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Sample records for pituitary hormone deficiency

  1. Genetics Home Reference: combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and lack the ability to have biological children (infertility). The condition can also be associated with a ... for triggering the release of several hormones that direct the development of many parts of the body. ...

  2. A newborn presented with cholestasis and diagnosed with congenital pituitary hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZALKAYA, ELİF; Akdağ, Arzu; DENİZ PAPATYA, ESRA; TOPÇUOĞLU, Sevilay

    2016-01-01

    An infrequent reason of neonatal cholestasis is congenital pituitary hormone deficiency. Clinical manifestations of cholestasis and hypoglycaemia in the neonatal period. Gestational week 37, 3700 grams, girl baby born with cesarean sectioning. Hypoglicemia symptoms developed at postnatal first and cholestasis at postnatal third week. Multiple pituitary hormone deficiency was identified.  Cholestasis symptoms recovered with growth hormone therapy. Congenital pituitary hormone deficiency should...

  3. Genetic and non-genetic causes of Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency and Combined Pituitary Hormone Deficiency: Results of the HYPOPIT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C.G. Graaff, de (Laura Corina Geertruida)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHypopituitarism, the deficiency of one or more pituitary hormones, causes stunted growth and severe health problems. Understanding the etiology of pituitary hormone deficiencies is important for anticipation of clinical problems, for genetic counselling and for possible prevention. This

  4. Progressive pituitary hormone deficiency following radiation therapy in adults; Deficiencia progressiva dos hormonios adeno-hipofisarios apos radioterapia em adultos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Rafaela A.; Vaisman, Mario [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Endocrinologia]. E-mail: rafaela_loureiro@hotmail.com

    2004-10-01

    Hypopituitarism can be caused by radiation therapy, even when it is not directly applied on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and can lead to anterior pituitary deficiency mainly due to hypothalamic damage. The progressive loss of the anterior pituitary hormones usually occurs in the following order: growth hormone, gonadotropin hormones, adrenocorticotropic hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Although there are several different tests available to confirm anterior pituitary deficiency, this paper will focus on the gold standard tests for patients submitted to radiation therapy. We emphasize that the decline of anterior pituitary function is time- and dose-dependent with some variability among the different axes. Therefore, awareness of the need of a joint management by endocrinologists and oncologists is essential to improve treatment and quality of life of the patients. (author)

  5. Diagnosis of growth hormone (GH deficiency: comparison of pituitary stalk interruption syndrome and transient GH deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brauner Raja

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most patients with childhood non-organic growth hormone (GH deficiency (GHD produce a normal GH peak as young adults. Our objectives were to better define this transient GHD and evaluate the factors influencing the growth response of patients with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS. Methods We studied 72 prepubertal patients with a GH peak Results At diagnosis, 64% of Group 1 and one Group 2 were During the first year of GH treatment, the growth rate was ≥ 2 SDS in 81% Group 1 and 37% Group 2 patients. In Group 1, it was negatively correlated with the GH peak before treatment (P The height gain SDSs between diagnosis and adult height were 1.7 ± 1.2 in Group 1 (n = 30 and 1.08 ± 0.8 in Group 2 (n = 12, P = 0.05. Conclusion The factors of the growth response to GH treatment should be analysed separately for each population: with and without PSIS or other markers.

  6. Neuroendocrine and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Adults with Pituitary Growth Hormone Deficiency (Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Ismailov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article authors discussed the results of literature review, which has been dedicated to study of different complications of growth hormone deficiency in adults, referring to the literature of the last 10–15 years. Based on this analysis, the authors concluded that in adults with growth hormone deficiency there is an adverse profile of cardiovascular risk. Patients with growth hormone deficiency have an adverse lipid profile, elevated body mass index, increased waist circumference and a high risk of hypertension. These disorders are likely to explain the increased cardiovascular mortality observed in patients with hypopituitarism, regardless of the etiology of growth hormone deficiency in adults.

  7. Comparison of response to 2-years' growth hormone treatment in children with isolated growth hormone deficiency, born small for gestational age, idiopathic short stature, or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Peter A; Sävendahl, Lars; Oliver, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have compared the response to growth hormone (GH) treatment between indications such as isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD), born small for gestational age (SGA), idiopathic short stature (ISS), and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD). The aim of this analysis of data......, collected from two large ongoing observational outcome studies, was to evaluate growth and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) response data for children of short stature with IGHD, MPHD, SGA, or ISS following two years of treatment with the recombinant GH product Norditropin® (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd...

  8. Effect of growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) on plasma GH in relation to magnitude and duration of GH deficiency in 26 children and adults with isolated GH deficiency or multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies: evidence for hypothalamic GRH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriock, E A; Lustig, R H; Rosenthal, S M; Kaplan, S L; Grumbach, M M

    1984-06-01

    Synthetic, amidated, 44 amino acid GH-releasing hormone ( GRH -44) was administered iv at a dose of 5 micrograms/kg to 20 patients with severe GH deficiency (GHD), 6 children and adolescents with partial GHD, and 6 non-GH deficient ( NGHD ) children and adolescents. The 17 patients with severe GHD that responded to GRH -44 had lower peak concentrations of plasma GH than the NGHD individuals (5.0 +/- 1.2 (SEM) vs. 27.2 +/- 3.5 ng/ml; P less than 0.0001). The children and adolescents with severe GHD tended to have higher peak GH responses to GRH -44 than the GHD adults (6.9 +/- 1.7 vs. 2.4 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) although the difference was not significant. The peak GH concentration was attained earlier in the GHD children and adolescents than in the GHD adults (28 +/- 4.7 vs. 69.3 +/- 13 min, P less than 0.004). There was a negative correlation between chronological age and peak plasma GH response to GRH in the children and adolescents with severe GHD (r = -0.758, P less than 0.02). Children and adolescents with partial GHD had a higher mean peak concentration of plasma GH (13. 1 +/- 1.8 ng/ml) than the children, adolescents, and adults with severe GHD (P less than 0.04), but one lower than the NGHD children and adolescents (P less than 0.05). In both severe and partial GHD the GH response to GRH was greater than that elicited by standard pharmacological tests. Serum somatomedin-C did not increase after a single pulse of GRH -44 in the 12 GHD patients studied. PRL increased minimally 30 min after 5 micrograms/kg iv GRH -44 in patients with multiple hypothalamic-pituitary hormone deficiencies but not in patients with isolated GHD or in NGHD individuals. The GH responses to GRH suggest that the majority of patients with isolated GHD as well as those with multiple hypothalamic-pituitary hormone deficiencies have deficiency of hypothalamic GRH . Lack of a GH response to a single pulse of GRH does not exclude GRH deficiency as priming of the somatotrope with multiple pulses of

  9. From isolated GH deficiency to multiple pituitary hormone deficiency: an evolving continuum - a KIMS analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, M.; Jonsson, B.; Abs, R.;

    2009-01-01

    with organic AO-GHD, who were GH naive prior to entry into the Pfizer International Metabolic Database (KIMS; 283 (7%) IGHD, 3827 MPHD). The effect of GH replacement after 2 years was assessed in those with available follow-up data (133 IGHD, 2207 MPHD), and development of new deficiencies in those...

  10. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Growth Defici H e o n r c m y one in Children What is growth hormone deficiency? Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a rare condition in which the body does not make enough growth hormone (GH). GH is made by the pituitary ...

  11. A Recessive Mutation Resulting in a Disabling Amino Acid Substitution (T194R) in the LHX3 Homeodomain Causes Combined Pituitary Hormone Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Bechtold-Dalla Pozza, Susanne; Hiedl, Stefan; Roeb, Julia; Lohse, Peter; Malik, Raleigh E.; Park, Soyoung; Duran-Prado, Mario; Rhodes, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims: Recessive mutations in the LHX3 homeodomain transcription factor gene are associated with developmental disorders affecting the pituitary and nervous system. We describe pediatric patients with combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) who harbor a novel mutation in LHX3. Methods: Two female siblings from related parents were examined. Both patients had neonatal complications. The index patient had CPHD featuring deficiencies of GH, LH, FSH, PRL, and TSH, with later onset ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Testing (4 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Ateleiotic dwarfism Genetic Testing Registry: Autosomal dominant isolated somatotropin deficiency ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition dwarfism, growth hormone deficiency dwarfism, pituitary growth hormone deficiency ...

  13. Effects of pituitary hormone deficiency on growth and glucose metabolism of the sheep fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowden, A L; Forhead, A J

    2007-10-01

    Pituitary hormones are essential for normal growth and metabolic responsiveness after birth, but their role before birth remains unclear. This study examined the effects of hypophysectomizing fetal sheep on their growth and glucose metabolism during the late normal and extended periods of gestation, and on their metabolic response to maternal fasting for 48 h near term. Fetal hypophysectomy reduced crown rump length (CRL), limb lengths, and body weight but increased ponderal index relative to controls near normal term. It also lowered the daily rate of crown rump length increment uniformly from 35 d before, to 20 d after normal term. Hypophysectomized (HX) fetuses had normal weight-specific rates of umbilical uptake, utilization, and oxidation of glucose but lower rates of umbilical oxygen uptake than controls near term. All these metabolic rates were significantly less in HX fetuses during the extended period of gestation than in HX and intact fetuses near normal term. In contrast to controls, glucogenesis was negligible in HX fetuses during maternal fasting. Consequently, the rate of glucose utilization decreased significantly in fasted HX but not intact fetuses. Conversely, the rate of CO(2) production from glucose carbon decreased in fasted intact but not HX fetuses. Fetal hypophysectomy also prevented the fasting-induced increases in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine concentrations seen in controls. These findings demonstrate that the pituitary hormones are important in regulating the growth rate and adaptive responses of glucose metabolism to undernutrition in fetal sheep. They also suggest that fetal metabolism is altered when gestational length is extended.

  14. Metabolic impact of adult-onset, isolated, growth hormone deficiency (AOiGHD due to destruction of pituitary somatotropes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul M Luque

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH inhibits fat accumulation and promotes protein accretion, therefore the fall in GH observed with weight gain and normal aging may contribute to metabolic dysfunction. To directly test this hypothesis a novel mouse model of adult onset-isolated GH deficiency (AOiGHD was generated by cross breeding rat GH promoter-driven Cre recombinase mice (Cre with inducible diphtheria toxin receptor mice (iDTR and treating adult Cre(+/-,iDTR(+/- offspring with DT to selectively destroy the somatotrope population of the anterior pituitary gland, leading to a reduction in circulating GH and IGF-I levels. DT-treated Cre(-/-,iDTR(+/- mice were used as GH-intact controls. AOiGHD improved whole body insulin sensitivity in both low-fat and high-fat fed mice. Consistent with improved insulin sensitivity, indirect calorimetry revealed AOiGHD mice preferentially utilized carbohydrates for energy metabolism, as compared to GH-intact controls. In high-fat, but not low-fat fed AOiGHD mice, fat mass increased, hepatic lipids decreased and glucose clearance and insulin output were impaired. These results suggest the age-related decline in GH helps to preserve systemic insulin sensitivity, and in the context of moderate caloric intake, prevents the deterioration in metabolic function. However, in the context of excess caloric intake, low GH leads to impaired insulin output, and thereby could contribute to the development of diabetes.

  15. Metabolic impact of adult-onset, isolated, growth hormone deficiency (AOiGHD) due to destruction of pituitary somatotropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Raul M; Lin, Qing; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Subbaiah, Papasani V; Buch, Thorsten; Waisman, Ari; Vankelecom, Hugo; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2011-01-19

    Growth hormone (GH) inhibits fat accumulation and promotes protein accretion, therefore the fall in GH observed with weight gain and normal aging may contribute to metabolic dysfunction. To directly test this hypothesis a novel mouse model of adult onset-isolated GH deficiency (AOiGHD) was generated by cross breeding rat GH promoter-driven Cre recombinase mice (Cre) with inducible diphtheria toxin receptor mice (iDTR) and treating adult Cre(+/-),iDTR(+/-) offspring with DT to selectively destroy the somatotrope population of the anterior pituitary gland, leading to a reduction in circulating GH and IGF-I levels. DT-treated Cre(-/-),iDTR(+/-) mice were used as GH-intact controls. AOiGHD improved whole body insulin sensitivity in both low-fat and high-fat fed mice. Consistent with improved insulin sensitivity, indirect calorimetry revealed AOiGHD mice preferentially utilized carbohydrates for energy metabolism, as compared to GH-intact controls. In high-fat, but not low-fat fed AOiGHD mice, fat mass increased, hepatic lipids decreased and glucose clearance and insulin output were impaired. These results suggest the age-related decline in GH helps to preserve systemic insulin sensitivity, and in the context of moderate caloric intake, prevents the deterioration in metabolic function. However, in the context of excess caloric intake, low GH leads to impaired insulin output, and thereby could contribute to the development of diabetes.

  16. Dynamic pituitary hormones change after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the dynamic changes of pituitary hormones in traumatic brain injury (TBI and to correlate the severity and neurological outcome. Patients and Methods: Dynamic changes in the pituitary hormones were evaluated in 164 patients with TBI on day-1, day-7, day-14, day-21, and day-28 post injury. Admission TBI severity and long-term outcome were assessed with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS score. The pituitary hormonal changes were correlated with TBI severity and outcome. Results: Of the 164 patients included in the study, pituitary dysfunction was found in 84 patients and in the remaining 80 patients pituitary function was normal. Most of the pituitary hormone deficiencies observed resolved over time; however, a significant proportion of patients had pituitary dysfunction at one month post injury. The hormones associated with poor outcome included growth hormone, thyrotropic hormone, and gonadotropic hormone. Conclusion: Dynamic changes of pituitary hormones in patients with TBI may reflect the severity of injury and also determine the outcome. Deficiency of growth hormone, gonadotropic hormone, and thyrotropic hormone can adversely affect neurological outcome.

  17. A novel missense mutation (P366T) of the LHX4 gene causes severe combined pituitary hormone deficiency with pituitary hypoplasia, ectopic posterior lobe and a poorly developed sella turcica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Toshihiro; Hattori, Tsukasa; Nakajima, Takeo; Okuhara, Koji; Tsubaki, Junko; Fujieda, Kenji

    2007-08-01

    LIM homeodomain transcription factors regulate many aspects of development in multicellular organisms. LHX4/Lhx4 is a protein that is essential for pituitary development and motor neuron specification in mammals. In human, a heterozygous splicing mutation of the LHX4 gene was reported in a family with combined pituitary hormone deficiencies (CPHD). In addition to CPHD, these patients were characterized by small sella turcica and chiari malformation. Here we report a Japanese patient with CPHD (GH, PRL, TSH, LH, FSH, and ACTH deficiency) due to a novel missense mutation (P366T) of the LHX 4 gene. She showed severe respiratory disease and hypoglycemia soon after birth. Brain MRI demonstrated hypoplastic anterior pituitary, ectopic posterior lobe, a poorly developed sella turcica, and chiari malformation. Sequence analysis of the LHX 4 gene identified a heterozygous missense mutation (P366T) in exon 6, which was present in LIM4 specific domain. Neither of the patient's parents harbored this mutation, indicating de novo mutation.

  18. MRI findings of complete growth hormone deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiba, Yozo [National Hospital of Okayama (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed on the pituitary gland of 20 children (age range, 2-11 years) with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency. Sixteen patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency showed disappearance of the pituitary stalk, disappearance of high signal area of the posterior pituitary, presence of ectopic pituitary, and decreased volume of the anterior pituitary. Many of them had a history of perinatal abnormalities such as asphyxia at delivery, breech delivery, and bradytocia. On the contrary, patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency presented no abnormal findings on MR images, and had no history of perinatal abnormalities. The findings of pituitary stalk separation syndrome suggested the presence of multiple hypopituitarism. (S.Y.).

  19. In vivo multiplex quantitative analysis of 3 forms of alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone in pituitary of prolyl endopeptidase deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perroud Bertrand

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro reactions are useful to identify putative enzyme substrates, but in vivo validation is required to identify actual enzyme substrates that have biological meaning. To investigate in vivo effects of prolyl endopeptidase (PREP, a serine protease, on alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH, we developed a new mass spectrometry based technique to quantitate, in multiplex, the various forms of α-MSH. Methods Using Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM, we analyzed peptide transitions to quantify three different forms of α-MSH. Transitions were first confirmed using standard peptides. Samples were then analyzed by mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, after elution from a reverse phase C18 column by a gradient of acetonitrile. Results We first demonstrate in vitro that PREP digests biological active alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH1–13, by cleaving the terminal amidated valine and releasing a truncated alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH1–12 product – the 12 residues α-MSH form. We then use the technique in vivo to analyze the MRM transitions of the three different forms of α-MSH: the deacetylated α-MSH1–13, the acetylated α-MSH1–13 and the truncated form α-MSH1–12. For this experiment, we used a mouse model (PREP-GT in which the serine protease, prolyl endopeptidase, is deficient due to a genetrap insertion. Here we report that the ratio between acetylated α-MSH1–13 and α-MSH1–12 is significantly increased (P-value = 0.015, N = 6 in the pituitaries of PREP-GT mice when compared to wild type littermates. In addition no significant changes were revealed in the relative level of α-MSH1–13 versus the deacetylated α-MSH1–13. These results combined with the demonstration that PREP digests α-MSH1–13 in vitro, strongly suggest that α-MSH1–13 is an in vivo substrate of PREP. Conclusion The multiplex targeted quantitative peptidomics technique we

  20. Comparison of response to 2-years’ growth hormone treatment in children with isolated growth hormone deficiency, born small for gestational age, idiopathic short stature, or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency: combined results from two large observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Peter A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have compared the response to growth hormone (GH treatment between indications such as isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD, born small for gestational age (SGA, idiopathic short stature (ISS, and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD. The aim of this analysis of data, collected from two large ongoing observational outcome studies, was to evaluate growth and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I response data for children of short stature with IGHD, MPHD, SGA, or ISS following two years of treatment with the recombinant GH product Norditropin® (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark. Methods Analysis of auxologic data from two ongoing prospective observational studies, NordiNet® International Outcomes Study (NordiNet® IOS and NovoNet®/American Norditropin® Studies: Web-enabled Research (ANSWER Program®. Results 4,582 children aged p = 0.047; p  0.001 vs. IGHD, respectively. Height gain was comparable between IGHD and MPHD. In pre-pubertal children vs. total population, height SDS change after two years was: IGHD, +1.24 vs. +0.97; SGA, +1.17 vs. +1.03; ISS, +1.04 vs. +0.84; and MPHD, +1.16 vs. +0.99 (all p  Conclusions After two years’ GH treatment, change in height SDS was greater in SGA and less in ISS, compared with IGHD; the discrepancy in responses may be due to the disease nature or confounders (i.e. age. Height SDS increase was greatest in pre-pubertal children, supporting early treatment initiation to optimize growth outcomes.

  1. Decreased hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone content and pituitary responsiveness in hypothyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Katakami, H; Downs, T. R.; Frohman, L A

    1986-01-01

    The effects of thyroidectomy (Tx) and thyroxine replacement (T4Rx) on pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion and hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GRH) concentration were compared to define the mechanism of hypothyroid-associated GH deficiency. Thyroidectomized rats exhibited a complete loss of pulsatile GH secretion with extensive reduction in GRH responsiveness and pituitary GH content. Cultured pituitary cells from Tx rats exhibited reduced GRH sensitivity, maximal GH responsiveness, and...

  2. Deficiência progressiva dos hormônios adeno-hipofisários após radioterapia em adultos Progressive pituitary hormone deficiency following radiation therapy in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela A. Loureiro

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A radioterapia é um dos fatores desencadeantes do hipopituitarismo, mesmo quando não direcionada diretamente para o eixo hipotálamo-hipofisário, podendo resultar em redução de hormônios adeno-hipofisários, principalmente por lesão hipotalâmica. A perda da função da hipófise anterior é progressiva e geralmente na seguinte ordem: hormônio do crescimento, gonadotrofinas, adrenocorticotrofina e o hormônio estimulante da tireóide. Vários testes estão disponíveis para a confirmação das deficiências, sendo discutidos, neste artigo, os melhores testes para pacientes submetidos à irradiação. Enfatizamos que o desenvolvimento do hipopituitarismo após a radioterapia é dose e tempo dependente de irradiação, com algumas diferenças entre os eixos hipofisários. Portanto, a conscientização da necessidade de terapia em conjunto de endocrinologistas e oncologistas otimizará o tratamento e a qualidade de vida do paciente.Hypopituitarism can be caused by radiation therapy, even when it is not directly applied on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and can lead to anterior pituitary deficiency mainly due to hypothalamic damage. The progressive loss of the anterior pituitary hormones usually occurs in the following order: growth hormone, gonadotropin hormones, adrenocorticotropic hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Although there are several different tests available to confirm anterior pituitary deficiency, this paper will focus on the gold standard tests for patients submitted to radiation therapy. We emphasize that the decline of anterior pituitary function is time- and dose-dependent with some variability among the different axes. Therefore, awareness of the need of a joint management by endocrinologists and oncologists is essential to improve treatment and quality of life of the patients.

  3. Multicenter study on adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing-min; Gu, Jian-wen; Kuang, Yong-qin; Ma, Yuan; Xia, Xun; Yang, Tao; Lu, Min; He, Wei-qi; Sun, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Yan-chao

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to observe the adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients of multi-centers, and explore the change of hypophyseal hormones in postoperative pituitary tumor patients. Sixty patients with pituitary tumor admitted during March, 2011-March, 2012 were selected. Postoperative hypophyseal hormone deficiency and the change of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative growth hormone levels were recorded. Growth hormone hypofunction was the most common hormonal hypofunction, which took up to 85.0 %. Adrenocortical hormone hypofunction was next to it and accounted for 58.33 %. GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn deficiency was the most common in postoperative hormone deficiency, which took up to 40.00 %, and GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn + AVP and GH deficiencies were next to it and accounted for 23.33 and 16.67 %, respectively. The hormone levels in patients after total pituitary tumor resection were significantly lower than those after partial pituitary tumor resection, and the difference was statistically significant; growth hormone and serum prolactin levels after surgery in two groups were decreased, and the difference was statistically significant. The incidence rate of growth hormone deficiency in postoperative pituitary tumor patients is high, which is usually complicated with deficiency of various hypophyseal hormones. In clinical, we should pay attention to the levels of the hypopnyseal hormones, and take timely measures to avoid postoperative complications.

  4. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on pituitary hormone secretion and hormone replacement therapies in GHD adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubina, Erika; Mersebach, Henriette; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh;

    2004-01-01

    We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes.......We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes....

  5. Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Tarım

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone deficiency is the most promising entity in terms of response to therapy among the treatable causes of growth retardation. It may be due to genetic or acquired causes. It may be isolated or a part of multiple hormone deficiencies. Diagnostic criteria and therefore treatment indications are still disputed. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 36-8

  6. A retrospective review of pituitary MRI findings in children on growth hormone therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Sarah L.; Lawrence, Sarah [University of Ottawa, Division of Endocrinology, Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada); Laffan, Eoghan [Children' s University Hospital, Pediatric Radiology, Dublin 1 (Ireland)

    2012-07-15

    Patients with congenital hypopituitarism might have the classic triad of pituitary stalk interruption syndrome, which consists of: (1) an interrupted or thin pituitary stalk, (2) an absent or ectopic posterior pituitary (EPP), and (3) anterior pituitary hypoplasia or aplasia. To examine the relationship between pituitary anatomy and the degree of hormonal dysfunction. This study involved a retrospective review of MRI findings in all children diagnosed with congenital growth hormone deficiency from 1988 to 2010 at a tertiary-level pediatric hospital. Of the 52 MRIs reviewed in 52 children, 26 children had normal pituitary anatomy and 26 had one or more elements of the classic triad. Fourteen of fifteen children with multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies had structural anomalies on MRI. Twelve of 37 children with isolated growth hormone deficiency had an abnormal MRI. Children with multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies were more likely to have the classic triad than children with isolated growth hormone deficiency. A normal MRI was the most common finding in children with isolated growth hormone deficiency. (orig.)

  7. Growth hormone response to growth hormone-releasing peptide-2 in growth hormone-deficient Little mice

    OpenAIRE

    PERONI, CIBELE N.; Cesar Y. Hayashida; Nancy Nascimento; LONGUINI, VIVIANE C.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Paolo Bartolini; Bowers, Cyril Y.; Toledo,Sergio P. A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate a possible direct, growth hormone-releasing, hormone-independent action of a growth hormone secretagogue, GHRP-2, in pituitary somatotroph cells in the presence of inactive growth hormone-releasing hormone receptors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The responses of serum growth hormone to acutely injected growth hormone-releasing P-2 in lit/litmice, which represent a model of GH deficiency arising frommutated growth hormone-releasing hormone-receptors, were compared to those ...

  8. Hypopituitarism: growth hormone and corticotropin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capatina, Cristina; Wass, John A H

    2015-03-01

    This article presents an overview of adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) and corticotropin deficiency (central adrenal failure, CAI). Both conditions can result from various ailments affecting the hypothalamus or pituitary gland (most frequently a tumor in the area or its treatment). Clinical manifestations are subtle in AGHD but potentially life-threatening in CAI. The diagnosis needs dynamic testing in most cases. Treatment of AGHD is recommended in patients with documented severe deficiency, and treatment of CAI is mandatory in all cases. Despite significant progress in replacement hormonal therapy, more physiologic treatments and more reliable indicators of treatment adequacy are still needed.

  9. Hormonal and morphological study of the pituitaries in reeler mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lombardero, Matilde; Kovacs, Kalman; Horvath, Eva; Salazar, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    .... Since the brain is one of the main regulator of pituitary hormone secretion and no information was reported regarding pituitary function and structure in these mutant mice, we studied pituitary...

  10. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  11. Pituitary and mammary growth hormone in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatti, Sofie Fatima Mareyam

    2006-01-01

    Several pathological (e.g. obesity and chronic hypercortisolism) and non-pathological (e.g. ageing) states in humans are characterized by a reduction in pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion. Chronic hypercortisolism in humans is also associated with an impaired GH response to various stimuli. Pit

  12. A case of Silver–Russell syndrome (SRS): multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, lack of H19 hypomethylation and favourable growth hormone (GH) treatment response

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zoran S. Gucev; Velibor Tasic; Aleksandra Jancevska; Ilija Kirovski

    2009-08-01

    Hypomethylation of the imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) at the IGF2/H19 locus on 11p15 is linked to Silver–Russell syndrome (SRS) and/or hemihypertrophy. This SRS patient was born in term with weight of 3500 g (50 percentile) and length 48 cm (>1 SD below the mean). He was first noticed at the age of 10 years for short stature (114.5 cm, $-3.85$ SD), relatively normal head circumference, a classic facial phenotype, hemihypertrophy (2.5 cm thinner left arm and leg in comparison to the right, asymmetric face), moderate clinodactyly and striking thinness (BMI of 15.3). At the age of 30, the body asymmetry ameliorated (1 cm thinner left arm and leg than the right), and BMI normalized (20.5 cm). Methylation analysis was performed by bisulphate treatment of DNA samples, radiolabelled PCR amplification, and digestion of the PCR products using restriction enzymes. The patient had normomethylation, and in addition hypopituitarism, with low levels of growth hormone (GH) (provocative testing before the start and after termination of GH treatment), thyroxin, TSH, FSH, LH and testosterone. The GH was given for six years, growth response was satisfactory and he reached an adult height of 166 cm. This is a first report of hypopituitarism in a patient with SRS without H19 hypomethylation. It seems that the lack of hypomethylation in this hypopituitary SRS patient is responsible, at least partly, for the favourable final adult height under GH treatment.

  13. Growth hormone receptor expression and function in pituitary adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lene R; Kristiansen, Mikkel T; Rasmussen, Lars M

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: Hypopituitarism, in particular GH deficiency, is prevalent in patients with clinically nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) both before and after surgery. The factors regulating the growth of pituitary adenomas in general and residual tumour tissue in particular...

  14. GH and Pituitary Hormone Alterations After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Züleyha; Tanrıverdi, Fatih; Ünlühızarcı, Kürşad; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a crucially important public health problem around the world, which gives rise to increased mortality and is the leading cause of physical and psychological disability in young adults, in particular. Pituitary dysfunction due to TBI was first described 95 years ago. However, until recently, only a few papers have been published in the literature and for this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism has been neglected for a long time. Recent studies have revealed that TBI is one of the leading causes of hypopituitarism. TBI which causes hypopituitarism may be characterized by a single head injury such as from a traffic accident or by chronic repetitive head trauma as seen in combative sports including boxing, kickboxing, and football. Vascular damage, hypoxic insult, direct trauma, genetic predisposition, autoimmunity, and neuroinflammatory changes may have a role in the development of hypopituitarism after TBI. Because of the exceptional structure of the hypothalamo-pituitary vasculature and the special anatomic location of anterior pituitary cells, GH is the most commonly lost hormone after TBI, and the frequency of isolated GHD is considerably high. TBI-induced pituitary dysfunction remains undiagnosed and therefore untreated in most patients because of the nonspecific and subtle clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism. Treatment of TBI-induced hypopituitarism depends on the deficient anterior pituitary hormones. GH replacement therapy has some beneficial effects on metabolic parameters and neurocognitive dysfunction. Patients with TBI without neuroendocrine changes and those with TBI-induced hypopituitarism share the same clinical manifestations, such as attention deficits, impulsion impairment, depression, sleep abnormalities, and cognitive disorders. For this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism may be neglected in TBI victims and it would be expected that underlying hypopituitarism would aggravate the clinical picture of TBI

  15. Etiology of growth hormone deficiency in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Katarina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD can be isolated or associated with deficiency of other pituitary gland hormones. According to age at diagnosis, causes of GHD are divided into congenital or acquired, and according to etiology into recognized and unknown. Objective. We analyzed etiology and prevalence of GHD, demographic data at birth, age, body height (BH and bone age at diagnosis as well as the frequency of other pituitary hormone deficiencies. Methods. The study involved 164 patients (109 male. The main criterion for the diagnosis of GHD was inadequate response of GH after two stimulation tests. The patients were classified into three groups: idiopathic, congenital and acquired GHD. Results. Idiopathic GHD was confirmed in 57.9% of patients, congenital in 11.6% and acquired in 30.5%. The mean age at diagnosis of GHD was 10.1±4.5 years. The patients with congenital GHD had most severe growth retardation (-3.4±1.4 SDS, while the patients with idiopathic GHD showed most prominent bone delay (-3.6±2.3 SDS. The prevalence of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency was 56.1%, in the group with congenital GHD 73.7%, acquired GHD 54.0% and idiopathic GHD 53.7%. The frequency of thyrotropin deficiency ranged from 88.2-100%, of adrenocorticotrophin 57.1-68.8% and of gonadotrophins deficiency 57.1- 63.0%, while deficiency of antidiuretic hormone was 2.0-25.0%. Conclusion. Although regular BH measurements enable early recognition of growth retardation, patients’ mean age and degree of growth retardation indicate that GHD is still diagnosed relatively late. A high incidence of other pituitary hormone deficiencies requires a detailed investigation of the etiology of disorders and evaluation of all pituitary functions in each child with confirmed GHD.

  16. Growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dosage of the medicine. Serious side effects of growth hormone treatment are rare. Common side effects include: Headache Fluid ... years. The rate of growth then slowly decreases. Growth hormone therapy does not work for all children. Left untreated, ...

  17. Pituitary Apoplexy After Thyrotropin-releasing Hormone Stimulation Test in a Patient with Pituitary Macroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Fang Wang

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy is a rare complication of pituitary tumors. We report a case of a 41-year-old female with acromegaly due to a pituitary macroadenoma, who developed pituitary apoplexy after a thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH 200 mg intravenous injection stimulation test. Neither emergency computed tomography (CT scans nor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, performed 6 hours and 12 hours, respectively, after the active episode, disclosed the evidence of acute hemorrhage or infarction. Two days later, the pituitary mass, removed by transsphenoidal approach, showed ischemic necrosis and acute hemorrhage. The TRH test is generally safe for evaluating pituitary function, but pituitary apoplexy may occur after the procedure. CT and MRI may miss the diagnosis of pituitary apoplexy, especially if performed immediately after the acute episode.

  18. Fractures in pituitary adenoma patients from the Dutch National Registry of Growth Hormone Treatment in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.C. Van Varsseveld; C.C. van Bunderen (Christa); A.A.M. Franken (Anton); H.P.F. Koppeschaar (Hans); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); M.L. Drent (Madeleine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on fracture risk in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients with different etiologies of pituitary GHD are not well known, due to limited data. The aim of this study was to investigate characteristics and fracture occurrence at st

  19. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The maintainance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro was studied. The primary approach was the testing of agents which may be expected to increase the release of the human growth hormone (hGH). A procedure for tissue procurement is described along with the methodologies used to dissociate human pituitary tissue (obtained either at autopsy or surgery) into single cell suspensions. The validity of the Biogel cell column perfusion system for studying the dynamics of GH release was developed and documented using a rat pituitary cell system.

  20. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone is prerequisite for the constitutive expression of pituitary annexin A5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Aiko; Kurusu, Shiro; Kawaminami, Mitsumori

    2015-01-01

    Annexin A5 (ANXA5), a member of the structurally related family of annexin proteins, is expressed in pituitary gonadotropes. We previously reported that ANXA5 expression is stimulated by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the present study, we investigated ANXA5 expression in the anterior pituitary gland of GnRH-deficient mutant hypogonadal (hpg) mice. RT-PCR demonstrated that luteinizing hormone β subunit (LHβ) and ANXA5 mRNA levels were both lower in the pituitary gland of hpg mice than in wild-type mice. Immunohistochemistry showed that ANXA5 expression throughout the pituitary gland was very low in hpg mice, suggesting that ANXA5 is diminished in gonadotropes and also in other cell types. Subcutaneous administration of a GnRH analogue, des-gly10 (Pro9)-GnRH ethylamide (1 μg/day for 7 days), augmented the expression of LHβ and ANXA5 in the pituitary gland in hpg mice. However, LHβ- and ANXA5-positive cells did not show exactly matched spatial distributions. These findings suggest that GnRH is necessary for constitutive ANXA5 expression in the pituitary gland, not only in gonadotropes but also in other pituitary gland cell types. A close relationship between ANXA5 and LHβ expression was confirmed. It is suggested that a significant role of ANXA5 in the physiologic secretion of LH.

  1. alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating-hormone precursors in the pig pituitary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M

    1986-01-01

    The occurrence of intermediates from the processing of ACTH-(1-39) [adrenocorticotropic hormone-(1-39)] to alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone was investigated in normal pig pituitaries by the use of sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays for ACTH-(1-13), ACTH-(1-14), ACTH-(1-13)-NH2 and ACTH-(1...

  2. Patient reported out-come in posttraumatic pituitary deficiency: results from The Danish National Study on Posttraumatic Hypopituitarism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Krag, Kirstine Stochholm; Janukonyté, Jurgita

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Posttraumatic pituitary hormone deficiency is often suggested. The impact of these predominantly mild and often irreproducible deficiencies on outcome is less clear. The aim of the present study was to describe patient reported outcome in a national a priori unselected cohort of patien...

  3. Pituitary mammosomatotroph adenomas develop in old mice transgenic for growth hormone-releasing hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asa, S L; Kovacs, K; Stefaneanu, L

    1990-01-01

    It has been shown that mice transgenic for human growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) develop hyperplasia of pituitary somatotrophs and mammosomatotrophs, cells capable of producing both growth hormone and prolactin, by 8 months of age. We now report for the first time that old GRH-transgenic m......-transgenic mice, 16 to 24 months of age, develop pituitary mammosomatotroph adenomas. These findings provide conclusive evidence that protracted stimulation of secretory activity can cause proliferation, hyperplasia and adenoma of adenohypophysial cells....

  4. Concomitant therapies (glucocorticoids and sex hormones) in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaroni, C; Ceccato, F; Rizzati, S; Mantero, F

    2008-09-01

    Adult-onset GH deficiency (GHD), mostly due to organic lesions of the pituitary-hypothalamic region, is frequently associated with multiple anterior pituitary deficiencies that need long-term substitutive treatment. The GH-IGF-I axis may play an important role in modulating peripheral metabolism of hormones (adrenal, thyroid, and sex hormones) and these interactions may have clinically significant implications on the phenotypes of adult GHD patients and on the effects of the combined replacement hormonal treatment of this condition. By accelerating the peripheral metabolism of cortisol, GH therapy may precipitate adrenal insufficiency in susceptible hypopituitary patients; estrogen replacement blunts the response to GH in women whereas in men with androgen substitution the responsivity increases over time. Endocrinologists should be mindful of these phenomena when starting patients with hypopituitarism on GH replacement therapy.

  5. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergus Keane

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour.

  6. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Efforts were directed towards maintenance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro. The production of human growth hormone (hGH) by this means would be of benefit for the treatment of certain human hypopituitary diseases such as dwarfism. One of the primary approaches was the testing of agents which may logically be expected to increase hGH release. The progress towards this goal is summarized. Results from preliminary experiments dealing with electrophoresis of pituitary cell for the purpose of somatotroph separation are described.

  7. [Cornelia de Lange Syndrome and multiple hormonal deficiency, an unusual association. Clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Bautista, Víctor M; Mendoza-Rojas, Víctor; Contreras-García, Gustavo A

    2017-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a genetic disease characterized by distinctive facial features, failure to thrive, microcephaly and several malformations associated. Its main endocrinological features are anomalies of the genitalia. We present a 13-year-old boy, who suffered from complicated aspiration pneumonia and showed Cornelia de Lange syndrome phenotype, with global developmental delay, suction-swallowing abnormalities, short stature and abnormal genitalia associated. His bone age was delayed, so he underwent full endocrinological panel. Central hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency and low luteinizing hormone-follicle-stimulating hormone levels were observed and multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies diagnosis was made. Basal cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone and prolactin levels were normal. He received thyroid hormonal substitution. Multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies are an unusual feature of De Lange syndrome. We suggest evaluating all different endocrine axes in these patients. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  8. Pituitary transplantation: Part 1. Successful reconstitution of pituitary-dependent hormone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipan, N B; Zacur, H A; Allen, G S

    1985-03-01

    Neonatal or adult pituitary glands were transplanted to the median eminence of adult rats of the same or a histoincompatible inbred strain. The hormonal status of 39 transplanted rats and of control animals was evaluated by serial determination of serum prolactin and thyroxine. Grafts of neonatal tissue to adults of the same strain resulted in normal postoperative hormone levels. This indicates not only that pituitary grafts had survived, but also that the transplants were under hypothalamic control. Grafts of adult tissue were less successful. The prolactin value was lower, but still within the normal range, whereas the thyroxine value was lower than normal, suggesting that viable pituitary tissue had survived but was not under hypothalamic control. Transplantation across a histocompatibility barrier was uniformly unsuccessful. Postoperative prolactin levels were low and thyroxine levels were not significantly different from those in hypophysectomized controls.

  9. GROWTH HORMONE-, ALPHA-SUBUNIT AND THYROTROPIN-COSECRETING PITUITARY-ADENOMA IN FAMILIAL SETTING OF PITUITARY-TUMOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LINKS, TP; MONKELBAAN, JF; DULLAART, RPF; VANHAEFTEN, TW

    1993-01-01

    A patient with acromegaly and hyperthyroidism due to a growth hormone-, thyrotrophin- and alpha-subunit-secreting pituitary adenoma is described. His deceased father had suffered from a pituitary tumour, and was likely to have had acromegaly as well. Plasma growth hormone and insulin-like growth fac

  10. Pituitary and placental hormone levels in pseudocyesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osotimehin, B O; Ladipo, O A; Adejuwon, C A; Otolorin, E O

    1981-10-01

    Twelve patients with clinical features of pseudocyesis were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of galactorrhea. The mean serum prolactin level of patients with galactorrhea was significantly higher than the normal values of the patients without galactorrhea. The mean serum levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone were markedly elevated in patients without galactorrhea. This was especially true of luteinizing hormone. Serum levels of human chorionic gonadotropin were undetectable in all patients. The significance of these observations is discussed.

  11. Gigantism caused by growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Noorisaem; Jeong, Kumi; Yang, Eun Mi; Kim, Chan Jong

    2014-06-01

    Gigantism indicates excessive secretion of growth hormones (GH) during childhood when open epiphyseal growth plates allow for excessive linear growth. Case one involved a 14.7-year-old boy presented with extreme tall stature. His random serum GH level was 38.4 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was noted during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; nadir serum GH, 22.7 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a 12-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed and a pituitary adenoma displaying positive immunohistochemical staining for GH was reported. Pituitary MRI scan was performed 4 months after surgery and showed recurrence/residual tumor. Medical treatment with a long-acting somatostatin analogue for six months was unsuccessful. As a result, secondary surgery was performed. Three months after reoperation, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor 1 was 205 ng/mL. Case two involved a 14.9-year-old boy, who was referred to our department for his tall stature. His basal GH level was 9.3 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was reported during OGTT (nadir GH, 9.0 ng/mL). Pituitary MRI showed a 6-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Surgery was done and histopathological examination demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with positive staining for GH. Three months after surgery, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and nadir GH during OGTT was less than 0.1 ng/mL. Pituitary MRI scans showed no residual tumor. We present two cases of gigantism caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with clinical and microscopic findings.

  12. Expression of growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor gene in GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, I; Inokuchi, K; Hasegawa, O; Sugihara, H; Minami, S

    1992-02-01

    Pituitary cells synthesize various neuropeptides that influence pituitary hormone secretion. GH-releasing factor (GRF) may also be produced by normal or pituitary tumor cells. We examined GRF gene expression in pituitary tumors. Standard techniques for the analysis of GRF gene expression did not appear to be suitable. Highly sensitive reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction was used. Specimens of pituitary adenoma were obtained by transsphenoidal adenomectomy from six patients with acromegaly and three patients with no clinical evidence of pituitary hormone overproduction; non-functioning adenoma. Pituitary glands were collected at autopsy from three patients who died from nonendocrine disorders. A specific GRF gene transcript was detected in five out of six GH-producing pituitary adenomas, whereas this was not found in three separate specimens of nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma or anterior and posterior pituitary tissue. The data suggest that GRF is synthesized as an intrinsic product in human GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

  13. Improved response of growth hormone to growth hormone-releasing hormone and reversible chronic thyroiditis after hydrocortisone replacement in isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Miho; Sato, Haruhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshiyasu; Hirukawa, Takashi; Sawaya, Asako; Miyakogawa, Takayo; Tatsumi, Ryoko; Kakuta, Takatoshi

    2009-07-20

    We report a 44-year-old Japanese man who showed a reversible blunted response of growth hormone (GH) to GH-releasing hormone (GRH) stimulation test and reversible chronic thyroiditis accompanied by isolated ACTH deficiency. He was admitted to our hospital because of severe general malaise, hypotension, and hypoglycemia. He showed repeated attacks of hypoglycemia, and his serum sodium level gradually decreased. Finally, he was referred to the endocrinology division, where his adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol values were found to be low, and his GH level was slightly elevated. An increased value of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and decreased values of free triidothyronine and free thyroxine were observed along with anti-thyroglobulin antibody, suggesting chronic thyroiditis. Pituitary stimulation tests revealed a blunted response of ACTH and cortisol to corticotropin-releasing hormone, and a blunted response of GH to GRH. Hydrocortisone replacement was then started, and this improved the patient's general condition. His hypothyroid state gradually ameliorated and his titer of anti-thyroglobulin antibody decreased to the normal range. Pituitary function was re-evaluated with GRH stimulation test under a maintenance dose of 20 mg/day hydrocortisone and showed a normal response of GH to GRH. It is suggested that re-evaluation of pituitary and thyroid function is useful for diagnosing isolated ACTH deficiency after starting a maintenance dose of hydrocortisone in order to avoid unnecessary replacement of thyroid hormone.

  14. Pituitary glycoprotein hormone a-subunit secretion by cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira M.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of the a-subunit of pituitary glycoprotein hormones usually follows the secretion of intact gonadotropins and is increased in gonadal failure and decreased in isolated gonadotropin deficiency. The aim of the present study was to determine the levels of the a-subunit in the serum of patients with cirrhosis of the liver and to compare the results obtained for eugonadal cirrhotic patients with those obtained for cirrhotic patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Forty-seven of 63 patients with cirrhosis (74.6% presented hypogonadism (which was central in 45 cases and primary in 2, 7 were eugonadal, and 9 women were in normal menopause. The serum a-subunit was measured by the fluorimetric method using monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity with LH, TSH, FSH and hCG was 6.5, 1.2, 4.3 and 1.1%, respectively, with an intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV of less than 5% and an interassay CV of 5%, and sensitivity limit of 4 ng/l. The serum a-subunit concentration ranged from 36 to 6253 ng/l, with a median of 273 ng/l. The median was 251 ng/l for patients with central hypogonadism and 198 ng/l for eugonadal patients. The correlation between the a-subunit and basal LH levels was significant both in the total sample (r = 0.48, P<0.01 and in the cirrhotic patients with central hypogonadism (r = 0.33, P = 0.02. Among men with central hypogonadism there was a negative correlation between a-subunit levels and total testosterone levels (r = 0.54, P<0.01 as well as free testosterone levels (r = -0.53, P<0.01. In conclusion, although the a-subunit levels are correlated with LH levels, at present they cannot be used as markers for hypogonadism in patients with cirrhosis of the liver.

  15. Ontogeny of pituitary growth hormone and growth hormone mRNA in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann-Levorse, L M; Radecki, S V; Donoghue, D J; Malamed, S; Foster, D N; Scanes, C G

    1993-01-01

    The changes in pituitary growth hormone (GH) mRNA levels have been determined by Northern blot analysis and laser densitometry during embryonic development and posthatch growth of white Leghorn cockerels. Pituitary GH mRNA levels were observed to progressively increase between 18 days of embryonic development to a maximum at 4 weeks of age (posthatch). Subsequently, pituitary GH mRNA levels declined between 4 and 8 weeks of age, and between 12 weeks of age and adulthood. Pituitary GH contents showed increases during embryonic development and posthatch growth that paralleled the rise in GH mRNA. The decline in pituitary GH mRNA levels between 4 weeks of age and adulthood occurs when GH secretion has been observed previously to decline.

  16. Postoperative pituitary hormonal disturbances and hormone replacement therapy time and dosage in children with craniopharyngiomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gui-mei; SUN Xiao-jun; SHAO Peng

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundThe proliferative activity and penetration into the hypothalamic structures in children craniopharyngiomas (CP) often make radical resection difficult. Therefore, complete resection of CP often results in permanent multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD). This study aimed to elucidate the postoperative pituitary hormonal disturbances, and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) time and dosage in children with CP.Methods Twenty patients with growth retardation and CP after resection, comprising 14 boys and 6 girls, with a mean age of (10.63 3.18) years (Group A) and 10 male patients of group A aged >10 years (Group B) were entailed. Thirty age-, sex- and Tanner stage-matched normal children (control Group A), and 44 male older children >10 years (control Group B) served as controls. The serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), growth hormone (GH), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), adrenocorticortropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol (COR), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) were measured in the CP patients after resection and in controls. The appropriate time and dosage of HRT were investigated. Linear correlation analysis was made between levothyroxine (L-T4) dosage and primary FT4 in CP patients after resection. Results All cases had MPHD. The serum peak GH, IGF-1, FT4 and COR levels of Group A were significantly lower than that of the control Group A. The serum IGF-1 concentration increased to the normal level after 3 months of rhGH therapy; the serum FSH, LH, and T levels were significantly decreased (P <0.001); however, E2 and PRL were significantly increased (P <0.001) in Group B compared with the control Group B; 18 cases were found to have central diabetes insipidus (Dl) by water deprivation test and MRI. There was a significant negative linear regression (r= -0.8, P <0.001) between L-T4 and primary FT4 in Group A patients with CP

  17. The chicken pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit-1 is involved in the hypothalamic regulation of pituitary hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van P.; Janssens, K.; Pals, K.; Groef, De B.; Onagbesan, O.M.; Bruggeman, V.; Darras, V.M.; Denef, C.; Decuypere, E.

    2006-01-01

    Pit-1 is a pituitary-specific POU-domain DNA binding factor, which binds to and trans-activates promoters of growth hormone- (GH), prolactin- (PRL) and thyroid stimulating hormone-beta- (TSHbeta) encoding genes. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is located in the hypothalamus and stimulates TSH, G

  18. Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas: An Underestimated Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappe, Ulrich J; Jaspers, Christian; Buschsieweke, Desirée; Reinbold, Wolf-Dieter; Alomari, Ali; Saeger, Wolfgang; Ehlenz, Klaus; Mann, W Alexander; Kann, Peter Herbert; Feldkamp, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    The diagnosis of Cushing disease is based on endocrinological pa-rameters, with no single test being specific. In some patients, dynamic thin-slice sellar magnetic resonance imaging fails to detect a pituitary tumor. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of ectopic pituitary adenoma in this situation. In a retrospective chart review, 5 patients (6%) with ectopic adenomas were identified in 83 consecutive patients undergoing transsphenoidal surgery for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas by 1 surgeon. In all 5 patients (all female, 32-41 years of age), an exclusively extrasellar ACTH-secreting adenoma was excised. Three adenomas were located in the cavernous sinus, 1 in the sphenoid sinus, and 1 in the ethmoidal cells. Histologically, none of the tumors showed signs of aggressiveness. Three of the 5 adenomas specifically expressed somatostatin receptor 5. In 4 patients with Cushing disease, postoperative remission was obtained, with 1 recurrence after 14 months. In the patient with Nelson syndrome, ACTH decreased from >800 to ectopic adenoma (positive for somatostatin receptor 5) in the ethmoidal cells turned out to be positive on gallium 68 DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computed tomography. The incidence of primarily ectopic ACTH-secreting adenomas in this series was 6%. In cases of negative MRI findings, an ectopic ACTH-secreting adenoma should be taken into account. 68 Ga DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computed tomography may identify ectopic pituitary adenomas. Hypophysectomy should always be avoided in primary surgery for CD.

  19. IN VITRO CELL CULTURE AND HORMONE RADIOIMMUNOASSAY OF HUAMAN PITUITARY ADENOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆汉魁; 林祥通; 等

    1994-01-01

    Tissues from 30 human pituitary adenomas are monolayer-cell-cultured in vitro.Hormone secretion of GH,PRL,TSH,LH and FSH by cells into medium is detected by radioimmunoassay .The pattern and amount of hormone(s0 in the medium are used to determine the nature of the cells and thus to establish functional classification of pituitary adenomas.The results show that cell culture technique provides and easy and suitable mode for investigating the nature of pituitary adenomas.Hormone radioimmunoassay of culture medium is precise and reliable and represents the whole adenoma tissue.Further studies can lead to clearer understandngs of the pathology of pituitary adenomas.

  20. Radiation therapy alone for growth hormone-producing pituitary adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plataniotis, G.A.; Kouvaris, J.R.; Vlahos, L.; Papavasiliou, C. [Athens Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-09-01

    We present our experience in the treatment of growth hormone (GH)-producing pituitary adenomas using irradiation alone. Between 1983 and 1991, 21 patients suffering from GH-secreting pituitary adenomas were treated with radiotherapy alone. Two bilateral opposing coaxial fields were used in 10 patients and in the remaining 11 a third frontovertex field was added. Treatment was given in 1.8-2 Gy daily fractions and total dose ranged between 45 and 54 Gy. Treatment was given using a cobalt unit. Four patients treated with somatostatin prior to and 14 patients treated after the end of radiotherapy experienced symptom relief for 6-28 weeks. The 5-year actuarial rate of disease control was 72%. Five out of six failed patients had macroadenomas. Hypopituitarism was observed in 5/21 (24%) patients. Whereas RT alone is effective in the treatment of microadenomas, this is not true for large infiltrative macroadenomas. (orig.)

  1. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mass and strength Mild bone loss Thinning skin Sleep problems Decreased exercise performance Decreased energy Decreased well-being, mild depression, or moodiness What are the benefits of growth hormone therapy? Growth hormone treatment involves injections (shots) ...

  2. Purification and Cultivation of Human Pituitary Growth Hormones Secreting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Grindeland, R.; Lanham, W.; Morrison, D.

    1985-01-01

    The rat and human pituitary gland contains a mixture of hormone producing cell types. The separation of cells which make growth hormone (GH) is attempted for the purpose of understanding how the hormone molecule is made within the pituitary cell; what form(s) it takes within the cell; and what form(s) GH assumes as it leaves the cell. Since GH has a number of biological targets (e.g., muscle, liver, bone), the assessment of the activities of the intracellular/extracellular GH by new and sensitive bioassays. GH cells contained in the mixture was separated by free flow electrophoresis. These experiments show that GH cells have different electrophoretic mobilities. This is relevant to NASA since a lack of GH could be a prime causative factor in muscle atrophy. Further, GH has recently been implicated in the etiology of motion sickness in space. Continous flow electrophoresis experiment on STS-8 showed that GH cells could be partially separated in microgravity. However, definitive cell culture studies could not be done due to insufficient cell recoveries.

  3. What Happens After Treatment for Pituitary Tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop pituitary hormone deficiencies after surgery or radiation therapy. These people will need hormone replacement. Thyroid hormone and adrenal steroids can be taken as pills. In men, testosterone can be given to restore sex drive and ...

  4. Investigation of the serum levels of anterior pituitary hormones in male children with autism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iwata, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Miyachi, Taishi; Shimmura, Chie; Suda, Shiro; Tsuchiya, Kenji J; Matsumoto, Kaori; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Iwata, Yasuhide; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Sugiyama, Toshirou; Sato, Kohji; Mori, Norio

    2011-01-01

    .... To test whether the anterior pituitary hormones and cortisol could be useful as biological markers for autism, we assessed the basal serum levels of these hormones in subjects with autism and normal controls...

  5. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  6. Growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulates cAMP release in superfused rat pituitary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Horváth, J E; Groot, K. de; Schally, A V

    1995-01-01

    The release of growth hormone (GH) and cAMP was studied in superfused rat pituitary cells by infusing growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) at different doses or a combination of GHRH and somatostatin 14 (SS-14). Three-minute pulses of GHRH caused a dose-dependent GH and cAMP release (effective concentration of 50% of the maximal biological effect is 0.21 nM and 52.5 nM, respectively). The lowest effective doses of GHRH in the superfusion system were 0.03 nM for GH release and 0.3 nM for cA...

  7. Relative sparing of anterior pituitary function in patients with growth hormone-secreting macroadenomas: comparison with nonfunctioning macroadenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Y; Tordjman, K; Kisch, E; Razon, N; Ouaknine, G; Stern, N

    1995-05-01

    Pre- and postoperative anterior pituitary function was assessed in 26 subjects with nonfunctioning macroadenoma (NFMA) and in 15 acromegalic subjects with macroadenomas. Preoperatively, NFMA patients had a higher prevalence of secondary hypogonadism (78% vs. 40%; P < 0.05), hypothyroidism (23% vs. 0%; P = 0.06), and hypoadrenalism (43% vs. 7%; P = 0.02) compared to individuals with GH-secreting macroadenoma (GHMA). Patients with NFMA also had a higher prevalence of more severe pituitary failure compared with acromegalic patients; 56% of the patients in this group had more than one pituitary hormone axis impaired compared to only 8% in the acromegalic group. These differences could not be accounted for by tumor grade and/or stage. Transsphenoidal pituitary surgery led to a significant improvement in anterior pituitary function in the NFMA group. Nevertheless, the prevalence of pituitary deficiency postoperatively was still significantly greater in NFMA patients than in the acromegalic group (68% vs. 17%, respectively; P < 0.04). The results suggest that anterior pituitary function is better preserved in GHMA than in NFMA and that this difference is independent of tumor size. The mechanism underlying the lower rate of hypopituitarism in acromegalics with macroadenomas remains to be elucidated.

  8. Concomitant occurrence of Turner syndrome and growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jung; Shin, Ha Young; Lee, Chong Guk; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2016-11-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder in phenotypic females that has characteristic physical features and presents as partial or complete absence of the second sex chromosome. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a condition caused by insufficient release of growth hormone from the pituitary gland. The concomitant occurrence of TS and GHD is rare and has not yet been reported in Korea. Here we report 2 cases of TS and GHD. In case 1, GHD was initially diagnosed. Karyotyping was performed because of the presence of the typical phenotype and poor response to growth hormone therapy, which revealed 45,X/45,X+mar. The patient showed increased growth velocity after the growth hormone dose was increased. In case 2, a growth hormone provocation test and chromosomal analysis were performed simultaneously because of decreased growth velocity and the typical TS phenotype, which showed GHD and a mosaic karyotype of 45,X/46,XX. The patient showed spontaneous pubertal development. In female patients with short stature, it is important to perform a throughout physical examination and test for hormonal and chromosomal abnormalities because diagnostic accuracy is important for treatment and prognosis.

  9. Effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 deficiency on ageing and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2002-01-01

    Present knowledge on the effects of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth hormone (IGF)1 deficiency on ageing and lifespan are reviewed. Evidence is presented that isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) including GH, as well as primary IGE1 deficiency (GH resistance, Laron syndrome) present signs of early ageing such as thin and wrinkled skin, obesity, hyperglycemia and osteoporosis. These changes do not seem to affect the lifespan, as patients reach old age. Animal models of genetic MPHD (Ames and Snell mice) and GH receptor knockout mice (primary IGF1 deficiency) also have a statistically significant higher longevity compared to normal controls. On the contrary, mice transgenic for GH and acromegalic patients secreting large amounts of GH have premature death. In conclusion longstanding GH/IGF1 deficiency affects several parameters of the ageing process without impairing lifespan, and as shown in animal models prolongs longevity. In contrast high GH/IGF1 levels accelerate death.

  10. HPG-axis hormones during puberty : A study on the association with hypothalamic and pituitary volumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peper, Jiska S.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; van Leeuwen, Marieke; Schnack, Hugo G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Kahn, Rene S.; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff

    2010-01-01

    Objective: During puberty, the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is activated, leading to increases in luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and sex steroids (testosterone and estradiol) levels. We aimed to study the association between hypothalamic and pituitary volum

  11. Isolated growth hormone deficiency type 2: from gene to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Lochmatter, Didier; Pektovic, Vibor; Mullis, Primus-E

    2012-01-01

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency type-2 (IGHD-2), the autosomal-dominant form of GH deficiency, is mainly caused by specific splicing mutations in the human growth hormone (hGH) gene (GH-1). These mutations, occurring in and around exon 3, cause complete exon 3 skipping and produce a dominant-negative 17.5 kD GH isoform that reduces the accumulation and secretion of wild type-GH (wt-GH). At present, patients suffering from IGHD-2 are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH (rhGH) in order to reach normal height. However, this type of replacement therapy, although effective in terms of growth, does not prevent toxic effects of the 17.5-kD mutant on the pituitary gland, which can eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. Considering a well-known correlation between the clinical severity observed in IGHD-2 patients and the increased expression of the 17.5-kD isoform, therapies that specifically target this isoform may be useful in patients with GH-1 splicing defects. This chapter focuses on molecular strategies that could represent future directions for IGHD-2 treatment.

  12. High prevalence of chronic pituitary and target-organ hormone abnormalities after blast-related mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W. Wilkinson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least one year after injury, in 25-50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI, an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least one year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and

  13. Recruiting of somatotroph cells after combined somatostatin, GHRH and growth hormone (GH) secretagogue stimulation in a study of pituitary GH reserve in prepuberal female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Reina, L.; García-Martínez, E.; Rojas, J.P.; Cañete, M.D.; G. Bernal; Cañete, R.

    2006-01-01

    Diagnostic confirmation of growth hormone (GH) deficiency in children and adults is based on stimulation tests designed to assess the pituitary reserve by measuring the amount of GH released into the bloodstream; however, the results obtained by this means cannot provide any direct indication of the amount of GH actually produced by pituitary somatotroph cells. The present paper sought to test the hypothesis that release of GH following administration of sp...

  14. Development of gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion and pituitary response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanowska, Katarzyna M; Burger, Laura L; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2014-11-05

    Acquisition of a mature pattern of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion from the CNS is a hallmark of the pubertal process. Little is known about GnRH release during sexual maturation, but it is assumed to be minimal before later stages of puberty. We studied spontaneous GnRH secretion in brain slices from male mice during perinatal and postnatal development using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to detect directly the oxidation of secreted GnRH. There was good correspondence between the frequency of GnRH release detected by FSCV in the median eminence of slices from adults with previous reports of in vivo luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse frequency. The frequency of GnRH release in the late embryonic stage was surprisingly high, reaching a maximum in newborns and remaining elevated in 1-week-old animals despite low LH levels. Early high-frequency GnRH release was similar in wild-type and kisspeptin knock-out mice indicating that this release is independent of kisspeptin-mediated excitation. In vivo treatment with testosterone or in vitro treatment with gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) reduced GnRH release frequency in slices from 1-week-old mice. RF9, a putative GnIH antagonist, restored GnRH release in slices from testosterone-treated mice, suggesting that testosterone inhibition may be GnIH-dependent. At 2-3 weeks, GnRH release is suppressed before attaining adult patterns. Reduction in early life spontaneous GnRH release frequency coincides with the onset of the ability of exogenous GnRH to induce pituitary LH secretion. These findings suggest that lack of pituitary secretory response, not lack of GnRH release, initially blocks downstream activation of the reproductive system.

  15. Empty sella syndrome associated with hormone deficiency in adults; Silla turca vacia asociada a disfuncion hormonal en adultos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleaga, L.; Paja, M.; Goni, F.; Grande, J.; Grande, D. [Hospital de Basurto. Bilbao (Spain); Merino, M. [Hospital General Yague (Spain); Delgado, A. [Hospital Marques de Valdecilla. Santander (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this study was to correlate the magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients with hormone deficiencies with the clinical data and the hormonal status. We studied 11 cases ef empty sella with different peripheral pituitary deficiencies. Hormone levels were determined according to standard laboratory methods. All the patients underwent MR imaging. The studies were carried out with a 1 Tesla superconducting magnet, using the cranial cavity for transmission and reception. Segittal and coronal T1-weighted spin-echo sequences (TR/TE: 600/15 ms), axial T2-weighted spin-echo sequences (TR/TE: 3,500/19/93 ms) and gadolinium-enhanced (=.2 cc/kg body weight) sagital and coronal T1-weighted spin-echo sequences (TR/TE: 600/15 ms) were employed. Six of the patients presented partial or total hypopituitarism associated with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH); there was one case of panhypopituitarism without SIADH and four cases of primary hypothyroidism, there of which were associated with pituitary deficiency, MR imaging revealed five cases of partially empty sella with residual pituitary gland on the sella floor and six cases in which the sella was completely empty. This study also identified six cases of normally situated neurohypophysis, another four in which the neurohypophysis could not be identified and one case of ectopic neurohypophysis. MR imaging is the technique of choice in the study of abnormal hypothalamic-pituitary activity. Empty and partially empty sella should be included among the frequent causes of hypopituitarism, although there is no clear relationship between the degree of adenohypophyseal insufficiency and the degree of atrophy of this system as viewed in MR images. In some cases, this entity may be the radiological sign of a phase in the development of an autoimmune inflammatory process involving the pituitary gland. (Author) 16 refs.

  16. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated mitochondrial damage plays a critical role in T-2 toxin-induced apoptosis and growth hormone deficiency in rat anterior pituitary GH3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianglian; Guo, Pu; Liu, Aimei; Wu, Qinghua; Xue, Xijuan; Dai, Menghong; Hao, Haihong; Qu, Wei; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2017-04-01

    T-2 toxin, a major compound of trichothecenes, induces cell apoptosis and growth hormone (GH) deficiency and causes considerable growth retardation in animals and human cells. However, the mechanism underlying its growth suppression still remains unclear. Recent studies have suggested that ROS induced cell apoptosis and animal feed intake reduction, but there are limited reports on the role of RNS in T-2 toxin-mediated mitochondrial damage, cell apoptosis and growth retardation. Herein, T-2 toxin-induced GH3 cell damage and apoptosis were tested by MTT assay, LDH leakage and flow cytometry, respectively. Intracellular NO and antioxidant enzyme activity, ΔΨm, morphometric changes of mitochondria, the caspase pathway, and inflammatory factors were investigated. Free radical scavengers NAC, SOD and NO scavenger haemoglobin were used to explore the role of oxidative stress and the relationship between NO production and caspase pathway. The results clearly revealed that T-2 toxin caused significant increases in NO generation, cell apoptosis, GH deficiency, increased iNOS activity, upregulation of inflammatory factors and caspase pathway, decreases in ΔΨm and morphosis damage. These data suggest that mitochondria are a primary target of T-2 toxin-induced NO, and NO is a key mediator of T-2 toxin-induced cell apoptosis and GH deficiency via the mitochondria-dependent pathway in cells.

  17. Pituitary adenomas in mice transgenic for growth hormone-releasing hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asa, S L; Kovacs, K; Stefaneanu, L

    1992-01-01

    It has been shown that mice transgenic for human GH-releasing hormone (GRH) develop hyperplasia of pituitary somatotrophs, lactotrophs, and mammosomatotrophs, cells capable of producing both GH and PRL, by 8 months of age. We now report that GRH transgenic mice 10-24 months of age develop pituita...... somatotrophs or mammosomatotrophs to cells with features of the glycoprotein hormone cell line. These findings provide conclusive evidence that protracted GRH stimulation of secretory activity can result in proliferation, hyperplasia, and adenoma of adenohypophysial cells....

  18. Giant growth-hormone secreting pituitary tumour with etracranial extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ip Taipang; Chan Fuluk; Kung Annie Waichee; Lam Karen Siuling [Univ. of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong). Depts. of Medicine and Diagnostic Radiology

    1996-02-01

    A 19 year old female patient with typical features of acromegaly was found to have an extensive pituitary tumour with suprasellar, lateral and inferior extensions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed a portion of the tumour extending from the right cavernous sinus through the foramen ovale to become extracranial. Serum growth hormone (GH) was 52.6 mU/L basally and remained elevated after oral glucose, confirming the diagnosis of acromegaly. Treatment with the long-acting somatostatin analogue, octreotide, for 6 months led to a 30% reduction in tumour volume of the intracranial portion but no effect on the extracranial and sphenoidal extensions. She was subsequently treated with trans-sphenoidal surgery followed by external irradiation. The possibility of perineural spread of the tumour was considered. 9 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  19. Effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on IGF-related parameters and on the pituitary-gonadal axis in GH-deficient males. A double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Andersson, A M; Pedersen, S A;

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that growth hormone (GH) may play a regulatory role in male reproductive function. To express full anabolic effect in immature boys testosterone apparently requires the presence of GH. In GH-deficient adults, GH replacement therapy exerts a variety of anabolic actions, some...... in hypogonadal patients substituted with androgens, but GH had no effect on inhibin-B levels. In conclusion, GH replacement therapy in 13 GH-deficient young adult males resulted in significant increases in total and free IGF-I as well as in ALS levels in all patients, but had no significant effect on: (1....../l and ALS levels from 9,182 (5,524) to 16,872 (6,278) microg/l (all p testosterone levels in the 13 patients between the GH and placebo treatment periods (21.9 (5.1) vs. 24.5 (8.1) nmol/l, nonsignificant). Furthermore, no effect of GH on the testicular response...

  20. MRI of pituitary macroadenomas with reference to hormonal activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, P.; Nyman, R. (Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology); Burmann, P. (Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Internal Medicine); Lundberg, P.O. (Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Neurology)

    1992-02-01

    In 115 patients with pituitary macroadenomas, the findings on mid-field MRI were correlated with the hormonal activity of the tumours. Adenomas secreting growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) and clinically nonsecretory adenomas were studied. Tumour size, invasiveness and signal intensity patterns were recorded. Relaxation times and ratios of signal intensity and proton density (relative to the corpus callosum) were analysed in areas of apparently solid tissue in a subgroup of 59 previously untreated patients. Invasiveness was more common in PRL- and GH-secreting adenomas than in the nonsecreting ones. Diffuse invasion of the base of the skull was most common in prolactinomas, and associated with a lower frequency of suprasellar tumour extension. In prolactinomas, a correlation was found between the maximum serum PRL level and tumour size. Haemorrhagic, cystic or necrotic areas were less common in GH-secreting tumours than in the other types. Haemorrhage was more common in prolactinomas than in nonsecreting tumours. MR parameters were similar in prolactinomas and nonsecreting adenomas, but indicated a smaller amount of water in GH-secreting tumours. (orig.).

  1. The Spectrum of Hormone Immunoreactivity in Typical and Atypical Pituitary Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeşim ERTAN

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to assess the spectrum of hormone immunoreactivity in our pituitary adenoma cases and discuss the diagnostic parameters of atypical pituitary adenomas.Material and Methods: A total of 166 pituitary adenoma cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2008 in our department were included in the present study. Hematoxylin-eosin stained and immunohistochemistry performed slides (ACTH, PRL, GH, TSH, FSH, LH, Ki-67, and p53 were evaluated. Cases having more than two mitoses on 10 high power fields besides more than 3% Ki-67 index were accepted in the atypical group.Results: Histologically, 159 cases were typical pituitary adenoma and 7 were atypical pituitary adenoma. Of the atypical pituitary adenoma cases, one case was ACTH, one GH and one both GH and prolactin hormone immunoreactive pituitary adenomas. Four cases were hormone immunonegative adenomas. Of the typical pituitary adenoma cases, 39 cases were GH, 19 ACTH, 17 prolactin, 10 FSH, 8 LH and one TSH immunreactive pituitary adenomas. Fourty-seven cases were hormone immunonegative adenomas.Twenty-two of the all pitutary adenoma cases had recurrence. Of these cases, 18 were typical adenoma and four were atypical adenoma.Conclusion: The ratio of prolactin immunoreactive pituitary adenoma cases in the surgical material of neuropathology is decreasing due to medical therapy. Atypical pituitary adenomas are not the sole factor affecting the recurrence mechanism but these tumors have higher recurrence rate compared with typical pituitary adenomas and we think the proliferation index might be the principal approach in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  2. Comparison of post-surgical MRI presentation of the pituitary gland and its hormonal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladowska, Joanna; Sokolska, Violetta; Sozański, Tomasz; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Post-surgical evaluation of the pituitary gland in MRI is difficult because of a change of anatomical conditions. It depends also on numerous other factors, including: size and expansion of a tumour before surgery, type of surgical access, quality and volume of filling material used and time of its resorption.The aim of the study was to compare MR image of the pituitary gland after surgery with clinical findings and to establish a correlation between MRI presentation of spared pituitary and its hormonal function. Material/Methods: 124 patients after resection of pituitary adenomas – 409 MRI results in total – were studied. With a 1.5-T unit, T1-weighted sagittal and coronal, enhanced and unenhanced images were obtained. Results: The pituitary gland seemed to be normal in MRI in 11 patients, 8 of them had completely regular pituitary function but in 3 of them we noticed a partial hypopituitarism. In 99 patients only a part of the pituitary gland was recognised, 53 of them had hypopituitarism but 46 of them were endocrinologically healthy. 14 patients seemed to have no persistent pituitary gland in MRI, in comparison to hormonal studies: there was panhypopituitarism in 6 and hypopituitarism in 8 cases. Conclusions: MRI presentation of post – surgical pituitary gland doesn’t necessarily correlate with its hormonal function – there was a significant statistical difference. Some patients with partial pituitary seems normal hormonal function. In some cases the pituitary seem normal in MRI but these patients have hormonal disorders and need substitution therapy. PMID:22802758

  3. Pituitary apoplexy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Ranabir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy is rare endocrine emergency which can occur due to infarction or haemorrhage of pituitary gland. This disorder most often involves a pituitary adenoma. Occasionally it may be the first manifestation of an underlying adenoma. There is conflicting data regarding which type of pituitary adenoma is prone for apoplexy. Some studies showed predominance of non-functional adenomas while some other studies showed a higher prevalence in functioning adenomas amongst which prolactinoma have the highest risk. Although pituitary apoplexy can occur without any precipitating factor in most cases, there are some well recognizable risk factors such as hypertension, medications, major surgeries, coagulopathies either primary or following medications or infection, head injury, radiation or dynamic testing of the pituitary. Patients usually present with headache, vomiting, altered sensorium, visual defect and/or endocrine dysfunction. Hemodynamic instability may be result from adrenocorticotrophic hormone deficiency. Imaging with either CT scan or MRI should be performed in suspected cases. Intravenous fluid and hydrocortisone should be administered after collection of sample for baseline hormonal evaluation. Earlier studies used to advocate urgent decompression of the lesion but more recent studies favor conservative approach for most cases with surgery reserved for those with deteriorating level of consciousness or increasing visual defect. The visual and endocrine outcomes are almost similar with either surgery or conservative management. Once the acute phase is over, patient should be re-evaluated for hormonal deficiencies.

  4. Zinc influences on brain development, pituitary an thyroidfunction iniodine-deficient pregnant and neonatal rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoxia Yang; Jianchao Bian; Xin Wang; Haiming Wang; Yongping Liu; Shuzhen Wang; Zhichun Mu; Xinluan Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Zinc (Zn) has been shown to greatly influence brain development. Zn supplements may reduce injury to cell membranes of the thyroid gland due to iodine deficiency. OBJECTIVE: To establish an iodine deficiency rat model using low-iodine food, which was supplemented with compound Zn and Zn gluconate, to observe the effects of Zn on brain development, as well as pituitary gland and thyroid gland function in iodine-deficient rats. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized grouping study of neural development was performed in the central laboratory of Shandong Institute for Prevention and Treatment of Endemic Disease from 1998 to 1999. MATERIALS: A total of 270 Wistar, female rats, one month after weaning, were used in this study, including 150 pregnant and 120 neonatal rats. Rats were randomly divided into six groups: normal control, model, iodine, compound Zn, iodine and compound Zn, and zinc gluconate. Each group contained 25 pregnant rats and 20 nenoatal rats. METHODS: The pregnant rats and 20 neonatal rats, and well as the normal group, were fed standard chow and allowed free access to tap water (containing 5 μ g/L iodine and 1 mg/L Zn). The remaining five groups were fed low-iodine chow. However, the model group received distilled water, the iodine group received potassium-iodide distilled water (containing 300 μ g/L iodine), the compound Zn group received distilled water and intragastrically administrated 10 mL/kg compound Zn solution, once per day, the iodine and compound Zn group received distilled water with 300 p g/L iodine and intragastrically administrated 10 mL/kg compound Zn solution, once per day. All treatments lasted 90 days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All pregnant rats were sacrificed on the day 21 of pregnancy. Body mass, number and rate of fetal absorption, as well as fetal death and malformation, were determined. Thyroid and pituitary gland weights were measured, as well as serum levels of thyroid hormone, gonadotropin, and sex hormones. In the

  5. Familial growth hormone releasing factor deficiency in pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Stirling, H F; Barr, D G; Kelnar, C J

    1991-01-01

    A mother with pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism and her short son showed poor spontaneous growth hormone secretion, and provocation tests suggested a deficiency of growth hormone releasing factor. This is the first report of growth hormone releasing factor deficiency in pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism. The boy has responded well to growth hormone treatment over a period of three years.

  6. A FSH-Secreting Pituitary Macroadenoma Causing A Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available FSH-secreting pituitary adenomas can affect sexual and reproductive function. In this article, we have reported the case of a 32-year-old male with secondary infertility. The patient had sexual and reproductive disturbances. The test results of the blood samples indicated obviously decreased testosterone (T and estradiol (E2 levels. Based on previous hormonal results, the patient received pituitary stimulation and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG tests. Both follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH showed low response during the pituitary stimulation test. The results of the hCG test indicated that T/E2 could recover to a normal level. In addition, this patient was diagnosed with pituitary macroadenoma, which was supported by the pituitary MRI. The man’s sexual and reproductive functions recovered following surgery. The pathological results confirmed that the tumor tissue was an FSH-secreting pituitary adenoma by immunohistochemical staining. The purpose of this report was to review the relative literature and discuss the influence of FSH-secreting pituitary adenomas on hormones through the hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis.

  7. Effects of retinoic acid on growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene expression and growth hormone secretion in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliza, Rita; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-30

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule in embryonic development and adult tissue. The actions of RA are mediated by the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), which regulate gene expression. RAR and RXR are widely expressed in the anterior pituitary gland. RA was reported to stimulate growth hormone (GH) gene expression in the anterior pituitary cells. However, current evidence is unclear on the role of RA in gene expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (Ghrh-r), growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghs-r) and somatostatin receptors (Sst-rs). Using isolated anterior pituitary cells of rats, we examined the effects of RA on gene expression of these receptors and GH release. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10(-6) M) for 24 h increased gene expression levels of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r; however, expressions of Sst-r2 and Sst-r5 were unchanged. Combination treatment with the RAR-agonist Am80 and RXR-agonist PA024 mimicked the effects of ATRA on Ghrh-r and Ghs-r gene expressions. Exposure of isolated pituitary cells to ATRA had no effect on basal GH release. In contrast, ATRA increased growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-stimulated GH release from cultured anterior pituitary cells. Our results suggest that expressions of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r are regulated by RA through the RAR-RXR receptor complex and that RA enhances the effects of GHRH and ghrelin on GH release from the anterior pituitary gland.

  8. High-Cholesterol Diet Disrupts the Levels of Hormones Derived from Anterior Pituitary Basophilic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Zhang, X; Liu, Z; Yuan, Z; Song, Y; Shao, S; Zhou, X; Yan, H; Guan, Q; Gao, L; Zhang, H; Zhao, J

    2016-03-01

    Emerging evidence shows that elevated cholesterol levels are detrimental to health. However, it is unclear whether there is an association between cholesterol and the pituitary. We investigated the effects of a high-cholesterol diet on pituitary hormones using in vivo animal studies and an epidemiological study. In the animal experiments, rats were fed a high-cholesterol or control diet for 28 weeks. In rats fed the high-cholesterol diet, serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; also known as thyrotrophin), luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) produced by the basophilic cells of the anterior pituitary were elevated in a time-dependent manner. Among these hormones, TSH was the first to undergo a significant change, whereas adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), another hormone produced by basophilic cells, was not changed significantly. As the duration of cholesterol feeding increased, cholesterol deposition increased gradually in the pituitary. Histologically, basophilic cells, and especially thyrotrophs and gonadotrophs, showed an obvious increase in cell area, as well as a potential increase in their proportion of total pituitary cells. Expression of the β-subunit of TSH, FSH and LH, which controls hormone specificity and activity, exhibited a corresponding increase. In the epidemiological study, we found a similar elevation of serum TSH, LH and FSH and a decrease in ACTH in patients with hypercholesterolaemia. Significant positive correlations existed between serum total cholesterol and TSH, FSH or LH, even after adjusting for confounding factors. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that the high-cholesterol diet affected the levels of hormones derived from anterior pituitary basophilic cells. This phenomenon might contribute to the pituitary functional disturbances described in hypercholesterolaemia.

  9. Regulation of pituitary hormones and cell proliferation by components of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Paez-Pereda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix is a three-dimensional network of proteins, glycosaminoglycans and other macromolecules. It has a structural support function as well as a role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The extracellular matrix conveys signals through membrane receptors called integrins and plays an important role in pituitary physiology and tumorigenesis. There is a differential expression of extracellular matrix components and integrins during the pituitary development in the embryo and during tumorigenesis in the adult. Different extracellular matrix components regulate adrenocorticotropin at the level of the proopiomelanocortin gene transcription. The extracellular matrix also controls the proliferation of adrenocorticotropin-secreting tumor cells. On the other hand, laminin regulates the production of prolactin. Laminin has a dynamic pattern of expression during prolactinoma development with lower levels in the early pituitary hyperplasia and a strong reduction in fully grown prolactinomas. Therefore, the expression of extracellular matrix components plays a role in pituitary tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the remodeling of the extracellular matrix affects pituitary cell proliferation. Matrix metalloproteinase activity is very high in all types of human pituitary adenomas. Matrix metalloproteinase secreted by pituitary cells can release growth factors from the extracellular matrix that, in turn, control pituitary cell proliferation and hormone secretion. In summary, the differential expression of extracellular matrix components, integrins and matrix metalloproteinase contributes to the control of pituitary hormone production and cell proliferation during tumorigenesis.

  10. Activation of GABA B receptors in the anterior pituitary inhibits prolactin and luteinizing hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux-Lantos, V; Rey, E; Libertun, C

    1992-11-01

    Previous work from our laboratory showed that baclofen could lower serum prolactin (PRL) levels acting at the central nervous system. The present experiments were designed to evaluate whether the gamma-aminobutyric acid B agonist was also effective in inhibiting hormone release at the pituitary level. In monolayer cultures of adenohypophyseal dispersed cells, baclofen inhibited basal PRL secretion after 1 or 2 h of incubation. This inhibition was significantly abolished by three antagonists: phaclofen, 3-aminopropyl-phosphonic acid and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid. Furthermore, baclofen inhibited the thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced PRL release in a concentration-dependent manner. With regard to gonadotropin secretion, baclofen was unable to modify basal luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, but significantly inhibited the LH-releasing hormone-induced LH release. These results show that baclofen, in addition to its central neuroendocrine effects, inhibits pituitary hormone secretion, under basal and/or stimulated conditions, by direct action at the pituitary level.

  11. Hyperprolactinemia after neonatal prolactin (PRL) deficiency in rats: evidence for altered anterior pituitary regulation of PRL secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, G V; Shyr, S W; Grosvenor, C E; Crowley, W R

    1988-05-01

    Previous findings from this laboratory suggest a role for milk-borne PRL in the development of the inhibitory neuroendocrine controls over PRL secretion. Thus, rats that consumed milk deficient in PRL on days 2-5 postpartum show reduced concentrations and turnover of DA in the median eminence and elevated serum levels of PRL at 30-35 days of age. The present experiments were undertaken to investigate whether these consequences of neonatal PRL deficiency persist beyond puberty, and whether alterations in pituitary responsiveness to hypothalamic hormones may be involved. Lactating rats received sc injections of either saline or the dopamine (DA) agonist bromocriptine (125 micrograms/rat.day) on each of days 2-5 postpartum, a treatment that reduces the amount of PRL in milk without abolishing lactation. Blood samples were obtained from male and female offspring at various postnatal ages, and PRL concentrations were determined by RIA. Serum PRL concentrations in offspring from both groups were low until after weaning, but the female offspring of bromocriptine-treated mothers showed significantly elevated serum PRL between days 30 and 90 postpartum. Male offspring of bromocriptine-treated mothers also had transiently increased serum PRL levels, which returned to control levels by day 40. The turnover rate of DA in the median eminence, calculated from the rate of decline after synthesis inhibition, was reduced on day 35 in neonatally PRL-deficient offspring, as shown previously. However, no differences in DA turnover between the two groups were apparent on day 60, indicating a recovery of normal dopaminergic activity. Anterior pituitary cells of 100-day-old control and neonatally PRL-deficient animals were dispersed, cultured for 3 days, and then exposed to either TRH, to stimulate PRL release, or to the DA agonist bromocriptine, which inhibits PRL release. Pituitary cells of neonatally PRL-deficient offspring were almost completely unresponsive to bromocriptine with

  12. Follicle stimulating hormone secreting pituitary adenoma: a challenging diagnosis

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    Madhuri Alap Mehendale

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available FSH secreting pituitary adenomas are relatively uncommon brain tumours and usually non-functioning. But in rare cases they produce ovarian hyperstimulation. We report a case of a 32 year old female P2L2, with amenorrhoea of 1 year, pain in abdomen and galactorrhoea since 6 months. Initially thought to be a simple prolactinoma with multicystic ovaries, but after thorough investigations to our surprise diagnosed to be a rare case of gonadotropin secreting pituitary adenoma. Patient was successfully managed by excision of the pituitary adenoma. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 493-496

  13. Clinical and Biochemical Characteristics of Growth Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the difference of biochemical characteristics on gsp-positive and gsp-negative growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumors, 18 GH-secreting pituitary tumors were examined for their clinical characteristics and gsp oncogenes. All patients received the pituitary function combinative stimulating test. It was found that there were no difference in the sex, age, tumor size, course of disease and plasma basal GH levels with gsp- positive and gsp-negative patients. The plasma levels of PRL were increased in most patients (11/18), and the plasma levels of TSH in gsp-positive patients were higher than those in gsp-negative patients (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in the responses to pituitary combinative stimulating test in gsp-positive and gsp-negative patients. It was concluded that there was little difference in the clinical biochemical characteristics of gsp-positive with gsp-negative GH-secreting pituitary tumors.

  14. Efficacy of hCG and hMG on testicular morphology and function in male patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency%促性腺激素治疗对多种垂体激素缺乏症男性患者睾丸形态和功能影响的时效性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐琳; 李桂梅; 王倩

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究人绒毛膜促性腺激素(hCG)和人绝经期促性腺激素(hMG)起始治疗年龄对多种垂体激素缺乏症男性患者的睾丸形态和功能改善情况的影响。方法以多种垂体激素缺乏症男性患者为研究对象,给予hCG和hMG治疗,同时维持其他激素正常,观察睾丸、阴茎形态,促性激素水平,身高,骨龄等变化值与开始治疗年龄的相关性。结果入组的54例患者经hCG和hMG治疗6个月后,阴茎长度由治疗前的(2.58±0.69)cm增长至(4.19±0.77)cm,阴茎周长由治疗前的(3.71±1.36)cm增长至(5.95±1.26)cm,睾丸容积从治疗前的(1.76±1.49)ml增加至(5.20±2.30)ml,身高从治疗前的(147.01±12.29)cm增加至(151.98±11.52)cm,骨龄从治疗前的(11.22±2.71)岁增长至(11.64±2.72)岁,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.01)。睾丸容积及睾酮水平在治疗前、后的增长值随年龄增长均呈降低趋势,在各年龄组间的差异均有统计学意义(P均<0.05)。用药前后睾丸容积增长值、血清促卵泡激素(FSH)和黄体生成素(LH)水平增加值以及用药前后身高增长值均与开始治疗年龄呈负相关(r=-0.517~-0.334,P<0.05)。结论在正常青春期时期适当早期给予多种垂体激素缺乏症男性患者hCG和hMG治疗可更好改善其第二性征和睾丸功能。%Objectives To study the impact of initial age of treatment on testicular morphology and function in male pa-tients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency using human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and human menopausal gonadotro-pin (hMG). Methods Patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency were treated with hCG and hMG while keeping other hormone levels normal. Correlations among their testicular volume, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and height, bone age were analyzed. Results After 6-month hCG and hMG treatment, the penis

  15. Anophthalmia, hearing loss, abnormal pituitary development and response to growth hormone therapy in three children with microdeletions of 14q22q23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, Sophie; Slamova, Zuzana; Dusatkova, Petra; Briand-Suleau, Audrey; Milcent, Karen; Metay, Corinne; Simandlova, Martina; Sumnik, Zdenek; Tosca, Lucie; Goossens, Michel; Labrune, Philippe; Zemankova, Elsa; Lebl, Jan; Tachdjian, Gerard; Sedlacek, Zdenek

    2014-02-28

    Microdeletions of 14q22q23 have been associated with eye abnormalities and pituitary defects. Other phenotypic features in deletion carriers including hearing loss and response to growth hormone therapy are less well recognized. We studied genotype and phenotype of three newly identified children with 14q22q23 deletions, two girls and one boy with bilateral anophthalmia, and compared them with previously published deletion patients and individuals with intragenic defects in genes residing in the region. The three deletions were de novo and ranged in size between 5.8 and 8.9 Mb. All three children lacked one copy of the OTX2 gene and in one of them the deletion involved also the BMP4 gene. All three patients presented partial conductive hearing loss which tended to improve with age. Analysis of endocrine and growth phenotypes showed undetectable anterior pituitary, growth hormone deficiency and progressive growth retardation in all three patients. Growth hormone therapy led to partial catch-up growth in two of the three patients but just prevented further height loss in the third. The pituitary hypoplasia, growth hormone deficiency and growth retardation associated with 14q22q23 microdeletions are very remarkable, and the latter appears to have an atypical response to growth hormone therapy in some of the cases.

  16. How effective is external pituitary irradiation for growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feek, C.M.; McLelland, J.; Seth, J.; Toft, A.D.; Irvine, W.J.; Padfield, P.L.; Edwards, C.R.W. (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (UK); Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh (UK))

    1984-04-01

    Forty-six patients with GH-secreting pituitary tumours were treated with external pituitary irradiation through two opposed fields to a total dose of 3750 cGy over 15 fractions. Thirty-patients received external radiotherapy as primary treatment; 16 received radiotherapy combined with pituitary surgery. The mean (+- SD) serum GH in the former group was 74.3 +- 74.8 mU/l before treatment, falling by 28% per year over 0-5 years and by 16% per year over 0-20 years. The mean (+- SD) serum GH in the latter group was 265.4 +- 209.3 mU/l before treatment, falling by 76% in the first year-a direct result of surgery-then by 30% per year over 1-5 years and 16% per year over 1-20 years. Progressive failure of normal anterior pituitary function developed by 10 years, with variable loss of gonadotrophin, corticotrophin and thyrotrophin function. The respective figures for patients treated with radiotherapy alone were 47.4, 29.6 and 16.0% and for the combined group 70.2, 53.9 and 38.1%. Whilst external pituitary irradiation appears to reduce serum GH concentrations in patients with GH-secreting pituitary tumours the major disadvantages are the time taken to achieve a cure and the high incidence of hypopituitarism.

  17. Effects of ZCF on the Hormones Secretion of Pituitary-gonad Axis in Kidney-Yang Deficiency Female Rats%壮阳促孕散对雌性肾阳虚大鼠垂体-性腺轴分泌激素的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐红艳; 鞠玉琳; 张敏; 夏广军

    2011-01-01

    试验研究了中药壮阳促孕散对雌性肾阳虚大鼠垂体-性腺轴分泌激素的影响,初步探讨其作用机制.用氢化可的松造雌性大鼠肾阳虚模型,造模21d,从试验第八天开始,中药治疗组灌胃中药壮阳促孕散,阳性对照组灌胃金匮肾气丸,连续给药14d.放射免疫法测定血清中雌二醇(E2)、孕酮(P)、黄体生成素(LH)和促卵泡激素(FSH).结果表明,模型对照组造模后大鼠出现明显的阳虚症状,体重下降,血清中E2、P下降,LH、FSH升高,给药后阳性对照组、中药治疗组大鼠体重增加,血清中E2、P升高,LH、FSH下降.中药壮阳促孕散可调节雌性肾阳虚大鼠血清中LH、FSH、E2和P的分泌,对生殖内分泌有促进作用.%To study the effects of traditional Chinese medicine ZCF on the hormones secretion of pituitary-gonad axis in kid-ney yang deficiency female rats and preliminarily discuss the action mechanism, the kidney-yang deficiency model of female rats was built by using hydrocortisone for 21 days. From the eighth day, Jinkuishenqi pill and traditional Chinese medicine ZCF was given to positive control group and treating group by gavage for 14 days, respectively. The contents of E2, P, LH and FSH in serum were determined by radioimmunoassay. After the model building, the control group presented obvious yang deficiency symptom. The weight of the rats decreased, the content of E2 and P in serum decreased but the contents of LH and FSH increased. After medication, the content of E2 and P in serum of the treating group increased; while the contents of LH and FSH decreased. It indicated that Chinese medicine ZCF could adjust the secretion of LH, FSH, E2 and P in serum of kidney-yang deficiency female rats, and had stimulative function on procreation endocrine.

  18. Transformation of a microprolactinoma into a mixed growth hormone and prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CEDRIC eDESSIMOZ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined prolactin (PRL and growth hormone (GH secretion by a single pituitary tumor can occur in approximately 5% of cases. However, in all previously reported patients, combined secretion of both hormones was present at the time of diagnosis. Here we describe a patient initially diagnosed with a pure prolactin-secreting microadenoma, who experienced the progressive apparition of symptomatic autonomous GH secretion while on intermittent long term dopamine agonist therapy. She was operated on, and immunohistochemical analysis of tumour tissue confirmed the diagnosis of pituitary adenoma with uniform co-staining of all cells for both GH and PRL. This patient represents the first documented occurrence of asynchronous development of combined GH and PRL secretion in a pituitary adenoma. Although pathogenic mechanisms implicated remain largely speculative, it emphasizes the need for long term hormonal follow up of patients harboring prolactinomas.

  19. cDNA microarray reveals signaling pathways involved in hormones expression of human pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yue-Yun; Qi, Xiao-Fei; Song, Shao-Jun; Zhao, Zhan-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Xin; Xiao, Hua-Sheng; Teng, Yun; Han, Ze-Guang

    2005-09-01

    Pituitary, a master gland of neuroendocrine system, secretes hormones that orchestrate many physiological processes, under the regulation of multiple signaling pathways. To investigate the genes involved in hormones expression of human pituitary, homemade cDNA microarray containing 14,800 human genes/ESTs were used to profile the gene expression in both fetal and adult pituitaries. Seven hundred and twelve known genes changed over 2-fold between the both tissues. Of which, 23 genes were changed with hormones expression in aging were confirmed by RT-PCR, not only the known regulators such as Pit1, GATA4, ESRRA, GABA-A, and EMK, but also LOC55884, DUSP3, PNN, and RCL, which had not been reported to be involved in the hormones expression. Correspondingly, the mRNAs of GH, PRL, POMC, TSH-beta, FSH-beta, and LH-beta, was increased as much as 6- to 20-fold in adult pituitary than those in fetal pituitary, by real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay. In addition, the mRNAs of signaling pathways, such as cAMP-PKA-CREB, PI3K-Akt, and PKA-ERK were further investigated. Of them, it was only cAMP-PKA-CREB pathway, but not PI3K-Akt and PKA-ERK have the same expressing pattern as hormones. It suggested that cDNA microarray is highly advantages to profile the differential expressed genes that were involved in hormones expression of human pituitary, but it might ignore some responding proteins regulated posttranscriptionally.

  20. Characterization of growth hormone and prolactin produced by human pituitary in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyler, J S; Rogol, A D; Lovenberg, W; Knazek, R A

    1977-02-01

    Fragments of a pituitary tumor from a patient with acromegaly were grown in tissue culture. The tumor secreted both growth hormone and prolactin,which were recovered in high concentrations. The nonpurified hormones were characterized and compared to their respective counterparts obtained by extraction from normal pituitaries obtained at autopsy. The tissue culture and pituitary extracted hormones were eluted from Sephadex G-100 with the same partition coefficients. Growth hormone from both sources showed parallel dose-response displacement curves, by logit-log transformation, in both specific immunoassay and in a specific lymphocyte binding assay. Prolactin from both sources was compared in specific immunoassay using three different antisera. Parallel logit-log displacement curves were seen with one antiserum, while the other two antisera yielded non-parallel curves, indicating structural differences between prolactin from the two sources. Quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed using multiphasic buffer systems previously developed for characterization of each hormone. By the criteria of joint 95% confidence envelopes of retardation co-efficient and relative free mobility, tissue culture growth hormone and prolactin were indistinguishable from their pituitary-extracted counterparts. This study demonstrates that, prior to purification, tissue culture derived hormone can be characterized by multiple criteria and compared to a standard preparation. Structural differences can be detected, as in the case of prolactin. When the hormones are indistinguishable, as in the case of growth hormone, it becomes worthwhile to increase the scale of tissue cultured production, with the prospect that tissue culture may serve as a source of hormone for both experimental and therapeutic use.

  1. Prospective hormone study of hypothalamic-pituitary function in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after high dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ming-Shen; Lin, Fang-Jen; Huang, Miau-Ju; Wang, Pei-Wan; Tang, Simon; Leung, Wei-Man; Leung, Wan (Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan))

    1989-09-01

    With the aim of evaluating the effect of high dose irradiation (6,500 cGy/36 fractions or higher) to pituitary fossa, a prospective study was carried out in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer by a serial determination of several hormones in the serum, before and after the course of radiation therapy (RT). The radiation treatment field was at least 1 cm above the skull base with bilateral parallel opposing fields. Hormone assays were performed three times on each patient: (1)prior to, (2)one month after, (3)15-18 months after radiation therapy. The study included determination of serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), cortisol, growth hormone (GH) and prolactin concentrations and LH-releasing hormone, thyrotrophin-releasing hormone stimulation and insulin tolerance tests were also carried out. Complete profiles were obtained in 24 patients (16 males and 8 females), aged 16-67 years. The results showed a significant decrease in the level of serum peak value of LH in males 18 months after therapy, and also in GH both one month and 18 months after therapy. A significant increase in the peak value of serum TSH was observed after therapy. Decreased serum FSH, cortisol and prolactin levels were noted, but these did not reach statistical significance. The decrease in GH level appeared earlier and was more sensitive than that found for the other hormones, and could prove to be a useful parameter for clinical evaluation. None of the patients showed any clinically recognizable symptoms or signs of hormone deficiency in the 18-33 months following completion of the radiation therapy. (author).

  2. Pituitary hormone circadian rhythm alterations in cirrhosis patients with subclinical hepatic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze pituitary hormone and melatonin cir- cadian rhythms, and to correlate hormonal alterations with clinical performance, hepatic disease severity and diagnostic tests used for the detection of hepatic en- cephalopathy in cirrhosis. METHODS: Twenty-six patients with cirrhosis were enrolled in the study. Thirteen patients hospitalized for systemic diseases not affecting the liver were included as controls. Liver disease severity was assessed by the Child-Pugh score. All patients underwent detailed neurological assessment, electroencephalogram (EEG), brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), assays of pi- tuitary hormone, cortisol and melatonin, and complete blood chemistry evaluation. RESULTS: Pituitary hormone and melatonin circadian patterns were altered in cirrhosis patients without clinical encephalopathy. Circadian hormone alterations were different in cirrhosis patients compared with con- trois. Although cortisol secretion was not altered in any patient with cirrhosis, the basal cortisol levels were low and correlated with EEG and brain MRI abnormalities. Melatonin was the only hormone associated with the severity of liver insufficiency. CONCLUSION: Abnormal pituitary hormone and mel- atonin circadian patterns are present in cirrhosis before the development of hepatic encephalopathy. These abnormalities may be early indicators of impending hepatic encephalopathy. Factors affecting the human biologic clock at the early stages of liver insufficiency require further study.

  3. Investigation of the serum levels of anterior pituitary hormones in male children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Miyachi, Taishi; Shimmura, Chie; Suda, Shiro; Tsuchiya, Kenji J; Matsumoto, Kaori; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Iwata, Yasuhide; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Sugiyama, Toshirou; Sato, Kohji; Mori, Norio

    2011-10-19

    The neurobiological basis of autism remains poorly understood. The diagnosis of autism is based solely on behavioural characteristics because there are currently no reliable biological markers. To test whether the anterior pituitary hormones and cortisol could be useful as biological markers for autism, we assessed the basal serum levels of these hormones in subjects with autism and normal controls. Using a suspension array system, we determined the serum levels of six anterior pituitary hormones, including adrenocorticotropic hormone and growth hormone, in 32 drug-naive subjects (aged 6 to 18 years, all boys) with autism, and 34 healthy controls matched for age and gender. We also determined cortisol levels in these subjects by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone, growth hormone and cortisol were significantly higher in subjects with autism than in controls. In addition, there was a significantly positive correlation between cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels in autism. Our results suggest that increased basal serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone accompanied by increased cortisol and growth hormone may be useful biological markers for autism.

  4. Investigation of the serum levels of anterior pituitary hormones in male children with autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwata Keiko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neurobiological basis of autism remains poorly understood. The diagnosis of autism is based solely on behavioural characteristics because there are currently no reliable biological markers. To test whether the anterior pituitary hormones and cortisol could be useful as biological markers for autism, we assessed the basal serum levels of these hormones in subjects with autism and normal controls. Findings Using a suspension array system, we determined the serum levels of six anterior pituitary hormones, including adrenocorticotropic hormone and growth hormone, in 32 drug-naive subjects (aged 6 to 18 years, all boys with autism, and 34 healthy controls matched for age and gender. We also determined cortisol levels in these subjects by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone, growth hormone and cortisol were significantly higher in subjects with autism than in controls. In addition, there was a significantly positive correlation between cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels in autism. Conclusion Our results suggest that increased basal serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone accompanied by increased cortisol and growth hormone may be useful biological markers for autism.

  5. High prevalence rate of pituitary incidentaloma: is it associated with the age-related decline of the sex hormones levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastelan, Darko; Korsic, Mirko

    2007-01-01

    Incidental pituitary adenoma is the common finding during brain imaging. According to multistep model of pituitary tumourigenesis genetic alterations provide the initiating event that transforms cells while hormones play a role in promoting cell proliferation. Development of pituitary adenoma in a case of excessive hypophysiotrophic hormones production or reduced feedback suppression by target gland hormones emphasizes the importance of hormonal stimulation in pituitary tumourigenesis. Pituitary hyperplasia has been reported in pregnancy, hypothyroidism and conditions such as CRH or GHRH hypersecretion. Moreover, recent study reported one case of gonadotroph macroadenoma and two cases of gonadotroph cells hyperplasia in patients with Klinefelter syndrome probably due to protracted stimulation of gonadotroph cells because of lack of androgen feedback. Significant changes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis occurred with aging. In females, after menopause, estradiol level decreases by 35-fold and estrone level by 20-fold that results in increased gonadotropins levels. Similarly, FSH, but not LH, level is increased with advancing age in men, too, although the age-related difference in the level is less in comparison with women. Regarding these data, we hypothesised that high prevalence rate of pituitary incidentaloma in the elderly is associated with age-related decline in sex hormones levels and subsequent lack of feedback suppression leading to permanent gonadotrophs stimulation which is the crucial step in the pituitary tumour development. According to previously mentioned multistep model of pituitary tumourigenesis, incidentaloma will develop only in persons with already present intrinsic pituitary cell defects. However, further studies have to answer the questions of whether the incidence of pituitary tumours is more frequent in elderly, whether women with late onset menopause or those taking long-term hormone replacement therapy have lower rate of

  6. Growth hormone deficiency in treated acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Marzullo, Paolo; Doga, Mauro; Aimaretti, Gianluca; Giustina, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) of the adult is characterized by reduced quality of life (QoL) and physical fitness, skeletal fragility, and increased weight and cardiovascular risk. Hypopituitarism may develop in patients after definitive treatment of acromegaly, but an exact prevalence of GHD in this population is still uncertain owing to limited awareness and the scarce and conflicting data available on this topic. Because acromegaly and GHD may yield adverse consequences on similar target systems, the final outcomes of some complications of acromegaly may be further affected by the occurrence of GHD. However, it is still largely unknown whether patients with post-acromegaly GHD may benefit from GH replacement. We review the diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of GHD in adult patients treated for acromegaly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of zeranol on in vitro growth hormone release by lamb and rat pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, C J; Wiggins, J P; Wangsness, P J

    1988-10-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the effect of zeranol on release and synthesis of growth hormone (GH) by anterior pituitary cells established in either static or continuous flow cultures. Young adult male rats, slaughter-age lambs and juvenile lambs were used as sources of pituitary cells. In static primary cell cultures, no consistent effect of zeranol at 10(-7), 10(-9) or 10(-11) M was demonstrated by either rat or ovine cells. Rat pituitaries established in perifusion culture chambers showed no repeatable response to zeranol. Dissociated cells from lambs established in perifusion culture, however, had significant increases in release of GH in response to 37% of zeranol pulse exposures. When dissociated cells from juvenile lamb pituitaries were used, up to 10-fold increases in GH release consistently were measured within minutes of exposure to zeranol.

  8. Both pituitary and placental growth hormone transcripts are expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melen, L; Hennen, G; Dullaart, RPF; Igout, A

    1997-01-01

    The hGH-V gene codes for a variant of human pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) named placental growth hormone (hPGH). hPGH shares 93% amino acid identity with hGH-N. Until now the hGH-V gene was considered to be exclusively expressed in human placenta, where it replaces maternal circulating hGH-N at t

  9. Effect of Camphor on Pituitary-Gonadal Hormonal Axis and Oogenesis in Adult Female Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Habibollah Johari; Amir Ashkan Mahjoor; Siyamak Fallahi; Hossein Kargar Jahromi; Maryam Abedini; Mohammad Ali Poor Danesh; Zahra Zamani

    2013-01-01

    Background & Objective: Camphor stimulates the nervous system and the circulatory system, reduces lactation, and prevents conception and embryo embedding. We investigated the effects of camphor on the pituitary-gonadal hormonal axis and concentration of steroidal hormones.   Materials & Methods: The parameters investigated were concentrations of LH, FSH, estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. Forty adult female rats at a mean weight of 180 ± 20 grams were divided into five groups. Camphor ...

  10. Growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma:clinical and MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hong Suk; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Sim, Jung Suk; Lee, Sang Hyun; Song, Jae Uoo; Yoo, In Kyu; Jung, Hee Won; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To describe clinical and MRI findings of growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma, to determine if there are any characteristic MRI findings different from those of other pituitary adenomas, to evaluate the relationship between tumor size and serum growth hormone level, and to assess the results of immunohi-stochemical study. We retrospectively analysed clinical and MRI findings of 29 patients with growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma confirmed by serum growth hormone level and surgery. We also evaluated the relationship between the tumor volume and serum growth hormone level, and the results of immunohistochemical study. Coronal and sagittal T1-weighted MR images in all patients and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR images in 28 patients were obtained with 2.0 T(24 cases) and 0.5 T(5 cases) MR imagers. The images were analyzed in terms of tumor size, signal intensity, degree of contrast enhancement, extent of tumor growth and the presence or absence of cystic change, hemorrhage and calcification. Clinical manifestations included facial feature change and soft tissue swelling of hands and feet(n=29), headache(n=12), impaired visual acuity(n=9), symptoms of hyperprolactinemia(n=8), visual field defect(n=5), and others(n=6). On MR images, all of the 29 cases were seen to be macroadenomas and the size of the tumors averaged 2.2cm(1-5.2cm). Supra- and infrasellar extensions were seen in 21 and 22 patients, respectively. Cavernous sinus invasion was noted in seven, and in one this was bilateral. Signal intensity was isointense with cortical grey matter in 26 cases(90%). Cystic change or necrosis was seen in eight cases(28%), hemorrhage in four(14%), and calcification in two(7%). After enhancement, most(25/28) of the tumors enhanced less than normal pituitary in degree. There was no correlation between serum growth hormone level and tumor size. Immunohistochemical study showed positive growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas were various and included

  11. MR imaging of growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Ueda, Fumiaki; Fujinaga, Yasunari [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] (and others)

    2000-11-01

    We evaluated MR imaging of 51 growth hormonesecreting pituitary adenomas. On T1WI, 22 tumors were isointense with gray matter (GM), nine isointense with GM and white matter (WM), 14 isointense with WM, and six more hyperintense than WM. On T2WI of 45 patients, only fifteen tumors showed hypointensity than WM, 10 were isointense with WM, eight isointense with GM and WM, 12 showed in part isointensity with GM, and one was more hyperintense than GM. The dynamic study demonstrated the tumor more clearly than the delayed study in 10, while the opposite was true for two patients. The dynamic study is inevitable for MR imaging of GH-secreting pituitary adenomas. (author)

  12. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs.

  13. MRI of growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas: factors determining pretreatment hormone levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, N.; Iuchi, T.; Eda, M.; Yamaura, A. [Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Chiba University School of Medicine (Japan); Isono, S. [Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Anesthesiology, Chiba University School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    Preoperative serum growth hormone (GH) level is one of the most important determinants of outcome. Our aim was to assess MRI findings which may correlate with pretreatment GH levels in GH-secreting adenomas. We retrospectively studied 29 patients with acromegaly caused by a pituitary adenoma. Tumor size (height, width, thickness and volume), suprasellar extension, sphenoid or cavernous sinus invasion, signal intensity and contrast enhancement were studied. Linear regression analysis or Fisher's exact probability test was used for statistical analysis. Factors related to high GH levels were the maximum dimension of the tumour (r = 0.496, P < 0.01), its volume (r = 0.439, P < 0.05), spenoid sinus invasion (P < 0.01) and intracavernous carotid artery encasement (P < 0.01). The other items were not related to serum GH levels. Since we believe surgery is the first choice of treatment and the cavernous sinus is difficult of access with a conventional surgical approach, preoperative assessment of invasion into the cavernous sinus is critical for predicting the surgical outcome. Low GH levels (5-50 ng/ml) were found with tumours medial to the intercarotid line and high levels (more than 101 ng/ml) with invasive tumours with carotid artery encasement. Variable GH levels were noted with tumours extending beyond the intercarotid line. Because functioning adenomas invading the cavernous sinus tend to have markedly high hormone levels, and only patients with carotid artery encasement showed markedly elevated GH levels, we believe carotid artery encasement a reliable MRI indicator of cavernous sinus invasion. (orig.)

  14. The cardiovascular system in growth hormone excess and growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, G; Di Somma, C; Grasso, L F S; Savanelli, M C; Colao, A; Pivonello, R

    2012-12-01

    The clinical conditions associated with GH excess and GH deficiency (GHD) are known to be associated with an increased risk for the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, suggesting that either an excess or a deficiency in GH and/or IGF-I is deleterious for cardiovascular system. In patients with acromegaly, chronic GH and IGF-I excess commonly causes a specific cardiomyopathy characterized by a concentric cardiac hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction and, in later stages, with systolic dysfunction ending in heart failure if GH/IGF-I excess is not controlled. Abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and anomalies of cardiac valves can also occur. Moreover, the increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance, as well as dyslipidemia, confer an increased risk for vascular atherosclerosis. Successful control of the disease is accompanied by a decrease of the cardiac mass and improvement of cardiac function and an improvement in cardiovascular risk factors. In patients with hypopituitarism, GHD has been considered the under- lying factor of the increased mortality when appropriate standard replacement of the pituitary hormones deficiencies is given. Either childhood-onset or adulthood-onset GHD are characterized by a cluster of abnormalities associated with an increased cardiovascular risk, including altered body composition, unfavorable lipid profile, insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction and vascular atherosclerosis, a decrease in cardiac mass together with an impairment of systolic function mainly after exercise. Treatment with recombinant GH in patients with GHD is followed by an improvement of the cardiovascular risk factors and an increase in cardiac mass together with an improvement in cardiac performance. In conclusion, acromegaly and GHD are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but the control of GH/IGF-I secretion reverses cardiovascular

  15. Pituitary-Gonadal Axis Hormone and Semen Analysis in Narcotic Dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Assaei

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug abuse is associated with numerous complications including hormonal disorders of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and spermatogenic disorders. We have compared the hormone concentration of pituitary-gonadal axis and the semen analysis in opioid-dependent and non-opioid-dependent men.Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, serum concentration of pituitary- gonadal axis hormones and semen analysis in 48 opioid-dependent men as eligible to participate in the study were compared with those in 12 non-dependent men.Results: Free testosterone concentration in all test groups was significantly less than that in control group. Furthermore, the concentration of Dihydrotestosterone (DHT and Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate (DHEAS in all test groups except those addicted to heroin was less than in those in control group. Concentrations of LH, FSH, prolactin, SHBG, progesterone and estradiol, normal and abnormal sperm count in test groups were significantly different from control group. However, in all test groups, sperm motility rate was less than control group. No significant relationship was found between the concentration of sex hormones and the status of sperms motility. Conclusion: Chronic use of opioids will affect testosterone hormone and sperm, and it will cause hypogonadism and impairment of sperm motility.

  16. Modulations of prolactin and growth hormone gene expression and chromatin structure in cultured rat pituitary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Levy-Wilson, B

    1983-01-01

    I have measured the effect of hormones and other regulatory factors present in the serum component of the culture medium on the levels of growth hormone and prolactin mRNAs in rat pituitary (GH4) cells. Hybridization of cytoplasmic RNA with growth hormone or prolactin cDNA clones indicate that serum depletion reduces significantly the amount of these two mRNAs. The localization of these two genes in chromatin was also analysed using micrococcal nuclease as a probe. At intermediate levels of d...

  17. Characterization of pituitary growth hormone and its receptor in the green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Mendoza, José; Carranza, Martha; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary growth hormone (GH) has been studied in most vertebrate groups; however, only a few studies have been carried out in reptiles. Little is known about pituitary hormones in the order Squamata, to which the green iguana (gi) belongs. In this work, we characterized the hypophysis of Iguana iguana morphologically. The somatotrophs (round cells of 7.6-10 μm containing 250- to 300-nm secretory granules where the giGH is stored) were found, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, exclusively in the caudal lobe of the pars distalis, whereas the lactotrophs were distributed only in the rostral lobe. A pituitary giGH-like protein was obtained by immuno-affinity chromatography employing a heterologous antibody against chicken GH. giGH showed molecular heterogeneity (22, 44, and 88 kDa by SDS-PAGE/Western blot under non-reducing conditions and at least four charge variants (pIs 6.2, 6.5, 6.9, 7.4) by isoelectric focusing. The pituitary giGH cDNA (1016 bp), amplified by PCR and RACE, encodes a pre-hormone of 218 aa, of which 190 aa correspond to the mature protein and 28 aa to the signal peptide. The giGH receptor cDNA was also partially sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of the amino acid sequences of giGH and giGHR homologs in vertebrates suggest a parallel evolution and functional relationship between the GH and its receptor.

  18. [Pituitary hormone secretion induced by optokinetic stimulation (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, W L; Scherer, H; Eversmann, T; Gottsmann, M

    1978-08-01

    A slight optokinetic stimulation induces a significant increase of serum levels of antidiuretic hormone 1,1 +/- 0.8 pg/ml (mean +/- SD) to 3,3 +/- 1,9 pg/ml (mean +/- SD). Serum levels of gGH and cortisol remain unchanged, whereas serum prolactin levels decrease slightly. The ADH secretion seems to be the most sensitive hormonal parameter of the stimulation of the vestibular nuclei induced either by the optokinetic stimulation or by the Coriolis effect.

  19. Pituitary diseases : long-term clinical consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaauw, Agatha Apolonia van der

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes various studies during the long-term follow-up of patients after treatment for pituitary diseases. The focus of this thesis is acromegaly, growth hormone deficiency, sleep and quality of life. Various aspects are described.

  20. Pituitary diseases : long-term clinical consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaauw, Agatha Apolonia van der

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes various studies during the long-term follow-up of patients after treatment for pituitary diseases. The focus of this thesis is acromegaly, growth hormone deficiency, sleep and quality of life. Various aspects are described.

  1. Secretion of human parathyroid hormone from rat pituitary cells infected with a recombinant retrovirus encoding preproparathyroid hormone.

    OpenAIRE

    Hellerman, J G; Cone, R C; Potts, J. T.; Rich, A; Mulligan, R C; Kronenberg, H M

    1984-01-01

    In order to study the functions of precursors to secreted proteins, we expressed cloned DNA encoding human preproparathyroid hormone (preproPTH) in rat pituitary cells. We first constructed a recombinant plasmid containing human preproPTH cDNA and retroviral control signals. This recombinant plasmid was transfected into psi-2 cells, a packaging cell line that produces Moloney murine leukemia viral particles containing no retroviral RNA. The transfected psi-2 cells generated helper-free recomb...

  2. Psychomotor retardation in a girl with complete growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Devi; Malhi, Prabhjot; Kumar Bhalla, Anil; Sachdeva, Naresh; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Infants with complete growth hormone deficiency may suffer from psychomotor retardation in addition to severe growth failure. Without replacement therapy, they may have a compromised intellectual potential manifesting as learning disabilities and attention-deficit disorders in later life. In this communication, we discuss an infant who showed improvement in physical growth after growth hormone therapy but her psychomotor skills did not improve probably due to late start of treatment. There is a need to start growth hormone therapy as early as possible in infants with complete growth hormone deficiency to avoid adverse effects on psychomotor and brain development.

  3. Pituitary cell differentiation from stem cells and other cells: toward restorative therapy for hypopituitarism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Christophe; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary gland, key regulator of our endocrine system, produces multiple hormones that steer essential physiological processes. Hence, deficient pituitary function (hypopituitarism) leads to severe disorders. Hypopituitarism can be caused by defective embryonic development, or by damage through tumor growth/resection and traumatic brain injury. Lifelong hormone replacement is needed but associated with significant side effects. It would be more desirable to restore pituitary tissue and function. Recently, we showed that the adult (mouse) pituitary holds regenerative capacity in which local stem cells are involved. Repair of deficient pituitary may therefore be achieved by activating these resident stem cells. Alternatively, pituitary dysfunction may be mended by cell (replacement) therapy. The hormonal cells to be transplanted could be obtained by (trans-)differentiating various kinds of stem cells or other cells. Here, we summarize the studies on pituitary cell regeneration and on (trans-)differentiation toward hormonal cells, and speculate on restorative therapies for pituitary deficiency.

  4. Multiple-scale neuroendocrine signals connect brain and pituitary hormone rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanò, Nicola; Guillou, Anne; Martin, Agnès O; Mollard, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Small assemblies of hypothalamic “parvocellular” neurons release their neuroendocrine signals at the median eminence (ME) to control long-lasting pituitary hormone rhythms essential for homeostasis. How such rapid hypothalamic neurotransmission leads to slowly evolving hormonal signals remains unknown. Here, we show that the temporal organization of dopamine (DA) release events in freely behaving animals relies on a set of characteristic features that are adapted to the dynamic dopaminergic control of pituitary prolactin secretion, a key reproductive hormone. First, locally generated DA release signals are organized over more than four orders of magnitude (0.001 Hz–10 Hz). Second, these DA events are finely tuned within and between frequency domains as building blocks that recur over days to weeks. Third, an integration time window is detected across the ME and consists of high-frequency DA discharges that are coordinated within the minutes range. Thus, a hierarchical combination of time-scaled neuroendocrine signals displays local–global integration to connect brain–pituitary rhythms and pace hormone secretion. PMID:28193889

  5. Adaptation of the hypothalamic-pituitary hormones during intensive endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, T; Brechtel, L; Mai, K; Otto, B; Maser-Gluth, C; Pfeiffer, A F H; Spranger, J; Diederich, S

    2005-11-01

    Physical activity leads to changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary hormonal system. However, acute and long-term adaptations have not yet been precisely characterized. In this study, the changes of the hormonal system as a result of marathon training and running a marathon were examined. In particular, we focused on adaptations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, regarding the activation or inactivation of cortisol to cortisone by the 11beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase system (11beta-HSD). Patient measurements: 8 healthy women and 11 healthy men volunteered for this study. Blood samples, 24-h urine and a dexamethasone suppression test were analysed for metabolic and hormonal parameters at five different dates 12 weeks around a marathon. Cortisol and ACTH values decreased significantly 2 days after the marathon, whereas the activity of the whole body 11beta-HSD-1 was up-regulated. An increased suppression of cortisol levels was observed in the dexamethasone suppression test after 6 weeks of reduced training levels. Ghrelin was elevated 2 days after the marathon. Only minor changes in the other hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal axes could be observed. However, the free androgen index increased significantly after 6 weeks of reduced training. The HPA system appeared to become chronically activated by continuous physical training and therefore less sensitive to the dexamethasone suppression test. The acute stress of the marathon led to a central exhaustion of the HPA system with a paracrine counteraction by the activation of the 11beta-HSD system. Changes in the other hypothalamic-pituitary hormonal axes were the result of long-term differences in training levels and were not altered by the marathon.

  6. Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  7. The relationship of appetitive, reproductive and posterior pituitary hormones to alcoholism and craving in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, George A; Swift, Robert M; Hillemacher, Thomas; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2012-09-01

    A significant challenge for understanding alcoholism lies in discovering why some, but not other individuals, become dependent on alcohol. Genetic, environmental, cultural, developmental, and neurobiological influences are recognized as essential factors underlying a person's risk for becoming alcohol dependent (AD); however, the neurobiological processes that trigger this vulnerability are still poorly understood. Hormones are important in the regulation of many functions and several hormones are strongly associated with alcohol use. While medical consequences are important, the primary focus of this review is on the underlying confluence of appetitive/feeding, reproductive and posterior pituitary hormones associated with distinct phases of alcoholism or assessed by alcohol craving in humans. While these hormones are of diverse origin, the involvement with alcoholism by these hormone systems is unmistakable, and demonstrates the complexity of interactions with alcohol and the difficulty of successfully pursuing effective treatments. Whether alcohol associated changes in the activity of certain hormones are the result of alcohol use or are the result of an underlying predisposition for alcoholism, or a combination of both, is currently of great scientific interest. The evidence we present in this review suggests that appetitive hormones may be markers as they appear involved in alcohol dependence and craving, that reproductive hormones provide an example of the consequences of drinking and are affected by alcohol, and that posterior pituitary hormones have potential for being targets for treatment. A better understanding of the nature of these associations may contribute to diagnosing and more comprehensively treating alcoholism. Pharmacotherapies that take advantage of our new understanding of hormones, their receptors, or their potential relationship to craving may shed light on the treatment of this disorder.

  8. Hyperprolactinaemia is associated with a higher prevalence of pituitary-adrenal dysfunction in non-functioning pituitary macroadenoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjeerdsma, Geert; Sluiter, WJ; Hew, JM; Molenaar, WM; deLange, WE; Dullaart, RPF

    1996-01-01

    In non-functioning pituitary macroadenoma (NFMA), hyperprolactinaemia (hyperPRL) is considered to be a sign of hypothalamic-pituitary dysregulation, but it is unknown whether hyperPRL is associated with an increased frequency of pituitary hormone deficiencies. Forty consecutive patients with histolo

  9. Skin morphological changes in growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Merete Wolder; Thulesen, J; Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the histomorphology of skin and its appendages, especially eccrine sweat glands, in patients with GH disorders, because reduced sweating ability in patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is associated with increased risk of hyperthermia under stressed conditions....

  10. Prevalence of pituitary hormone dysfunction, metabolic syndrome, and impaired quality of life in retired professional football players: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Daniel F; Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C J; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    Hypopituitarism is common after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we address the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and pituitary and metabolic function in retired football players. Retirees 30-65 years of age, with one or more years of National Football League (NFL) play and poor quality of life (QoL) based on Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS) were prospectively enrolled. Pituitary hormonal and metabolic syndrome (MetS) testing was performed. Using a glucagon stimulation test, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was defined with a standard cut point of 3 ng/mL and with a more stringent body mass index (BMI)-adjusted cut point. Subjects with and without hormonal deficiency (HD) were compared in terms of QoL, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, metabolic parameters, and football career data. Of 74 subjects, 6 were excluded because of significant non-football-related TBIs. Of the remaining 68 subjects (mean age, 47.3±10.2 years; median NFL years, 5; median NFL concussions, 3; mean BMI, 33.8±6.0), 28 (41.2%) were GHD using a peak GH cutoff of <3 ng/mL. However, with a BMI-adjusted definition of GHD, 13 of 68 (19.1%) were GHD. Using this BMI-adjusted definition, overall HD was found in 16 (23.5%) subjects: 10 (14.7%) with isolated GHD; 3 (4.4%) with isolated hypogonadism; and 3 (4.4%) with both GHD and hypogonadism. Subjects with HD had lower mean scores on the IIEF survey (p=0.016) and trended toward lower scores on the SF-36 MCS (p=0.113). MetS was present in 50% of subjects, including 5 of 6 (83%) with hypogonadism, and 29 of 62 (46.8%) without hypogonadism (p=0.087). Age, BMI, median years in NFL, games played, number of concussions, and acknowledged use of performance-enhancing steroids were similar between HD and non-HD groups. In summary, in this cohort of retired NFL players with poor QoL, 23.5% had HD, including 19% with GHD (using a BMI-adjusted definition), 9% with hypogonadism, and 50% had Met

  11. Spontaneous remission of acromegaly or gigantism due to subclinical apoplexy of pituitary growth hormone adenoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xian-ling; DOU Jing-tao; L(U) Zhao-hui; ZHONG Wen-wen; BA Jian-ming; JIN Du; LU Ju-ming; PAN Chang-yu; MU Yi-ming

    2011-01-01

    Background Subclinical apoplexy of pituitary functional adenoma can cause spontaneous remission of hormone hypersecretion.The typical presence of pituitary growth hormone (GH) adenoma is gigantism and/or acromegaly.We investigated the clinical characteristics of patients with spontaneous partial remission of acromegaly or gigantism due to subclinical apoplexy of GH adenoma.Methods Six patients with spontaneous remission of acromegaly or gigantism were enrolled.The clinical characteristics,endocrinological evaluation and imageological characteristics were retrospectively analyzed.Results In these cases,the initial clinical presences were diabetes mellitus or hypogonadism.No abrupt headache,vomiting,visual function impairment,or conscious disturbance had ever been complained of.The base levels of GH and insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were normal or higher,but nadir GH levels were all still >1 μg/L in 75 g oral glucose tolerance test.Magnetic resonance imaging detected enlarged sella,partial empty sella and compressed pituitary.The transsphenoidal surgery was performed in 2 cases,and the other patients were conservatively managed.All the patients were in clinical remission.Conclusions When the clinical presences,endocrine evaluation,biochemical examination and imageology indicate spontaneous remission of GH hypersecretion in patients with gigantism or acromegaly,the diagnosis of subclinical apoplexy of pituitary GH adenoma should be presumed.To these patients,conservative therapy may be appropriate.

  12. Spontaneous remission of acromegaly or gigantism due to subclinical apoplexy of pituitary growth hormone adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Ling; Dou, Jing-Tao; Lü, Zhao-Hui; Zhong, Wen-Wen; Ba, Jian-Ming; Jin, Du; Lu, Ju-Ming; Pan, Chang-Yu; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2011-11-01

    Subclinical apoplexy of pituitary functional adenoma can cause spontaneous remission of hormone hypersecretion. The typical presence of pituitary growth hormone (GH) adenoma is gigantism and/or acromegaly. We investigated the clinical characteristics of patients with spontaneous partial remission of acromegaly or gigantism due to subclinical apoplexy of GH adenoma. Six patients with spontaneous remission of acromegaly or gigantism were enrolled. The clinical characteristics, endocrinological evaluation and imageological characteristics were retrospectively analyzed. In these cases, the initial clinical presences were diabetes mellitus or hypogonadism. No abrupt headache, vomiting, visual function impairment, or conscious disturbance had ever been complained of. The base levels of GH and insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were normal or higher, but nadir GH levels were all still > 1 µg/L in 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Magnetic resonance imaging detected enlarged sella, partial empty sella and compressed pituitary. The transsphenoidal surgery was performed in 2 cases, and the other patients were conservatively managed. All the patients were in clinical remission. When the clinical presences, endocrine evaluation, biochemical examination and imageology indicate spontaneous remission of GH hypersecretion in patients with gigantism or acromegaly, the diagnosis of subclinical apoplexy of pituitary GH adenoma should be presumed. To these patients, conservative therapy may be appropriate.

  13. Skeletal muscle afferent regulation of bioassayable growth hormone in the rat pituitary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    There are forms of growth hormone (GH) in the plasma and pituitary of the rat and in the plasma of humans that are undetected by presently available immunoassays (iGH) but can be measured by bioassay (bGH). Although the regulation of iGH release is well documented, the mechanism(s) of bGH release is unclear. On the basis of changes in bGH and iGH secretion in rats that had been exposed to microgravity conditions, we hypothesized that neural afferents play a role in regulating the release of these hormones. To examine whether bGH secretion can be modulated by afferent input from skeletal muscle, the proximal or distal ends of severed hindlimb fast muscle nerves were stimulated ( approximately 2 times threshold) in anesthetized rats. Plasma bGH increased approximately 250%, and pituitary bGH decreased approximately 60% after proximal nerve trunk stimulation. The bGH response was independent of muscle mass or whether the muscles were flexors or extensors. Distal nerve stimulation had little or no effect on plasma or pituitary bGH. Plasma iGH concentrations were unchanged after proximal nerve stimulation. Although there may be multiple regulatory mechanisms of bGH, the present results demonstrate that the activation of low-threshold afferents from fast skeletal muscles can play a regulatory role in the release of bGH, but not iGH, from the pituitary in anesthetized rats.

  14. Skeletal muscle afferent regulation of bioassayable growth hormone in the rat pituitary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    There are forms of growth hormone (GH) in the plasma and pituitary of the rat and in the plasma of humans that are undetected by presently available immunoassays (iGH) but can be measured by bioassay (bGH). Although the regulation of iGH release is well documented, the mechanism(s) of bGH release is unclear. On the basis of changes in bGH and iGH secretion in rats that had been exposed to microgravity conditions, we hypothesized that neural afferents play a role in regulating the release of these hormones. To examine whether bGH secretion can be modulated by afferent input from skeletal muscle, the proximal or distal ends of severed hindlimb fast muscle nerves were stimulated ( approximately 2 times threshold) in anesthetized rats. Plasma bGH increased approximately 250%, and pituitary bGH decreased approximately 60% after proximal nerve trunk stimulation. The bGH response was independent of muscle mass or whether the muscles were flexors or extensors. Distal nerve stimulation had little or no effect on plasma or pituitary bGH. Plasma iGH concentrations were unchanged after proximal nerve stimulation. Although there may be multiple regulatory mechanisms of bGH, the present results demonstrate that the activation of low-threshold afferents from fast skeletal muscles can play a regulatory role in the release of bGH, but not iGH, from the pituitary in anesthetized rats.

  15. The FGFR4-G388R Polymorphism Promotes Mitochondrial STAT3 Serine Phosphorylation to Facilitate Pituitary Growth Hormone Cell Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Toru Tateno; Asa, Sylvia L.; Lei Zheng; Thomas Mayr; Axel Ullrich; Shereen Ezzat

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are common intracranial neoplasms, yet few germline abnormalities have been implicated in their pathogenesis. Here we show that a single nucleotide germline polymorphism (SNP) substituting an arginine (R) for glycine (G) in the FGFR4 transmembrane domain can alter pituitary cell growth and hormone production. Compared with FGFR4-G388 mammosomatotroph cells that support prolactin (PRL) production, FGFR4-R388 cells express predominantly growth hormone (GH). Growth promoting eff...

  16. MRI of Pituitary Gland Morphology in Idiopathic Growth Hormone Deficiency in Stage of Adolescent and Its Correlation with Provocation Peaked of Growth Hormone%单纯生长激素缺乏青少年垂体MRI表现与生长激素激发峰值的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马宜传; 张俊祥; 倪红霞; 许红; 陈岩

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨单纯生长激素缺乏症(isolated growth hormone deficiency,IGHD)青少年的腺垂体各径线值与临床生长激素(growth hormone,GH)激发峰值的关系,为临床诊断提供影像学依据.方法 搜集52例临床确诊为IGHD的青少年(7.2 ~18.3岁)行垂体MRI检查,测量腺垂体各径线并与正常对照组比较;分析其腺垂体各径线及其与GH激发峰值的关系.结果 男性患者中,10~<15岁和15~ <18.3岁的冠状高径、矢状高径均比正常对照组减小(P<0.05);女性患者中,10~<15岁的冠状高径、矢状高径、矢状前后径均比正常对照组减小(P<0.05).IGHD患者的腺垂体各径线值在不同性别组和不同年龄组间比较,差异无统计学意义.IGHD患者腺垂体的冠状高径与GH激发峰值呈正相关(r=0.38,P<0.01;r =0.32,P<0.05).结论 IGHD患者腺垂体各径线值不随性别和年龄而改变,且其腺垂体冠状高径与GH激发峰值呈正相关.%Objective To study diameter of adenohypophysis with isolated growth hormone deficiency(IGHD) in stage of adolescent and its correelation with provocation peaked of growth hormone ( GH). Methods 52 cases of MRI data of adenohypophysis in IGHD adolescents range from7. 2 year to 18. 3 year were used,which were divided into 6 - < 10 years old, 10 - < 15 years old, 15.0 - 18. 9 year group in adolescents. Using 1. 5 T MR scanner,the appearances of adenohypophysis in 52 IGHD adolescents were analyzed on T, WI in sagittal and coronal plane, and to compare with normal control. Relation of the diamete of adenohypophysis in sagittal and coronal plane with GH provocation peak was analyzed. Results The coronal and sagittal height diameter of adenohypophysis in 10 - < 15 years old year group and 15 - < 18. 3 years old year group for male was grow down compare with normal control {P <0. 05). The coronal and sagittal height diameter and sagittal anteroposterior diameterof adenohypophysis in 10 ~ < 15 years old year

  17. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), stress, and sex hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S Bradley; Toufexis, Donna J; Hammack, Sayamwong E

    2017-06-14

    Stressor exposure is associated with the onset and severity of many psychopathologies that are more common in women than men. Moreover, the maladaptive expression and function of stress-related hormones have been implicated in these disorders. Evidence suggests that PACAP has a critical role in the stress circuits mediating stress-responding, and PACAP may interact with sex hormones to contribute to sex differences in stress-related disease. In this review, we describe the role of the PACAP/PAC1 system in stress biology, focusing on the role of stress-induced alterations in PACAP expression and signaling in the development of stress-induced behavioral change. Additionally, we present more recent data suggesting potential interactions between stress, PACAP, and circulating estradiol in pathological states, including PTSD. These studies suggest that the level of stress and circulating gonadal hormones may differentially regulate the PACAPergic system in males and females to influence anxiety-like behavior and may be one mechanism underlying the discrepancies in human psychiatric disorders.

  18. Thyroid ultrasonography in congenital isolated thyroid stimulating hormone deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Wakamoto, H; Miyazaki, M.; Tatsumi, K; Amino, N

    1995-01-01

    The effects of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) deficiency on thyroid development was examined using ultrasonography in a child with congenital isolated TSH deficiency. Ultrasound revealed the thyroid gland was one sixth normal volume, suggesting that TSH plays an important part in thyroid growth, but not a critical role in differentiation.

  19. Changes of hypothalamus-pituitary hormones in patients after total removal of craniopharyngiomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周忠清; 石祥恩

    2004-01-01

    Background This paper aimed to elucidate the changes of hypothalamus-pituitary hormones in patients after total removal of craniopharyngiomas.Methods A total of 40 patients with craniopharyngiomas received surgery. The levels of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyrotropic hormone (TSH), antidiuretic hormone (ADH), and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) were measureed in the 40 patients before surgery and one week after surgery respectively.Results Twenty-eight patients (70%) had hypothyroidism before surgery, but 38 (95%) had hypothyroidism after surgery (P0.05), whereas those of ACTH were (23.97±2.69) pg/ml and (15.60±1.91) pg/ml respectively (P<0.05).Conclusions Hormone deficits after total removal of craniopharyngioma appear to be the common complication of surgery. Hypothyroidism and diabetes insipidus are more frequent after surgery than before surgery. Thyroxine and glucocorticoids should be administered routinely after total removal of craniopharyngioma.

  20. Influence of catecholamines, prostaglandins and thyroid hormones on growth hormone secretion by chicken pituitary cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, D J; Perez, F M; Diamante, B S; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1990-01-01

    In young chickens plasma concentrations of growth hormone (GH) are depressed by prostaglandins (PG) E1 and E2, epinephrine, norepinephrine, alpha 2 and beta agonists or thyroid hormones. A primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells was used to examine the direct effects of these agents at the level of the pituitary as evaluated by GH release in the presence and absence of growth hormone releasing factor (GRF). Following collagenase dispersion and culture (preincubation, 48 hr) cells were exposed (incubation, 2 hr) to test agents, except for thyroid hormones which were added during the preincubation, and incubation period. Growth hormone release was increased (P less than .05) in the presence of PGE1 (10(-8)M by 34%; 10(-7)M by 54%), PGE2 (10(-8)M by 29%; 10(-7)M by 29%), PGF2 alpha (10(-8)M by 28%), and the beta agonist isoproterenol (10(-7)M by 46%). Basal GH release from chicken pituitary cells was not affected by dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), or alpha adrenergic agonists. Growth hormone releasing factor stimulated GH release was not affected by the presence of prostaglandins E1, E2 or F2 alpha in the incubation media. However, GRF stimulated GH release was reduced by high doses of catecholamines: dopamine (10(-6)M by 34%), norepinephrine (10(-6)M by 74%), epinephrine (10(-8)M by 47%; 10(-7)M by 41%; 10(-6)M by 89%), and by the alpha 1 adrenergic agonist, phenylephrine (10(-7)M by 52%), the alpha 2 agonist, clonidine (10(-8)M by 34%; 10(-7)M by 83%) and the beta agonist, isoproterenol (10(-7)M by 64%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Fasting Upregulates PPAR Target Genes in Brain and Influences Pituitary Hormone Expression in a PPAR Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina König

    2009-01-01

    PPAR target genes implicated in -oxidation of fatty acids (acyl-CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and ketogenesis (mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase in pituitary gland and partially also in frontal cortex and diencephalon compared to nonfasted animals. These data strongly indicate that fasting activates PPAR in brain and pituitary gland. Furthermore, pituitary prolactin and luteinizing hormone- mRNA concentrations were increased upon fasting in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking PPAR. For proopiomelanocortin and thyrotropin-, genotype-specific differences in pituitary mRNA concentrations were observed. Thus, PPAR seems to be involved in transcriptional regulation of pituitary hormones.

  2. Growth hormone deficiency in adults--an indication for therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, M A; Round, J M; Jones, D A

    1987-01-01

    Case studies are presented for two patients, one with isolated hGH deficiency and one with multiple hormone deficiencies. The patients were studied 3 months before, and 3 and 9 months after discontinuing hGH therapy, at 19 and 18 years of age, respectively. Strength in the quadriceps femoris, cross-sectional area of the quadriceps muscles and cross-sectional muscle fibre area were measured. In the patient with multiple hormone deficiencies, clear decreases in all three parameters were evident after discontinuing hGH treatment. There were no significant changes in the other patient. Reasons for these differences are discussed.

  3. Reversible growth failure and complete GH deficiency in a 4-year-old girl with very early Hashimoto's thyroiditis and subsequent hyperplasia of pituitary thyrotroph cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspari, Laura; Paris, Françoise; Leboucq, Nicolas; Bonafé, Alain; Sultan, Charles

    2016-08-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a well-known cause of growth retardation in adolescence. It is less frequently seen in children and rarely seen in infants. A 4-year-old girl was referred to our clinic for a second opinion before starting growth hormone (GH) treatment. Linear growth had markedly declined in the past 2 years, with height -3.4 standard deviations. GH deficiency was complete. She had dry, gray-sallow skin and bloated abdomen, but no goiter. The parents reported fatigue and constipation. Hormonal evaluation revealed TSH 629.5 mIU/ml, free T4 0.08 ng/dl, and prolactin 17.2 ng/ml. Bone age was 2 years. Antibodies to thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase were positive, suggesting Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed anterior pituitary hyperplasia. After 3 years of L-thyroxine therapy, she was symptomless, her height was -0.6 standard deviations, and the TSH level was normal. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed regression of the pituitary hyperplasia. This report describes a patient with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and pituitary hyperplasia, both quite rare in very young children. Acquired hypothyroidism may appear after neonatal screening and therefore should not be overlooked in investigations of short stature, even when clinical signs of hypothyroidism are absent. • Hashimoto's thyroiditis and pituitary hyperplasia are rare in very young children. • Acquired hypothyroidism can appear after negative neonatal screening and should not be overlooked. What is New: • Short children should be evaluated for growth hormone deficiency but only after excluding other causes, particularly hypothyroidism, as we report a child with this disease but no clinical signs of it.

  4. Shedding light on canine pituitary dwarfism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorbij, A.M.W.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary dwarfism, associated with growth hormone deficiency, is an autosomal, recessively inherited disorder in shepherd dogs. Due to the serious nature of pituitary dwarfism and lack of efficient treatment, it is preferable to prevent dwarfs from being born by applying a correct breeding policy.

  5. Shedding light on canine pituitary dwarfism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorbij, A.M.W.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary dwarfism, associated with growth hormone deficiency, is an autosomal, recessively inherited disorder in shepherd dogs. Due to the serious nature of pituitary dwarfism and lack of efficient treatment, it is preferable to prevent dwarfs from being born by applying a correct breeding policy.

  6. Rab18 is reduced in pituitary tumors causing acromegaly and its overexpression reverts growth hormone hypersecretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Martinez, Rafael; Martinez-Fuentes, Antonio J; Pulido, Marina R; Jimenez-Reina, Luis; Quintero, Ana; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Soto, Alfonso; Webb, Susan M; Sucunza, Nuria; Bartumeus, Frederic; Benito-Lopez, Pedro; Galvez-Moreno, Maria A; Castaño, Justo P; Malagon, Maria M

    2008-06-01

    Rab proteins regulate the sequential steps of intracellular membrane transport. Alterations of these GTPases and their associated proteins are emerging as the underlying cause for several human diseases involving dysregulated secretory activities. Herein we investigated the role of Rab18, which negatively regulates hormone secretion by interacting with secretory granules, in relation to the altered functioning of tumoral pituitary somatotropes causing acromegaly. A total of 18 patients diagnosed with pituitary tumors causing acromegaly (nine patients) or nonfunctioning adenomas (nine patients) underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery. Adenomas were subsequently processed to evaluate Rab18 production in relation to GH secretion. We found that somatotropinoma cells are characterized by a high secretory activity concomitantly with a remarkably reduced Rab18 expression (15%) and protein content levels (30%), as compared with cells from nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas derived from patients with normal or reduced GH plasma levels (100%). Furthermore, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that Rab18 association with the surface of GH-containing secretory granules was significantly lower in somatotropes from acromegalies than nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. Finally, we provide evidence that modulation of Rab18 gene expression can revert substantially the hypersecretory activity of cells because Rab18 overexpression reduced by 40% the capacity of cells from acromegalies to respond to GHRH stimulation. These results suggest that molecular alterations affecting individual components of the secretory granule traffic machinery can contribute to maintain a high level of GH in plasma. Accordingly, Rab18 constitutes a valuable target as a diagnostic, prognostic, and/or therapeutic tool for human acromegaly.

  7. The hypothalamic-pituitary response in SLE. Regulation of prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovenský, J; Blazícková, S; Rauová, L; Jezová, D; Koska, J; Lukác, J; Vigas, M

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that neuroendocrine regulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and activation of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the hypothalamic-pituitary response to a well-defined stimulus under standardised conditions in patients with SLE. Plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol were determined in venous blood drawn through an indwelling cannula during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (0.1 U/kg b.w., i.v.) in ten patients and in 12 age-, gender- and weight-matched healthy subjects. Basal PRL concentrations were higher in patients vs healthy controls (12 vs 6 ng/ml, P < 0.01), though still within the physiological range. Insulin-induced plasma PRL and GH were significantly increased both in patients and healthy subjects; however, the increments or areas under the curves were not different in the two groups. Plasma cortisol response showed moderate attenuation in patients. Sensitivity of pituitary lactotrothrops to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) administration (200 microg, i.v.) was the same in patients and control subjects. In SLE patients with low activity of the disease the sensitivity of pituitary PRL release to TRH administration remained unchanged. The hypothalamic response to stress stimulus (hypoglycaemia) was comparable in patients and healthy subjects.

  8. Reproductive Hormone and Transcriptomic Responses of Pituitary Tissue in Anestrus Gilts Induced by Nutrient Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shengyu; Wang, Dingyue; Zhou, Dongsheng; Lin, Yan; Che, Lianqiang; Fang, Zhengfeng; Wu, De

    2015-01-01

    The onset of estrus is a critical sign of female sexual maturity. The pituitary plays a vital role in this process by the secretion of reproductive hormones. To investigate the effects of nutrient restriction on reproductive function and the underlying mechanisms involved, deep RNA sequencing of pituitary gland tissue was carried out to determine the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between gilts in normal estrus, and gilts in which anestrus was induced by nutrient restriction. Gilts which had gone through two estrus cycles were fed a normal (CON, 2.86kg/d, n = 10) or nutrient restricted (NR, 1kg/d, n = 10) diet. The NR gilts experienced another three estrus cycles, but did not express estrus symptoms at the anticipated 6th and 7th cycles. Body weight gain in NR gilts was significantly decreased by nutrient restriction. Gilts were considered as anestrus when blood progesterone concentrations lower than 1.0 ng/mL from three consecutive blood samples were recorded. Circulating concentrations of progesterone (interaction", "GnRH signaling pathway" and "immune response system". Our findings provide a new perspective for understanding the nutrient restriction-induced reproductive impairment at the pituitary transcriptional level, and how this is linked to hormone secretion. Moreover, the transcriptomic changes in anestrus gilts associated with nutrient restriction could be a resource for targeted studies of genes and pathways potentially involved in the regulation of reproductive function and animal health.

  9. Acylated ghrelin as provocative test for the diagnosis of ACTH deficiency in patients with hypothalamus-pituitary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasco, Valentina; Berton, Alessandro; Caprino, Mirko Parasiliti; Karamouzis, Ioannis; Maccario, Mauro; Ghigo, Ezio; Grottoli, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    The insulin tolerance test (ITT) is the gold standard to evaluate adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) insufficiency. However, alternative tests have been proposed such as metyrapone, glucagon, and ACTH stimulation test. We determined the diagnostic reliability of testing with ghrelin, the natural GH secretagogue that is a potent stimulus exploring the integrity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We studied the ACTH and cortisol response to acylated ghrelin in 49 patients with history of pituitary disease. The best cortisol and ACTH cut offs to ghrelin test, defined as those with the best sensitivity (SE) and specificity (SP), were identified using the ROC analysis. We also compared accuracy of ghrelin test with that of a simple and cheap test like basal cortisol and ACTH levels. The best cortisol and ACTH cut offs to ghrelin test were ≤11.6 µg/dl (SE 86.4%, SP 77.8%) and ≤32.5 pg/ml (SE 72.7%, SP 51.9%), respectively; the best basal cortisol and ACTH cut offs were ≤10.7 µg/dl (SE 90.9%, SP 70.4%) and ≤25.0 pg/ml (SE 85%, SP 37%), respectively. The diagnostic accuracy was 81.6, 60.9, 79.6, and 57.4%, respectively. A comparison between ROC AUC showed a great diagnostic power for cortisol, both stimulated and basal, versus ACTH, both stimulated and basal, but no difference between stimulated and basal cortisol evaluation. Our data show that testing with acylated ghrelin is not a useful diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of central hypocortisolism; particularly ghrelin test adds no more information that basal cortisol evaluation in the diagnosis of ACTH deficiency in patients with hypothalamus-pituitary disease.

  10. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif

    1995-01-01

    Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH-deficiency ......Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH...

  11. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif

    1995-01-01

    Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH-deficiency ......Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH...

  12. Linkage of congenital isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency to the corticotropin releasing hormone locus using simple sequence repeat polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyllo, J.H.; Collins, M.M.; Vetter, K.L. [Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-29

    Genetic screening techniques using simple sequence repeat polymorphisms were applied to investigate the molecular nature of congenital isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency. We hypothesize that this rare cause of hypocortisolism shared by a brother and sister with two unaffected sibs and unaffected parents is inherited as an autosomal recessive single gene mutation. Genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis controlling cortisol sufficiency were investigated for a causal role in this disorder. Southern blotting showed no detectable mutations of the gene encoding pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), the ACTH precursor. Other candidate genes subsequently considered were those encoding neuroendocrine convertase-1, and neuroendocrine convertase-2 (NEC-1, NEC-2), and corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Tests for linkage were performed using polymorphic di- and tetranucleotide simple sequence repeat markers flanking the reported map locations for POMC, NEC-1, NEC-2, and CRH. The chromosomal haplotypes determined by the markers flanking the loci for POMC, NEC-1, and NEC-2 were not compatible with linkage. However, 22 individual markers defining the chromosomal haplotypes flanking CRH were compatible with linkage of the disorder to the immediate area of this gene of chromosome 8. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the ACTH deficiency in this family is due to an abnormality of CRH gene structure or expression. These results illustrate the useful application of high density genetic maps constructed with simple sequence repeat markers for inclusion/exclusion studies of candidate genes in even very small nuclear families segregating for unusual phenotypes. 25 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Interferon-alpha-2a is a potent inhibitor of hormone secretion by cultured human pituitary adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Hofland (Leo); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); M. Waaijers (Marlijn); J. Zuijderwijk; P. Uitterlinden (Piet); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractInterferon-alpha (IFN alpha) may exert direct inhibitory effects on cell proliferation and on the production of different peptide hormones. We investigated the effect of IFN alpha on hormone production by 15 GH-secreting pituitary adenomas, 4 clinically nonf

  14. Psychological functioning after growth hormone therapy in adult growth hormone deficient patients: endocrine and body composition correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Lašaitė, Lina; Bunevičius, Robertas; Lašienė, Danutė Teresė; Lašas, Liudvikas

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement in adult growth hormone deficient patients improves psychological well-being and the quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate relationship between changes in mood, cognitive functioning, quality of life, changes in body composition and hormone concentration at baseline and six months after treatment with human recombinant growth hormone. Eighteen adult patients with growth hormone deficiency syndrome were recruited to the study. Growth hormone was a...

  15. Changes in pituitary growth hormone cells prepared from rats flown on Spacelab 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindeland, R.; Hymer, W. C.; Farrington, M.; Fast, T.; Hayes, C.; Motter, K.; Patil, L.; Vasques, M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of exposure to microgravity on pituitary gland was investigated by examining cells isolated from anterior pituitaries of rats flown on the 7-day Spacelab 3 mission and, subsequently, cultured for 6 days. Compared with ground controls, flight cells contained more intracellular growth hormone (GH); however, the flight cells released less GH over the 6-day culture period and after implantation into hypophysectomized rats than did the control cells. Compared with control rats, glands from large rats (400 g) contained more somatotrophs (44 percent compared with 37 percent in control rats); small rats (200 g) showed no difference. No major differences were found in the somatotroph ultrastructure (by TEM) or in the pattern of the immunoactive GH variants. However, high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of culture media indicated that flight cells released much less of a biologically active high-molecular weight GH variant, suggesting that space flight may lead to secretory dysfunction.

  16. Optimization of growth hormone therapy in growth hormone deficient children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIt is obvious that the results published so far as well as the present preliminary data do not answer many questions regarding the optimal therapeutic regimen in GH deficiency. In particular, long-term follow-up must be organized to evaluate efficacy and safety of GH therapy not only in

  17. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional pituitary and gonadal sex hormone receptors: Therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    PONIEWIERSKA-BARAN, AGATA; SCHNEIDER, GABRIELA; SUN, WENYUE; ABDELBASET-ISMAIL, AHMED; BARR, FREDERIC G.; RATAJCZAK, MARIUSZ Z.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated that sex hormones play an important role in several types of cancer. Because they are also involved in skeletal muscle development and regeneration, we were therefore interested in their potential involvement in the pathogenesis of human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a skeletal muscle tumor. In the present study, we employed eight RMS cell lines (three fusion positive and five fusion negative RMS cell lines) and mRNA samples obtained from RMS patients. The expression of sex hormone receptors was evaluated by RT-PCR and their functionality by chemotaxis, adhesion and direct cell proliferation assays. We report here for the first time that follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) receptors are expressed in established human RMS cell lines as well as in primary tumor samples isolated from RMS patients. We also report that human RMS cell lines responded both to pituitary and gonadal sex hormone stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. In summary, our results indicate that sex hormones are involved in the pathogenesis and progression of RMS, and therefore, their therapeutic application should be avoided in patients that have been diagnosed with RMS. PMID:26983595

  18. Internalization and recycling of receptor-bound gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in pituitary gonadotropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schvartz, I.; Hazum, E.

    1987-12-15

    The fate of cell surface gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors on pituitary cells was studied utilizing lysosomotropic agents and monensin. Labeling of pituitary cells with a photoreactive GnRH derivative, (azidobenzoyl-D-Lys6)GnRH, revealed a specific band of Mr = 60,000. When photoaffinity-labeled cells were exposed to trypsin immediately after completion of the binding, the radioactivity incorporated into the Mr = 60,000 band decreased, with a concomitant appearance of a proteolytic fragment (Mr = 45,000). This fragment reflects cell surface receptors. Following GnRH binding, the hormone-receptor complexes underwent internalization, partial degradation, and recycling. The process of hormone-receptor complex degradation was substantially prevented by lysosomotropic agents, such as chloroquine and methylamine, or the proton ionophore, monensin. Chloroquine and monensin, however, did not affect receptor recycling, since the tryptic fragment of Mr = 45,000 was evident after treatment with these agents. This suggests that recycling of GnRH receptors in gonadotropes occurs whether or not the internal environment is acidic. Based on these findings, we propose a model describing the intracellular pathway of GnRH receptors.

  19. Estradiol potentiation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone responsiveness in the anterior pituitary is mediated by an increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, M.; Peegel, H.; Katta, V.

    1985-02-15

    In order to investigate the mechanism by which 17 beta-estradiol potentiates the action of gonadotropin-releasing hormone on the anterior pituitary in vitro, cultured pituitary cells from immature female rats were used as the model system. Cultures exposed to estradiol at concentrations ranging from 10(-10) to 10(-6) mol/L exhibited a significant augmentation of luteinizing hormone release in response to a 4-hour gonadotropin-releasing hormone (10 mumol/L) challenge at a dose of 10(-9) mol/L compared to that of control cultures. The estradiol augmentation of luteinizing hormone release was also dependent on the duration of estradiol exposure. When these cultures were incubated with tritium-labeled L-leucine, an increase in incorporation of radiolabeled amino acid into total proteins greater than that in controls was observed. A parallel stimulatory effect of estradiol on iodine 125-labeled D-Ala6 gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding was observed. Cultures incubated with estradiol at different concentrations and various lengths of time showed a significant increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding capacity and this increase was abrogated by cycloheximide. Analysis of the binding data showed that the increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding activity was due to a change in the number of gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding sites rather than a change in the affinity. These results suggest that (1) estradiol treatment increases the number of pituitary receptors for gonadotropin-releasing hormone, (2) the augmentary effect of estradiol on luteinizing hormone release at the pituitary level might be mediated, at least in part, by the increase in the number of binding sites of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and (3) new protein synthesis may be involved in estradiol-mediated gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor induction.

  20. Duchenne muscular dystrophy with associated growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoor, Tariq; Mahmood, Arshad; Shams, Shahnaz

    2003-12-01

    A patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and growth hormone (GH) deficiency is described who had no clinical evidence of muscular weakness before initiation of GH replacement therapy. Treatment with human GH resulted in appearance of symptoms of easy fatigability and proximal muscle weakness. Thorough investigations including serum creatinine phosphokinase (CK) levels is recommended in every patient with GH deficiency before starting GH replacement therapy.

  1. Effect of Growth Hormone Deficiency on Brain Structure, Motor Function and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Emma A.; O'Reilly, Michelle A.; Clayden, Jonathan D.; Seunarine, Kiran K.; Chong, Wui K.; Dale, Naomi; Salt, Alison; Clark, Chris A.; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis plays a role in normal brain growth but little is known of the effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure. Children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (peak growth hormone less than 6.7 [micro]g/l) and idiopathic short stature (peak growth hormone greater than 10 [micro]g/l)…

  2. High Population Density of Juvenile Chum Salmon Decreased the Number and Sizes of Growth Hormone Cells in the Pituitary

    OpenAIRE

    Salam, Md. Abdus; Ota, Yuki; Ando, Hironori; Fukuwaka, Masa-aki; Kaeriyama, Masahide; Urano, Akihisa

    1999-01-01

    Juveniles of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) held at high population density were apparently smaller than those held at medium and low population densities. The effects of high population density on pituitary growth hormone (GH) cells in juvenile chum salmon were examined using immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization techniques. The ratio of GH-immunoreactive (ir) area to the whole pituitary was almost constant in all of the high, medium and low population density groups, although the nu...

  3. Hypergravity and estrogen effects on avian anterior pituitary growth hormone and prolactin levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorindo, R. P.; Negulesco, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Developing female chicks with fractured right radii were maintained for 14 d at either earth gravity (1 g) or a hypergravity state (2 g). The birds at 1 g were divided into groups which received daily injections of (1) saline, (2) 200 micrograms estrone, and (3) 400 micrograms estrone for 14 d. The 2-g birds were divided into three similarly treated groups. All 2-g birds showed significantly lower body weights than did 1-g birds. Anterior pituitary (AP) glands were excised and analyzed for growth hormone and prolactin content by analytical electrophoresis. The 1-g chicks receiving either dose of daily estrogen showed increased AP growth hormone levels, whereas hypergravity alone did not affect growth hormone content. Chicks exposed to daily estrogen and hypergravity displayed reduced growth hormone levels. AP prolactin levels were slightly increased by the lower daily estrogen dose in 1-g birds, but markedly reduced in birds exposed only to hypergravity. Doubly-treated chicks displayed normal prolactin levels. Reduced growth in 2-g birds might be due, in part, to reduced AP levels of prolactin and/or growth hormone.

  4. Long-term mortality in the United States cohort of pituitary-derived growth hormone recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, James L; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Wysowski, Diane K; Brown, Paul; Durako, Stephen J; Cox, Christopher; Kong, Fanhui; Fradkin, Judith E

    2004-04-01

    Patients who received pituitary-derived growth hormone (GH) are at excess risk of mortality from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We investigated whether they were at increased risk of death from other conditions, particularly preventable conditions. A cohort (N=6107) from known US pituitary-derived GH recipients (treated 1963-1985) was studied. Deaths were identified by reports from physicians and parents and the National Death Index. Rates were compared with the expected rates for the US population standardized for race, age, and sex. There were 433 deaths versus 114 expected (relative risk [RR], 3.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.4-4.2; Pderived GH recipients was almost four times the expected rate. Replacing pituitary-derived GH with recombinant GH has eliminated only the risk of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Hypoglycemia and adrenal insufficiency accounted for far more mortality than Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The large number of potentially preventable deaths in patients with adrenal insufficiency and hypoglycemia underscores the importance of early intervention when infection occurs in patients with adrenal insufficiency, and aggressive treatment of panhypopituitarism.

  5. Clinical applications of somatostatin analogs for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang JW

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ji-wen Wang,1,2 Ying Li,3 Zhi-gang Mao,1,2 Bin Hu,1,2 Xiao-bing Jiang,1,2 Bing-bing Song,4 Xin Wang,4 Yong-hong Zhu,4 Hai-jun Wang1,21Department of Neurosurgery and Pituitary Tumor Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 2Key Laboratory of Pituitary Adenoma in Guangdong Province, 3State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, 4Department of Histology and Embryology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Excessive growth hormone (GH is usually secreted by GH-secreting pituitary adenomas and causes gigantism in juveniles or acromegaly in adults. The clinical complications involving cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic systems lead to elevated morbidity in acromegaly. Control of serum GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF 1 hypersecretion by surgery or pharmacotherapy can decrease morbidity. Current pharmacotherapy includes somatostatin analogs (SAs and GH receptor antagonist; the former consists of lanreotide Autogel (ATG and octreotide long-acting release (LAR, and the latter refers to pegvisomant. As primary medical therapy, lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR can be supplied in a long-lasting formulation to achieve biochemical control of GH and IGF-1 by subcutaneous injection every 4–6 weeks. Lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR provide an effective medical treatment, whether as a primary or secondary therapy, for the treatment of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma; however, to maximize benefits with the least cost, several points should be emphasized before the application of SAs. A comprehensive assessment, especially of the observation of clinical predictors and preselection of SA treatment, should be completed in advance. A treatment process lasting at least 3 months should be implemented to achieve a long-term stable blood concentration. More satisfactory surgical outcomes for noninvasive macroadenomas treated

  6. Growth hormone deficiency in a Nigerian child with Turner's syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IRORO YARHERE

    Keywords: Turner's syndrome, short stature, growth hormone deficiency, ... CD is a 15-year-old female who presented to the consultant paediatric .... system thus promoting growth.4,7,8 Randomised controlled trials have ... improve non-verbal processing speed, motor performance and verbal and non-verbal memory.

  7. The FGFR4-G388R polymorphism promotes mitochondrial STAT3 serine phosphorylation to facilitate pituitary growth hormone cell tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Tateno

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary tumors are common intracranial neoplasms, yet few germline abnormalities have been implicated in their pathogenesis. Here we show that a single nucleotide germline polymorphism (SNP substituting an arginine (R for glycine (G in the FGFR4 transmembrane domain can alter pituitary cell growth and hormone production. Compared with FGFR4-G388 mammosomatotroph cells that support prolactin (PRL production, FGFR4-R388 cells express predominantly growth hormone (GH. Growth promoting effects of FGFR4-R388 as evidenced by enhanced colony formation was ascribed to Src activation and mitochondrial serine phosphorylation of STAT3 (pS-STAT3. In contrast, diminished pY-STAT3 mediated by FGFR4-R388 relieved GH inhibition leading to hormone excess. Using a knock-in mouse model, we demonstrate the ability of FGFR4-R385 to promote GH pituitary tumorigenesis. In patients with acromegaly, pituitary tumor size correlated with hormone excess in the presence of the FGFR4-R388 but not the FGFR4-G388 allele. Our findings establish a new role for the FGFR4-G388R polymorphism in pituitary oncogenesis, providing a rationale for targeting Src and STAT3 in the personalized treatment of associated disorders.

  8. The FGFR4-G388R polymorphism promotes mitochondrial STAT3 serine phosphorylation to facilitate pituitary growth hormone cell tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, Toru; Asa, Sylvia L; Zheng, Lei; Mayr, Thomas; Ullrich, Axel; Ezzat, Shereen

    2011-12-01

    Pituitary tumors are common intracranial neoplasms, yet few germline abnormalities have been implicated in their pathogenesis. Here we show that a single nucleotide germline polymorphism (SNP) substituting an arginine (R) for glycine (G) in the FGFR4 transmembrane domain can alter pituitary cell growth and hormone production. Compared with FGFR4-G388 mammosomatotroph cells that support prolactin (PRL) production, FGFR4-R388 cells express predominantly growth hormone (GH). Growth promoting effects of FGFR4-R388 as evidenced by enhanced colony formation was ascribed to Src activation and mitochondrial serine phosphorylation of STAT3 (pS-STAT3). In contrast, diminished pY-STAT3 mediated by FGFR4-R388 relieved GH inhibition leading to hormone excess. Using a knock-in mouse model, we demonstrate the ability of FGFR4-R385 to promote GH pituitary tumorigenesis. In patients with acromegaly, pituitary tumor size correlated with hormone excess in the presence of the FGFR4-R388 but not the FGFR4-G388 allele. Our findings establish a new role for the FGFR4-G388R polymorphism in pituitary oncogenesis, providing a rationale for targeting Src and STAT3 in the personalized treatment of associated disorders.

  9. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A.; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs. PMID:26106585

  10. Homologous and heterologous regulation of pituitary receptors for ghrelin and growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Raúl M; Kineman, Rhonda D; Park, Seungjoon; Peng, Xiao-Ding; Gracia-Navarro, Francisco; Castaño, Justo P; Malagon, María M

    2004-07-01

    Secretion of GH by pituitary somatotropes is primarily stimulated by the hypothalamic GHRH through the activation of a specific G protein-coupled receptor, GHRH receptor (GHRH-R). GH is also released in response to ghrelin, a peptide produced in the stomach, hypothalamus, and pituitary that activates somatotropes via a distinct G protein-coupled receptor, referred to as the GH secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Here, we have analyzed the expression of both GHRH-R and GHS-R (by multiplex RT-PCR) in porcine pituitary cell cultures, after acute (4 h) treatment with GHRH or ghrelin as well as with other regulators of somatotropes (somatostatin, dexamethasone). Exposure of cultures to GHRH decreased GHRH-R mRNA content and also diminished GHS-R transcript levels. Likewise, ghrelin down-regulated both GHS-R and GHRH-R expression. Interestingly, administration of the activator of adenylate cyclase, forskolin, decreased GHRH-R mRNA levels but had no effect on GHS-R, thus suggesting a distinct contribution of the various intracellular signals operating in somatotropes to the regulation of the expression of these receptors. Accordingly, an atypical activator of adenylate cyclase in the pig somatotrope is low-dose (10(-13) m) somatostatin, which also suppressed GHRH-R mRNA levels without altering GHS-R expression. Finally, dexamethasone did not modify GHRH-R or GHS-R expression. In summary, our data show for the first time that ghrelin, as well as GHRH, mediates homologous and heterologous down-regulation of their own receptor synthesis. However, our results also indicate that the expression of porcine GHRH-R and GHS-R is regulated by distinct signals that may differ from those reported in other mammalian species.

  11. Effect of cadmium on sexual hormone secretion from pituitary and ovary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhanWC; WuZR

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide the evidence of endocrine disruption induced by Cd.The changes of serum luteinizing hormone(LH),follicle stimulating hormone(FSH),progesterone(P) and estradiol(E2) levels were observed in female rats administrated ac with Cd.Serum FSH or LH was no significant difference between groups for 7-day and for 14-day exposure.But the serum E2 of the high dose group of 7-day exposure,the low dose and high dose group for 14d was significantly lower than that of the control group.Serum P of the low dose group of 7 day exposure was significantly lower than that of the control group.After injection of gonadotropin-release hormones (GnRH) the serum FSH and LH levels increased significantly in each group(Cd 0.5,1.0mg·kg-1,5days a week, for 6 weeks).However,the serum LH was lower significantly in the rats administrated Cd than in the control rats after the injection of GnRH.There was no difference of the number of ovum between groups(0,1.5,3.0mg·kg-1 for 5d) in the super-ovulation test(P>0.05).Cadmium has the distinct adverse effect on the ovary of female rats.But the response function of the ovary to excess gonadotropin was basically normal.Under this experimental conditions.the function of secual hormone secretion of pituitary has been damaged,but the normal level of both FSH and LH could be maintained because of the limited compensative function of pituitary.

  12. Pituitary tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enough of its hormones. This condition is called hypopituitarism . The causes of pituitary tumors are unknown. Some ... Cyst Endocrine glands Gigantism Growth hormone test Hyperthyroidism Hypopituitarism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Prolactin blood test ...

  13. Hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis hormones stimulate mitochondrial function and biogenesis in human hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidali, Silvia; Knuever, Jana; Lerchner, Johannes; Giesen, Melanie; Bíró, Tamás; Klinger, Matthias; Kofler, Barbara; Funk, Wolfgang; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Paus, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate mitochondrial function. As other hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis hormones, i.e., thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), are expressed in human hair follicles (HFs) and regulate mitochondrial function in human epidermis, we investigated in organ-cultured human scalp HFs whether TRH (30 nM), TSH (10 mU ml(-1)), thyroxine (T4) (100 nM), and triiodothyronine (T3) (100 pM) alter intrafollicular mitochondrial energy metabolism. All HPT-axis members increased gene and protein expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase (MTCO1), a subunit of respiratory chain complex IV, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and Porin. All hormones also stimulated intrafollicular complex I/IV activity and mitochondrial biogenesis. The TSH effects on MTCO1, TFAM, and porin could be abolished by K1-70, a TSH-receptor antagonist, suggesting a TSH receptor-mediated action. Notably, as measured by calorimetry, T3 and TSH increased follicular heat production, whereas T3/T4 and TRH stimulated ATP production in cultured HF keratinocytes. HPT-axis hormones did not increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Rather, T3 and T4 reduced ROS formation, and all tested HPT-axis hormones increased the transcription of ROS scavengers (catalase, superoxide dismutase 2) in HF keratinocytes. Thus, mitochondrial biology, energy metabolism, and redox state of human HFs are subject to profound (neuro-)endocrine regulation by HPT-axis hormones. The neuroendocrine control of mitochondrial biology in a complex human mini-organ revealed here may be therapeutically exploitable.

  14. Effects of acute organophosphate poisoning on pituitary target gland hormones at admission, discharge and three months after poisoning: A hospital based pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinaki Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organophosphate compound (OPC poisoning is common in the developing countries such as India. The acute and later effects of OPC poisoning on pituitary and target gland hormones is largely unknown. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted at Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research between January 2012 and March 2013. Fourteen patients (8 males, age 18-50 years with acute OPC poisoning were included in the study based on the history and clinical features, documented decreased in plasma cholinesterase activity or presence of the OPC in gastric lavage/blood samples. The hormonal parameters were done at baseline, at the time of discharge and at three months of follow-up. Results: A total of 14 patients out of 46 with the mean age of 30.1 ± 10.3 years were finally eligible for the study. Hormonal alterations at admission were similar to sick euhormonal syndrome. Overall 7 of them had nine hormonal deficits at three months of follow up, 4 having sub normal basal cortisol level and two each had low testosterone and growth hormone and only one had thyroxine deficiency. Conclusion: Acute organophosphate poisoning results in endocrine dysfunction akin to sick euhormonal syndrome. However, in a small subset of patients, varying level of hormonal insufficiency may occur either at admission or later. These observations need re-validation in a larger group of patients with specific OPC.

  15. Efficacy and safety of growth hormone treatment in adults with growth hormone deficiency: a systematic review of studies on morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bunderen, Christa C; van Varsseveld, Nadège C; Erfurth, Eva Marie; Ket, Johannes C F; Drent, Madeleine L

    2014-07-01

    Due to the positive effects demonstrated in randomized clinical trials on cardiovascular surrogate markers and bone metabolism, a positive effect of growth hormone (GH) treatment on clinically relevant end-points seems feasible. In this review, we discuss the long-term efficacy and safety of GH treatment in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) with emphasis on morbidity: fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke, fractures, fatal and nonfatal malignancies and recurrences, and diabetes mellitus. A positive effect of GH treatment on CVD and fracture risk could be concluded, but study design limitations have to be considered. Stroke and secondary brain tumours remained more prevalent. However, other contributing factors have to be taken into account. Regrowth and recurrences of (peri)pituitary tumours were not increased in patients with GH treatment compared to similar patients without GH treatment. All fatal and nonfatal malignancies were not more prevalent in GH-treated adults compared to the general population. However, follow-up time is still relatively short. The studies on diabetes are difficult to interpret, and more evidence is awaited. In clinical practice, a more individualized assessment seems appropriate, taking into consideration the underlying diagnosis of GHD, other treatment regimens, metabolic profile and the additional beneficial effects of GH set against the possible risks. Large and thoroughly conducted observational studies are needed and seem the only feasible way to inform the ongoing debate on health care costs, drug safety and clinical outcomes.

  16. Growth hormone deficiency and central hypogonadism in retired professional football players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor László Kovács

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the possible impact of multiple mild head traumas sustained during a long-term football career on the presence of central hypogonadism and growth hormone (GH deficiency. Methods: Twenty-seven retired, former professional male football players were investigated. All subjects were assessed for serum levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1, luteinizing hormone (LH and total testosterone (TT. Quality of life was quantified using the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (QoL-AGHDA questionnaire. Results: Subjects had a median age of 48.0 (42.0 – 53.0 years and a median football career of 29.0 years (22.0 – 32.0. One subject had central hypogonadism and none had growth hormone deficiency. Nine subjects reported sport-related head injuries. We found a negative correlation between sport-related head injuries and serum LH (p = -0.459, P = 0.016. Subjects with a history of sport-related head injury had a median LH of 3.3 U/L (2.7 – 3.6, while those without a history of sport-related head injury had a median LH of 4.1 (U/L (3.6 – 5.7, P = 0.017. However, there were no differences in other hormones between the two groups. Moreover, we did not find any correlation between the duration of the player’s career nor their field position with hormone profiles or QoL-AGHDA. Conclusion: Although retired footfall players with a history of sport-related head injury had lower LH levels, we did not find strong evidence of an increased prevalence of central hypogonadism or GH deficiency in these patients. Our results suggest that a long-term football career, which includes headings and repetitive mild head traumas, does not damage the most vulnerable anterior pituitary cells.

  17. Impaired thermoregulation in adults with growth hormone deficiency during heat exposure and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Behrenscheer, A; Tims, T;

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been shown that patients with growth hormone deficiency have a reduced sweating capacity. We hypothesize that reduced sweating might affect thermoregulation in growth hormone deficiency patients. In the present study we have examined thermoregulation in growth hormone deficiency...

  18. Impaired thermoregulation in adults with growth hormone deficiency during heat exposure and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Behrenscheer, A; Tims, T

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been shown that patients with growth hormone deficiency have a reduced sweating capacity. We hypothesize that reduced sweating might affect thermoregulation in growth hormone deficiency patients. In the present study we have examined thermoregulation in growth hormone deficiency p...

  19. Role of calcium in gonadotropin releasing hormone-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from the bovine pituitary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kile, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that GnRH acts to release LH by increasing calcium uptake by gonadotroph which in turn stimulates calcium-calmodulin activity and results in LH release from bovine pituitary cells as it does in the rat. Pituitary glands of calves (4-10 months of age) were enzymatically dispersed (0.2% collagenase) and grown for 5 days to confluency in multiwell plates (3 x 10/sup 5//well). Cells treated with GnRH Ca/sup + +/ ionophore A23187, and ouabain all produced significant releases of LH release in a pronounced all or none fashion, while thorough washing of the cells with 0.5 mM EGTA in Ca/sup + +/-free media prevented the action of GnRH. GnRH caused a rapid efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/. Both GnRH-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux and LH release could be partially blocked by verapamil GnRH-induced LH release could also be blocked by nifedipine and tetrodotoxin, although these agents did not affect /sup 45/Ca efflux. The calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium and W7 were found to block GnRH induced LH release, as well as LH release induced by theophylline, KC PGE/sub 2/ and estradiol. These data indicated that: (1) calcium is required for GnRH action, but extracellular Ca/sup + +/ does not regulate LH release; (2) GnRH elevates intracellular Ca/sup + +/ by opening both voltage sensitive and receptor mediated Ca/sup + +/ channels; (3) activation of calmodulin is one mechanism involved in GnRH-induced LH release.

  20. Gamma irradiation effects on human growth hormone producing pituitary adenoma tissue. An analysis of morphology and hormone secretion in an in vitro model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anniko, M. (Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology); Arndt, J. (Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiophysics, Radiumhemmet); Raehn, T. (Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Neurosurgery); Werner, S. (Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Endocrinology)

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation-induced effects on pituitary cell morphology and secretion of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) have been analysed using an in vitro system. Specimens for organ culture were were obtained from three patients with pituitary tumours causing acromegaly but with different clinical activity of disease. Specimens were followed in vitro 1 h - 6 days after single-dose gamma irradiation (/sup 60/Co) with 70 100 and 150 Gy, respectively. These doses are used in clinical work for the stereotactic radiosuregery of pituitary adenomas. Considerable fluctuations in hormone secretion/release occurred during the first 24h after irradiation. All three tumours showed individual differences concern ing irradiation-induced morphological damage. Only a minor variation occurred between specimens from the same tumour. An individual sensitivity to irradiation of pituitary tumours in vitro is documented. The great number of surviving pituitary tumour cells one week after irradiation-many with an intact ultrastructure and containing hormone granules-indicated an initial high degree of radioresistance.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of hormone release and secretagogue binding by individual pituitary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.F.; Neill, J.D.

    1987-08-01

    The quantitative relationship between receptor binding and hormone secretion at the single-cell level was investigated in the present study by combining a reverse hemolytic plaque assay for measurement of luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from individual pituitary cells with an autoradiographic assay of /sup 125/I-labeled gonadontropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist binding to the same cells. In the plaque assay, LH secretion induces complement-mediated lysis of the LH-antibody-coated erythrocytes around the gonadotropes, resulting in areas of lysis (plaques). LH release from individual gonadotropes was quantified by comparing radioimmunoassayable LH release to hemolytic area in similarly treated cohort groups of cells; plaque area was linearly related to the amount of LH secreted. Receptor autoradiography was performed using /sup 125/I-labeled GnRH-A (a superagonist analog of GnRH) both as the ligand and as the stimulant for LH release in the plaque assay. The grains appeared to represent specific and high-affinity receptors for GnRH because (i) no pituitary cells other than gonadotropes bound the labeled ligand and (ii) grain development was progressively inhibited by coincubation with increasing doses of unlabeled GnRH-A. The authors conclude that GnRH receptor number for any individual gonadotrope is a weak determinant of the amount of LH it can secrete; nevertheless, full occupancy of all its GnRH receptors is required for any gonadotrope to reach its full LH-secretory capacity. Apparently the levels of other factors comprising the steps along the secretory pathway determine the secretory capacity of an individual cell.

  2. Reproductive Hormone and Transcriptomic Responses of Pituitary Tissue in Anestrus Gilts Induced by Nutrient Restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyu Xu

    Full Text Available The onset of estrus is a critical sign of female sexual maturity. The pituitary plays a vital role in this process by the secretion of reproductive hormones. To investigate the effects of nutrient restriction on reproductive function and the underlying mechanisms involved, deep RNA sequencing of pituitary gland tissue was carried out to determine the differentially expressed genes (DEGs between gilts in normal estrus, and gilts in which anestrus was induced by nutrient restriction. Gilts which had gone through two estrus cycles were fed a normal (CON, 2.86kg/d, n = 10 or nutrient restricted (NR, 1kg/d, n = 10 diet. The NR gilts experienced another three estrus cycles, but did not express estrus symptoms at the anticipated 6th and 7th cycles. Body weight gain in NR gilts was significantly decreased by nutrient restriction. Gilts were considered as anestrus when blood progesterone concentrations lower than 1.0 ng/mL from three consecutive blood samples were recorded. Circulating concentrations of progesterone (< 1.0 ng/mL vs. 2.1 ng/mL and estradiol (208.6 ng/mL vs. 371.8 ng/mL were significantly lower in the NR gilts than in the CON gilts. Between 5,360,000 and 5,370,000 sequence reads per sample from the CON and NR gilts' pituitaries were obtained and mapped to the porcine genome. Analysis of read counts revealed 185 DEGs. Expression of selected genes was validated by the use of quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Bioinformatic analysis identified that the genes identified were enriched in the GO terms "neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction", "GnRH signaling pathway" and "immune response system". Our findings provide a new perspective for understanding the nutrient restriction-induced reproductive impairment at the pituitary transcriptional level, and how this is linked to hormone secretion. Moreover, the transcriptomic changes in anestrus gilts associated with nutrient restriction could be a resource for targeted studies of genes and pathways

  3. Influence of leptin on luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone secreted from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuebing Qiao; Xiuyan Ma; Huixian Cui

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leptin may regulate reproductive function via release of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y. However, it is unknown whether this regulatory effect is limited to the hypothalamus. OBJECTIVE: To detect the effect of different dosages of leptin on luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion from in vitro cultured rat anterior pituitary cells. DESIGN: Contrast study based on cells. SETTING: This study was performed in the Basic Institute of Chengde Medical College, Chengde City, Hebei Province, China from March to June 2007. MATERIALS: Eighteen female Wistar rats of three months of age, weighing 200-220 g, and of clean grade were used. Leptin was provided by Peprotech Company, DMEM culture medium by Invitrogen Company, and the radioimmunological kit by Beijing Zhongshan Jinqiao Biotechnology Co., Ltd. METHODS: Three glandular organs were regarded as one group for culture of anterior pituitary cells. In the control group, saline was added to the culture medium instead of leptin. In the leptin group, leptin was prepared into different concentrations of 1×10-12, 1×10-11, 1×10-9, 1×10-7, and 1×10-6 mol/L for stimulation of cultured cells. The culture supernatant was obtained at three hours after additional of saline/leptin. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Contents of LH and FSH were detected by radioimmunology. RESULTS: Following leptin stimulation, LH release increased with increasing concentrations of leptin up to 1×10-9 mol/L, where LH release peaked. LH release then progressively decreased with increasing leptin concentrations (P<0.01). LH release in the leptin (1×10-12, 1×10-11, 1×10-7, and 1×10-6 mol/L) groups was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.01). FSH content in the leptin (1×10-11, 1×10-9, and 1×10-7 mol/L) groups was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Leptin can directly affect pituitary tissue to promote the secretion of LH and FSH in a dose-dependent manner.

  4. PET/MR imaging in the diagnosis of hormone-producing pituitary micro-adenoma: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Hou, Bo; Lu, Lin; Feng, Ming; Zang, Jie; Yao, Shaobo; Feng, Feng; Wang, Renzhi; Li, Fang; Zhu, Zhaohui

    2017-08-03

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR), using (18)F-FDG and (68)Ga-DOTATATE as tracers, in the detection of hormone-producing pituitary micro-adenoma, where diagnosis is difficult using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone. Methods: A total of 37 patients with elevated hormone levels were recruited, including 19 patients with undiagnosable primary pituitary tumors and 18 patients with suspected recurrent pituitary adenomas (PAs). Patients underwent (18)F-FDG PET/MR and (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/MR within one week. Finally, 27 patients underwent transsphenoidal adenomectomy within two weeks, 3 patients underwent sella region radiotherapy, 1 patient underwent somatostatin therapy, and the other 6 patients had a clinical follow-up. The image characteristics and uptake levels were correlated with the surgical findings and pathological results. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to determine an optimal cutoff pituitary to differentiate pituitary adenoma from normal pituitary tissue. The area under the ROC curve was calculated to compare the diagnostic performance. Results: The PET/MR images were in diagnostic quality without obvious image artifacts. The high contrast of PET imaging provided complementary information to the fine anatomy display of MRI. Increased (18)F-FDG uptake was clearly observed in the all patients, whereas enhanced MRI enhanced MRI using 0.05 mmol/kg Gadopentetate dimeglumine had suspicious findings only in 47% primary and 39% recurrent PAs patients, which were 37% and 50%, respectively when using 0.1 mmol/kg Gadopentetate dimeglumine. The maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of (18)F-FDG activity (6.8 ± 3.7) in 16 primary pituitary adenomas who underwent transsphenoidal adenomectomy, was significantly higher than that of the rest of the normal pituitary gland (3.2 ± 1.1, P PET/MR imaging provides an ideal tool for the detection of small hormone

  5. CONTENTS BASAL LEVELS of SEX HORMONES and PITUITARY HORMONES IN PATIENTS DEMODECOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Bodnya K. I.; Revenko Zh. A.

    2014-01-01

    The regularities of changes in the nature and dynamics of clinical – hormonal parameters are revealed in this research that are not being specific they expand knowledge of the pathogenesis of demodicosis and create certain conditions for the directed correction of compensatory and adaptive capabilities of the host and open up prospect for improvement – pathogenetic treatment of demodicosis and its complications.

  6. Targeting GH-1 splicing as a novel pharmacological strategy for growth hormone deficiency type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2017-01-15

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD II) is a rare genetic splicing disorder characterized by reduced growth hormone (GH) secretion and short stature. It is mainly caused by autosomal dominant-negative mutations within the growth hormone gene (GH-1) which results in missplicing at the mRNA level and the subsequent loss of exon 3, producing the 17.5-kDa GH isoform: a mutant and inactive GH protein that reduces the stability and the secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform, the main biologically active GH form. At present, patients suffering from IGHD II are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH (rhGH) in order to reach normal height. However, this type of replacement therapy, although effective in terms of growth, does not prevent the toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa mutant on the pituitary gland, which may eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. As the severity of the disease inversely correlates with the 17.5-kDa/22-kDa ratio, increasing the inclusion of exon 3 is expected to ameliorate disease symptoms. This review focuses on the recent advances in experimental and therapeutic strategies applicable to treat IGHD II in clinical and preclinical contexts. Several avenues for alternative IGHD II therapy will be discussed including the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs that specifically target the exon 3-deleted transcripts as well as the application of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) to enhance full-length GH-1 transcription, correct GH-1 exon 3 splicing and manipulate GH pathway.

  7. Prevalence of posttraumatic growth hormone deficiency is highly dependent on the diagnostic set-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Krag, Kirstine Stochholm; Janukonyté, Jurgita

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Recent international guidelines suggest pituitary screening in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Predominantly isolated GH deficiency (GHD) was reported in the literature, raising the question of potential methodological bias. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to...

  8. The novel somatostatin analog SOM230 is a potent inhibitor of hormone release by growth hormone- and prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Hofland (Leo); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); A. Beckers (Albert); J. van der Hoek (Joost); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); M. Waaijers (Marlijn); D. Sprij-Mooij (Diana); C. Bruns (Christian); G. Weckbecker (Gisbert); R.A. Feelders (Richard)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractTo determine the inhibitory profile of the novel somatostatin (SRIF) analog SOM230 with broad SRIF receptor binding, we compared the in vitro effects of SOM230, octreotide (OCT), and SRIF-14 on hormone release by cultures of different types of secreting pituitary adenom

  9. CONTENTS BASAL LEVELS of SEX HORMONES and PITUITARY HORMONES IN PATIENTS DEMODECOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodnya K. I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regularities of changes in the nature and dynamics of clinical – hormonal parameters are revealed in this research that are not being specific they expand knowledge of the pathogenesis of demodicosis and create certain conditions for the directed correction of compensatory and adaptive capabilities of the host and open up prospect for improvement – pathogenetic treatment of demodicosis and its complications.

  10. Dexamethasone increases growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor mRNA levels in cultured rat anterior pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, M; Sato, M; Matsubara, S; Wada, Y; Takahara, J

    1996-06-01

    To examine the effects of glucocorticoid (GC) on growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor gene expression, a highly-sensitive and quantitative reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was used in this study. Rat anterior pituitary cells were isolated and cultured for 4 days. The cultured cells were treated with dexamethasone for 2, 6, and 24 h. GRH receptor mRNA levels were determined by competitive RT-PCR using a recombinant RNA as the competitor. Dexamethasone significantly increased GRH receptor mRNA levels at 5 nM after 6- and 24 h-incubations, and the maximal effect was found at 25 nM. The GC receptor-specific antagonist, RU 38486 completely eliminated the dexamethasone-induced enhancement of GRH receptor mRNA levels. Dexamethasone did not alter the mRNA levels of beta-actin and prolactin at 5 nM for 24 h, whereas GH mRNA levels were significantly increased by the same treatment. The GH response to GRH was significantly enhanced by the 24-h incubation with 5 nM dexamethasone. These findings suggest that GC stimulates GRH receptor gene expression through the ligand-activated GC receptors in the rat somatotrophs. The direct effects of GC on the GRH receptor gene could explain the enhancement of GRH-induced GH secretion.

  11. Dose dependency of time of onset of radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, P.E.; Shalet, S.M. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester (England))

    1991-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion during insulin-induced hypoglycemia was assessed on 133 occasions in 82 survivors of childhood malignant disease. All had received cranial irradiation with a dose range to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of 27 to 47.5 Gy (estimated by a schedule of 16 fractions over 3 weeks) and had been tested on one or more occasions between 0.2 and 18.9 years after treatment. Results of one third of the GH tests were defined as normal (GH peak response, greater than 15 mU/L) within the first 5 years, in comparison with 16% after 5 years. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that dose (p = 0.007) and time from irradiation (p = 0.03), but not age at therapy, had a significant influence on peak GH responses. The late incidence of GH deficiency was similar over the whole dose range (4 of 26 GH test results normal for less than 30 Gy and 4 of 25 normal for greater than or equal to 30 Gy after 5 years), but the speed of onset over the first years was dependent on dose. We conclude that the requirement for GH replacement therapy and the timing of its introduction will be influenced by the dose of irradiation received by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  12. Classification of pituitary growth hormone producing adenomas according to SIPAP: application in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Sofie (Dept. of Radiology, Lund Univ. and Skaane Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden)), email: Sofie.Meyer@skane.se; Valdemarsson, Stig (Dept. of Endocrinology, Lund Univ. and Skaane Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden)); Larsson, Elna-Marie (Dept. of Radiology, Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2011-09-15

    Background: In 1997, the SIPAP classification was introduced, a guide designed for MRI, to characterize pituitary adenomas with emphasis on extrasellar extensions and impact on adjacent structures. To our knowledge no previous evaluation of the inter-observer agreement of the SIPAP classification has been performed. Purpose: To evaluate the inter-observer agreement of the SIPAP classification. Material and Methods: Sixty patients operated on for growth hormone producing pituitary adenomas at Lund Univ. Hospital 1991-2007 had an assessable preoperative MRI scan. Forty-five of them also had an assessable postoperative MRI scan. The mean time between surgery and postoperative MRI scans was 11 months. Two observers evaluated all the MRI scans independently. The outcome of the evaluation is presented as the percentage of concordance in each of the evaluated directions and the degree of discrepancy for each of the directions evaluated. Results: In 284 (79%) of 360 preoperative gradings both observers agreed completely. In 17 of the 60 preoperative MRI scans, both observers made identical assessments according to the SIPAP classification in all the six different directions of tumor extension. In 76 gradings the results differed between the observers. The difference was 1 grade (or less) in 69 cases. In 230 (85%) of 270 postoperative gradings the results were identical for both observers. In 18 of the 45 postoperative MRI scans, both observers made the same assessments according to the SIPAP classification in all the six different directions of tumor extension. In 40 gradings the results differed between the observers. The difference was 1 grade (or less) in all 40 cases. Conclusion: We found a relatively high inter-observer agreement both pre- and postoperatively, supporting the usefulness and easy applicability of the SIPAP system for grading of pituitary adenomas pre- as well as postoperatively

  13. The Disorders of Growth Hormone Secretion in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Compared to Patients with the Non-Functional Pituitary Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Urmanova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study — to investigate the disorders of growth hormone (GH secretion in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS compared to patients with non-functional pituitary adenomas (NFPA. Under our supervision during period from September 2015 to March 2016, there were 15 female outpatients of childbearing age with PCOS and 15 — with NFPA. Average age of patients was 25.5 and 28.9 years, respectively. The duration of disease ranged from 7 months to 9 years. It was found that in both groups, there were neuroendocrine disorders typical for each pathology. So, in the first group of patients with PCOS, the following violations were most often: obesity, striae, acanthosis, аcne, hyperandrogenemia, hyperpolyme­norrhea, and in the second one — secondary amenorrhea, hyperprolactinemia, panhypopituitarism. In both groups, there was anovulation, as well as decline of GH and insulin-like growth factor‑1 (IGF‑1 secretion. In addition, patients with NFPA had significantly decreased basal levels of tropic hormones — GH, luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH on the background of hyperprolactinemia and normal values of IGF‑1, while in patients with PCOS, the levels of GH, LH, FSH were reduced on the background of hyperandrogenemia and IGF‑1 decline. Thus, it was found that in the group of patients with PCOS, there was the most significant reduction of basal IGF‑1 levels, whereas GH deficiency was less frequent. Patients with NFPA had panhypopituitarism, namely combined deficiency of GH, LH, FSH, thyroid stimulating hormone, while IGF‑1 deficiency was less frequent. Disorders of GH and IGF‑1 secretion identified in our study confirm the literature data that patients with PCOS have a reduction in the levels of GH and IGF‑1 on the background of hyperinsulinemia and hyperandrogenaemia.

  14. Effect of Camphor on Pituitary-Gonadal Hormonal Axis and Oogenesis in Adult Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Johari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Camphor stimulates the nervous system and the circulatory system, reduces lactation, and prevents conception and embryo embedding. We investigated the effects of camphor on the pituitary-gonadal hormonal axis and concentration of steroidal hormones.   Materials & Methods: The parameters investigated were concentrations of LH, FSH, estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. Forty adult female rats at a mean weight of 180 ± 20 grams were divided into five groups. Camphor solution was prepared in olive oil at 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg doses, and 0.2 cc injections were done intraperitoneally every day for 2 weeks. The control group received no injection. The sham group received olive oil (as solvent of camphor and treatment groups of 1, 2, and 3 received doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg. The treatment groups were sacrificed one day after the last injection, and their hearts were dissected and blood samples were obtained. The concentrations of the hormones were measured by the ELISA test, and the results were evaluated via the t-test, ANOVA, and Duncan.   Results: The results showed a significant decrease in the concentrations of testosterone and progesterone (p value < 0.05 and a significant increase in the concentrations of LH and FSH (p value <0.05.   Conclusion: Camphor augmented oogenesis via effecting a rise in the concentrations of LH and FSH in our rats.

  15. Blood plasma levels of anterior pituitary hormones of rabbits after apricot seed exposure in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína MICHALCOVÁ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes possible changes in plasma levels of anterior pituitary hormones induced by bitter apricot (Prunus armeniaca L. seeds in young female rabbits in vivo. Prunus armeniaca L. is an important medicinal edible plant species commonly known as “apricot”. The apricot is a member of the Rosaceae and subfamily Prunoideae. It is one of the most delicious and commercially traded fruits in the world. Apricot kernel is the inner part of the seed of the apricot fruit. The kernel is used to produce oil and other chemicals used for medicinal purposes. The seeds are potentially useful in human nutrition and for treatment several diseases especially cancer. In the present study apricot seeds were mixed with feed at different doses 0, 60, 300, 420 mg*kg-1 of body weight. ELISA was used to determine the levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH and prolactin (PRL. 58-days application of apricot seeds did not affect the concentration (P≥0.05 of PRL, LH in blood plasma. Significant (P≤0.01 inhibition of FSH levels induced by the seeds was found at the dose of 420 mg*kg-1 but not at 60 and 300 mg*kg-1 of body weight. These results are suggesting that the natural substances present in apricot seeds may be involved in mechanisms of ovarian folliculogenesis.

  16. Investigation of Responsiveness to Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone in Growth Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Ouk Chin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate how the paradoxical response of GH secretion to TRH changes according to tumor volumes. Methods. Patients with newly diagnosed acromegaly were classified as either TRH responders or nonresponders according to the results of a TRH stimulation test (TST, and their clinical characteristics were compared according to responsiveness to TRH and tumor volumes. Results. A total of 41 acromegalic patients who underwent the TST were included in this study. Between TRH responders and nonresponders, basal GH, IGF-I levels, peak GH levels, and tumor volume were not significantly different, but the between-group difference of GH levels remained near significant over the entire TST time. during the TST were significantly different according to the responsiveness to TRH. Peak GH levels and during the TST showed significantly positive correlations with tumor volume with higher levels in macroadenomas than in microadenomas. GH levels over the entire TST time also remained significantly higher in macroadenomas than in microadenomas. Conclusion. Our data demonstrated that the paradoxical response of GH secretion to TRH in GH-producing pituitary adenomas was not inversely correlated with tumor volumes.

  17. Exceptional Association Between Klinefelter Syndrome and Growth Hormone Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Sana Doubi; Zoubida Amrani; Hanan El Ouahabi; Saïd Boujraf; Farida Ajdi

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is characterized in adults by the combination of a tall stature, small testes, gynecomastia, and azoospermia. This case is described in a North African population of the Mediterranean region of North Africa. We report the case of a male 16 years old, of Arab ethnic origin, and diagnosed with this syndrome, who had a small height in relation to a growth hormone (GH) deficiency and a history of absence seizures (generalized myoclonic epilepsy). The patient′s size was

  18. Growth hormone treatment during pregnancy in a growth hormone-deficient woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Starup, J; Christiansen, J S

    1995-01-01

    protein 3 (IGFBP-3) during pregnancy, as well as birth weight and hormone levels after delivery in a 25-year-old woman with idiopathic, isolated GH deficiency diagnosed at the age of 7 years. As part of a clinical trial, the patient was treated with 2 IU/M2 GH for a period of 5 years. At this time she...

  19. Continuation of growth hormone therapy versus placebo in transition-phase patients with growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens; Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, parallel study of 18 patients with a mean age of 20 years who had confirmed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we evaluated body composition, insulin sensitivity, and glucose turnover at baseline (when all were receiving GH replacement); after 12 months of continued GH therapy...

  20. Synchronous esthesioneuroblastoma and growth-hormone-secreting pituitary macroadenoma: combined open and endoscopic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Costanza J; Tewfik, Marc A; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Di Maio, Salvatore

    2014-12-01

    Background Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon malignant neoplasm that arises from the olfactory neuroepithelium. In this article we report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma presenting concomitantly with a growth-hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary macroadenoma. Results A 52 year old woman underwent surgery for suspected nasal polyps. Intralesional debulking of an intranasal tumor disclosed a low-grade esthesioneuroblastoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large nasal and intracranial tumor, in addition to a separate sellar and suprasellar tumor. The patient was frankly acromegalic. She underwent a first-stage gross total resection of the esthesioneuroblastoma via a combined extended subfrontal and extended endonasal approach, followed by focused radiation therapy. She then returned for endoscopic removal of the GH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma. Conclusion The combined open and endoscopic management of this patient is described and a review of the literature presented. To our knowledge this is the first case of synchronous esthesioneuroblastoma and macroadenoma, in this case GH secreting, described in the literature.

  1. Primary hypothyroidism mimicking a pituitary macroadenoma: regression after thyroid hormone replacement therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Ki Seong; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Tae Young [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Iksan (Korea); See-Sung, Choi [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Iksan (Korea); Kim, Jong Duck [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Iksan (Korea)

    2009-02-15

    We report a 9-year-old girl with pituitary hyperplasia due to primary hypothyroidism. She presented with growth arrest, abnormal thyroid function studies, and a pituitary mass on MRI. With thyroxine therapy, the pituitary mass regressed and her symptoms resolved. Primary hypothyroidism should be considered in the differential diagnosis of solid mass lesions of the pituitary gland. (orig.)

  2. Peptic ulceration may be a hormonal deficiency disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jack W

    2008-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed that Helicobacter pylori infection may cause a deficiency of the hormone secretin that allows peptic ulcer disease to develop by impairing the body's defenses to gastric acid. Secretin is released into the circulation from the S-cells of the duodenal crypts in response to gastric acid entering the duodenum. Once in the circulation, secretin has five well-documented effects that protect the upper intestine from gastric acid: it stimulates secretion of bicarbonate rich exocrine pancreatic juice; it stimulates secretion of alkaline bile; it stimulates secretion of alkaline mucus from the duodenal submucosal glands of Brunner; it inhibits the humoral phase of gastric secretion; and it inhibits gastric motility, thereby delaying gastric emptying. Impaired secretin release and reduced duodenal S-cells have been documented in peptic ulcer patients compared with control patients. Clinical evidence that patients with H. pylori infection and peptic ulceration have increased gastric secretion and motility and decreased duodenal bicarbonate response to gastric acid, all of which normalize after eradication of the infection, could be explained by reversible impairment of the secretin mechanism. Gastric metaplasia in the duodenum with H. pylori infection is known to reduce the S-cell population. The fact that not all patients with H. pylori infection develop peptic ulceration suggests that degree of secretin deficiency determined by extent of the infection must reach a critical level for peptic ulceration to occur. Peptic ulceration may be a hormonal deficiency disease, a result of secretin deficiency caused by H. pylori infection. It may be the first example of a specific hormonal deficiency disease caused by a specific bacterial infection.

  3. Growth hormone treatment during pregnancy in a growth hormone-deficient woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Starup, J; Christiansen, J S

    1995-01-01

    Information on the course and outcome of pregnancies in growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients is sparse, and GH treatment during pregnancy in such women has not been described previously. We have studied fetal growth and serum levels of GH, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF binding...... protein 3 (IGFBP-3) during pregnancy, as well as birth weight and hormone levels after delivery in a 25-year-old woman with idiopathic, isolated GH deficiency diagnosed at the age of 7 years. As part of a clinical trial, the patient was treated with 2 IU/M2 GH for a period of 5 years. At this time she...... became pregnant after donor insemination. The GH treatment was continued until variant GH production from the placenta was evident. Serum levels of GH, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured monthly during pregnancy after 3 days off GH therapy. Abdominal ultrasound was performed five times. Hormonal levels were...

  4. Pituitary Tumors: Condition Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and metabolism. Thyroid-stimulating hormone is involved in growth, body temperature, and heart rate. Nonfunctioning pituitary tumors (also called nonsecretory tumors) do not produce hormones. They can press on or damage the pituitary ...

  5. Pituitary-gonadal and pituitary-thyroid axis hormone concentrations before and during a hypoglycemic clamp after sleep deprivation in healthy men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Jauch-Chara

    Full Text Available Total sleep deprivation (TSD exerts strong modulatory effects on the secretory activity of endocrine systems that might be related to TSD-induced challenges of cerebral glucose metabolism. Here, we investigate whether TSD affects the course of male pituitary-gonadal and pituitary-thyroid axis related hormones during a subsequent 240-min hypoglycemic clamp. Ten healthy men were tested on 2 different conditions, TSD and 7-hour regular sleep. Circulating concentrations of total testosterone, prolactin (PRL, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, free triiodothyronine (fT3, and free thyroxin (fT4 were measured during baseline and a subsequent hypoglycemic clamp taking place in the morning. Basal, i.e. at 07:00 am measured, concentrations of total testosterone (P = 0.05 and PRL (P<0.01 were lower while the values of TSH (P = 0.02, fT3 (P = 0.08, and fT4 (P = 0.04 were higher after TSD as compared to regular sleep. During the subsequent hypoglycemic clamp (all measurements from baseline to the end of the clamp analyzed total testosterone concentrations in the regular sleep (P<0.01 but not in the TSD condition (P = 0.61 decreased, while PRL levels increased (P = 0.05 irrespectively of the experimental condition (P = 0.31. TSH concentrations decreased during hypoglycemia (P<0.01, with this decrease being more pronounced after TSD (P = 0.04. However, at the end of the hypoglycemic clamp concentrations all of the above mentioned hormones did not differ between the two sleep conditions. Our data indicate a profound influence of TSD on male pituitary-gonadal and pituitary-thyroid axis hormones characterized by reduced basal testosterone and PRL levels and increased TSH levels. However, since concentrations of these hormones measured at the end of the 240-min hypoglycemic clamp were not affected by TSD it can be speculated that the influence of TSD on the two endocrine axes is rather short lived or does not interact in an additive

  6. Do deficiencies in growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) shorten or prolong longevity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2005-02-01

    Present knowledge on the effects of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiency on aging and lifespan are controversial. Studying untreated patients with either isolated GH deficiency due to GH gene deletion, patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency due to PROP-1 gene mutation and patients with isolated IGF-I deficiency due to deletions or mutations of the GH receptor gene (Laron syndrome); it was found, that these patients despite signs of early aging (wrinkled skin, obesity, insulin resistance and osteopenia) have a long life span reaching ages of 80-90 years. Animal models of genetic GH deficiencies such as Snell mice (Pit-1 gene mutations) the Ames mice (PROP-1 gene mutation) and the Laron mice (GH receptor gene knock-out) have a statistically significant higher longevity compared to normal controls. On the contrary, mice transgenic for GH and acromegalic patients secreting high amounts of GH have premature death. Those data raise the question whether pharmacological GH administration to adults is deleterious, in contrast to policies advocating such therapies.

  7. Clinical guidelines for management of diabetes insipidus and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion after pituitary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Cristina; del Pozo, Carlos; Villabona, Carles

    2014-04-01

    Changes in water metabolism and regulation of vasopressin (AVP) or antidiuretic hormone (ADH) are common complications of pituitary surgery. The scarcity of studies comparing different treatment and monitoring strategies for these disorders and the lack of prior clinical guidelines makes it difficult to provide recommendations following a methodology based on grades of evidence. This study reviews the pathophysiology of diabetes insipidus and inappropriate ADH secretion after pituitary surgery, and is intended to serve as a guide for their diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Cypermethrin on Sexual Behaviour and Plasma Concentrations of Pituitary-Gonadal Hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Solati

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyrethroids are commonly used as insecticides for both household and agriculturalapplications, and have recently been linked to endocrine disruption. Cypermethrin is a type Пpyrethroid which is used widely throughout the world. The present study was aimed to investigatethe effects of cypermethrin on the sexual behaviour and plasma level of pituitary-gonadal hormonesof adult male mice.Materials and Methods: Research methodology comprised injecting mice daily with cypermethrin(10, 15, 20 mg/kg i.p. or DMSO (0.2 ml for five weeks. Receptive female mice were used totest male sexual behaviors (sniffing, following, mounting, and coupling. Plasma concentrationsof testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle stimulation hormone (FSH were measuredafter five weeks treatment using the ELISA method.Results: The results of the present study showed that cypermethrin-treated groups exhibited reducedsexual behavior when compared with the control group. Assay results demonstrate significantlyreduced serum testosterone levels (p<0.05 versus the control group, whereas FSH and LH valuesincreased significantly.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that cypermethrin reduces plasma testosterone concentrationsand thus is able to disrupt sexual behaviours.

  9. Growth hormone modulation of arginine-induced glucagon release: studies of isolated growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Y; Taminato, T; Goto, Y; Inoue, Y; Kadowaki, S; Hattori, M; Mori, K; Kato, Y; Matsukura, S; Imura, H

    1978-12-01

    Plasma glucagon and insulin responses to L-arginine were compared in normal controls and patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly. Patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency were characterized by high plasma glucagon response and low plasma insulin response, whereas acromegalic patients showed exaggerated plasma glucagon response and almost normal insulin response. These results suggest that growth hormone is probably required for optimum function of the islets, and since hyperglucagonaemia was observed in both growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly, metabolic disturbances stemming from the respective primary diseases may affect glucagon secretion.

  10. Urinary growth hormone excretion as a screening test for growth hormone deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, J.M.; Wood, P. J.; Williamson, S.; Betts, P. R.; Evans, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Overnight urinary growth hormone secretion was measured by an immunoradiometric assay incorporating commercially available reagents, in 41 normal prepubertal school-children from three age groups: 3-5 years, 6-7 years, and 9-10 years. There was no significant difference between the groups expressing the results as total microU/specimen and so they have been combined to provide a prepubertal reference range of 2.25-10.50 microU/night. Prepubertal children with growth hormone deficiency who had...

  11. Increase in maternal placental growth hormone during pregnancy and disappearance during parturition in normal and growth hormone-deficient pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønberg, Ulla; Damm, Peter; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate placental growth hormone levels in maternal circulation throughout pregnancy in normal and growth hormone-deficient women with the use of a specific assay and to determine the clearance of placental growth hormone from maternal circulation after birth....

  12. The effects of iodine deficiency on thyroid hormone deiodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obregon, Maria-Jesus; Escobar del Rey, Francisco; Morreale de Escobar, Gabriella

    2005-08-01

    hormones of maternal origin are available to the embryo early in development and continue contributing to fetal thyroid hormone status, even after onset of fetal thyroid secretion. In the case of congenital hypothyroidism and normal maternal T(4), the transfer of the latter, together with increased D2 activity, protects the fetal brain from T(3) deficiency, even when it may be insufficient to maintain euthyroidism in other fetal tissues. Practically all of the T(3) found in the fetal brain is derived locally from T(4), and not from circulating T(3). In the case of severe iodine deficiency, both the embryo and the mother are T(4)-deficient; therefore, the fetal brain is exposed to T(3)-deficiency, both before and after onset of fetal thyroid function. This leads to irreversible alterations and damage to the central nervous system (i.e. abnormal corticogenesis). Moreover, because intrathyroidal autoregulatory mechanisms are not yet operative in the fetus, both T(4) and T(3) continue to be very low until birth, and the fetus is not only hypothyroxinemic, similar to its mother, but also clinically and biochemically hypothyroid.

  13. Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency associated with Hashimoto's disease and thyroid crisis triggered by head trauma. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanei, Takafumi; Eguchi, Youko; Yamamoto, Yuka; Hirano, Masaki; Takebayashi, Shigenori; Nakahara, Norimoto

    2012-01-01

    A 47-year-old man presented to our hospital after suffering transient loss of consciousness and falling to the floor. On admission, his Glasgow Coma Scale score was 11 (E3V3M5), and he exhibited restlessness. Blood examination revealed hyperthyroidism. Computed tomography showed slight traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage. He developed fever and tachycardia, and was diagnosed with thyroid crisis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a brain contusion in the right frontal lobe, and encephalopathy signs in the right frontal and insular cortex. Immunocytochemical examinations suggested Hashimoto's disease, and hormone examinations revealed plasma levels were undetectably low of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and low of cortisol. Pituitary stimulation tests showed inadequate plasma ACTH and cortisol response, consistent with isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD). The final diagnosis was IAD associated with Hashimoto's disease. Hydrocortisone replacement therapy was continued, and the patient was nearly free from neurological deficits after 18 months. The neuroimaging abnormalities gradually improved with time.

  14. Influence of sex and growth hormone deficiency on sweating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, K; Nilsson, K O; Skakkebaek, N E

    1991-01-01

    than 0.001, respectively). There was a significant increase in SSR from prepuberty to puberty (p less than 0.001) for both sexes. The children with GH deficiency, all pre-pubertal, showed significantly reduced SSR (p less than 0.001) compared with the healthy children (median values: 32.8 vs 80.0 mg 30...... min-1). We conclude that (a) sweat secretion pattern in children shows a significant sex difference and (b) sweating in children is dependent on growth hormone.......Sweat secretion rate (SSR) was measured by the pilocarpine iontophoresis test in (a) 254 healthy children and adolescents (aged 6.0 to 19.2 years, mean age 11.2 years); in (b) 58 healthy adults (aged 20.4 to 75.2 years, mean age 37.6 years); and in (c) eight prepubertal patients with growth hormone...

  15. Clinical applications of somatostatin analogs for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-wen; Li, Ying; Mao, Zhi-gang; Hu, Bin; Jiang, Xiao-bing; Song, Bing-bing; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Yong-hong; Wang, Hai-jun

    2014-01-01

    Excessive growth hormone (GH) is usually secreted by GH-secreting pituitary adenomas and causes gigantism in juveniles or acromegaly in adults. The clinical complications involving cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic systems lead to elevated morbidity in acromegaly. Control of serum GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 hypersecretion by surgery or pharmacotherapy can decrease morbidity. Current pharmacotherapy includes somatostatin analogs (SAs) and GH receptor antagonist; the former consists of lanreotide Autogel (ATG) and octreotide long-acting release (LAR), and the latter refers to pegvisomant. As primary medical therapy, lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR can be supplied in a long-lasting formulation to achieve biochemical control of GH and IGF-1 by subcutaneous injection every 4–6 weeks. Lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR provide an effective medical treatment, whether as a primary or secondary therapy, for the treatment of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma; however, to maximize benefits with the least cost, several points should be emphasized before the application of SAs. A comprehensive assessment, especially of the observation of clinical predictors and preselection of SA treatment, should be completed in advance. A treatment process lasting at least 3 months should be implemented to achieve a long-term stable blood concentration. More satisfactory surgical outcomes for noninvasive macroadenomas treated with presurgical SA may be achieved, although controversy of such adjuvant therapy exists. Combination of SA and pegvisomant or cabergoline shows advantages in some specific cases. Thus, an individual treatment program should be established for each patient under a full evaluation of the risks and benefits. PMID:24421637

  16. Influence of apricot kernels on blood plasma levels of selected anterior pituitary hormones in male and female rabbits in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Michalcová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Amygdalin is represented in the family Rosacea more precisely in an apricot kernels and an almonds. There are a lot of components such as trace elements, vitamins, carbohydrates, organic acids, esters, phenols, terpenoids, except cyanogenic glycoside in the seeds. It is known that bioregulators can modulate the activity of specific enzymes and hormones very exactly at low levels and in a short time. The aim of our study was examine the effects of selected doses (0, 60, 300, 420 mg/kg b.w. of apricot kernels in feed on the plasma levels of anterior pituitary hormones in young male and female rabbits in vivo. A sensitive, biochemical method, ELISA was used to determine the hormones prolactin (PRL, luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH. 28-day application of apricot kernels did not affect the concentration of PRL, LH, FSH in blood plasma of males. No significant (P≤0.05 differences in case of PRL and LH levels in the blood plasma of females were found. On the other hand a significant (P≤0.05 inhibition of FSH release induced by kernels at the doses 300, 420 mg/kg was found. Our results indicate that apricot kernels could affect secretion of anterior pituitary hormone FSH in female rabbits.

  17. Exceptional Association Between Klinefelter Syndrome and Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubi, Sana; Amrani, Zoubida; Ouahabi, Hanan El; Boujraf, Saïd; Ajdi, Farida

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is characterized in adults by the combination of a tall stature, small testes, gynecomastia, and azoospermia. This case is described in a North African population of the Mediterranean region of North Africa. We report the case of a male 16 years old, of Arab ethnic origin, and diagnosed with this syndrome, who had a small height in relation to a growth hormone (GH) deficiency and a history of absence seizures (generalized myoclonic epilepsy). The patient's size was Klinefelter syndrome - on the contrary, the presence of any associated sign (brain maturation, delay in puberty, aggressiveness) should encourage one to request a karyotype for the diagnosis and appropriate care of any case of KS that can be associated with GH deficiency, or which is in a variant form (isochromosome Xq, 49,XXXXY).

  18. Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy on Bone Mineral Density in Growth Hormone Deficient Adults: A Meta-Analysis

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    Peng Xue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Growth hormone deficiency patients exhibited reduced bone mineral density compared with healthy controls, but previous researches demonstrated uncertainty about the effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone in growth hormone deficient adults. The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth hormone replacement therapy could elevate bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Methods. In this meta-analysis, searches of Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library were undertaken to identify studies in humans of the association between growth hormone treatment and bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Random effects model was used for this meta-analysis. Results. A total of 20 studies (including one outlier study with 936 subjects were included in our research. We detected significant overall association of growth hormone treatment with increased bone mineral density of spine, femoral neck, and total body, but some results of subgroup analyses were not consistent with the overall analyses. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis suggested that growth hormone replacement therapy could have beneficial influence on bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults, but, in some subject populations, the influence was not evident.

  19. Long-term consequences of growth hormone replacement and cranial radiation on pituitary function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelman-Dijkstra, Natasha Mireille

    2015-01-01

    This thesis covers the consequences of cranial irradiation of non-pituitary tumors, eg nasopharyngeal carcinoma, on pituitary function. In chapter 2 we have performed a meta-analysis of available data reported in literature on pituitary function after cranial radiotherapy for head and neck and non-p

  20. Continuation of growth hormone therapy versus placebo in transition-phase patients with growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens; Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, parallel study of 18 patients with a mean age of 20 years who had confirmed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we evaluated body composition, insulin sensitivity, and glucose turnover at baseline (when all were receiving GH replacement); after 12 months of continued GH therapy...... or placebo; and after a 12-month open phase of GH therapy. In the placebo group, insulin sensitivity and fat mass increased and lipid oxidation decreased, whereas glucose oxidation increased (p...

  1. Efficacy of growth hormone therapy in adults with childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ja Hye; Cho, Ja Hyang; Yoo, Han-Wook; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Growth hormone (GH) plays a key role in the regulation of body composition, lipid metabolism, and quality of life in adults with GH deficiency (GHD). This study investigated changes in laboratory findings and body composition after GH recommencement for adult GHD and analyzed correlation between GH interruption period and endocrine or anthropometric parameters. Methods A total of 45 patients (17 females and 28 males) diagnosed with childhood-onset GHD (CO-GHD) were investigated and al...

  2. Adipokines (Leptin, Adiponectin, Resistin) Differentially Regulate All Hormonal Cell Types in Primary Anterior Pituitary Cell Cultures from Two Primate Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento-Cabral, André; Peinado, Juan R; Halliday, Lisa C; Malagon, María M; Castaño, Justo P; Kineman, Rhonda D; Luque, Raúl M

    2017-03-06

    Adipose-tissue (AT) is an endocrine organ that dynamically secretes multiple hormones, the adipokines, which regulate key physiological processes. However, adipokines and their receptors are also expressed and regulated in other tissues, including the pituitary, suggesting that locally- and AT-produced adipokines might comprise a regulatory circuit that relevantly modulate pituitary cell-function. Here, we used primary pituitary cell-cultures from two normal nonhuman-primate species [Papio-anubis/Macaca-fascicularis] to determine the impact of different adipokines on the functioning of all anterior-pituitary cell-types. Leptin and resistin stimulated GH-release, a response that was blocked by somatostatin. Conversely, adiponectin decreased GH-release, and inhibited GHRH-, but not ghrelin-stimulated GH-secretion. Furthermore: 1) Leptin stimulated PRL/ACTH/FSH- but not LH/TSH-release; 2) adiponectin stimulated PRL-, inhibited ACTH- and did not alter LH/FSH/TSH-release; and 3) resistin increased ACTH-release and did not alter PRL/LH/FSH/TSH-secretion. These effects were mediated through the activation of common (AC/PKA) and distinct (PLC/PKC, intra-/extra-cellular calcium, PI3K/MAPK/mTOR) signaling-pathways, and by the gene-expression regulation of key receptors/transcriptional-factors involved in the functioning of these pituitary cell-types (e.g. GHRH/ghrelin/somatostatin/insulin/IGF-I-receptors/Pit-1). Finally, we found that primate pituitaries expressed leptin/adiponectin/resistin. Altogether, these and previous data suggest that local-production of adipokines/receptors, in conjunction with circulating adipokine-levels, might comprise a relevant regulatory circuit that contribute to the fine-regulation of pituitary functions.

  3. Prospective assessment of pituitary size and shape on MR imaging after suppressive hormonal therapy in central precocious puberty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, J.T. van; Sharafuddin, M.J.A.; Kao, S.C.S. [Department of Radiology-JPP 3889, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52246 (United States); Luisiri, A. [Cardinal Glennon Children' s Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Garibaldi, L.R. [Children' s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark, New Jersey (United States); St. Barnabas Medical Center, Livingston, New Jersey (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Objective. The diagnostic significance of an enlarged pituitary gland regarding both shape and size parameters on MR imaging has previously been demonstrated in children with central precocious puberty. This study was designed to assess changes in these parameters following successful suppressive therapy of central precocious puberty with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. Materials and methods. Twelve girls (mean age 7.3 years) with central precocious puberty were prospectively enrolled in our study protocol. Sagittal and coronal MR images of the pituitary region were obtained in all patients before treatment and after at least 6 months of GnRH analogue therapy (mean 18.0 months). Parameters measured included pituitary gland height, length, width, sagittal cross-sectional area, and volume. Results. All patients had excellent clinical response to treatment with arrest of secondary sexual development, normalization of serum estradiol levels, and complete obliteration of the LH response to diagnostic GnRH stimulation. No significant change occurred in any pituitary size or shape parameter following GnRH analogue therapy. Conclusion. Favorable clinical response to GnRH analogue therapy in central precocious puberty is not accompanied by significant a change in pituitary gland size and shape. (orig.)

  4. Luteinizing hormone (LH) and prolactin-releasing pituitary tumor: possible malignant transformation of the LH cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spertini, F; Deruaz, J P; Perentes, E; Pelet, B; Gomez, F

    1986-05-01

    A pituitary tumor was diagnosed in a prepubertal 13-yr-old girl, who had elevated plasma LH (58 mIU/ml) and PRL (93 ng/ml) levels; decreased GH, ACTH, and FSH secretion; and diabetes insipidus. After surgery, plasma LH and PRL declined, but not to normal levels. Conventional external radiotherapy to the pituitary was immediately followed by a decrease in LH to prepubertal values (0.7 mIU/ml), while PRL levels became normal only after a long course of bromocriptine therapy. The pituitary tumor was composed of two distinct cell types: small polygonal cells, which were PRL positive by immunohistochemistry, and clusters of pleomorphic large frequently mitotic polynucleated cells, which were LH positive, some of them also being positive for the alpha-subunit or beta LH but not for beta FSH. Four years after surgery and radiotherapy, the patient deteriorated neurologically. Computed tomographic scan showed widespread frontal and periventricular tumor, which had the histological features of a poorly differentiated carcinoma. No PRL, LH, or alpha- or beta-subunits were detectable on immunocytochemistry. While the PRL-positive cells of the pituitary tumor displayed the histological and clinical features of PRL adenomas, the morphological characteristics of LH cells and the sharp decline of plasma LH levels after radiotherapy were suggestive of malignant transformation. In this context, the later brain tumor could have been the result of subependymal spread of the pituitary tumor after it lost its hormone-secreting capacity.

  5. Maternal iron deficiency alters circulating thyroid hormone levels in developing neonatal rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormone insufficiency and iron deficiency (FeD) during fetal and neonatal life are both similarly deleterious to mammalian development suggesting a possible linkage between iron and thyroid hormone insufficiencies. Recent published data from our laboratory demonstrate a r...

  6. Review: Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone action in the brain and pituitary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi eUbuka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH was first identified in the Japanese quail as a hypothalamic neuropeptide inhibitor of gonadotropin secretion. Subsequent studies have shown that GnIH is present in the brains of birds including songbirds, and mammals including humans. The identified avian and mammalian GnIH peptides universally possess an LPXRFamide (X = L or Q motif at their C-termini. Mammalian GnIH peptides are also designated as RFamide-related peptides from their structures. The receptor for GnIH is the G protein-coupled receptor 147 (GPR147, which is thought to be coupled to Gαi protein. Cell bodies of GnIH neurons are located in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN in birds and the dorsomedial hypothalamic area (DMH in mammals. GnIH neurons in the PVN or DMH project to the median eminence to control anterior pituitary function. GPR147 is expressed in the gonadotropes and GnIH suppresses synthesis and release of gonadotropins. It was further shown in immortalized mouse gonadotrope cell line (LT2 cells that GnIH inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH induced gonadotropin subunit gene transcriptions by inhibiting adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA dependent ERK pathway. GnIH neurons also project to GnRH neurons in the preoptic area, and GnRH neurons express GPR147 in birds and mammals. Accordingly, GnIH may inhibit gonadotropin synthesis and release by decreasing the activity of GnRH neurons as well as directly acting on the gonadotropes. GnIH also inhibits reproductive behavior possibly by acting within the brain. GnIH expression is regulated by a nocturnal hormone melatonin and stress in birds and mammals. Accordingly, GnIH may play a role in translating environmental information to inhibit reproductive physiology and behavior of birds and mammals. Finally, GnIH has therapeutic potential in the treatment of reproductive cycle and hormone-dependent diseases, such as precocious puberty, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and prostatic and

  7. Data on the characterization of follicle-stimulating hormone monoclonal antibodies and localization in Japanese eel pituitary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Jung Kim

    2016-09-01

    In support of our recent publication, "Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against recombinant tethered follicle-stimulating hormone from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica" [1], it was important to characterize the specificity of eel follicle-stimulating hormone antibodies. Here, the production and ELISA system of these monoclonal antibodies are presented. The affinity-purified monoclonal antibodies specifically detected eel rec-FSH in ELISA and on western blots of rec-FSH produced from CHO cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that FSH staining was specifically localized in the eel pituitary.

  8. Is bursting more effective than spiking in evoking pituitary hormone secretion? A spatiotemporal simulation study of calcium and granule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliavini, Alessia; Tabak, Joël; Bertram, Richard; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine cells of the pituitary gland secrete a number of hormones, and the amount of hormone released by a cell is controlled in large part by the cell's electrical activity and subsequent Ca(2+) influx. Typical electrical behaviors of pituitary cells include continuous spiking and so-called pseudo-plateau bursting. It has been shown that the amplitude of Ca(2+) fluctuations is greater in bursting cells, leading to the hypothesis that bursting cells release more hormone than spiking cells. In this work, we apply computer simulations to test this hypothesis. We use experimental recordings of electrical activity as input to mathematical models of Ca(2+) channel activity, buffered Ca(2+) diffusion, and Ca(2+)-driven exocytosis. To compare the efficacy of spiking and bursting on the same cell, we pharmacologically block the large-conductance potassium (BK) current from a bursting cell or add a BK current to a spiking cell via dynamic clamp. We find that bursting is generally at least as effective as spiking at evoking hormone release and is often considerably more effective, even when normalizing to Ca(2+) influx. Our hybrid experimental/modeling approach confirms that adding a BK-type K(+) current, which is typically associated with decreased cell activity and reduced secretion, can actually produce an increase in hormone secretion, as suggested earlier.

  9. Interaction involving the thymus and the hypothalamus-pituitary axis, immunomodulation by hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Ljiljana 2

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfectly projected and impeccably created, the endocrine system precisely regulates the most delicate immune processes. The immune and neuroendocrine systems are two essential physiological components of mammalian organisms important for protection from the infection and disease on one hand, and on the other, for regulation of metabolism and other physiological activities; namely, the evidence has been found indicating that there is active and dynamic collaboration of these systems in the execution of their designated functions [1, 2,4]. These interactions occur at many stages of embryonic and neonatal development, and they are a continual part of normal homeostatic balance necessary to preserve health. There is communication between neuroendocrine and immune system via cytokines, neurotransmitters and peptide hormones which act, in both systems, through the same receptor molecules (Scheme 1. Many investigators have reported the increased thymic weight in experimental animals due to both castration and adrenalectomy [4]. The discovery from 1898 revealing that thymus was enlarged in castrated rabbits has been considered the embryo of hybrid medical discipline, i.e. the immunoendocrinology [1]. In the actual literature, at least in that available to us, it has not been noted that the appearance of the eunuchs, i.e. the castrates, stimulated the analytical approach to this phenomenon. Endocrine influences appear to be a part of bidirectional circuitry, namely, thymic hormones also regulate the release of hormones from the pituitary gland. Physiologically, thymus is under neuroendocrine control. It is apparent that the circulating levels of distinct peptide hormones are necessary to maintain a series of biological functions related both to micro environmental and lymphoid cells of the organ. The neuroendocrine control of the thymus appears to be extremely complex, with apparent presence of complete intrathymic biological circuitry involving the

  10. Mobilized adult pituitary stem cells contribute to endocrine regeneration in response to physiological demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoti, Karine; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Lovell-Badge, Robin

    2013-10-03

    Pituitary hormone deficiencies, with Growth Hormone deficiency being most frequent (1 in 3,500-10,000 births), cause significant morbidity. Regeneration of missing endocrine cells would be a significant improvement over hormone replacement therapies, which incur side effects and do not mimic physiological secretion patterns. Recent in vitro studies have identified a population of adult pituitary progenitors that express the HMG box transcription factors SOX2 and SOX9. Here, we apply cell-lineage tracing analysis to demonstrate that SOX2- and SOX9-expressing progenitors can self-renew and give rise to endocrine cells in vivo, suggesting that they are tissue stem cells. Moreover, we show that they can become mobilized and differentiate into the appropriate endocrine cell types in response to physiological stress. Our results highlight the pituitary as a model for exploring how physiological changes influence stem cell behavior and suggest that manipulation of endogenous pituitary stem cells is a potential therapeutic strategy for pituitary deficiencies.

  11. Comorbidity and cardiovascular risk factors in adult GH deficiency following treatment for Cushing's disease or non-functioning pituitary adenomas during childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragnarsson, Oskar; Höybye, Charlotte; Jönsson, Peter J;

    2012-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) and non-functioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA) are rare in paediatric patients. The aim of this study was to describe long-term consequences in adults with GH deficiency (GHD) treated for CD or NFPA during childhood.......Cushing's disease (CD) and non-functioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA) are rare in paediatric patients. The aim of this study was to describe long-term consequences in adults with GH deficiency (GHD) treated for CD or NFPA during childhood....

  12. Timing of growth hormone treatment affects trabecular bone microarchitecture and mineralization in growth hormone deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Erika; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Morck, Douglas W; Boyd, Steven K

    2010-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is essential in the development of bone mass, and a growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in childhood is frequently treated with daily injections of GH. It is not clear what effect GHD and its treatment has on bone. It was hypothesized that GHD would result in impaired microarchitecture, and an early onset of treatment would result in a better recovery than late onset. Growth hormone deficient homozygous (lit/lit) mice of both sexes were divided into two treatment groups receiving daily injections of GH, starting at an early (21 days of age) or a late time point (35 days of age, corresponding to the end of puberty). A group of heterozygous mice with normal levels of growth hormone served as controls. In vivo micro-computed tomography scans of the fourth lumbar vertebra were obtained at five time points between 21 and 60 days of age, and trabecular morphology and volumetric BMD were analyzed to determine the effects of GH on bone microarchitecture. Early GH treatment led to significant improvements in bone volume ratio (p=0.006), tissue mineral density (p=0.005), and structure model index (p=0.004) by the study endpoint (day 60), with no detected change in trabecular thickness. Trabecular number increased and trabecular separation decreased in GHD mice regardless of treatment compared to heterozygous mice. This suggests fundamental differences in the structure of trabecular bone in GHD and GH treated mice, reflected by an increased number of thinner trabeculae in these mice compared to heterozygous controls. There were no significant differences between the late treatment group and GHD mice except for connectivity density. Taken together, these results indicate that bone responds to GH treatment initiated before puberty but not to treatment commencing post-puberty, and that GH treatment does not rescue the structure of trabecular bone to that of heterozygous controls. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adult growth hormone deficiency – benefits, side effects, and risks of growth hormone replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Lim Reed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of growth hormone (GH in adults results in a syndrome characterized by decreased muscle mass and exercise capacity, increased visceral fat, impaired quality of life, unfavorable alterations in lipid profile and markers of cardiovascular risk, decrease in bone mass and integrity and increased mortality. When dosed appropriately, GH replacement therapy (GHRT is well tolerated, with a low incidence of side effects, and improves most of the alterations observed in GH deficiency (GHD; beneficial effects on mortality, cardiovascular events and fracture rates, however, remain to be conclusively demonstrated. The potential of GH to act as a mitogen has resulted in concern over the possibility of increased de novo tumors or recurrence of pre-existing malignancies in individuals treated with GH. Though studies of adults who received GHRT in childhood have produced conflicting reports in this regard, long term surveillance of adult GHRT has not demonstrated increased cancer risk or mortality.

  14. The forkhead transcription factor, Foxd1, is necessary for pituitary luteinizing hormone expression in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason H Gumbel

    Full Text Available The pituitary gland regulates numerous physiological functions including growth, reproduction, temperature and metabolic homeostasis, lactation, and response to stress. Pituitary organogenesis is dependent on signaling factors that are produced in and around the developing pituitary. The studies described in this report reveal that the forkhead transcription factor, Foxd1, is not expressed in the developing mouse pituitary gland, but rather in the mesenchyme surrounding the pituitary gland, which is an essential source of signaling factors that regulate pituitary organogenesis. Loss of Foxd1 causes a morphological defect in which the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland protrudes through the cartilage plate that is developing ventral to the pituitary at embryonic days (e14.5, e16.5, and e18.5. The number of proliferating pituitary cells is increased at e14.5 and e16.5. Loss of Foxd1 also results in significantly decreased levels of Lhb expression at e18.5. This decrease in Lhb expression does not appear to be due to a change in the number of gonadotrope cells in the pituitary gland. Previous studies have shown that loss of the LIM homeodomain factor, Lhx3, which is activated by the FGF signaling pathway, results in loss of LH production. Although there is a difference in Lhb expression in Foxd1 null mice, the expression pattern of LHX3 is not altered in Foxd1 null mice. These studies suggest that Foxd1 is indirectly required for normal Lhb expression and cartilage formation.

  15. EFFECTS OF CHINA-MADE RECOMBINANT HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE ON THE TREATMENT OF GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Jiang; Wei Wang; Wen-xin Sun; Xiu-min Wang; Ji-hong Ni; Feng-sheng Chen; De-fen Wang

    2004-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the therapeutic effect of China-made recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and to investigate the utilities of various biochemical parameters in GHD diagnosis and treatment.Methods Our study comprises of 30 normal children and 71 GHD children treated with China-made r-hGH substitution 3 (IGFBP-3), bone turnover markers (Ost, ICTP), and anti-growth hormone antibody (GHAb) were detected before and after r-hGH treatment.Results After the first 3 and 6 months of treatment, growth velocities of GHD children were significantly increased (13.1 + 3.7 and 12.6 ± 3.6 cm/year) compared with pretreatment values (2.9 ± 0.8 cm/year, P < 0.01). GHD Children had obviously reduced serum levels of IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and bone turnover markers (Ost, ICTP) compared with normal controls(P < 0.01), and these biochemical parameters improved significantly after treatment (P < 0.01). Growth hormone antibodies were positive in 17 of 45 cases after treatment by binding capacity detection. The binding percentage of growth hormone antibody which was increased more than 30% after the treatment showed a negative correlation with growth velocity (P < 0.01).Conclusions (1) The growth stimulating effect and safety were confirmed in using China-made r-hGH in the treatment of GHD children for 6 months. (2) The measurements of serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 may serve as useful parameters in the diagnosis of GHD. (3) Serum Ost and ICTP are useful laboratory criteria for evaluating the effect of r-hGH therapy in the early stage. (4) It is necessary to monitor serum levels of GHAb during r-hGH therapy.

  16. Effect of long-term growth hormone treatment on bone mass and bone metabolism in growth hormone-deficient men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bravenboer, N; Holzmann, PJ; ter Maaten, JC; Stuurman, LM; Roos, JC; Lips, P

    2005-01-01

    Long-term GH treatment in GH-deficient men resulted in a continuous increase in bone turnover as shown by histomorphometry. BMD continuously increased in all regions of interest, but more in the regions with predominantly cortical bone. Introduction: Adults with growth hormone (GH) deficiency have

  17. Responsiveness of adenylate cyclase to pituitary gonadotropins and evidence of a hormone-induced desensitization in the lizard ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, L; De Stasio, R; Bovenzi, V; Parisi, E; Filosa, S

    1997-07-01

    Gonadotropins (FSH and LH) affect several mammalian gonadal functions. In particular, FSH stimulates oogonial proliferation and oocyte growth, while LH regulates ovulation and progesterone secretion. In lacertilian reptiles, gonadal function is also regulated by pituitary gonadotropins, but which hormone controls ovarian activities and the mechanisms of action are unknown. The present study aimed to clarify mechanisms of action of pituitary gonadotropins on the ovary of Podarcis sicula (Lacertilia). The data demonstrate that mammalian gonadotropins FSH and LH produce a threefold stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in follicular membranes, while hCG and TSH are less effective, causing a twofold increase in adenylate cyclase activity. Neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, and catecholamines have no effect on enzyme activity. The action of mammalian FSH and LH on the ovary mimics the effect of homologous hormones: in lizard ovaries incubated in vitro in the presence of isolated homologous pituitary glands, the intracellular cAMP level increased by 50% with respect to control ovaries. Mammalian gonadotropins appear homologous to lizard gonadotropin(s): Southern blot analyses show that the lizard genome contains nucleotide sequences homologous to those encoding for mammalian beta FSH and beta LH. Both homologous and heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase activity occurs in the lizard ovary. In fact, responsiveness of adenylate cyclase to gonadotropin stimulation is abolished in animals 2 hr after in vivo treatment with FSH. Sensitivity to gonadotropin stimulation is restored 2 weeks after the beginning of the in vivo treatment. Desensitization was also observed in ovaries incubated in vitro with mammalian FSH or with isolated pituitary glands.

  18. Catch-up growth in early treated patients with growth hormone deficiency. Dutch Growth Hormone Working Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Boersma, B.; Rikken, B.; Wit, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Catch-up growth of 26 children with growth hormone deficiency during four years of growth hormone treatment, which was started young (< 3 years), was compared with that of 16 children with coeliac disease on a gluten free diet. In children with growth hormone deficiency mean (SD) height SD score increased from -4.3 (1.8) to -1.9 (1.4) and in patients with coeliac disease from -1.8 (0.9) to -0.1 (0.8). Height SD score after four years correlated positively with injection frequency and height S...

  19. Effects of Growth Hormone Deficiency on Body Composition and Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Risk after Definitive Therapy for Acromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, E; Wexler, TL; Nachtigall, L; Tritos, N; Swearingen, B; Hemphill, L; Loeffler, J; Biller, BMK; Klibanski, A; Miller, KK

    2012-01-01

    Background Both growth hormone (GH) excess and GH deficiency are associated with body composition and biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in patients with pituitary disorders. However, the effects of developing GH deficiency after definitive treatment of acromegaly are largely unknown. Objective To determine whether development of GH deficiency after definitive therapy for acromegaly is associated with increased visceral adiposity and biomarkers of cardiovascular risk compared to GH sufficiency after definitive therapy for acromegaly. Design Cross-sectional Patients We studied three groups of subjects, all with a history of acromegaly (n=76): subjects with subsequent GH deficiency (GHD; n=31), subjects with subsequent GH sufficiency (GHS; n=25), and subjects with active acromegaly (AA; n=20). No study subjects were receiving somatostatin analogues, dopamine agonists or hGH. Measurements Body composition (by DXA), abdominal adipose tissue depots (by cross-sectional CT), total body water (by bioimpedance analysis) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) were measured. Fasting morning serum was collected for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), lipids and lipoprotein levels. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed, and homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. Results Abdominal visceral adipose tissue, total adipose tissue, and total body fat were higher in subjects with GHD than GHS or AA (p acromegaly may adversely affect body composition and inflammatory biomarkers of cardiovascular risk but does not appear to adversely affect glucose homeostasis, lipids and lipoproteins, or other cardiovascular risk markers. PMID:22315983

  20. Effect of a long-acting somatostatin analogue (SMS 201-995 on a growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone-producing pituitary tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirasawa,Ryoto

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available A 46-year-old woman with acromegaly and hyperthyroidism due to a pituitary adenoma. She had high serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH levels and very high serum growth hormone (GH levels. Transsphenoidal removal of the tumor, post-operative irradiation, frontal craniotomy for removal of residual tumor and large-dose bromocriptine therapy were carried out consecutively. After therapy, serum GH levels gradually decreased, but not to the normal range, and serum TSH levels remained at inappropriately normal levels. Using immunoperoxidase techniques, GH-, TSH- and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH-containing cells were demonstrated in the adenoma. A long-acting somatostatin analogue (SMS 201-995, 600 micrograms/day suppressed the serum GH level to the normal range with a concomitant suppression of TSH. Furthermore, the paradoxical serum GH responses to TRH and LH-RH were slightly improved. No important subjective side-effects were noted. Therefore, SMS 201-995 appeared to be a very effective drug in this patient with a GH- and TSH-producing pituitary tumor.

  1. Pituitary dwarfism in Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdogs is associated with a mutation in LHX3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorbij, AMWY; Leegwater, Peter; Kooistra, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Background Pituitary dwarfism in German Shepherd Dogs is associated with autosomal recessive inheritance and a mutation in LHX3, resulting in combined pituitary hormone deficiency. Congenital dwarfism also is encountered in breeds related to German Shepherd Dogs, such as Saarloos and Czechoslovakian

  2. Spontaneous remission of acromegaly and Cushing’s disease following pituitary apoplexy: Two case reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerink, S.H.P.P.; Lindert, E.J. van; Ven, A.C. van de

    2015-01-01

    In this double case report, we present two special cases of pituitary apoplexy. First, we describe a patient with growth hormone deficiency despite clinical suspicion of acromegaly. Imaging showed evidence of a recent pituitary apoplexy, which might have caused spontaneous remission of the acromegal

  3. Pituitary dwarfism in Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdogs is associated with a mutation in LHX3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorbij, AMWY; Leegwater, Peter; Kooistra, Hans

    Background Pituitary dwarfism in German Shepherd Dogs is associated with autosomal recessive inheritance and a mutation in LHX3, resulting in combined pituitary hormone deficiency. Congenital dwarfism also is encountered in breeds related to German Shepherd Dogs, such as Saarloos and Czechoslovakian

  4. An intronic SNP in the thyroid hormone receptor β gene is associated with pituitary cell-specific over-expression of a mutant thyroid hormone receptor β2 (R338W in the index case of pituitary-selective resistance to thyroid hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cochran Craig

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The syndrome of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH is caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor β gene (THRB. The syndrome varies from asymptomatic to diffuse hypothyroidism, to pituitary-selective resistance with predominance of hyperthyroid signs and symptoms. The wide spectrum of clinical presentation is not completely attributable to specific THRB mutations. The THRB gene encodes two main isoforms, TR β1 which is widely distributed, and TR β2, whose expression is limited to the cochlea, retina, hypothalamus, and pituitary. Recent data demonstrated that in mice an intron enhancer region plays a critical role in the pituitary expression of the β2 isoform of the receptor. We thus hypothesized that polymorphisms in the human homologous region could modulate the pituitary expression of the mutated gene contributing to the clinical presentation of RTH. Methods Screening and in vitro characterization of polymorphisms of the intron enhancer region of the THRB gene in the index case of pituitary-selective RTH. Results The index case of pituitary-selective resistance is characterized by the missense R338W exon 9 mutation in cis with two common SNPs, rs2596623T and rs2596622C, located in the intron enhancer region of the THRB gene. Reporter gene assay experiments in GH3 pituitary-derived cells indicate that rs2596623T generates an increased pituitary cell-specific activity of the TR β2 promoter suggesting that rs2596623T leads to pituitary over-expression of the mutant allele. Conclusions The combined coding mutation and non-coding SNP therefore generate a tissue-specific dominant-negative condition recapitulating the patient's peculiar phenotype. This case illustrates the role of regulatory regions in modifying the clinical presentation of genetic diseases.

  5. Anterior Pituitary Leptin Expression Changes in Different Reproductive States: Stimulation, in vitro, by Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH)

    OpenAIRE

    Akhter, Noor; Johnson, Brandy W.; Crane, Christopher; Iruthayanathan, Mary; Zhou, Yi-Hong; Kudo, Akihiko; Childs, Gwen V.

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to learn more about the changes in expression of rat anterior pituitary (AP) leptin during the estrous cycle. QRT-PCR assays of cycling rat AP leptin mRNA showed 2—fold increases from metestrus to diestrus followed by an 86% decrease on the morning of proestrus. Percentages of leptin cells increased in proestrus and pregnancy to 55–60% of AP cells. Dual labeling for leptin proteins and growth hormone (GH) or gonadotropins, showed that the rise in leptin protein-bearing...

  6. Results of endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery in 40 patients with a growth hormone-secreting macroadenoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenmakers, M.A.; Netea-Maier, R.T.; Lindert, E.J. van; Pieters, G.F.F.M.; Grotenhuis, A.J.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Transsphenoidal pituitary surgery (TS) is the primary treatment of choice for patients with acromegaly. Macroadenomas (>1 cm) are more difficult to resect than microadenomas (remission rate +/- 50% compared to +/- 90%). Besides the conventional microscopic TS, the more recently introdu

  7. Clinical, biological and genetic analysis of 8 cases of congenital isolated adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luu-Ly Pham

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congenital isolated adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH deficiency may be rare, but it could be an underestimated cause of neonatal death. Our objective was to shorten the time between first symptoms and diagnosis. METHODS: This single-centre retrospective case-cohort study was carried out on eight consecutive patients. RESULTS: Two had the neonatal form and 6 the late onset form. Six were admitted to an intensive care unit at least once for seizures with hypoglycemia, major hypothermia, fever, and/or collapsus. The 2 neonatal cases presented with hypoglycemia and in a state of "apparent death" at birth or hypothermia (29°C at 6 days. All 6 late onset cases had also been admitted to an emergency department 1-3 times, but had left hospital incorrectly diagnosed. Their first symptoms were noted at 3-12.3 years, and they were diagnosed at 3.3-14.4 years. All had hypoglycemia, and 4 had had seizures. The presenting symptoms were vomiting and/or abdominal pain, asthenia, irritability, difficulty with physical activities, and anorexia. The school performance of 4 deteriorated. Two underwent psychotherapy and treatment for depression, which was stopped when Hydrocortisone® replacement therapy began. The plasma concentrations in spontaneous hypoglycemia were: ACTH<5 to 17.1 pg/mL, with concomitant cortisol <3.5 to 37 ng/mL. The plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHAS concentrations were low in the 7 evaluated. The coding sequence of TPIT was normal in all. CONCLUSION: Several unexplained symptoms in a child, mainly gastro-intestinal symptoms and seizures due to hypoglycemia, may indicate ACTH deficiency. A low or normal basal plasma ACTH despite concomitant low cortisol at 8 a.m. and/or in spontaneous hypoglycemia, associated with low DHAS, in a patient not given corticosteroids is highly suggestive of ACTH deficiency. The isolated character of ACTH deficiency must be confirmed by determining the other hypothalamic-pituitary functions

  8. Thyroid hormone synthesis: a potential target of a Chinese herbal formula Haizao Yuhu Decoction acting on iodine-deficient goiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xia; Yan, Chen; Guo, Xiaodong; Guo, Qiuyan; Liu, Zhenli; Song, Zhiqian; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Haizao Yuhu Decoction (HYD), a famous multi-component herbal formula, has been widely used to treat various thyroid-related diseases, including iodine-deficient goiter. Herb pair Thallus Sargassi Pallidi (HZ) and Radix Glycyrrhizae (GC), one of the so-called “eighteen antagonistic medicaments”, contains in HYD. To explore pharmacological mechanisms of HYD acting on iodine-deficient goiter and to provide evidence for potential roles of herb pair HZ and GC in HYD, our genome-wide microarray detection and network analysis identified a list of goiter-related genes, mainly involved into the alterations in hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid/gonad/growth axes. Then, the disease genes-drug genes interaction network illustrated the links between HYD regulating genes and goiter-related genes, and identified the candidate targets of HYD acting on goiter. Functionally, these candidate targets were closely correlated with thyroid hormone synthesis. Moreover, the potential regulating genes of herb pair HZ and GC were revealed to be crucial components in the pathway of thyroid hormone synthesis. The prediction results were all verified by following experiments based on goiter rats. Collectively, this integrative study combining microarray gene expression profiling, network analysis and experimental validations offers the convincing evidence that HYD may alleviate iodine-deficient goiter via regulating thyroid hormone synthesis, and explains the necessity of herb pair HZ and GC in HYD. Our work provides a novel and powerful means to clarify the mechanisms of action for multi-component drugs such as herbal formulae in a holistic way, which may improve drug development and applications. PMID:27384475

  9. Management of nonfunctioning pituitary incidentaloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Françoise; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Cazabat, Laure; Boulin, Anne; Cotton, François; Bonneville, Jean-François; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Vidal-Trécan, Gwénaelle; Chanson, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Prevalence of pituitary incidentaloma is variable: between 1.4% and 27% at autopsy, and between 3.7% and 37% on imaging. Pituitary microincidentalomas (serendipitously discovered adenoma 1cm in diameter) show increased size in 20-24% and 34-40% of cases at respectively 4 and 8years' follow-up. Radiologic differential diagnosis requires MRI centered on the pituitary gland. Initial assessment of nonfunctioning (NF) microincidentaloma is firstly clinical, the endocrinologist looking for signs of hypersecretion (signs of hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly or Cushing's syndrome), followed up by systematic prolactin and IGF-1 assay. Initial assessment of NF macroincidentaloma is clinical, the endocrinologist looking for signs of hormonal hypersecretion or hypopituitarism, followed up by hormonal assay to screen for hypersecretion or hormonal deficiency and by ophthalmologic assessment (visual acuity and visual field) if and only if the lesion is near the optic chiasm (OC). NF microincidentaloma of less than 5mm requires no surveillance; those of≥5mm are not operated on but rather monitored on MRI at 6months and then 2years. Macroincidentaloma remote from the OC is monitored on MRI at 1year, with hormonal exploration (for anterior pituitary deficiency), then every 2years. When macroincidentaloma located near the OC is managed by surveillance rather than surgery, MRI is recommended at 6months, with hormonal and visual exploration, then annual MRI and hormonal and visual assessment every 6months. Surgery is indicated in the following cases: evolutive NF microincidentaloma, NF macroincidentaloma associated with hypopituitarism or showing progression, incidentaloma compressing the OC, possible malignancy, non-compliant patient, pregnancy desired in the short-term, or context at risk of apoplexy.

  10. Influence of ascorbic acid on in vivo amidation of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone in guinea pig pituitary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Hilsted, L

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ascorbic acid depletion on the amidation of alphamelanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha MSH) was studied in vivo in guinea pig pituitary. After four weeks, the concentration of ascorbic acid was 1.20 +/- 0.11 mumol/g tissue (mean +/- SD) in the pituitary and 0.34 +/- 0.07 mumol....../g tissue in the cerebral cortex from the depleted animals versus 7.58 +/- 0.08 and 1.51 +/- 0.32 mumol/g tissue, respectively, in the control animals. In the pituitaries from the animals depleted of ascorbate (N = 4), the relative amount of alpha MSH was reduced to approximately half the values obtained......-39) immunoreactivity was observed in the depleted guinea pigs. Gel chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance luquid chromatography showed that the alpha MSH and ACTH (1-14) immunoreactivity was of low molecular weight and partly mono- or diacetylated. Depletion of ascorbic acid had no influence on the degree...

  11. DNA methylation of pituitary growth hormone is involved in male growth superiority of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huan; Xiao, Jun; Chen, Wenzhi; Zhou, Yi; Tang, Zhanyang; Guo, Zhongbao; Luo, Yongju; Lin, Zhengbao; Gan, Xi; Zhang, Ming

    2014-05-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and its receptors are critical regulators of somatic growth and metabolism. It has been shown in mammals that the methylation of cytosines within the GH promoter plays a key role in regulating transcripts expression. In the present study, the GH, GHR1 and GHR2 proximal promoters were identified and the methylation levels of these genes in corresponding tissues were assayed. The results suggested that significant arising of GH putative promoter methylation levels in pituitary was observed in females compared with males. However, no such sex-specific changes were found in GHR1 and GHR2 promoters. The GH mRNA expression also was influenced by GH promoter methylation levels in pituitary, which resulted in the higher growth rate of Nile tilapia males. Meanwhile, the methylation levels of GH putative promoter were negatively correlated with growth rate as well as mRNA expression of GH. Furthermore, the methylation of specific E-Box CpG site is also negatively related to the mRNA expression of GH in pituitary. Taken together, our data provide an epigenetic mechanism of explicating the sex duality in phenotypic plasticity of growth rate in male and female of Nile tilapia.

  12. Human chorionic somatomammotropin and growth hormone gene expression in rat pituitary tumor cells is dependent on proximal promoter sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtigal, M.W.; Nickel, B.E.; Klassen, M.E.; Cattini, P.A. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada)); Zhang, Wengang; Eberhardt, N.L. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1989-06-12

    Human placental chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS-A or hCS-B) and pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) are related by structure and function. The hCS-A gene is expressed in rat pituitary tumor (GC) cells after gene transfer. Deletion of hCS-A 5{prime}-flanking DNA reveals repressor activity upstream of nucleotide {minus}132, and a region essential for expression in GC cells between nucleotides {minus}94 and {minus}61. The sequences in this region differ from the equivalent hGH-N gene DNA by one nucleotide, and include the binding site for a pituitary-specific factor (GHF-1), required for hGH-N expression in GC cells. Exchange of hGH-N with hCS-A gene DNA in this region maintains expression in GC cells. By contrast, modification of these sequences blocks expression. These data indicate that proximal promoter sequences, equivalent to those bound by GHF-1 on the hGH-N gene, are required for hCS-A expression in GC cells.

  13. Interaction of growth hormone overexpression and nutritional status on pituitary gland clock gene expression in coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Hyoung; White, Samantha L; Devlin, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    Clock genes are involved in generating a circadian rhythm that is integrated with the metabolic state of an organism and information from the environment. Growth hormone (GH) transgenic coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, show a large increase in growth rate, but also attenuated seasonal growth modulations, modified timing of physiological transformations (e.g. smoltification) and disruptions in pituitary gene expression compared with wild-type salmon. In several fishes, circadian rhythm gene expression has been found to oscillate in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as in multiple peripheral tissues, but this control system has not been examined in the pituitary gland nor has the effect of transgenic growth modification been examined. Thus, the daily expression of 10 core clock genes has been examined in pituitary glands of GH transgenic (T) and wild-type coho salmon (NT) entrained on a regular photocycle (12L: 12D) and provided either with scheduled feeding or had food withheld for 60 h. Most clock genes in both genotypes showed oscillating patterns of mRNA levels with light and dark cycles. However, T showed different amplitudes and patterns of expression compared with wild salmon, both in fed and starved conditions. The results from this study indicate that constitutive expression of GH is associated with changes in clock gene regulation, which may play a role in the disrupted behavioural and physiological phenotypes observed in growth-modified transgenic strains.

  14. 生长激素缺乏但持续增高:垂体柄中断合并垂体多激素缺乏一例报告及文献复习%Continuous growth with undetectable growth hormone level: one case of invisible pituitary stalk and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹卓娜; 金文胜; 许卫国; 邓爱民; 赵霞; 宋丹丹; 张松; 刘俊伟

    2009-01-01

    报道一例垂体柄中断合并垂体多激素缺乏、包括经低血糖刺激试验发现生长激素缺乏、但表现为持续增高的病例.结合文献复习发现,此种非生长激素依赖的身高生长一般有垂体其他激素尤其是促性腺激素缺乏、骨骺未闭合为基础条件.%Normal function of growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor Ⅰaxis is essential for linear growth after birth. A case of continuous growth with undetectable growth hormone level even under insulinhypoglycemia stimulation was reported. The growth hormone deficiency was due to pituitary stalk interruption combined with deficiency of multiple pituitary hormones. Taken together with reviewed literature, this so-called nongrowth hormone-dependent linear growth was preconditioned by other hormones, especially gonadotropin deficiency,and the unclosed epiphysis.

  15. Molecular Imaging of Pituitary Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2016-01-01

    The presence of large numbers and/or the high affinity of dopamine D2 and/or somatostatin receptors on pituitary adenomas may enable their visualization with radionuclide-coupled receptor agonists or antagonists. However, the role of these imaging modalities in the differential diagnosis of or therapeutic purposes for pituitary lesions is very limited. Only in very specific cases might these molecular imaging techniques become helpful. These include the differential diagnosis of pituitary lesions, ectopic production of pituitary hormones, such as adrenocorticotrophic hormone, growth hormone (GH) or their releasing hormones (corticotropin-releasing hormone and GH-releasing hormone), and the localization of metastases from pituitary carcinomas.

  16. Leucine-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity is localized in luteinizing hormone-producing cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we used immunohistochemical techniques to determine the cell type of leucine-enkephalin (Leu-ENK)-immunoreactive cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Immunoreactive cells were scattered throughout the pars distalis except for the dorso-caudal portion. These cells were immuno-positive for luteinizing hormone (LH), but they were immuno-negative for adrenocorticotrophic, growth, and thyroid-stimulating hormones, as well as prolactin. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that Leu-ENK-like substance and LH co-localized within the same secretory granules. Leu-ENK secreted from gonadotrophs may participate in LH secretion in an autocrine fashion, and/or may participate in the release of sex steroids together with LH.

  17. Luteinizing hormone promotes gonadal tumorigenesis in inhibin-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, Ankur K.; Agno, Julio E.; Kumar, T. Rajendra; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The inhibins are secreted α:β heterodimers of the TGF-β superfamily that are mainly synthesized in Sertoli cells and granulosa cells, and are critical regulators of testicular and ovarian development and function. Mice homozygous for a targeted deletion of the inhibin α subunit gene (Inha-/-) develop sex cord-stromal tumors in a gonadotropin-dependent manner. Here, we determine the contribution of LH to gonadal tumorigenesis by generating mice deficient in both inhibins and LH. Inha-/-Lhb-/- mice have increased survival and delayed tumor progression, and these observations correlate with lower serum FSH and estradiol levels compared to Inha-/- controls. Double mutant testicular tumors demonstrate decreased expression of cyclin D2, while double mutant ovarian tumors have elevated expression of p15INK4b and trend toward higher levels of p27Kip1. We conclude that LH is not required for tumor formation in the absence of inhibins but promotes tumor progression, likely through alterations in serum hormone levels and cell cycle regulators. PMID:18657590

  18. Molecular cloning of pituitary glycoprotein alpha-subunit and follicle stimulating hormone and chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunits from New World squirrel monkey and owl monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammell, Jonathan G; Funkhouser, Jane D; Moyer, Felricia S; Gibson, Susan V; Willis, Donna L

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the gonadotropins expressed in pituitary glands of the New World squirrel monkey (Saimiri sp.) and owl monkey (Aotus sp.). The various subunits were amplified from total RNA from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the deduced amino acid sequences compared to those of other species. Mature squirrel monkey and owl monkey glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides (96 amino acids in length) were determined to be 80% homologous to the human sequence. The sequences of mature beta subunits of follicle stimulating hormone (FSHbeta) from squirrel monkey and owl monkey (111 amino acids in length) are 92% homologous to human FSHbeta. New World primate glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides and FSHbeta subunits showed conservation of all cysteine residues and consensus N-linked glycosylation sites. Attempts to amplify the beta-subunit of luteinizing hormone from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands were unsuccessful. Rather, the beta-subunit of chorionic gonadotropin (CG) was amplified from pituitaries of both New World primates. Squirrel monkey and owl monkey CGbeta are 143 and 144 amino acids in length and 77% homologous with human CGbeta. The greatest divergence is in the C terminus, where all four sites for O-linked glycosylation in human CGbeta, responsible for delayed metabolic clearance, are predicted to be absent in New World primate CGbetas. It is likely that CG secreted from pituitary of New World primates exhibits a relatively short half-life compared to human CG.

  19. Meta-analysis of melanin-concentrating hormone signaling-deficient mice on behavioral and metabolic phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenkichi Takase

    Full Text Available The demand for meta-analyses in basic biomedical research has been increasing because the phenotyping of genetically modified mice does not always produce consistent results. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH has been reported to be involved in a variety of behaviors that include feeding, body-weight regulation, anxiety, sleep, and reward behavior. However, the reported behavioral and metabolic characteristics of MCH signaling-deficient mice, such as MCH-deficient mice and MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1-deficient mice, are not consistent with each other. In the present study, we performed a meta-analysis of the published data related to MCH-deficient and MCHR1-deficient mice to obtain robust conclusions about the role of MCH signaling. Overall, the meta-analysis revealed that the deletion of MCH signaling enhanced wakefulness, locomotor activity, aggression, and male sexual behavior and that MCH signaling deficiency suppressed non-REM sleep, anxiety, responses to novelty, startle responses, and conditioned place preferences. In contrast to the acute orexigenic effect of MCH, MCH signaling deficiency significantly increased food intake. Overall, the meta-analysis also revealed that the deletion of MCH signaling suppressed the body weight, fat mass, and plasma leptin, while MCH signaling deficiency increased the body temperature, oxygen consumption, heart rate, and mean arterial pressure. The lean phenotype of the MCH signaling-deficient mice was also confirmed in separate meta-analyses that were specific to sex and background strain (i.e., C57BL/6 and 129Sv. MCH signaling deficiency caused a weak anxiolytic effect as assessed with the elevated plus maze and the open field test but also caused a weak anxiogenic effect as assessed with the emergence test. MCH signaling-deficient mice also exhibited increased plasma corticosterone under non-stressed conditions, which suggests enhanced activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. To the best of our

  20. Changes in Plasma Prolactin and Growth Hormone Level and Visual Problem after radiation Therapy(RT) of Pituitary Adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sei Chul; Kwon, Hyung Chul; Oh, Yoon Kyeong; Bahk, Yong Whee; Son, Ho Young; Kang, Joon Ki; Song, Jin Un [Catholic Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-06-15

    Twenty-four cases of pituitary adenoma, 13 males and 11 females with the age ranging from 11 to 65 years, received radiation therapy(RT) on the pituitary area with 6MV linear accelerator during past 25 months at the Division of Radiation Therapy, Kangnam St. Mary Hospital, Catholic Medical College. Of 24 case of RT, 20 were postoperative and 4 primary. To evaluate the effect of RT, we analyzed the alteration of the endocrinological tests, neurologic abnormalities, major clinical symptoms, endocrinological changes and improvement in visual problems after RT. The results were as follows ; 1. Major clinical symptoms were headache, visual defects, diabetes insipidus, hypogonadisms and general weakness in decreasing order of frequency. 2. All but the one with Nelson syndrome showed abnormal neuroradiologic changes in the sella turcica with an invasive tumor mass around supra and para-sellar area. 3. Endocrinological classifications of the patient were 11 prolactinoma, 4 growth hormonesecreting tumors, 3 ACTH-secreting tumors consisting of one Cushing disease and two Nelson syndrome, and 6 nonfunctioning tumors. 4. Eleven of 14 patients, visual problems were improved after treatment but remaining 3 were unchanged. 5. Seven of 11 prolactinomas returned to normal hormonal level after postoperative and primary RT and 3 patients are being treated with bromocriptine (BMCP) but on lost case. 6. Two of 4 growth hormone-secreting tumor returned to normal level after RT but the remaining 2 are being treated with BMCP, as well.

  1. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma presenting with recurrent hyperthyroidism in post-treated Graves’ disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The coexistence of autoimmune hyperthyroid disease and thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma is rare. The simple presumption of coincidence of these two diseases has a calculated incidence of less than one/several hundred million, and only four cases with histological confirmation have been reported. A rapid decrease in thyroid-stimulating hormone level after pituitary tumor removal may induce subsequent activation of autoimmune responses against the thyroid gland. We report the first case of a sequential and paradoxical occurrence of Graves’ disease and a thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma. Case presentation A 32-year-old Japanese woman had recurrent hyperthyroidism. She had a history of Graves’ hyperthyroidism, which had been successfully treated with propylthiouracil. A head magnetic resonance imaging showed a less enhanced area in the left lateral wing of her sella turcica. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed, and the diagnosis was established as thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting plurihormonal adenoma. A rapid reduction in thyroid hormone levels was achieved, and her blood pressure was normalized after the operation. Conclusion Although incidental occurrence is the most probable etiology, long and repeated followup examinations of both thyroid and pituitary gland should be performed in patients with an atypical clinical course.

  2. Mathematical model describing the thyroids-pituitary axis with distributed time delays in hormone transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neamţu, Mihaela; Stoian, Dana; Navolan, Dan Bogdan

    2014-12-01

    In the present paper we provide a mathematical model that describe the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis. Since there is a spatial separation between thyroid and pituitary gland in the body, time is needed for transportation of thyrotropin and thyroxine between the glands. Thus, the distributed time delays are considered as both weak and Dirac kernels. The delayed model is analyzed regarding the stability and bifurcation behavior. The last part contains some numerical simulations to illustrate the effectiveness of our results and conclusions.

  3. Effects of aerobic exercise on ectopic lipids in patients with growth hormone deficiency before and after growth hormone replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) increases exercise capacity and insulin resistance while it decreases fat mass in growth hormone-deficient patients (GHD). Ectopic lipids (intramyocellular (IMCL) and intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL) are related to insulin resistance. The effect of GHRT on ectopic lipids is unknown. It is hypothesized that exercise-induced utilization of ectopic lipids is significantly decreased in GHD patients and normalized by GHRT. GHD (4 females, 6 males) and age...

  4. Growth Hormone Deficiency in a Patient with Becker Muscular Dystrophy: A Pediatric Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Valeria Calcaterra; Annachiara Malvezzi; Rossana Toglia; Angela Berardinelli; Elena Bozzola; Mauro Bozzola; Daniela Larizza

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To describe a biochemical growth hormone (GH) deficiency and to evaluate therapeutic result in a six-year-old male with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Methods. GH peak was evaluated after response to arginine and insulin. Bone age was evaluated according to Greulich and Pyle method. Results. The GH-supplementary therapy was very effective in terms of growth gain. Conclusion. The possibility of a growth hormone deficiency and treatment with GH in patients with BMD cannot be exclu...

  5. Single or group housing altered hormonal physiology and affected pituitary and interstitial cell kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A significant negative correlation between testicular interstitial cell tumors and pituitary tumors in control male F344 rats has been reported associated with the number of animals per cage. Change in numbers of animals per cage may cause stress and increased serum corticosteroi...

  6. Growth hormone-releasing factor induces c-fos expression in cultured primary pituitary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; Mitchell, R L; Vale, W;

    1987-01-01

    GH-releasing factor (GRF) and somatostatin regulates the secretion and biosynthesis of GH as well as the proliferation of GH-producing cells. In order to further characterize the mitogenic effect of GRF, we studied the expression of the proto-oncogene c-fos in primary pituitary cells. Maximal...

  7. Prenatal development of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors in the rat anterior pituitary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennes, L. (Wright State Univ. School of Medicine, Dayton, OH (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The development of pituitary GnRH receptors was studied in the rat with in vitro and in vivo autoradiography. GnRH receptors were first seen in pituitary primordia of 13-day-old fetuses. The binding was specific and saturable and was abolished in the presence of 10 microM synthetic GnRH. To examine whether GnRH was available to the fetus, amnionic fluid was collected on days E 12-18. RIA analyses showed that GnRH levels in the amnionic fluid were low on days 12 and 13 (0-20 pM/ml) and rose to 225 pM/ml on day E 16 before they declined to 110 pM/ml on fetal day E 18. The highest levels of GnRH in the amnionic fluid on day E 16 coincided with the first appearance of immunoreactive LH cells, as determined by immunohistochemistry. Intravenous injection of 500 microliters amnionic fluid into pentobarbital-anesthetized adult rats caused a transient 40-60% increase in circulating serum LH in the recipient animal. To show that GnRH from the amnionic fluid has access to the developing pituitary, the 125I-labeled GnRH agonist Buserelin was injected into the amnionic fluid of 13-, 14-, and 15-day-old fetuses in the presence or absence of 10 microM unlabeled GnRH. Autoradiographic analysis of the fetal tissue indicated that the labeled GnRH agonist bound to specific receptors in the primordial pituitaries. The results suggest that the pituitary gonadotropes are differentiated before day E 13 because the expression of GnRH receptors is already an indication of cell determination. Since GnRH is present in the amnionic fluid in a biologically active form and can reach the fetal pituitary, it is concluded that GnRH may be an important factor determining the onset LH synthesis, but not the differentiation, of primordial pituitary cells.

  8. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone provokes abnormal follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone responses in men who have pituitary adenomas and FSH hypersecretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, P J; Muzyka, R; Johnson, J; Utiger, R D

    1980-10-01

    Serum FSH ad LH concentrations after the administration of TRH were measured in 10 men who had pituitary adenomas associated with FSH hypersecretion. Similar measurements were made in 12 men who had pituitary adenomas but no FSH hypersecretion, in 10 age-matched, normal men, and in 5 men who had primary hypergonadism. The mean serum LH concentration in the men who had pituitary adenomas and FSH hypersecretion increased 136% after TRH administration, significantly greataer (P < 0.005) than the 48% increase in the normal men or the 51% increase in the men who had pituitary adenomas without FSH hypersecretion. Serum LH did not increase at all in the men who had primary hypoganadism. The serum FSH concentration did not increase in any of the normal men, in the men who had pituitary adenomas without FSH hypersecretion, or in the men who had primary hypogonadism, but did increase in 5 of the 10 men who had FSH hypersecretion; the mean increase in these 5 men was 38%. The exaggerated LH responses and the nonspecific FSH responses to TRH of the men who had pituitary adenomas associated with FSH hypersecretion suggest that control of both FSH and LH secretion by these adenomas is abnormal and, therefore, that these adenomas are likely gonadotroph cell adenomas.

  9. Growth hormone-releasing factor regulates growth hormone mRNA in primary cultures of rat pituitary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Gick, G G; Zeytin, F N; BRAZEAU, P.; Ling, N C; Esch, F S; Bancroft, C

    1984-01-01

    A peptide with high intrinsic activity for specifically stimulating the secretion of immunoreactive growth hormone (GH; somatotropin) has been characterized and reproduced by total synthesis. This peptide, human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor, 44-amino-acid form (hpGRF1-44-NH2), was isolated from a tumor localized in the pancreas of a patient with acromegaly. We report here the effect of this growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) on GH release and the GH mRNA levels in monolayer c...

  10. European audit of current practice in diagnosis and treatment of childhood growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Bernasconi, Sergio; Clayton, Peter E

    2002-01-01

    The present survey among members of the ESPE on current practice in diagnosis and treatment of growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) is of great clinical relevance and importance in the light of the recently published guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of GHD by the Growth Hormone Research...... Society. We have found much conformity but also numerous discrepancies between the recommendations of the Growth Hormone Research Society and the current practice in Europe....

  11. EFFECT OF GROWTH HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN WOMEN WITH GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY WHO HAVE A HISTORY OF ACROMEGALY VERSUS OTHER DISORDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valassi, Elena; Brick, Danielle J.; Johnson, Jessica C.; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the response in quality of life (QoL) to growth hormone (GH) replacement in women with GH deficiency (GHD) and a history of acromegaly with that in women with GHD of other causes. Methods Fifty-five women with GHD were studied: 17 with prior acromegaly and 38 with other causes of GHD. We compared two 6-month, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of GH therapy in women with hypopituitarism conducted with use of the same design—one in women with a history of acromegaly and one in women with no prior acromegaly. QoL was assessed with the following questionnaires: the QoL-Assessment of Growth Hormone deficiency in Adults (AGHDA), the Symptom Questionnaire, and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results The 2 groups had comparable mean pretreatment age, body mass index, and QoL scores and comparable mean GH dose at 6 months (0.61 ± 0.30 versus 0.67 ± 0.27 mg daily). After 6 months of GH replacement therapy, women with GHD and prior acromegaly demonstrated a greater improvement in AGHDA score, four SF-36 subscales (Role Limitations due to Physical Health, Energy or Fatigue, Emotional Well-Being, and Social Functioning), and the Somatic Symptoms subscale of the Symptom Questionnaire than did women with GHD of other causes. Poorer pretreatment QoL was associated with a greater improvement in QoL after administration of GH. Conclusion In this study, GH replacement therapy improved QoL in women with GHD and a history of acromegaly but not in women with GHD due to other hypothalamic and pituitary disorders. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term risks versus benefits of GH replacement in patients who develop GHD after definitive treatment for acromegaly. PMID:22440981

  12. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulates cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript gene (CART1) expression through CRH type 1 receptor (CRHR1) in chicken anterior pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Chunheng; Cai, Guoqing; Huang, Long; Deng, Qiuyang; Lin, Dongliang; Cui, Lin; Wang, Yajun; Li, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide(s) is generally viewed as neuropeptide(s) and can control food intake in vertebrates, however, our recent study revealed that CART1 peptide is predominantly expressed in chicken anterior pituitary, suggesting that cCART1 peptide is a novel pituitary hormone in chickens and its expression is likely controlled by hypothalamic factor(s). To test this hypothesis, in this study, we examined the spatial expression of CART1 in chicken anterior pituitary and investigated the effect of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on pituitary cCART1 expression. The results showed that: 1) CART1 is expressed in both caudal and cephalic lobes of chicken anterior pituitary, revealed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), western blot and immuno-histochemical staining; 2) CRH potently stimulates cCART1 mRNA expression in cultured chick pituitary cells, as examined by qPCR, and this effect is blocked by CP154526 (and not K41498), an antagonist specific for chicken CRH type I receptor (cCRHR1), suggesting that cCRHR1 expressed on corticotrophs mediates this action; 3) the stimulatory effect of CRH on pituitary cCART1 expression is inhibited by pharmacological drugs targeting the intracellular AC/cAMP/PKA, PLC/IP3/Ca(2+), and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. This finding, together with the functional coupling of these signaling pathways to cCRHR1 expressed in CHO cells demonstrated by luciferase reporter assay systems, indicates that these intracellular signaling pathways coupled to cCRHR1 can mediate CRH action. Collectively, our present study offers the first substantial evidence that hypothalamic CRH can stimulate pituitary CART1 expression via activation of CRHR1 in a vertebrate species.

  13. Impaired Pituitary Axes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Scranton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury (TBI is significant and rarely considered by clinicians. This topic has received much more attention in the last decade. The incidence of post TBI anterior pituitary dysfunction is around 30% acutely, and declines to around 20% by one year. Growth hormone and gonadotrophic hormones are the most common deficiencies seen after traumatic brain injury, but also the most likely to spontaneously recover. The majority of deficiencies present within the first year, but extreme delayed presentation has been reported. Information on posterior pituitary dysfunction is less reliable ranging from 3%–40% incidence but prospective data suggests a rate around 5%. The mechanism, risk factors, natural history, and long-term effect of treatment are poorly defined in the literature and limited by a lack of standardization. Post TBI pituitary dysfunction is an entity to recognize with significant clinical relevance. Secondary hypoadrenalism, hypothyroidism and central diabetes insipidus should be treated acutely while deficiencies in growth and gonadotrophic hormones should be initially observed.

  14. Dissociation between the effects of somatostatin (SS) and octapeptide SS-analogs on hormone release in a small subgroup of pituitary- and islet cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Hofland (Leo); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); H.A. Visser-Wisselaar (Heleen); C. van Uffelen; M. Waaijers (Marlijn); J. Zuyderwijk; P. Uitterlinden (Piet); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); J.M. Kros (Johan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe effects of somatostatin (SS-14 and/or SS-28) and of the three octapeptide SS-analogs that are available for clinical use (octreotide, BIM-23014 and RC-160) on hormone release by primary cultures of 15 clinically nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFA), 7

  15. Complete adrenocorticotropin deficiency after radiation therapy for brain tumor with a normal growth hormone reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Haruna; Yoshioka, Katsunobu; Yamagami, Keiko [Osaka City General Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-06-01

    A 34-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1, who had received radiation therapy after the excision of a brain tumor 5 years earlier, was admitted to our hospital with vomiting and weight loss. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) were undetectable before and after administration of 100 {mu}g corticotropin releasing hormone. The level of growth hormone without stimulation was 24.7 ng/ml. We diagnosed him to have complete ACTH deficiency attributable to radiation therapy. This is the first known case of a patient with complete ACTH deficiency after radiation therapy and a growth hormone reserve that remained normal. (author)

  16. Predictor Variables of Developing Anterior Pituitary Deficiencies in a Group of Paediatric Patients with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiani, Elisa; Malossetti, Carmen; Vega, Lina Margarita; Zubizarreta, Pedro; Braier, Jorge; Belgorosky, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare histiocytic disorder of unknown etiopathogenesis. Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is the most frequent endocrine manifestation and is a known risk factor for the development of further anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies (APD). However, not all CDI patients develop APD, as observed during prolonged periods of follow-up. To find predictors of developing APD in LCH children with CDI followed in our institution. We retrospectively analysed 44 patients over a median period (quartiles) of 12.3 years (8.79-14.24). Patients were subdivided into group 1 and group 2, according to absence or presence of APD, respectively. The main variables studied were: (1) chronological age (CA) at LCH diagnosis, (2) the primary site of LCH at diagnosis: low risk (LR) and multisystemic risk organs, and (3) the presence of reactivation. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that APD was positively associated with CA at LCH diagnosis [relative risk (RR) 1.14, p < 0.01], the LR clinical form (RR 8.6, p < 0.03), and negatively associated with the presence of reactivations (RR 0.3, p < 0.01). Patients with older CA at LCH diagnosis, LR clinical forms, and fewer reactivation episodes might represent a subgroup of paediatric LCH CDI patients with a higher risk of developing APD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. [Benefits and risks of growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan J; Cordido, Fernando

    2014-10-21

    Adult growth hormone (GH) deficiency is a well-recognized clinical syndrome with adverse health consequences. Many of these may improve after replacement therapy with recombinant GH. This treatment induces an increase in lean body mass and a decrease in fat mass. In long-term studies, bone mineral density increases and muscle strength improves. Health-related quality of life tends to increase after treatment with GH. Lipid profile and markers of cardiovascular risk also improve with therapy. Nevertheless, GH replacement therapy is not without risk. According to some studies, GH increases blood glucose, body mass index and waist circumference and may promote long-term development of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Risk of neoplasia does not appear to be increased in adults treated with GH, but there are some high-risk subgroups. Methodological shortcomings and difficulties inherent to long-term studies prevent definitive conclusions about the relationship between GH and survival. Therefore, research in this field should remain active. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. IMAGING IN PITUITARY APOPLEXY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy is an acute clinical condition characterized by sudden onset of headache, vomiting, visual disturbance, ophthalmoplegia and altered sensorium occurring due to infarction or haemorrhage of pituitary gland and often involving the pituita ry adenoma. Predominantly seen in non - functional adenomas and in functioning adenomas with prolactinomas having the highest risk. Patients usually present with headache, vomiting, altered sensorium, visual defect and/or endocrine dysfunction. Hemodynamic i nstability may result from adrenocorticotrophic hormone deficiency. Imaging with either CT scan or MRI is performed in suspected cases. On CT, a recent hemorrhage appears as a single or multiple hyperdense lesions with no or little contrast enhancement. MR I is useful in estimating the onset of bleeding and to show the relationship between the tumor and the surrounding structures. CT or MR Angiography is done to rule out aneurysm. Treatment is conservative and surgery is reserved for those cases with deterio rating level of consciousness or increasing visual defect. Here we present a 47 year old male who presented with history of headache and visual disturbances for 6 weeks and was evaluated with radiograph, CT and MRI. A 47 year old male patient presented to the Neurosurgical Department of Vydehi Medical College and Research Centre with history of gradual blurring of vision in the left eye for 2 months. History of diabetes or hypertension was present. The man was hemodynamically stable. Radiograph of the skull showed widening of sella with erosion of the floor. He was advised CT. CT showed widening of sella and a pituitary lesion with fluid level. MRI was advocated for further evaluation. MRI axial and coronal showed sellar and suprasellar mass with figure of e ight appearance mass suggesting pituitary mass. Hyper intense fluid level was seen suggesting bleed within the mass. Contrast MRI showed peripheral enhancement. Diagnosis of

  19. The Relationship of Appetitive, Reproductive and Posterior Pituitary Hormones to Alcoholism and Craving in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A significant challenge for understanding alcoholism lies in discovering why some, but not other individuals, become dependent on alcohol. Genetic, environmental, cultural, developmental, and neurobiological influences are recognized as essential factors underlying a person's risk for becoming alcohol dependent (AD); however, the neurobiological processes that trigger this vulnerability are still poorly understood. Hormones are important in the regulation of many functions and several hormone...

  20. Pituitary-specific overexpression of porcine follicle-stimulating hormone leads to improvement of female fecundity in BAC transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjun Bi

    Full Text Available Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH is a pituitary glycoprotein that, together with luteinizing hormone, plays a crucial role in ovarian folliculogenesis and female fertility. We previously found that FSH beta is a major gene controlling high prolificacy of Chinese Erhualian pigs. To directly study the biological effects on reproductive function of porcine FSH (pFSH for polyovulatory species, we generated a novel gain-of-function mouse model using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC system to jointly introduce 92 kb and 165 kb genomic fragments comprising the pFSH α- and β-subunit genes. These directed the physiological expression of pFSH with the same temporal and spatial pattern as endogenous FSH in female transgenic (TG mice. Serum levels of biologically active pFSH heterodimers in independent TG lines ranged from 6.36 to 19.83 IU/L. High basal pFSH activity led to a significant reduction of serum LH and testosterone levels in TG females compared to wild-type (WT littermates, yet endogenous FSH and estradiol levels were significantly elevated. Interestingly, ovarian histology showed that the number of corpora lutea was significantly higher at 14 and 28 weeks of age in TG females and breeding curves revealed that mean litter sizes of TG females were obviously larger than for WT littermates before 52 weeks of age. These findings indicate that pituitary-specific overexpression of pFSH within physiological boundaries can increase ovulation rate and litter size, but it does not cause reproductive defects. Therefore, our TG mouse model provides exciting insights for investigating the actions of pFSH in vivo.

  1. MJA Practice Essentials--Endocrinology. 9: Pituitary disease in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, David M; Ho, Ken K Y

    2004-04-19

    Pituitary adenomas are found in 10%-25% of unselected autopsy series and are evident in about 10% of asymptomatic individuals by magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis of pituitary disorders is often delayed by lack of awareness and the subtlety of symptoms and signs. Hypopituitarism is suspected when peripheral hormone concentrations are low without an elevation in the corresponding pituitary tropic hormone(s). Severe adult-onset growth-hormone deficiency results in reduced muscle mass, increased fat mass and diminished quality of life, which are reversed by growth hormone replacement therapy. While trans-sphenoidal surgery remains first-line treatment for acromegaly, drug treatment has an important role in controlling residual growth-hormone excess and, in some circumstances, as first-line treatment. Dopamine-agonist therapy (cabergoline or bromocriptine) is the treatment of choice for micro- and macroprolactinomas. In patients with suggestive clinical features, elevated 24-hour urine free cortisol level is usually sufficient to diagnose endogenous Cushing's syndrome; careful additional investigation is needed to determine whether the cause is Cushing's disease (pituitary adenoma secreting adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH]), ectopic ACTH secretion or adrenal disease. Heightened awareness is needed to detect the sometimes subtle symptoms and signs of pituitary disease

  2. Immunoreactive neuronal pathways of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) in the brain and pituitary of the teleost Gadus morhua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, J X; Lechan, R M; Lin, H D; Jackson, I M

    1985-01-01

    Using an antiserum directed against the C-terminus of hGRH(1-44)NH2 and another recognizing the mid portion to C-terminal of hGRH(1-40)OH, we identify two immunocytochemically distinct GRH-immunoreactive systems in the brain of the codfish, Gadus morhua. The antiserum directed against GRF(1-44)NH2 stains cell bodies exclusively in the rostral pars distalis. The other antiserum immunoreactive with GRF(1-40)OH reacts with a population of parvocellular and magnocellular neuronal cell bodies in the hypothalamus and with two major axonal pathways which project toward the median eminence and terminate primarily in the pars nervosa. These results indicate the presence of at least two forms of hGRH-like peptides in the teleost which may have different roles in the regulation of pituitary function.

  3. Two gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor subtypes with distinct ligand selectivity and differential distribution in brain and pituitary in the goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    OpenAIRE

    Illing, Nicola; Troskie, Brigitte E.; Nahorniak, Carol S.; Janet P Hapgood; Peter, Richard E.; Millar, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    In the goldfish (Carassius auratus) the two endogenous forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), namely chicken GnRH II ([His5,Trp7,Tyr8]GnRH) and salmon GnRH ([Trp7,Leu8]GnRH), stimulate the release of both gonadotropins and growth hormone from the pituitary. This control is thought to occur by means of the stimulation of distinct GnRH receptors. These receptors can be distinguished on the basis of differential gonadotropin and growth hormone releasing activities of naturally occurring...

  4. Ectopic Neurohypophysis in Patient with Pituitary Dwarfism: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhan Kılınç

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic neurohypophysis is an anomaly of the Pituitary gland whichmay be associated with short stature due to Growth hormone deficiency.MRI is the modality of choice in diagnosing this condition. We present acase of pituitary dwarfism and ectopic neurohypophysis with clinical andradiological findings. 21 year-old male admitted with short stature. Allhormones, except prolactin, of anterior hypophysis were low. Bright spotwas ectopically located at level of median eminence on enhanced MRI ofhypophysis and stalk of hypophysis was not observed. Ectopicneurohypophysis may be present with pituitary dwarfism. Cranial MRI maybe useful to investigate related pathologies in such cases.

  5. Impact of monocarboxylate transporter-8 deficiency on the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Trajkovic-Arsic (Marija); J. Müller (Julia); V.M. Darras (Veerle); C. Groba (Claudia); S. Lee (Sooyeon); D. Weih (Debra); K. Bauer (Karl); T.J. Visser (Theo); H. Heuer (Heike)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn patients, inactivating mutations in the gene encoding the thyroid hormone-transporting monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8) are associated with severe mental and neurological deficits and disturbed thyroid hormone levels. The latter phenotype characterized by high T3and low T4serum co

  6. Impact of environmental chemicals on the thyroid hormone function in pituitary rat GH3 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva

    2005-01-01

    -nonylphenol, 4-octylphenol), pesticides (prochloraz, iprodion, chlorpyrifos), PCB metabolites (OH-PCB 106, OH-PCB 121, OH-PCB 69) and brominated flame-retardants (tetrabromobisphenol A). The ED potential of a chemical was determined by its effect on the cell proliferation of TH-dependent rat pituitary GH3 cell...... line. All tested chemicals significantly interfered with the cell proliferation alone or upon co-treatment with T3. The growth of GH3 cells was stimulated by all tested chemicals, but 4-n-nonylphenol, 4-octylphenol, prochloraz and iprodion elicited an inhibitory effect on cell growth. In conclusion...

  7. Effects of spaceflight on hypothalamic peptide systems controlling pituitary growth hormone dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1992-01-01

    Possible effects of reduced gravity on central hypophysiotropic systems controlling growth hormone (GH) secretion were investigated in rats flown on Cosmos 1887 and 2044 biosatellites. Immunohistochemical (IHC)staining for the growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF), somatostatin (SS), and other hypothalamic hormones was performed on hypothalami obtained from rats. IHC analysis was complemented by quantitative in situ assessments of mRNAs encoding the precursors for these hormones. Data obtained suggest that exposure to microgravity causes a preferential reduction in GRF peptide and mRNA levels in hypophysiotropic neurons, which may contribute to impared GH secretion in animals subjected to spaceflight. Effects of weightlessness are not mimicked by hindlimb suspension in this system.

  8. Effect of alcohol and glucose infusion on pituitary-gonadal hormones in normal females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, U; Gluud, C; Bennett, Patrick

    1988-01-01

    During 1 h, median 976 mmol ethanol in 5.5% glucose was administered i.v. to six healthy female volunteers (aged 26-37 years) in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The median maximal blood ethanol concentration was median 33.5 mmol/l and serum ethanol concentrations of 2 mmol/l were reached...... and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate levels decreased 6-48%, while testosterone levels did not change significantly. Prolactin concentrations were reduced by 41-51% of basal values and luteinizing hormone concentrations by 37-68% Follicle stimulating hormone levels did not change significantly. Stress factors...... or haemodilution are not likely explanations of the observed changes in hormone concentrations. A circadian rhythm could not explain changes in hormones of non-adrenal origin....

  9. Endocrine disrupting effects of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane analogues on gonadotropin hormones in pituitary gonadotrope cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinghua; Yang, Ye; Xiong, Kang; Liu, Jing

    2014-05-01

    It has been shown that exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) analogues leads to disharmony of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). However, the effects and mechanisms of DDT analogues on the expression of gonadotropin genes (FSHβ, LHβ and Cgα), which is the rate-limiting step of FSH and LH biosynthesis, remain unknown. In this study, we assessed the effects of p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and methoxychlor (MXC) on gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis in gonadotrope cells. p,p'-DDT and MXC at test concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-7)mol/L, stimulated gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. The activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was required for the induction of gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis by p,p'-DDT or MXC exposure. This study showed for the first time that p,p'-DDT and MXC regulated gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis through ERK pathway in gonadotrope cells.

  10. A rare case of type 1 diabetes mellitus with pituitary hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Jostol; Sudeep, K; Venkatesha, B M

    2014-01-01

    Growth failure and pubertal abnormalities are not uncommon in chronic uncontrolled metabolic diseases like diabetes mellitus. We present a young girl with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes mellitus, who presented with short stature and primary amenorrhea, and on evaluation was found to have anterior pituitary hypoplasia. In addition to uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, she presented with early onset growth failure and lack of spontaneous secondary sexual characteristics. She had central hypothyroidism and inappropriately normal gonadotropin levels. However her serum cortisol levels were normal. MRI of the sellar-suprasellar region revealed a small anterior pituitary gland with thinning of the pituitary stalk consistent with pituitary hypoplasia. While uncontrolled type 1 diabetes itself may cause growth retardation and pubertal abnormalities, this girl had coexisting pituitary maldevelopment - a rare co-existence of two major illnesses of unrelated etiologies. The partial pituitary hormonal deficiency, which spared the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, may be due to a transcription factor defect.

  11. Effects of aqueous extract from Asparagus officinalis L. roots on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormone levels and the number of ovarian follicles in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojatollah Karimi Jashni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asparagus is a plant with high nutritional, pharmaceutical, and industrial values. Objective: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of asparagus roots on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormones and oogenesis in female rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 adult female Wistar rats were divided into five groups, which consist 8 rats. Groups included control, sham and three experimental groups receiving different doses (100, 200, 400 mg/kg/bw of aqueous extract of asparagus roots. All dosages were administered orally for 28 days. Blood samples were taken from rats to evaluate serum levels of Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH, follicular stimulating hormone (FSH, Luteinal hormone (LH, estrogen, and progesterone hormones. The ovaries were removed, weighted, sectioned, and studied by light microscope. Results: Dose-dependent aqueous extract of asparagus roots significantly increased serum levels of GnRH, FSH, LH, estrogen, and progestin hormones compared to control and sham groups. Increase in number of ovarian follicles and corpus luteum in groups treated with asparagus root extract was also observed (p<0.05. Conclusion: Asparagus roots extract stimulates secretion of hypothalamic- pituitary- gonadal axis hormones. This also positively affects oogenesis in female rats.

  12. Sleep and Endocrinology: Hypothalamic-pituitary- adrenal axis and growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Goswami

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The supra-chiasmatic nucleus (SCN is the primarily biological clock determining thecircadian rhythm. The neurons of the nucleus making this clock have inherent rhythmand set in biological day and night. These periods usually corresponds to day/night, andindirectly to sleep-wakefulness cycle, in most individuals. Retino-hypothalamic tractcarrying photic information from the retina provides the most important input tomaintain the inherent rhythm of the SCN. The rhythmic discharges from the SCN tovarious neurons of the central nervous system, including pineal gland andhypothalamus, translate into circadian rhythm characteristic of several hormones andmetabolites such as glucose. As a result there is a pattern of hormonal changesoccurring during cycle of sleep wakefulness. Most characteristic of these changes aresurge of melatonin with biological night, surge of growth hormone-releasing hormone(GHRHat onset of sleep and surge of corticotropin-releasinghormone(CRHduring late part of the sleep. The cause and effect relationship of the hypothalamicreleasing hormones and their target hormones on various phases of sleep includinginitial non rapid eye movement (NREM phase at onset of sleep, and rapid eyemovement (REM phase near awakening, is an upcoming research area. Sleepelectroencephalogram (EEG determining the onset of NREM and REM sleep is animportant tool complimenting the studies assessing relationship between varioushormones and phases of sleep. The slow wave activity (SWA corresponds to theintensity of sleep at its onset during the biological night of an individual. Besides,GHRH and CRH, several other peptide and steroid hormones such as growthhormone (GH, its secretagogues, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y, estrogen anddehydroepiandrosterone sulfate are associated or have the potential to change phases ofsleep including initial slow wave-NREM sleep.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the human pituitary gland: expression and splicing pattern in adenomas versus normal pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhi, G; Albiger, N; Berlucchi, S; Gardiman, M; Scanarini, M; Scienza, R; Fassina, A; Mantero, F; Scaroni, C

    2007-07-01

    Pituitary adenomas are slow-growing tumours arising within the pituitary gland. If secreting, they give rise to well-known syndromes such as Cushing's disease or acromegaly; when hormonally inactive, they come to clinical attention often with local mass effects or pituitary deficiency. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a nuclear hormone receptor with a key role in fat and glucose metabolism, but also involved in several neoplasia, has recently been detected in pituitary adenomas. In the present study, we evaluated the occurrence and splicing profile of PPARgamma in 43 cases of pituitary adenoma of different subtypes and compared it to 12 normal pituitary glands. By real-time polymerase chain reaction, PPARgamma was expressed as much in adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and ACTH-silent adenomas as in controls, with a moderate underexpression in somatotrophinomas and prolactinomas and overexpression in 54% of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA). There was no apparent qualitative change in the splicing profile of pathological pituitary glands, nor was the presence of specific isoforms with dominant negative effects against PPARgamma detected. Western blotting revealed similar expression levels in the different subgroups of pituitary adenomas and normal glands. Immunohistochemistry confirmed PPARgamma expression in approximately one-half of analysed samples. The intra- and intergroup differences observed in pituitary adenomas may represent new elements in the process of understanding the different clinical responses of Cushing's and Nelson patients to PPARgamma-ligand treatment. Moreover, the higher level of PPARgamma expression detected in the NFPA subgroup may suggest its possible role as a molecular target in these pituitary adenomas, paving the way for investigations on the effectiveness of treatment with thiazolidinediones in such patients.

  14. Growth hormone effects on cortical bone dimensions in young adults with childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldstrup, L; Conway, G S; Racz, K

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment in young adults with childhood-onset GH deficiency has beneficial effects on bone mass. The present study shows that cortical bone dimensions also benefit from GH treatment, with endosteal expansion and increased cortical thickness leading to improved bone strength....... INTRODUCTION: In young adults with childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency (CO GHD), GH treatment after final height is reached has been shown to have beneficial effects on spine and hip bone mineral density. The objective of the study was to evaluate the influence of GH on cortical bone dimensions. METHODS......: Patients (n = 160; mean age, 21.2 years; 63% males) with CO GHD were randomised 2:1 to GH or no treatment for 24 months. Cortical bone dimensions were evaluated by digital x-ray radiogrammetry of the metacarpal bones every 6 months. RESULTS: After 24 months, cortical thickness was increased compared...

  15. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to acute psychosocial stress: Effects of biological sex and circulating sex hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Mary Ann C; Mahon, Pamela B; McCaul, Mary E; Wand, Gary S

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences the risk for developing stress-related disorders. Sex-dependent differences in the HPA axis stress response are believed to contribute to the different prevalence rates of stress-related disorders found in men and women. However, studies examining the HPA axis stress response have shown mixed support for sex differences, and the role of endogenous sex hormones on HPA axis response has not been adequately examined in humans. This study utilized the largest sample size to date to analyze the effects of biological sex and sex hormones on HPA axis social stress responses. Healthy, 18- to 30- year-old community volunteers (N=282) completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a widely used and well-validated stress-induction laboratory procedure. All women (n=135) were tested during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle (when progesterone levels are most similar to men). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol measures were collected at multiple points throughout pre- and post-TSST. Testosterone and progesterone (in men) and progesterone and estradiol (in women) were determined pre-TSST. Following the TSST, men had greater ACTH and cortisol levels than women. Men had steeper baseline-to-peak and peak-to-end ACTH and cortisol response slopes than women; there was a trend for more cortisol responders among men than women. Testosterone negatively correlated with salivary cortisol response in men, while progesterone negatively correlated with ACTH and cortisol responses in women. These data confirm that men show more robust activation of the HPA axis response to the TSST than do women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Testosterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in men. Progesterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in women. Future work is needed to explain why men mount a greater ACTH and cortisol response to the

  16. Adult growth hormone deficiency: academic extravagance or real clinical entity for the internist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Scanelli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Growth Hormone (GH continues to act lifelong: it has been described, in fact, an Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency (AGHD syndrome, involving several organs and functions, whose clinical aspects greatly improve with the administration of human recombinant GH. The authors describe, evaluating the most recent data from the literature, the clinical picture, the pathophysiologic mechanisms, the diagnostic tools and the therapy of AGHD.

  17. Effect of Imatinib on the Oogenesis and Pituitary -Ovary Hormonal Axis in Female Wistar Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Parichehreh Yaghmaei; Kazem Parivar; Fatemeh Jalalvand

    2009-01-01

    Background: Imatinib mesylate, a small-molecular analog of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)that potently inhibits tyrosine kinase activities of Bcr–Abl, PDGFR-β, PDGFR-α, c-Fms, Argand c-kit, is one of the novel molecularly targeted drugs being introduced into cancer therapy.We tested the effect of imatinib on the ovarian histological structure and the concentration ofestrogen and progesterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)in the serum of female Wistar rats.Mater...

  18. Predictors of Insulin Like Growth Factor-I responses to Growth Hormone replacement in young adults with Growth Hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Thankamony, Ajay; Capalbo, Donatella; Jonsson, Peter J.; Simpson, Helen L.; Dunger, David B.

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. It is currently under an indefinite embargo pending publication by Karger Publishers. Background/Aims: Physiological growth hormone (GH) secretion and IGF-I levels are greater in young compared to older adults. We evaluated IGF-I levels and predictors of IGF-I responses in young adults on GH replacement. Design: From KIMS database, 310 young adults (age, 15 26 years) with the severe GH deficiency related to childhood-onset disease, and commenced ...

  19. Growth Hormone Deficiency in a Patient with Becker Muscular Dystrophy: A Pediatric Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Calcaterra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe a biochemical growth hormone (GH deficiency and to evaluate therapeutic result in a six-year-old male with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD. Methods. GH peak was evaluated after response to arginine and insulin. Bone age was evaluated according to Greulich and Pyle method. Results. The GH-supplementary therapy was very effective in terms of growth gain. Conclusion. The possibility of a growth hormone deficiency and treatment with GH in patients with BMD cannot be excluded, especially considering the good therapeutic response.

  20. Growth hormone deficiency in a patient with becker muscular dystrophy: a pediatric case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Malvezzi, Annachiara; Toglia, Rossana; Berardinelli, Angela; Bozzola, Elena; Bozzola, Mauro; Larizza, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To describe a biochemical growth hormone (GH) deficiency and to evaluate therapeutic result in a six-year-old male with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Methods. GH peak was evaluated after response to arginine and insulin. Bone age was evaluated according to Greulich and Pyle method. Results. The GH-supplementary therapy was very effective in terms of growth gain. Conclusion. The possibility of a growth hormone deficiency and treatment with GH in patients with BMD cannot be excluded, especially considering the good therapeutic response.

  1. Effects of growth hormone therapy on thyroid function of growth hormone-deficient adults with and without concomitant thyroxine-substituted central hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, J O; Pedersen, S A; Laurberg, P

    1989-01-01

    Administration of human GH to GH-deficient patients has yielded conflicting results concerning its impact on thyroid function, ranging from increased resting metabolic rate to induction of hypothyroidism. However, most studies have been casuistic or uncontrolled and have used pituitary-derived GH...

  2. RENAL RESERVE FILTRATION CAPACITY IN GROWTH-HORMONE DEFICIENT SUBJECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DULLAART, RPF; MEIJER, S; MARBACH, P; SLUITER, WJ

    In normal subjects, the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) acutely increase in response to infusion of amino acids and to low doses of dopamine. It is uncertain whether circulatory growth hormone (GH) is a permissive factor for these stimulatory effects. GFR and

  3. Immunoreactive gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like material in the brain and the pituitary gland during the periovulatory period in the brown trout (Salmo trutta L.): relationships with the plasma and pituitary gonadotropin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, B; Motin, A; Billard, R; Kah, O; Geoffre, S; Precigoux, G

    1986-01-01

    In fish there are few data on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) neurosecretory activity, which could explain long- and short-term variations of the gonadotropin secretion. There is no biological species specificity between mammal and fish Gn-RH; although there is a structural difference, they are, on the contrary, characterized by a high immunological specificity which does not allow measurement of fish Gn-RH using radioimmunoassay for LH-RH. We have synthesized salmon Gn-RH according to the formula recently proposed by Sherwood (N. Sherwood, L. Eiden, M. Brownstein, J. Spies, J. Rivier, and W. Vale, 1983. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 80, 2794-2798). Its activity has been tested by its ability to stimulate the gonadotropin hormone (GtH) secretion in vivo in testosterone-implanted juvenile rainbow trout, and for the recognition of synthesized Gn-RH (s-Gn-RH) perykaria by a specific antibody raised against the s-Gn-RH in regions of the brain described as containing LH-RH immunoreactive-like material. A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the salmon Gn-RH, and its specificity to measure trout Gn-RH has been tested. Using this assay, the brain and pituitary Gn-RH contents have been measured throughout the final phases of maturation and ovulation. Brain Gn-RH increases from the end of vitellogenesis (8.9 +/- 0.76 ng/brain) to ovulation (more than 15 ng/brain). Pituitary Gn-RH is lower (1.58 +/- 0.69 ng/pituitary) at the end of vitellogenesis and follows a similar profile as in the brain, except for a significant decrease just prior the beginning of oocyte maturation. The correlations between Gn-RH levels and GtH pituitary and plasma levels show that total brain Gn-RH is never correlated to the GtH, suggesting that the increase in the brain Gn-RH content is related to a Gn-RH system closely related to maturation and ovulation, which remains to be investigated. On the contrary, pituitary Gn-RH levels are well correlated with pituitary and plasma GtH levels

  4. Concentrations of the adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone and sex steroid hormones and the expression of the androgen receptor in the pituitary and adrenal glands of male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) during growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiezun, J; Kaminska, B; Jankowski, J; Dusza, L

    2015-01-01

    Androgens take part in the regulation of puberty and promote growth and development. They play their biological role by binding to a specific androgen receptor (AR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of AR mRNA and protein in the pituitary and adrenal glands, to localize AR protein in luteinizing hormone (LH)-producing pituitary and adrenocortical cells, to determine plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone and the concentrations of corticosterone, testosterone (T), androstenedione (A4) and oestradiol (E2) in the adrenal glands of male turkeys at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28weeks. The concentrations of hormones and the expression of AR varied during development. The expression of AR mRNA and protein in pituitary increased during the growth. The increase of AR mRNA levels in pituitary occurred earlier than increase of AR protein. The percentage of pituitary cells expressing ARs in the population of LH-secreting cells increased in week 20. It suggests that AR expression in LH-producing pituitary cells is determined by the phase of development. The drop in adrenal AR mRNA and protein expression was accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of adrenal androgens. Those results could point to the presence of a compensatory mechanism that enables turkeys to avoid the potentially detrimental effects of high androgen concentrations. Our results will expand our knowledge of the role of steroids in the development of the reproductive system of turkeys from the first month of age until maturity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Single dose and pulsatile treatment with human growth hormone in growth hormone deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    P. J. Smith; Pringle, P J; Brook, C. G.

    1987-01-01

    The growth and growth hormone profiles in four children receiving three different regimens of treatment with human growth hormone (hGH) were compared. There was no significant difference in the rate of growth between the regimens; the rate of growth fell dramatically after treatment. Pulsatile administration of hGH was no better than conventional treatment.

  6. Prevalence of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Eskes; E. Endert; E. Fliers; W.M. Wiersinga

    2010-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune hypophysitis can result in GH deficiency (GHD) and is associated with other autoimmune endocrine diseases like Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Recent studies suggest a high prevalence (5%) of GHD in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Objective: Our objective was to establish the prevalence of GHD

  7. Effects of aqueous extract from Asparagus officinalis L. roots on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormone levels and the number of ovarian follicles in adult rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hojatollah Karimi Jashni; Hossein Kargar Jahromi; Ali Ghorbani Ranjbary

    2016-01-01

    Background: Asparagus is a plant with high nutritional, pharmaceutical, and industrial values. Objective: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of asparagus roots on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormones and oogenesis in female rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 adult female Wistar rats were divided into five groups, which consist 8 rats. Groups included control, sham and three experimental groups receiving different doses ...

  8. Effects of aqueous extract from Asparagus officinalis L. roots on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormone levels and the number of ovarian follicles in adult rats

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi Jashni, Hojatollah; Kargar Jahromi, Hossein; Ghorbani Ranjbary, Ali; Kargar Jahromi, Zahra; Khabbaz Kherameh, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Asparagus is a plant with high nutritional, pharmaceutical, and industrial values. Objective: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of asparagus roots on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormones and oogenesis in female rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 adult female Wistar rats were divided into five groups, which consist 8 rats. Groups included control, sham and three experimental groups receiving different doses (100, ...

  9. Pituitary hyperplasia: an uncommon presentation of a common disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massolt, E T; Peeters, R P; Neggers, S J; de Herder, W W

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 21-year-old woman presented with amenorrhea, bilateral galactorrhea and fatigue. Visual acuity and visual fields were normal. Laboratory examination demonstrated hyperprolactinemia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pituitary showed a 19×17×12-mm sellar mass with supra- and parasellar extension, causing compression of the pituitary stalk and optic chiasm. Further examinations confirmed mild hyperprolactinemia, strongly elevated TSH (>500 mU/l), low free thyroxine (FT4), hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and secondary adrenal insufficiency. Hydrocortisone and l-T4 replacement therapy was started. Three months later, the galactorrhea had disappeared, thyroid function was normalized and MRI revealed regression of the pituitary enlargement, confirming the diagnosis of pituitary hyperplasia (PH) due to primary hypothyroidism. Subsequently, the menstrual cycle returned and the hypocortisolism normalized. This case demonstrates that severe primary hypothyroidism may have an unusual presentation and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pituitary enlargement associated with moderate hyperprolactinemia. Learning points One should always try to find one etiology as the common cause of all the clinical findings in a pathologic process.Amenorrhea, galactorrhea and fatigue may be the only presenting clinical manifestations of primary hypothyroidism.Not every patient with galactorrhea, hyperprolactinemia and a pituitary mass has a prolactinoma.Primary hypothyroidism should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia associated with pituitary enlargement and pituitary hormone(s) deficiency(ies).When PH due to primary hypothyroidism is suspected, thyroid hormone replacement should be started and only regression of pituitary enlargement on MRI follow-up can confirm the diagnosis.Examination of thyroid function in patients with a pituitary mass may avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26279852

  10. Metabolic effects of growth hormone administered subcutaneously once or twice daily to growth hormone deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    1994-01-01

    -term metabolic effects in GH deficient patients. An improved growth response is obtained in GH deficient children when a fixed weekly GH dose is administered by daily subcutaneous injections instead of twice or thrice-weekly intramuscular injections. A more pulsatile pattern and serum GH levels above zero might...

  11. Tissue-specific alterations in thyroid hormone homeostasis in combined Mct10 and Mct8 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Müller (Julia); S. Mayerl (Steffen); T.J. Visser (Theo); V.M. Darras (Veerle); A. Boelen (Anita); L. Frappart (Lucien); L. Mariotta (Luca); F. Verrey; H. Heuer (Heike)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe monocarboxylate transporter Mct10 (Slc16a10; T-type amino acid transporter) facilitates the cellular transport of thyroid hormone (TH) and shows an overlapping expression with the wellestablished TH transporter Mct8. Because Mct8 deficiency is associated with distinct tissue-specific

  12. Should we start and continue growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy in adults with GH deficiency?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC

    2000-01-01

    During the last decade, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults has been described as a clinical syndrome. Central features of this entity include increased fat mass, reduced muscle and bone mass, as well as impaired exercise capacity and quality of life. GH replacement therapy has been initiated

  13. Cytoplasmic kinases downstream of GPR30 suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Faidiban O; Kadokawa, Hiroya

    2016-01-01

    GPR30 is known as a membrane receptor for picomolar concentrations of estradiol. The GPR30-specific agonist G1 causes a rapid, non-genomic suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells. A few studies have recently clarified that protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) might be involved in cytoplasmic signaling pathways of GPR30 in other cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that PKA and ERK kinase (MEK) are important cytoplasmic mediators for GPR30-associated non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells. Bovine AP cells (n = 8) were cultured for 3 days under steroid-free conditions. The AP cells were previously treated for 30 min with one of the following: 5000 nM of PKA inhibitor (H89), 1000 nM of MEK inhibitor (U0126), or a combination of H89 and U0126. Next, the AP cells were treated with 0.01 nM estradiol for 5 min before GnRH stimulation. Estradiol treatment without inhibitor pretreatment significantly suppressed GnRH-induced LH secretion (P < 0.01). In contrast, estradiol treatment after pretreatment with H89, U0126 or their combination had no suppressive effect on GnRH-induced LH secretion. The inhibitors also inhibited the G1 suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion. Therefore, these data supported the hypothesis that PKA and MEK (thus, also pERK) are the intracellular mediators downstream of GPR30 that induce the non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells by estradiol or G1.

  14. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  15. The Effect of Disulfiram on Serum Levels of Hormones in the Pituitary-Thyroid in Adult Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Disulfiram is used for treatment of alcohol intoxication.Based on the results of different studies, excessive amounts of the drug can affect the body's endocrine function. This study investigated the effect of disulfiram on the activity of the pituitary - thy-roid in adult male rats. Materials & Methods: In this study 50 adult male Wistar rats weighing approximately 200 to 220 g were used in the experimental, control and intact groups. Experimental groups received 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg oral doses of disulfiram for 10 days and control group received 1 ml saline for 10 days and intact groups did not receive any thing. At the end of the tenth day ,the rats were bled from the heart and T3, T4 and TSH hormones were measured by commercial kits Gama Counter and the results were analyzed using one-way (ANOVA with SPSS ver-sion 18. Results: Results show that there was no significant changes in T4 plasma level, but T3 and TSH level increased significantly when the control and intact groups were compared. Conclusion: Disulfiram had no significant effect in T4 plasma level but T3 and TSH level in-creased significantly. It probably happened due to increasing serotonin and reducing soma-tostatine and also enhancing the activity of 5-Deiodinase enzymes following the entry of cal-cium ions into the cells.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 19 (4:43-47

  16. EFFECT OF PREOPERATIVE USE OF LONG-ACTING OCTREOTIDE ON GROWTH HORMONE SECRETING PITUITARY ADENOMA AND TRANSSPHENOIDAL SURGERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Yin; Chang-bao Su; Zhi-qin Xu; Yi Yang; Wen-bin Ma; Wei Tao; Zhong Yang; Xue-wei Xia

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether somatostatin analog octreotide long acting release (LAR) shrinks growth hormone (GH) secreting adenomas, and improves the results of subsequent transsphenoidal surgery.Methods Seventeen previously untreated active acromegalic patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with LAR (30 mg intramuscular injection every 28 days) for 3 months prior to transsphenoidal surgery. Clinical reaction, mean GH secretion, and tumor volume were measured under basal conditions and after LAR treatment.Results Presurgical treatment improved acromegaly symptoms and induced a significant reduction of GH under the 5 ng/mL limit in microadenoma (P < 0.05), while only 18.2% (2/11) in macroadenoma. Meanwhile, tumor shrinkage occurred in 58.8% (10/17) patients, with 1 case in the microadenoma group. All marked shrinkage (> 25%) occurred in the macroadenoma group. Statistical analysis showed tumor shrinkage caused by LAR was greater in macroadenoma group than that in microadenoma group (P < 0.05). During operation, adenoma was soft in 15 cases, with the exception of 2cases in which the soft rumor was divided by fibrous septa, but all tumor removal was smooth.Conclusions A short term administration of preoperative LAR may induce a significant decrease in GH-secretion level and adenoma volume. Presurgical use of octreotide LAR improves surgical results especially in macroadenomas.

  17. Familial pituitary tumor syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Marianne S; McDonald, Kerrie L; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Robinson, Bruce G

    2009-08-01

    The vast majority of pituitary tumors are benign and occur sporadically; however, they can still result in significant morbidity and even premature mortality through mass effects and hormone dysfunction. The etiology of sporadic tumors is still poorly understood; by contrast, advances have been made in our understanding of familial pituitary adenoma syndromes in the past decade. Currently, four genes are known to be associated with familial pituitary tumor syndromes: MEN1, CDKN1B, PRKAR1A and AIP. The first three genes are associated with a variety of extrapituitary pathologies, for example, primary hyperparathyroidism with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, which might aid identification of these syndromes. By contrast, AIP mutations seem to occur in the setting of isolated familial pituitary adenomas, particularly of the growth-hormone-secreting subtype. Awareness and identification of familial pituitary tumor syndromes is important because of potential associated pathologies and important implications for family members. Here, we review the current knowledge of familial pituitary tumor syndromes.

  18. Effect of Imatinib on the Oogenesis and Pituitary -Ovary Hormonal Axis in Female Wistar Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parichehreh Yaghmaei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imatinib mesylate, a small-molecular analog of adenosine triphosphate (ATPthat potently inhibits tyrosine kinase activities of Bcr–Abl, PDGFR-β, PDGFR-α, c-Fms, Argand c-kit, is one of the novel molecularly targeted drugs being introduced into cancer therapy.We tested the effect of imatinib on the ovarian histological structure and the concentration ofestrogen and progesterone, luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle stimulating hormone (FSHin the serum of female Wistar rats.Materials and Methods: Two groups of rats (180 ± 15 grams were gavaged with doses of 50and 100 mg/kg body weight imatinib dissolved in distilled water for 14 days. The control groupreceived sterile water. On day 7, after termination of the treatment, blood serum concentrationwas measured with the radioimmunoassay (RIA method. Also, sections (5 μm thick of ovariesstained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E were investigated histologically.Results: Progesterone concentration in the experimental groups was increased (p<0.001,estrogen and FSH concentrations were decreased (p<0.01, and the LH concentration decreasedbut was not statistically different in comparison with the control group. The weight of ovaries andnumber of atretic follicles in the experimental groups was increased compared with the controlgroup (p<0.05. The diameter of corpus lutea were increased but the number of corpus luteadecreased in both experimental groups (p<0.01.Conclusion: These findings suggest that administration of imatinib may have profound effects onfemale fertility.

  19. A case of pituitary abscess presenting without a source of infection or prior pituitary pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derick Adams

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary abscess is a relatively uncommon cause of pituitary hormone deficiencies and/or a suprasellar mass. Risk factors for pituitary abscess include prior surgery, irradiation and/or pathology of the suprasellar region as well as underlying infections. We present the case of a 22-year-old female presenting with a spontaneous pituitary abscess in the absence of risk factors described previously. Her initial presentation included headache, bitemporal hemianopia, polyuria, polydipsia and amenorrhoea. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of her pituitary showed a suprasellar mass. As the patient did not have any risk factors for pituitary abscess or symptoms of infection, the diagnosis was not suspected preoperatively. She underwent transsphenoidal resection and purulent material was seen intraoperatively. Culture of the surgical specimen showed two species of alpha hemolytic Streptococcus, Staphylococcus capitis and Prevotella melaninogenica. Urine and blood cultures, dental radiographs and transthoracic echocardiogram failed to show any source of infection that could have caused the pituitary abscess. The patient was treated with 6 weeks of oral metronidazole and intravenous vancomycin. After 6 weeks of transsphenoidal resection and just after completion of antibiotic therapy, her headache and bitemporal hemianopsia resolved. However, nocturia and polydipsia from central diabetes insipidus and amenorrhoea from hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism persisted.

  20. Terapia de reposição hormonal no hipopituitarismo

    OpenAIRE

    Abucham, Julio; Vieira, Teresa C. Alfinito [UNIFESP; BARBOSA, Erika Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Rogério Silicani [UNIFESP; Martins, Manoel R. Alves [UNIFESP

    2003-01-01

    This article brings an updated review of hypopituitarism with emphasis in hormone replacement therapy. The physiological basis of hormone replacement therapy and practical aspects of treating hypopituitary patients were both taken into account to provide a rational strategy for treatment. The review is organized by individual pituitary hormone deficiency and covers epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, and diagnosis of hypopituitarism, as well as the most relevant hormone preparation...

  1. Headache and pituitary disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitschmann-Andermahr, I; Siegel, S; Weber Carneiro, R; Maubach, J M; Harbeck, B; Brabant, G

    2013-12-01

    Headache is very common in pituitary disease and is reported to be present in more than a third of all patients with pituitary adenomas. Tumour size, cavernous sinus invasion, traction or displacement of intracranial pain-sensitive structures such as blood vessels, cranial nerves and dura mater, and hormonal hypersecretion are implicated causes. The present review attempts to systematically review the literature for any combination of headache and pituitary or hormone overproduction or deficiency. Most data available are retrospective and/or not based on the International Headache Society (IHS) classification. Whereas in pituitary apoplexy a mechanical component explains the almost universal association of the condition with headaches, this correlation is less clear in other forms of pituitary disease and a positive impact of surgery on headaches is not guaranteed. Similarly, invasion into the cavernous sinus or local inflammatory changes have been linked to headaches without convincing evidence. Some studies suggest that oversecretion of GH and prolactin may be important for the development of headaches, and treatment, particularly with somatostatin analogues, has been shown to improve symptoms in these patients. Otherwise, treatment rests on general treatment options for headaches based on an accurate clinical history and a precise classification which includes assessment of the patient's psychosocial risk factors.

  2. Researches on Evaluating the Efficiency of Hormonal Stimulation with Silver Carp Pituitary Extract in Order to Optimize Controlled Reproductive Technology at Asian Cyprinids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina Popescu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Large requirements of fish larvae, led the specialists at the Carja 1 farm to experience injection with pituitary extract from other species of cyprinids, silver carp pituitary. The experiment took place in the period from 2-25 June 2008. To verify the effectiveness of injections of silver carp pituitary suspension were used two experimental groups of 30 exemplars (1:1, the first group of females received a total dose of 2.9 mg/kg, and the second batch a dose of 4.5 mg/kg. The total dose used for breeding male is 2 mg/kg pituitary. During the Asian cyprinid reproductive guided aimed to determine: the proportion of breeding maturation, fertilization rates and survival during embryonic development index and the index of survival to hatch from eggs to larvae of 3-5 days (most representative for the whole process of reproduction. Determining the number of larvae from each batch of fertilized eggs, the ultimate goal of action is guided by reproductive hormonal stimulation with silver carp pituitary. The number of larvae obtained from experimental plots 3-5 days silver carp injected with silver carp pituitary extract (63,96 and 64,67 thousand comparable with those obtained in experimental groups grass carp (36,21 and 31,14 thousand and bighead carp (39,36 and 41, 34 thousand was approximately 58% higher.

  3. Suppression of episodic growth hormone secretion in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice: time-course studies on the hypothalamic pituitary axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murao, S; Sato, M; Tamaki, M; Niimi, M; Ishida, T; Takahara, J

    1995-10-01

    To elucidate the roles of the hypothalamic peptides, GH-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH), potentially responsible for altered GH dynamics in diabetes, we studied the time courses of their changes in level associated with altered GH secretion in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Diabetic mice were used at 4, 7, and 14 days after STZ injection for analyses of 1) GH secretion in vivo, 2) hypothalamic GRH and SRIH messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, 3) pituitary GH mRNA and protein contents, and 4) pituitary GH response to GRH in vitro. GH secretion was completely suppressed 7 and 14 days after STZ injection. The hypothalamic GRH mRNA level was reduced to 59.8%, 61.2%, and 48.5% of control values at 4, 7, and 14 days, respectively. In contrast, the hypothalamic SRIH mRNA level was not altered at all of these time points. Pituitary GH mRNA and protein contents were significantly reduced to 70.2% and 61.5% of those in controls, respectively, only at 14 days. Pituitary GH responses to GRH at three doses (10, 50, and 250 nM) in vitro were remarkably increased at 4, 7, and 14 days. These findings indicate that the diabetic state rapidly and primarily inhibits hypothalamic GRH gene expression without affecting SRIH. A persistent decrease in hypothalamic GRH tone has been suggested to result in inhibition of GH synthesis in the pituitary. Enhancement of GH responsiveness to GRH may be due to the up-regulation of GRH receptors in the pituitary.

  4. Mortality in patients with pituitary disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sherlock, Mark

    2010-06-01

    Pituitary disease is associated with increased mortality predominantly due to vascular disease. Control of cortisol secretion and GH hypersecretion (and cardiovascular risk factor reduction) is key in the reduction of mortality in patients with Cushing\\'s disease and acromegaly, retrospectively. For patients with acromegaly, the role of IGF-I is less clear-cut. Confounding pituitary hormone deficiencies such as gonadotropins and particularly ACTH deficiency (with higher doses of hydrocortisone replacement) may have a detrimental effect on outcome in patients with pituitary disease. Pituitary radiotherapy is a further factor that has been associated with increased mortality (particularly cerebrovascular). Although standardized mortality ratios in pituitary disease are falling due to improved treatment, mortality for many conditions are still elevated above that of the general population, and therefore further measures are needed. Craniopharyngioma patients have a particularly increased risk of mortality as a result of the tumor itself and treatment to control tumor growth; this is a key area for future research in order to optimize the outcome for these patients.

  5. The influence of growth hormone (GH) deficiency and GH replacement on quality of life in GH-deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deijen, J B; van der Veen, E A

    1999-01-01

    The total absence of hormones such as cortisol or thyroxine causes death within weeks. Lack of estrogen or testosterone is followed by infertility and impaired sexual functioning. Relative deficiencies of almost all classical hormones have a substantial impact on quality of life (QOL). However, in contrast to virtually all aspects of metabolism, QOL is difficult to measure. Only recently have tests been developed to assess general QOL, whereas specific tests address those aspects of QOL affected only in specific situations or disease states. For example, in rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic disabling diseases, the use of measures of QOL to assess treatment modalities is almost routine. In diseases with overt metabolic disturbances attention is generally focused on changes in metabolic parameters and the issue of QOL is neglected. Although very few practising endocrinologists will not support the idea that they specialize in improving QOL, its assessment in patients with endocrinological disorders began only recently--in patients with growth hormone (GH) deficiency only 10 years ago. It became apparent that GH deficiency in adult life is unmistakably followed by changes in parameters that determine QOL. In adults with childhood-onset GH deficiency, the unemployment rate is higher and the marriage rate lower than in the general population. Another symbol of success in life, the possession of a driver's licence, is less frequently attained by these patients. Most patients with adult-onset GH deficiency score unfavourably in questionnaires such as the Nottingham Health Profile. GH substitution is now available on a scale large enough to enable studies to be made of the effects on QOL in adults. The first studies were reported in 1989. However, only in the last few years have studies appeared in which sufficient number of patients and sufficient length of treatment were reported to allow a more objective judgement of the effectiveness of GH substitution. Although

  6. Pituitary hormone responses to meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in panic disorder and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, R S; Wetzler, S; Asnis, G M; Kling, M A; Suckow, R F; van Praag, H M

    1991-04-01

    The present study reports adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and prolactin responses after oral administration of 0.25 mg/kg of the serotonin agonist, meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (MCPP), in patients with panic disorder (PD) and in healthy subjects. MCPP blood levels were similar for the two groups, but almost twice as high in males as in females. Female patients had augmented ACTH and prolactin release as compared to healthy females, while ACTH and prolactin release in male patients was similar to that of male controls. These results suggest that female PD patients have hypersensitive serotonin receptors. Moreover, they indicate that pharmacokinetic gender differences may affect challenge studies, and that different doses may be required to study neuroendocrine responses in males and females.

  7. Aged PROP1 deficient dwarf mice maintain ACTH production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor O Nasonkin

    Full Text Available Humans with PROP1 mutations have multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD that typically advance from growth insufficiency diagnosed in infancy to include more severe growth hormone (GH deficiency and progressive reduction in other anterior pituitary hormones, eventually including adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH deficiency and hypocortisolism. Congenital deficiencies of GH, prolactin, and thyroid stimulating hormone have been reported in the Prop1(null (Prop1(-/- and the Ames dwarf (Prop1(df/df mouse models, but corticotroph and pituitary adrenal axis function have not been thoroughly investigated. Here we report that the C57BL6 background sensitizes mutants to a wasting phenotype that causes approximately one third to die precipitously between weaning and adulthood, while remaining homozygotes live with no signs of illness. The wasting phenotype is associated with severe hypoglycemia. Circulating ACTH and corticosterone levels are elevated in juvenile and aged Prop1 mutants, indicating activation of the pituitary-adrenal axis. Despite this, young adult Prop1 deficient mice are capable of responding to restraint stress with further elevation of ACTH and corticosterone. Low blood glucose, an expected side effect of GH deficiency, is likely responsible for the elevated corticosterone level. These studies suggest that the mouse model differs from the human patients who display progressive hormone loss and hypocortisolism.

  8. MR imaging of pituitary dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashimada, Akio; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari; Mamiya, Toshio; Takahashi, Taku; Kamano, Tsuyoshi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Inoue, Yusuke (Saitama Medical School, Kawagoe (Japan). Medical Center)

    1993-02-01

    Pituitary MR imaging was performed in 32 patients with clinically diagnosed pituitary dwarfism and 12 normal controls. The patients were divided into two groups according to the severity of pituitary dwarfism based on endocrinological data. The two patients with severe dwarfism showed transection of the pituitary stalk, ectopic posterior lobe and atrophy of the anterior lobe on MR imaging, while the 27 patients with mild dwarfism showed no abnormal MR findings of the pituitary gland. The former group corresponds to typical pituitary dwarfism and the latter to partial GH deficiency, which was recently proposed as another type of pituitary dwarfism. In conclusion, pituitary MR imaging may differentiate partial GH deficiency from typical (stalk-transected) pituitary dwarfism. (author).

  9. Addison's disease concomitant with corticotropin deficiency and pituitary CRH resistance - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Krzysztof C; Malicka, Katarzyna; Dąbrowska, Katarzyna; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman was found to have a low morning ACTH concentration despite a history of Addison's disease. Past medical history: At the age of 23 years the subject developed Graves's disease, which was treated with radioiodine. At about the same time, she claimed to have two episodes of pancreatitis treated with cholecystectomy. About seven months later she was euthyroid on L-thyroxine (TSH 1.51 mIU/mL) but was admitted with hypotension, hyponatraemia (sodium 109 mmol/L), and low morning cortisol (119 nmol/L). Further investigations confirmed primary adrenal failure with ACTH concentration of 779 pg/mL (ref. range 0-60) prior to the dose of hydrocortisone. About nine years later she complained about tiredness. Clinically she was normotensive and not pigmented. BMI 22.3 kg/m². Periods were regular. ACTH concentration was surprisingly low (ACTH 8.53 pg/mL, ref. range 0-46), despite very low cortisol (3.37 nmol/L). She was admitted for further assessment. Pituitary MRI scan was unremarkable. An insulin tolerance test was performed and showed a clear increase of ACTH (from 15.2 to 165 pg/mL). There was, however, hardly any increase of ACTH after CRH stimulation (from 6.05 pg/mL to 10.2 pg/mL), thus demonstrating central CRH resistance. In summary, this patient developed secondary adrenal failure in the setting of previous Addison's disease. Interestingly, hypoglycaemia (but not CRH) provided a stimulus for ACTH release, thus demonstrating CRH resistance. The case confirms that besides CRH, other factors are responsible for stimulation of the ACTH-cortisol axis during insulin tolerance test.

  10. Dental Abnormalities in Pituitary Dwarfism: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Ferrante

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypopituitarism is a disorder caused by a reduced level of trophic hormones that may be consequent on different destructive processes. The clinical manifestations depend on the type of hormone involved. A deficiency of growth hormone (GH in children causes the lack of growth known as pituitary dwarfism. The case is reported of a patient with pituitary dwarfism, multiple dental anomalies, functional prosthetic problems, and a revision of the literature. She was subjected to prosthetic rehabilitation without surgical intervention, using zirconium substructures, thus eliminating the potential complications that may require trauma surgery. The therapeutic approach adopted led to excellent results and restored an aesthetic smile.

  11. Impaired nocifensive behaviours and mechanical hyperalgesia, but enhanced thermal allodynia in pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sándor, K; Kormos, V; Botz, B; Imreh, A; Bölcskei, K; Gaszner, B; Markovics, A; Szolcsányi, J; Shintani, N; Hashimoto, H; Baba, A; Reglodi, D; Helyes, Z

    2010-10-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP-38) and its receptors (PAC1 and VPAC) have been shown in the spinal dorsal horn, dorsal root ganglia and sensory nerve terminals. Data concerning the role of PACAP in central pain transmission are controversial and we have recently published its divergent peripheral effects on nociceptive processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate acute somatic and visceral nocifensive behaviours, partial sciatic nerve ligation-evoked chronic neuropathic, as well as resiniferatoxin-induced inflammatory thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in PACAP deficient (PACAP(-/-)) mice to elucidate its overall function in pain transmission. Neuronal activation was investigated with c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Paw lickings in the early (0-5 min) and late (20-45 min) phases of the formalin test were markedly reduced in PACAP(-/-) mice. Acetic acid-evoked abdominal contractions referring to acute visceral chemonociception was also significantly attenuated in PACAP knockout animals. In both models, the excitatory role of PACAP was supported by markedly greater c-Fos expression in the periaqueductal grey and the somatosensory cortex. In PACAP-deficient animals neuropathic mechanical hyperalgesia was absent, while c-Fos immunopositivity 20 days after the operation was significantly higher. In this chronic model, these neurons are likely to indicate the activation of secondary inhibitory pathways. Intraplantarly injected resiniferatoxin-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia involving both peripheral and central processes was decreased, but thermal allodynia mediated by only peripheral mechanisms was increased in PACAP(-/-) mice. These data clearly demonstrate an overall excitatory role of PACAP in pain transmission originating from both exteroceptive and interoceptive areas, it is also involved in central sensitization. This can be explained by the signal transduction mechanisms of its identified receptors, both PAC1 and VPAC

  12. Different effects of continuous and intermittent patterns of growth hormone administration on lipoprotein levels in growth hormone-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Lemming, Lone; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde

    1998-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) is a risk marker for the development of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease. Growth hormone (GH) administration to GH-deficient (GHD) adults increases serum Lp(a) concentrations, and the levels of Lp(a) and GH are correlated in patients...... received GH in random order as: (1) continuous subcutaneous (s.c.) infusion, and (2) daily s.c. injections in the evening for 1 month each. The patients were studied during steady-state conditions at the end of each treatment period. RESULTS: In study A Lp(a) levels increased significantly following...

  13. What Are Pituitary Tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grow and to make steroid hormones (such as cortisol). Too much ACTH from the pituitary causes Cushing’s ... Cancer Atlas Press Room Cancer Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook Instagram Cancer Information, ...

  14. 甲状腺激素与下丘脑-垂体-性腺轴%Thyroid Hormone and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗兰; 牛敏; 高政南

    2016-01-01

    生殖功能的调节主要是由下丘脑-垂体-性腺轴各环节共同完成,适量的甲状腺激素有助于维持垂体-性腺轴的稳定。一旦甲状腺功能发生紊乱,将会影响性激素分泌水平及性腺功能,造成不孕不育等,给人们的生活带来了极大的不便。同时甲状腺功能异常引起的代谢紊乱也会进一步增加不孕不育的风险。本文将对TH与下丘脑-垂体-性腺轴的关系进行简单阐述。%The regulation of reproductive function is mainly completed by the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal axis of each link together, the amount of thyroid hormone helps to maintain the stability of the pituitary gonadal axis. Once the thyroid function is disorder, it will affect the level of sex hormone secretion and gonadal function, causing infertility, bringing great inconvenience to people's life. At the same time, metabolic disorder caused by abnormal thyroid function will further increase the risk of infertility. This article briefly elaborates on the relationship between TH and the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal axis.

  15. Receptors of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Ovarian-Axis Hormone in Uterine Myomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Plewka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the expression of GnRH, FSH, LH, ER-α, ER-β, and PR receptors was examined in uterine myomas of women in reproductive and perimenopausal age. In cases of GnRH and tropic hormones a membranous and cytoplasmic immunohistochemical reaction was detected, in cases of ER-α and PR the reaction was located in cell nucleus, and in the case of ER-β it manifested also a cytoplasmic location. In some of the examined cases the expression was detected in endometrium, myocytes, and endothelium of blood vessels, in uterine glands and myoma cells. In myometrium the level of GnRH and LH receptors increases with age, whereas the level of progesterone and both estrogen receptors decreases. In myomas of women in reproductive age, independently of their size, expression of GnRH, FSH, and LH receptors was more pronounced than in myometrium. In women of perimenopausal age, independently of myoma size, expression of LH and estrogen α receptors was higher while expression of GnRH receptors was lower than in myometrium. FSH receptor expression was not observed. Expression of estrogen receptor β was not affected by age of the woman or size of myoma. Analysis of obtained results indicates on existing in small myomas local feedback axis between GnRH-LH-progesterone.

  16. An unusual combination of Klinefelter syndrome and growth hormone deficiency in a prepubertal child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Jayanthy; Nagasatyavani, Mudiganti; Venkateswarlu, Javvadii; Nagender, Jakka

    2014-09-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is the most common chromosomal aneuploidy in males. It is very difficult to diagnose this disorder in childhood due to absence of significant manifestations before puberty. These patients usually present with tall stature. We report a case of KS with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency. The boy's height was below the 3rd centile with significant delay in bone age. He responded well to growth hormone injections. In view of mental subnormality karyotyping was done, which revealed KS (47XXY).

  17. Effect of copper deficiency on the content and secretion of pancreatic islet hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhathena, S.J.; Voyles, N.R.; Timmers, K.I.; Fields, M.; Kennedy, B.W.; Recant, L.

    1986-03-01

    Experimental copper (Cu) deficiency in rats is characterized by glucose intolerance and hyperlipemia. Its severity is increased by dietary fructose (F) as compared to starch (S). Since islet hormones are intimately involved in carbohydrate metabolism the authors studied the effects of Cu deficiency on their content and secretion. Rats were fed Cu deficient (CuD) (0.6 ..mu..g Cu/g) or Cu supplemented (6.0 ..mu..g Cu/g) diets with either 62% F or S for 7 weeks after weaning. Feeding CuD diets decreased plasma insulin (I) (P < 0.001) but not plasma glucagon (G). F feeding compared to S magnified the effects of Cu deficiency. Total pancreatic content of I in CuD rats was increased threefold (P < 0.001). Total somatostatin content increased significantly only in the pancreas of CuD rats fed F. Although total G content was not altered in CuD rats, when G was expressed per g protein or g wet weight, significant increases were found in CuD rats fed F. Thus, of the islet hormones, the major effect of Cu deficiency was on I. When pancreata were perfused in vitro with high glucose, pancreas from CuD rats had reduced insulin response. Thus, cellular functions dependent on Cu are involved in maintaining the ability of the islets of Langerhans to secrete I in a normal fashion.

  18. Evaluation of Hydro-alcoholic Extract of Peganum harmala on Pituitary-thyroid Hormones in Adult Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E HOssini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objectives: Peganum harmala from the Jigo Phalluses family has compounds such as: alkaloid,saponine steroid and lignin which is used as a traditional medicine witht antibacterial, anti tumor, inhibition of MAO enzyme, and stimulation of the nerve system. It also serves as a modulator to endocrine activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the hydro-alcoholic extract of Peganum harmala on plasma levels of pituitary-thyroid’s hormones of adult rats. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study, which was conducted at Yasuj University of Medical sciences in 2009, 50 adult Mala rats with the approximate weight of 260+30 grams were divided into 5 groups: the control group, the sham group, and 3 experimental groups. The control group did not take any medicine. The sham group received 1 mL of distilled water daily for 17 consecutive days. The experimental groups took 90 mg/kg, 180mg/kg, or 270 mg/kg of Peganum harmala extract daily respectively for 17 consecutive days. In the 18th day, by collecting the blood samples of the animals, plasma level of TSH, T4, and T3 was measured using radioimmunoassay method. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: This study revealed that the minimum and maximum dose of the Peganum harmala extract reduces the TSH level and average and maximum dose of the extract significantly reduces the level of T4 and T3 in rats. Conclusion: results of this study indicate that by further study the Peganum harmala extract might be used for treatment hyperthyroidism. However further study is needed to explore this concept.

  19. Estrogenic effects of the new opioid antagonist naltrexone-estrone azine on pituitary luteinizing hormone secretion in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armeanu, M C; van Dieten, J A; Kolb, V M; Schoemaker, J; de Koning, J

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the new opioid antagonist naltrexone-estrone azine (EH-NX) on pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in the ovariectomized rat was studied. EH-NX is a hybrid between the steroid component estrone and the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NX). It is a potent and long-acting opioid antagonist in vitro and in vivo, but its effect upon in vivo LH secretion has not been tested before. The aims of the study were to investigate whether, unlike naltrexone, EH-NX can stimulate LH secretion without the need of additional estrogen pretreatment and whether EH-NX has peripheral estrogenic effects upon the uterine weight, when administered chronically to long-term ovariectomized rats. Female rats were injected subcutaneously with EH-NX 21 days after ovariectomy. The effects of EH-NX injections on LH secretion were compared to the effects of NX and estrone hydrazone (EH) alone, or in combination, with or without estradiol-benzoate (EB) pretreatment. Inhibition of LH secretion and uterine proliferation were observed in rats treated chronically with EH-NX in dosages of 0.250 mg/kg bw and higher. These effects were similar to those caused by EH and EB. In short-term OVX rats EH-NX appeared to act faster than EH. In contrast to NX, no stimulatory effect on LH secretion was seen with EH-NX in EB primed OVX rats. These results surprisingly demonstrate that EH-NX behaves like an estrogen and not like an opioid antagonist. The unexpected pharmacological profile of this new drug may open up doors for several medical applications.

  20. Repetitive Stimulation of the Pituitary with Growth-Hormone-Releasing Hormone Alters the Proportion of 22 and 20 Kilodalton Human-Growth Hormone Released

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C. Hindmarsh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. 20 Kilodalton-hGH (20 K-hGH is the second most abundant pituitary GH variant after 22 K-hGH. In the steady state the proportion of 20 : 22 K-hGH appears constant; does this proportion change with repetitive somatotroph stimulation? Methods. Forty adult males were randomised to receive a GHRH(1–29NH2 bolus (0.5 μg/kg (n=20 or 1.0 μg/kg (n=20, preceded or followed by a saline bolus, 1 week apart. Four to six weeks later, 10 subjects received 0.5 μg/kg GHRH(1–29NH2 at 0, 60, 120, and 180 minutes. Clearance rate of 22 and 20 K-hGH was measured in 10 subjects. Results. Total amount/proportion of 22 K-hGH/20 K-hGH secreted was similar for both GHRH(1–29NH2 doses. Repetitive stimulation reduced the amount of 22 K-hGH released whereas the amount of 20 K-hGH did not change significantly leading to an increase in the proportion of 20 K-hGH (P=.05. Half-life of 20 and 22 K-hGH were not significantly different (P=.55. Conclusions. Repetitive stimulation of the somatotroph may alter the proportion of GH variant released.

  1. Repetitive Stimulation of the Pituitary with Growth-Hormone-Releasing Hormone Alters the Proportion of 22 and 20 Kilodalton Human-Growth Hormone Released

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson IainCAF

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. 20 Kilodalton-hGH (20 K-hGH is the second most abundant pituitary GH variant after 22 K-hGH. In the steady state the proportion of 20 : 22 K-hGH appears constant; does this proportion change with repetitive somatotroph stimulation? Methods. Forty adult males were randomised to receive a GHRH(1–29 bolus   ( or   (, preceded or followed by a saline bolus, 1 week apart. Four to six weeks later, 10 subjects received   GHRH(1–29 at 0, 60, 120, and 180 minutes. Clearance rate of 22 and 20 K-hGH was measured in 10 subjects. Results. Total amount/proportion of 22 K-hGH/20 K-hGH secreted was similar for both GHRH(1–29 doses. Repetitive stimulation reduced the amount of 22 K-hGH released whereas the amount of 20 K-hGH did not change significantly leading to an increase in the proportion of 20 K-hGH . Half-life of 20 and 22 K-hGH were not significantly different . Conclusions. Repetitive stimulation of the somatotroph may alter the proportion of GH variant released.

  2. No Improvement of Adult Height in Non-growth Hormone (GH) Deficient Short Children with GH Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Fujieda, Kenji; Yokoya, Susumu; Shimatsu, Akira; Tachibana, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Tanizawa, Takakuni; Teramoto, Akira; Nagai, Toshiro; Nishi, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Hanew, Kunihiko; Fujita, Keinosuke; Horikawa, Reiko; Takada, Goro

    2006-01-01

    It is still in doubt whether the standard-dose growth hormone (GH) used in Japan (0.5 IU/kg/week, 0.167 mg/kg/week) for growth hormone deficiency is effective for achieving significant adult height improvement in non-growth hormone deficient (non-GHD) short children. We compared the growth of GH-treated non-GHD short children with that of untreated short children to examine the effect of standard-dose GH treatment on non-GHD short children. GH treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (...

  3. Negative regulation of human growth hormone gene expression by insulin is dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor binding in primary non-tumor pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Cattini, Peter A

    2012-09-28

    Insulin controls growth hormone (GH) production at multiple levels, including via a direct effect on pituitary somatotrophs. There are no data, however, on the regulation of the intact human (h) GH gene (hGH1) by insulin in non-tumor pituitary cells, but the proximal promoter region (nucleotides -496/+1) responds negatively to insulin in transfected pituitary tumor cells. A DNA-protein interaction was also induced by insulin at nucleotides -308/-235. Here, we confirmed the presence of a hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) binding site within these sequences (-264/-259) and investigated whether HIF-1 is associated with insulin regulation of "endogenous" hGH1. In the absence of primary human pituitary cells, transgenic mice expressing the intact hGH locus in a somatotroph-specific manner were generated. A significant and dose-dependent decrease in hGH and mouse GH RNA levels was detected in primary pituitary cell cultures from these mice with insulin treatment. Increasing HIF-1α availability with a hypoxia mimetic significantly decreased hGH RNA levels and was accompanied by recruitment of HIF-1α to the hGH1 promoter in situ as seen with insulin. Both inhibition of HIF-1 DNA binding by echinomycin and RNA interference of HIF-1α synthesis blunted the negative effect of insulin on hGH1 but not mGH. The insulin response is also sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibition/trichostatin A and associated with a decrease in H3/H4 hyperacetylation in the proximal hGH1 promoter region. These data are consistent with HIF-1-dependent down-regulation of hGH1 by insulin via chromatin remodeling specifically in the proximal promoter region.

  4. Marked changes of arginine vasopressin, oxytocin, and corticotropin-releasing hormone in hypophysial portal plasma after pituitary stalk damage in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makara, G B; Sutton, S; Otto, S; Plotsky, P M

    1995-05-01

    Mechanical compression of the pituitary stalk with the help of a blunt stereotaxic knife results in posterior pituitary denervation (PPD) and sprouting proximal to the injury, leading to formation of an ectopic neurohypophysis in the stalk. This provides an experimental model for those cases in which traumatic damage severs the nerve fibers to the neural lobe but does not obliterate the hypophysial-portal circulation. The effect of PPD on the hypophysial-portal concentration profile of putative ACTH secretagogues as well as basal and stimulated ACTH secretion in vitro were investigated at varying times after PPD. The contents of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) in extracts of the stalk median eminence 1 week after PPD were markedly elevated, whereas corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) content was unaffected. Levels of these three neuropeptides in hypophysial-portal blood collected under anesthesia from the proximal stump of the transected stalk (or the ectopic neural lobe) were measured at weekly intervals in groups of rats after sham or PPD surgery. Hypophysial-portal AVP levels showed a monotonic increase with time after PPD from a 1.8-fold elevation at 1 week post-PPD to a maximum concentration 6-fold greater than that in sham groups at 4 weeks post-PPD. Portal plasma OT levels also exhibited extreme elevation. In contrast, portal plasma CRH levels showed an initial 72% decline 1 week post-PPD. We suggest that mechanical damage to the pituitary stalk and the subsequent sprouting redirected secretion of AVP and OT from the neural lobe to the pituitary stalk. This caused sustained elevations of portal plasma concentrations of AVP and OT. The resulting tonic exposure to AVP and/or OT may down-regulate anterior pituitary receptors to these neurohypophyseal peptides and indirectly decrease CRH release into the portal circulation.

  5. 47,+(9q-) in unrelated three children with plasma growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, H; Shimazaki, M; Takeuchi, T; Hayakawa, Y; Oura, T

    1976-03-12

    Marker chromosomes carried by unrelated 3 cases were identified as a part of No. 9 chromosome through the analysis of the chromatid fine structure after trypsin-giemsa treatment. They showed characteristic features of that 9p trisomic syndrome which were described by Rethoré et al. (1973). In addition to those features, some clinical and laboratory findings on growth hormon deficiency were disclosed in this report.

  6. NFKB2 mutation in common variable immunodeficiency and isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Chuan; Wang, Fen; Tong, Anli; Xiao-qian ZHANG; Song, Hong-Mei; Liu, Zheng-Yin; Lyu, Wei; Liu, Yue-Hua; XIA, Wei-bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) with central adrenal insufficiency is a recently defined clinical syndrome caused by mutations in the nuclear factor kappa-B subunit 2 (NFKB2) gene. We present the first case of NFKB2 mutation in Asian population. Methods and Results An 18-year-old Chinese female with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency was admitted due to adrenal crisis and pneumonia. She had a history of recurrent respiratory infections since childhood an...

  7. Growth Hormone Deficiency and Lysinuric Protein Intolerance: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Evelina, Maines; Grazia, Morandi; Francesca, Olivieri; Marta, Camilot; Paolo, Cavarzere; Rossella, Gaudino; Franco, Antoniazzi; Andrea, Bordugo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI; MIM# 222700) is a rare metabolic disorder caused by a defective cationic amino acids (CAA) membrane transport leading to decreased circulating plasma CAA levels and resulting in dysfunction of the urea cycle. Short stature is commonly observed in children with LPI and has been associated with protein malnutrition. A correlation between LPI and growth hormone deficiency (GHD) has also been postulated because of the known interaction between the A...

  8. STUDY OF CLINICAL AND ENDOCRINE PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH PITUITARY TUMOURS ATTENDING A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binoy Kumar Mohanty

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pituitary tumours are relatively common endocrine tumours. They can present with symptoms related to hormone excess or hormone deficiency. They can also present with compressive symptoms like visual problems and headache. OBJECTIVE To study the various clinical presentations and endocrine profile of patients presenting with pituitary tumours to a tertiary care hospital. DESIGN Cross sectional study. MATERIAL AND METHODS We collected and analysed the clinical data including hormonal status of 33 consecutive patients who presented to our department from March 2014 to February 2016 for evaluation of pituitary tumours. RESULTS Majority of the subjects studied belonged to 40-50 years group (33.34%.The most common type of pituitary tumour in our population was non-functioning pituitary tumours (45.45%. The next common cause was somatotroph adenoma (27.27% followed by prolactinoma (15.15% and corticotroph adenomas (12.13%. There was significant male predominance (60.60% among total cases. Among all patients, headache (54.54% was most common presentation followed by features related to hormone excess (51.51%. CONCLUSIONS Pituitary tumours can present with variety of symptoms. A detailed endocrine workup is essential in each case to reach at correct diagnosis. In our cohort, non-functioning pituitary tumour was the most common tumour subtype.

  9. Atrial fibrillation associated with a thyroid stimulating hormone-secreting adenoma of the pituitary gland leading to a presentation of acute cardiac decompensation: A case report

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    George Jyothis T

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hyperthyroidism is a well established cause of atrial fibrillation (AF. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone-secreting pituitary tumours are rare causes of pituitary hyperthyroidism. Whilst pituitary causes of hyperthyroidism are much less common than primary thyroid pathology, establishing a clear aetiology is critical in minimising complications and providing appropriate treatment. Measuring Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH alone to screen for hyperthyroidism may be insufficient to appropriately evaluate the thyroid status in such cases. Case presentation A 63-year-old Caucasian man, previously fit and well, presented with a five-day history of shortness of breath associated with wheeze and dry cough. He denied symptoms of hyperthyroidism and his family, social and past history were unremarkable. Initial investigation was in keeping with a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF with fast ventricular response leading to cardiac decompensation. TSH 6.2 (Normal Range = 0.40 – 4.00 mU/L, Free T3 of 12.5 (4.00 – 6.8 pmol/L and Free T4 51(10–30 pmol/L. Heterophilic antibodies were ruled out. Testosterone was elevated at 43.10 (Normal range: 10.00 – 31.00 nmol/L with an elevated FSH, 18.1 (1.0–7.0 U/L and elevated LH, 12.4 (1.0–8.0 U/L. Growth Hormone, IGF-1 and prolactin were normal. MRI showed a 2.4 cm pituitary macroadenoma. Visual field tests showed a right inferotemporal defect. While awaiting neurosurgical removal of the tumour, the patient was commenced on antithyroid medication (carbimazole and maintained on this until successful trans-sphenoidal excision of the macroadenoma had been performed. AF persisted post-operatively, but was electrically cardioverted subsequently and he remains in sinus rhythm at twelve months follow-up off all treatment. Conclusion This case reiterates the need to evaluate thyroid function in all patients presenting with atrial fibrillation. TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas must be considered

  10. An unusual case of hypopituitarism and transient thyrotoxicosis following asymptomatic pituitary apoplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masanori; Murakami, Miho; Ueda, Harumi; Miyata, Misaki; Takahashi, Norio; Oiso, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Although pituitary function is often impaired in pituitary apoplexy, the development of thyrotoxicosis is rare. We describe an unusual case of hypopituitarism due to pituitary apoplexy coexisting with transient hyperthyroidism. A 74-year-old woman presented with severe fatigue, palpitation, appetite loss, hypotension, and hyponatremia. Endocrine studies showed hyperthyroidism and anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies. A magnetic resonance imaging suggested recent-onset pituitary apoplexy in a pituitary tumor, although the patient had no apoplectic symptoms such as headache and visual disturbance. Thyrotoxicosis and adrenal insufficiency worsened her general condition. Glucocorticoid supplementation improved her clinical symptoms and hyponatremia. Serum anti-thyrotropin receptor and thyroid-stimulating antibody titers were negative, and her thyroid function was spontaneously normalized without antithyroid medication, suggesting painless thyroiditis. Thereafter, her thyroid function decreased because of central hypothyroidism and 75 µg of levothyroxine was needed to maintain thyroid function at the euthyroid stage. The pituitary mass was surgically removed and an old hematoma was detected in the specimen. Considering that painless thyroiditis develops as a result of an autoimmune process, an immune rebound mechanism due to adrenal insufficiency probably caused painless thyroiditis. Although the most common type of thyroid disorder in pituitary apoplexy is central hypothyroidism, thyrotoxicosis caused by painless thyroiditis should be considered even if the patient has pituitary deficiencies. Because thyrotoxicosis with adrenal insufficiency poses a high risk for a life-threatening adrenal crisis, prompt diagnosis and treatment are critical.

  11. Pituitary Adenoma as a Rare Form of Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency. A Case Report

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    Ana María León Blasco

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenomas are benign tumors arising from one of the five cell types in the anterior pituitary. Secondary adrenal insufficiency occurs when the adrenal glands do not produce hormones due to the lack of pituary adrenocorticotropic hormone or hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor. The case of a 37-year-old female patient who started developing muscle twitching in legs and arms, muscular weakness, fatigue, muscle aches, severe and throbbing hemicrania on the right side, among other symptoms, a year ago is presented. Several tests were performed (cortisol level, adrenocorticotropic hormone, calcium and phosphorus in blood and urine, magnetic resonance imaging of the skull, leading to the diagnosis of pituitary adenoma with isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency and secondary adrenal insufficiency. Treatment with steroids and calcium supplements ensured a satisfactory recovery.

  12. Pathobiology and oncogenesis of pituitary corticotroph adenomas in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) or Cushing's disease is a common endocrinopathy in the elderly dog caused by a pituitary adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) producing tumor (corticotroph adenoma) of unknown pathogenesis. Surgical removal of the pituitary tumor is applied as routine

  13. Justified and unjustified use of growth hormone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGrowth hormone (GH) replacement therapy for children and adults with proven GH deficiency due to a pituitary disorder has become an accepted therapy with proven efficacy. GH is increasingly suggested, however, as a potential treatment for frailty, osteoporosis, morbid o

  14. Common soil of smoking-associated and hormone-related cancers: estrogen deficiency

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    Zsuzsanna Suba

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of non-smoker, non-drinker elderly postmenopausal female patients among smokingassociated oral cancer cases raised the plausible idea: estrogen deficiency maybe a cancer risk factor. On the other hand, the extremely rare cases of young women with oral cancer regularly exhibited hormonal disorders, such as irregular menstrual cycles and infertility. Furthermore, in the history of middle-aged female, oral cancer cases a primary ovarian failure or complete hysterectomy was a conspicuously frequent finding suggestive of an estrogen deficient milieu. There were many striking contradictions concerning the associations of female sexual steroids and cancer risk as well. Until now, breast and endometrial cancers were regarded as typically estrogen-induced tumors, particularly in postmenopausal cases. However, unexplained beneficial anti-cancer effects of hormonereplacement therapy were reported against cancers at several sites, even tumors of the highly hormone-responsive organs. Re-evaluation of results of the experimental and epidemiological studies, which endeavored to justify the carcinogenic capacity of estrogen, exhibited many shortcomings and controversies. The new findings both on smoking associated and on hormone related cancers added up to the same conversion; not estrogen but rather its deficiency might provoke cancer initiation. Thorough review of the literary data justified that the exquisite regulatory capacity of estrogen and its surveillance on growth, development, differentiation, and metabolism are indispensable, whereas an estrogen-deficient milieu may induce a breakdown in gene-regulation. Recognition of the anticancer capacity of estrogen may provide new insights into the etiology of malignancies and leads to new strategies for cancer prevention and cure.

  15. Multiple intracellular signallings involved in regulation of on channels by GH releasing or inhibitory hormones in pituitary somatotropes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Influx of Ca2- via Ca2+ channels is the major step triggering exocytosis of pituitary somatotropes to release growth hormone (GH). Voltage-gated Ca2+ and K+ channels, the primary determinants of the influx of Ca2+ in somatotropes, are regulated by GH-releasing hornone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SRIF) through G protein-coupled signalling systems. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques, the changes of the Ca2+ and K+ currents in primary cultured somatotropes were recorded and signalling systems were studied using pharmacological reagents and intracellular dialysis of non-permeable molecules including antibodies and antisense oligonucleotides. GHRH increased both L-and T-types Ca2+ currents and decreased transient (I4) and delayed rectified (Ik) K+ currents. The increase in Ca2+ currents by GHRH was mediated by cAMP/protein kinase A system but the decrease in K+ currents required normal function of protein kinase C system. The GHRH-induced alteration of Ca2+ and K+ currents augments the influx of Ca2+ , leading to an increase in the [ Ca2+ ]i and the GH secretion. In contrary, a significant reduction in Ca2+ currents and increase in K currents were obtained in response to SRIF. The ion channel response to SRIF was demonstrated as a membrane delimited pathway and can be recorded by classic whole-cell configuration, Intracellular dialysis of anti-αi3 antibodies attenuated the increase in K + currents by SRIF whereas anti-αo antibodies blocked the reduction in the Ca2+ current by SRIF. Dialysis of antisense oligonucleotides specific for αo2 sub-units also attenuated the inhibition of SRIF on the Ca2+current. The Gi3 protein mediated the increase in K + currents and the Go2 protein mediated the reduction in the Ca2 +current by SRIF. The SRIF-induced alteration of Ca2 + and K + currents diminished the influx of Ca2+ , leading to a decrease in the [ Ca2+ ]i and the GH secretion. It is therefore concluded that multiple signalling systems are employed in the ion channel

  16. Reproductive, Growth Performance and Nutrient Utilization of Heterobranchus bidorsalis (Geoffroy, 1809 and its Hybrid Clariabranchus Induced with Synthetic Hormone and Pituitary Gland of Heterobranchus bidorsalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Anetekhai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the reproductive performance, growth rate and nutrient utilization capacities of pure breed Heterobranchus bidorsalis (H. bidorsalis ? x H. bidorsalis ? and its hybrid (H. bidorsalis ? x C. gariepinus ? (Clariabranchus induced with synthetic hormone (ovaprim and pituitary of male and female Heterobranchus bidorsalis. In this study, 3 female Heterobranchus bidorsalis, 3 male Heterobranchus bidorsalis and 3 male Clarias gariepinus were used for the experiment. One female H. bidorsalis induced with ovaprim produced eggs which were divided into two equal halves. Each half was fertilized separately by milt from H. bidorsalis and C. gariepinus to produce pure breed and hybrid, respectively. A similar crossing was done for the female H. bidorsalis induced with Male Pituitary Extract (MPE and Female Pituitary Extract (FPE. Percentage fertilization and hatching rate of pure breed induced with ovaprim were significantly (p<0.05 higher than the other genetic crosses. The highest values for weight gain (5.461.58 g, average daily growth (0.390.11 g and specific growth rate (1.040.16%/day occurred in pure breed induced with MPE. The lowest values for these growth parameters were obtained in the hybrid induced with FPE. Feed intake, protein intake, feed conversion ratio and protein efficiency ratio varied significantly (p<0.05 among the treatments. This study has shown that the pure breeds and hybrids induced with ovaprim and MPE performed better than those induced with FPE. Therefore, they are recommended for commercial aquaculture.

  17. 垂体非生长激素瘤病人术后生长激素储备功能观察%OBSERVATION ON THE RESERVED FUNCTION OF PITUITARY GROWTH HORMONE IN PATIENTS AFTER SURGERY FOR NON-SOMATOTROPHINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯丕秀; 王新凤; 袁鹰

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the reserved function of pituitary growth hormone (GH) in patients after surgery for non-somatotrophinoma (NSP).Methods Insulin tolerance test (ITT) was done in 23 patients after six months of surgery for NSP.Serum levels of glucose and GH were measured 30 min before and 0, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after the test.The blood sample taken 30 min before ITT was also used to detect the levels of IGF-Ⅰ and IGFBP-3.Results The average level of IGF-Ⅰwas (0.32±0.14) g/L, which was negatively correlated with the age (r=-0.555, P<0.05), that of IGFBP-3 was (5.92±1.15) g/L, not correlated with the age (r=0.036,P>0.05).The average peak value of GH was (3.92 ± 4.71) μg/L,with the peak value over 5.0μg/L in four patients, and that of the rest 19 was under 5.0 μg/L, of whom, 15 patients had the GH peak value under 3.0μg/L.In those with the GH peak value under 5.0 μg/L, eight had the IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in range of normal values.The peak value of GH was not correlated with the lowest level of glucose (r=-0.352, P>0.05).Conclusion Most patients with NSP will develop deficiency or severe deficiency of GH after surgery, for those with hypofunction of anterior pituitary after surgery for pituitary tumor, the GH reserved function assessment is needed.Besides routine supply of glucocorticosteroid and thyroid hormone, for those with deficiency or severe deficiency of GH, a long-term of GH-substitution therapy should be highly considered.%目的 了解垂体非生长激素瘤病人术后生长激素(GH)储备功能状况.方法 对23例垂体非生长激素瘤术后6个月以上病人行胰岛素耐量试验(ITT),在试验前30 min及试验后0、30、45、60、90、120 min分别采血测葡萄糖(GLU)和GH,试验前30 min的血标本加测胰岛素样生长因子-1(IGF-Ⅰ)和胰岛素样生长因子结合蛋白-3(IGFBP-3).结果 垂体非生长激素瘤病人术后IGF-Ⅰ的浓度平均为(0.32±0.14)g/L,与年龄呈负相关关系(r=-0.555,P0

  18. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium metabolism in patients with human growth hormone deficiency or acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, K; Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Kihara, M; Ohta, M; Sakoda, K; Uozumi, T; Usui, T

    1985-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate trace metal metabolism in patients with known abnormalities of human growth hormone (hGH). The mean concentration of zinc in plasma and urine decreased in patients with hGH deficiency after hGH injection, whereas, after adenomectomy, in patients with acromegaly, zinc increased in plasma, remained the same in erythrocytes, and decreased in urine. There was a negative correlation between plasma zinc and serum hGH levels and a positive correlation between urinary zinc excretion and serum hGH levels in acromegaly. In hGH deficiency, the copper content remained unchanged in plasma and erythrocytes and rose in urine after treatment; however, in acromegaly, the copper content increased in plasma and remained unchanged in erythrocytes and urine after surgery. The mean concentration of erythrocyte manganese did not change significantly after treatment in patients with hGH deficiency or acromegaly, but the pre-hGH treatment level of erythrocyte manganese in hGH deficiency was lower than in the controls. Plasma selenium concentrations were decreased in hGH deficiency and increased in acromegaly patients after therapy. These results suggest that hGH affects the metabolism of zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium.

  19. Effects of aerobic exercise on ectopic lipids in patients with growth hormone deficiency before and after growth hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Emanuel R; Egger, Andrea; Allemann, Sabin; Buehler, Tania; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2016-01-21

    Growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) increases exercise capacity and insulin resistance while it decreases fat mass in growth hormone-deficient patients (GHD). Ectopic lipids (intramyocellular (IMCL) and intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL) are related to insulin resistance. The effect of GHRT on ectopic lipids is unknown. It is hypothesized that exercise-induced utilization of ectopic lipids is significantly decreased in GHD patients and normalized by GHRT. GHD (4 females, 6 males) and age/gender/waist-matched control subjects (CS) were studied. VO2max was assessed on a treadmill and insulin sensitivity determined by a two-step hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) fat were quantified by MR-imaging. IHCL and IMCL were measured before and after a 2 h exercise at 50-60% of VO2max using MR-spectroscopy (∆IMCL, ∆IHCL). Identical investigations were performed after 6 months of GHRT. VO2max was similar in GHD and CS and significantly increased after GHRT; GHRT significantly decreased SAT and VAT. 2 h-exercise resulted in a decrease in IMCL (significant in CS and GHRT) and a significant increase in IHCL in CS and GHD pre and post GHRT. GHRT didn't significantly impact on ∆IMCL and ∆IHCL. We conclude that aerobic exercise affects ectopic lipids in patients and controls. GHRT increases exercise capacity without influencing ectopic lipids.

  20. A five year prospective investigation of anterior pituitary function after traumatic brain injury: is hypopituitarism long-term after head trauma associated with autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, Fatih; De Bellis, Annamaria; Ulutabanca, Halil; Bizzarro, Antonio; Sinisi, Antonio A; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Amoresano Paglionico, Vanda; Dalla Mora, Liliana; Selcuklu, Ahmed; Unluhizarci, Kursad; Casanueva, Felipe F; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2013-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been recently recognized as a common cause of pituitary dysfunction. However, there are not sufficient numbers of prospective studies to understand the natural history of TBI induced hypopituitarism. The aim was to report the results of five years' prospective follow-up of anterior pituitary function in patients with mild, moderate and severe TBI. Moreover, we have prospectively investigated the associations between TBI induced hypopituitarism and presence of anti-hypothalamus antibodies (AHA) and anti-pituitary antibodies (APA). Twenty five patients (20 men, five women) were included who were prospectively evaluated 12 months and five years after TBI, and 17 of them also had a third-year evaluation. Growth hormone (GH) deficiency is the most common pituitary hormone deficit at one, three, and five years after TBI. Although most of the pituitary hormone deficiencies improve over time, there were substantial percentages of pituitary hormone deficiencies at the fifth year (28% GH, 4% adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH], and 4% gonadotropin deficiencies). Pituitary dysfunction was significantly higher in strongly AHA- and APA-positive (titers ≥1/16) patients at the fifth year. In patients with mild and moderate TBI, ACTH and GH deficiencies may improve over time in a considerable number of patients but, although rarely, may also worsen over the five-year period. However in severe TBI, ACTH and GH status of the patients at the first year evaluation persisted at the fifth year. Therefore, screening pituitary function after TBI for five years is important, especially in patients with mild TBI. Moreover, close strong associations between the presence of high titers of APA and/or AHA and hypopituitarism at the fifth year were shown for the first time.

  1. Zinc deficiency (ZD) without starvation affects thyroid hormone metabolism of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukaski, H.C.; Smith, S.M.; Hall, C.B.; Bucher, D.R. (Dept. of Agriculture, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Young rats fed diets severely deficient in Zn exhibit impaired growth and endocrine function. These hormone effects may be confounded by cyclical feeding and starvation. To examine the effects of zinc deficiency (ZD) with and without starvation, 40 male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a semipurified diet containing all essential nutrients and 30 ppm Zn until they weighed 150 g, then were matched by weight into four groups and were fed one of the following diets for 28d: ad lib control Zn diet, marginal ZD diet, severe ZD diet, and C diet pair-fed (PF) in amounts consumed by matched ZD1 rat. Food intake was depressed in ZD1; body weights were reduced in ZD1 and PF. There was no difference in either food intake or weight gain between C and ZD6. ZD reduced liver and femur Zn concentrations. Plasma thyroxine (T{sub 4}) concentration was greater in ZD6 then ZD1 or PF, but less than C; triodothyronine concentration was less in PF than C, but similar to ZD1 and ZD6. Hepatic T{sub 4}-5{prime}-deiodinase activity was greater in ZD6 than ZD1 or PF, but less than C. These findings indicate that altered thyroid hormone metabolism of severe ZD is related to Zn intake and starvation, whereas ZD uncomplicated by starvation affects peripheral deiodination of T{sub 4}, and suggests altered rates of thyroid hormone synthesis or degradation.

  2. Pituitary aspergillosis abscess in an immunocompetent black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pituitary aspergillosis abscess in an immunocompetent black woman. ... female patient showed up with amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome with infertility for several years. The CT Findings and hormonal studies strongly suggested pituitary ...

  3. Favorable Impacts of Growth Hormone (GH) Replacement Therapy on Atherogenic Risks in Japanese Children with GH Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kohno, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Fujieda, Kenji; Chihara, Kazuo; Seino, Yoshiki; Irie, Minoru; Takano, Kazue

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) affects body composition and atherogenic risk factors. Severe hyperlipidemia may develop in GH-deficient adults as a consequence of continuous GH deficiency. We investigated changes in lipid profiles in 158 Japanese children (103 boys and 55 girls) with GH deficiency who had been enrolled in the Pfizer International Growth Database Japan during 3 yr of GH replacement therapy to evaluate whether GH treatment has beneficial effects on atherogenic risk factors. Total choleste...

  4. Prospective investigation of pituitary functions in patients with acute infectious meningitis: is acute meningitis induced pituitary dysfunction associated with autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, F; De Bellis, A; Teksahin, H; Alp, E; Bizzarro, A; Sinisi, A A; Bellastella, G; Paglionico, V A; Bellastella, A; Unluhizarci, K; Doganay, M; Kelestimur, F

    2012-12-01

    Previous case reports and retrospective studies suggest that pituitary dysfunction may occur after acute bacterial or viral meningitis. In this prospective study we assessed the pituitary functions, lipid profile and anthropometric measures in adults with acute bacterial or viral meningitis. Moreover, in order to investigate whether autoimmune mechanisms could play a role in the pathogenesis of acute meningitis-induced hypopituitarism we also investigated the anti-pituitary antibodies (APA) and anti-hypothalamus antibodies (AHA) prospectively. Sixteen patients (10 males, 6 females; mean ± SD age 40.9 ± 15.9) with acute infectious meningitis were included and the patients were evaluated in the acute phase, and at 6 and 12 months after the acute meningitis. In the acute phase 18.7% of the patients had GH deficiency, 12.5% had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. At 12 months after acute meningitis 6 of 14 patients (42.8%) had GH deficiency, 1 of 14 patients (7.1%) had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. Two of 14 patients (14.3%) had combined hormone deficiencies and four patients (28.6%) had isolated hormone deficiencies at 12 months. Four of 9 (44.4%) hormone deficiencies at 6 months were recovered at 12 months, and 3 of 8 (37.5%) hormone deficiencies at 12 months were new-onset hormone deficiencies. At 12 months there were significant negative correlations between IGF-I level vs. LDL-C, and IGF-I level vs. total cholesterol. The frequency of AHA and APA positivity was substantially high, ranging from 35 to 50% of the patients throughout the 12 months period. However there were no significant correlations between AHA or APA positivity and hypopituitarism. The risk of hypopituitarism, GH deficiency in particular, is substantially high in the acute phase, after 6 and 12 months of the acute infectious meningitis. Moreover we found that 6th month after meningitis is too early to make a decision for pituitary dysfunction and these patients should be screened for at least 12 months

  5. Insight into the neuroendocrine site and cellular mechanism by which cortisol suppresses pituitary responsiveness to gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Kellie M; Davis, Tracy L; Doro, Lisa C; Nett, Terry M; Oakley, Amy E; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Rispoli, Louisa A; Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Karsch, Fred J

    2008-02-01

    Stress-like elevations in plasma glucocorticoids rapidly inhibit pulsatile LH secretion in ovariectomized sheep by reducing pituitary responsiveness to GnRH. This effect can be blocked by a nonspecific antagonist of the type II glucocorticoid receptor (GR) RU486. A series of experiments was conducted to strengthen the evidence for a mediatory role of the type II GR and to investigate the neuroendocrine site and cellular mechanism underlying this inhibitory effect of cortisol. First, we demonstrated that a specific agonist of the type II GR, dexamethasone, mimics the suppressive action of cortisol on pituitary responsiveness to GnRH pulses in ovariectomized ewes. This effect, which became evident within 30 min, documents mediation via the type II GR. We next determined that exposure of cultured ovine pituitary cells to cortisol reduced the LH response to pulse-like delivery of GnRH by 50% within 30 min, indicating a pituitary site of action. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that suppression of pituitary responsiveness to GnRH in ovariectomized ewes is due to reduced tissue concentrations of GnRH receptor. Although cortisol blunted the amplitude of GnRH-induced LH pulses within 1-2 h, the amount of GnRH receptor mRNA or protein was not affected over this time frame. Collectively, these observations provide evidence that cortisol acts via the type II GR within the pituitary gland to elicit a rapid decrease in responsiveness to GnRH, independent of changes in expression of the GnRH receptor.

  6. Effect of Valsartan on the hormones of Pituitary-gonadal axis Performance in mature female Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Hosseini

    2013-02-01

    Conclusion: Valsartan , as a receptor antagonist of Ang II inhibits the secretion of gonadotropin hormones and accelerates their effect on blocking the follicular cells of the female sex ,causing the reduction of female hormones.

  7. Netherton Syndrome in a Neonate with Possible Growth Hormone Deficiency and Transient Hyperaldosteronism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatziioannidis Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Netherton syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder, is classified as an ichthyosiform syndrome. In this report we present the case of a neonate with erythroderma shortly after birth, accompanied by severe hypernatremia, recurrent infections, transient hyperaldosteronism, and signs of growth hormone (GH deficiency. DNA molecular analysis in the SPINK5 gene revealed heterozygosity in our index patient for 238insG and 2468delA frameshift mutations in exons 4 and 26, respectively, in the maternal allele and 1431-12G>A splice-site mutation in intron 15 in the paternal allele as well as the missense variation E420K in homozygous state. Combination of the identified mutations along with transient hyperaldosteronism and possible GH deficiency have not been described before. Accordingly, the importance of early multidisciplinary approach is highlighted, in order to reach accurate diagnosis, initiate prompt treatment, and ensure survival with fewer disease complications.

  8. How should we interrogate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in patients with suspected hypopituitarism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrahy, Aoife; Agha, Amar

    2016-06-17

    Hypopituitarism is deficiency of one or more pituitary hormones, of which adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) deficiency is the most serious and potentially life-threatening. It may occur in isolation or, more commonly as part of more widespread pituitary failure. Diagnosis requires demonstration of subnormal cortisol rise in response to stimulation with hypoglycemia, glucagon, ACTH(1-24) or in the setting of acute illness. The choice of diagnostic test should be individualised for the patient and clinical scenario. A random cortisol and ACTH level may be adequate in making a diagnosis in an acutely ill patient with a suspected adrenal crisis e.g. pituitary apoplexy. Often however, dynamic assessment of cortisol reserve is needed. The cortisol response is both stimulus and assay- dependent and normative values should be derived locally. Results must be interpreted within clinical context and with understanding of potential pitfalls of the test used.

  9. Behavioral Abnormality Induced by Enhanced Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis Activity under Dietary Zinc Deficiency and Its Usefulness as a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Nishio, Ryusuke; Murakami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency increases glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex via enhanced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and induces neuropsychological symptoms, i.e., behavioral abnormality. Behavioral abnormality is due to the increase in glucocorticoid secretion rather than disturbance of brain zinc homeostasis, which occurs after the increase in glucocorticoid secretion. A major target of glucocorticoids is the hippocampus and their actions are often associated with disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which may be linked to behavioral abnormality, such as depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior under zinc deficiency. Glucocorticoid-mediated disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus is also involved in the pathophysiology of, not only psychiatric disorders, such as depression, but also neurodegenerative disorders, e.g., Alzheimer’s disease. The evidence suggests that zinc-deficient animals are models for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), as well as depression. To understand validity to apply zinc-deficient animals as a behavioral abnormality model, this paper deals with the effect of antidepressive drugs and herbal medicines on hippocampal dysfunctions and behavioral abnormality, which are induced by enhanced HPA axis activity under dietary zinc deficiency. PMID:27438830

  10. Behavioral Abnormality Induced by Enhanced Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis Activity under Dietary Zinc Deficiency and Its Usefulness as a Model

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    Atsushi Takeda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary zinc deficiency increases glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex via enhanced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis activity and induces neuropsychological symptoms, i.e., behavioral abnormality. Behavioral abnormality is due to the increase in glucocorticoid secretion rather than disturbance of brain zinc homeostasis, which occurs after the increase in glucocorticoid secretion. A major target of glucocorticoids is the hippocampus and their actions are often associated with disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which may be linked to behavioral abnormality, such as depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior under zinc deficiency. Glucocorticoid-mediated disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus is also involved in the pathophysiology of, not only psychiatric disorders, such as depression, but also neurodegenerative disorders, e.g., Alzheimer’s disease. The evidence suggests that zinc-deficient animals are models for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD, as well as depression. To understand validity to apply zinc-deficient animals as a behavioral abnormality model, this paper deals with the effect of antidepressive drugs and herbal medicines on hippocampal dysfunctions and behavioral abnormality, which are induced by enhanced HPA axis activity under dietary zinc deficiency.

  11. Central regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis: focus on clinical aspects.

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    Fliers, E; Boelen, A; van Trotsenburg, A S P

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus is the most prominent brain region involved in setpoint regulation of the thyroid axis. It generates the diurnal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) rhythm, and it plays a central role in the adaptation of the thyroid axis to environmental factors such as caloric deprivation or infection. Many studies, including studies in human post-mortem tissue samples, have confirmed a key role for the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) neuron in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in thyroid axis regulation. In addition to their negative feedback action on TRH neurons in the hypothalamus, intrahypothalamic thyroid hormones can also modulate metabolism in adipose tissue and the liver via the autonomic nervous system. Congenital or acquired dysfunction of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland may result in central hypothyroidism (CeH). In the Netherlands, the prevalence of permanent congenital CeH as detected by neonatal screening is approximately 1 in 18000. In most neonates congenital CeH is accompanied by additional anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies, and many show clear morphological abnormalities such as a small anterior gland, a thin or absent pituitary stalk, or an ectopic posterior pituitary gland. Recently, a mutation in the immunoglobulin superfamily member 1 (IGSF1) gene was reported as a novel cause of X-linked, apparently isolated CeH occurring in neonates, children and adults. In adults, the most frequent cause of acquired CeH is a pituitary macroadenoma, usually accompanied by other pituitary hormone deficiencies. Central hyperthyroidism is a rare disorder, especially in children. In adults, it is mostly caused by a TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Safety and Clinical Nursing of Growth Hormone Stimulation Test for Postoperative Patients with Pituitary Adenomas%垂体瘤患者术后生长激素激发试验安全性观察与护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷静; 钟历勇; 王宾; 孙月明; 唐晓山; 王莹; 周静; 曹菲; 梁丹; 綦雯雯

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨垂体瘤患者术后生长激素激发试验用于诊断成人生长激素缺乏症的安全性与临床护理要点.方法 采用胰岛素耐量试验(insulin telerance test,ITT)作为探测垂体生长激素储备功能的药物激发试验.选择15例垂体瘤术后(无功能性腺瘤和催乳素大腺瘤)患者术后进行ITT试验,行ITT前禁食10 h,静脉注射短效人胰岛素 0.1~0.15 U/kg,于静注短效人胰岛素前30 min、推注前即刻,推注后第30、第45、第60、第90、第120分钟各采血3.5 mL做生长激素及静脉血糖测定,同时监测上述时间点心率及出现低血糖的频率与严重性.结果 血糖低谷主要发生在注射胰岛素后的30~45 min,试验中所有受试者均诱导出生化低血糖,30 min发生低血糖12例,45 min发生低血糖3例,其中需要静脉注射质量浓度50 g/L葡萄糖缓解症状者仅2例.结论 ITT用于诊断生长激素缺乏症过程中低血糖多发生于推注胰岛素后30~45 min,经对症处理后低血糖症状多迅速缓解.试验过程中严密监测血糖可保证试验的安全性.%Objective To explore the safety and clinical nursing of growth hormone (CH) stimulation test in the diagnosis of adult growth hormone deficiency. Methods 15 patients (including nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas and macro-prolactinomas) who had received the pituitary tumor surgery, received insulin tolerance test (ITT), which was applied as a stimulation test of growth hormone to evaluate the function of pituitary in secreting growth hormone. After fasting for 10 hours, regular insulin (0.1~ 0.15U/kg) were injected intravenously. At 30 min before the insulin injection, 0 min instantly before injecting, and 30 min, 45 min, 60 min, 90 min, 120 min after the injection, the monitoring of heart rate and the measuring of blood glucose and GH were necessary. At the same time, the frequency and severity of hypoglycemia were observed. Results Hypoglycemia occurred in all patients

  13. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency

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    Charlotte Höybye

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available TransCon growth hormone is a sustained-release human growth hormone prodrug under development in which unmodified growth hormone is transiently linked to a carrier molecule. It is intended as an alternative to daily growth hormone in the treatment of growth hormone deficiency. This was a multi-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial designed to compare the safety (including tolerability and immunogenicity, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of three doses of weekly TransCon GH to daily growth hormone (Omnitrope. Thirty-seven adult males and females diagnosed with adult growth hormone deficiency and stable on growth hormone replacement therapy for at least 3 months were, following a wash-out period, randomized (regardless of their pre-study dose to one of three TransCon GH doses (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08 mg GH/kg/week or Omnitrope 0.04 mg GH/kg/week (divided into 7 equal daily doses for 4 weeks. Main outcomes evaluated were adverse events, immunogenicity and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels. TransCon GH was well tolerated; fatigue and headache were the most frequent drug-related adverse events and reported in all groups. No lipoatrophy or nodule formation was reported. No anti-growth hormone-binding antibodies were detected. TransCon GH demonstrated a linear, dose-dependent increase in growth hormone exposure without accumulation. Growth hormone maximum serum concentration and insulin-like growth factor 1 exposure were similar after TransCon GH or Omnitrope administered at comparable doses. The results suggest that long-acting TransCon GH has a profile similar to daily growth hormone but with a more convenient dosing regimen. These findings support further TransCon GH development.

  14. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höybye, Charlotte; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Ferone, Diego; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Gilfoyle, David; Christoffersen, Eva Dam; Mortensen, Eva; Leff, Jonathan A; Beckert, Michael

    2017-04-01

    TransCon growth hormone is a sustained-release human growth hormone prodrug under development in which unmodified growth hormone is transiently linked to a carrier molecule. It is intended as an alternative to daily growth hormone in the treatment of growth hormone deficiency. This was a multi-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial designed to compare the safety (including tolerability and immunogenicity), pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of three doses of weekly TransCon GH to daily growth hormone (Omnitrope). Thirty-seven adult males and females diagnosed with adult growth hormone deficiency and stable on growth hormone replacement therapy for at least 3 months were, following a wash-out period, randomized (regardless of their pre-study dose) to one of three TransCon GH doses (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08 mg GH/kg/week) or Omnitrope 0.04 mg GH/kg/week (divided into 7 equal daily doses) for 4 weeks. Main outcomes evaluated were adverse events, immunogenicity and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels. TransCon GH was well tolerated; fatigue and headache were the most frequent drug-related adverse events and reported in all groups. No lipoatrophy or nodule formation was reported. No anti-growth hormone-binding antibodies were detected. TransCon GH demonstrated a linear, dose-dependent increase in growth hormone exposure without accumulation. Growth hormone maximum serum concentration and insulin-like growth factor 1 exposure were similar after TransCon GH or Omnitrope administered at comparable doses. The results suggest that long-acting TransCon GH has a profile similar to daily growth hormone but with a more convenient dosing regimen. These findings support further TransCon GH development.

  15. The Influence of Alcohol Consumption in Conjunction with Sex Hormone Deficiency on Ca/P Ratio in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, Karina Bortolin; Marchini, Adriana Mathias Pereira da Silva; Santo, Ana Maria do Espírito; Rode, Sigmar de Mello; Marchini, Leonardo; da Rocha, Rosilene Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of sex hormones and excessive alcohol consumption are factors that have been related to alterations in the pattern of bone mineralization and osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible alterations in the calcium/phosphorus (Ca/P) ratio in the femur of rats subjected to sex hormone deficiency and/or alcohol consumption. Methods. Female and male Wistar rats (n = 108) were divided into ovariectomized (Ovx), orchiectomized (Orx), or sham-operated groups and subdivided according to diet: alcoholic diet (20% alcohol solution), isocaloric diet, and ad libitum diet. The diets were administered for 8 weeks. The Ca/P ratio in the femur was analyzed by energy dispersive micro-X-ray spectrometer (μEDX). Results. Consumption of alcohol reduced the Ca/P ratio in both females and males. The isocaloric diet reduced the Ca/P ratio in females. In groups with the ad libitum diet, the deficiency of sex hormones did not change the Ca/P ratio in females or males. However, the combination of sex hormone deficiency and alcoholic diet presented the lowest values for the Ca/P ratio in both females and males. Conclusions. There was a reduced Ca/P ratio in the femur of rats that consumed alcohol, which was exacerbated when combined with a deficiency of sex hormones. PMID:27073396

  16. The Influence of Alcohol Consumption in Conjunction with Sex Hormone Deficiency on Ca/P Ratio in Rats

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    Karina Bortolin Lodi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of sex hormones and excessive alcohol consumption are factors that have been related to alterations in the pattern of bone mineralization and osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible alterations in the calcium/phosphorus (Ca/P ratio in the femur of rats subjected to sex hormone deficiency and/or alcohol consumption. Methods. Female and male Wistar rats (n=108 were divided into ovariectomized (Ovx, orchiectomized (Orx, or sham-operated groups and subdivided according to diet: alcoholic diet (20% alcohol solution, isocaloric diet, and ad libitum diet. The diets were administered for 8 weeks. The Ca/P ratio in the femur was analyzed by energy dispersive micro-X-ray spectrometer (μEDX. Results. Consumption of alcohol reduced the Ca/P ratio in both females and males. The isocaloric diet reduced the Ca/P ratio in females. In groups with the ad libitum diet, the deficiency of sex hormones did not change the Ca/P ratio in females or males. However, the combination of sex hormone deficiency and alcoholic diet presented the lowest values for the Ca/P ratio in both females and males. Conclusions. There was a reduced Ca/P ratio in the femur of rats that consumed alcohol, which was exacerbated when combined with a deficiency of sex hormones.

  17. Children with isolated growth hormone deficiency: Empty sella versus normal sella

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    Nagwa Abdallah Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Empty sella (ES may be associated with variable clinical conditions ranging from the occasional discovery of a clinically asymptomatic pouch within the sella turcica to severe intracranial hypertension and rhinorrhea. The need for replacement hormone therapy in ES, as in other syndromes that may cause hypopituitarism, must be assessed for every single hormone, including growth hormone (GH. Aim: To determine whether or not the presence of ES could allow some changes in the GH responses of the isolated growth hormone deficiency (GHD patients. Materials and Methods: We included a cohort of 59 short stature children and adolescents with isolated GHD. According to computed tomography finding, they were classified into 2 groups: Group 1 included 40 children with normal sella and 19 children with ES in Group 2. All patients received recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH with a standard dose of 20 IU/m 2 /week. Results: The baseline results were not significantly different for all variables except weight standard deviation was smaller with statistical significant difference ( P = 0.02. We identified no significant differences when comparing both groups, except for height standard deviation (HTSD after the first year of therapy which revealed significant difference in favor of group 1. When comparing pre- and the two post-treatments HTSD results of the studied cases, all showed significant changes after GH therapy. The results of related variables pre-and post-treatment in both the groups showed significant improvement in all variables of the two groups of the study . Conclusion: Our study showed a similar stature outcome in the two treatment groups.

  18. Identification of a novel pituitary-specific chicken gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor and its splice variants.

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    Shimizu, Mamiko; Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y

    2006-11-01

    In all vertebrates, GnRH regulates gonadotropin secretion through binding to a specific receptor on the surface of pituitary gonadotropes. At least two forms of GnRH exist within a single species, and several corresponding GnRH receptors (GNRHRs) have been isolated with one form being pituitary specific. In chickens, only one type of widely expressed GNRHR has previously been identified. The objectives of this study were to isolate a chicken pituitary-specific GNRHR and to determine its expression pattern during a reproductive cycle. Using a combined strategy of PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), a new GNRHR (chicken GNRHR2) and two splice variants were isolated in domestic fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus). Full-length GNRHR2 and one of its splice variant mRNAs were expressed exclusively in the pituitary, whereas mRNA of the other splice variant was expressed in most brain tissues examined. The deduced amino acid sequence of full-length chicken GNRHR2 reveals a seven transmembrane domain protein with 57%-65% homology to nonmammalian GNRHRs. Semiquantitative real-time PCR revealed that mRNA levels of full-length chicken GNRHR2 in the pituitary correlate with the reproductive status of birds, with maximum levels observed during the peak of lay and 4 wk postphotostimulation in females and males, respectively. Furthermore, GnRH stimulation of GH3 cells that were transiently transfected with cDNA that encodes chicken GNRHR2 resulted in a significant increase in inositol phosphate accumulation. In conclusion, we isolated a novel GNRHR and its splice variants in chickens, and spatial and temporal gene expression patterns suggest that this receptor plays an important role in the regulation of reproduction.

  19. Microarchitecture, but Not Bone Mechanical Properties, Is Rescued with Growth Hormone Treatment in a Mouse Model of Growth Hormone Deficiency

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    Erika Kristensen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH deficiency is related to an increased fracture risk although it is not clear if this is due to compromised bone quality or a small bone size. We investigated the relationship between bone macrostructure, microarchitecture and mechanical properties in a GH-deficient (GHD mouse model undergoing GH treatment commencing at an early (prepubertal or late (postpubertal time point. Microcomputed tomography images of the femur and L4 vertebra were obtained to quantify macrostructure and vertebral trabecular microarchitecture, and mechanical properties were determined using finite element analyses. In the GHD animals, bone macrostructure was 25 to 43% smaller as compared to the GH-sufficient (GHS controls (P<0.001. GHD animals had 20% and 19% reductions in bone volume ratio (BV/TV and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th, respectively. Whole bone mechanical properties of the GHD mice were lower at the femur and vertebra (67% and 45% resp. than the GHS controls (P<0.001. Both early and late GH treatment partially recovered the bone macrostructure (15 to 32 % smaller than GHS controls and the whole bone mechanical properties (24 to 43% larger than GHD animals although there remained a sustained 27–52% net deficit compared to normal mice (P<0.05. Importantly, early treatment with GH led to a recovery of BV/TV and Tb.Th with a concomitant improvement of trabecular mechanical properties. Therefore, the results suggest that GH treatment should start early, and that measurements of microarchitecture should be considered in the management of GHD.

  20. Treatment of short stature and growth hormone deficiency in children with somatotropin (rDNA origin

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    Dana S Hardin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Dana S HardinOhio State University and Columbus Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USAAbstract: Somatotropin (growth hormone, GH of recombinant DNA origin has provided a readily available and safe drug that has greatly improved management of children and adolescents with GH deficiency (GHD and other disorders of growth. In the US and Europe, regulatory agencies have given approval for the use of GH in children and adults who meet specific criteria. However, clinical and ethical controversies remain regarding the diagnosis of GHD, dosing of GH, duration of therapy and expected outcomes. Areas which also require consensus include management of pubertal patients, transitioning pediatric patients to adulthood, management of children with idiopathic short stature and the role of recombinant IGF-1 in treatment. Additionally, studies have demonstrated anabolic benefits of GH in children who have inflammatory-based underlying disease and efficacy of GH in overcoming growth delays in people treated chronically with corticosteroids. These areas are open for possible new uses of this drug. This review summarizes current indications for GH use in children and discusses areas of clinical debate and potential anabolic uses in chronic illness.Keywords: somatotropin, growth hormone deficiency, children, short stature

  1. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2015-08-01

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections, using a fully automated droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS-MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectrometric detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this method and data obtained with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland. AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis), and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH-secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH-secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared with non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis, as expected. This work reveals that a fully automated droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS-MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, including AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity, and specificity of this method support the potential of this basic technology, with further advancement, for assisting surgical decision-making. Graphical Abstract Mass spectrometry based profiling of hormones in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections.

  2. Possible participation of calcium in growth hormone release and in thyrotropin-releasing hormone and human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor synergy in a primary culture of chicken pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1989-09-01

    We previously reported that thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) exert synergistic (greater than additive) effects on growth hormone (GH) release from chicken pituitary cells in primary culture. In the present studies the possible participation of calcium in GH release and in TRH and hpGRF synergy was investigated. Following dispersion with collagenase, cells were cultured for 48 hr prior to exposure (2 hr) to test agents. Cultured cells were exposed to a range of calcium concentrations (0, 0.02, 0.2, and 2.0 mM) in the presence and absence of secretagogues. These results demonstrated that basal GH release was not altered by the concentration of calcium in the medium: however, secretagogue-induced GH release required calcium. Thus, TRH, hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, or forskolin stimulated GH release in the absence of calcium. Furthermore, synergistic GH release evoked by TRH and hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, or forskolin was observed only at the highest calcium concentration (2.0 mM). In other studies, ionomycin (10(-5) M), a calcium ionophore, stimulated GH release to a value about 125% over the basal (absence of test agent) value. Ionomycin-induced GH release was not affected by TRH (5.0 ng/ml); the combined effects of ionomycin (10(-7)-10(-5) M) and hpGRF (5.0 ng/ml) on GH release were less than additive. However, ionomycin (10(-5) M) further increased GH release over that resulting from the synergistic action of TRH and hpGRF (5.0 ng/ml each). Verapamil (a calcium channel blocker) did not affect GH release induced by either TRH or hpGRF (5.0 ng/ml each). However, this agent did inhibit synergistic GH release evoked by TRH and hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, forskolin, or isobutylmethylxanthine. These results suggest that calcium participates in secretagogue-induced GH release from chicken somatotrophs in vitro.

  3. Comparative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a PEGylated recombinant human growth hormone and daily recombinant human growth hormone in growth hormone-deficient children

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    Hou L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ling Hou,1,* Zhi-hang Chen,2,* Dong Liu,3 Yuan-guo Cheng,2 Xiao-ping Luo1 1Department of Pediatrics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 2Department of Pharmacy, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, 3Department of Pharmacy, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this study Objective: Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH replacement therapy in children generally requires daily subcutaneous (sc injections, which may be inconvenient for patients. Jintrolong® is a PEGylated rhGH with the purpose of weekly sc injections. The aim of the current study was to examine the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety, and tolerability of multiple sc doses of Jintrolong® vs daily doses of rhGH. Design and methods: Twelve children with growth hormone deficiency participated in this single-center, open-label, crossover Phase I trial. All subjects received daily sc injections of rhGH at 0.0286 mg/kg/d for 7 days, followed by a 4-week washout period and six weekly doses of Jintrolong® at 0.2 mg/kg/w. Results: In comparison with rhGH, sc injection of Jintrolong® produced a noticeably higher Cmax, significantly longer half-life (t1/2, and slower plasma clearance, signifying a profile suitable for long-term treatment. The ratio of the area under the concentration vs time curve (AUC after the seventh and first injections (AUC(0–∞7th/AUC(0–∞1st of rhGH was 1.02, while the AUC(0–∞6th/AUC(0–∞1st of Jintrolong® was 1.03, indicating no accumulation of circulating growth hormone. There was no significant difference in the change in insulin-like growth factor-1 expression produced by 7 days of sc rhGH and weekly Jintrolong® injections. There were no severe adverse events during the trial. Conclusion: The elimination rate of Jintrolong® was

  4. Neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations in Belgium: a useful indicator for detecting mild iodine deficiency?

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    Stefanie Vandevijvere

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH concentrations are a good indicator of iodine deficiency in the population. A frequency of neonatal TSH concentrations above 5 mU/L below 3% has been proposed as the threshold indicating iodine sufficiency. The objective of the present study was to evaluate feasibility and usefulness of nation-wide neonatal TSH concentration screening results to assess iodine status in Belgium. All newborns born in Belgium during the period 2009-2011 (n = 377713 were included in the study, except those suffering from congenital hypothyroidism and premature neonates. The frequency of neonatal TSH concentrations above 5 mU/L from 2009 to 2011 in Belgium fluctuated between 2.6 and 3.3% in the centres using the same TSH assay. There was a significant inverse association between neonatal TSH level and birth weight. The longer the duration between birth and screening, the lower the TSH level. Neonatal TSH levels were significantly lower in winter than in spring or autumn and significantly lower in spring and summer than in autumn while significantly higher in spring compared to summer. In conclusion, despite that pregnant women in Belgium are mildly iodine deficient, the frequency of neonatal TSH concentrations above 5 mU/L was very low, suggesting that the neonatal TSH threshold proposed for detecting iodine deficiency needs to be re-evaluated. Although neonatal TSH is useful to detect severe iodine deficiency, it should not be recommended presently for the evaluation of iodine status in mildly iodine deficient regions.

  5. Dissociated hypopituitarism after spontaneous pituitary apoplexy in acromegaly

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    Shahnaz Ahmad Mir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pituitary apoplexy is an uncommon event and usually occurs in non-functioning pituitary tumors. Among the functioning tumors, prolactinomas are the ones most likely to apoplexy. Apoplexy in growth hormone (GH producing adenomas is a very rare event with less than thirty cases reported worldwide. Objective: To describe a case of spontaneous pituitary apoplexy in acromegaly. Case Report: A 55 year old smoker male presented to the our outpatient clinic in 2004 with complaints of gradual onset increase in the size of hands and feet, bilateral knee pain, increased sweating and blurring of vision. Investigations uncovered diabetes mellitus by a casual blood glucose of 243 mg/dl and HbA1c of 8.5%. Growth hormone suppression test using 75 gram oral glucose showed a 60 minute growth hormone of 105 ng/ml. Magnetic resonance imaging of the sellar region showed a 12.0 mm × 10.0 mm pituitary adenoma. The patient was planned for transsphenoidal tumor decompression. However, the patient was lost to follow up. Eight-years later, he presented in the emergency department of our institute with sudden onset headache, vomiting and decreased level of consciousness of one day duration. CT scan of the head with focus on the sella was suggestive of apoplexy which was later confirmed by the MRI of the sellar region. Conclusion: Although acromegaly can remit following apoplexy of the responsible pituitary adenoma, long term follow up is needed for early detection of the development of deficiency of pituitary hormones which may occur over years following the event as well as to detect tumor regrowth which again may occur several years later.

  6. Evaluation of adrenal function in patients with hypothalamic and pituitary disorders : comparison of serum cortisol, urinary free cortisol and the human-corticotrophin releasing hormone test with the insulin tolerance test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, RPF; Pasterkamp, SH; Beentjes, JAM; Sluiter, WJ

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to evaluate the performance of screening tests (serum cortisol and 24-h urinary free cortisol) and the human-corticotrophin releasing hormone (h-CRH) test in the assessment of adrenal function in patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders. DESIGN Summary receiver opera

  7. Evaluation of adrenal function in patients with hypothalamic and pituitary disorders : comparison of serum cortisol, urinary free cortisol and the human-corticotrophin releasing hormone test with the insulin tolerance test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, RPF; Pasterkamp, SH; Beentjes, JAM; Sluiter, WJ

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to evaluate the performance of screening tests (serum cortisol and 24-h urinary free cortisol) and the human-corticotrophin releasing hormone (h-CRH) test in the assessment of adrenal function in patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders. DESIGN Summary receiver opera

  8. Educating children and families about growth hormone deficiency and its management: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Jacqueline; Whitehead, Amanda; Walker, Jenny

    2016-03-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a long-term condition, therefore creating ongoing partnerships with families is a fundamental part of the role of a paediatric endocrine nurse specialist (PENS). Teaching children, young people and their families about GHD and exploring what it means to them and how they can manage their ongoing treatment is central to building positive relationships. Educating children about the management of their growth hormone treatment (GHT) is an ongoing process and professionals must respond to the changing needs for that information children may have as they grow and develop. Long-term relationships with families are strengthened by recognising and respecting the developing expertise of families as they gain confidence and competence to manage GHT. This article is the second of two parts. Part one was published in the February issue of Nursing Children and Young People and covered an overview of growth hormone, causes and clinical presentation of GHD, development and availability of GHT and the role of the PENS in building partnerships with parents. The focus of this article is the education role of the PENS and the importance of providing information that is appropriate to the child or young person's developmental age.

  9. The Effect of Ecstasy (MDMA on the Number of Ovary Follicles and Hormonal Axis of Pituitary-Gonadal in Immature Rats

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    Zahra Allaeian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: The widespread use of the pills of ecstasy has opened the floodgates to social damage. Severe kidney and liver damage as well amnesia and imbalance are some of ecstasy pills complications. This study evaluated the effect of these pills on the ovary and hormonal axis of pituitary-gonadal axis in rats.   Materials & Methods: Thirty-five female immature Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups of 7 rats, comprising control, sham, experimental 1, experimental 2, and experimental 3 groups. The control group did not receive any solvent or medication; the sham group received physiologic serum (0.2 cc once daily for 14 days; and the experimental groups of 1, 2, and 3 received a solution (0.2 cc once daily containing 0.5, 1, and 2 mg of medication for 14 days via intraperitoneal injection. Hormone measurement was done with the ELISA method. Ovaries were excised to prepare tissue sections and to investigate the number of ovarian follicles. The number of follicles was calculated via the physical dissector technique.   Results: There was a statistically significant difference in body and ovary weight between the control group and the experimental group 3. Also, the number of primary and Graafian follicles decreased significantly. The results did not show a statistically significant difference between the three experimental groups and the control group in terms of FSH and LH hormones, but the rate of progesterone hormone had a meaningful increase.   Conclusion: Use of ecstasy pills exerted a destructive impact on the ovary and progesterone hormone.

  10. Phosphorylation substrates for protein kinase C in intact pituitary cells: characterization of a receptor-mediated event using novel gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strulovici, B.; Tahilramani, R.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.

    1987-09-22

    The involvement of protein kinase C in the signal transduction of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) action was investigated with a GnRH superagonist, partial agonists, and antagonists in intact rat pituitary cells. Exposure of /sup 32/P-labeled cells to GnRH or to the superagonist (D-Nal(2)/sup 6/)GnRH induced the enhanced phosphorylation of 42-, 34-, 11-, and 10-kDa proteins and the dephosphorylation of a 15-kDa protein as assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/autoradiography. This effect was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by potent GnRG antagonists. Downregulation of protein kinase C by prolonged incubation of the pituitary cells with high concentrations of active phorbol esters abolished protein kinase C activity and also prevented the phosphorylation induced by GnRN, or (D-Nal(2)/sup 6/)GnRH. The same effect was obtained by preincubating the cells with the protein kinase C inhibitor H-7. In this study the authors identify for the first time physiological substrates for protein kinase C in intact pituitary cells. They demonstrate a close quantitative correlation between the extent of translocation of protein kinase C, levels of phosphorylation of specific substrates in the intact cells, and the biological activity of the GnRH analogues with varying affinity for the GnRH receptor. These data strengthen the contention that the physiological effects of GnRH are primarily mediated via the phosphatidylinositol/Ca/sup 2 +/ signal transfer system and represent a first step toward defining the physiological substrates of protein kinase C and their role in the cascade of events that starts upon binding of GnRH to its receptor.

  11. Cardiac and metabolic effects of chronic growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I excess in young adults with pituitary gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondanelli, Marta; Bonadonna, Stefania; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Doga, Mauro; Gola, Monica; Onofri, Alessandro; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Giustina, Andrea; degli Uberti, Ettore C

    2005-09-01

    Chronic growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) excess is associated with considerable mortality in acromegaly, but no data are available in pituitary gigantism. The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term effects of early exposure to GH and IGF-I excess on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in adult patients with pituitary gigantism. Six adult male patients with newly diagnosed gigantism due to GH secreting pituitary adenoma were studied and compared with 6 age- and sex-matched patients with acromegaly and 10 healthy subjects. Morphologic and functional cardiac parameters were evaluated by Doppler echocardiography. Glucose metabolism was assessed by evaluating glucose tolerance and homeostasis model assessment index. Disease duration was significantly longer (Pgigantism than in patients with acromegaly, whereas GH and IGF-I concentrations were comparable. Left ventricular mass was increased both in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, as compared with controls. Left ventricular hypertrophy was detected in 2 of 6 of both patients with gigantism and patients with acromegaly, and isolated intraventricular septum thickening in 1 patient with gigantism. Inadequate diastolic filling (ratio between early and late transmitral flow velocitygigantism and 1 of 6 patients with acromegaly. Impaired glucose metabolism occurrence was higher in patients with acromegaly (66%) compared with patients with gigantism (16%). Concentrations of IGF-I were significantly (Pgigantism who have cardiac abnormalities than in those without cardiac abnormalities. In conclusion, our data suggest that GH/IGF-I excess in young adult patients is associated with morphologic and functional cardiac abnormalities that are similar in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, whereas occurrence of impaired glucose metabolism appears to be higher in patients with acromegaly, although patients with gigantism are exposed to GH excess for a

  12. Athletic induced iron deficiency: new insights into the role of inflammation, cytokines and hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeling, Peter; Dawson, Brian; Goodman, Carmel; Landers, Grant; Trinder, Debbie

    2008-07-01

    Iron is utilised by the body for oxygen transport and energy production, and is therefore essential to athletic performance. Commonly, athletes are diagnosed as iron deficient, however, contrasting evidence exists as to the severity of deficiency and the effect on performance. Iron losses can result from a host of mechanisms during exercise such as hemolysis, hematuria, sweating and gastrointestinal bleeding. Additionally, recent research investigating the anemia of inflammation during states of chronic disease has allowed us to draw some comparisons between unhealthy populations and athletes. The acute-phase response is a well-recognised reaction to both exercise and disease. Elevated cytokine levels from such a response have been shown to increase the liver production of the hormone Hepcidin. Hepcidin up-regulation has a negative impact on the iron transport and absorption channels within the body, and may explain a potential new mechanism behind iron deficiency in athletes. This review will attempt to explore the current literature that exits in this new area of iron metabolism and exercise.

  13. Accuracy of episodic autobiographical memory in children with early thyroid hormone deficiency using a staged event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Willoughby

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autobiographical memory (AM is a highly constructive cognitive process that often contains memory errors. No study has specifically examined AM accuracy in children with abnormal development of the hippocampus, a crucial brain region for AM retrieval. Thus, the present study investigated AM accuracy in 68 typically and atypically developing children using a staged autobiographical event, the Children's Autobiographical Interview, and structural magnetic resonance imaging. The atypically developing group consisted of 17 children (HYPO exposed during gestation to insufficient maternal thyroid hormone (TH, a critical substrate for hippocampal development, and 25 children with congenital hypothyroidism (CH, who were compared to 26 controls. Groups differed significantly in the number of accurate episodic details recalled and proportion accuracy scores, with controls having more accurate recollections of the staged event than both TH-deficient groups. Total hippocampal volumes and anterior hippocampal volumes were positively correlated with proportion accuracy scores, but not total accurate episodic details, in HYPO and CH. In addition, greater severity of TH deficiency predicted lower proportion accuracy scores in both HYPO and CH. Overall, these results indicate that children with early TH deficiency have deficits in AM accuracy and that the anterior hippocampus may play a particularly important role in accurate AM retrieval.

  14. Mice deficient in MCT8 reveal a mechanism regulating thyroid hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cosmo, Caterina; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Philp, Nancy J; Weiss, Roy E; Refetoff, Samuel

    2010-09-01

    The mechanism of thyroid hormone (TH) secretion from the thyroid gland into blood is unknown. Humans and mice deficient in monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) have low serum thyroxine (T4) levels that cannot be fully explained by increased deiodination. Here, we have shown that Mct8 is localized at the basolateral membrane of thyrocytes and that the serum TH concentration is reduced in Mct8-KO mice early after being taken off a treatment that almost completely depleted the thyroid gland of TH. Thyroid glands in Mct8-KO mice contained more non-thyroglobulin-associated T4 and triiodothyronine than did those in wild-type mice, independent of deiodination. In addition, depletion of thyroidal TH content was slower during iodine deficiency. After administration of 125I, the rate of both its secretion from the thyroid gland and its appearance in the serum as trichloroacetic acid-precipitable radioactivity was greatly reduced in Mct8-KO mice. Similarly, the secretion of T4 induced by injection of thyrotropin was reduced in Mct8-KO in which endogenous TSH and T4 were suppressed by administration of triiodothyronine. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that Mct8 is involved in the secretion of TH from the thyroid gland and contributes, in part, to the low serum T4 level observed in MCT8-deficient patients.

  15. The Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Matricaria Recutita on the Hormonal Pituitary-Testis Axis and Testis Tissue Changes of Mature Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laili Hatami

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Matricaria recutita is one of the most ancient and well- known medicinal plants, and its role in the treatment of a wide range of diseases has been studied . The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Matricaria recutita on spermatogenesis and the pituitary-gonadal axis in male adult rats.   Materials & Methods: In this experimental study, the animals were divided into two groups: the control group, which received 1 ml of distilled water orally, and the experimental group, which received 100 mg/kg of Matricaria recutita extract via gavage feeding once daily for an 8-week period. After the treatment period, several fertility indices such as the weight of the reproductive organs, sperm count, sperm motility and vitality, and testis histological changes as well as blood serum levels of testosterone, estrogen, FSH, and LH were measured.   Results: Our statistical analysis showed a significant increase in the weight of the reproductive organs, sperm count, and blood testosterone in the group which received 100 mg/kg of Matricaria recutita hydroalcholic extract .   Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrated that hydroalcholic extract of Matricaria recutita could increase the function of the hormonal pituitary-testis axis and spermatogenesis in male rats.  

  16. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Inhibit Growth Hormone and Prolactin Gene Transcription via cAMP/PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Dairy Cow Anterior Pituitary Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Fa Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs play a key role in altering carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, influence endocrine pancreas activity, and as a precursor of ruminant milk fat. However, the effect and detailed mechanisms by which SCFAs mediate bovine growth hormone (GH and prolactin (PRL gene transcription remain unclear. In this study, we detected the effects of SCFAs (acetate, propionate, and butyrate on the activity of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway, GH, PRL, and Pit-1 gene transcription in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells (DCAPCs. The results showed that SCFAs decreased intracellular cAMP levels and a subsequent reduction in PKA activity. Inhibition of PKA activity decreased CREB phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. Furthermore, PTX blocked SCFAs- inhibited cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. These data showed that the inhibition of GH and PRL gene transcription induced by SCFAs is mediated by Gi activation and that propionate is more potent than acetate and butyrate in inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. In conclusion, this study identifies a biochemical mechanism for the regulation of SCFAs on bovine GH and PRL gene transcription in DCAPCs, which may serve as one of the factors that regulate pituitary function in accordance with dietary intake.

  17. Treatment protocols for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas combined with craniofacial fibrous dysplasia: A case report of atypical McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Li, Xi; Lv, Chang-Sheng; Chen, Ying; Wang, Meng; Liu, Jian-Feng; Gui, Lai

    2014-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare, post-zygotic (non-germline) disorder, characterized by hypersecretory endocrinopathies, fibrous dysplasia of the bone and café-au-lait macules. The most common endocrine dysfunction is gonadal hyperfunction; thus, hypersecretion of growth hormones (GHs) as a manifestation of endocrine hyperfunction in MAS is rarely reported. MAS affects both genders, although the majority of cases have been reported in young females. Atypical presentations of MAS, with only one or two of the classic symptoms, have been previously described, but remain particularly challenging due to the lack of a diagnostic phenotype. In patients with atypical MAS, analysis of mutations in the gene of the α-subunit of the stimulatory G-protein is limited; thus, diagnosis is based on clinical judgment. In the present study, a male with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and GH-secreting pituitary adenomas, diagnosed with atypical MAS, was reported. The pituitary adenoma was effectively treated with radiotherapy and the patient underwent surgery for the polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, with marked improvements observed in appearance.

  18. Hormonal status modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidases and vasopressin-degrading activity in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, María Jesús; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Mayas, María Dolores; Carrera, María Pilar; De la Chica, Susana; Cortés, Pedro; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2008-07-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) participates in the maintenance of cardiovascular functions and in the control of blood pressure. By other hand, it is known that blood pressure regulation and HPA activity are affected by sex hormones. The aim of the present work is to analyze the influence of estradiol and progesterone on renin-angiotensin system (RAS)-regulating aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase B and aminopeptidase N activities and vasopressin-degrading activity in the HPA axis of ovariectomized mice and ovariectomized mice treated subscutaneously with different doses of estradiol and progesterone. Our data suggest that in female mice, estradiol and progesterone influence RAS-regulating and vasopressin-degrading activities at different levels of the HPA axis.

  19. Blood-brain barrier to peptides: (/sup 3/H)gonadotropin-releasing hormone accumulation by eighteen regions of the rat brain and by anterior pituitary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermisch, A.; Ruehle, H.J. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Biowissenschaften); Klauschenz, E.; Kretzschmar, R. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Inst. fuer Wirkstofforschung)

    1984-01-01

    After intracarotid injection of (/sup 3/H)gonadotropin-releasing hormone ((/sup 3/H)GnRH) the mean accumulation of radioactivity per unit wet weight of 18 brain samples investigated and the anterior pituitary was 0.38 +- 0.11% g/sup -1/ of the injected tracer dose. This indicates a low but measurable brain uptake of the peptide. The brain uptake of (/sup 3/H)GnRH in blood-brain barrier (BBB)-protected regions is 5% of that of separately investigated (/sup 3/H)OH. In BBB-free regions the accumulation of radioactivity was more than 25-fold higher than in BBB-protected regions. The accumulation of (/sup 3/H)GnRH among regions with BBB varies less than among regions with leaky endothelia. The data presented for (/sup 3/H)GnRH are similar to those for other peptides so far investigated.

  20. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of the thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) receptor from clonal GH sub 4 C sub 1 pituitary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of drugs with anesthetic properties on the activity of the pituitary thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor was determined in the clonal GH{sub 4}C{sub 1} somatomammotropic cell line. Classic local anesthetics and other drugs with anesthetic activity inhibited binding of ({sup 3}H)methyl-TRH to cell receptors at concentrations known to produce anesthetic effects on the membrane. The inhibition of TRH receptor binding by tetracaine was competitive and temperature and pH dependent. Verapamil and tetracaine inhibited TRH-stimulated prolactin secretion at concentrations that inhibited peptide binding. TRH-stimulated prolactin secretion was equivalent with or without Ca{sup 2+} channel activity. Verapamil and tetracaine also inhibited basal prolactin and secretion stimulated by drugs that bypass membrane receptors, db-cAMP and TPA. These results indicate that inhibition of TRH binding and responses by diverse drugs results from an anesthetic effect on the cell membrane.

  1. Spectrum of Adrenal Dysfunction in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Evaluation of Adrenal and Pituitary Reserve with ACTH and Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freda, P U; Papadopoulos, A D; Wardlaw, S L; Goland, R S

    1997-07-01

    Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been reported to develop abnormalities of the endocrine system and in particular of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. To define the abnormalities of HPA function in AIDS patients better, we performed ACTH and ovine corticotropin-releasing hormone (oCRH) testing in a group of AIDS patients and oCRH testing in a group of healthy subjects. Our study found that in AIDS patients with normal ACTH testing, oCRH testing revealed a variety of subclinical abnormalities of ACTH and cortisol responses. Although we did not find frank adrenal insufficiency in any of these AIDS patients, it remains to be determined if any of the subclinical abnormalities we identified are predictive of clinically significant adrenal insufficiency; it may be that as AIDS patients live longer, the subclinical abnormalities will progress to adrenal insufficiency. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:173-180). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  2. The pituitary hormones arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II and oxytocin-neurophysin I show close linkage with interleukin-1 on mouse chromosome 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, J.C.; Nelson, K.K.; Siracusa, L.D. (Jefferson Cancer Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Battey, J. (National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXT) are posterior pituitary hormones. AVP is involved in fluid homeostasis, while OXT is involved in lactation and parturition. AVP is derived from a larger precursor, prepro-arginine-vasopressin-neurophysin II (prepro-AVP-NP II; AVP), and is physically linked to prepro-oxytocin-neurophysin I (prepro-OXT-NPI1; OXT). The genes for AVP and OXT are separated by only 12 kb of DNA in humans, whereas in the mouse 3.5 kb of intergenic sequence lies between Avp and Oxt. Interspecific backcross analysis has now been used to map the Avp/Oxt complex to chromosome 2 in the mouse. This map position confirms and extends the known region of linkage conservation between mouse chromosome 2 and human chromosome 20. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Adherence in children with growth hormone deficiency treated with r-hGH and the easypod™ device

    OpenAIRE

    S. Loche; Salerno, M.; Garofalo, P; Cardinale, G. M.; Licenziati, MR; Citro, G.; Caruso Nicoletti, M.; Cappa, M.; Longobardi, S.; Maghnie, M; Perrone, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Poor adherence to recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) therapy is associated with reduced growth velocity in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). This twelve-month observational study was to assess adherence in r-hGH patients treated with the easypod™, an electronic, fully automated injection device designed to track the time, date and dose administered. Methods Ninety-seven prepubertal patients receiving r-hGH therapy were included in the study from ten Italian clinical...

  4. Cysteamine, zinc, and thiols modify detectability of rat pituitary prolactin: a comparison with effects on bovine prolactin suggests differences in hormone storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, L.S.; Lorenson, M.Y.

    1986-03-01

    Little is known about the structure of prolactin (PRL) within secretory granules. Evidence from our previous studies in bovine tissue preparations suggests that control of secretion may reside, in part, in the conversion of storage hormone to releasable PRL. The conversion can be monitored by measuring changes in immunodetectability since the oligomeric, storage form is poorly recognized by antisera raised against monomeric PRL. Since many investigators use rats to study the secretory process and changes in detectability of rat pituitary PRL occur during lactation (depletion-transformation), we undertook the present immunodetectability studies to gain insight into the storage structure of rat (r) PRL. Cysteamine and zinc inhibited tissue PRL immunoassayability in male rat pituitary homogenates and also in partially purified secretory granules as they had inhibited bovine (b) PRL; however, zinc inhibited the rodent hormone less potently than the bovine. In vitro incubation of rat tissue samples without additions resulted in increases in rPRL detectability of up to 84% after 180 minutes; such incubation of bovine samples had no significant effect. A striking additional difference between the species was that exposure to reduced glutathione (GSH), cysteine, homocysteine, mercaptoethanol, and dithiothreitol inhibited rPRL by up to 44%. This compared to thiol stimulation of bPRL by as much as 450%. The inhibitory GSH effect on rPRL was abolished when 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was included; in contrast, the stimulatory GSH effect on bPRL did not change with added SDS. SDS alone had no effect on rat homogenate PRL, and only increased rat granule rPRL by 23% compared to its ability to increase bPRL assayability by 44%.

  5. Does prolonged pituitary down-regulation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist improve the live-birth rate in in vitro fertilization treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jianzhi; Sha, Aiguo; Han, Dongmei; Li, Ping; Geng, Jie; Ma, Chaihui

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of a prolonged duration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) in pituitary down-regulation for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) on the live-birth rate in nonendometriotic women undergoing in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET). Retrospective cohort study. University-affiliated hospital. Normogonadotropic women undergoing IVF. Three hundred seventy-eight patients receiving a prolonged pituitary down-regulation with GnRH-a before ovarian stimulation and 422 patients receiving a GnRH-a long protocol. Live-birth rate per fresh ET. In comparison with the long protocol, the prolonged down-regulation protocol required a higher total dose of gonadotropins. A lower serum luteinizing hormone (LH) level on the starting day of gonadotropin and the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and a fewer number of oocytes and embryos were observed in the prolonged down-regulation protocol. However, the duration of stimulation and number of high-quality embryos were comparable between the two groups. A statistically significantly higher implantation rate (50.27% vs. 39.69%), clinical pregnancy rate (64.02% vs. 56.87%) and live-birth rate per fresh transfer cycle (55.56% vs. 45.73%) were observed in the prolonged protocol. Prolonged down-regulation in a GnRH-a protocol might increase the live-birth rates in normogonadotropic women. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ligand-biased regulation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-dependent signal transduction in GPCR control of pituitary hormone release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, Joshua G; Chang, John P

    2016-12-01

    Biased signaling describes the selective activation of signal transduction cascades by structurally-related ligands downstream of shared G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Although class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are important components of GPCR-controlled transduction networks, little is known regarding the potential for biased regulation of class I PI3K-dependent signaling. The full compliment of class I PI3K catalytic subunits (p110α, p110β, p110δ and p110γ) first appear in bony fishes and, despite being associated with distinct cellular functions, all class I PI3Ks produce the lipid second-messenger phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3). We have previously shown that two endogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH2 and GnRH3), which both signal through shared Gαq/11-coupled receptors, selectively activate different subsets of class I PI3K isoforms in their control of hormone release from goldfish (Carassius auratus) pituitary cells. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the biased activation of class I PI3K isoforms results in the selective recruitment of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-sensitive effectors downstream of GnRH-stabilized GPCRs using pharmacological mapping. Our results reveal that distinct PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-sensitive effectors are involved in the differential control of GnRH2- and GnRH3-stimulated, as well as basal, hormone release and implicate the participation of non-canonical PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-sensitive transduction elements. Furthermore, observations using a selective inhibitor of the shared Gβγ-effector interaction surface indicate a role for Gβγ-dependent signaling in the integrated control of pituitary hormone exocytosis. These novel findings add to our understanding of functional selectivity in GPCR signal transduction networks, in general, and reveal the complexity of biased signaling downstream of class I PI3K catalytic activity.

  7. Vitamin D across growth hormone (GH) disorders: From GH deficiency to GH excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciresi, A; Giordano, C

    2017-04-01

    The interplay between vitamin D and the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I system is very complex and to date it is not fully understood. GH directly regulates renal 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity, although the action of GH in modulating vitamin D metabolism may also be IGF-I mediated. On the other hand, vitamin D increases circulating IGF-I and the vitamin D deficiency should be normalized before measurement of IGF-I concentrations to obtain reliable and unbiased IGF-I values. Indeed, linear growth after treatment of nutritional vitamin D deficiency seems to be mediated through activation of the GH/IGF-I axis and it suggests an important role of vitamin D as a link between the proliferating cartilage cells of the growth plate and GH/IGF-I secretion. Vitamin D levels are commonly lower in patients with GH deficiency (GHD) than in controls, with a variable prevalence of insufficiency or deficiency, and this condition may worsen the already known cardiovascular and metabolic risk of GHD, although this finding is not common to all studies. In addition, data on the impact of GH treatment on vitamin D levels in GHD patients are quite conflicting. Conversely, in active acromegaly, a condition characterized by a chronic GH excess, both increased and decreased vitamin D levels have been highlighted, and the interplay between vitamin D and the GH/IGF-I axis becomes even more complicated when we consider the acromegaly treatment, both medical and surgical. The current review summarizes the available data on vitamin D in the main disorders of the GH/IGF-I axis, providing an overview of the current state of the art.

  8. Effects of growth hormone deficiency and recombinant growth hormone therapy on postprandial gallbladder motility and cholecystokinin release.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moschetta, A.; Twickler, M.; Rehfeld, J.F.; Ooteghem, N.A. van; Castro Cabezas, M.; Portincasa, P.; Berge-Henegouwen, G.P. van; Erpecum, K.J. van

    2004-01-01

    In addition to cholecystokinin, other hormones have been suggested to be involved in regulation of postprandial gallbladder contraction. We aimed to evaluate effects of growth hormone (GH) on gallbladder contractility and cholecystokinin release. Gallbladder and gastric emptying (by ultrasound) and

  9. Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome in Chinese people: clinical characteristic analysis of 55 cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Guo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS is characterized by the absence of pituitary stalk, pituitary hypoplasia, and ectopic posterior pituitary. Due to the rarity of PSIS, clinical data are limited, especially in Chinese people. Herein, we analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with PSIS from our center over 10 years. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical manifestations and laboratory and MRI findings in 55 patients with PSIS. RESULTS: Of the 55 patients with PSIS, 48 (87.3% were male. The average age was 19.7±6.7 years and there was no familial case. A history of breech delivery was documented in 40 of 45 patients (88.9% and 19 of 55 patients (34.5% had a history of dystocia. Short stature was found in 47 of 55 patients (85.5% and bone age delayed 7.26±5.37 years. Secondary sex characteristics were poor or undeveloped in most patients. The prevalence of deficiencies in growth hormone, gonadotropins, corticotropin, and thyrotropin were 100%, 95.8%, 81.8%, 76.3%, respectively. Hyperprolactinemia was found in 36.4% of patients. Three or more pituitary hormone deficiencies were found in 92.7% of the patients. All patients had normal posterior pituitary function and absent pituitary stalk on imaging. The average height of anterior pituitary was 28 mm, documented anterior pituitary hypoplasia. Midline abnormalities were presented in 9.1% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical features of our Chinese PSIS patients seem to be different from other reported patients in regarding to the higher degree of hypopituitarism and lower prevalence of midline defects. In addition, our patients were older at the time of case detection and the bone age was markedly delayed. We also had no cases of familial PSIS.

  10. Pituitary metastasis as a presenting manifestation of silent systemic malignancy: A retrospective analysis of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Dutta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pituitary metastasis as a presenting manifestation of silent systemic malignancy is rare. We describe four such cases. Materials and Methods: Four patients (0.7% of malignancy with pituitary metastasis out of 540 patients of sellar mass within a period of 10 years were analyzed for clinical, hormonal and radiological findings. Result: The age range of these patients was 39-60 years with lag time ranging from 2to 5 months. Pituitary pathology was presenting manifestation in all 4 patients including diabetes insipidus, ophthalmoplegia and variable anterior pituitary hormone deficiency. 2 patients had bronchogenic carcinoma and one each had squamous cell and adenocarcinoma with unknown primary. Diagnosis of pituitary metastasis was confirmed in three on pituitary mass histopathology and in one it was based on rapidly appearing mass in a short time. Conclusion: Rapidly appearing mass in the sellar region, short lag time,sudden onset of ophthalmoplegia, -symptoms and signs disproportionate to the size of mass, presence of diabetes insipidus and destroyed but normal sized sella should invoke the suspicion of pituitary metastasis.

  11. Long-Term Effect of Cranial Radiotherapy on Pituitary-Hypothalamus Area in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follin, Cecilia; Erfurth, Eva Marie

    2016-09-01

    Survival rates of childhood cancer have improved markedly, and today more than 80 % of those diagnosed with a pediatric malignancy will become 5-year survivors. Nevertheless, survivors exposed to cranial radiotherapy (CRT) are at particularly high risk for long-term morbidity, such as endocrine insufficiencies, metabolic complications, and cardiovascular morbidity. Deficiencies of one or more anterior pituitary hormones have been described following therapeutic CRT for primary brain tumors, nasopharyngeal tumors, and following prophylactic CRT for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Studies have consistently shown a strong correlation between the total radiation dose and the development of pituitary deficits. Further, age at treatment and also time since treatment has strong implications on pituitary hormone deficiencies. There is evidence that the hypothalamus is more radiosensitive than the pituitary and is damaged by lower doses of CRT. With doses of CRT hypothalamus and this usually causes isolated GH deficiency (GHD). Higher doses (>50 Gy) may produce direct anterior pituitary damage, which contributes to multiple pituitary deficiencies. The large group of ALL survivors treated with CRT in the 70-80-ties has now reached adulthood, and these survivors were treated mainly with 24 Gy, and the vast majority of these patients suffer from GHD. Further, after long-term follow-up, insufficiencies in prolactin (PRL) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been reported and a proportion of these patients were also adrenocoticotrophic hormone (ACTH) deficient. CRT to the hypothalamus causes neuroendocrine dysfunction, which means that the choice of GH test is crucial for the diagnosis of GHD.

  12. Hypopituitarism after external irradiation. Evidence for both hypothalamic and pituitary origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaan, N.A.; Bakdash, M.M.; Caderao, J.B.; Cangir, A.; Jesse, R.H. Jr.; Ballantyne, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    Endocrine complications after radiotherapy for tumors of the head and neck are thought to be relatively rare. The availability of synthetic hypothalamic hormones for clinical investigations and the radioimmunoassay of hormones have enabled us to study function of the hypothalamic pituitary axis in 15 patients who had radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer. Fourteen had evidence of endocrine deficiency. Twelve patients had evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction, 7 developed primary pituitary hormone deficiencies, and 3 developed primary hypothyroidism. These results indicate that (1) secondary hypopituitarism due to a hypothalamic lesion after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer may be more common than suspected in the past; (2) primary hypopituitarism after irradiation of extracranial tumors can occur; and (3) primary hypothyroidism may result from irradiation of regional neck nodes.

  13. Human pituitary and placental hormones control human insulin-like growth factor II secretion in human granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasharma, K.; Li, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    Human granulosa cells cultured with calf serum actively proliferated for 18-20 generations and secreted progesterone into the medium; progesterone levels appeared to decline with increase in generation number. Cells cultured under serum-free conditions secreted significant amounts of progesterone and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The progesterone secretion was enhanced by the addition of human follitropin, lutropin, and chorionic gonadotropin but not by growth hormone. These cells, when challenged to varying concentrations of human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, human prolactin, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin, secreted IGF-II into the medium as measured by specific IGF-II RIA. Among these human hormones, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin were most effective in inducing IGF-II secretion from these cells. When synthetic lutropin-releasing hormone and ..cap alpha..-inhibin-92 were tested, only lutropin-releasing hormone was effective in releasing IGF-II. The results described suggest that cultured human granulosa cells can proliferate and actively secrete progesterone and IGF-II into the medium. IGF-II production in human granulosa cells was influenced by a multi-hormonal complex including human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, and prolactin.

  14. Type I and III procollagen propeptides in growth hormone-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L T; Jørgensen, J O; Risteli, J;

    1991-01-01

    The effect of increasing doses of growth hormone on collagen synthesis in GH-treated GH-deficient patients was determined in a short-term study. The synthesis of type I and III collagen was estimated by measurements of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen and the aminoterminal...... propeptide of type III procollagen. Type I collagen is mainly found in bone and type III collagen in loose connective tissue. We observed a GH dose dependency of both procollagen propeptides. Serum type I procollagen propeptide was significantly higher following GH doses of 4 and 6 IU/day for 14 days...... procollagen propeptide increased twice as much as type I procollagen propeptide, by 47 vs 25%, at a GH dose of 6 IU/day compared with 2 IU/day. The differences between the effects on type I and type III collagen may reflect differences in secretion or turn-over rate of collagen in bone and loose connective...

  15. Bone mineral density in patients with growth hormone deficiency: does a gender difference exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitz, Mette Friberg; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck; Eskildsen, Peter C

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to clarify whether a gender difference exists with respect to bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: A case-control design. METHODS: Blood sampling for measurements of calcium......, phosphate, creatinine, PTH, vitamin D, IGF-1, markers of bone formation and bone resorption, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), to determine BMD and BMC of the lumbar spine, hip, distal arm and total body, were performed in 34 patients with GHD (19 females) and 34 sex-, age- and weight...... identical BMD values at all regions. This gender difference was even more obvious when BMD values were expressed as Z-scores or as three-dimensional BMD of the total body. The bone formation and bone resorption markers, as well as calcium and vitamin D, were all at the same levels in GH...

  16. Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Growth Hormone Deficiency - Does a Gender Difference Exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitz, Mette; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck; Eskildsen, PC

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to clarify whether a gender difference exists with respect to bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: A case-control design. METHODS: Blood sampling for measurements of calcium......, phosphate, creatinine, PTH, vitamin D, IGF-1, markers of bone formation and bone resorption, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), to determine BMD and BMC of the lumbar spine, hip, distal arm and total body, were performed in 34 patients with GHD (19 females) and 34 sex-, age- and weight...... identical BMD values at all regions. This gender difference was even more obvious when BMD values were expressed as Z-scores or as three-dimensional BMD of the total body. The bone formation and bone resorption markers, as well as calcium and vitamin D, were all at the same levels in GH...

  17. Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Growth Hormone Deficiency - Does a Gender Difference Exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitz, Mette; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck; Eskildsen, PC

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to clarify whether a gender difference exists with respect to bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: A case-control design. METHODS: Blood sampling for measurements of calcium......, phosphate, creatinine, PTH, vitamin D, IGF-1, markers of bone formation and bone resorption, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), to determine BMD and BMC of the lumbar spine, hip, distal arm and total body, were performed in 34 patients with GHD (19 females) and 34 sex-, age- and weight...... identical BMD values at all regions. This gender difference was even more obvious when BMD values were expressed as Z-scores or as three-dimensional BMD of the total body. The bone formation and bone resorption markers, as well as calcium and vitamin D, were all at the same levels in GH...

  18. Bone mineral density in patients with growth hormone deficiency: does a gender difference exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitz, Mette Friberg; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck; Eskildsen, Peter C

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to clarify whether a gender difference exists with respect to bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: A case-control design. METHODS: Blood sampling for measurements of calcium......, phosphate, creatinine, PTH, vitamin D, IGF-1, markers of bone formation and bone resorption, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), to determine BMD and BMC of the lumbar spine, hip, distal arm and total body, were performed in 34 patients with GHD (19 females) and 34 sex-, age- and weight...... identical BMD values at all regions. This gender difference was even more obvious when BMD values were expressed as Z-scores or as three-dimensional BMD of the total body. The bone formation and bone resorption markers, as well as calcium and vitamin D, were all at the same levels in GH...

  19. Nutrition, evolution and thyroid hormone levels - a link to iodine deficiency disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    An increased iodine requirement as a result of significant changes in human nutrition rather than a decreased environmental iodine supply is suggested to represent the main cause of the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). The pathomechanism proposed is based on the fact that serum concentrations of thyroid hormones, especially of trijodothyronine (T3), are dependent on the amount of dietary carbohydrate. High-carbohydrate diets are associated with significantly higher serum T3 concentrations, compared with very low-carbohydrate diets. While our Paleolithic ancestors subsisted on a very low carbohydrate/high protein diet, the agricultural revolution about 10,000 years ago brought about a significant increase in dietary carbohydrate. These nutritional changes have increased T3 levels significantly. Higher T3 levels are associated with an enhanced T3 production and an increased iodine requirement. The higher iodine requirement exceeds the availability of iodine from environmental sources in many regions of the world, resulting in the development of IDD.

  20. Pituitary binding and internalization of radioiodinated gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and antagonist ligands in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynn, P.C.; Suarez-Quian, C.A.; Childs, G.V.; Catt, K.J.

    1986-10-01

    In rat pituitary gonadotrophs, the rates of binding and endocytosis of two GnRH superagonist analogs, (D-Ala6,Pro9-NEt)GnRH and (D-Lys6,Pro9-NEt)GnRH, were compared with those of the potent antagonist analog (N-acetyl-D-pCl-Phe1,2,D-Trp3,D-Lys6,D-Ala10)GnRH by quantitative electron microscopic autoradiography. In dispersed pituitary cells, the two agonist analogs showed similar binding kinetics and comparable degrees of sequestration, as measured by their resistance to dissociation by low pH buffer. However, quantification of silver grain localization suggested that cellular internalization of the (D-Ala6)GnRH agonist increased more rapidly than that of the (D-Lys6)GnRH analog. These discrepancies, and the finding that a larger amount of the specifically bound /sup 125/I-(D-Ala6)GnRH agonist was removed during glutaraldehyde fixation, indicated that the proportional internalization of this analog was over estimated by quantitative autoradiography owing to loss of cell surface-bound radioligand. We, therefore, employed radioiodinated D-Lys6-substituted analogs to analyze the receptor binding and cellular uptake of GnRH agonist and antagonist derivatives in vivo. After iv injection, a high proportion of the /sup 125/I-(D-Lys6)GnRH agonist was translocated into pituitary gonadotrophs within 60 min, whereas the D-Lys6 antagonist was predominantly associated with the plasma membrane during that time. Four hours after injection of the antagonist, an appreciable proportion of silver grains was associated with intracellular organelles, and this trend increased progressively at later time points. The relatively prolonged cellular processing of the GnRH antagonist is consistent with in vivo binding kinetics, and its slower internalization may reflect the basal rate of GnRH receptor turnover in the cell membrane.

  1. [Impact of pregnancy on pituitary disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, J

    2013-06-01

    In pregnancy, the volume of pituitary increases by multiplication of lactotopic and gonadotropic cells and developing placenta is the source of numerous hormones and enzymes that significantly affect and alter the function of the endocrine system. This naturally has an impact on the course of pituitary disorders and their treatment. The most common disorders of pituitary gland, which we can meet in pregnancy, are adenomas, particularly prolactinomas, and functionless adenomas. During pregnancy we avoid the treatment of microprolactinomas, but in macroprolactinomas where there is the risk of their enlargement by stimulation of placental estrogens, we administer preventively the dopaminergic agonists. Patients with acromegaly usually do not need the treatment during pregnancy, unless there is a danger to damage the visual pathway or heavy headaches occur. ACTH secreting adenomas (Cushings disease) in pregnancy are rare, they are difficult to diagnose but existing hypercortisolism is very dangerous to fetus and may damage even mother. Large functionless adenomas, unless treated before pregnancy, may damage the visual pathway. The volume of the enlarged pituitary gland in pregnancy and sometimes even of the functionless adenoma adenoma, may be reduced by cabergoline, so that the urgent neurosurgery in pregnancy is very rare. A typical disease that occurs primarily in pregnant women is autoimmune lymphocytic hypophysitis. Diagnosis is established on the basis of headaches and symptoms and signs of the deficits of adrenocorticotropic and thyreotropic function usually in the last third of pregnancy or in the first six months after birth, using a specific image in magnetic resonance. Treatment is limited to hormone replacement. It is also possible to meet pregnant women with deficient pituitary functions. In hypocortical women with exception of strains like as pregnancy vomiting, doses of hydrocortisone replacement usually do not change until birth. Childbirth, however

  2. Molecular genetic analysis of X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia and isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D.M.; Kurman, C.C.; Staudt, L.M. [Univ. of Brescia (Italy)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    In 1980 the clinical syndrome of X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia and isolated growth hormone deficiency (XLA/GHD) was described. XLA/GHD patients have reduced serum levels of Ig and normal cell-mediated immunity, and thus resemble patients with Bruton`s X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). However, XLA/GHD patients also have isolated GHD. Mutations and deletions in the Bruton`s tyrosine kinase gene (BTK) are responsible for Bruton`s XLA. We investigated BTK gene expression in an XLA/GHD patient from the family originally described by Northern analysis, cDNA sequencing, and Western analysis of protein production using mAb to BTK. BTK mRNA was normal in size and abundance, and the mRNA sequence was normal over the coding region, except for a single silent mutation. BTK protein was present in normal amounts in PBMC of this patient. Thus, at the molecular level, XLA/GHD is a different disease entity from Bruton`s XLA. These results suggest that undescribed genes critical for B cell development and growth hormone production exist on the X chromosome. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Hormonal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelot, A; Chakhtoura, Z; Rouxel, A; Dulon, J; Touraine, P

    2007-09-01

    During childhood, the main aims of the medical treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) secondary to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, are to prevent salt loss and virilization and to achieve normal stature and normal puberty. As such, there is a narrow therapeutic window through which the intended results can be achieved. In adulthood, the clinical management has received little attention, but recent studies have shown the relevance of long-term follow-up of these patients. Indeed, long-term evaluation of adult CAH patients enables the identification of multiple clinical, hormonal and metabolic abnormalities as bone mineral density alteration, overweight and disturbed reproductive functions. In women with classic CAH, low fertility rate is reported, and is probably the consequence of multiple factors, including neuroendocrine and hormonal factors, feminizing surgery, and psychological factors. Men with CAH may present hypogonadism either through the effect of adrenal rests or from suppression of gonadotropins resulting in infertility. These patients should therefore be carefully followed-up, from childhood through to adulthood, to avoid these complications and to ensure treatment compliance and tight control of the adrenal androgens, by multidisciplinary teams who have knowledge of CAH.

  4. Regulation of NR4A by nutritional status, gender, postnatal development and hormonal deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sieira, S; López, M; Nogueiras, R; Tovar, S

    2014-03-03

    The NR4A is a subfamily of the orphan nuclear receptors (NR) superfamily constituted by three well characterized members: Nur77 (NR4A1), Nurr1 (NR4A2) and Nor 1 (NR4A3). They are implicated in numerous biological processes as DNA repair, arteriosclerosis, cell apoptosis, carcinogenesis and metabolism. Several studies have demonstrated the role of this subfamily on glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity and energy balance. These studies have focused mainly in liver and skeletal muscle. However, its potential role in white adipose tissue (WAT), one of the most important tissues involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, is not well-studied. The aim of this work was to elucidate the regulation of NR4A in WAT under different physiological and pathophysiological settings involved in energy balance such as fasting, postnatal development, gender, hormonal deficiency and pregnancy. We compared NR4A mRNA expression of Nur77, Nurr1 and Nor 1 and found a clear regulation by nutritional status, since the expression of the 3 isoforms is increased after fasting in a leptin-independent manner and sex steroid hormones also modulate NR4A expression in males and females. Our findings indicate that NR4A are regulated by different physiological and pathophysiological settings known to be associated with marked alterations in glucose metabolism and energy status.

  5. Physico-chemical characterization of human recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH) and its subunits by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography ( RP-HPLC): comparison with pituitary hFSH reference preparation from 'National Hormone and Pituitary Program' from USA; Caracterizacao fisico-quimica da foliculotropina humana(hFSH) recombinabte e de suas subunidades, por cromatografia liquida de alta eficiencia (HPLC) em fase reversa: comparacao com a preparacao de referencia de hFSH de origem hipofisaria do ''National Hormone and Pituitary Program'' dos EUA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Renan Fernandes

    2006-07-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of intact human folliclestimulating hormone (hFSH) was established and validated for accuracy, precision and sensitivity. Human FSH is a dimeric glycoprotein hormone widely used as a diagnostic analyte and as therapeutic product in reproductive medicine. The technique developed preserves the protein integrity, allowing the analysis of the intact heterodimeric form rather than just of its subunits, as it is the case for the majority of the conditions currently employed. This methodology has also been employed for comparing the relative hydrophobicity of pituitary, urinary and two Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-derived hFSH preparations, as well as of two other related glycoprotein hormones of the anterior pituitary: human thyroid-stimulating hormone (hTSH) and human luteinizing hormone (hLH). The least hydrophobic of the three glycohormones analyzed was hFSH, followed by hTSH and hLH. A significant difference (p<0.005) was observed in t{sub R} between the pituitary and recombinant hFSH preparations, reflecting structural differences in their carbohydrate moieties. Two main isoforms were detected in urinary hFSH, including a form which was significantly different (p<0.005) for the pituitary and recombinant preparations. The linearity of the dose-response curve (r = 0.9965, n = 15) for this RP-HPLC methodology, as well as an inter-assay precision with relative standard deviation less than 4% for the quantification of different hFSH preparations and a sensitivity of the order of 40 ng, were demonstrated. The chromatographic behavior and relative hydrophobicity of the individual subunits of the pituitary and recombinant preparations were also analyzed. Furthermore, the accurate molecular mass of the individual hFSH subunits and of the heterodimer were simultaneously determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectral

  6. Precocious metamorphosis in the juvenile hormone-deficient mutant of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Daimon

    Full Text Available Insect molting and metamorphosis are intricately governed by two hormones, ecdysteroids and juvenile hormones (JHs. JHs prevent precocious metamorphosis and allow the larva to undergo multiple rounds of molting until it attains the proper size for metamorphosis. In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, several "moltinism" mutations have been identified that exhibit variations in the number of larval molts; however, none of them have been characterized molecularly. Here we report the identification and characterization of the gene responsible for the dimolting (mod mutant that undergoes precocious metamorphosis with fewer larval-larval molts. We show that the mod mutation results in complete loss of JHs in the larval hemolymph and that the mutant phenotype can be rescued by topical application of a JH analog. We performed positional cloning of mod and found a null mutation in the cytochrome P450 gene CYP15C1 in the mod allele. We also demonstrated that CYP15C1 is specifically expressed in the corpus allatum, an endocrine organ that synthesizes and secretes JHs. Furthermore, a biochemical experiment showed that CYP15C1 epoxidizes farnesoic acid to JH acid in a highly stereospecific manner. Precocious metamorphosis of mod larvae was rescued when the wild-type allele of CYP15C1 was expressed in transgenic mod larvae using the GAL4/UAS system. Our data therefore reveal that CYP15C1 is the gene responsible for the mod mutation and is essential for JH biosynthesis. Remarkably, precocious larval-pupal transition in mod larvae does not occur in the first or second instar, suggesting that authentic epoxidized JHs are not essential in very young larvae of B. mori. Our identification of a JH-deficient mutant in this model insect will lead to a greater understanding of the molecular basis of the hormonal control of development and metamorphosis.

  7. The impact of idiopathic childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency (GHD) on bone mass in subjects without adult GHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Martin; Müller, Jørn; Svendsen, Ole Lander

    2005-01-01

    Despite seemingly adequate growth hormone (GH) treatment during childhood, children with GH deficiency (GHD) have reduced bone mineral density (BMD) at final height. The aim was to evaluate BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in adults treated for idiopathic childhood-onset (CO) GHD, 18 years after...

  8. Parathyroid hormone-related protein and calcium regulation in vitamin D-deficient sea bream (Sparus auratus).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, W.; Hang, X.M.; Guerreiro, P.M.; Spanings, F.A.T.; Ross, H.A.; Canario, A.V.; Flik, G.

    2007-01-01

    Gilthead sea bream (Sparus auratus L.) were fed a vitamin D-deficient diet for 22 weeks. Growth rate, whole body mineral pools and calcium balance were determined. Plasma parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and calcitriol levels were assessed. Expression of mRNA for pthrp and pth1r was

  9. Butyrate increases intracellular calcium levels and enhances growth hormone release from rat anterior pituitary cells via the G-protein-coupled receptors GPR41 and 43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Consolata Miletta

    Full Text Available Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA closely related to the ketone body ß-hydroxybutyrate (BHB, which is considered to be the major energy substrate during prolonged exercise or starvation. During fasting, serum growth hormone (GH rises concomitantly with the accumulation of BHB and butyrate. Interactions between GH, ketone bodies and SCFA during the metabolic adaptation to fasting have been poorly investigated to date. In this study, we examined the effect of butyrate, an endogenous agonist for the two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR, GPR41 and 43, on non-stimulated and GH-releasing hormone (GHRH-stimulated hGH secretion. Furthermore, we investigated the potential role of GPR41 and 43 on the generation of butyrate-induced intracellular Ca2+ signal and its ultimate impact on hGH secretion. To study this, wt-hGH was transfected into a rat pituitary tumour cell line stably expressing the human GHRH receptor. Treatment with butyrate promoted hGH synthesis and improved basal and GHRH-induced hGH-secretion. By acting through GPR41 and 43, butyrate enhanced intracellular free cytosolic Ca2+. Gene-specific silencing of these receptors led to a partial inhibition of the butyrate-induced intracellular Ca2+ rise resulting in a decrease of hGH secretion. This study suggests that butyrate is a metabolic intermediary, which contributes to the secretion and, therefore, to the metabolic actions of GH during fasting.

  10. Butyrate increases intracellular calcium levels and enhances growth hormone release from rat anterior pituitary cells via the G-protein-coupled receptors GPR41 and 43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Petkovic, Vibor; Eblé, Andrée; Ammann, Roland A; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2014-01-01

    Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) closely related to the ketone body ß-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), which is considered to be the major energy substrate during prolonged exercise or starvation. During fasting, serum growth hormone (GH) rises concomitantly with the accumulation of BHB and butyrate. Interactions between GH, ketone bodies and SCFA during the metabolic adaptation to fasting have been poorly investigated to date. In this study, we examined the effect of butyrate, an endogenous agonist for the two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), GPR41 and 43, on non-stimulated and GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)-stimulated hGH secretion. Furthermore, we investigated the potential role of GPR41 and 43 on the generation of butyrate-induced intracellular Ca2+ signal and its ultimate impact on hGH secretion. To study this, wt-hGH was transfected into a rat pituitary tumour cell line stably expressing the human GHRH receptor. Treatment with butyrate promoted hGH synthesis and improved basal and GHRH-induced hGH-secretion. By acting through GPR41 and 43, butyrate enhanced intracellular free cytosolic Ca2+. Gene-specific silencing of these receptors led to a partial inhibition of the butyrate-induced intracellular Ca2+ rise resulting in a decrease of hGH secretion. This study suggests that butyrate is a metabolic intermediary, which contributes to the secretion and, therefore, to the metabolic actions of GH during fasting.

  11. A Rare Presentation of Adrenal Insufficiency: Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Deficiency and Miyelofibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Agbaht

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH deficiency is a rare cause of hypocortisolism, mostly associated with lymphocytic hypophisitis (LYH. Autoimmune miyelofibrosis is another rare autoimmune disease causing bone marrow fibrosis. Here, we report the case of a patient who presented with common symptoms (weakness, fatigue, weight loss, vague pain and anemia and was diagnosed with both rare autoimmune disorders (lymphocytic hypophisitis and autoimmune myelofibrosis. A 34-year-old male presented with weakness, fatigue, weight loss, and diffuse musculoskeletal pain. He had mild normochromic normocytic anemia. Further investigations revealed bone marrow fibrosis. The World Health Organization criteria were not fulfilled for the diagnosis of primary myelofibrosis. Since his symptoms could not be explained by mild anemia, a thorough evaluation was performed which revealed hypocortisolism associated with undetectable ACTH. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia test yielded insufficient response of ACTH and cortisol. Sellar MRI demonstrated typical features of LYH. Resolution of all the symptoms and anemia was achieved with low-dose glucocorticoid replacement therapy. In conclusion, when evaluating a patient presenting with fatigue, weight loss, vague pain, backache, and mild anemia, hypocortisolism also should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. If the case is isolated ACTH deficiency, the most probable cause is LYH. In such a case, additional endocrinological or non-endocrinological autoimmune disorders are likely to be present. We report the first case of lymphocytic hypophysitis coexisting with autoimmune myelofibrosis. Turk Jem 2014; 2: 47-51

  12. Deletion of OTX2 in neural ectoderm delays anterior pituitary development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Amanda H.; Schade, Vanessa; Lamonerie, Thomas; Camper, Sally A.

    2015-01-01

    OTX2 is a homeodomain transcription factor that is necessary for normal head development in mouse and man. Heterozygosity for loss-of-function alleles causes an incompletely penetrant, haploinsufficiency disorder. Affected individuals exhibit a spectrum of features that range from developmental defects in eye and/or pituitary development to acephaly. To investigate the mechanism underlying the pituitary defects, we used different cre lines to inactivate Otx2 in early head development and in the prospective anterior and posterior lobes. Mice homozygous for Otx2 deficiency in early head development and pituitary oral ectoderm exhibit craniofacial defects and pituitary gland dysmorphology, but normal pituitary cell specification. The morphological defects mimic those observed in humans and mice with OTX2 heterozygous mutations. Mice homozygous for Otx2 deficiency in the pituitary neural ectoderm exhibited altered patterning of gene expression and ablation of FGF signaling. The posterior pituitary lobe and stalk, which normally arise from neural ectoderm, were extremely hypoplastic. Otx2 expression was intact in Rathke's pouch, the precursor to the anterior lobe, but the anterior lobe was hypoplastic. The lack of FGF signaling from the neural ectoderm was sufficient to impair anterior lobe growth, but not the differentiation of hormone-producing cells. This study demonstrates that Otx2 expression in the neural ectoderm is important intrinsically for the development of the posterior lobe and pituitary stalk, and it has significant extrinsic effects on anterior pituitary growth. Otx2 expression early in head development is important for establishing normal craniofacial features including development of the brain, eyes and pituitary gland. PMID:25315894

  13. Sindrom pomanjkanja rastnega hormona pri odraslem - učinki nadomestnega zdravljenja: Syndrome of growth hormone deficiency in adults - effects of growth hormone replacement therapy:

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeifer, Marija

    2001-01-01

    Background. After the cessation of longitudinal growth, growth hormone (GH) continues to subserve an important role in the regulation of body metabolism (stimulation of lipolysis and lipid oxidation, protein synthesis, insulin antagonism, and sodium and water retention) to optimise body composition and function. Most patients with hypopituitarism exhibit the syndrome of GH deficiency with a number of abnormal features which can be reversed with recombinant GH replacement therapy. Conclusions....

  14. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Homozygous GPR161 Mutation in a Family with Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Ender; Buyukkaya, Ramazan; Pehlivan, Davut; Charng, Wu-Lin; Yaykasli, Kursat O.; Bayram, Yavuz; Gambin, Tomasz; Withers, Marjorie; Atik, Mehmed M.; Arslanoglu, Ilknur; Bolu, Semih; Erdin, Serkan; Buyukkaya, Ayla; Yaykasli, Emine; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) is a rare, congenital anomaly of the pituitary gland characterized by pituitary gland insufficiency, thin or discontinuous pituitary stalk, anterior pituitary hypoplasia, and ectopic positioning of the posterior pituitary gland (neurohypophysis). The clinical presentation of patients with PSIS varies from isolated growth hormone (GH) deficiency to combined pituitary insufficiency and accompanying extrapituitary findings. Mutations in HESX1, LHX4, OTX2, SOX3, and PROKR2 have been associated with PSIS in less than 5% of cases; thus, the underlying genetic etiology for the vast majority of cases remains to be determined. Objective: We applied whole-exome sequencing (WES) to a consanguineous family with two affected siblings who have pituitary gland insufficiency and radiographic findings of hypoplastic (thin) pituitary gland, empty sella, ectopic neurohypophysis, and interrupted pitiutary stalk—characteristic clinical diagnostic findings of PSIS. Design and Participants: WES was applied to two affected and one unaffected siblings. Results: WES of two affected and one unaffected sibling revealed a unique homozygous missense mutation in GPR161, which encodes the orphan G protein–coupled receptor 161, a protein responsible for transducing extracellular signals across the plasma membrane into the cell. Conclusion: Mutations of GPR161 may be implicated as a potential novel cause of PSIS. PMID:25322266

  15. The effect of training on responses of beta-endorphin and other pituitary hormones to insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikines, K J; Kjær, Michael; Hagen, C;

    1985-01-01

    We studied whether the previously reported intensified beta-endorphin response to exercise after training might result from a training-induced general increase in anterior pituitary secretory capacity. Identical hypoglycemia was induced by insulin infusion in 7 untrained (VO2max 49 +/- 4 ml X (kg X...... min)-1, mean and SE) and 8 physically trained (VO2max 65 +/- 4 ml X (kg X min)-1) subjects. In response to hypoglycemia, levels of beta-endorphin and prolactin immunoreactivity in serum increased similarly in trained (from 41 +/- 2 pg X ml-1 and 6 +/- 1 pg X ml-1 before hypoglycemia to 103 +/- 11 pg X...... to hypoglycemia neither in trained nor in untrained subjects. Finally, differences in beta-endorphin responses to exercise between trained and untrained subjects cannot be ascribed to differences in responsiveness to hypoglycemia....

  16. Effects of lamprey PQRFamide peptides on brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone concentrations and pituitary gonadotropin-β mRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daukss, Dana; Gazda, Kristen; Kosugi, Takayoshi; Osugi, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Sower, Stacia A

    2012-06-01

    Within the RFamide peptide family, PQRFamide peptides that include neuropeptide FF and AF possess a C-terminal Pro-Gln-Arg-Phe-NH(2) motif. We previously identified PQRFamide peptides, lamprey PQRFa, PQRFa-related peptide (RP)-1 and -RP-2 by immunoaffinity purification in the brain of lamprey, one of the most ancient vertebrate species [13]. Lamprey PQRFamide peptide precursor mRNA was expressed in regions predicted to be involved in neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus. However, the putative function(s) of lamprey PQRFamide peptides (PQRFa, PQRFa-RP-1 and PQRFa-RP-2) were not examined nor was the distribution of PQRFamide peptides examined in other tissues besides the brain. The objective of this study was to determine tissue distribution of lamprey PQRFamide peptide precursor mRNA, and to examine the effects of PQRFamide peptides on brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-I, -II, and -III protein concentrations, and pituitary gonadotropin (GTH)-β mRNA expression in adult lampreys. Lamprey PQRFamide peptide precursor mRNA was expressed in the eye and the brain. Lamprey PQRFa at 100 μg/kg increased brain concentrations of lamprey GnRH-II compared with controls. PQRFa, PQRFa-RP-1 and PQRFa-RP-2 did not significantly change brain protein concentrations of either lamprey GnRH-I, -III, or lamprey GTH-β mRNA expression in the pituitary. These data suggest that one of the PQRFamide peptides may act as a neuroregulator of at least the lamprey GnRH-II system in adult female lamprey.

  17. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) regulates prolactin, growth hormone, and IGF-1 receptor expression in the pituitary gland of the gilthead sea bream Sparus aurata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed-Geba, Khaled; Martos-Sitcha, J A; Galal-Khallaf, A; Mancera, J M; Martínez-Rodríguez, G

    2016-02-01

    The role of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on regulation of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) as well as the possible involvement of IGF-1 receptor subtype a (IGF-1Ra) mRNA was assessed in juvenile specimens of Sparus aurata. IGF-1Ra was successfully cloned, and active receptor domains were localized in its mRNA precursor. Also, phylogenetic analysis of the protein sequence indicated a closer proximity to IGF-1Ra isoform found in zebrafish and other teleosts, than to the isoform IGF-1Rb. The most abundant presence of IGF-1Ra mRNA was detected in white muscle, whereas head kidney showed the lowest gene expression among 24 different studied tissues. Pituitaries of juvenile specimens of S. aurata were incubated in vitro with different doses of IGF-1 (0, 1, 100, and 1000 ng mL(-1)) during a period of 10 h. Total RNA with a high quality could be obtained from these pituitaries. PRL mRNA expression significantly increased with increasing IGF-1 doses. Similarly, IGF-1Ra mRNA increased its expression in response to IGF-1. However, GH mRNA levels decreased in a dose-dependent manner after IGF-1 treatment. The contradictory responses of GH and PRL expressions to IGF-1 in our experiment are possibly mediated by IGF-1Ra presence on the somatotrophs and prolactotrophs. The increase in IGF-1Ra mRNA levels may be related to the proper activation of the PI3-K/Akt signal transduction pathways which are normally involved in GH and PRL regulation.

  18. Relative effectiveness of carp pituitary extract, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog LHRHa injections and LHRHa implants for producing hybrid catfish fry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoption of the hybrid catfish (channel catfish, Ictalruus punctatus, female x blue catfish, I. furcatus, male) is increasing in the catfish industry. The most effective way to produce fry is hormone induced spawning of females coupled with hand stripping and in vitro fertilization. The success of...

  19. Evaluation of pituitary function in cases with the diagnosis of pediatric mild traumatic brain injury: Cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Aylanç

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was to determine whether pituitary dysfunction occurs after head trauma in children or not and which axis is affected more; to define the association of pituitary dysfunction with the severity of head trauma and duration time after the diagnosis of head trauma. Materials and Methods: In this study, 24 children who were diagnosed with head trauma were evaluated regarding pituitary dysfunction. In all cases, after 12 h fasting, serum cortisol, fT3, fT4, thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, insulin-like growth factor-1, serum sodium, urine density, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, in female cases E2, in male cases, TT levels were determined. Results: Mean age of children was 9.5 ± 3.1 years, 14 children (58.3% had mild, 9 children (37.5% had moderate, and 1 children (4.2% had severe head trauma according to the Glasgow coma scale. Mean duration time after head trauma was 29.4 ± 9.8 months. In all cases, no pathologic condition was determined in the pituitary hormonal axis. In one children (4.2%, low basal cortisol level was found. There were no children with hormonal deficiency in this study. Conclusion: Although pituitary dysfunction after head trauma may develop in the early period, some may present in the late period; therefore, all cases should be followed up at outpatient clinics for a longer period.

  20. Pituitary dysfunction in traumatic brain injury: Is evaluation in the acute phase worthwhile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalwadi, Pradip P.; Bhagwat, Nikhil M.; Tayde, Parimal S.; Joshi, Ameya S.; Varthakavi, Premlata K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an under-recognized cause of hypopituitarism. According to recent data, it could be more frequent than previously known. However, there is a scarcity of data in Indian population. Aims: The main aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of pituitary hormone deficiencies in the acute phase of TBI. The secondary objectives were to correlate the severity of trauma with basal hormone levels and to determine whether initial hormone deficiencies predict mortality. Subjects and Methods: Forty-nine TBI patients (41 men and 8 women) were included in this study. Pituitary functions were evaluated within 24 h of admission. Results: Gonadotropin deficiency was found in 65.3% patient while 46.9% had low insulin-like growth factor-1, 12.24% had cortisol level <7 mcg/dl. Cortisol and prolactin level were positively correlated with the severity of TBI suggestive of stress response. Free triiodothyronine (fT3) and free thyroxine were significantly lower in patients with increasing severity of tuberculosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that mortality after TBI was unrelated to the basal pituitary hormone levels except low T3 level, which was found to be positively related to mortality. Conclusions: Pituitary dysfunction is common after TBI and the most commonly affected axes are growth hormone and gonadotropin axis. Low fT3 correlates best with mortality. During the acute phase of TBI, at least an assessment of cortisol is vital as undetected cortisol deficiency can be life-threatening PMID:28217503

  1. Pituitary dysfunction in traumatic brain injury: Is evaluation in the acute phase worthwhile?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip P Dalwadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an under-recognized cause of hypopituitarism. According to recent data, it could be more frequent than previously known. However, there is a scarcity of data in Indian population. Aims: The main aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of pituitary hormone deficiencies in the acute phase of TBI. The secondary objectives were to correlate the severity of trauma with basal hormone levels and to determine whether initial hormone deficiencies predict mortality. Subjects and Methods: Forty-nine TBI patients (41 men and 8 women were included in this study. Pituitary functions were evaluated within 24 h of admission. Results: Gonadotropin deficiency was found in 65.3% patient while 46.9% had low insulin-like growth factor-1, 12.24% had cortisol level <7 mcg/dl. Cortisol and prolactin level were positively correlated with the severity of TBI suggestive of stress response. Free triiodothyronine (fT3 and free thyroxine were significantly lower in patients with increasing severity of tuberculosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that mortality after TBI was unrelated to the basal pituitary hormone levels except low T3 level, which was found to be positively related to mortality. Conclusions: Pituitary dysfunction is common after TBI and the most commonly affected axes are growth hormone and gonadotropin axis. Low fT3 correlates best with mortality. During the acute phase of TBI, at least an assessment of cortisol is vital as undetected cortisol deficiency can be life-threatening

  2. Temozolomide treatment of a pituitary carcinoma and two pituitary macroadenomas resistant to conventional therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, C; Schroeder, H D; Hansen, S

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Aggressive pituitary tumours may be difficult to treat. Temozolomide (TMZ) is an alkylating cytostaticum. In a small number of cases, TMZ therapy has been reported to reduce pituitary tumour size and hormone hypersecretion. DESIGN: We present three patients with pituitary tumours treat...

  3. Hypopituitarism as the presenting feature of bronchogenic carcinoma with metastases to the pituitary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip C Johnston

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumours metastasizing to the pituitary gland are uncommon. Symptomatic patients with pituitary metastases can present with diabetes insipidus, headache, visual field defects and/or anterior pituitary hormonal dysfunction. Treatment options for pituitary metastases include, surgical resection, cranial or parasellar irradiation and/or chemotherapy, and hormonal replacement if indicated. The overall prognosis of pituitary metastases is poor. We present a case of hypopituitarism as the presenting feature of bronchogenic carcinoma with metastases to the pituitary gland.

  4. Pituitary disease in childhood: utility of magnetic resonance; Patologia hipofisaria en la edad pediatrica: unidad de la resonance magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela, A. C.; Oleaga, L.; Ibanez, A. M.; Campo, M.; Grande, D. [Hospital de Basurto. Bilbao (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    To assess the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the study of pediatric patients with clinical suspicion of pituitary disease. We studied 18 patients aged 7 to 18 years.Fifteen had hormonal disturbances, two presented amenorrhea and 1 complained of headache, fever and symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia. All the patients were examined using a Siemens SP 42 1-Tesla MRI scanner. Sagittal and coronal T1-weighted spin-echo images were obtained; in addition T2-weighted spin-echo or fast spin-echo imaging was performed in ten cases and intravenous gadolinium was administered in nine. We found 9 patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysgenesis, 2 with germinoma, 2 cases of pituitary hemosiderosis in patients with thalassemia, 2 cases of microadenoma, one abscess, one case of idiopathic central diabetes insipidus and one of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. MR enabled us to assess pituitary structural alterations in children with hypothalamic-pituitary hormone deficiencies. In our series of patients, hypothalamic-pituitary dysgenesiss was the most frequent cause of adenohypophyseal deficiencies, and most cases of central diabetes insipidus were secondary to masses in the sellar and suprasellar region. In patients with thalassemia, T2-weighted MR images showed the amount of iron deposited in adenophypophysis. Gadolinium-enhanced studies were useful in the study of masses and when the presence of microadenoma was suspected. (Author) 26 refs.

  5. The Effect of an Angiotensin II Antagonist on Hormones of Pituitary-Gonad Axis in Adult Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ebrahim Hosseini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of valsartan, an angiotensin II antagonist, on the function of the pituitary- gonad axis. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 220 g were used as experimental and control groups. The 3 experimental groups received either 100, 200, or 400 mg/kg/day valsartan in 1 ml water orally for 28 days, while a set of control group received 1 ml distilled water for the same period of time and another set received no treatment. At the end of the experimental period, blood was collected and serum was analyzed for FSH, LH, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone levels by RIA methods. Results: There were no significant differences among FSH levels at all doses of valsartan used, while the serum LH level was decreased significantly at the maximum dose of the drug used. Serum testosterone level decreased at both the 200 and 400 mg/kg dose compared to the control, while the dihydrotestosterone level was reduced significantly at all the three dosages used. Conclusion: According to our founding, suggested that the effects of valsartan on serum LH, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone may be mediated through angiotensin II receptor.

  6. Heart failure caused by atrial fibrillation in a patient with isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency and hashimoto′s thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Maemura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 75-year-old female patient with a history of Hashimoto′s thyroiditis who presented with congestive heart failure caused by atrial fibrillation associated with isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH deficiency. This is the first case of the combination of these complex conditions. Clinical conditions in a patient with isolated ACTH deficiency and Hashimoto′s thyroiditis can be variable. Thus, it is sometimes difficult to establish a diagnosis. The mechanism underlying heart failure may be complex in some cases. Various conditions can affect patients simultaneously. Therefore, making a proper diagnosis is necessary to improve the patient′s prognosis.

  7. Growth retardation and growth hormone deficiency in patients with Ataxia telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Sandra; Pietzner, Julia; Hoche, Franziska; Taylor, Alexander Malcolm R; Last, James I; Schubert, Ralf; Zielen, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a devastating human recessive disorder characterised by progressive cerebellar ataxia, immunodeficiency, genetic instability, and cancer susceptibility. In addition, many patients suffer from growth failure. We analyzed growth and IGF-1/BP3 levels of 24 A-T-patients compared with an age-matched group of healthy controls (n = 36). Ten (41.7%) A-T patients and none of healthy controls had an IGF-1 level below the 3rd percentile for age. The growth hormone (GH) stimulation tests revealed a severe GH deficiency with no increase of >5 ng/ml in six of the ten A-T patients. The IGF-1 generation tests revealed normal increases in IGF-1 values in all patients. Our results show that a disturbance in the GH/IGF-1 axis was present in 58.3% of A-T patients. Low levels of GH were the result of reduced central GH secretion. GH treatment may be a therapeutic option for A-T patients with severe growth failure.

  8. Hormonal interactions during cluster-root development in phosphate-deficient white lupin (Lupinus albus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengrui; Rahman, A B M Moshiur; Wang, Guoying; Ludewig, Uwe; Shen, Jianbo; Neumann, Günter

    2015-04-01

    This study addresses hormonal interactions involved in cluster-root (CR) development of phosphate (Pi)-deficient white lupin (Lupinus albus), which represents the most efficient plant strategy for root-induced mobilisation of sparingly soluble soil phosphorus (P) sources. Shoot-to-root translocation of auxin was unaffected by P-limitation, while strong stimulatory effects of external sucrose on CR formation, even in P-sufficient plants, suggest sucrose, rather than auxins, acts as a shoot-borne signal, triggering the induction of CR primordia. Ethylene may act as mediator of the sucrose signal, as indicated by moderately increased expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis in pre-emergent clusters and by strong inhibitory effects of the ethylene antagonist CoCl2 on CR formation induced by sucrose amendments or P-limitation. As reported in other plants, moderately increased production of brassinosteroids (BRs) and cytokinin, in pre-emergent clusters, may be required for the formation of auxin gradients necessary for induction of CR primordia via interference with auxin biosynthesis and transport. The well-documented inhibition of root elongation by high doses of ethylene may be involved in the growth inhibition of lateral rootlets during CR maturation, indicated by a massive increased expression of gene involved in ethylene production, associated with a declined expression of transcripts with stimulatory effects (BR and auxin-related genes). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. [Relation between parathyroid hormone and cardiovascular risk in patients with vitamin D deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado Cerrada, Jesús; Parra Caballero, Pedro; Vega Piris, Lorena; Suárez Fernández, Carmen

    2013-10-05

    Vitamin D deficiency and parathyroid hormone (PTH) are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk and arterial stiffness. The aim of our study is to compare the cardiovascular risk in subjects with low vitamin D, attending to the PTH concentration, as well as evaluating the response after administration of vitamin D. Prospective study of patients with a concentration of 25(OH)-vitamin D below 30nmol/l. We evaluated vascular risk parameters as blood pressure, arterial stiffness, lipid profile and glucose metabolism. Patients received vitamin D supplements for 3 months, after which the previous parameters were reassessed. A total of 32 patients were included. Those with PTH over 65pg/ml were older, had worse renal function, higher systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and arterial stiffness. Treatment with vitamin D showed a statistically significant trend to lower blood pressure and pulse wave velocity. The increase in PTH in patients with low vitamin D involves poor control of blood pressure and increased vascular stiffness. Vitamin D replacement shows a tendency to reduce these parameters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Information for People Treated with Human Growth Hormone (Summary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NHPP): Information for People Treated with Pituitary Human Growth Hormone (Summary) How did Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) occur in people treated with pituitary human growth hormone (hGH)? From 1963 to 1985, the National Hormone ...

  11. Sulpiride-Induced Hyperprolactinemia in Mature Female Rats: Evidence for Alterations in The Reproductive System, Pituitary and Ovarian Hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mostafapour

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of hyperprolactinemia following administration of conventional antipsychotic drugs requires further investigation. The current study is designed to evaluate the effect of sulpiride (SPD-induced hyperprolactinemia on alterations to ovarian follicular growth, gonadotropins, and ovarian hormones and to analyze the extent of potential problems in mammary glands. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 albino Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control (no treatment, control-sham (0.3 ml olive oil, low dose SPD (20 mg/kg and high dose SPD (40 mg/kg. All compounds were intraperitoneally (IP administered for a period of 28 days. Results: After 28 days, we dissected the rats’ ovarian tissues, uterine horns and mammary glands which were sent for histological analyses. We counted the numbers of normal, atretic follicles and corpora lutea (CL. Serum levels of prolactin (PRL, estradiol, progesterone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH were evaluated. SPD-administered animals showed sporadic follicular atresia in different sizes associated with higher numbers of CL on the ovaries. The mammary glands exhibited features of galactorrhea. There was remarkable (p<0.05 elevation in SPD-administered animals’ uterine horn endometrium, myometrium and perimetrium thicknesses. The serum levels of PRL and progesterone significantly (p<0.05 increased, while the serum concentration of estradiol, LH and FSH notably (p<0.05 decreased according to the SPD administered dose. No histological and biological changes occurred in control-sham animals. SPD-induced animals had unsuccessful attempts at mating and decreased pregnancy rates. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that SPD-induced disturbances depend on PRL level. In addition, an increased PRL level is largely dependent on the administered doses of SPD.

  12. Profile of follitropin alpha/lutropin alpha combination for the stimulation of follicular development in women with severe luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Leonardo; Selman, Helmy

    2016-01-01

    A severe gonadotropin deficiency together with chronic estradiol deficiency leading to amenorrhea characterizes patients suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Administration of both follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) to these patients has been shown to be essential in achieving successful stimulation of follicular development, ovulation, and rescue of fertility. In recent years, the availability of both recombinant FSH (rFSH) and recombinant LH (rLH) has provided a new therapeutic option for the stimulation of follicular growth in hypopituitary-hypogonadotropic women (World Health Organization Group I). In this article, we review the data reported in the literature to highlight the role and the efficacy of using recombinant gonadotropins, rFSH and rLH, in the treatment of women with severe LH/FSH deficiency. Although the studies on this issue are limited and the experiences available in the literature are few due to the small number of such patients, it is clearly evident that the recombinant gonadotropins rFSH and rLH are efficient in treating patients affected by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The results observed in the studies reported in this review suggest that recombinant gonadotropins are able to induce proper follicular growth, oocyte maturation, and eventually pregnancy in this group of women. Moreover, the clinical use of recombinant gonadotropins in this type of patients has given more insight into some endocrinological aspects of ovarian function that have not yet been fully understood.

  13. Influence of apricot kernels on blood plasma levels of selected anterior pituitary hormones in male and female rabbits in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Katarína Michalcová; Marek Halenár; Eva Tušimová; Anton Kováčik; Ľubica Chrastinová; Ľubomír Ondruška; Rastislav Jurčík; Eduard Kolesár; Adriana Kolesarova

    2016-01-01

    Amygdalin is represented in the family Rosacea more precisely in an apricot kernels and an almonds. There are a lot of components such as trace elements, vitamins, carbohydrates, organic acids, esters, phenols, terpenoids, except cyanogenic glycoside in the seeds. It is known that bioregulators can modulate the activity of specific enzymes and hormones very exactly at low levels and in a short time. The aim of our study was examine the effects of selected doses (0, 60, 300, 420 mg/kg b.w.) of...

  14. Reevaluation of the electrophysiological actions of thyrotropin-releasing hormone in a rat pituitary cell line (GH3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simasko, S M

    1991-04-01

    The electrophysiological actions of TRH were examined in the clonal pituitary cell line GH3 with the use of the perforated patch variation of the standard whole cell patch-clamp technique. The action of TRH on spontaneously spiking cells was to cause a brief hyperpolarization (first phase action), followed by a period during which action potential behavior was significantly modified (second phase action). The modifications during second phase action included a reduction in the slope of the up-stroke, a reduced peak potential, an increase in duration, and a depolarizing shift of the after-hyperpolarization. The modification of voltage- and calcium-dependent conductances that underlie these changes were investigated in voltage clamp experiments. During first phase action TRH was found to increase calcium-dependent potassium current. During second phase action TRH was found to significantly reduce the L-type calcium current (35%), with no alteration in the T-type calcium current. The second phase action of TRH on calcium-dependent potassium conductance was complex. First, a decrease was observed. This was followed by an increase that did not become fully manifest until after TRH was washed from the cell. TRH caused no change in voltage-dependent potassium current. These results indicate that the second phase action of TRH on action potential behavior in GH3 cells is mediated by a reduction in L-type calcium current and alterations in the behavior of calcium-dependent potassium currents, but not through changes in voltage-dependent potassium currents.

  15. Role of mTOR Inhibitors in Growth Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenomas Harboring Different FGFR4 Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Shahrzad; Monsalves, Eric; Tateno, Toru; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-09-01

    Pituitary adenomas (PAs) are common intracranial lesions. Available medical therapies are limited in PAs, and therefore, it is essential to identify treatments that control PA growth when surgery is not an option. Fibroblast growth factor 4 is implicated in PA pathogenesis; therefore, in this study, we used an isogenic mammosomatotroph cell line (GH4C1) harboring different fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-4 genotypes to establish and characterize intracranial xenograft mouse models that can be used for preclinical drug testing. We show that proliferating GH4C1 tumors have an average latency of 3 weeks to form. Histological analysis revealed that prototypic FGFR4 (G388) tumors express increased prolactin and less GH, whereas tumors possessing the polymorphic variant of FGFR4 (R388) express increased GH relative to prolactin. All tumors show abundant mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling as confirmed using phosphorylated (p)-S6 and p-4E-binding protein 1 as downstream regulators of this pathway. We subsequently demonstrate that the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 decreases tumor growth rate and reduces p-S6 but not p-4E-binding protein 1 activation, regardless of FGFR4 status. More importantly, GH activity was significantly reduced after mTOR inhibition in the R388 polymorphic variant tumors. This reduction was also associated with a concomitant reduction in serum IGF-1 levels in the R388 group. In summary, we demonstrate that the GH4C1 FGFR polymorphic xenograft is a useful model for examining PAs. Furthermore, we show that RAD001 can efficiently reduce tumor growth rate by a reduction in mTOR signaling and more importantly results in control of GH expression and IGF-1 secretion, providing further support for using mTOR inhibitors in PA patients, in particular GH-producing adenomas.

  16. Centrally Applied Somatostatin Inhibits the Estrogen-Induced Luteinizing Hormone Surge via Hypothalamic Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Cell Activation in Female Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, van H.H.; Swarts, J.J.M.; Heijning, van de H.J.M.; Beek, van der E.M.

    2004-01-01

    Overexpression of growth hormone (GH) as well as GH-deficiency dramatically impairs reproductive function. Decreased reproductive function as a result of altered GH release is, at least partially, due to changes at the hypothalamic-pituitary level. We hypothesize that hypothalamic somatostatin (SOM)

  17. Correlation between plasma neuropeptide Y and growth hormone in patients with pituitary adenoma%垂体腺瘤患者血浆神经肽Y与生长激素水平相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甄自刚; 陈胜利; 马景鑑

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨垂体腺瘤患者血浆神经肽Y与生长激素之间的相关关系.方法 收集82例垂体腺瘤患者空腹静脉血3ml,进行血浆神经肽Y放射免疫测定分析,并与生长激素水平进行相关分析.初步探讨神经肽Y与生长激素之间的相关性.结果 促性腺激素细胞腺瘤患者中血浆神经肽Y与生长激素呈负相关.而在其他组别中神经肽Y与生长激素均无相关.结论神经肽Y参与了垂体腺瘤病理生理状态中下丘脑.垂体轴生长激素的调节,可能与垂体腺瘤的发生有关.%Objective To investigate the correlation between plasma neuropeptide Y (NPY) and growth hormone (GH) in patients with pituitary adenoma. Methods Fasting venous blood (3 ml per patient) was collected from 82 patients with pituitary adenoma. The level of plasma NPY was measured using radioimmunoassay, and the correlation with GH was analyzed. Results The level of plasma GH was negatively correlated with NPY in patients with go-nadotropin cell adenoma but not in those with pituitary adenoma of other cell-types. Conclusion NPY is involved in the regulation of growth hormone production from the hypothalamus-pituitary axis in pathological conditions, and is possibly associated with development of pituitary adenoma.

  18. Effects of octreotide on insulin-like growth factor I and metabolic indices in growth hormone-treated growth hormone-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Ørskov, Hans;

    1993-01-01

    Abstract Animals studies have demonstrated that in addition to inhibiting growth hormone (GH) secretion octreotide inhibits in a direct manner hepatic or peripheral insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) generation. To test this hypothesis in humans we studied ten GH-deficient patients with frequent.......5 +/- 1.47 (octreotide) and 12.8 +/- 1.42 (placebo) (p = 0.83), and Tmax (h) was 6.1 +/- 0.97 (octreotide) and 5.2 +/- 0.65 (placebo) (p = 0.49). Growth hormone administration was associated with an increase in serum IGF-I (microgram/l), which was identical during the two studies, from 85.3 +/- 19...

  19. Melatonina y deficiencia de hormona de crecimiento: contribucin a la evaluacin de los desrdenes neuroendocrinos Melatonin and growth hormone deficiency: a contribution to the evaluation of neuroendocrine disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Fideleff

    2011-10-01

    . The relationship between melatonin and different pituitary hormones and sex steroids has been studied; however, the relationship between growth hormone (GH and melatonin remains unclear. Considering that melatonin is an essential component of the so-called "biological clock", related to circadian rhythm, day-night cycle, and sleep-dependent hormonal alterations, and knowing that physiological GH secretion occurs predominantly at night, we decided to evaluate nocturnal melatonin secretion in a group of GH-deficient children and adults on and off replacement therapy. Patients and Methods: We studied 44 patients with GH deficiency (GHD, duly confirmed by pharmacological tests, divided into 4 groups: Group a (Ga : untreated GHD children; Group b (Gb: GHD children on GH replacement therapy (0.16 mg/Kg/week, stable dose for at least 6 months; Group c (Gc: untreated GHD adults and Group d (Gd: GHD adults on GH replacement therapy (0.1- 0.8 mg/day, to maintain IGF1 between 0 and +2 SDS, stable dose for at least 6 months. All associated hormonal deficits were adequately replaced. Melatonin production was evaluated by measuring the excretion of its major urinary metabolite: 6-Sulphatoxymelatonin (6-SM. Urinary 6-SM was measured (radioimmunoassay, Stockgrand Ltd, Guildford, UK in nocturnal samples (6PM to 8AM in all patients. Results: Nocturnal 6-SM levels expressed as μg/unit of time were (mean SEM for the pediatric group: Ga = 6.50 ( 5.10 and Gb = 8.21 ( 5.31 (Mann Whitney test, p = 0.82. For adults: Gc = 2.99 ( 1.17 and Gd = 6.60 ( 2.00 (Mann Whitney test, p = 0.35. Discussion and Conclusions: It is difficult to characterize the relationship between melatonin and GH in healthy individuals; however, the administration of intravenous melatonin stimulates GH secretion in normal adults. In some hypothalamic-pituitary alterations, changes in the secretory pattern of melatonin have been reported, but possible variations in GHD patients have not been thoroughly characterized yet

  20. Testicular function in boys previously treated with recombinant-human growth hormone for non-growth hormone-deficient short stature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radicioni, A F; Paris, E; De Marco, E; Anzuini, A; Gandini, L; Lenzi, A

    2007-12-01

    Data on the effects of recombinant human GH (hGH) therapy during male puberty on future testis function are still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of recombinant hGH treatment on reproductive function in non-GH-deficient short stature boys. Eight boys with non-GH-deficient short stature, affected by constitutional delay of puberty or idiopathic short stature, were retrospectively studied after recombinant-hGH treatment to verify gonadal development, hormone production and semen quality. Auxological data, endocrinological/ andrological parameters and laboratory evaluation (GH, IGF-I, FSH, LH, testosterone, inhibin B) were assessed before treatment; after completion of pubertal development, the same parameters plus SHBG levels were evaluated and a seminal fluid examination was conducted (ejaculate volume, pH, sperm concentration, total sperm count, forward and total motility, morphology). All patients showed normal testicular volume at the final pubertal stage, with regular androgenization. Hormonal levels were within the normal adult range in all boys. Considering the immature reproductive system of these patients in comparison with adults, semen parameters (sperm count, motility, and morphology) were within almost normal limits, except in one patient. Although patients showed the wide fluctuation of semen values frequently observed at the end of puberty, the hypophysis-gonadal axis hormones were in the normal range in all adolescents. Pathological measurements of some seminal parameters were found in one patient only. This study suggests that recombinant hGH treatment has no detrimental effects on the development and maturation of male gonadal function in non- GH deficient short stature young patients.

  1. Comparative Reproductive and Growth Performance of Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822) and Its Hybrid Induced with Synthetic Hormone and Pituitary Gland of Clarias gariepinus

    OpenAIRE

    Ndimele, Prince Emeka; Owodeinde, Fatai Gbolahan

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the comparative reproductive, growth performances and nutrient utilization of Clarias gariepinus and its hybrid "heteroclarias" using ovaprim and pituitary extract of male and female C. gariepinus. The experimental broodstocks consisted of 6 female C. gariepinus (2 each were induced separately with ovaprim, male pituitary of C. gariepinus and female pituitary of C. gariepinus), 3 male C. gariepinus and 3 male Heterobranchus bidorsalis. 2 female C. ...

  2. Psychometric properties of two measures of psychological well-being in adult growth hormone deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell-Jones David L

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychometric properties of two measures of psychological well-being were evaluated for adults with growth hormone deficiency (GHD: the General Well-being Index, (GWBI – British version of the Psychological General Well-being Index, and the 12-item Well-being Questionnaire (W-BQ12. Methods Reliability, structure and other aspects of validity were investigated in a cross-sectional study of 157 adults with treated or untreated GHD, and sensitivity to change in a randomised placebo-controlled study of three months' growth hormone (GH withdrawal from 12 of 21 GH-treated adults. Results Very high completion rates were evidence that both questionnaires were acceptable to respondents. Factor analyses did not indicate the existence of useful GWBI subscales, but confirmed the validity of calculating a GWBI Total score. However, very high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.96, N = 152, probably indicated some item redundancy in the 22-item GWBI. On the other hand, factor analyses confirmed the validity of the three W-BQ12 subscales of Negative Well-being, Energy, and Positive Well-being, each having excellent internal reliability (alphas of 0.86, 0.86 and 0.88, respectively, N from 152 to 154. There was no sign of item redundancy in the highly acceptable Cronbach's alpha of 0.93 (N = 148 for the whole W-BQ12 scale. Whilst neither questionnaire found significant differences between GH-treated and non-GH-treated patients, there were correlations (for GH-treated patients with duration of GH treatment for GWBI Total (r = -0.36, p = 0.001, N = 85, W-BQ12 Total (r = 0.35, p = 0.001, N = 88 and for all W-BQ12 subscales: thus the longer the duration of GH treatment (ranging from 0.5 to 10 years, the better the well-being. Both questionnaires found that men had significantly better overall well-being than women. The W-BQ12 was more sensitive to change than the GWBI in the GH-Withdrawal study. A significant between

  3. Regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) subunit biosynthesis in cultured male anterior pituitary cells: effects of GnRH and testosterone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krummen, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the direct effects of testosterone (T) on LH subunit apoprotein synthesis, glycosylation and release by the male pituitary. Cells from 1 wk castrate rats were cultured for 48 h in steroid-free medium followed by 48h in media /+-/10nM T. The cells were then incubated for 2, 4, 6, 8, or 12h in media containing (/sup 35/S)-methionine (/sup 35/S-Met) or (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine (/sup 3/H-Gln), /+-/1nM GnRH (exp 1) or in media containing precursors /+-/ 10nM T and/or 1nM GnRH (exp 2). Radiolabeled precursor incorporation into LH subunits was determined by immunoprecipitation followed by SDS-PAGE. In experiment 1, precursor incorporation into total protein (TP) and LH subunits increased linearly with time for at least 8h. GnRH did not effect precursor incorporation in to TP or /sup 35/S-Met labeling of LH subunits, but stimulated a linear, time-dependent accumulation of /sup 3/H-Gln into total LH subunits and the release of RIA-LH and radiolabeled subunits into media. Based on these results, the effects of T on LH subunit biosynthesis were studied during an 8h incubation. In experiment 2, GnRH enhanced the total /sup 3/H-Gln incorporation (but not /sup 35/S-Met incorporation) into both LH subunits. GnRH stimulated the release of /sup 35/S-Met LH..cap alpha.. and /sup 3/H-Gln LH subunits into media and increased the relative glycosylation of secreted LH subunits without altering the relative glycosylation of intracellular LH subunits. T inhibited RIA-LH release and incorporation of both precursors into total and secreted LH subunits (/+-/GnRH). However, only the relative glycosylation of secreted LH..cap alpha.. was reduced by T (/+-/GnRh).

  4. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate disrupts pituitary and testicular hormonal functions to reduce sperm quality in mature goldfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golshan, M.; Hatef, A.; Socha, M.;

    2015-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) interferes with male reproductive endocrine system in mammals, however its effects on fish reproduction are largely unknown. We evaluated sperm quality and investigated reproductive endocrine system in mature goldfish (Carassius auratus) exposed to nominal 1, 10......, respectively. Luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were decreased in DEHP and E2 treated goldfish following 15 and 30d of exposure, respectively. In DEHP treated goldfish, gnrh3, kiss1 and its receptor (gpr54) mRNA levels did not change during the experimental period. In E2 treated goldfish, gnrh3 mRNA levels were...... decreased at day 7, but kiss1 and gpr54 mRNA levels were increased at day 30 of exposure. The mRNA levels of genes encoding testicular LH and androgen receptors remained unchanged in DEHP and E2 treated goldfish. In contrast to E2 treated goldfish, vitellogenin production was not induced in DEHP treated...

  5. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) deficiencies affect expression of lipolytic activities in mouse adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Maria; Schmidinger, Hannes; Riesenhuber, Gernot; Rechberger, Gerald N; Kollroser, Manfred; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Kronenberg, Florian; Hermetter, Albin

    2012-12-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are key enzymes involved in intracellular degradation of triacylglycerols. It was the aim of this study to elucidate how the deficiency in one of these proteins affects the residual lipolytic proteome in adipose tissue. For this purpose, we compared the lipase patterns of brown and white adipose tissue from ATGL (-/-) and HSL (-/-) mice using differential activity-based gel electrophoresis. This method is based on activity-recognition probes possessing the same substrate analogous structure but carrying different fluorophores for specific detection of the enzyme patterns of two different tissues in one electrophoresis gel. We found that ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue had a profound effect on the expression levels of other lipolytic and esterolytic enzymes in this tissue, whereas HSL-deficiency hardly showed any effect in brown adipose tissue. Neither ATGL- nor HSL-deficiency greatly influenced the lipase patterns in white adipose tissue. Enzyme activities of mouse tissues on acylglycerol substrates were analyzed as well, showing that ATGL-and HSL-deficiencies can be compensated for at least in part by other enzymes. The proteins that responded to ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue were overexpressed and their activities on acylglycerols were analyzed. Among these enzymes, Es1, Es10, and Es31-like represent lipase candidates as they catalyze the hydrolysis of long-chain acylglycerols.

  6. Tetrac can replace thyroid hormone during brain development in mouse mutants deficient in the thyroid hormone transporter Mct8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Horn (Sigrun); S. Kersseboom (Simone); S. Mayerl (Steffen); J. Müller (Julia); C. Groba (Claudia); M. Trajkovic-Arsic (Marija); T. Ackermann (Tobias); T.J. Visser (Theo); H. Heuer (Heike)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) plays a critical role in mediating the uptake of thyroid hormones (THs) into the brain. In patients, inactivating mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with a severe form of psychomotor retardation and abnormal serum TH levels. Here, we evalua

  7. Pituitary gigantism: Causes and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Acromegaly and pituitary gigantism are very rare conditions resulting from excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH), usually by a pituitary adenoma. Pituitary gigantism occurs when GH excess overlaps with the period of rapid linear growth during childhood and adolescence. Until recently, its etiology and clinical characteristics have been poorly understood. Genetic and genomic causes have been identified in recent years that explain about half of cases of pituitary gigantism. We describe these recent discoveries and focus on some important settings in which gigantism can occur, including familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and the newly described X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome.

  8. Reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in mice deficient for pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide type-I-receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Mathias; Otto, Christiane; Zörner, Björn; Zacher, Christiane; Schütz, Günther; Henn, Fritz A; Gass, Peter

    2004-04-22

    In vitro pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) induces the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via its specific receptor PAC1. Since BDNF has been implicated in learning paradigms and mice lacking functional PAC1 have deficits in hippocampus-dependent associative learning, we investigated whether PAC1 mutants show alterations in hippocampal expression of BDNF and its receptor TrkB. Semi-quantitative in situ-hybridization using exon-specific BDNF-probes revealed significantly reduced expression of the exon-III and exon-V-specific transcripts within the hippocampal CA3 region in PAC1-deficient mice. A similar trend was observed for the exon-I-specific transcript. The expression of the exon-III-specific transcript was also reduced within the dentate gyrus, while Trk B-expression did not differ between genotypes. Our data demonstrate that even in vivo PAC1-mediated signaling seems to play a pivotal role for the transcriptional regulation of BDNF.

  9. Becker and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy associated with pituitary dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, G; Taiuti, R; Sbrilli, C; Pizzi, A

    1987-08-01

    In 1981 a report appeared of a patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy associated with dwarfism caused by growth hormone deficiency, in whom the muscular disease was unusually benign. The authors suggested that the benign course might be related to the growth hormone deficiency and dwarfism. Other authors later supported this idea, having observed that in dystrophic mice and hamsters with congenital and experimentally induced pituitary dwarfism, respectively, pathological expressions of the dystrophy were markedly reduced. In this paper one case of Becker and one of limb-girdle dystrophy, each associated with short stature and growth hormone deficiency are described. In these cases the disease did not have a particularly benign course. It is concluded that caution is necessary, at least in certain cases, before an association between reduced muscular growth and the dystrophic process can be assumed.

  10. Adult growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients demonstrate heterogeneity between childhood onset and adult onset before and during human GH treatment. Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attanasio, A F; Lamberts, S W; Matranga, A M

    1997-01-01

    The onset of adult GH deficiency may be during either adulthood (AO) or childhood (CO), but potential differences have not previously been examined. In this study the baseline and GH therapy (12.5 micrograms/kg per day) data from CO (n = 74; mean age 29 yr) and AO (n = 99; mean age 44 yr) GH-defi...

  11. Effects of Long-term Growth Hormone Replacement in Adults With Growth Hormone Deficiency Following Cure of Acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritos, Nicholas A; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Korbonits, Márta

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: GH deficiency (GHD) may occur in adults with cured acromegaly (acroGHD). OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the effectiveness and safety of GH replacement in acroGHD. DESIGN: This study was a retrospective analysis of data from KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database). SETTING...

  12. Heterogeneity in the growth hormone pituitary gland system of rats and humans: Implications to microgravity based research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Hayes, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Cleveland, C.; Todd, P.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    The cell separation techniques of velocity sedimentation, flow cytometry and continuous flow electrophoresis were used to obtain enriched populations of growth hormone (GH) cells. The goal was to isolate a GH cell subpopulation which releases GH molecules which are very high in biological activity, it was important to use a method which was effective in processing large numbers of cells over a short time span. The techniques based on sedimentation are limited by cell density overlaps and streaming. While flow cytometry is useful in the analytical mode for objectively establishing cell purity, the numbers of cells which can be processed in the sort mode are so small as to make this approach ineffective in terms of the long term goals. It was shown that continuous flow electrophoresis systems (CFES) can separate GH cells from other cell types on the basis of differences in surface charge. The bioreactive producers appear to be more electrophoretically mobile than the low producers. Current ground based CFES efforts are hampered by cell clumping in low ionic strength buffers and poor cell recoveries from the CFES device.

  13. Pituitary-gonadal hormones and adrenal androgens in non-cirrhotic female alcoholics after cessation of alcohol intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välimäki, M; Pelkonen, R; Härkönen, M; Tuomala, P; Koistinen, P; Roine, R; Ylikahri, R

    1990-04-01

    To investigate the sex-hormone profiles associated with chronic alcoholism in women we examined 16 non-cirrhotic alcohol abusers (aged 18-46 years). They were admitted for the treatment of alcoholism (duration of 2-16 yrs) to a social hospital for 6 weeks. Their mean daily alcohol consumption was 170 g. Blood samples for serum LH, FSH, prolactin (PRL), oestrone (E1), oestradiol (E2), progesterone (P), 17-alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), androstenedione (A) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were drawn three times a week during the hospital stay. Similar blood samples were taken from 10 control women during one menstrual cycle. The cycles were anovulatory in two patients and in none of controls. Serum LH and FSH levels were similar in alcoholic and control women but serum concentrations of PRL were increased 2-4-fold in alcoholic women. In the patients serum, concentrations of E1 and E2 tended to be lower during the follicular and midcycle phases, as did those of P and 17-OHP during the luteal phase. Compared with the controls, serum levels of A were increased 2-3-fold in the patients. A parallel difference between the two groups was seen in serum DHEA concentrations. We conclude that until liver injury, even heavy alcohol drinking has only minor effects on the secretion of gonadotrophins and ovarian steroids. Hypersecretion of PRL and adrenal androgens may well be an initiating mechanism for sexual dysfunction of female alcoholics.

  14. Influence of season and nutritional status on the direct effects of leptin, orexin-A and ghrelin on luteinizing hormone and growth hormone secretion in the ovine pituitary explant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsz, K; Szczesna, M; Dudek, K; Bartlewski, P M; Zieba, D A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether leptin (anorexigenic peptide), orexin-A, and ghrelin (orexigenic peptides) could directly (ie, independently of hypothalamic influences) affect the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) by adenohypophyseal (AP) explants obtained from normally fed or fasted (48 h) ewes during the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. In addition, a specific ovine super leptin antagonist (SLAN-3) was used to assess the interactions between leptin and ghrelin and/or orexin-A. Pituitary glands from 16 ovariectomized Polish Longwool ewes that had received estradiol-releasing subcutaneous implants were collected in the breeding (November; n = 8) and nonbreeding (May; n = 8) seasons. The AP explants were incubated for 240 min in a gas-liquid interface and treated with leptin (50 ng/mL), ghrelin (100 ng/mL), orexin-A (100 ng/mL), and SLAN-3 (500 ng/mL) with orexin-A or ghrelin. Treatments with leptin and SLAN-3 + orexin-A increased (P secretion by AP explants from both fasted and fed animals in the breeding season. Ghrelin stimulated (P secretion by AP explants collected from fasted animals in nonbreeding season and from normally fed ewes in both seasons. Leptin decreased (P secretion by AP explants collected from fasted ewes in both seasons and from nonfasted ewes in the breeding season. However, the treatment with SLAN-3 + ghrelin resulted in greater (P ghrelin exerted direct effects on AP secretory function in an ex situ model and both the reproductive season and nutritional status of the animals impinged on the direct effects of the peptides on LH and GH release. Specifically, orexin-A was more potent than leptin in directly stimulating LH secretion in cycling ewes, whereas ghrelin and leptin generally had opposing effects on the secretory function of somatotrophs in sheep.

  15. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impairment, and behavioral changes. Tumors can also either produce excessive amounts of hormone or limit how much hormone is produced. The hormones most commonly affected include: growth hormone (regulates body height and structure), prolactin (controls ...

  16. The clinacal significance of detecting endocrine hormones in pituitary adenoma patients withadenomectomy%PRL型和GH型垂体瘤手术前后内分泌激素水平监测的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙刚

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical significance of endocrine hormone levels monitored before and after PRL and GH type of pituitary tumor surgery. Methods prolactin (PRL) adenoma, 36 cases of growth hormone (GH) adenoma,29 cases before and after surgery serum PRL, GH level of detection. Results Total resection of PRL adenomas and GH adenoma patients 7 and 14 days after hormone levels were lower than the preoperative and surgery is not the total resection group, the difference was statistically significant( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion Surgical treatment can significantly improve the state of high hormone levels in patients with pituitary tumors before surgery, postoperative PRL and GH levels can be used as an important indicator of the degree of removal of the judge of PRL-and GH pituitary tumor surgery.%目的 探讨PRL型和GH型垂体瘤手术前后内分泌激素水平监测的临床意义.方法 泌乳素(PRL)腺瘤36例和生长激素(GH)腺瘤29例,对手术前后血清PRL、GH水平进行检测.结果 PRL腺瘤及GH腺瘤手术全切组患者术后1、7、14d时激素水平,均低于术前和手术未全切组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 手术治疗可以明显改善垂体瘤患者术前高激素水平状态,术后PRL和GH水平可做为判断PRL型和GH型垂体瘤手术切除程度的重要指标.

  17. Forkhead Box O1 is present in quiescent pituitary cells during development and is increased in the absence of p27 Kip1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreeparna Majumdar

    Full Text Available Congenital pituitary hormone deficiencies have been reported in approximately one in 4,000 live births, however studies reporting mutations in some widely studied transcription factors account for only a fraction of congenital hormone deficiencies in humans. Anterior pituitary hormones are required for development and function of several glands including gonads, adrenals, and thyroid. In order to identify additional factors that contribute to human congenital hormone deficiencies, we are investigating the forkhead transcription factor, FOXO1, which has been implicated in development of several organs including ovary, testis, and brain. We find that FOXO1 is present in the nuclei of non-dividing pituitary cells during embryonic development, consistent with a role in limiting proliferation and/or promoting differentiation. FOXO1 is present in a subset of differentiated cells at e18.5 and in adult with highest level of expression in somatotrope cells. We detected FOXO1 in p27(Kip1-positive cells at e14.5. In the absence of p27(Kip1 the number of pituitary cells containing FOXO1 is significantly increased at e14.5 suggesting that a feedback loop regulates the interplay between FOXO1 and p27(Kip1.

  18. Muscle force and endurance in untreated and human growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-I-treated patients with growth hormone deficiency or Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brat, O; Ziv, I; Klinger, B; Avraham, M; Laron, Z

    1997-01-01

    Muscle force and endurance of four muscle groups (biceps, triceps, hamstrings and quadriceps) were measured by a computerized device in three groups: (A) 4 boys with isolated growth hormone deficiencies (IGHD) examined before at 10 and 24 months of hGH treatment; (B) 5 children (2 F, 3 M) with Laron syndrome were examined 3.5-4 years after initiation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) treatment, and (C) comprised 8 untreated adults (5 F, 3 M) with Laron syndrome. For each patient, 2 matched controls, by age, sex, physical activity and height below the 50th percentile, were examined. GH- or IGF-I-deficient patients before treatment revealed reduced muscle force and endurance. GH treatment (0.6 U/kg/week) restored muscle force and endurance, progressively, mainly in the boys with puberty. Three to 4 years of IGF-I treatment (150 micrograms/kg/day) in patients with Laron syndrome proved to have a weaker effect than GH in restoring muscle force. The difference in effectiveness between hGH and IGF-I in restoring muscle force may be due to either the more marked muscle underdevelopment in Laron syndrome patients than in patients with IGHD or a difference in action potential between the two hormones.

  19. Polymorphisms in the pituitary growth hormone gene and its receptor associated with coronary artery disease in a predisposed cohort from India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arindam Maitra; Jayashree Shanker; Debabrata Dash; Prathima R. Sannappa; Shibu John; Pratibha Siwach; Veena S. Rao; H. Sridhara; Vijay V. Kakkar

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the promoter polymorphisms of the pituitary growth hormone gene (GH1) and exon 3 deletion polymorphism (GHRd3) in its receptor gene (GHR) in 299 angiographically proven patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 231 asymptomatic controls enrolled in the ongoing Indian Atherosclerosis Research Study. Real time PCR based analysis of the GHR variant showed significant association of the GHRd3 deletion allele with CAD (OR 0.48, 95% CI: 0.30–0.76, $P = 0.0014$) and a dominant model of inheritance (Akaike information criterion = 482). The deletion allele showed significant association with high plasma HDL-c levels ($P = 0.001$). Sequencing of the proximal promoter region of GH1 revealed 12 novel polymorphisms and a TAGA haplotype constituted by the functional SNPs rs2005171, rs11568828, rs2005172 and rs6171, that showed significant association with CAD alone (adjusted OR of 3.31 (95% CI = 1.33–8.29, $P = 0.011$) and in CAD patients with diabetes ($P = 0.019$). Mean standardized height was associated with three of the four haplotype-tagging SNPs in the cohort ($P \\leq 0.03$). Eleven of the 12 polymorphic promoter SNPs contributed to 14.7% of variation in height in females in the whole dataset ($P = 0.029$). CAD patients with history of stroke exhibited marginally significantly lower mean height as compared to rest of the cohort ($P \\lt 0.006$). In conclusion, genetic polymorphisms in the GHR gene and its ligand, GH1, may modulate the risk of CAD in the Asian Indian population.

  20. Fetal and neonatal iron deficiency exacerbates mild thyroid hormone insufficiency effects on male thyroid hormone levels and brain thyroid hormone-responsive gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Thomas W; Prohaska, Joseph R; Georgieff, Michael K; Anderson, Grant W

    2014-03-01

    Fetal/neonatal iron (Fe) and iodine/TH deficiencies lead to similar brain developmental abnormalities and often coexist in developing countries. We recently demonstrated that fetal/neonatal Fe deficiency results in a mild neonatal thyroidal impairment, suggesting that TH insufficiency contributes to the neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with Fe deficiency. We hypothesized that combining Fe deficiency with an additional mild thyroidal perturbation (6-propyl-2-thiouracil [PTU]) during development would more severely impair neonatal thyroidal status and brain TH-responsive gene expression than either deficiency alone. Early gestation pregnant rats were assigned to 7 different treatment groups: control, Fe deficient (FeD), mild TH deficient (1 ppm PTU), moderate TH deficient (3 ppm PTU), severe TH deficient (10 ppm PTU), FeD/1 ppm PTU, or FeD/3 ppm PTU. FeD or 1 ppm PTU treatment alone reduced postnatal day 15 serum total T4 concentrations by 64% and 74%, respectively, without significantly altering serum total T3 concentrations. Neither treatment alone significantly altered postnatal day 16 cortical or hippocampal T3 concentrations. FeD combined with 1 ppm PTU treatment produced a more severe effect, reducing serum total T4 by 95%, and lowering hippocampal and cortical T3 concentrations by 24% and 31%, respectively. Combined FeD/PTU had a more severe effect on brain TH-responsive gene expression than either treatment alone, significantly altering Pvalb, Dio2, Mbp, and Hairless hippocampal and/or cortical mRNA levels. FeD/PTU treatment more severely impacted cortical and hippocampal parvalbumin protein expression compared with either individual treatment. These data suggest that combining 2 mild thyroidal insults during development significantly disrupts thyroid function and impairs TH-regulated brain gene expression.

  1. Hypopituitarism in the elderly: a narrative review on clinical management of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtò, L; Trimarchi, F

    2016-10-01

    Hypopituitarism is an uncommon and under-investigated endocrine disorder in old age since signs and symptoms are unspecific and, at least in part, can be attributed to the physiological effects of aging and related co-morbidities. Clinical presentation is often insidious being characterized by non-specific manifestations, such as weight gain, fatigue, low muscle strength, bradipsychism, hypotension or intolerance to cold. In these circumstances, hypopituitarism is a rarely life-threatening condition, but evolution may be more dramatic as a result of pituitary apoplexy, or when a serious condition of adrenal insufficiency suddenly occurs. Clinical presentation depends on the effects that each pituitary deficit can cause, and on their mutual relationship, but also, inevitably, it depends on the severity and duration of the deficit itself, as well as on the general condition of the patient. Indeed, indications and methods of hormone replacement therapy must include the need to normalize the endocrine profile without contributing to the worsening of intercurrent diseases, such as those of glucose and bone metabolism, and the cardiovascular system, or to the increasing cancer risk. Hormonal requirements of elderly patients are reduced compared to young adults, but a prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment of pituitary deficiencies are strongly recommended, also in this age range.

  2. Imbalance in the blood antioxidant system in growth hormone-deficient children before and after 1 year of recombinant growth hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. Pankratova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to examine the effects of 12-month therapy with recombinant growth hormone (rGH on the blood antioxidant system in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC of plasma was measured by FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power or ferric reducing ability of plasma; activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT in erythrocytes were assessed; non-protein thiols (NT and ceruloplasmin (CP levels were also measured. These parameters were determined before and after 12 month of rGH treatment. Eleven treatment-naive prepubertal children with growth hormone deficiency were included in the study. Another 11 prepubertal children comprised a control group. Before rGH treatment, TAC of plasma and NT level in the control group were significantly lower (726 ± 196 vs. 525 ± 166 µmol/L, P = 0.0182 and 0.92 ± 0.18 vs. 0.70 ± 0.22 µmol/ml, P = 0.0319, before and after the therapy, respectively. The only parameter that significantly (19.6 ± 4.7 vs. 14.5 ± 3.4 Units/g Hb, P = 0.0396 exceeded the same in the control group after rGH therapy was SOD activity. However, none of the measured parameters of antioxidant system in GHD children, except for TAC (525 ± 166 vs. 658 ± 115 µmol/L, P = 0.0205, exhibited significant improvement toward the end of the 12-month treatment period, although non-significant changes in CAT activity and CP level were also observed. This work has demonstrated that some parameters of the blood antioxidant system are out of balance and even impaired in GHD children. A 12-month treatment with rGH resulted in a partial improvement of the antioxidant system.

  3. Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  4. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research related to brain tumors, including pituitary tumors, in their laboratories at ... institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research related to brain tumors, including pituitary tumors, in their laboratories at ...

  5. Etiology of hypopituitarism in tertiary care institutions in Turkish population: analysis of 773 patients from Pituitary Study Group database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, F; Dokmetas, H S; Kebapcı, N; Kilicli, F; Atmaca, H; Yarman, S; Ertorer, M E; Erturk, E; Bayram, F; Tugrul, A; Culha, C; Cakir, M; Mert, M; Aydin, H; Taskale, M; Ersoz, N; Canturk, Z; Anaforoglu, I; Ozkaya, M; Oruk, G; Hekimsoy, Z; Kelestimur, F; Erbas, T

    2014-09-01

    Hypopituitarism in adult life is commonly acquired and the main causes are known as pituitary tumors and/or their treatments. Since there are new insights into the etiology of hypopituitarism and presence of differences in various populations, more studies regarding causes of hypopituitarism are needed to be done in different ethnic groups with sufficient number of patients. Therefore, we performed a multi-center database study in Turkish population investigating the etiology of hypopituitarism in 773 patients in tertiary care institutions. The study was designed and coordinated by the Pituitary Study Group of SEMT (The Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism of Turkey). Nineteen tertiary reference centers (14 university hospitals and 5 training hospitals) from the different regions of Turkey participated in the study. It is a cross-sectional database study, and the data were recorded for 18 months. We mainly classified the causes of hypopituitarism as pituitary tumors (due to direct effects of the pituitary tumors and/or their treatments), extra-pituitary tumors and non-tumoral causes. Mean age of 773 patients (49.8 % male, 50.2 % female) was 43.9 ± 16.1 years (range 16-84 years). The most common etiology of pituitary dysfunction was due to non-tumoral causes (49.2 %) among all patients. However, when we analyze the causes according to gender, the most common etiology in males was pituitary tumors, but the most common etiology in females was non-tumoral causes. According to the subgroup analysis of the causes of hypopituitarism in all patients, the most common four causes of hypopituitarism which have frequencies over 10 % were as follows: non-secretory pituitary adenomas, Sheehan's syndrome, lactotroph adenomas and idiopathic. With regard to the type of hormonal deficiencies; FSH/LH deficiency was the most common hormonal deficit (84.9 % of the patients). In 33.8 % of the patients, 4 anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies (FSH/LH, ACTH, TSH, and GH) were

  6. Correlation between atherogenic index of plasma level and metabolism components in adult growth hormone deficiency patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-jia XIA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the correlation of atherogenic index of plasma (AIP levels with anthropometrics, glycolipid metabolism markers and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6 in adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD patients. Methods Retrospective analysis were carried out in 40 AGHD patients (AGHD group, admitted to First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University and 40 healthy adults from physical examination centre (control group during June 2009 to September 2012. The general anthropometries and blood biochemical indexes were collected and compared between two groups. AIP, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, homeostasis model assessment β-cell function (HOMA-β, LDL-C/HDL-C, TC/HDL-C, and TG/LDL-C were calculated and compared between two groups. The correlation between AIP and these indexes was analyzed using Pearson correlation. Results Compared with control group, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, waist-hip ratio (WHR, fasting insulin (FINS, HOMA-β, HOMA-IR, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, LDL-C/HDL-C, TC/HDL-C, hs-CPR, IL-6, AIP were significant higher, but HDL-C levels were lower in AGHD group (P0.05. There was a positive association between AIP and all the WC, WHR, FINS, HOMA-β, HOMA-IR, TC, LDL-C/HDL-C, TC/HDL-C, TG/LDL-C, hs-CRP and IL-6 (r=0.349, 0.314, 0.347, 0.335, 0.297, 0.256, 0.576, 0.749, 0.702, 0.477, 0.226, respectively, P<0.05. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that hs-CRP and IL-6 were independent risk factors of AIP. Conclusion AIP is significantly higher in AGHD patients than healthy people, and it shows a strong correlation with many risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.12.10

  7. Impact of growth hormone (GH deficiency and GH replacement upon thymus function in adult patients.

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    Gabriel Morrhaye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite age-related adipose involution, T cell generation in the thymus (thymopoiesis is maintained beyond puberty in adults. In rodents, growth hormone (GH, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, and GH secretagogues reverse age-related changes in thymus cytoarchitecture and increase thymopoiesis. GH administration also enhances thymic mass and function in HIV-infected patients. Until now, thymic function has not been investigated in adult GH deficiency (AGHD. The objective of this clinical study was to evaluate thymic function in AGHD, as well as the repercussion upon thymopoiesis of GH treatment for restoration of GH/IGF-1 physiological levels. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-two patients with documented AGHD were enrolled in this study. The following parameters were measured: plasma IGF-1 concentrations, signal-joint T-cell receptor excision circle (sjTREC frequency, and sj/beta TREC ratio. Analyses were performed at three time points: firstly on GH treatment at maintenance dose, secondly one month after GH withdrawal, and thirdly one month after GH resumption. After 1-month interruption of GH treatment, both plasma IGF-1 concentrations and sjTREC frequency were decreased (p<0.001. Decreases in IGF-1 and sjTREC levels were correlated (r = 0.61, p<0.01. There was also a decrease in intrathymic T cell proliferation as indicated by the reduced sj/beta TREC ratio (p<0.01. One month after reintroduction of GH treatment, IGF-1 concentration and sjTREC frequency regained a level equivalent to the one before GH withdrawal. The sj/beta TREC ratio also increased with GH resumption, but did not return to the level measured before GH withdrawal. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with AGHD under GH treatment, GH withdrawal decreases thymic T cell output, as well as intrathymic T cell proliferation. These parameters of thymus function are completely or partially restored one month after GH resumption. These data indicate that the functional

  8. Oral manifestations in growth hormone disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Atreja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone is of vital importance for normal growth and development. Individuals with growth hormone deficiency develop pituitary dwarfism with disproportionate delayed growth of skull and facial skeleton giving them a small facial appearance for their age. Both hyper and hypopituitarism have a marked effect on development of oro-facial structures including eruption and shedding patterns of teeth, thus giving an opportunity to treating dental professionals to first see the signs and symptoms of these growth disorders and correctly diagnose the serious underlying disease.

  9. Effect of Chlorotriazine Pesticides on Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone in the Neuronal GT1-7 Cell Line and Hypothalamic Explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulates the release of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone. These pituitary hormones are necessary for normal reproductive function in both males and females. It is well recognized that disruption of nor...

  10. Consequences of monocarboxylate transporter 8 deficiency for renal transport and metabolism of thyroid hormones in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Trajkovic-Arsic (Marija); T.J. Visser (Theo); V.M. Darras (Veerle); E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); B. Schlott (Bernhard); J. Mittag (Jens); K. Bauer (Karl); H. Heuer (Heike)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPatients carrying inactivating mutations in the gene encoding the thyroid hormone transporting monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-8 suffer from a severe form of psychomotor retardation and exhibit abnormal serum thyroid hormone levels. The thyroidal phenotype characterized by highserum T3

  11. Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency not linked to gene for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in Brazilian kindred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraco, J.; Francke, U.; Toledo, S. [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency (FIGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder which results in failure to develop secondary sexual characteristics. The origin is a hypothalamic defect resulting in insufficient secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH (also called LHRH, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) and follicle-stimuating hormone (FSH). FIGD has been determined to be a separate entity from Kallmann syndrome which presents with hypogonadism as well as anosmia. The FIGD phenotype appears to be analogous to the phenotype of the hpg (hypogonadal) mouse. Because the hpg phenotype is the result of a structurally abnormal GnRH gene, we have studied the GnRH gene in individuals from a previously reported Brazilian FIGD family. An informative dimorphic marker in the signal peptide sequence of the GnRH gene allowed assessment of linkage between the disease gene and the GnRH locus in this pedigree. We have concluded that the GnRH locus is not linked to the disease-causing mutation in these hypogonadal individuals. Recent evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a role in the initiation of puberty. We hypothesize that mutations in NPY may result in failure to secrete GnRH. We have characterized three diallelic frequent-cutter restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the human NPY locus, and are currently using these markers to determine if the NPY gene is linked to, and possibly the site of the disease mutation in this kindred.

  12. Management of Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency at Peking Union Medical College Hospital:A Survey among Physicians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-bo Yang; Meng-qi Zhang; Hui Pan; Hui-juan Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate physicians’ attitude and knowledge about the management of adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) at Peking Union Medical College Hospital and impact factors associated with better decision-making. Methods A 21-question anonymous survey was distributed and collected at Peking Union Medical College Hospital, a major teaching hospital in Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. Data of physicians’ educational background, clinical training, patient workload per year and continuing medical education in AGHD were collected. Factors associated with appropriate answers were further analyzed by multivariate regression models. Results One hundred and eighteen internal medicine residents, endocrine fellows, attending physicians and visiting physicians responded to the survey. Among them, 44.9% thought that AGHD patients should accept recombinant human growth hormone replacement therapy. Moreover, 56.8% selected insulin tolerance test and growth hormone-releasing hormone-arginine test for the diagnosis of AGHD. Logistic regression analysis of physician demographic data, educational background, and work experience found no consistent independent factors associated with better decision-making, other than continued medical education, that were associated with treatment choice. Conclusions The physicians’ reported management of AGHD in this major academic healthcare center in Beijing was inconsistent with current evidence. High quality continued medical education is required to improve Chinese physician management of AGHD.

  13. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höybye, Charlotte; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Ferone, Diego

    2017-01-01

    deficiency and stable on growth hormone replacement therapy for at least 3 months were, following a wash-out period, randomized (regardless of their pre-study dose) to one of three TransCon GH doses (0.02, 0.04, 0.08 mg GH/kg/week) or Omnitrope 0.04 mg GH/kg/week (divided into 7 equal daily doses) for 4...... weeks. Main outcomes evaluated were adverse events, immunogenicity, and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels. TransCon GH was well tolerated; fatigue and headache were the most frequent drug-related adverse events and reported in all groups. No lipoatrophy or nodule formation...

  14. MR of the pituitary in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome: size determination and imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY (United States); Angulo, M. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Div. of Endocrinology and Genetics, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY (United States); Price, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY (United States); Taneja, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is an unusual genetic disorder characterized by short stature, obesity, hypogonadism, hypotonia, cognitive impairment, and dysmorphic facies. There is an interstitial deletion of the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 in about 70% of patients. Some of these clinical features suggest a central hypothalamic/pituitary dysfunction, and recent investigations have demonstrated a marked impairment in spontaneous growth hormone (GH) secretion. We studied 15 GH-deficient PWS patients by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine whether there was a diminution in the gross morphological size of the anterior pituitary gland, the site of GH synthesis. We also set out to catalog the pertinent imaging findings in this patient population. Our results indicate that this is the first report documenting pituitary size by MRI in PWS patients. No statistically significant difference was found in the height of the anterior pituitary gland in PWS patients compared with either normal children or children with isolated GH deficiency. An interesting imaging finding is that three of 15 patients (20%) demonstrated complete absence of the posterior pituitary bright spot (PPBS), and a fourth patient demonstrated a small PPBS. These observations reflect an objective physiologic disturbance in the hypothalamus. The clinical and radiologic implications of these findings are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of a cDNA encoding pituitary thyroid stimulating hormone beta-subunit of the Chinese soft-shell turtle Pelodiscus sinensis and regulation of its gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jung-Tsun; Chowdhury, Indrajit; Lin, Yao-Sung; Liao, Ching-Fong; Shen, San-Tai; Yu, John Yuh-Lin

    2006-04-01

    A cDNA encoding thyroid stimulating hormone beta-subunit (TSHbeta) was cloned from pituitary of the Chinese soft-shell turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, and its regulation of mRNA expression was investigated for the first time in reptile. The Chinese soft-shell turtle TSHbeta cDNA was cloned from pituitary RNA by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE) methods. The Chinese soft-shell turtle TSHbeta cDNA consists of 580-bp nucleotides, including 67-bp nucleotides of 5'-untranslated region (UTR), 402-bp of the open reading frame, and 97-bp of 3'-UTR followed by a 14 poly (A) trait. It encodes a precursor protein molecule of 133 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids and a putative mature protein of 114 amino acids. The number and position of 12 cysteine residues, presumably forming six disulfide bonds, one putative asparagine-linked glycosylation site, and six proline residues that are found at positions for changing the backbone direction of the protein have been conserved in the turtle as in other vertebrate groups. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Chinese soft-shell turtle TSHbeta mature protein shares identities of 82-83% with birds, 71-72% with mammals, 49-57% with amphibians, and 44-61% with fish. The Chinese soft-shell turtle