenoma. New findings by this method were reported.

  12. Incidence of underlying biliary neoplasm in patients after major hepatectomy for preoperative benign hepatolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeong Min; Cho, Chol Kyoon; Koh, Yang Seok; Kim, Hee Joon; Park, Eun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Despite hepatolithiasis being a risk factor for biliary neoplasm including cholangiocarcinoma, the incidence of underlying biliary neoplasm is unknown in patients with preoperative benign hepatolithiasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of underlying biliary neoplasm in patients who underwent major hepatectomy for preoperative benign hepatolithiasis. Methods Between March 2005 and December 2015, 73 patients who underwent major hepatectomy for preoperative benign hepatolithiasis were enrolled in this study. The incidence and pathological differentiation of concomitant biliary neoplasm were retrospectively determined by review of medical records. Postoperative complications after major hepatectomy were evaluated. Results Concomitant biliary neoplasm was pathologically confirmed in 20 patients (27.4%). Biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BIN) was detected in 12 patients (16.4%), and 1 patient (1.4%) had intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), as the premalignant lesion. Cholangiocarcinoma was pathologically confirmed in 7 patients (9.6%). Preoperative imaging of the 73 patients revealed biliary stricture at the first branch of bile duct in 31 patients (42.5%), and at the second branch of bile duct in 39 patients (53.4%). Postoperative complications developed in 14 patients (19.1%). Almost all patients recovered from complications, including intra-abdominal abscess (9.6%), bile leakage (4.1%), pleural effusion (2.7%), and wound infection (1.4%). Only 1 patient (1.4%) died from aspiration pneumonia. Conclusions The incidence of underlying biliary neoplasm was not negligible in the patients with hepatolithiasis, despite meticulous preoperative evaluations. PMID:28261696

  13. The burden of hospitalizations for anus and penis neoplasm in Spain (1997-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Ester, Pablo Viguera; Álvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Rodríguez, María San Martín; De Miguel, Ángel Gil

    2012-02-01

    An epidemiological retrospective study has been performed to assess the burden of hospitalization by anus and penis neoplasm in the general population in Spain. All hospital discharges and deaths related to anal malign neoplasm and penile malign neoplasm from 1997 to 2008 in Spain were obtained. A total of 19,608 hospital admissions were recorded during the study period: 11,965 were related to anal malign neoplasm (4,992 in women and 6,973 in men) and 7,643 to penis malignant neoplasm. This corresponds to a hospitalization rate of 1.97 (CI 95%: 1.91-2.02) hospitalizations per 100,000 women/ year, 2.84 (CI 95%: 2.77-2.91) hospitalizations per 100,000 men/ year and 3.11 (CI 95%: 3.04- 3.18) hospitalizations per 100,000 men/ year, respectively during the study period.   The hospitalization rate increased significantly during the study period in all locations. It also increased significantly with age for all locations. Hospitalization and mortality rates in men were 50% higher than in women A total of 530 deaths related to penis malignant neoplasm and 738 deaths related to anus malignant neoplasm in men and 488 in women were reported during the 12-y study period. Although a decrease in smoking prevalence has led to a decrease in the incidence of cancers in the last decade, the hospitalizations due to anal and penile malign neoplasm have not declined in our study. This might be attributed to a high prevalence of HPV infection in these particular genital malign neoplasms.

  14. Mechanisms for growth factor-induced pituitary tumor transforming gene-1 expression in pituitary folliculostellate TtT/GF cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlotides, G; Cruz-Soto, M; Rubinek, T; Eigler, T; Auernhammer, C J; Melmed, S

    2006-12-01

    PTTG1, a securin protein, also behaves as a transforming gene and is overexpressed in pituitary tumors. Because pituitary folliculostellate (FS) cells regulate pituitary tumor growth factors by paracrine mechanisms, epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR)-mediated PTTG1 expression and cell proliferation was tested in pituitary FS TtT/GF cells. EGFR ligands caused up to 3-fold induction of Pttg1 mRNA expression, enhanced proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and increased entry of G0/1-arrested cells into S-phase. PTTG binding factor mRNA expression was not altered. EGF-induced Pttg1 expression and cell proliferation was abolished by preincubation of TtT/GF cells with EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and gefitinib. Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, protein kinase C, and MAPK, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase and Janus activating kinase signaling regulated EGF-induced Pttg1, as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen mRNA expression and entry into S-phase. EGF-induced EGFR and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was followed by rapid MAPK kinase/ERK kinase-dependent activation of Elk-1 and c-Fos. EGF-induced Pttg1 expression peaked at the S-G2 transition and declined thereafter. Pttg1 cell cycle dependency was confirmed by suppression of EGF-induced Pttg1 mRNA by blockade of cells in early S-phase. The results show that PTTG1 and its binding protein PTTG binding factor are expressed in pituitary FS TtT/GF cells. EGFR ligands induce PTTG1 and regulate S-phase, mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, protein kinase C, and MAPK pathways. PTTG1 is therefore a target for EGFR-mediated paracrine regulation of pituitary cell growth.

  15. Synchronous Low-grade Appendiceal Mucinous Neoplasm and Primary Peritoneal Low-grade Serous Carcinoma: A First Description of These 2 Neoplasms Presenting Together as Suspected Peritoneal Carcinomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulic, Miroslav; Pichler Sekulic, Simona; Movahedi-Lankarani, Saeid

    2016-09-28

    Low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm is a neoplasm typically of appendiceal origin, which is characterized by diffuse peritoneal involvement by pools of mucin with mucinous epithelium lacking high-grade cytologic atypia, and clinically presents as suspected peritoneal carcinomatosis. A similar clinical presentation can sometimes be seen with disseminated low-grade serous carcinomas of the peritoneum, fallopian tubes, or ovaries; however, this neoplasm is histologically characterized by tubal-type epithelium and invasive or confluent growth. In this case report, we describe a patient presenting with a clinical examination and radiologic features suggestive of peritoneal carcinomatosis and a prominent pelvic mass; however, after pathologic review, the patient was proven to have peritoneal involvement by both low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm of appendiceal origin and a low-grade peritoneal primary serous carcinoma. In short, we present the first description of low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm and serous carcinoma of the peritoneum presenting synchronously, providing morphologic characterization and immunohistochemical studies supporting the diagnosis, and illustrating a rare instance in which 2 neoplastic processes are underlying clinically suspected peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  16. Retroperitoneal neoplasm with perivascular epithelioid cell differentiation:A case report and review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zhao; Jin Huang; Jin Wang

    2013-01-01

    The retroperitoneal neoplasm with perivascular epithelioid cel differentiation (PEComa) is an extremely rare path-ological entity. In this article, we reported one case of a 45-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital (The Second People’s Hospital of Hefei, China) for retroperitoneal neoplasm with perivascular epithelioid cel dif erentiation. The B ultra-sonic examination showed echopoor in the region of cavitas pelvis. The histologic characteristics and immunohistochemical phenotype both revealed the neoplasm with perivascular epithelioid cel differentiation.

  17. Pediatric adrenocortical neoplasms: can imaging reliably discriminate adenomas from carcinomas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynt, Kelsey A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Smith, Ethan A.; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Davenport, Matthew S.; Caoili, Elaine M. [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Else, Tobias [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-08-15

    There is a paucity of literature describing and comparing the imaging features of adrenocortical adenomas and carcinomas in children and adolescents. To document the CT and MRI features of adrenocortical neoplasms in a pediatric population and to determine whether imaging findings (other than metastatic disease) can distinguish adenomas from carcinomas. We searched institutional medical records to identify pediatric patients with adrenocortical neoplasms. Pre-treatment CT and MRI examinations were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus, and pertinent imaging findings were documented. We also recorded relevant histopathological, demographic, clinical follow-up and survival data. We used the Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test to compare parametric and nonparametric continuous data, and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses to evaluate the diagnostic performances of tumor diameter and volume for discriminating carcinoma from adenoma. A P-value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Among the adrenocortical lesions, 9 were adenomas, 15 were carcinomas, and 1 was of uncertain malignant potential. There were no differences in mean age, gender or sidedness between adenomas and carcinomas. Carcinomas were significantly larger than adenomas based on mean estimated volume (581 ml, range 16-2,101 vs. 54 ml, range 3-197 ml; P-value = 0.003; ROC area under the curve = 0.92) and mean maximum transverse plane diameter (9.9 cm, range 3.0-14.9 vs. 4.4 cm, range 1.9-8.2 cm; P-value = 0.0001; ROC area under the curve = 0.92). Carcinomas also were more heterogeneous than adenomas on post-contrast imaging (13/14 vs. 2/9; odds ratio [OR] = 45.5; P-value = 0.001). Six of 13 carcinomas and 1 of 8 adenomas contained calcification at CT (OR = 6.0; P-value = 0.17). Seven of 15 children with carcinomas exhibited metastatic disease at diagnosis, and three had inferior vena cava invasion. Median

  18. Effect of treatment modality on the hypothalamic-pituitary function of patients treated with radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas: Hypothalamic dose and endocrine outcomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew eElson; Joseph eBovi; Kawaljeet eKaur; Diana eMaas; Grant eSinson; Chris eSchultz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Both fractionated external beam radiotherapy and single fraction radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas are associated with the risk of hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis dysfunction.Objective: To analyze the effect of treatment modality (Linac, TomoTherapy, or Gamma Knife) on hypothalamic dose and correlate these with HP-Axis deficits after radiotherapy.Methods:Radiation plans of patients treated postoperatively for pituitary adenomas using Linac-based 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT) ...

  19. Effect of Treatment Modality on the Hypothalamic–Pituitary Function of Patients Treated with Radiation Therapy for Pituitary Adenomas: Hypothalamic Dose and Endocrine Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Elson, Andrew; Bovi, Joseph; Kaur, Kawaljeet; Maas, Diana; Sinson, Grant; Schultz, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background: Both fractionated external beam radiotherapy and single fraction radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas are associated with the risk of hypothalamic–pituitary (HP) axis dysfunction. Objective: To analyze the effect of treatment modality (Linac, TomoTherapy, or gamma knife) on hypothalamic dose and correlate these with HP-axis deficits after radiotherapy. Methods: Radiation plans of patients treated post-operatively for pituitary adenomas using Linac-based 3D-conformal radiother...

  20. [Cerebral infarction after pituitary apoplexy: Description of a case and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serramito García, Ramón; Santín Amo, José María; Román Pena, Paula; Pita Buezas, Lara; González Gómez, Lara; García Allut, Alfredo

    Pituitary apoplexy is usually the result of hemorrhagic infarction in a pituitary adenoma. The clinical presentation varies widely and includes asymptomatic cases, classical pituitary apoplexy and even sudden death. Cerebral ischemia due to pituitary apoplexy is very rare. It may be caused by vasospasm or direct compression of cerebral vessels by the tumor. We report a case of pituitary apoplexy associated with cerebral infarction and discuss the relationship between the two events. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.