WorldWideScience

Sample records for pitch angle scattering

  1. Pitch angle scattering of energetic particles by oblique whistler waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    First order cyclotron or Landau resonant pitch angle scattering of electrons by oblique whistler waves propagating at large angles to the ambient field are found to be at least as large as that due to parallel propagating waves. Commonly observed precipitation of more than 40 keV electrons in association with ducted whistlers may thus be accompanied by substantial fluxes of lower energy (10 eV-40 keV) electrons precipitated by the nonducted components.

  2. Numerical analysis of the Fokker-Planck equation with adiabatic focusing: Realistic pitch-angle scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasuik, J.; Fiege, J. D.; Shalchi, A.

    2017-01-01

    We solve the focused transport equation of cosmic rays numerically to investigate non-isotropic models of the pitch-angle scattering coefficient. In previous work, the Fokker-Planck equation was solved either analytically by using approximations, or by using a numerical approach together with simple models for the pitch-angle scattering coefficient. It is the purpose of the current article so compute particle distribution functions as well as the parallel diffusion coefficient by solving numerically the focused transport equation for a more realistic Fokker-Planck coefficient of pitch-angle scattering. Our analytical form for the scattering parameter is based on non-linear diffusion theory that takes into account realistic scattering at pitch-angles close to 90 ° . This general form contains the isotropic form as well as the quasi-linear limit as special cases. We show that the ratio of the diffusion coefficients with and without focusing sensitively depends on the ratio of the turbulent magnetic field and the mean field. The assumed form of the pitch-angle Fokker-Planck coefficient has an influence on the parallel diffusion coefficient. In all considered cases we found a reduction of the ratio of the diffusion coefficients if the ratio of magnetic fields is reduced.

  3. Cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in imbalanced MHD turbulence simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Weidl, Martin S; Teaca, Bogdan; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pitch-angle scattering rates for cosmic-ray particles in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with imbalanced turbulence are calculated for fully evolving electromagnetic turbulence. We compare with theoretical predictions derived from the quasilinear theory of cosmic-ray diffusion for an idealized slab spectrum and demonstrate how cross helicity affects the shape of the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient. Additional simulations in evolving magnetic fields or static field configurations provide evidence that the scattering anisotropy in imbalanced turbulence is not primarily due to coherence with propagating Alfven waves, but an effect of the spatial structure of electric fields in cross-helical MHD turbulence.

  4. Chaotic scattering of pitch angles in the current sheet of the magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Chen, J.

    1992-01-01

    The modified Harris field model is used to investigate the process of pitch angle scattering by a current sheet. The relationship between the incoming asymptotic pitch angle alpha(in) and the outgoing asymptotic pitch angle alpha(out) is studied from first principles by numerically integrating the equation of motion. Evidence that charged particles undergo chaotic scattering by the current sheet is found. For fixed alpha(in), it is shown that alpha(out) exhibits sensitive dependence on the energy parameter in certain energy ranges. For a fixed energy parameter value in the same energy ranges, alpha(out) sensitively depends on alpha(in). For other energy values, alpha(out) does not show sensitive dependence on alpha(in) for most phase angles. A distribution of alpha(in) is mapped from the asymptotic region to the midplane, and it is found that the resulting particle distribution should have beam structures with well-collimated pitch angles near each resonance energy value. Implications for the particle distribution functions in the earth's magnetotail are discussed.

  5. Pitch angle scattering by triggered emissions from the Siple Station wave injection experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harid, V.; Golkowski, M.; Bell, T. F.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Nonlinear amplification of whistler mode waves in the Earth's magnetosphere , due to gyroresonance with energetic electrons, also known as the phenomena of VLF triggered emissions, has been investigated extensively with analytical formulations, experimental observations and computer simulations. However, the pitch angle scattering of typical triggered emission waveforms has not been specifically considered. Most authors consider particle scattering either in the presence of a monochromatic constant amplitude wave or a broadband incoherent but time-frequency homogenous emission. Although investigation of these two limiting cases has provided valuable insight into radiation belt dynamics, a large class of waves including triggered emissions and chorus do not fall under either of the two descriptions. The inherent symmetry of a constant amplitude monochromatic wave around the equator results in non-cumulative pitch angle change for a large population of electrons. Wave amplification generated during linear and nonlinear growth result in wave gradients that can have a more significant effect on particle pitch angle and energy. In addition, coherent frequency changing signals are capable of shifting the cyclotron resonance condition and significantly perturbing particle trajectories from their adiabatic motion. The wave-injection experiment at Siple Station, Antarctica was designed to study wave growth and triggering processes in the magnetosphere. Amplified signals from Siple Station often show both wave gradients as well advances in phase and frequency. Using a numerical test-particle simulation, we model the effect of typical Siple Station signals on pitch angle scattering and particle precipitation. Results show that triggered emission type wave forms are more efficient in producing large pitch angle changes in resonant particles.

  6. Particle acceleration with anomalous pitch angle scattering in 2D magnetohydrodynamic reconnection simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borissov, A.; Kontar, E. P.; Threlfall, J.; Neukirch, T.

    2017-09-01

    The conversion of magnetic energy into other forms (such as plasma heating, bulk plasma flows, and non-thermal particles) during solar flares is one of the outstanding open problems in solar physics. It is generally accepted that magnetic reconnection plays a crucial role in these conversion processes. In order to achieve the rapid energy release required in solar flares, an anomalous resistivity, which is orders of magnitude higher than the Spitzer resistivity, is often used in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of reconnection in the corona. The origin of Spitzer resistivity is based on Coulomb scattering, which becomes negligible at the high energies achieved by accelerated particles. As a result, simulations of particle acceleration in reconnection events are often performed in the absence of any interaction between accelerated particles and any background plasma. This need not be the case for scattering associated with anomalous resistivity caused by turbulence within solar flares, as the higher resistivity implies an elevated scattering rate. We present results of test particle calculations, with and without pitch angle scattering, subject to fields derived from MHD simulations of two-dimensional (2D) X-point reconnection. Scattering rates proportional to the ratio of the anomalous resistivity to the local Spitzer resistivity, as well as at fixed values, are considered. Pitch angle scattering, which is independent of the anomalous resistivity, causes higher maximum energies in comparison to those obtained without scattering. Scattering rates which are dependent on the local anomalous resistivity tend to produce fewer highly energised particles due to weaker scattering in the separatrices, even though scattering in the current sheet may be stronger when compared to resistivity-independent scattering. Strong scattering also causes an increase in the number of particles exiting the computational box in the reconnection outflow region, as opposed to along the

  7. MAGNETIC VARIANCES AND PITCH-ANGLE SCATTERING TIMES UPSTREAM OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano, E-mail: silvia.perri@fis.unical.it, E-mail: gaetano.zimbardo@fis.unical.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Italy)

    2012-07-20

    Recent observations of power-law time profiles of energetic particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks have shown the possibility of anomalous, superdiffusive transport for energetic particles throughout the heliosphere. Those findings call for an accurate investigation of the magnetic field fluctuation properties at the resonance frequencies upstream of the shock's fronts. Normalized magnetic field variances, indeed, play a crucial role in the determination of the pitch-angle scattering times and then of the transport regime. The present analysis investigates the time behavior of the normalized variances of the magnetic field fluctuations, measured by the Ulysses spacecraft upstream of corotating interaction region (CIR) shocks, for those events which exhibit superdiffusion for energetic electrons. We find a quasi-constant value for the normalized magnetic field variances from about 10 hr to 100 hr from the shock front. This rules out the presence of a varying diffusion coefficient and confirms the possibility of superdiffusion for energetic electrons. A statistical analysis of the scattering times obtained from the magnetic fluctuations upstream of the CIR events has also been performed; the resulting power-law distributions of scattering times imply long range correlations and weak pitch-angle scattering, and the power-law slopes are in qualitative agreement with superdiffusive processes described by a Levy random walk.

  8. Relativistic electron dropouts by pitch angle scattering in the geomagnetic tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Lee

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Relativistic electron dropout (RED events are characterized by fast electron flux decrease at the geostationary orbit. It is known that the main loss process is non adiabatic and more effective for the high energy particles. RED events generally start to occur at midnight sector and propagate to noon sector and are correlated with magnetic field stretching. In this paper, we discuss this kind of event can be caused from pitch angle diffusion induced when the gyro radius of the electrons is comparable to the radius of curvature of the magnetic field and the magnetic moment is not conserved any more. While this process has been studied theoretically, the question is whether electron precipitation could be explained with this process for the real field configuration. This paper will show that this process can successfully explain the precipitation that occurred on 14 June 2004 observed by the low-altitude (680 km polar orbiting Korean satellite, STSAT-1. In this precipitation event, the energy dispersion showed higher energy electron precipitation occurred at lower L values. This feature is a good indicator that precipitation was caused by the magnetic moment scattering in the geomagnetic tail. This interpretation is supported by the geosynchronous satellite GOES observations that showed significant magnetic field distortion occurred on the night side accompanying the electron flux depletion. Tsyganenko-01 model also shows the magnetic moment scattering could occur under the geomagnetic conditions existing at that time. We suggest the pitch angle scattering by field curvature violating the first adiabatic invariant as a possible candidate for loss mechanism of relativistic electrons in radiation belt.

  9. Direct detection of resonant electron pitch angle scattering by whistler waves in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Compernolle, B; Bortnik, J; Pribyl, P; Gekelman, W; Nakamoto, M; Tao, X; Thorne, R M

    2014-04-11

    Resonant interactions between energetic electrons and whistler mode waves are an essential ingredient in the space environment, and in particular in controlling the dynamic variability of Earth's natural radiation belts, which is a topic of extreme interest at the moment. Although the theory describing resonant wave-particle interaction has been present for several decades, it has not been hitherto tested in a controlled laboratory setting. In the present Letter we report on the first laboratory experiment to directly detect resonant pitch angle scattering of energetic (∼keV) electrons due to whistler mode waves. We show that the whistler mode wave deflects energetic electrons at precisely the predicted resonant energy, and that varying both the maximum beam energy, and the wave frequency, alters the energetic electron beam very close to the resonant energy.

  10. Pitch angle scattering of relativistic electrons near electromagnetic ion cyclotron resonances in diverging magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, B.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2017-10-01

    A theoretical study of the propagation of left-hand polarized shear Alfvén waves in spatially decreasing magnetic field geometries near the EMIC resonance, including the spectrum and amplitude of the mode converted EMIC waves and the pitch angle scattering of relativistic electrons transiting the resonant region, is presented. The objective of the paper is to motivate an experimental study of the subject using the UCLA LAPD chamber. The results are relevant in exploring the possibility that shear Alfvén waves strategically injected into the radiation belts using either ionospheric heating from ground based RF transmitters or injected by transmitters based on space platforms can enhance the precipitation rate of trapped relativistic electrons. Effects of multi-ionic composition are also investigated.

  11. Method for direct detection of pitch angle scattering of energetic electrons caused by whistler mode chorus emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, M.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The Wave-Particle Interaction Analyzer (WPIA), a new instrument proposed by Fukuhara et al. (2009), measures the relative phase angle between the wave magnetic field vector and the velocity vector of each particle and calculates the energy exchange from waves to particles. In this study, we expand its applicability by proposing a method of using the WPIA to directly detect pitch angle scattering of resonant particles by plasma waves by calculating the g values. The g value is defined as the accumulation value of the Lorentz force acting on each particle and indicates the lost momentum of waves. We apply the proposed method to the results of a one-dimensional electron hybrid simulation reproducing the generation of whistler mode chorus emissions around the magnetic equator. Using the wave and particle data obtained at fixed observation points assumed in the simulation system, we conduct a pseudo-observation of the simulation result using the WPIA and analyze the g values. Our analysis yielded significant values indicating the strong pitch angle scattering for electrons in the kinetic energy and pitch angle ranges satisfying the cyclotron resonance condition with the reproduced chorus emissions. The results of this study demonstrate that the proposed method enables us to directly and quantitatively identify the location at which pitch angle scattering occurs in the simulation system and that the method can be applied to the results of space-based observations by the forthcoming Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) satellite.

  12. First in situ evidence of electron pitch angle scattering due to magnetic field line curvature in the Ion diffusion region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. C.; Shen, C.; Marchaudon, A.; Rong, Z. J.; Lavraud, B.; Fazakerley, A.; Yao, Z.; Mihaljcic, B.; Ji, Y.; Ma, Y. H.; Liu, Z. X.

    2016-05-01

    Theory predicts that the first adiabatic invariant of a charged particle may be violated in a region of highly curved field lines, leading to significant pitch angle scattering for particles whose gyroradius are comparable to the radius of the magnetic field line curvature. This scattering generates more isotropic particle distribution functions, with important impacts on the presence or absence of plasma instabilities. Using magnetic curvature analysis based on multipoint Cluster spacecraft observations, we present the first investigation of magnetic curvature in the vicinity of an ion diffusion region where reconnected field lines are highly curved. Electrons at energies > 8 keV show a clear pitch angle ordering between bidirectional and trapped distribution in surrounding regions, while we show that in the more central part of the ion diffusion region electrons above such energies become isotropic. By contrast, colder electrons (~1 keV) retain their bidirectional character throughout the diffusion regions. The calculated adiabatic parameter K2 for these electrons is in agreement with theory. This study provides the first observational evidence for particle pitch angle scattering due to magnetic field lines with well characterized curvature in a space plasma.

  13. Turbulent pitch-angle scattering and diffusive transport of hard-X-ray producing electrons in flaring coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Kontar, E P; Emslie, A G; Vilmer, N

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations from {\\em RHESSI} have revealed that the number of non-thermal electrons in the coronal part of a flaring loop can exceed the number of electrons required to explain the hard X-ray-emitting footpoints of the same flaring loop. Such sources cannot, therefore, be interpreted on the basis of the standard collisional transport model, in which electrons stream along the loop while losing their energy through collisions with the ambient plasma; additional physical processes, to either trap or scatter the energetic electrons, are required. Motivated by this and other observations that suggest that high energy electrons are confined to the coronal region of the source, we consider turbulent pitch angle scattering of fast electrons off low frequency magnetic fluctuations as a confinement mechanism, modeled as a spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field. In general, turbulent scattering leads to a reduction of the collisional stopping distance of non-thermal electrons along the loop and ...

  14. Pitch angle scattering of diffuse auroral electrons by whistler mode waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalon, E. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Burke, W.J. [Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Resonant electron-whistler interactions in the plasma sheet are investigated as possible explanations of the nearly isotropic fluxes of low-energy electrons observed above the diffuse aurora. Whistler mode waves, propagating near the resonance cone with frequencies near or larger than half the equatorial electron cyclotron frequency, can interact with low-energy plasma sheet electrons. A Hamiltonian formulation is developed for test particles interacting with the coherent chorus emission spectra. The authors consider the second-order resonance condition which requires that inhomogeneities in the Earth`s magnetic field be compensated by a finite bandwidth of wave frequencies to maintain resonance for extended distances along field lines. These second-order interactions are very efficient in scattering the electrons toward the atmospheric loss cone. Numerical calculations are presented for the magnetic shell L=5.5 for wave amplitudes of {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} V/m, using different frequency and magnetospheric conditions. 34 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations of proton acceleration in coronal shocks: Effect of anisotropic pitch-angle scattering of particles

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Vainio, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Context. Solar energetic particles observed in association with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are produced by the CME-driven shock waves. The acceleration of particles is considered to be due to diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Aims. We aim at a better understanding of DSA in the case of quasi-parallel shocks, in which self-generated turbulence in the shock vicinity plays a key role. Methods. We have developed and applied a new Monte Carlo simulation code for acceleration of protons in parallel coronal shocks. The code performs a self-consistent calculation of resonant interactions of particles with Alfv\\'en waves based on the quasi-linear theory. In contrast to the existing Monte Carlo codes of DSA, the new code features the full quasi-linear resonance condition of particle pitch-angle scattering. This allows us to take anisotropy of particle pitch-angle scattering into account, while the older codes implement an approximate resonance condition leading to isotropic scattering.We performed simulations with...

  16. Determining pitch-angle diffusion coefficients from test particle simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Ivascenko, A.; S. Lange; Spanier, F.; R. Vainio

    2016-01-01

    Transport and acceleration of charged particles in turbulent media is a topic of great interest in space physics and interstellar astrophysics. These processes are dominated by the scattering of particles off magnetic irregularities. The scattering process itself is usually described by small-angle scattering with the pitch-angle coefficient $D_{\\mu\\mu}$ playing a major role. Since the diffusion coefficient $D_{\\mu\\mu}$ can be determined analytically only for the approximation of quasi-linear...

  17. Transcription and the Pitch Angle of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Kasper W

    2013-01-01

    The question of the value of the pitch angle of DNA is visited from the perspective of a geometrical analysis of transcription. It is suggested that for transcription to be possible, the pitch angle of B-DNA must be smaller than the angle of zero-twist. At the zero-twist angle the double helix is maximally rotated and its strain-twist coupling vanishes. A numerical estimate of the pitch angle for B-DNA based on differential geometry is compared with numbers obtained from existing empirical data. The crystallographic studies shows that the pitch angle is approximately 38 deg., less than the corresponding zero-twist angle of 41.8 deg., which is consistent with the suggested principle for transcription.

  18. Pitch Perfect: How Fruit Flies Control their Body Pitch Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Whitehead, Samuel C; Canale, Luca; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Flapping insect flight is a complex and beautiful phenomenon that relies on fast, active control mechanisms to counter aerodynamic instability. To directly investigate how freely-flying D. melanogaster control their body pitch angle against such instability, we perturb them using impulsive mechanical torques and film their corrective maneuvers with high-speed video. Combining experimental observations and numerical simulation, we find that flies correct for pitch deflections of up to 40 degrees in 29 +/- 8 ms by bilaterally modulating their wings' front-most stroke angle in a manner well-described by a linear proportional-integral (PI) controller. Flies initiate this corrective process after only 10 +/- 2 ms, indicating that pitch stabilization involves a fast reflex response. Remarkably, flies can also correct for very large-amplitude pitch perturbations--greater than 150 degrees--providing a regime in which to probe the limits of the linear-response framework. Together with previous studies regarding yaw an...

  19. Determining pitch-angle diffusion coefficients from test particle simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ivascenko, A; Spanier, F; Vainio, R

    2016-01-01

    Transport and acceleration of charged particles in turbulent media is a topic of great interest in space physics and interstellar astrophysics. These processes are dominated by the scattering of particles off magnetic irregularities. The scattering process itself is usually described by small-angle scattering with the pitch-angle coefficient $D_{\\mu\\mu}$ playing a major role. Since the diffusion coefficient $D_{\\mu\\mu}$ can be determined analytically only for the approximation of quasi-linear theory, the determination of this coefficient from numerical simulations has, therefore, become more important. So far these simulations yield particle tracks for small-scale scattering, which can then be interpreted using the running diffusion coefficients. This method has a limited range of validity. This paper presents two new methods that allow for the calculation of the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient from numerical simulations. These methods no longer analyse particle trajectories, but the change of particle dist...

  20. Energetic Electron Pitch Angle Diffusion due to Whistler Wave during Terrestrial Storms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fu-Liang; HE Hui-Yong

    2006-01-01

    A concise and elegant expression of cyclotron harmonic resonant quasi-pure pitch-angle diffusion is constructed for the parallel whistler mode waves, and the quasi-linear diffusion coefficient is prescribed in terms of the whistler mode wave spectral intensity. Numerical computations are performed for the specific case of energetic electrons interacting with a band of frequency of whistler mode turbulence at L ≈ 3. It is found that the quasi-pure pitch-angle diffusion driven by the whistler mode scatters energetic electrons from the larger pitch-angles into the loss cone, and causes pitch-angle distribution to evolve from the pancake-shaped before the terrestrial storms to the flat-top during the main phase. This probably accounts for the quasi-isotropic pitch-angle distribution observed by the combined release and radiation effects satellite spacecraft at L ≈ 3.

  1. Small angle neutron scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousin Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ∼ 1 nm up to ∼ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ∼ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area… through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer, form factor analysis (I(q→0, Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system, structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates, and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast. It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of

  2. Pitch Angle Control for Variable Speed Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cheng, M;

    2008-01-01

    controller, the mathematical model of the system should be known well. A fuzzy logic pitch angle controller is developed in this paper, in which it does not need well known about the system and the mean wind speed is used to compensate the non-linear sensitivity. The fuzzy logic control strategy may have......Pitch angle control is the most common means for adjusting the aerodynamic torque of the wind turbine when wind speed is above rated speed and various controlling variables may be chosen, such as wind speed, generator speed and generator power. As conventional pitch control usually use PI...

  3. Spirality: A Noval Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Henderson, Casey L.; Hartley, Matthew; Davis, Benjamin L.; Pour Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. For a given pitch angle template, the mean pixel value is found along each of typically 1000 spiral axes. The fitting function, which shows a local maximum at the best-fit pitch angle, is the variance of these means. Error bars are found by varying the inner radius of the measurement annulus and finding the standard deviation of the best-fit pitches. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming at least 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 128 synthetic spiral images of known pitch. These spirals varied in the number of spiral arms, pitch angle, degree of logarithmicity, radius, SNR, inclination angle, bar length, and bulge radius. A correct result is defined as a result that matches the true pitch within the error bars, with error bars no greater than ±7°. For the non-logarithmic spiral sample, the correct answer is similarly defined, with the mean pitch as function of radius in place of the true pitch. For all synthetic spirals, correct results were obtained so long as SNR > 0.25, the bar length was no more than 60% of the spiral's diameter (when the bar was included in the measurement), the input center of the spiral was no more than 6% of the spiral radius away from the true center, and the inclination angle was no more than 30°. The synthetic spirals were not deprojected prior to measurement. The code produced the correct result for all barred spirals when the measurement annulus was placed outside the bar. Additionally, we compared the code's results against 2DFFT results for 203 visually selected spiral galaxies in GOODS North and South. Among the entire sample, Spirality's error bars overlapped 2DFFT's error bars 64% of the time. For those galaxies in which Source code is available by email request from the primary author.

  4. Storm-Time Evolution of Energetic Electron Pitch Angle Distributions by Wave-Particle Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fuliang; HE Huiyong; ZHOU Qinghua; WU Guanhong; SHI Xianghua

    2008-01-01

    The quasi-pure pitch-angle scattering of energetic electrons driven by field-alignedpropagating whistler mode waves during the 9~15 October 1990 magnetic storm at L ≈ 3 ~ 4 is studied, and numerical calculations for energetic electrons in gyroresonance with a band of frequency of whistler mode waves distributed over a standard Gaussian spectrum is performed. It is found that the whistler.mode waves can efficiently drive energetic electrons from the larger pitch-angles into the loss cone, and lead to a flat-top distribution during the main phase of geomagnetic storms. This result perhaps presents a feasible interpretation for observation of time evolution of the quasi-isotropic pitch-angle distribution by Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) spacecraft at L ≈ 3 ~ 4.

  5. Wind farm operation planning using optimal pitch angle pattern (OPAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, Natalia S.; Rudion, K. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Chair for Electric Power Networks and Renewable Energy Sources

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the possibilities of optimal operation planning to maximize the energy production from a wind farm based on optimal pitch angle pattern (OPAP). The current status of this work is to investigate the influence of the pitch angle adaptation of single wind turbines (WTs) on the overall energy yield of the farm. The approach proposed in this paper assumes a selective change of the pitch angle of the chosen WTs from the optimal value, which corresponds to the maximal utilization of kinetic energy from the wind flow, in order to minimize wake effect influence on the overall energy yield of the farm. In this paper the fundamental assumptions of the proposed approach will be specified and the calculation algorithm will be presented. Furthermore, an exemplary test system will be defined and chosen scenarios will be calculated in order to show the potentials of the OPAP method. (orig.)

  6. Characteristics of Rotary Electromagnet with Large Tooth-pitch Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Jian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the conventional electro-mechanical converter of 2D valve had problems of step lose due to its small tooth-pitch angle, a novel rotary electromagnet with large tooth-pitch angle and coreless rotor structure was proposed. Combined with the approaches of magnetic circuit analysis, finite element simulation and experimental study, the static and dynamic characteristics of electromagnet including torque-angle characteristics, frequency response and step response were studied. The experimental results are in a close agreement with the simulated results. The electromagnet has sinusoidal torque-angle characteristics and good dynamic response. The maximum static torque is approximately 0.083N.M, and its frequency width is about 125Hz/-3dB, 130Hz/-90°, respectively, and the rise time is about 5.5 ms. It is appropriate to be used as the electro-mechanical converter of 2D proportional valve.

  7. Evaluation of fluidic thrust vectoring nozzle via thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Hirota, M.; Ouchi, K.; Saito, T.

    2016-03-01

    Shock vector control (SVC) in a converging-diverging nozzle with a rectangular cross-section is discussed as a fluidic thrust vectoring (FTV) method. The interaction between the primary nozzle flow and the secondary jet is examined using experiments and numerical simulations. The relationships between FTV parameters [nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and secondary jet pressure ratio (SPR)] and FTV performance (thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment) are investigated. The experiments are conducted with an NPR of up to 10 and an SPR of up to 2.7. Numerical simulations of the nozzle flow are performed using a Navier-Stokes solver with input parameters set to match the experimental conditions. The thrust pitching angle and moment computed from the force-moment balance are used to evaluate FTV performance. The experiment and numerical results indicate that the FTV parameters (NPR and SPR) directly affect FTV performance. Conventionally, FTV performance evaluated by the common method using thrust pitching angle is highly dependent on the location of evaluation. Hence, in this study, we show that the thrust pitching moment, a parameter which is independent of the location, is the appropriate figure of merit to evaluate the performance of FTV systems.

  8. STEREO/LET Observations of Solar Energetic Particle Pitch Angle Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leske, Richard; Cummings, Alan; Cohen, Christina; Mewaldt, Richard; Labrador, Allan; Stone, Edward; Wiedenbeck, Mark; Christian, Eric; von Rosenvinge, Tycho

    2015-04-01

    As solar energetic particles (SEPs) travel through interplanetary space, the shape of their pitch angle distributions is determined by magnetic focusing and scattering. Measurements of SEP anisotropies therefore probe interplanetary conditions far from the observer and can provide insight into particle transport. Bidirectional flows of SEPs are often seen within interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), resulting from injection of particles at both footpoints of the CME or from mirroring of a unidirectional beam. Mirroring is clearly implicated in those cases that show a loss cone distribution, in which particles with large pitch angles are reflected but the magnetic field enhancement at the mirror point is too weak to turn around particles with the smallest pitch angles. The width of the loss cone indicates the magnetic field strength at the mirror point far from the spacecraft, while if timing differences are detectable between outgoing and mirrored particles they may help constrain the location of the reflecting boundary.The Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) onboard both STEREO spacecraft measure energetic particle anisotropies for protons through iron at energies of about 2-12 MeV/nucleon. With these instruments we have observed loss cone distributions in several SEP events, as well as other interesting anisotropies, such as unusual oscillations in the widths of the pitch angle distributions on a timescale of several minutes during the 23 July 2012 SEP event and sunward-flowing particles when the spacecraft was magnetically connected to the back side of a distant shock well beyond 1 AU. We present the STEREO/LET anisotropy observations and discuss their implications for SEP transport. In particular, we find that the shapes of the pitch angle distributions generally vary with energy and particle species, possibly providing a signature of the rigidity dependence of the pitch angle diffusion coefficient.

  9. Pitch Angle Control of Variable Speed Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif El-Tous

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to design a simple controller to maximize the extracted energy of wind turbines. In this study the pitch angle control of variable speed wind turbine is investigated. In particular, it concentrates on the extraction of maximum available energy, reduction of torque and output power variations, which gives stresses in the gearbox and mechanical structure. The control concentrates on separate wind speed internals as well as on whole wind speed region. It is found that the control structures varies substantially between the wind speed regions. Two different control systems are compared. The results show that pitch actuator with three levels of pitching speed have better response.

  10. The Norma spiral arm: large-scale pitch angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2017-09-01

    In the inner Galaxy, we statistically find the mean pitch angle of the recently mapped Norma arm in two galactic quadrants (observed tangentially at galactic longitudes near l=328° and near l=20°), using the twin-tangent method, and obtain -13.7°± 1.4°. We compared with other measurements in the literature. Also, using the latest published data on pitch angle and the latest published data on the radial starting point of the four arms (R_{Gal} = 2.2 kpc) in each galactic quadrant, a revised velocity plot of the Norma spiral arm is made, along with other spiral arms in the Milky Way, in each Galactic quadrant.

  11. Small angle scattering and polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, J.P. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (LLB) - Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1996-12-31

    The determination of polymer structure is a problem of interest for both statistical physics and industrial applications. The average polymer structure is defined. Then, it is shown why small angle scattering, associated with isotopic substitution, is very well suited to the measurement of the chain conformation. The corresponding example is the old, but pedagogic, measurement of the chain form factor in the polymer melt. The powerful contrast variation method is illustrated by a recent determination of the concentration profile of a polymer interface. (author) 12 figs., 48 refs.

  12. Spirality: A Noval Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Douglas; Arkansas Galaxy Evolution Survey

    2017-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 117 synthetic spiral images with known pitches, varying both the spiral properties and the input parameters. The code yielded correct results for all synthetic spirals with galaxy-like properties. We also compared the code’s results to two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2DFFT) measurements for the sample of nearby galaxies defined by DMS PPak. Spirality’s error bars overlapped 2DFFT’s error bars for 26 of the 30 galaxies. The two methods’ agreement correlates strongly with galaxy radius in pixels and also with i-band magnitude, but not with redshift, a result that is consistent with at least some galaxies’ spiral structure being fully formed by z=1.2, beyond which there are few galaxies in our sample. We also analyze apparent spiral structure of three galaxies beyond z=2. The Spirality code package also includes GenSpiral, which produces FITS images of synthetic spirals, and SpiralArmCount, which uses a one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform to count the spiral arms of a galaxy after its pitch is determined.

  13. Spirality: A Novel Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Shields, Douglas W; Pfountz, Casey; Davis, Benjamin L; Hartley, Matthew; Imani, Hamed Pour; Slade, Zac; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming at least 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 117 synthetic spiral images with known pitches, varying both the spiral properties and the input parameters. The code yielded correct results for all synthetic spirals with galaxy-like properties. We also compared the code's results to two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2DFFT) measurements for the sample of nearby galaxies defined by DMS PPak. Spirality's error bars overlapped 2DFFT's error bars for 26 of the 30 galaxies. The two methods' agreement correlates strongly with galaxy radius in pixels and also with i-band magnitude, but not with redshift, a result that is consistent with at least some galaxies' spiral structure being fully formed by z=1.2, beyond which there are few galaxies in our sample. The Spirality code pa...

  14. Internal magnetic pitch angle measurements at KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, J.; Chung, J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Messmer, M. C. C. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Specification of the hardware for photo-detecting and digitizing electronics has almost complete as well and many of them are ready for procurement. The main collaboration party is Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, whose main responsibilities include the development of filter module design and off-line and real-time analysis schemes along with overall consultations. The following sections describe some major parts of the design progress. 3D MSE stokes-vector simulations have been tuned to match the MSE spectra measured in KSTAR and used to design the band-pass filters. From these simulations, 0.4-nm 2-cavity interference filters have been chosen to minimize pitch angle errors. Figure 4 shows an example of the MSE spectrum calculated from the simulation that is compared with the measured spectrum. Also shown in Figure 4 are the possible passband (shaded in green) of the spectrum where the redmost shifted polarization component (+4π) is chosen, the pitch angles and their errors. Due to the overlap of the spectra among ion sources, the second ion source of NBI1 (NBI1-2) should operate at about 15% lower voltage than that of the first ion source (NBI1-1). An example of this overlap in the spectrum and the large error in pitch angle it causes is shown in Figure 5. Pass-band control by the filter-angle tuning is under development to fully cover most of the KSTAR plasmas which include Ip = 0.5 - 1 MA, Bt = 1.5 - 3.5 T, and the beam energy (for the ion source 1 from NBI1) = 70 - 100 keV. The accuracy obtained is in the order of 0.5 % and compatible with the MSE requirement. The software also allows sequences creation, which consists of executing a series of a predefined central wavelength and a corresponding time delay. One PC can control 5 controller hubs each of which can accommodate up to 6 rotational stage/controller sets, resulting in the maximum 30 sets.

  15. Electron - whistler interaction at the Earth`s bow shock: 2. Electron pitch angle diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veltri, P.; Zimbardo, G. [Universita della Calabria, Cosenza (Italy)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper the authors further examine the interactions of whistler waves with electrons in the bow shock, simulating a crossing made on Nov 7, 1977. The authors consider the effects of whistler waves and electrostatic noise on the electron distribution function, using a Monte Carlo technique. Their simulations are able to reproduce the moments of the distribution function, including spatial and velocity profiles. They conclude that the fields in the bow shock accelerate electrons, creating asymmetric distributions, which are filled in due to diffusion caused by the electrostatic noise, and which have the velocity distributions balanced due to pitch angle scattering of parallel electrons from whistler waves.

  16. THE BEHAVIOR OF THE PITCH ANGLE OF SPIRAL ARMS DEPENDING ON OPTICAL WAVELENGTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-García, Eric E.; Puerari, Ivânio; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Luna, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); González-Lópezlira, Rosa A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacán, México, C.P. 58089 (Mexico); Fuentes-Carrera, Isaura, E-mail: ericmartinez@inaoep.mx [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, U. P. Adolfo López Mateos, Zacatenco, 07730 México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-09-20

    Based on integral field spectroscopy data from the CALIFA survey, we investigate the possible dependence of spiral arm pitch angle with optical wavelength. For three of the five studied objects, the pitch angle gradually increases at longer wavelengths. This is not the case for two objects where the pitch angle remains constant. This result is confirmed by the analysis of SDSS data. We discuss the possible physical mechanisms to explain this phenomenon, as well as the implications of the results.

  17. HYDRODYNAMICS OF OSCILLATING WING ON THE PITCH ANGLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalii Korobov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: research of the hydrodynamic characteristics of a wing in a nonstationary stream. Methods: The experimental studies of the hydrodynamic load acting on the wing of 1.5 elongation, wich harmonically oscillated respect to the transversal axis in the frequency range of 0.2-2.5 Hz. The flow speed in the hydrodynamic tunnel ranged of 0.2-1.5 m/s. Results: The instantaneous values of the coefficients of lift and drag / thrust on the pitch angle at unsteady flow depends on the Strouhal number.Discussion: with increasing oscillation frequency coefficients of hydrodynamic force components significantly higher than the data for the stationary blowing out of the wing.

  18. PITCH ANGLE RESTRICTIONS IN LATE-TYPE SPIRAL GALAXIES BASED ON CHAOTIC AND ORDERED ORBITAL BEHAVIOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Villegas, A.; Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E.; Peimbert, A. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Velazquez, H. M., E-mail: barbara@astroscu.unam.mx [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 877, 22800 Ensenada (Mexico)

    2012-01-20

    We built models for low bulge mass spiral galaxies (late type as defined by the Hubble classification) using a three-dimensional self-gravitating model for spiral arms, and analyzed the orbital dynamics as a function of pitch angle, ranging from 10 Degree-Sign to 60 Degree-Sign . Indirectly testing orbital self-consistency, we search for the main periodic orbits and studied the density response. For pitch angles up to approximately {approx}20 Degree-Sign , the response closely supports the potential readily permitting the presence of long-lasting spiral structures. The density response tends to 'avoid' larger pitch angles in the potential by keeping smaller pitch angles in the corresponding response. Spiral arms with pitch angles larger than {approx}20 Degree-Sign would not be long-lasting structures but would rather be transient. On the other hand, from an extensive orbital study in phase space, we also find that for late-type galaxies with pitch angles larger than {approx}50 Degree-Sign , chaos becomes pervasive, destroying the ordered phase space surrounding the main stable periodic orbits and even destroying them. This result is in good agreement with observations of late-type galaxies, where the maximum observed pitch angle is {approx}50 Degree-Sign .

  19. Effect of blade pitch angle on aerodynamic performance of straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立勋; 梁迎彬; 刘小红; 郭健

    2014-01-01

    Wind energy is one of the most promising renewable energy sources, straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine (S-VAWT) appears to be particularly promising for the shortage of fossil fuel reserves owing to its distinct advantages, but suffers from poor self-starting and low power coefficient. Variable-pitch method was recognized as an attractive solution to performance improvement, thus majority efforts had been devoted into blade pitch angle effect on aerodynamic performance. Taken into account the local flow field of S-VAWT, mathematical model was built to analyze the relationship between power outputs and pitch angle. Numerical simulations on static and dynamic performances of blade were carried out and optimized pitch angle along the rotor were presented. Comparative analyses of fixed pitch and variable-pitch S-VAWT were conducted, and a considerable improvement of the performance was obtained by the optimized blade pitch angle, in particular, a relative increase of the power coefficient by more than 19.3%. It is further demonstrated that the self-starting is greatly improved with the optimized blade pitch angle.

  20. Effect of EMIC Wave Normal Angle Distribution on Relativistic Electron Scattering in Outer RB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2007-01-01

    We present the equatorial and bounce average pitch angle diffusion coefficients for scattering of relativistic electrons by the H+ mode of EMIC waves. Both the model (prescribed) and self consistent distributions over the wave normal angle are considered. The main results of our calculation can be summarized as follows: First, in comparison with field aligned waves, the intermediate and highly oblique waves reduce the pitch angle range subject to diffusion, and strongly suppress the scattering rate for low energy electrons (E less than 2 MeV). Second, for electron energies greater than 5 MeV, the |n| = 1 resonances operate only in a narrow region at large pitch-angles, and despite their greatest contribution in case of field aligned waves, cannot cause electron diffusion into the loss cone. For those energies, oblique waves at |n| greater than 1 resonances are more effective, extending the range of pitch angle diffusion down to the loss cone boundary, and increasing diffusion at small pitch angles by orders of magnitude.

  1. Different studies of the global pitch angle of the Milky Way's spiral arms

    CERN Document Server

    Vallee, Jacques P

    2015-01-01

    There are many published values for the pitch angle of individual spiral arms, and their wide distribution (from -3 to -28 degrees) begs for various attempts for a single value. Each of the four statistical methods used here yields a mean pitch angle in a small range, between -12 and -14 degrees (table 7, figure 2). The final result of our meta-analysis yields a mean global pitch angle in the Milky Way's spiral arms of -13.1 degrees, plus or minus 0.6 degree.

  2. Near-equatorial pitch angle diffusion of energetic electrons by oblique whistler waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Elena; Burke, William J.

    1991-06-01

    The pitch angle scattering of trapped, energetic electrons by obliquely propagating whistler waves in the equatorial regions of the plasmasphere is investigated. Storm-injected electrons moving along field lines near the equator interact with electromagnetic waves whose frequencies are Doppler-shifted to some harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. The wave normals are distributed almost parallel to the geomagnetic field. Waves grow from the combined contributions of a large reservoir of energetic electrons that are driven into the loss cone by the highest-harmonic interactions permitted to them. Relativistic, quasi-linear theory is applied to obtain self-consistent equations describing the temporal evolution of waves and particles over time scales which are longer than the particle bounce time and group time delay of the waves. The equilibrium solutions and their stability are studied, considering the reflection of the waves by the ionsphere and the coupling of multiple harmonic resonances.

  3. Pitch Angle Distribution Evolution of Energetic Electrons by Whistler-Mode Chorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hui-Nan; SU Zhen-Peng; XIONG Ming

    2008-01-01

    We develop a two-dimensional momentum and pitch angle code to solve the typical Fokker-Planck equation which governs wave-particle interaction in space plasmas. We carry out detailed calculations of momentum and pitch angle diffusion coefficients, and temporal evolution of pitch angle distribution for a band of chorus frequency distributed over a standard Gaussian spectrum particularly in the heart of the Earth's radiation belt L = 4.5,where peaks of the electron phase space density are observed. We find that the Whistler-mode chorus can produce significant acceleration of electrons at large pitch angles, and can enhance the phase space density for energies of 0.5~1 MeV by a factor of 10 or above after about 24h. This result can account for observation of significant enhancement in flux of energetic electrons during the recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm.

  4. Pitch Angle Restrictions in Late Type Spiral Galaxies Based on Chaotic and Ordered Orbital Behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Villegas, Angeles; Moreno, Edmundo; Peimbert, Antonio; Velazquez, Hector M

    2011-01-01

    We built models for low bulge mass spiral galaxies (late type as defined by the Hubble classification) using a 3-D self-gravitating model for spiral arms, and analyzed the orbital dynamics as a function of pitch angle, going from 10$\\deg$ to 60$\\deg$. Testing undirectly orbital self-consistency, we search for the main periodic orbits and studied the density response. For pitch angles up to approximately $\\sim 20\\deg$, the response supports closely the potential permitting readily the presence of long lasting spiral structures. The density response tends to "avoid" larger pitch angles in the potential, by keeping smaller pitch angles in the corresponding response. Spiral arms with pitch angles larger than $\\sim 20\\deg$, would not be long-lasting structures but rather transient. On the other hand, from an extensive orbital study in phase space, we also find that for late type galaxies with pitch angles larger than $\\sim 50\\deg$, chaos becomes pervasive destroying the ordered phase space surrounding the main sta...

  5. Protein Amyloidogenesis Investigated by Small Angle Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Caterina; Spinozzi, Francesco; Mariani, Paolo; Ortore, Maria Grazia

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, the study of the mechanisms inducing amyloid fibril formation has involved several experimental and theoretical biophysical approaches. Many efforts have been made by scientist at the borderline between biology, chemistry, biochemistry and physics in order to understand why and in which way a protein starts its amyloidogenic pattern. This fundamental research issue is evolving in parallel to the development of drugs and inhibitors able to modify protein self assembly towards amyloid fibrils. Small angle xray and neutron scattering experiments represent suitable methods to investigate protein amyloidogenesis and the possible effects of inhibitors: they are in-solution techniques, require low amount of sample and their time-resolution makes it possible to follow aggregation pattern. In this paper we review small angle x-ray and neutron scattering studies dedicated to investigate amyloid β peptide and α-synuclein, related to Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s diseases, respectively, together with some other studies that introduced innovative models to describe with small angle scattering techniques amyloid fibrillation processes.

  6. Adaptive sliding mode back-stepping pitch angle control of a variable-displacement pump controlled pitch system for wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiu-xing; Lin, Yong-gang; Li, Wei; Liu, Hong-wei; Gu, Ya-jing

    2015-09-01

    A variable-displacement pump controlled pitch system is proposed to mitigate generator power and flap-wise load fluctuations for wind turbines. The pitch system mainly consists of a variable-displacement hydraulic pump, a fixed-displacement hydraulic motor and a gear set. The hydraulic motor can be accurately regulated by controlling the pump displacement and fluid flows to change the pitch angle through the gear set. The detailed mathematical representation and dynamic characteristics of the proposed pitch system are thoroughly analyzed. An adaptive sliding mode pump displacement controller and a back-stepping stroke piston controller are designed for the proposed pitch system such that the resulting pitch angle tracks its desired value regardless of external disturbances and uncertainties. The effectiveness and control efficiency of the proposed pitch system and controllers have been verified by using realistic dataset of a 750 kW research wind turbine.

  7. Pitch-Perfect: How Do Flies Control Their Pitch Angle During Aerial Stumbles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Samuel; Canale, Luca; Beatus, Tsevi; Cohen, Itai

    2014-11-01

    The successful flight of flapping-wing insects is contingent upon a complex and beautiful relationship between sensory input, neural response, and muscular actuation. In particular, the inherent instabilities of flapping-wing flight require insects like D. melanogaster to constantly sense, process, and adjust for in-flight stumbles. Here we present an analysis of the mechanisms for pitch control in D. melanogaster. By gluing small ferromagnetic pins to the backs of the flies and applying an external magnetic field, we induce torques along the flies' pitch axis during free flight. Using an automated hull reconstruction technique developed in the lab, we analyze these torque events and the flies' subsequent recoveries in order to characterize the flies' response to external perturbations. Ultimately, we aim to develop a reduced-order controller model that will capture the salient aspects of the flies' recovery mechanism.

  8. The pitch angle paradox and radiative life times in a synchrotron source

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    In synchrotron radiation there is a paradox whether or not the pitch angle of a radiating charge varies. The conventional wisdom is that the pitch angle does not change during the radiation process. The argument is based on Larmor's radiation formula, where in a synchrotron case the radiation power is along the instantaneous direction of motion of the charge. Then the momentum loss will also be parallel to that direction and therefore the pitch angle of the charge would remain unaffected. The accordingly derived formulas for energy losses of synchrotron electrons in radio galaxies are the standard text-book material for the last 50 years. However, if we use the momentum transformation laws from special relativity, then we find that the pitch angle of a radiating charge varies. While the velocity component parallel to the magnetic field remains unaffected, the perpendicular component does reduce in magnitude due to radiative losses, implying a change in the pitch angle. This apparent paradox is resolved when e...

  9. Cyclotron maser emission from power-law electrons with strong pitch-angle anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, G Q; Wu, D J; Chen, L; Tang, J F; Liu, Q

    2016-01-01

    Energetic electrons with power-law spectrum are most commonly observed in astrophysics. This paper investigates electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME) from the power-law electrons, in which strong pitch-angle anisotropy is emphasized. The electron distribution function proposed in this paper can describe various types of pitch-angle anisotropy. Results show that the emission properties of ECME, including radiation growth, propagation, and frequency properties, depend considerably on the types of electron pitch-angle anisotropy, and different wave modes show different dependences on the pitch angle of electrons. In particular, the maximum growth rate of X2 mode rapidly decreases with respect to the electron pitch-angle cosine $\\mu_0$ at which the electron distribution peaks, while the growth rates for other modes (X1, O1, O2) initially increase before decreasing as $\\mu_0$ increases. Moreover, the O mode as well as the X mode can be the fastest growth mode, in terms of not only the plasma parameter but also ...

  10. Loss cone fluxes and pitch angle diffusion at the equatorial plane during auroral radio absorption events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, P.N.; Hargreaves, J.K.

    1983-04-01

    Flux and pitch angle distributions of energetic electrons at geostationary altitude in the vicinity of the atmospheric loss cone associated with an auroral radio absorption event are investigated. Measurements were made in the energy range 15-300 keV by the medium energy charged particle spectrometer on board the GEOS-2 satellite at the times of absorption events detected near the predicted foot of the geomagnetic field line passing through the satellite. Comparisons with theoretical pitch angle distributions and recombination rates indicate pitch angle diffusion coefficients to be 0.001/sec for a 2-dB event and 0.0001/sec for a 1-dB event. Further comparisons of the average electron measurements in the pitch angle range 0-5 deg with observations of the radio absorption by the portion of this flux which is actually precipitated are used to deduce the degree of departure of the electron pitch angle distribution from isotropy, and to place limits upon the ranges of effective recombination rate profiles. An empirical relation is derived which allows radio absorption to be predicted from measured electron fluxes.

  11. MEASUREMENT OF GALACTIC LOGARITHMIC SPIRAL ARM PITCH ANGLE USING TWO-DIMENSIONAL FAST FOURIER TRANSFORM DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel C.; Shields, Douglas W.; Kennefick, Julia; Kennefick, Daniel; Seigar, Marc S.; Lacy, Claud H. S. [Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences, 202 Field House, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Puerari, Ivanio [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Calle Luis Enrique Erro 1, 72840 Santa Maria Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2012-04-01

    A logarithmic spiral is a prominent feature appearing in a majority of observed galaxies. This feature has long been associated with the traditional Hubble classification scheme, but historical quotes of pitch angle of spiral galaxies have been almost exclusively qualitative. We have developed a methodology, utilizing two-dimensional fast Fourier transformations of images of spiral galaxies, in order to isolate and measure the pitch angles of their spiral arms. Our technique provides a quantitative way to measure this morphological feature. This will allow comparison of spiral galaxy pitch angle to other galactic parameters and test spiral arm genesis theories. In this work, we detail our image processing and analysis of spiral galaxy images and discuss the robustness of our analysis techniques.

  12. Measurement of Galactic Logarithmic Spiral Arm Pitch Angle Using Two-Dimensional Fast Fourier Transform Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Benjamin L; Shields, Douglas W; Kennefick, Julia; Kennefick, Daniel; Seigar, Marc S; Lacy, Claud H S; Puerari, Ivânio

    2012-01-01

    A logarithmic spiral is a prominent feature appearing in a majority of observed galaxies. This feature has long been associated with the traditional Hubble classification scheme, but historical quotes of pitch angle of spiral galaxies have been almost exclusively qualitative. We have developed a methodology, utilizing two-dimensional fast Fourier transformations of images of spiral galaxies, in order to isolate and measure the pitch angles of their spiral arms. Our technique provides a quantitative way to measure this morphological feature. This will allow comparison of spiral galaxy pitch angle to other galactic parameters and test spiral arm genesis theories. In this work, we detail our image processing and analysis of spiral galaxy images and discuss the robustness of our analysis techniques.

  13. Scattering angle-based filtering via extension in velocity

    KAUST Repository

    Kazei, Vladimir

    2016-09-06

    The scattering angle between the source and receiver wavefields can be utilized in full-waveform inversion (FWI) and in reverse-time migration (RTM) for regularization and quality control or to remove low frequency artifacts. The access to the scattering angle information is costly as the relation between local image features and scattering angles has non-stationary nature. For the purpose of a more efficient scattering angle information extraction, we develop techniques that utilize the simplicity of the scattering angle based filters for constantvelocity background models. We split the background velocity model into several domains with different velocity ranges, generating an

  14. Neutron elastic scattering at very small angles

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will measure neutron-proton elastic scattering at very small angles and hence very small four-momentum transfer, |t|. The range of |t| depends on the incident neutron momentum of the events but the geometrical acceptance will cover the angular range 0.025 < $\\Theta_{lab}$ < 1.9 mrad. The higher figure could be extended to 8.4 mrad by changing the geometry of the experiment in a later phase. \\\\ \\\\ The neutron beam will be highly collimated and will be derived from a 400 GeV external proton beam of up to $4 \\times 10^{10}$ protons per pulse in the SPS North Area Hall 1. The hydrogen target will be gaseous, operating at 40 atm. pressure and acts as a multiwire proportional chamber to detect the recoil protons. The forward neutron will be detected and located by interaction in a neutron vertex detector and its energy measured by a conventional steel plate calorimeter. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment will cover the angular region of nucleon-nucleon scattering which is dominated by Coulomb scattering ...

  15. Near-equatorial pitch angle diffusion of energetic electrons by oblique whistler waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalon, E. (Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (USA)); Burke, W.J. (Geophysics Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (USA))

    1991-06-01

    The pitch angle scattering of trapped, energetic electrons by obliquely propagating whistler waves in the equatorial regions of the plasmasphere is investigated. Storm-injected electrons moving along field lines near the equator interact with electromagnetic waves whose frequencies are Doppler-shifted to some harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. The wave normals are distributed almost parallel to the geomagnetic field. Waves grow from the combined contributions of a large reservoir of energetic electrons that are driven into the loss cone by the highest-harmonic interactions permitted to them. Relativistic, quasi-linear theory is applied to obtain self-consistent equations describing the temporal evolution of waves and particles over time scales which are longer than the particle bounce time and group time delay of the waves. The equilibrium solutions and their stability are studied, considering the reflection of the waves by the ionosphere and the coupling of multiple harmonic resonances. The contributions of nonlocal wave sources are also included in the theory. Numerical computations based on the authors theoretical analysis for regions inside the plasmasphere (L{le}2) and near the plasmapause (L{approximately}4.5) and for the first three harmonic resonances are presented.

  16. Sensitivity of magnetic field-line pitch angle measurements to sawtooth events in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J.

    2016-11-01

    The sensitivity of the pitch angle profiles measured by the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic to the evolution of the safety factor, q, profiles during the tokamak sawtooth events has been investigated for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). An analytic relation between the tokamak pitch angle, γ, and q estimates that Δγ ˜ 0.1° is required for detecting Δq ˜ 0.05 near the magnetic axis (not at the magnetic axis, though). The pitch angle becomes less sensitive to the same Δq for the middle and outer regions of the plasma (Δγ ˜ 0.5°). At the magnetic axis, it is not straightforward to directly relate the γ sensitivity to Δq since the gradient of γ(R), where R is the major radius of the tokamak, is involved. Many of the MSE data obtained from the 2015 KSTAR campaign, when calibrated carefully, can meet these requirements with the time integration down to 10 ms. The analysis with the measured data shows that the pitch angle profiles and their gradients near the magnetic axis can resolve the change of the q profiles including the central safety factor, q0, during the sawtooth events.

  17. Pitch Angle Regulation of Floating Wind Turbines with Dynamic Uncertainty and External Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najah F. Jasim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of pitch angle regulation of floating wind turbines with the presence of dynamic uncertainty and unknown disturbances usually encountered in offshore wind turbines, where two control laws are derived for two different cases to continuously achieve zero pitch angle for the floating turbine. In the first case, the timevarying unknown coefficients that characterize the turbine's dynamics are assumed reasonably bounded by known functions, where robust controller is designed in terms of these known functions to achieve zero pitch angle for the turbine with exponential rate of convergence. While in the second case, the turbine's dynamics are considered to be characterized by unknown coefficients of unknown bounds. In this case, a slidingmode adaptive controller is constructed in terms of estimated values for the unknown coefficients, where these values are continuously updated by adaptive laws associated with the proposed controller to ensure asymptotic convergence to zero for the turbine's pitch angle. Simulations are performed to demonstrate the validity of the proposed controllers to achieve the required regulation objective.

  18. Radiation reaction and the pitch angle changes for a charge undergoing synchrotron losses

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Ashok K

    2015-01-01

    In synchrotron radiation formulas it is always assumed that the pitch angle of a charged particle remains constant during the radiation process. The argument employed is that as the radiation is beamed along the instantaneous direction of motion of the charge, the momentum loss will also be along the direction of motion. Accordingly radiation reaction should not cause any change in the direction of the velocity vector, and the pitch angle of the charge would therefore remain constant during the radiation process. However, it turns out that this picture is not relativistically covariant and that in the case of synchrotron losses, the pitch angle in general varies. While the component of the velocity vector perpendicular to the magnetic field does reduce in magnitude due to radiative losses, the parallel component does not undergo any change during radiation. Therefore there is a change in the ratio of the two components, implying a change in the pitch angle. This apparent paradox gets resolved and one gets a c...

  19. Numerical study of effect of pitch angle on performance characteristics of a HAWT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhamshu A.R.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy is one of the clean renewable forms of energy that can handle the existing global fossil fuel crisis. Although it contributes to 2.5% of the global electricity demand, with diminishing fossil fuel sources, it is important that wind energy is harnessed to a greater extent to meet the energy crisis and problem of pollution. The present work involves study of effect of pitch angle on the performance of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT, NREL Phase VI. The wind velocities considered for the study are 7, 15.1 and 25.1 m/s. The simulations are performed using a commercial CFD code Fluent. A frozen rotor model is used for simulation, wherein the governing equations are solved in the moving frame of reference rotating with the rotor speed. The SST k-ω turbulence model has been used. It is seen that the thrust increases with increase in wind velocity, and decreases with increase in pitch angle. For a given wind velocity, there is an optimum pitch angle where the power generated by the turbine is maximum. The observed effect of pitch angle on the power produced has been correlated to the stall characteristics of the airfoil blade.

  20. The Black Hole Mass - Pitch Angle Relation of Type I AGN In Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Amanda; Jones, Logan; Hughes, John A.; Barrows, R. Scott; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2017-01-01

    A relationship between the mass of supermassive black holes, M, at the center of galaxies and the pitch angle, P, a measure of tightness of spiral arms, was recently reported by Berrier, et al. (2013 ApJ 769, 132) for late type galaxies. The relationship, established for a local sample, shows that spiral galaxies with tighter pitch angles host higher mass black holes. In this work, we explore the M-P relation for a sample of 50 low to moderate redshift (0.04Pitch angles were measured using a 2DFFT technique (Davis, et al., 2012 ApJS 199, 33). We find that the M-P relation for the higher redshift, AGN sample differs from that of the local sample and discuss the possibility of AGN feedback by looking at a proposed Fundamental Plane for late-type galaxies - a correlation between bulge mass, disk mass, and spiral-arm pitch angle (Davis, et al. 2015, ApJ 802, L13).

  1. Effect of pitch angle on initial stage of a transport airplane ditching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Baodong; Liu Peiqing; Qu Qiulin; Wang Jiawen

    2013-01-01

    Airworthiness regulations require that the transport airplane should be proved to ensure the survivability of the ditching for the passengers.The planned ditching of a transport airplane on the calm water is numerically simulated.The effect of pitch angle on the impact characteristics is especially investigated by a subscaled model.The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations of unsteady compressible flow are solved and the realizable κ-ε equations are employed to model the turbulence.The transformation of the air-water interface is tracked by volume of fluid (VOF) model.The motion of the rigid body is modeled by dynamic mesh method.The initial ditching stage of the transport airplane is analyzed in detail.The numerical results show that as the pitching angle increases,the maximal normal force decreases and the pitching motion becomes much gentler.The aft fuselage would be sucked down by the water and lead to pitching up,whereas the low horizontal tail prevents this trend.Consequently,the transport aircraft with low horizontal tail should ditch on the water at an angle between 10° and 12° as a recommendation.

  2. Flight Test Techniques for Quantifying Pitch Rate and Angle of Attack Rate Dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.; Murri, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Three different types of maneuvers were designed to separately quantify pitch rate and angle of attack rate contributions to the nondimensional aerodynamic pitching moment coefficient. These maneuvers combined pilot inputs and automatic multisine excitations, and were own with the subscale T-2 and Bat-4 airplanes using the NASA AirSTAR flight test facility. Stability and control derivatives, in particular C(sub mq) and C(sub m alpha(.)) were accurately estimated from the flight test data. These maneuvers can be performed with many types of aircraft, and the results can be used to increase simulation prediction fidelity and facilitate more accurate comparisons with wind tunnel experiments or numerical investigations.

  3. Conical pitch angle distributions of very-low energy ion fluxes observed by ISEE 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, J.L.; Baugher, C.R.; Chappell, C.R.; Shelley, E.G.; Young, D.T.

    1982-04-01

    Observations of low-energy ionospheric ions by the plasma composition experiment abroad ISEE 1 often show conical pitch angle distributions, that is, peak fluxes between 0/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/ to the directions parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field. Frequently, all three primary ionospheric ion species (H/sup +/, He/sup +/, and O/sup +/) simultaneously exhibit conical distributions with peak fluxes at essentially the same pitch angle. A distinction is made here between unidirectional, or streaming, distributions, in which ions are traveling essentially from only one hemisphere, and symmetrical distributions, in which significant fluxes are observed traveling from both hemispheres. The orbital coverage for this survey was largely restricted to the night sector, approximately 2100--0600 LT, and moderate geomagnetic latitudes of 20/sup 0/--40/sup 0/. Also, lack of complete pitch angle coverage at all times may have reduced detection for conics with small cone angles. However, we may conclude that the unidirectional conical distributions observed in the northern hemisphere are always observed to be traveling from the northern hemisphere and that they exhibit the following characteristics relative to the symmetric distributions, in that they (1) are typically observed on higher L shells (that is, higher geomagnetic latitudes or larger geocentric distances or both), (2) tend to have significantly larger cone angles, and (3), are associated with higher magnetic activity levels.

  4. Generalized parton distributions and wide-angle exclusive scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kroll, P

    2004-01-01

    The handbag mechanism for wide-angle exlusive scattering reactions is discussed and compared with other theoretical approaches. Its application to Compton scattering, meson photoproduction and two-photon annihilations into pairs of hadrons is reviewed.

  5. Electron pitch angle diffusion by electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves: The origin of pancake distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Richard B.; Thorne, Richard M.

    2000-03-01

    It has been suggested that highly anisotropic electron pancake distributions are the result of pitch angle diffusion by electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode waves in the equatorial region. Here we present pitch angle diffusion rates for ECH wave spectra centered at different frequencies with respect to the electron gyrofrequency Ωe corresponding to spacecraft observations. The wave spectra are carefully mapped to the correct resonant electron velocities. We show that previous diffusion calculations of ECH waves at 1.5Ωe, driven by the loss cone instability, result in large diffusion rates confined to a small range of pitch angles near the loss cone and therefore cannot account for pancake distributions. However, when the wave spectrum is centered at higher frequencies in the band (>1.6Ωe), the diffusion rates become very small inside the loss cone, peak just outside, and remain large over a wide range of pitch angles up to 60° or more. When the upper hybrid resonance frequency ωUHR is several times Ωe, ECH waves excited in higher bands also contribute significantly to pitch angle diffusion outside the loss cone up to very large pitch angles. We suggest that ECH waves driven by a loss cone could form pancake distributions as they grow if the wave spectrum extends from the middle to the upper part of the first (and higher) gyroharmonic bands. Alternatively, we suggest that pancake distributions can be formed by outward propagation in a nonhomogeneous medium, so that resonant absorption occurs at higher frequencies between(n+12) and (n+1)Ωe in regions where waves are also growing locally at <=1.5Ωe. The calculated diffusion rates suggest that ECH waves with amplitudes of the order of 1 mV m-1 can form pancake distributions from an initially isotropic distribution on a timescale of a few hours. This is consistent with recent CRRES observations of ECH wave amplitudes following substorm injections near geostationary orbit and the

  6. Computer programs for calculation of sting pitch and roll angles required to obtain angles of attack and sideslip on wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Two programs have been developed to calculate the pitch and roll angles of a wind-tunnel sting drive system that will position a model at the desired angle of attack and and angle of sideslip in the wind tunnel. These programs account for the effects of sting offset angles, sting bending angles and wind-tunnel stream flow angles. In addition, the second program incorporates inputs from on-board accelerometers that measure model pitch and roll with respect to gravity. The programs are presented in the report and a description of the numerical operation of the programs with a definition of the variables used in the programs is given.

  7. Exploration of a SMBH Mass-Pitch Angle Relation at Intermediate Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Logan H.; Schilling, Amanda; Davis, Benjamin L.; Barrows, Robert S.; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have established a correlation between central black hole mass M and spiral arm pitch angle P in disk galaxies. The mathematical form of this relation was developed for local objects (z < 0.04; Berrier, J. C. et al, 2013, ApJ, 769, 2), but the form at higher redshifts is currently unknown. Here we aim to develop an extended M-P relation in a sample of spiral galaxies with type 1 AGN, using spectroscopic techniques to estimate black hole masses and image analysis to measure pitch angle of the host galaxy. The sample was chosen from a list of 545 X-ray selected objects previously identified as type 1 AGN (Lusso, E. et al., 2010, A&A, 512, A34) and limited to those that had available spectral data (327 of 545) and visible spiral structure (14 of 327). The final sample consisted of thirteen objects with 0.196 < z < 1.34.Black hole masses were measured using optical or UV spectroscopic information from a number of emission lines, including [OIII] l5007, the broad-line component of Hβ, MgII, and CIV. Each spectrum was extinction corrected and fitted with an FeII template, an underlying power law curve, and Gaussian curves for the emission line(s) under consideration. Relationships developed by Vestergaard & Peterson (Vestergaard, M. & Peterson, B., 2006, ApJ, 641, 2) and Salviander & Shields (Salviander, S. & Shields, G. A., 2013, ApJ, 764, 82) use information from these fits to estimate log(MBH).Measurement of pitch angles was accomplished using a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform technique, 2DFFT (Davis, B. et al. 2012, ApJS, 199, 2). HST images were formatted for and processed by the 2DFFT program; output was analyzed for ranges of stable P for an appropriate number of spiral arms. Average pitch angle over these ranges were calculated using an extension of 2DFFT.

  8. Design of a wind turbine pitch angle controller for power system stabilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauch, Clemens; Islam, S.M.; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar

    2007-01-01

    The design of a PID pitch angle controller for a fixed speed active-stall wind turbine, using the root locus method is described in this paper. The purpose of this controller is to enable an active-stall wind turbine to perform power system stabilisation. For the purpose of controller design...... can effectively contribute to power system stabilisation. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. Fractal Approach in Petrology: Combining Ultra-Small Angle (USANA) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LoCelso, F.; Triolo, F.; Triolo, A.; Lin, J.S.; Lucido, G.; Triolo, R.

    1999-10-14

    Ultra small angle neutron scattering instruments have recently covered the gap between the size resolution available with conventional intermediate angle neutron scattering and small angle neutron scattering instruments on one side and optical microscopy on the other side. Rocks showing fractal behavior in over two decades of momentum transfer and seven orders of magnitude of intensity are examined and fractal parameters are extracted from the combined USANS and SANS curves.

  10. Multiple exchange and high-energy fixed-angle scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Halliday, I G; Orzalesi, C A; Tau, M

    1975-01-01

    The application of the eikonal ansatz to fermion fermion elastic scattering with Abelian vector gluon exchanges is discussed. The behaviours of the elastic scattering amplitude and the elastic form factor are considered and an important mechanism for fixed angle high energy elastic scattering is identified. (6 refs).

  11. Multiple small-angle neutron scattering studies of anisotropic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, A J; Long, G G; Ilavsky, J

    2002-01-01

    Building on previous work that considered spherical scatterers and randomly oriented spheroidal scatterers, we describe a multiple small-angle neutron scattering (MSANS) analysis for nonrandomly oriented spheroids. We illustrate this with studies of the multi-component void morphologies found in plasma-spray thermal barrier coatings. (orig.)

  12. Multiangle static and dynamic light scattering in the intermediate scattering angle range

    CERN Document Server

    Tamborini, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    We describe a light scattering apparatus based on a novel optical scheme covering the scattering angle range $0.5\\dg \\le \\theta \\le 25\\dg$, an intermediate regime at the frontier between wide angle and small angle setups that is difficult to access by existing instruments. Our apparatus uses standard, readily available optomechanical components. Thanks to the use of a charge-coupled device detector, both static and dynamic light scattering can be performed simultaneously at several scattering angles. We demonstrate the capabilities of our apparatus by measuring the scattering profile of a variety of samples and the Brownian dynamics of a dilute colloidal suspension.

  13. Energetic Particle Pitch Angle Distributions Observed At Widely-Spaced Longitudes in the 23 July 2012 and Other Large Solar Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leske, R. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Cohen, C. M.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Labrador, A. W.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Christian, E. R.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2015-12-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) pitch angle distributions arise from the competing effects of magnetic focusing and scattering as the particles travel through the interplanetary medium, and can therefore indicate interplanetary conditions far from the observer. The STEREO Low Energy Telescopes measure SEP pitch angle distributions for protons, helium, and heavier ions with energies of about 2-12 MeV/nucleon. A wide variety of particle anisotropies was observed in the extreme SEP event of 23 July 2012. At the STEREO-Ahead spacecraft, the solar source of the activity was near central meridian and the pitch angle distribution was initially an outward-flowing beam. High time resolution (1-minute) observations revealed peculiar oscillations in beam width on a timescale of several minutes; such behavior does not seem to have been previously reported in other events. Particle flow became bidirectional while inside a magnetic cloud following a tremendous shock. Particle intensities at the Behind spacecraft, from which the event occurred over the east limb of the Sun, were about 1000 times lower than at Ahead. Pitch angle distributions during the peak of the event show inward-flowing particles that underwent partial mirroring closer to the Sun and formed a distinctive loss-cone distribution (indicating that the magnetic field strength at the mirror point was too small to turn around particles with the smallest pitch angles). We present the observations of this rich variety of anisotropies within a single event, compare with observations in other events, and discuss the implications for SEP transport in the inner heliosphere.

  14. Physical mechanism causing rapid changes in ultrarelativistic electron pitch angle distributions right after a shock arrival: Evaluation of an electron dropout event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.-J.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Ma, Q.; Li, J.; Bortnik, J.; Nishimura, Y.; Chen, L.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain relativistic electron flux depletions (dropouts) in the Earth's outer radiation belt during storm times: adiabatic expansion of electron drift shells due to a decrease in magnetic field strength, magnetopause shadowing and subsequent outward radial diffusion, and precipitation into the atmosphere (driven by EMIC wave scattering). Which mechanism predominates in causing electron dropouts commonly observed in the outer radiation belt is still debatable. In the present study, we evaluate the physical mechanism that may be primarily responsible for causing the sudden change in relativistic electron pitch angle distributions during a dropout event observed by Van Allen Probes during the main phase of the 27 February 2014 storm. During this event, the phase space density of ultrarelativistic (>1 MeV) electrons was depleted by more than 1 order of magnitude over the entire radial extent of the outer radiation belt (3 highly anisotropic (peaked in 90°), energy-dependent pitch angle distributions, which appear to be associated with the typical EMIC wave scattering, comparison of the modeled electron distribution to electron measurements indicates that drift shell splitting is responsible for this rapid change in electron pitch angle distributions. This further indicates that magnetopause loss is the predominant cause of the electron dropout right after the shock arrival.

  15. Tests of Two Full-Scale Propellers with Different Pitch Distributions, at Blade Angles up to 60 Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, David; HARTMAN EDWIN P

    1939-01-01

    Two 3-blade 10-foot propellers were operated in front of a liquid-cooled engine nacelle. The propellers differed only in pitch distribution; one had normal distribution (nearly constant pitch for a blade angle of 15 degrees at 0.75 radius), and the other had the pitch of the tip sections decreased with respect to that for the shank sections (blade angle of 35 degrees for nearly constant pitch distribution). Propeller blade angles at 0.75r from 15 degrees to sixty degrees, corresponding to design speeds up to 500 miles per hour, were investigated. Propeller blade angles at 0.75r from 15 degrees to 60 degrees, corresponding to design speeds up to 500 miles per hour, were investigated. The results indicated that the propulsive efficiency at a blade angle of 60 degrees was about 9 percent less than the maximum value of 86 percent, which occurred at blade angle of about 30 degrees. The efficiency at a blade angle of 60 degrees was increased about 7 percent by correcting for the effect of a spinner and, at a blade angle of 30 degrees about 3 percent. The peak efficiencies for the propeller having the washed-out pitch distribution were slightly less than for the normal propeller but the take-off efficiency was generally higher.

  16. Pitch angle distributions of energetic ions in the lobes of the distant geomagnetic tail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, C.J.; Cowley, S.W.H.; Richardson, I.G.; Balogh, A. (Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (UK). Blackett Lab.)

    1990-07-01

    Analysis of energetic (> 35 keV) ion data from the ISEE-3 spacecraft obtained during 1982-1983, when the spacecraft made a series of traversals of the distant geomagnetic tail (X{sub GSE} > - 230 R{sub E}), indicates that the pitch angle distribution of energetic ions in the distant tail lobes is usually highly anisotropic, being peaked closely perpendicular to the magnetic field direction, but with a small net flow in the antisunward direction. In this paper we present a model, based on the motion of single particles into and within the tail lobes, which accounts for these observed distributions. This model assumes that the lobe ions originate in the magnetosheath, where the energetic ion population consists of two components; a spatially uniform ''solar'' population, and a population of ''terrestrial'' origin, which decreases in strength with downtail distance. The pitch angle distribution at any point within the lobe may be constructed, assuming that the value of the distribution function along the particle trajectory is conserved. In general, those ions with a large field-aligned component to their motion enter the lobes in the deep tail, where the ''terrestrial'' source is weak, whilst those moving closely perpendicular to the field enter the lobes at positions much closer to the Earth, where the source is strong. The fluxes of these latter ions are therefore much enhanced above the rest of the pitch angle distribution, and are shown to account for the form of the observed distributions. The model also accounts for the more isotropic ion population observed in the lobe during solar particle events, when the ''terrestrial'' component of the magnetosheath source may be considered negligible in comparison to the enhanced ''solar'' component. (author).

  17. Design and Pitch Angle Optimisation of Horizontal Axis Hydrokinetic Turbine with Constant Tip Speed Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigam Suyash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Booming population and associated energy demands, looming threat of exhaustion of conventional sources of energy and the severe environmental repercussions of the same call for alternate sources of clean energy. Hydrokinetic turbine is one such developing technology which harnesses zero-head free flow of water and affects hydrological ecology minimally. This paper discusses the optimisation of Horizontal Axis Hydrokinetic Turbine (HAHkT blade chord length and twist angle using blade element momentum (BEM theory to achieve a constant optimal angle of attack (AoA, thus maximising the power output. To achieve this while maintaining robustness at the hub end and eliminate cavitation, two different hydrofoils (S832 and E817 are selected. S832 is simulated using ANSYS 14.0 at low (00 and high (150 angles of attack and compared against more widely used NACA 4412 to study flow separation characteristics. This is followed by calculating angles of relative flow, ratios of chord length and subsequently twist angles for each blade element using MATLAB simulations. A blade model is thus developed for visualisation using computer aided designing after obtaining optimal chord lengths and pitch angles.

  18. The Inclination, Pitch Angle and Forbidden Radius of Spiral Arms of PGC 35105

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We have studied some properties including surface brightness in the u, g,r, i, and z bands of the nearly face-on galaxy PGC 35105. By subtracting a model surface brightness distribution from the observed image we obtain the residual image that shows only the spiral arms freed from the contamination by the bulge. From this we measured the the inclination, pitch angle, and forbidden radius (identified with the innermost point of the arm) for each of the two arms; and that for each of the five observing bands. We found these three parameters are largely independent of the observing band.

  19. Incoherent scatter plasma lines at angles with the magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredriksen, A.; Bjorna, N.; Lilensten, J. (Auroral Observatory, Tromso (Norway) Centre d' Etude des Phenomenes Aleatoires et Geophysiques, St.-Martin-d' Heres (France))

    1992-11-01

    The detectability and damping of photoelectron-enhanced plasma lines, as measured with the EISCAT UHF radar at off-field angles are evaluated, and the measured plasma line intensities are compared to the intensities computed from modeled photoelectron fluxes. It was found that, when allowing for a pitch angle dependence in the flux, the plasma line temperatures can be predicted to within a very good accuracy at altitudes where remnants of the N2 excitation dip are no longer present in the photoelectron distribution. 35 refs.

  20. Banded structures in electron pitch angle diffusion coefficients from resonant wave-particle interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Khazanov, G. V.; Avanov, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    Electron pitch angle (Dαα) and momentum (Dpp) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L = 4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies ≤10 keV. Landau (n = 0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n = ±1, ±2, … ±5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (α) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n = +1 and n = +2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n = +2. However, the banded structures in Dαα and Dpp coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n = +2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The Dpp diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than Dαα coefficients. For chorus waves, Dpp coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than Dαα coefficients for the case n ≠ 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of Dpp coefficient are generally larger than the values of Dαα coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89° and harmonic resonances n = +1, +2, and +3, whereas for whistler mode waves, the frequencies have been calculated for angle 10° and Landau

  1. Discharge Coefficient of 3-in-1 Hole with Various Inclination Angle and Hole Pitch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guangchao; Zhu Huiren; Fan Huiming

    2008-01-01

    Discharge coefficients of 3-in- 1 hole of three inclination angles and three spacing between holes are presented which described the discharge behavior of a row of holes. The inlet and outlet of the 3-in-1 hole both have a 15° lateral expansion. The flow conditions considered are mainstream turbulence intensities and density ratios of secondary flow to mainstream. The momentum flux ratios varied in the range froom 1 to 4. The comparison is made of the discharge coefficients of three shaped holes to find an optimal hole with low flow loss. The results show that the discharge coefficients of 3-in-1 hole are highest in three shaped holes and therefore this article is focused on the measurements of discharge coefficients of 3-in-1 hole for various geometries and aerodynamic parameters. The measured results of 3-in-1 hole indicate that turbulence intensities, density ratios and momentum flux ratios have weak influence on discharge coefficients for inclination angle of 20°. The high turbulence intensity yields the small discharge coefficients for inclination angle of 45° and 90°.The increased both momentum flux ratios and density ratios lead to the increased discharge coefficients for inclination angle of 45° and 90°. The increased inclination angle causes the rapidly increased discharge coefficients. There is a weak dependence of discharge coefficients on hole pitches.

  2. Stellar Orbital Studies in Normal Spiral Galaxies I: Restrictions to the Pitch Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Villegas, A; Moreno, E

    2013-01-01

    We built a family of non-axisymmetric potential models for normal non-barred or weakly-barred spiral galaxies as defined in the simplest classification of galaxies: the Hubble sequence. For this purpose a three-dimensional self-gravitating model for spiral arms PERLAS is superimposed to the galactic axisymmetric potentials. We analyze the stellar dynamics varying only the pitch angle of the spiral arms, from 4$\\deg$ to 40$\\deg$, for an Sa galaxy, from 8$\\deg$ to 45$\\deg$, for an Sb galaxy, and from 10$\\deg$ to 60$\\deg$, for an Sc galaxy. Self-consistency is indirectly tested through periodic orbital analysis, and through density response studies for each morphological type. Based on ordered behavior, periodic orbits studies show that for pitch angles up to approximately $15\\deg$, $18\\deg$, and $20\\deg$ for Sa, Sb and Sc galaxies, respectively, the density response supports the spiral arms potential, a requisite for the existence of a long-lasting large-scale spiral structure. Beyond those limits, the density ...

  3. Further Evidence for a Supermassive Black Hole Mass - Pitch Angle Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Berrier, Joel C; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D; Seigar, Marc S; Barrows, R Scott; Hartley, Matthew; Shields, Doug; Bentz, Misty C; Lacy, Claud H S

    2013-01-01

    We present new and stronger evidence for a previously reported relationship between galactic spiral arm pitch angle P (a measure of the tightness of spiral structure) and the mass M_BH of a disk galaxy's nuclear supermassive black hole (SMBH). We use an improved method to accurately measure the spiral arm pitch angle in disk galaxies to generate quantitative data on this morphological feature for 34 galaxies with directly measured black hole masses. We find a relation of log(M/M_sun) = (8.21 +/- 0.16) - (0.062 +/- 0.009)P. This method is compared with other means of estimating black hole mass to determine its effectiveness and usefulness relative to other existing relations. We argue that such a relationship is predicted by leading theories of spiral structure in disk galaxies, including the density wave theory. We propose this relationship as a tool for estimating SMBH masses in disk galaxies. This tool is potentially superior when compared to other methods for this class of galaxy, and has the advantage of ...

  4. Further evidence for a supermassive black hole mass-pitch angle relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrier, Joel C.; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.; Hartley, Matthew; Lacy, Claud H. S. [Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, 825 West Dickson Street, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Davis, Benjamin L.; Barrows, Robert Scott; Shields, Doug [Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences, University of Arkansas, 202 Old Field House, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Seigar, Marc S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Bentz, Misty C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We present new and stronger evidence for a previously reported relationship between galactic spiral arm pitch angle P (a measure of the tightness of spiral structure) and the mass M {sub BH} of a disk galaxy's nuclear supermassive black hole (SMBH). We use an improved method to accurately measure the spiral arm pitch angle in disk galaxies to generate quantitative data on this morphological feature for 34 galaxies with directly measured black hole masses. We find a relation of log (M/M {sub ☉}) = (8.21 ± 0.16) – (0.062 ± 0.009)P. This method is compared with other means of estimating black hole mass to determine its effectiveness and usefulness relative to other existing relations. We argue that such a relationship is predicted by leading theories of spiral structure in disk galaxies, including the density wave theory. We propose this relationship as a tool for estimating SMBH masses in disk galaxies. This tool is potentially superior when compared to other methods for this class of galaxy and has the advantage of being unambiguously measurable from imaging data alone.

  5. Effect of EMIC Wave Normal Angle Distribution on Relativistic Electron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    The flux level of outer-zone relativistic electrons (above 1 MeV) is extremely variable during geomagnetic storms, and controlled by a competition between acceleration and loss. Precipitation of these electrons due to resonant pitch-angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is considered one of the major loss mechanisms. This mechanism was suggested in early theoretical studies more than three decades ago. However, direct experimental evidence of the wave role in relativistic electrons precipitation is difficult to obtain because of lack of concurrent measurements of precipitating electrons at low altitudes and the waves in a magnetically conjugate equatorial region. Recently, the data from balloon-borne X-ray instruments provided indirect but strong evidence on an efficiency of the EMIC wave induced loss for the outer-zone relativistic electrons. These observations stimulated theoretical studies that, particularly, demonstrated that EMIC wave induced pitch-angle diffusion of MeV electrons can operate in the strong diffusion limit and this mechanism can compete with relativistic electron depletion caused by the Dst effect during the initial and main phases of storm. Although an effectiveness of relativistic electron scattering by EMIC waves depends strongly on the wave spectral properties, the most favorable assumptions regarding wave characteristics has been made in all previous theoretical studies. Particularly, only quasi field-aligned EMIC waves have been considered as a driver for relativistic electron loss. At the same time, there is growing experimental and theoretical evidence that these waves can be highly oblique; EMIC wave energy can occupy not only the region of generation, i.e. the region of small wave normal angles, but also the entire wave normal angle region, and even only the region near 90 degrees. The latter can dramatically change he effectiveness of relativistic electron scattering by EMIC waves. In the present study, we

  6. Scattering-angle based filtering of the waveform inversion gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-11-22

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) requires a hierarchical approach to maneuver the complex non-linearity associated with the problem of velocity update. In anisotropic media, the non-linearity becomes far more complex with the potential trade-off between the multiparameter description of the model. A gradient filter helps us in accessing the parts of the gradient that are suitable to combat the potential non-linearity and parameter trade-off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain, in which the low scattering angle of the gradient update is initially muted out in the FWI implementation, in what we may refer to as a scattering angle continuation process. The result is a low wavelength update dominated by the transmission part of the update gradient. In this case, even 10 Hz data can produce vertically near-zero wavenumber updates suitable for a background correction of the model. Relaxing the filtering at a later stage in the FWI implementation allows for smaller scattering angles to contribute higher-resolution information to the model. The benefits of the extended domain based filtering of the gradient is not only it\\'s ability in providing low wavenumber gradients guided by the scattering angle, but also in its potential to provide gradients free of unphysical energy that may correspond to unrealistic scattering angles.

  7. Influence of Thread Pitch, Helix Angle, and Compactness on Micromotion of Immediately Loaded Implants in Three Types of Bone Quality: A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of thread pitch, helix angle, and compactness on micromotion in immediately loaded implants in bone of varying density (D2, D3, and D4. Five models of the three-dimensional finite element (0.8 mm pitch, 1.6 mm pitch, 2.4 mm pitch, double-threaded, and triple-threaded implants in three types of bone were created using Pro/E, Hypermesh, and ABAQUS software. The study had three groups: Group 1, different pitches (Pitch Group; Group 2, same compactness but different helix angles (Angle Group; and Group 3, same helix angle but different compactness (Compact Group. Implant micromotion was assessed as the comprehensive relative displacement. We found that vertical relative displacement was affected by thread pitch, helix angle, and compactness. Under vertical loading, displacement was positively correlated with thread pitch and helix angle but negatively with compactness. Under horizontal loading in D2, the influence of pitch, helix angle, and compactness on implant stability was limited; however, in D3 and D4, the influence of pitch, helix angle, and compactness on implant stability is increased. The additional evidence was provided that trabecular bone density has less effect on implant micromotion than cortical bone thickness. Bone type amplifies the influence of thread pattern on displacement.

  8. Analysis of the distribution of pitch angles in model galactic disks - Numerical methods and algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, William S.; Roberts, William W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    An automated mathematical method capable of successfully isolating the many different features in prototype and observed spiral galaxies and of accurately measuring the pitch angles and lengths of these individual features is developed. The method is applied to analyze the evolution of specific features in a prototype galaxy exhibiting flocculent spiral structure. The mathematical-computational method was separated into two components. Initially, the galaxy was partitioned into dense regions constituting features using two different methods. The results obtained using these two partitioning algorithms were very similar, from which it is inferred that no numerical biasing was evident and that capturing of the features was consistent. Standard least-squares methods underestimated the true slope of the cloud distribution and were incapable of approximating an orientation of 45 deg. The problems were overcome by introducing a superior fit least-squares method, developed with the intention of calculating true orientation rather than a regression line.

  9. Hybrid intelligent control of PMSG wind generation system using pitch angle control with RBFN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Whei-Min; Hong, Chih-Ming [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804 (China); Ou, Ting-Chia; Chiu, Tai-Ming [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan 325 (China)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents the design of a fuzzy sliding mode loss-minimization control for the speed of a permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) and a high-performance on-line training radial basis function network (RBFN) for the turbine pitch angle control. The back-propagation learning algorithm is used to regulate the RBFN controller. The PMSG speed uses maximum power point tracking below the rated speed, which corresponds to low and high wind speed, and the maximum energy can be captured from the wind. A sliding mode controller with an integral-operation switching surface is designed, in which a fuzzy inference mechanism is utilized to estimate the upper bound of uncertainties. Furthermore, the fuzzy inference mechanism with center adaptation is investigated to estimate the optimal bound of uncertainties. (author)

  10. Rapid flattening of butterfly pitch angle distributions of radiation belt electrons by whistler-mode chorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-08-01

    Van Allen radiation belt electrons exhibit complex dynamics during geomagnetically active periods. Investigation of electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) can provide important information on the dominant physical mechanisms controlling radiation belt behaviors. Here we report a storm time radiation belt event where energetic electron PADs changed from butterfly distributions to normal or flattop distributions within several hours. Van Allen Probes observations showed that the flattening of butterfly PADs was closely related to the occurrence of whistler-mode chorus waves. Two-dimensional quasi-linear STEERB simulations demonstrate that the observed chorus can resonantly accelerate the near-equatorially trapped electrons and rapidly flatten the corresponding electron butterfly PADs. These results provide a new insight on how chorus waves affect the dynamic evolution of radiation belt electrons.

  11. Simulating Galaxies: Investigating Spiral Pitch Angle and the Efficiency of Radial Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifset, Noah; Barbano, Luke; Daniel, Kathryne J.

    2017-01-01

    Radial mixing refers to the permanent rearrangement of orbital angular momenta in a galactic disk due to interactions with transient spiral arms. A star is subject to this dynamical process when it is temporarily in a trapped orbit between the spiral arms near the corotation radius. The purpose of this research was to numerically investigate how spiral shape affects the efficiency of radial mixing. This was done by designing an orbital integrator that numerically simulated the motion of test particles in a 2D disk potential that had a steady spiral pattern and was populated using a Monte Carlo simulation. Several realizations of N=10^4 orbits were simulated and analyzed using the open source, distributed computing service Open Science Grid (OSG). The results were in agreement with previous theoretical predictions, and preliminary analysis of the data indicates that the RMS change in orbital angular momentum for stars in trapped orbits depends on spiral arm pitch angle.

  12. Linear systems formulation of scattering theory for rough surfaces with arbitrary incident and scattering angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krywonos, Andrey; Harvey, James E; Choi, Narak

    2011-06-01

    Scattering effects from microtopographic surface roughness are merely nonparaxial diffraction phenomena resulting from random phase variations in the reflected or transmitted wavefront. Rayleigh-Rice, Beckmann-Kirchhoff. or Harvey-Shack surface scatter theories are commonly used to predict surface scatter effects. Smooth-surface and/or paraxial approximations have severely limited the range of applicability of each of the above theoretical treatments. A recent linear systems formulation of nonparaxial scalar diffraction theory applied to surface scatter phenomena resulted first in an empirically modified Beckmann-Kirchhoff surface scatter model, then a generalized Harvey-Shack theory that produces accurate results for rougher surfaces than the Rayleigh-Rice theory and for larger incident and scattered angles than the classical Beckmann-Kirchhoff and the original Harvey-Shack theories. These new developments simplify the analysis and understanding of nonintuitive scattering behavior from rough surfaces illuminated at arbitrary incident angles.

  13. Banded structures in electron pitch angle diffusion coefficients from resonant wave-particle interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, A. K., E-mail: aktrip2001@yahoo.co.in; Singhal, R. P., E-mail: rpsiitbhu@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh (India); Khazanov, G. V., E-mail: George.V.Khazanov@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Avanov, L. A., E-mail: levon.a.avanov@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Electron pitch angle (D{sub αα}) and momentum (D{sub pp}) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L = 4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies ≤10 keV. Landau (n = 0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n = ±1, ±2, … ±5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (α) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n = +1 and n = +2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n = +2. However, the banded structures in D{sub αα} and D{sub pp} coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n = +2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The D{sub pp} diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than D{sub αα} coefficients. For chorus waves, D{sub pp} coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than D{sub αα} coefficients for the case n ≠ 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of D{sub pp} coefficient are generally larger than the values of D{sub αα} coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89° and harmonic resonances n = +1, +2, and +3

  14. Small angle neutron scattering and small angle X-ray scattering studies of platinum-loaded carbon foams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P U Sastry; V K Aswal; A G Wagh

    2008-11-01

    The morphology of carbon nanofoam samples comprising platinum nanoparticles dispersed in the matrix was characterized by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Results show that the structure of pores of carbon matrix exhibits a mass (pore) fractal nature and the average radius of the platinum particles is about 2.5 nm. The fractal dimension as well as the size distribution parameters of platinum particles varies markedly with the platinum content and annealing temperature. Transmission electron micrographs of the samples corroborate the SANS and SAXS results.

  15. Small-angle neutron scattering in materials science - an introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratzl, P. [Vienna Univ., Inst. fuer Materialphysik, Vienna (Austria)

    1996-12-31

    The basic principles of the application of small-angle neutron scattering to materials research are summarized. The text focusses on the classical methods of data evaluation for isotropic and for anisotropic materials. Some examples of applications to the study of alloys, porous materials, composites and other complex materials are given. (author) 9 figs., 38 refs.

  16. Progress in small angle neutron scattering activities in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Aziz Bin Mohamed; Azali Bin Muhamad; Shukri Bin Mohd [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Kajang (Malaysia)

    1999-10-01

    The current status of SANS (Small Angle Neutron Scattering facility) activities in Malaysia has been presented. Many works need to be done for system improvement before the system can be confidently used as one of effective quality control tools in materials production and engineering sectors. (author)

  17. Small Angle Neutron Scattering instrument at Malaysian TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukri Mohd; Razali Kassim; Zal Uyun Mahmood [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Kajang (Malaysia); Shahidan Radiman

    1998-10-01

    The TRIGA MARK II Research reactor at the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Research (MINT) was commissioned in July 1982. Since then various works have been performed to utilise the neutrons produced from this steady state reactor. One of the project involved the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS). (author)

  18. Spin-Echo Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uca, O

    2003-01-01

    Spin-Echo Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SESANS) instrument is a novel SANS technique which enables one to characterize distances from a few nanometers up to the micron range. The most striking difference between normal SANS and SESANS is that in SESANS one gets information in real space, whereas i

  19. Low frequency seabed scattering at low grazing angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji-Xun; Zhang, Xue-Zhen

    2012-04-01

    Low-frequency (LF) seabed scattering at low grazing angles (LGA) is almost impossible to directly measure in shallow water (SW), except through inversion from reverberation. The energy flux method for SW reverberation is briefly introduced in this paper. The closed-form expressions of reverberation in an isovelocity waveguide, derived from this method, indicate that in the three-halves law range interval multimode/ray sea bottom scattering with different incident and scattering angles in forming the reverberation may equivalently be represented by the bottom backscattering at a single range-dependent angle. This equivalent relationship is used to derive the bottom backscattering strength (BBS) as a function of angle and frequency. The LF&LGA BBS is derived in a frequency band of 200-2500 Hz and in a grazing angle range of 1.1°-14.0° from reverberation measurements at three sites with sandy bottoms. This is based on three previous works: (1) The closed-form expressions of SW reverberation [Zhou, (Chinese) Acta Acustica 5, 86-99 (1980)]; (2) the effective geo-acoustic model of sandy bottoms that follows the Biot model [Zhou et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 2847-2866 (2009)] and (3) A quality database of wideband reverberation level normalized to source level [Zhou and Zhang, IEEE J. Oceanic Eng. 30, 832-842 (2005)].

  20. Multiple magnetic scattering in small-angle neutron scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Tetsuro; Saito, Kotaro; Yano, Masao; Ito, Masaaki; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Kato, Akira; Manabe, Akira; Hashimoto, Ai; Gilbert, Elliot P; Keiderling, Uwe; Ono, Kanta

    2016-06-20

    We have investigated the influence of multiple scattering on the magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. We performed sample-thickness- and neutron-wavelength-dependent SANS measurements, and observed the scattering vector dependence of the multiple magnetic scattering. It is revealed that significant multiple scattering exists in the magnetic scattering rather than the nuclear scattering of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet. It is considered that the mean free path of the neutrons for magnetic scattering is rather short in Nd-Fe-B magnets. We analysed the SANS data by the phenomenological magnetic correlation model considering the magnetic microstructures and obtained the microstructural parameters.

  1. Calculation on the pitch angle of rocker of a rocker lunar rover on uneven terrain and path planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Zong-quan; HOU Xu-yan; GAO Hai-bo; HU Ming

    2008-01-01

    Forthe concertedmotion of rockerlunar rover,the pitch angle of rocker of a rocker lunar rover in uneven terrain must be calculated.According to the character of passive shape-shifting adaptive suspension of rocker lunar rover,the model of rocker lunar rover and the model of terrain were both simplified.The pitch angle of rocker was calculated using forward solving,reverse solving and the method of offsetting the curve of terrain respectively.Because of the banishment of the nonlinearity of equation sets of calculation by reverse solving,the calculation of the pitch angle based on reverse solving was programmed by means of MATLAB.Simulations were carried out by means of ADAMS.The result verified the validity of the calculation based on reverse solving.It provides the theoretical foundation for motion planning and path planning of rocker lunar rover.As applications of the calculation of pitch angle of rocker,the multi-attribute decision making of path based on the concerted motion planning and the predictive control on lunar rover based on the Markov prediction model were introduced.

  2. Characterization of porous materials by small-angle scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Mazumder; D Sen; A K Patra

    2004-07-01

    Characterization of porous materials by small-angle scattering has been extensively pursued for several years now as the pores are often of mesoscopic size and compatible with the length scale accessible by the technique using both neutrons and X-rays as probing radiation. With the availability of ultra small-angle scattering instruments, one can investigate porous materials in the sub-micron length scale. Because of the increased accessible length scale vis-a-vis the multiple scattering effect, conventional data analysis procedures based on single scattering approximation quite often fail. The limitation of conventional data analysis procedures is also pronounced in the case of thick samples and long wavelength of the probing radiation. Effect of multiple scattering is manifested by broadening the scattering profile. Sample thickness for some technologically important materials is often significantly high, as the experimental samples have to replicate all its essential properties in the bulk material. Larger wavelength of the probing radiation is used in some cases to access large length scale and also to minimize the effect of double Bragg reflections.

  3. Ultra-small angle neutron scattering on structured materials

    CERN Document Server

    Hainbuchner, M

    2000-01-01

    neutrons has reached a level that makes it a complementary method to conventional small angle scattering at each neutron source supplying enough neutron flux. prove high order interference effects. Measuring this kind of samples the performance of an USANS instrument can simply be determined. This allows the comparison of different instruments. For the calibration of the instrument and testing of the data treatment routines suspensions of latex spheres of various diameters were examined. In order to demonstrate that the evaluation of samples showing strong multiple scattering can produce meaningful results, measurements on sintered alumina using various sample thickness were carried out. The investigation of the scattering behavior of sedimentary source rocks revealed that only selected samples show a fractal scattering behavior and, therefore, a fractal inner structure. Time resolved measurements on hardening cement paste demonstrate that time dependent information on the changes of the structural parameter ...

  4. A new method to estimate local pitch angles in spiral galaxies: Application to spiral arms and feathers in M81 and M51

    CERN Document Server

    Puerari, Ivânio; Block, David L

    2014-01-01

    We examine $8\\mu$m IRAC images of the grand design two-arm spiral galaxies M81 and M51 using a new method whereby pitch angles are locally determined as a function of scale and position, in contrast to traditional Fourier transform spectral analyses which fit to average pitch angles for whole galaxies. The new analysis is based on a correlation between pieces of a galaxy in circular windows of $(\\ln R, \\theta)$ space and logarithmic spirals with various pitch angles. The diameter of the windows is varied to study different scales. The result is a best-fit pitch angle to the spiral structure as a function of position and scale, or a distribution function of pitch angles as a function of scale for a given galactic region or area. We apply the method to determine the distribution of pitch angles in the arm and interarm regions of these two galaxies. In the arms, the method reproduces the known pitch angles for the main spirals on a large scale, but also shows higher pitch angles on smaller scales resulting from ...

  5. Low-angle X-ray scattering from spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desouky, O.S. E-mail: omardesouky@yahoo.com; Ashour, Ahmed H.; Abdullah, Mohamed I.; Elshemey, Wael M

    2002-07-01

    Low-angle scattering of X-rays is characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are due to the interference of photons coherently scattered from the molecules of the medium. Thus these patterns are closely linked to the molecular structure of the investigated medium. In this work, low-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) profiles of five spices; pimpinella anisum (anise), coriandrum sativum (coriander), cuminum cyminum (cumin), foenculum vulgare (fennel) and nigella sativa (nigella or black cumin) are presented after extensive measurements. It is found that all spices exhibit one characteristic peak at a scattering angle around 10 deg. This is equivalent to a value x=0.0565 A{sup -1}, where x=sin({theta}/2)/{lambda}. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak is found to be characteristic for each type of the investigated spices. The possibility to detect the irradiation of these spices from their LAXS profiles is also examined after 10, 20, 30 and 40 kGy doses of gamma radiation. Except for anise, coriander and cumin at 40 kGy, there are no detectable deviations from the control samples in the scattering profiles of irradiated samples. These results comply with the recommendations of the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) which defines 30 kGy as the maximum dose for irradiation of spices. The present technique could be used to detect over-irradiation, which causes damage to the molecular structure of some spices.

  6. Low-angle X-ray scattering from spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Ashour, Ahmed H.; Abdullah, Mohamed I.; Elshemey, Wael M.

    2002-07-01

    Low-angle scattering of X-rays is characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are due to the interference of photons coherently scattered from the molecules of the medium. Thus these patterns are closely linked to the molecular structure of the investigated medium. In this work, low-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) profiles of five spices; pimpinella anisum (anise), coriandrum sativum (coriander), cuminum cyminum (cumin), foenculum vulgare (fennel) and nigella sativa (nigella or black cumin) are presented after extensive measurements. It is found that all spices exhibit one characteristic peak at a scattering angle around 10°. This is equivalent to a value x=0.0565 Å -1, where x=sin( θ⧸2)⧸ λ. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak is found to be characteristic for each type of the investigated spices. The possibility to detect the irradiation of these spices from their LAXS profiles is also examined after 10, 20, 30 and 40 kGy doses of gamma radiation. Except for anise, coriander and cumin at 40 kGy, there are no detectable deviations from the control samples in the scattering profiles of irradiated samples. These results comply with the recommendations of the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) which defines 30 kGy as the maximum dose for irradiation of spices. The present technique could be used to detect over-irradiation, which causes damage to the molecular structure of some spices.

  7. Application of reflectometry power flow for magnetic field pitch angle measurements in tokamak plasmas (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdain, P-A; Peebles, W A

    2008-10-01

    Reflectometry has successfully demonstrated measurements of many important parameters in high temperature tokamak fusion plasmas. However, implementing such capabilities in a high-field, large plasma, such as ITER, will be a significant challenge. In ITER, the ratio of plasma size (meters) to the required reflectometry source wavelength (millimeters) is significantly larger than in existing fusion experiments. This suggests that the flow of the launched reflectometer millimeter-wave power can be realistically analyzed using three-dimensional ray tracing techniques. The analytical and numerical studies presented will highlight the fact that the group velocity (or power flow) of the launched microwaves is dependent on the direction of wave propagation relative to the internal magnetic field. It is shown that this dependence strongly modifies power flow near the cutoff layer in a manner that embeds the local magnetic field direction in the "footprint" of the power returned toward the launch antenna. It will be shown that this can potentially be utilized to locally determine the magnetic field pitch angle at the cutoff location. The resultant beam drift and distortion due to magnetic field and relativistic effects also have significant consequences on the design of reflectometry systems for large, high-field fusion experiments. These effects are discussed in the context of the upcoming ITER burning plasma experiment.

  8. MreB helical pitch angle determines cell diameter in Escherichia coli

    CERN Document Server

    Ouzounov, Nikolay; Bratton, Benjamin; Jacobowitz, David; Gitai, Zemer; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have remarkably robust cell shape control mechanisms. For example, cell diameter only varies by a few percent across a population. MreB is necessary for establishment and maintenance of rod shape although the mechanism of shape control remains unknown. We perturbed MreB in two complimentary ways to produce steady-state cell diameters over a wide range, from 790+/-30 nm to 1700+/-20 nm. To determine which properties of MreB are important for diameter control, we correlated structural characteristics of fluorescently-tagged MreB polymers with cell diameter by simultaneously analyzing 3-dimensional images of MreB and cell shape. Our results indicate that the pitch angle of MreB inversely correlates with cell diameter. Other correlations are not found to be significant. These results demonstrate that the physical properties of MreB filaments are important for shape control and support a model in which MreB dictates cell diameter and organizes cell wall growth to produce a chiral cell wall.

  9. A Neural Network Approach for Identifying Particle Pitch Angle Distributions in Van Allen Probes Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, V. M.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Medeiros, C.; Da Silva, L. A.; Alves, L. R.; Koga, D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walsh, B. M.; Kanekal, S. G.; Jauer, P. R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of particle pitch angle distributions (PADs) has been used as a means to comprehend a multitude of different physical mechanisms that lead to flux variations in the Van Allen belts and also to particle precipitation into the upper atmosphere. In this work we developed a neural network-based data clustering methodology that automatically identifies distinct PAD types in an unsupervised way using particle flux data. One can promptly identify and locate three well-known PAD types in both time and radial distance, namely, 90deg peaked, butterfly, and flattop distributions. In order to illustrate the applicability of our methodology, we used relativistic electron flux data from the whole month of November 2014, acquired from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope instrument on board the Van Allen Probes, but it is emphasized that our approach can also be used with multiplatform spacecraft data. Our PAD classification results are in reasonably good agreement with those obtained by standard statistical fitting algorithms. The proposed methodology has a potential use for Van Allen belt's monitoring.

  10. A Neural Network Approach for Identifying Relativistic Electron Pitch Angle Distributions in Van Allen Probes Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, V. M. C. E. S.; Vieira, L.; Alves, L. R.; Da Silva, L. A.; Koga, D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walsh, B.; Kanekal, S. G.; Silveira, M. D.; Medeiros, C.; Mendes, O., Jr.; Marchezi, J.; Rockenbach, M.; Jauer, P. R.; Gonzalez, W.; Baker, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    A myriad of physical phenomena occur in the inner magnetosphere, in particular at the Earth's radiation belts, which can be a result of the combination of both internal and external processes. However, the connection between physical processes occurring deep within the magnetosphere and external interplanetary drivers it is not yet well understood. In this work we investigate whether a selected set of interplanetary structures affect the local time distribution of three different classes of high energy electron pitch angle distributions (PADs), namely normal, isotropic, and butterfly. We split this work into two parts: initially we focus on the methodology used which employs a Self-Organized Feature Map (SOFM) neural network for identifying different classes of electron PAD shapes in the Van Allen Probes' Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) data. The algorithm can categorize the input data into an arbitrary number of classes from which three of them appears the most: normal, isotropic and butterfly. Other classes which are related with these three also emerge and deserve to be addressed in detail in future works. We also discuss the uncertainties of the algorithm. Then, we move to the second part where we describe in details the criteria used for selecting the interplanetary events, and also try to investigate the relation between key parameters characterizing such interplanetary structures and the local time distributions of electron PAD shapes.

  11. Scattering angle base filtering of the inversion gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) requires a hierarchical approach based on the availability of low frequencies to maneuver the complex nonlinearity associated with the problem of velocity inversion. I develop a model gradient filter to help us access the parts of the gradient more suitable to combat this potential nonlinearity. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain, in which low scattering angles of the gradient update are initially muted. The result are long-wavelength updates controlled by the ray component of the wavefield. In this case, even 10 Hz data can produce near zero wavelength updates suitable for a background correction of the model. Allowing smaller scattering angle to contribute provides higher resolution information to the model.

  12. KWS-3: Very small angle scattering diffractometer with focusing mirror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Pipich

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available KWS-3, which is operated by JCNS, Forschungszentrum Jülich, is a very small angle neutron scattering (VSANS instrument running on the focussing mirror principle. KWS-3 is designed to bridge the gap between Bonse-Hart and pinhole cameras. Owing to its extended Q range, optimized flux, and good wavelength resolution, KWS-3 has shown good performance and has become scientifically productive to the user community.

  13. Small-angle neutron scattering from micellar solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Aswal; P S Goyal

    2004-07-01

    Micellar solutions are the suspension of the colloidal aggregates of the surfactant molecules in aqueous solutions. The structure (shape and size) and the interaction of these aggregates, referred to as micelles, depend on the molecular architecture of the surfactant molecule, presence of additives and the solution conditions such as temperature, concentration etc. This paper gives the usefulness of small-angle neutron scattering to the study of micellar solutions with some of our recent results.

  14. Probing polymer nanocomposite morphology by small angle neutron scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Puyam S Singh; Vinod K Aswal

    2008-11-01

    Polyamide nanocomposite films were prepared from nanometer-sized silica particles having particle radius of gyration (g) of about 66 Å and trimesoyl chloride--phenylene diamine-based polyamides having macromolecular units of about 100-140 Å. The nanoscale morphology of the samples was characterized using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). SANS reveals that silica nanoparticles interact well with the polyamide units only at limited silica loading.

  15. Large-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beenakker, Wim; Passarino, Giampiero

    1998-04-01

    A critical assessment is given of the theoretical uncertainty in the predicted cross-sections for large-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP 1, with or without t-channel subtraction. To this end a detailed comparison is presented of the results obtained with the programs ALIBABA and TOPAZ0. Differences in the implementation of the radiative corrections and the effect of missing higher-order terms are critically discussed. © 1998

  16. Efficient scattering angle filtering for Full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-08-19

    Controlling the scattering angles between the state and the adjoint variables for the energy admitted into an inversion gradient or an image can help improve these functions for objectives in full waveform inversion (FWI) or seismic imaging. However, the access of the scattering angle information usually requires an axis extension that could be costly, especially in 3D. For the purpose of a scattering angle filter, I develop techniques that utilize the mapping nature (no domain extension) of the filter for constant-velocity background models to interpolate between such filtered gradients using the actual velocity. The concept has well known roots in the application of phase-shift-plus-interpolation utilized commonly in the downward continuation process. If the difference between the minimum and maximum velocity of the background medium is large, we obtain filtered gradients corresponding to more constant velocity backgrounds and use linear interpolation between such velocities. The accuracy of this approximation for the Marmousi model gradient demonstrates the e ectiveness of the approach.

  17. Small-angle neutron scattering study on irradiated kappa carrageenan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, Lucille [Neutron Science Laboratory, Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 106-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan) and Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Commonwealth Ave., Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines) and Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)]. E-mail: lvabad@pnri.dost.gov.ph; Okabe, Satoshi [Neutron Science Laboratory, Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 106-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Koizumi, Satoshi [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shibayama, Mitsuhiro [Neutron Science Laboratory, Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 106-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan)]. E-mail: sibayama@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-05-31

    The structure of gamma-ray-irradiated {kappa}-carrageenan in aqueous solutions was investigated in terms of small-angle neutron scattering. The scattered intensity, I(q), of non-irradiated {kappa}-carrageenan solutions (5 wt%) was well described with an Ornstein-Zernike (OZ)-type function with the correlation length of 85 A, indicating that the {kappa}-carrageenan solution behaves just as a polymer solution in the semi-dilute regime. By increasing the irradiation dose (100 kGy), I(q) changed to a power-law function with the scattering exponent of -1.84. Further increase in dose results in a recovery of OZ-type function. This indicates that a progressive cleavage of {kappa}-carrageenan chains takes place randomly, leading to a self-similar structure at 100 kGy. This is followed by further segmentation of {kappa}-carrageenan chains.

  18. Magnetic field pitch angle and perpendicular velocity measurements from multi-point time-delay estimation of poloidal correlation reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisiazhniuk, D.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Conway, G. D.; Happel, T.; Lebschy, A.; Manz, P.; Nikolaeva, V.; Stroth, U.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-02-01

    In fusion machines, turbulent eddies are expected to be aligned with the direction of the magnetic field lines and to propagate in the perpendicular direction. Time delay measurements of density fluctuations can be used to calculate the magnetic field pitch angle α and perpendicular velocity {{v}\\bot} profiles. The method is applied to poloidal correlation reflectometry installed at ASDEX Upgrade and TEXTOR, which measure density fluctuations from poloidally and toroidally separated antennas. Validation of the method is achieved by comparing the perpendicular velocity (composed of the E× B drift and the phase velocity of turbulence {{v}\\bot}={{v}E× B}+{{v}\\text{ph}} ) with Doppler reflectometry measurements and with neoclassical {{v}E× B} calculations. An important condition for the application of the method is the presence of turbulence with a sufficiently long decorrelation time. It is shown that at the shear layer the decorrelation time is reduced, limiting the application of the method. The magnetic field pitch angle measured by this method shows the expected dependence on the magnetic field, plasma current and radial position. The profile of the pitch angle reproduces the expected shape and values. However, comparison with the equilibrium reconstruction code cliste suggests an additional inclination of turbulent eddies at the pedestal position (2-3°). This additional angle decreases towards the core and at the edge.

  19. Investigating hard sphere interactions through spin echo scattering angle measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Adam

    Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME) allows neutron scattering instruments to perform real space measurements on large micron scale samples by encoding the scattering angle into the neutron's spin state via Larmor precession. I have built a SESAME instrument at the Low Energy Neutron Source. I have also assisted in the construction of a modular SESAME instrument on the ASTERIX beamline at Los Alamos National lab. The ability to tune these instruments has been proved mathematically and optimized and automated experimentally. Practical limits of the SESAME technique with respect to polarization analyzers, neutron spectra, Larmor elements, and data analysis were investigated. The SESAME technique was used to examine the interaction of hard spheres under depletion. Poly(methyl methacrylate) spheres suspended in decalin had previously been studied as a hard sphere solution. The interparticle correlations between the spheres were found to match the Percus-Yevick closure, as had been previously seen in dynamical light scattering experiments. To expand beyond pure hard spheres, 900kDa polystyrene was added to the solution in concentrations of less than 1% by mass. The steric effects of the polystyrene were expected to produce a short-range, attractive, "sticky" potential. Experiment showed, however, that the "sticky" potential was not a stable state and that the spheres would eventually form long range aggregates.

  20. Development of swashplateless helicopter blade pitch control system using the limited angle direct-drive motor (LADDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It can be greatly beneficial to remove the swashplate of conventional helicopter, because the swashplate is usually complicated, aerodynamically resistive, and obstacle of more complex pitch control for improving performance. The present technologies for helicopter vibration reduction are usually narrow in effective range or requiring additional actuators and signal transfer links, and more effective technology is desired. Helicopter blade pitch control system, which is removed of swashplate and integrated high-frequency pitch control function for active vibration reduction, is likely the suitable solution at current technical level. Several potential implementation schemes are discussed, such as blades being directly or indirectly driven by actuators mounted in rotating frame and application of different types of actuators, especially implementation schemes of electro-mechanical actuator with or without gear reducer. It is found that swashplateless blade pitch control system based on specially designed limited angle direct-drive motor (LADDM is a more practical implementation scheme. An experimental prototype of the finally selected implementation scheme has been designed, fabricated and tested on rotor tower. The test results show considerable feasibility of the swashplateless helicopter blade pitch control system using the LADDM.

  1. Development of swashplateless helicopter blade pitch control system using the limited angle direct-drive motor (LADDM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jian; Wang Haowen; Wu Chao

    2015-01-01

    It can be greatly beneficial to remove the swashplate of conventional helicopter, because the swashplate is usually complicated, aerodynamically resistive, and obstacle of more complex pitch control for improving performance. The present technologies for helicopter vibration reduc-tion are usually narrow in effective range or requiring additional actuators and signal transfer links, and more effective technology is desired. Helicopter blade pitch control system, which is removed of swashplate and integrated high-frequency pitch control function for active vibration reduction, is likely the suitable solution at current technical level. Several potential implementation schemes are discussed, such as blades being directly or indirectly driven by actuators mounted in rotating frame and application of different types of actuators, especially implementation schemes of electro-mechanical actuator with or without gear reducer. It is found that swashplateless blade pitch control system based on specially designed limited angle direct-drive motor (LADDM) is a more practical implementation scheme. An experimental prototype of the finally selected implementation scheme has been designed, fabricated and tested on rotor tower. The test results show considerable feasibility of the swashplateless helicopter blade pitch control system using the LADDM.

  2. Surface Pressure Estimates for Pitching Aircraft Model at High Angles-of-attack (Short Communication)

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Pashilkar

    2002-01-01

    The surface pressure on a pitching delta wing aircraft is estimated from the normal force and the pitching moment characteristics. The pressure model is based on parametrising the surface pressure distribution on a simple delta wing. This model is useful as a first approximation of the load distribution on the aircraft wing. Leeward surface pressure distributions computed by this method are presented.

  3. Relativistic electron's butterfly pitch angle distribution modulated by localized background magnetic field perturbation driven by hot ring current ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying; Chen, Lunjin; Xie, Lun; Fu, Suiyan; Xia, Zhiyang; Pu, Zuyin

    2017-05-01

    Dayside modulated relativistic electron's butterfly pitch angle distributions (PADs) from ˜200 keV to 2.6 MeV were observed by Van Allen Probe B at L = 5.3 on 15 November 2013. They were associated with localized magnetic dip driven by hot ring current ion (60-100 keV proton and 60-200 keV helium and oxygen) injections. We reproduce the electron's butterfly PADs at satellite's location using test particle simulation. The simulation results illustrate that a negative radial flux gradient contributes primarily to the formation of the modulated electron's butterfly PADs through inward transport due to the inductive electric field, while deceleration due to the inductive electric field and pitch angle change also makes in part contribution. We suggest that localized magnetic field perturbation, which is a frequent phenomenon in the magnetosphere during magnetic disturbances, is of great importance for creating electron's butterfly PADs in the Earth's radiation belts.

  4. Implications of unusual pitch-angle distributions observed by ISEE-1 and 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Zuluaga

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Unusual energetic particle pitch angle distributions (PADs were observed by the ISEE-1 and 2 satellites at 3 h MLT and a radial distance of about 10–15 RE during the time period of 07:00-14:00 UT on 3 March 1979. The ISEE-1 satellite obtained complete 3-D distributions of energetic proton and electron fluxes as a function of energy, while ISEE-2 was configured to provide higher time resolution but less angular resolution than ISEE-1. The ISEE-1 observed a butterfly PAD (a minimum in the 90° PA particle flux for a period of about 2 h (10:00–12:00 UT for the electrons, and 3 h (09:00–12:00 UT for the protons over an energy range of 22.5–189 keV (E1–E4 for the electrons and 24–142 keV (P1–P4 for the protons. The small pitch angle (15°, 30° charged particles (electrons and protons are seen to behave collectively in all four energy ranges. The relative differences in electron fluxes between 15° PA and 90° PA are more significant for higher energy channels during the butterfly PAD period. Three different types of electron PADs (butterfly, isotropic, and peaked-at-90° were observed at the same location and time as a function of energy for a short period of time before 10:00 UT. Electron butterfly distributions were also observed by the ISEE-2 for about 1.5 h over 28–62 keV (E2–E4, although less well resolved than ISEE-1. Unlike the ISEE-1, no butterfly distributions were resolved in the ISEE-2 proton PADs due to less angular resolution. The measured drift effects by ISEE-1 suggest that the detected protons were much closer to the particle source than the electrons along their trajectories, and thus ruled out a nightside source within 18:00 MLT to 03:00 MLT. Compared to 07:30 UT, the charged particle fluxes measured by ISEE-1 were enhanced by up to three orders of magnitude during the period 08:30–12:00 UT. From 09:10:00 UT to 11:50 UT, the geomagnetic conditions were quiet (AE<100 nT, the LANL geosynchronous

  5. Small Angle X-ray Scattering for Nanoparticle Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Senesi, Andrew J; Lee, Byeongdu

    2016-09-28

    X-ray scattering is a structural characterization tool that has impacted diverse fields of study. It is unique in its ability to examine materials in real time and under realistic sample environments, enabling researchers to understand morphology at nanometer and angstrom length scales using complementary small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS), respectively. Herein, we focus on the use of SAXS to examine nanoscale particulate systems. We provide a theoretical foundation for X-ray scattering, considering both form factor and structure factor, as well as the use of correlation functions, which may be used to determine a particle's size, size distribution, shape, and organization into hierarchical structures. The theory is expanded upon with contemporary use cases. Both transmission and reflection (grazing incidence) geometries are addressed, as well as the combination of SAXS with other X-ray and non-X-ray characterization tools. We conclude with an examination of several key areas of research where X-ray scattering has played a pivotal role, including in situ nanoparticle synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and operando studies of catalysts and energy storage materials. Throughout this review we highlight the unique capabilities of X-ray scattering for structural characterization of materials in their native environment.

  6. GOES Observations of Pitch Angle Evolution During an Electron Radiation Belt Dropout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, D. P.; Denton, M. H.; Green, J. C.; Onsager, T. G.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Singer, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    High Speed Stream (HSS) events exhibit characteristic structure in the solar wind which, when studied in conjunction with in situ observations at geostationary orbit (GEO) from GOES, allows us to examine the temporal evolution of dropouts in the outer electron radiation belt. Using pitch-angle-resolved Magnetospheric Electron Detector (MAGED) data, we study the evolution of perpendicular and parallel electron flux. During the HSS commencing on January 6th 2011, the flux over the entire energy distribution (30-600 keV) takes ~1.5 hours to dropout by two orders of magnitude from its pre-onset level. At this time, the lower energy electrons begin to reappear at GEO; however the 350-600 keV electron flux becomes highly parallel oriented and continues to decrease. Calculating the phase space density as a function of the three adiabatic invariants allows us to further investigate these loss mechanisms. Taking partial moments of the available electron distribution, we observe the number density quickly recovers (~4 hours), as well as the flux of the lower energy channels, however, the highest energy channel takes ~18 hours to recover to an approximately constant elevated level. This indicates that the electrons quickly reappear at GEO following the dropout before being heated over a period of days. This is consistent with the temperature values from GOES, showing an increase after the arrival of the HSS, peaking after ~3 days. This study provides independent confirmation of earlier statistical work and is a first step toward gaining understanding of the electron radiation belt dropout and recovery phenomena, in conjunction with coincident magnetic field measurements.

  7. A new method to estimate local pitch angles in spiral galaxies: Application to spiral arms and feathers in M81 and M51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puerari, Ivânio [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Optica y Electrónica, Calle Luis Enrique Erro 1, 72840 Santa María Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Block, David L., E-mail: puerari@inaoep.mx [School of Computational and Applied Mathematics, University of Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050 (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    We examine 8 μm IRAC images of the grand design two-arm spiral galaxies M81 and M51 using a new method whereby pitch angles are locally determined as a function of scale and position, in contrast to traditional Fourier transform spectral analyses which fit to average pitch angles for whole galaxies. The new analysis is based on a correlation between pieces of a galaxy in circular windows of (lnR,θ) space and logarithmic spirals with various pitch angles. The diameter of the windows is varied to study different scales. The result is a best-fit pitch angle to the spiral structure as a function of position and scale, or a distribution function of pitch angles as a function of scale for a given galactic region or area. We apply the method to determine the distribution of pitch angles in the arm and interarm regions of these two galaxies. In the arms, the method reproduces the known pitch angles for the main spirals on a large scale, but also shows higher pitch angles on smaller scales resulting from dust feathers. For the interarms, there is a broad distribution of pitch angles representing the continuation and evolution of the spiral arm feathers as the flow moves into the interarm regions. Our method shows a multiplicity of spiral structures on different scales, as expected from gas flow processes in a gravitating, turbulent and shearing interstellar medium. We also present results for M81 using classical 1D and 2D Fourier transforms, together with a new correlation method, which shows good agreement with conventional 2D Fourier transforms.

  8. Survey of background scattering from materials found in small-angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J. G.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of beam attenuation and background scattering for common materials placed in a neutron beam are presented over the temperature range of 300–700 K. Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements have also been made, to determine the fraction of the background that is either inelastic or quasi-elastic scattering as measured with a 3He detector. Other background sources considered include double Bragg diffraction from windows or samples, scattering from gases, and phonon scattering from solids. Background from the residual air in detector vacuum vessels and scattering from the 3He detector dome are presented. The thickness dependence of the multiple scattering correction for forward scattering from water is calculated. Inelastic phonon background scattering at small angles for crystalline solids is both modeled and compared with measurements. Methods of maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio by material selection, choice of sample thickness and wavelength, removal of inelastic background by TOF or Be filters, and removal of spin-flip scattering with polarized beam analysis are discussed. PMID:26306088

  9. Surface Pressure Estimates for Pitching Aircraft Model at High Angles-of-attack (Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Pashilkar

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The surface pressure on a pitching delta wing aircraft is estimated from the normal force and the pitching moment characteristics. The pressure model is based on parametrising the surface pressure distribution on a simple delta wing. This model is useful as a first approximation of the load distribution on the aircraft wing. Leeward surface pressure distributions computed by this method are presented.

  10. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A. E., E-mail: schmidt@omrb.pnpi.spb.ru; Shvetsov, A. V. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Kuklin, A. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  11. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A. E.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  12. Precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Anthony, P L; Arroyo, C; Bega, K; Biesiada, J; Bosted, P E; Bower, G; Cahoon, J; Carr, R; Cates, G D; Chen, J P; Chudakov, E; Cooke, M; Decowski, P; Deur, A; Emam, W; Erickson, R; Fieguth, T; Field, C; Gao, J; Gary, M; Gustafsson, K; Hicks, R S; Holmes, R; Hughes, E W; Humensky, T B; Jones, G M; Kaufman, L J; Keller, L; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kumar, K S; La Violette, P; Lhuillier, D; Lombard-Nelsen, R M; Marshall, Z; Mastromarino, P; McKeown, R D; Michaels, R; Niedziela, J; Olson, M; Paschke, K D; Peterson, G A; Pitthan, R; Relyea, D; Rock, S E; Saxton, O; Singh, J; Souder, P A; Szalata, Z M; Turner, J; Tweedie, B; Vacheret, A; Walz, D; Weber, T; Weisend, J; Woods, M; Younus, I

    2005-01-01

    We report on a precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in fixed target electron-electron (Moller) scattering: A_PV = -131 +/- 14 (stat.) +/- 10 (syst.) parts per billion, leading to the determination of the weak mixing angle \\sin^2\\theta_W^eff = 0.2397 +/- 0.0010 (stat.) +/- 0.0008 (syst.), evaluated at Q^2 = 0.026 GeV^2. Combining this result with the measurements of \\sin^2\\theta_W^eff at the Z^0 pole, the running of the weak mixing angle is observed with over 6 sigma significance. The measurement sets constraints on new physics effects at the TeV scale.

  13. Influence on the hydrodynamic performance of a variable vector propeller of different rules of pitch angle change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To design a more effective blade pitch adjustment mechanism, research was done on changes to the hydrodynamic characteristics of VVPs (Variable Vector Propeller) caused by different rules for changing pitch angle.A mathematical method for predicting the hydrodynamic characteristics of a VVP under unsteady conditions is presented based on the panel method.Mathematical models for evaluation based on potential flow theory and the Green theorem are also presented.The hydrodynamic characteristics are numerically predicted.To avoid gaps between panels, hyperboloidal quadrilateral panels were used.The pressure Kutta condition on the trailing edge of the WP blade was satisfied by the Newton-Raphson iterative procedure.The influence coefficients of the panels were calculated by Morino's analytical formulations to improve numerical calculation speed, and the method developed by Yanagizawa was used to eliminate the point singularity on derivation calculus while determining the velocities on propeller surfaces.The calculation results show that it's best for the hydrodynamic characteristics of the VVP that pitch angle changes follow the sine rule.

  14. Molecular shapes from small-angle X-ray scattering: extension of the theory to higher scattering angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneerson, V L; Saldin, D K

    2009-03-01

    A low-resolution shape of a molecule in solution may be deduced from measured small-angle X-ray scattering I(q) data by exploiting a Hankel transform relation between the coefficients of a multipole expansion of the scattered amplitude and corresponding coefficients of the electron density. In the past, the radial part of the Hankel transform has been evaluated with the aid of a truncated series expansion of a spherical Bessel function. It is shown that series truncation may be avoided by analytically performing the radial integral over an entire Bessel function. The angular part of the integral involving a spherical harmonic kernel is performed by quadrature. Such a calculation also allows a convenient incorporation of a molecular hydration shell of constant density intermediate between that of the protein and the solvent. Within this framework, we determine the multipole coefficients of the shape function by optimization of the agreement with experimental data by simulated annealing.

  15. Small angle scatter imaging from wide beam diffraction patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, Steven J [Department of Materials and Medical Sciences, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, Swindon, Wiltshire SN6 8LA (United Kingdom); Rogers, Keith D [Department of Materials and Medical Sciences, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, Swindon, Wiltshire SN6 8LA (United Kingdom); Hall, Chris J [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Round, Adam R [EMBL c/o DESY, Building 25a, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-05-07

    In this paper we report on the extension of the technique of mapping small angle x-ray scatter (SAXS) across a soft material specimen several millimetres square. In the conventional SAXS mapping technique a pencil beam of x-rays is raster scanned over the specimen with the scatter pattern recorded from each point in the raster. In our technique a wide, parallel beam is used, speeding up the data collection time considerably. An image processing algorithm is used to separate the scatter pattern features from individual points along the line of the beam. To test the efficacy of the technique a phantom was constructed using gelatin and rat tail tendon collagen. Collagen fibres in the phantom were arranged in quarters horizontally, diagonally and vertically leaving one quarter with just gelatin. The phantom was used to collect both raster scanned sets of SAXS patterns spaced at 0.25 mm horizontally and vertically and also a wide beam data set. The width of the beam in this case was approximately 7 mm. Using the third-order diffraction of rat tail tendon intensity data were gathered from each SAXS pattern and used to construct a map. Data from the raster scan image and that from the wide beam are compared. Finally using a phantom made from dehydrated rat tail tendon and paraffin wax a tomographic slice constructed using data from SAXS patterns is shown.

  16. Pitch-angle diffusion coefficients from resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves in planetary magnetospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Tripathi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pitch-angle diffusion coefficients have been calculated for resonant interaction with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH waves in the magnetospheres of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Calculations have been performed at two radial distances of each planet. It is found that observed wave electric field amplitudes in the magnetospheres of Earth and Jupiter are sufficient to put electrons on strong diffusion in the energy range of less than 100 eV. However, for Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, the observed ECH wave amplitude are insufficient to put electrons on strong diffusion at any radial distance.

  17. Pitch-angle diffusion coefficients from resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves in planetary magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Singh, K. P.

    2011-02-01

    Pitch-angle diffusion coefficients have been calculated for resonant interaction with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves in the magnetospheres of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Calculations have been performed at two radial distances of each planet. It is found that observed wave electric field amplitudes in the magnetospheres of Earth and Jupiter are sufficient to put electrons on strong diffusion in the energy range of less than 100 eV. However, for Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, the observed ECH wave amplitude are insufficient to put electrons on strong diffusion at any radial distance.

  18. Signatures of the various regions of the outer magnetosphere in the pitch angle distributions of energetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, H.I. Jr.

    1978-12-11

    An account is given of the obervations of the pitch angle distributions of energetic particles in the near equatorial regions of the Earth's magnetosphere. The emphasis is on relating the observed distributions to the field configuration responsible for the observed effects. The observed effects relate to drift-shell splitting, to the breakdown of adiabatic guiding center motion in regions of sharp field curvature relative to partial gyro radii, to wave-particle interactions, and to moving field configurations. 39 references.

  19. Computational investigation of heat transfer and pressure drop in a typical louver fin-and-tube heat exchanger for various louver angles and fin pitches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okbaz Abdulkerim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study 3-D numerical simulations on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics for a typical louver fin-and- double-row tube heat exchanger were carried out. The heat transfer improvement and the corresponding pressure drop amounts were investigated depending on louver angles, fin pitch and Reynolds number, and reported in terms of Colburn j-factor and Fanning friction factor f. The heat transfer improvement and the corresponding pressure drop amounts were investigated depending on louver angles between 20° ≤Ө≤ 30°, louver pitch of Lp=3.8 mm and frontal velocities of U between 1.22 m/s - 3 m/s. In addition, flow visualization of detailed flow features results, such as velocity vectors, streamlines and temperature counters have been shown to understand heat transfer enhancement mechanism. The present results indicated that louver angle and fin pitch noticeably affected the thermal and hydraulic performance of heat exchanger. It has been seen that increasing louver angle, increases thermal performance while decreasing hydraulic performance associated to pressure drop for fin pitches of 3.2 mm and 2.5 mm. Fin pitch determines the flow behaviour that for fin pitch of 2 mm, increasing louver angle decreased heat transfer and pressure drop. Velocity vectors and streamlines give considerable information about the flow whether it is duct directed or louver directed. For all conditions the flow is louver directed.

  20. A small angle neutron scattering study of thermoplastic elastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutiarso; Edy Giri, R. Putra; Andon, Insani; Sudirman; Sudaryanto [Materials Science Research Centre, National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1998-10-01

    A bilateral scientific cooperation, in the small angle neutron scattering has been agreed upon between CIAE, China and BATAN, Indonesia as well as MINT Malaysia. As stated in the agreed proposal that the objective of this cooperation, in the initial stage (stage-1), was to have a regional intercomparison measurements of SANS instruments in order to determine their characteristic/performance. Therefore, this report is supposed to describe the progress in the SANS instrument development of each country involved during the period of 1996/97 and some activities related to the SANS instrument. Since, up to now, we have not yet received any progresses reported from either China or Malaysia, this report will describe the progress of SANS`s activities in BATAN only. (author)

  1. Glancing-angle scattering of fast ions at crystal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannami, Michihiko; Narumi, Kazumasa; Katoh, Humiya; Kimura, Kenji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    Glancing angle scattering of fast ions from a single crystal surface is a novel technique to study ion-surface interaction. Results of recent studies of ion-surface interaction are reviewed for ions with velocities faster than the Fermi velocity of solid. For the ions with velocities less than the Fermi velocity of target valence electrons the ion-surface interaction shows a new aspect where only the valence electrons of target solid participate in the stopping processes. It will show that the position-dependent stopping power of a surface for these ions governed by the elastic collisions of valence electrons and the ions. A method is proposed from this position-dependent stopping power to derived the electron density distribution averaged over the plane parallel to the surface. (author)

  2. Radiation damage study using small-angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rétfalvi, E.; Török, Gy; Rosta, L.

    2000-03-01

    Nuclear radiation provides important changes in the microstructure of metallic components of nuclear power plant and research reactors, influencing their mechanical properties. The investigation of this problem has primary interest for the safety and life-time of such nuclear installations. For the characterization of this kind of nanostructures small angle neutron scattering technique is a very useful tool. We have carried out experiments on samples of irradiated reactor vessel material and welded components of VVER-440-type reactors on the SANS instrument at the Budapest Research Reactor. In our measurements irradiated as well as non-irradiated samples were compared and magnetic field was applied for viewing the magnetic structure effects of the materials. A clear modification of the structure due to irradiation was obtained. Our data were analyzed by the ITP92 code, the inverse Fourier transform program of O. Glatter [1].

  3. The small angle neutron scattering study on the segmented polyurethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudirman; Gunawan; Prasetyo, S.M.; Karo Karo, A.; Lahagu, I.M.; Darwinto, Tri [Materials Science Research Center, National Nuclear Energy Agency, Serpong, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1999-10-01

    The distance between hard segment (HS) and soft segment (SS) of segmented polyurethane have been determined using the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique. The segmented Polyurethanes (SPU) are linear multiblock copolymers, which include elastomer thermoplastic. SPU consist of hard segment and soft segment, each has tendency to make a group with similar type to form a domain. The soft segments used were polypropylene glycol (PPG) and 4,4 diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI), while l,4 butanediol (BD) was used as hard segment. The characteristic of SPU depends on its phase structure which is affected by several factors, such as type of chemical formula and the composition of the HS and SS, solvent as well as the synthesizing process. The samples used in this study were SPU56 and SPU68. Based on the appearance of SANS profile, it was obtained that domain distances are 12.32 nm for the SPU56 and 19 nm for the SPU68. (author)

  4. A novel small-angle neutron scattering detector geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaki, Kalliopi; Jackson, Andrew; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Piscitelli, Francesco; Kirstein, Oliver; Andersen, Ken H.

    2013-01-01

    A novel 2π detector geometry for small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) applications is presented and its theoretical performance evaluated. Such a novel geometry is ideally suited for a SANS instrument at the European Spallation Source (ESS). Motivated by the low availability and high price of 3He, the new concept utilizes gaseous detectors with 10B as the neutron converter. The shape of the detector is inspired by an optimization process based on the properties of the conversion material. Advantages over the detector geometry traditionally used on SANS instruments are discussed. The angular and time resolutions of the proposed detector concept are shown to satisfy the requirements of the particular SANS instrument. PMID:24046504

  5. Effect of the pitch angle and of the number of blades on depression created under impellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Băbuţanu Corina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a set of experiments concerning the behavior of several types of impellers regarding the depression formatted and operating in a specific range of rotations. Various mixer designs including a four pitched blades impeller, a six flat blades impeller and four two flat blades impeller were compared. Experimental data confirmed the analytical results previously obtained. The results showed that there are similarities regarding the effects generated by four pitched blades impeller and one of the two flat blades impeller. Also, it is found that two shortblade impeller produces the lowest depression of all tested impeller. The maximum depression produced by all type of impellers do not exceeds 120 mmH2O at 400 rpm, which is a small value to realize the vaporization of the fluid and to reach the cavitation. The equipment is not in danger to be destroyed. The numerical results obtained by experiments can be used in various practical applications.

  6. Low-energy (<100 eV) ion pitch angle distributions in the magnetosphere by ISEE 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T.; Johnson, J. F. E.; Chappell, C. R.

    1983-09-01

    Low-energy (plasma composition experiment on ISEE 1 are examined statistically to study pitch angle distributions in all local times of the magnetosphere (L=3-10). The pitch angle distributions in the data set used here can be classified into seven types; however, there are four major types, i.e., isotropic distribution, bi-directional field-aligned distribution unidirectional field-aligned distribution, and low flux. The isotropic distribution that consists of very low energy (typically =10 eV) is a persistent feature on the outer dayside and it is seen just outside the isotropic distribution region of the nightside. It is noted that the loss cone-like structure is also a common feature of this type of distribution in the noon sector. On the outer nightside the unidirectional field-aligned distribution consisting of warm ions is the dominant signature, but in some cases only the low flux (no appreciable flux) is observed. The `sources' of ions in various regions are discussed on the basis of these results and others.

  7. Enabling High Fidelity Measurements of Energy and Pitch Angle for Escaping Energetic Ions with a Fast Ion Loss Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, R.; Pace, D. C.; Marcy, G. R.; Taussig, D.

    2016-10-01

    Energetic ion losses must be minimized in burning plasmas to maintain fusion power, and existing tokamaks provide access to energetic ion parameter regimes that are relevant to burning machines. A new Fast Ion Loss Detector (FILD) probe on the DIII-D tokamak has been optimized to resolve beam ion losses across a range of 30 - 90 keV in energy and 40° to 80° in pitch angle, thereby providing valuable measurements during many different experiments. The FILD is a magnetic spectrometer; once inserted into the tokamak, the magnetic field allows energetic ions to pass through a collimating aperture and strike a scintillator plate that is imaged by a wide view camera and narrow view photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The design involves calculating scintillator strike patterns while varying probe geometry. Calculated scintillator patterns are then used to design an optical system that allows adjustment of the focus regions for the 1 MS/s resolved PMTs. A synthetic diagnostic will be used to determine the energy and pitch angle resolution that can be attained in DIII-D experiments. Work supported in part by US DOE under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program and under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  8. Kalman Filtering and Smoothing of the Van Allen Probes Observations to Estimate the Radial, Energy and Pitch Angle Diffusion Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podladchikova, T.; Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Kalman filter technique combines the strengths of new physical models of the Earth's radiation belts with long-term spacecraft observations of electron fluxes and therefore provide an extremely useful method for the analysis of the state and evolution of the electron radiation belts. However, to get the reliable data assimilation output, the Kalman filter application is confronted with a set of fundamental problems. E.g., satellite measurements are usually limited to a single location in space, which confines the reconstruction of the global evolution of the radiation environment. The uncertainties arise from the imperfect description of the process dynamics and the presence of observation errors, which may cause the failure of data assimilation solution. The development of adaptive Kalman filter that combines the Van Allen Probes data and 3-D VERB code, its accurate customizations in the reconstruction of model describing the phase space density (PSD) evolution, extension of the possibilities to use measurement information, and the model adjustment by developing the identification techniques of model and measurement errors allowed us to reveal hidden and implicit regularities of the PSD dynamics and obtain quantitative and qualitative estimates of radial, energy and pitch angle diffusion characteristics from satellite observations. In this study we propose an approach to estimate radial, energy and pitch angle diffusion rates, as well as the direction of their propagation.

  9. Computer programs for the calculation of dual sting pitch and roll angles required for an articulated sting to obtain angles of attack and sideslip on wind-tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two programs were developed to calculate the pitch and roll position of the conventional sting drive and the pitch of a high angle articulated sting to position a wind tunnel model at the desired angle of attack and sideslip and position the model as near as possible to the centerline of the tunnel. These programs account for the effects of sting offset angles, sting bending angles, and wind-tunnel stream flow angles. In addition, the second program incorporates inputs form on-board accelerometers that measure model pitch and roll with respect to gravity. The programs are presented and a description of the numerical operation of the programs with a definition of the variables used in the programs is given.

  10. Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klejda, B.

    2005-01-28

    scattering. This value corresponds to a weak mixing angle at Q{sup 2} = 0.026 (GeV/c){sup 2} of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w{ovr MS}} = 0.2379 {+-} 0.0016 (stat.) {+-} 0.0013 (syst.), which is -0.3 standard deviations away from the Standard Model prediction: sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w{ovr MS}}{sup predicted} = 0.2385 {+-} 0.0006 (theory). The E158 measurement of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w} at a precision of {delta}(sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}) = 0.0020 provides new physics sensitivity at the TeV scale.

  11. Wide Angle Compton Scattering within the SCET factorization Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivel Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing data for the electromagnetic proton form factors and for the cross section of the wide angle Compton scattering (WACS show that the hard two-gluon exchange mechanism (collinear factorization is still not applicable in the kinematical region where Mandelstam variables s ~ −t ~ −u are about few GeV2. On the other hand these observables can be described in phenomenological models where spectator quarks are soft which assumes a large contribution due to the soft-overlap mechanism. It turns out that the simple QCD factorization picture is not complete and must also include the soft-overlap contribution which can be described as a certain matrix element in the soft collinear effective theory (SCET. Then the leading power contribution to WACS amplitude is described as a sum of the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. The existing experimental data allows one to check certain conclusions based on the assumption about dominant role of the soft-spectator mechanism.

  12. Small angle X-ray scattering beamline at SSRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田丰; 李小芸; 缪夏然; 边风刚; 王吉力; 李秀宏; 王玉柱; 杨春明; 周平; 林金友; 曾建荣; 洪春霞; 滑文强

    2015-01-01

    Beamline BL16B1 at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) is dedicated to studying the mi-crostructure and dynamic processes of polymers, nanomaterials, mesoporous materials, colloids, liquid crystals, metal materials, etc. At present, SAXS, wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), simultaneous SAXS/WAXS, grazing incident SAXS, and anomalous SAXS techniques are available for end user to conduct diverse ex-periments at this beamline. The sample-to-detector distance is adjustable from 0.2 m to 5 m. The practicable q-range is 0.03–3.6 nm−1 at incident X-ray of 10 keV for conventional SAXS whilst a continuous q-region of 0.06–33 nm−1 can be achieved in simultaneous SAXS/WAXS mode. Time-resolved SAXS measurements in sub-second level was achieved by the beamline upgrating in 2013. This paper gives detailed descriptions about the status, performance and applications of the SAXS beamline.

  13. New Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Every, E.; Deyhim, A.; Kulesza, J.

    2016-09-01

    The design of a new Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Instrument for use in National Institute of Standards And Technology (NIST) will be discussed. This instrument is similar to a shorter instrument we designed and delivered to ANSTO in Australia called the Bilby SANS instrument. The NIST VSANS and the ANSTO Bilby SANS instruments have very similar dimensions for length and diameter and have similar requirements for internal detector motion, top access port, walkway supports, and ports; however, the Bilby SANS instrument vacuum requirement was lower (7.5×10-5 Torr) and the entire (60,000 pound) vessel was required to move 1.5 meters on external rails with a repeatability of 100 um, which ADC achieved. The NIST VSANS length is 24 meter, internal diameter 2.3 meter with three internal carriages. The NIST VSANS instrument, which covers the usual SANS range will also allow configuration to cover the range between q ∼⃒ 10-4 A-1 to 10-3 A-1 with a sample beam current of (104 neutrons/s). The key requirements are a second position-sensitive detector system having a 1 mm pixel size and a longer sample-detector flight path of 20 m (i.e., a 40 m instrument).

  14. Branch Content in Hybrid Materials using Small-Angle Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, Greg

    2005-03-01

    Inorganic/organic hybrid materials often display ramified mass- fractal structures characterized by primary particle size, aggregate size, and mass-fractal dimension. Physical properties, such as mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties and electrical conductivity (in carbon composites for instance), can not be predicted using only these structural features since such properties are intimately tied to the degree and type of branching as shown by Witten [1]. Witten suggested the use of the minimum dimension, or the related connectivity dimension, to calculate mechanical response in these hybrid systems. A viable technique to quantify the minimum dimension and connectivity dimension in hybrid materials has, until recently, been absent from the literature. This presentation will discuss the use of small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering to describe branch content in hybrid materials [2] and will outline an approach to use the minimum dimension and connectivity dimension to predict static and dynamic mechanical properties for hybrid materials based on structure [1, 3]. 1. Witten TA, Rubinstein M, Colby RH Reinforcement of Rubber by Fractal Aggregates J Phys II 3 (3): 367-383 (1993). 2. Beaucage G Determination of branch fraction and minimum dimension of mass-fractal aggregates Phys Rev E 70 (3): art. no. 031401 Part 1 (2004). 3. Kohls DJ, Beaucage G Rational design of reinforced rubber Curr Opin Solid St M 6 (3): 183-194 (2002).

  15. Impact of pitch angle setup error and setup error correction on dose distribution in volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Akihiro; Togawa, Kumiko; Yokoi, Tomohiro; Ueda, Shinichi; Noto, Kimiya; Kojima, Hironori; Isomura, Naoki; Kumano, Tomoyasu

    2016-07-01

    In volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer, a positional and rotational error correction is performed according to the position and angle of the prostate. The correction often involves body leaning, and there is concern regarding variation in the dose distribution. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the impact of body pitch rotation on the dose distribution regarding VMAT. Treatment plans were obtained retrospectively from eight patients with prostate cancer. The body in the computed tomography images for the original VMAT plan was shifted to create VMAT plans with virtual pitch angle errors of ±1.5° and ±3°. Dose distributions for the tilted plans were recalculated with use of the same beam arrangement as that used for the original VMAT plan. The mean value of the maximum dose differences in the dose distributions between the original VMAT plan and the tilted plans was 2.98 ± 0.96 %. The value of the homogeneity index for the planning target volume (PTV) had an increasing trend according to the pitch angle error, and the values of the D 95 for the PTV and D 2ml, V 50, V 60, and V 70 for the rectum had decreasing trends (p < 0.05). However, there was no correlation between differences in these indexes and the maximum dose difference. The pitch angle error caused by body leaning had little effect on the dose distribution; in contrast, the pitch angle correction reduced the effects of organ displacement and improved these indexes. Thus, the pitch angle setup error in VMAT for prostate cancer should be corrected.

  16. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Using Silver Nanoparticles by Frederick L Beyer Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOTICES...Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles by Frederick L Beyer Weapons and Materials...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles 5a. CONTRACT

  17. Small Angle X ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Using Silver Nanoparticles by Frederick L Beyer Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOTICES...Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles by Frederick L Beyer Weapons and Materials...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Instrument Performance and Validation Using Silver Nanoparticles 5a. CONTRACT

  18. Low-energy (less than 100 eV) ion pitch angle distributions in the magnetosphere by ISEE 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. F. E.; Chappell, C. R.; Nagai, T.

    1983-09-01

    Attention is given to isotropic distribution, bidirectional field alignment distribution, unidirectional field alignment distribution, and low flux, in a statistical examination of low energy ion data from the ISEE 1 plasma composition experiment whose aim was the study of pitch angle distributions in all local times of the magnetosphere. The isotropic distribution consisting of less than 10 eV ions is a persistent inner region feature, while the bidirectional field-aligned distribution consisting of warm ions is a persistent feature of the outer dayside and is seen just outside the isotropic distribution region of the nightside. On the outer nightside, the unidirectional field-aligned distribution consisting of warm ions is the dominant signature. The 'sources' of ions in various regions are discussed in view of the present and other results.

  19. Magnetic nanoparticles studied by small angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fluidos Complexos; Antonel, Soledad; Negri, Martin [Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Dept. de Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica

    2011-07-01

    nanoparticles are very interesting because they exhibit magnetic (ferromagnetic) and electrical properties in the same material. Then, the nickel nanoparticles could be used for the development of electroelastic materials. In this case, the electrical conductivity of the material can be strongly dependent on the applied magnetic field, for example the case of nickel metal nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer, resulting in an anisotropic material with combined piezomagnetic and piezoelectric properties. In order to investigate the structural characteristics of cobalt-iron oxides and nickel nanoparticles, powder samples of those magnetic materials were studied by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering. As will be shown, from the analysis and modeling of the scattering data, structural information could be obtained, enabling a detailed description of the structural properties of the studied samples which could be directly correlated to the magnetic properties. (author)

  20. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300-2500 nm at incidence angles 15-60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0-60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350-1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article "Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators" in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells.

  1. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Good

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300−2500 nm at incidence angles 15–60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0–60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350–1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article “Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators” in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells.

  2. On the origin of low-energy electrons in the inner magnetosphere: Fluxes and pitch-angle distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, M. H.; Reeves, G. D.; Larsen, B. A.; Friedel, R. F. W.; Thomsen, M. F.; Fernandes, P. A.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Sarno-Smith, L. K.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate knowledge of the plasma fluxes in the inner magnetosphere is essential for both scientific and programmatic applications. Knowledge of the low-energy electrons (approximately tens to hundreds of eV) in the inner magnetosphere is particularly important since these electrons are acted upon by various physical processes, accelerating the electrons to higher energies, and also causing their loss. However, measurements of low-energy electrons are challenging, and as a result, this population has been somewhat neglected previously. This study concerns observations of low-energy electrons made by the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron instrument on board the Van Allen Probes satellites and also observations from geosynchronous orbit made by the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer on board Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites. The fluxes of electrons from 30 eV to 1 keV are quantified as a function of pitch-angle, McIlwain L parameter, and local time for both quiet and active periods. Results indicate two sources for low-energy electrons in this energy range: the low-energy tail of the electron plasma sheet and the high-energy tail of the dayside ionosphere. These populations are identified primarily as a result of their different pitch-angle distributions. Field-aligned outflows from the dayside ionosphere are observed at all L shells during quiet and active periods. Our results also demonstrate that the dayside electron field-aligned fluxes at 30 eV are particularly strong between L values of 6 and 7, indicating an enhanced source within the polar ionosphere.

  3. Scattering intensity limit value at very small angles

    CERN Document Server

    Ciccariello, Salvino

    2016-01-01

    The existence of the limit of a sample scattering intensity, as the scattering vector approaches zero, requires and is ensured by the property that the mean value of the scattering density fluctuation over volume $V$ asymptotically behaves, at large $V$s, as $\

  4. Small-angle X-ray scattering at the ESRF high-brillance beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesecke, P.; Diat, O. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 -Grenoble (France)

    1997-10-01

    The high-brilliance beamline (BL4/ID2) at the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble has been constructed with the emphasis on time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering and macromolecular crystallography. It has been open to users for two years. The beamline has opened up new areas in small-angle scattering research, facilitating (a) small-angle crystallography on structures with unit cells of several hundredths of nanometres, (b) overlap with the light scattering range for the study of optical systems, (c) high photon flux for time-resolved experiments and (d) a high spatial coherence allowing submicrometre imaging with X-rays. The set-up and the detector system of the small-angle scattering station are presented. A method for obtaining absolute scattering intensities is described. The parasitic background at the station is discussed in terms of absolute scattering intensities. (orig.). 22 refs.

  5. Angle-Resolved Scatter Measurements of Laser Damaged DKDP Crystals Using a Bi-Directional Scatter Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluck, R; Wegner, P; Sheehan, L; Hackel, L A

    2000-12-22

    We built a bi-directional scatter diagnostics to measure and quantify losses due to scattering and absorption of harmonic conversion crystals (DKDP) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The main issues to be addressed are (1) amount of total energy reaching the target if the target hole was {+-}200 {micro}rad in size, (2) distribution of energy inside the target hole, (3) collateral damage of other optics by scattered light. The scatter diagnostics enables angle-resolved measurements at 351 nm, and is capable of both near specular transmission and large angle scatter measurements. In the near specular setup, the transmission can be measured within {+-}65 {micro}rad up to {+-}60 mrad acceptance angle. A silicon photo detector and a scientific-grade CCD camera provide total energy and energy distribution. A linear swing arm detection system enables large angle scatter measurements of 360{sup o}, in principal, with step sizes as small as 0.01{sup o} and different collection angle ranging between 1 and 20 mad. In this paper, scatter effects from laser damage and final finishing process of DKDP are discussed.

  6. Resolution effects and analysis of small-angle neutron scattering data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the instrumental smearing effects for small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) data sets is given. It is shown that these effects can be described by a resolution function, which describes the distribution of scattering vectors probed for the nominal values of the scattering vector. ...

  7. A novel full-angle scanning light scattering profiler to quantitatively evaluate forward and backward light scattering from intraocular lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Bennett N., E-mail: bennett.walker@fda.hhs.gov [Optical Therapeutics and Medical Nanophotonics Laboratory, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); James, Robert H.; Ilev, Ilko K. [Optical Therapeutics and Medical Nanophotonics Laboratory, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Calogero, Don [Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Glare, glistenings, optical defects, dysphotopsia, and poor image quality are a few of the known deficiencies of intraocular lenses (IOLs). All of these optical phenomena are related to light scatter. However, the specific direction that light scatters makes a critical difference between debilitating glare and a slightly noticeable decrease in image quality. Consequently, quantifying the magnitude and direction of scattered light is essential to appropriately evaluate the safety and efficacy of IOLs. In this study, we introduce a full-angle scanning light scattering profiler (SLSP) as a novel approach capable of quantitatively evaluating the light scattering from IOLs with a nearly 360° view. The SLSP method can simulate in situ conditions by controlling the parameters of the light source including angle of incidence. This testing strategy will provide a more effective nonclinical approach for the evaluation of IOL light scatter.

  8. Design and Pitch Angle Optimisation of Horizontal Axis Hydrokinetic Turbine with Constant Tip Speed Ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Nigam Suyash; Bansal Shubham; Nema Tanmay; Sharma Vansh; Singh Raj Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Booming population and associated energy demands, looming threat of exhaustion of conventional sources of energy and the severe environmental repercussions of the same call for alternate sources of clean energy. Hydrokinetic turbine is one such developing technology which harnesses zero-head free flow of water and affects hydrological ecology minimally. This paper discusses the optimisation of Horizontal Axis Hydrokinetic Turbine (HAHkT) blade chord length and twist angle using blade element ...

  9. Multifrequency Polarimetry of the Nrao 140 Jet: Possible Detection of a Helical Magnetic Field and Constraints on its Pitch Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Asada, Keiichi; Nakamura, Masanori; Kameno, Seiji; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We present results from multifrequency polarimetry of NRAO 140 using the Very Long Baseline Array. These observations allow us to reveal the distributions of both the polarization position angle and the Faraday rotation measure (RM). These distributions are powerful tools to discern the projected and line-of-sight components of the magnetic field, respectively. We find a systematic gradient in the RM distribution, with its sign being opposite at either side of the jet with respect to the jet axis. The sign of the RM changes only with the direction of the magnetic field component along the line of sight, so this can be explained by the existence of helical magnetic components associated with the jet itself. We derive two constraints for the pitch angle of the helical magnetic field from the distributions of the RM and the projected magnetic field; the RM distribution indicates that the helical fields are tightly wound, while that of the projected magnetic field suggests they are loosely wound around the jet ax...

  10. Combined multiaxial deformation of polymers with in situ small angle and wide angle x-ray scattering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurun, B; Thio, Y S; Bucknall, D G

    2009-12-01

    A unique multiaxial deformation device has been designed and built specifically for simultaneous synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements. The device can operate at strain rates of 0.0005-0.3 s(-1) and induce strains up to stretch ratios of 5. Measurements can either be made at ambient or at elevated temperatures (up to approximately 150 degrees C), the latter using a heating unit. The capabilities of the device coupled with simultaneous SAXS/WAXS measurements have been demonstrated by studying the morphological evolution of a number of polymers and their nanocomposites.

  11. Angle dependence of Andreev scattering at semiconductor-superconductor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1999-01-01

    and increase of the probability of normal reflection. We show that in the presence of a Fermi velocity mismatch between the semiconductor and the superconductor the angles of incidence and transmission are related according to the well-known Snell's law in optics. As a consequence there is a critical angle...

  12. Small-angle scattering theory revisited: Photocurrent and spatial localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, N.P.; Zoletnik, S.; Michelsen, Poul

    2005-01-01

    In this paper theory on collective scattering measurements of electron density fluctuations in fusion plasmas is revisited. We present the first full derivation of the expression for the photocurrent beginning at the basic scattering concepts. Thereafter we derive detailed expressions for the auto...... laser based two-volume collective scattering instrument for spatially localized turbulence measurements,"Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 2579-2592 (2001)].......- and crosspower spectra obtained from measurements. These are discussed and simple simulations made to elucidate the physical meaning of the findings. In this context, the known methods of obtaining spatial localization are discussed and appraised. Where actual numbers are applied, we utilize quantities from two...

  13. Issues of Reggeization in $qq'$ Back-Angle Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarenco, M V

    2008-01-01

    The Kirschner-Lipatov result for the DLLA of high-energy $qq'$ backward scattering is re-derived without the use of integral equations. It is shown that part of the inequalities between the variables in the logarithmically-divergent integrals is inconsequential. The light-cone wave-function interpretation under the conditions of backward scattering is discussed. It is argued that for hadron-hadron scattering in the valence-quark model the reggeization should manifest itself at full strength starting from $s_{hh}=50 GeV^2$.

  14. A new screening length for small angle multiple scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikegami, Seiji, E-mail: double1892@gmail.com

    2013-09-15

    A new screening length formulation that incorporates the charge state of the projectile is applied to multiple scattering. The present screening length is derived from an interatomic potential that accounts for electron–electron, electron–nuclear, and nuclear–nuclear interactions using the Thomas–Fermi–Moliere potential. We examined the charge state effect on multiple scattering angular distributions. We successfully estimate the charge state effects and predict angular distributions. The present screening length is compared with many low energy ion scattering experiments and with O’Connor–Biersack prediction values.

  15. Conical pitch angle distributions of very low-energy ion fluxes observed by ISEE 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Shelley, E. G.; Young, D. T.

    1982-04-01

    Observations are presented of conical distributions of low-energy ion fluxes from throughout the magnetosphere. The data were provided by the plasma composition experiment (PCE) on ISEE 1. ISEE 1 was launched in October 1977 into a highly elliptical orbit with a 30 deg inclination to the equator and 22.5 earth radii apogee. Particular attention is given to data taken when the instrument was in its thermal plasma mode, sampling ions in the energy per charge range 0-100 eV/e. Attention is given to examples of conical distributions in 0- to 100-eV/e ions, the occurrence of conical distributions of 0- to 100-eV ions in local time-geocentric distance and latitude-geocentric distance coordinates, the cone angles in 0- to 100-eV ion conics, Kp distributions of 0- to 100-eV ion conics, and some compositional aspects of 0- to 100-eV ion conics.

  16. The effect of electron beam pitch angle and density gradient on solar type III radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pechhacker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    1.5D Particle-In-Cell simulations of a hot, low density electron beam injected into magnetized, maxwellian plasma were used to further explore the alternative non-gyrotropic beam driven electromagnetic emission mechanism, first studied in Tsiklauri (2011). Variation of beam injection angle and background density gradient showed that the emission process is caused by the perpendicular component of the beam injection current, whereas the parallel component only produces Langmuir waves, which play no role in the generation of EM waves in our mechanism. Particular emphasis was put on the case, where the beam is injected perpendicularly to the background magnetic field, as this turned off any electrostatic wave generation along the field and left a purely electromagnetic signal in the perpendicular components. The simulations establish the following key findings: i) Initially waves at a few w_ce/gamma are excited, mode converted and emitted at w_pe ii) The emission intensity along the beam axis is proportional to ...

  17. Publication guidelines for structural modelling of small-angle scattering data from biomolecules in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, David A; Guss, J Mitchell; Svergun, Dmitri I; Trewhella, Jill

    2012-06-01

    Small-angle scattering is becoming a mainstream technique for structural molecular biology. As such, it is important to establish guidelines for publication that will ensure that there is adequate reporting of the data and its treatment so that reviewers and readers can independently assess the quality of the data and the basis for any interpretations presented. This article presents a set of preliminary guidelines that emerged after consultation with the IUCr Commission on Small-Angle Scattering and other experts in the field and discusses the rationale for their application. At the 2011 Congress of the IUCr in Madrid, the Commission on Journals agreed to adopt these preliminary guidelines for the presentation of biomolecular structures from small-angle scattering data in IUCr publications. Here, these guidelines are outlined and the reasons for standardizing the way in which small-angle scattering data are presented.

  18. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Screening Complements Conventional Biophysical Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Xinsheng; Langkilde, Annette Eva; Thorolfsson, Matthias;

    2014-01-01

    introduce small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to characterize antibody solution behavior, which strongly complements conventional biophysical analysis. First, we apply a variety of conventional biophysical techniques for the evaluation of structural, conformational, and colloidal stability and report...

  19. Angle-resolved molecular beam scattering of NO at the gas-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutz, Amelia; Nesbitt, David J.

    2017-08-01

    This study presents first results on angle-resolved, inelastic collision dynamics of thermal and hyperthermal molecular beams of NO at gas-liquid interfaces. Specifically, a collimated incident beam of supersonically cooled NO (2 Π 1/2, J = 0.5) is directed toward a series of low vapor pressure liquid surfaces ([bmim][Tf2N], squalane, and PFPE) at θinc = 45(1)°, with the scattered molecules detected with quantum state resolution over a series of final angles (θs = -60°, -30°, 0°, 30°, 45°, and 60°) via spatially filtered laser induced fluorescence. At low collision energies [Einc = 2.7(9) kcal/mol], the angle-resolved quantum state distributions reveal (i) cos(θs) probabilities for the scattered NO and (ii) electronic/rotational temperatures independent of final angle (θs), in support of a simple physical picture of angle independent sticking coefficients and all incident NO thermally accommodating on the surface. However, the observed electronic/rotational temperatures for NO scattering reveal cooling below the surface temperature (Telec dynamical branching between thermal desorption and impulsive scattering (IS) pathways that depend strongly on θs. Characterization of the data in terms of the final angle, rotational state, spin-orbit electronic state, collision energy, and liquid permit new correlations to be revealed and investigated in detail. For example, the IS rotational distributions reveal an enhanced propensity for higher J/spin-orbit excited states scattered into near specular angles and thus hotter rotational/electronic distributions measured in the forward scattering direction. Even more surprisingly, the average NO scattering angle (⟨θs⟩) exhibits a remarkably strong correlation with final angular momentum, N, which implies a linear scaling between net forward scattering propensity and torque delivered to the NO projectile by the gas-liquid interface.

  20. Magnetic field amplitude and pitch angle measurements using Spectral MSE on EAST and Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ken; Rowan, William; Fu, Jia; Lyu, Bo; Li, Ying-Ying; Marchuk, Oleksandr; Ralchenko, Yuri

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic field amplitude and pitch angle measurements follow from the analysis of the Motional Stark Effect spectrum emitted by high energy neutral beam emission in tokamaks. Here we focus on deriving these quantities on EAST and Alcator C-Mod. These measurements provide a cross check for the polarimetry MSE diagnostics, and also act as a proof of principle for a spectral MSE diagnostic, which could potentially provide real-time measurements of the magnetic field and be used to increase the accuracy of equilibrium reconstruction. Measurement uncertainty is evaluated using the NBASS synthetic diagnostic. The same code allows design of measurements with improved accuracy such as spectral measurements techniques which take advantage of polarization. Accurate fitting of the MSE spectrum requires taking into account non-statistical beam excited state populations. The spectral MSE analysis techniques have applications to measurement of the beam density, which allows for improved analysis of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic. Resolution of beam components improves with increased beam energy and magnetic field, so these techniques have high applicability to future fusion devices. Supported by USDoE Award DE-FG03- 96ER-54373.

  1. Precision determination of electron scattering angle by differential nuclear recoil energy method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liyanage, N. [Physics Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Saenboonruang, K., E-mail: fscikssa@ku.ac.th [Physics Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Department of Applied Radiation and Isotopes, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2015-12-01

    The accurate determination of the scattered electron angle is crucial to electron scattering experiments, both with open-geometry large-acceptance spectrometers and ones with dipole-type magnetic spectrometers for electron detection. In particular, for small central-angle experiments using dipole-type magnetic spectrometers, in which surveys are used to measure the spectrometer angle with respect to the primary electron beam, the importance of the scattering angle determination is emphasized. However, given the complexities of large experiments and spectrometers, the accuracy of such surveys is limited and insufficient to meet demands of some experiments. In this paper, we present a new technique for determination of the electron scattering angle based on an accurate measurement of the primary beam energy and the principle of differential nuclear recoil. This technique was used to determine the scattering angle for several experiments carried out at the Experimental Hall A, Jefferson Lab. Results have shown that the new technique greatly improved the accuracy of the angle determination compared to surveys.

  2. A schlieren method for ultra-low angle light scattering measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Brogioli, D; Giglio, M; Giglio, Marzio

    2003-01-01

    We describe a self calibrating optical technique that allows to perform absolute measurements of scattering cross sections for the light scattered at extremely small angles. Very good performances are obtained by using a very simple optical layout similar to that used for the schlieren method, a technique traditionally used for mapping local refraction index changes. The scattered intensity distribution is recovered by a statistical analysis of the random interference of the light scattered in a half-plane of the scattering wave vectors and the main transmitted beam. High quality data can be obtained by proper statistical accumulation of scattered intensity frames, and the static stray light contributions can be eliminated rigorously. The potentialities of the method are tested in a scattering experiment from non equilibrium fluctuations during a free diffusion experiment. Contributions of light scattered from length scales as long as Lambda=1 mm can be accurately determined.

  3. Different approaches to the analysis of small angle scattering experiments on porous aluminum-hydroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F.B.

    2001-01-01

    Different approaches to the analysis of Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments on the porous aluminum-hydroxide pseudo-boehmite are compared. Experimental data is analyzed both as scattering from mass fractal aggregates and polydisperse collections of anisotropic particles. Both types of analys...

  4. Small-angle neutron-scattering studies of the magnetic phase diagram of MnSi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, P.; Lebech, B.; Hae Seop Shim;

    1995-01-01

    The antiferromagnetic order of MnSi has been studied as function of temperature and applied magnetic field using small-angle neutron scattering. The results were analyzed using the three-dimensional resolution function and the scattering cross-section to model the diffraction data. Physical param...

  5. Two-Photon-Exchange Correction to Elastic ep Scattering in the Forward Angle Limit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hai-Qing

    2009-01-01

    The two-photon-exchange (TPE) correction to elastic ep ecattering in the forward angle region is discussed based on a simple hadronic model.It is found that the correction is exactly zero in the forward angle limit.This analytical result gives a good explanation of the previous numerical results and shows the clear power behavior of the TPE correction to elastic ep scattering in the forward angle region.

  6. A review on the study of polymer properties by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Baek Seok; Lee, Chang Hee; Sim, Hae Seop; Lee, Jung Sool [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daeduk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Doo [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eu Gene [Hongik Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Kuk Heon [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    This report contains concept of small angle neutron scattering , various design features and considerations of the small angle neutron spectrometer at HANARO, and recent trends of polymer studies by using this SANS technique with the installation of the spectrometer in near future. We, therefore, wish to review feasibility of small angle studies for polymer field at this spectrometer and to help possible beam time users for their experimental consideration. (author). 23 refs., 7 tabs., 23 figs

  7. Parity Violation in Forward Angle Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, IV, Grady Wilson [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2001-01-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from the proton at Jefferson Laboratory. The kinematic point (θlab = 12.3 deg. and (Q2) = 0.48 (GeV/c)2) is chosen to provide sensitivity to the strange electric form factor GsE. A 3.36 GeV beam of longitudinally polarized electrons was scattered from protons in a liquid hydrogen target. The scattered flux was detected by a pair of spectrometers which focussed the elastically-scattered electrons onto total-absorption detectors. The detector signals were integrated and digitized by a custom data acquisition system. A feedback system reduced systematic errors by controlling helicity-correlated beam intensity differences at the sub-ppm (part per million) level. The experimental result, A = 14.5 +/- 2.0 (stat) ± 1.1 (syst) ppm, is consistent with the electroweak Standard Model with no additional contributions from strange quarks. In particular, the measurement implies GSE + 0.39 GsM = 0.023 ± 0.040 ± 0.026 (ζGnE), where the last uncertainty is due to the estimated uncertainty in the neutron electric form factor GnE . This result represents the first experimental constraint of the strange electric form factor.

  8. Quasiclassical Green function in an external field and small-angle scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, R N; Strakhovenko, V M

    1999-01-01

    The quasiclassical Green functions of the Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations in the external electric field are obtained with the first correction taken into account. The relevant potential is assumed to be localized, while its spherical symmetry is not required. Using these Green functions, the corresponding wave functions are found in the approximation similar to the Furry-Sommerfeld-Maue approximation. It is shown that the quasiclassical Green function does not coincide with the Green function obtained in the eikonal approximation and has a wider region of applicability. It is illustrated by the calculation of the small-angle scattering amplitude for a charged particle and the forward photon scattering amplitude. For charged particles, the first correction to the scattering amplitude in the non-spherically symmetric potential is found. This correction is proportional to the scattering angle. The real part of the amplitude of forward photon scattering in a screened Coulomb potential is obtained.

  9. Anisotropic pitch angle distribution of ~100 keV microburst electrons in the loss cone: measurements from STSAT-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Electron microburst energy spectra in the range of 170 keV to 360 keV have been measured using two solid-state detectors onboard the low-altitude (680 km, polar-orbiting Korean STSAT-1 (Science and Technology SATellite-1. Applying a unique capability of the spacecraft attitude control system, microburst energy spectra have been accurately resolved into two components: perpendicular to and parallel to the geomagnetic field direction. The former measures trapped electrons and the latter those electrons with pitch angles in the loss cone and precipitating into atmosphere. It is found that the perpendicular component energy spectra are harder than the parallel component and the loss cone is not completely filled by the electrons in the energy range of 170 keV to 360 keV. These results have been modeled assuming a wave-particle cyclotron resonance mechanism, where higher energy electrons travelling within a magnetic flux tube interact with whistler mode waves at higher latitudes (lower altitudes. Our results suggest that because higher energy (relativistic microbursts do not fill the loss cone completely, only a small portion of electrons is able to reach low altitude (~100 km atmosphere. Thus assuming that low energy microbursts and relativistic microbursts are created by cyclotron resonance with chorus elements (but at different locations, the low energy portion of the microburst spectrum will dominate at low altitudes. This explains why relativistic microbursts have not been observed by balloon experiments, which typically float at altitudes of ~30 km and measure only X-ray flux produced by collisions between neutral atmospheric particles and precipitating electrons.

  10. The optical scattering property: spatial and angle variability in Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai; Cao, Wenxi; Yang, Yuezhong; Xu, Zhantang

    2015-02-01

    Observations are presented of the Volume scattering function (VSF) over the angular interval 20 to 160°, to maximum depth of about 90m in the Northern South China Sea in Case I and Case II waters. The observations were collected by using a self-developed in situ scattering instrument, which synchronously measured the attenuation coefficient, the VSFs in seven angles between 20 to 160° at 650nm, and the sea depths. General, the VSFs show a strong scattering in the forward, a broad scattering minimum in the scattering angular interval 90 to 126° and a weak increase in the rest of backward scattering angles. The analysis of the in situ data also indicates that the magnitude and the shape of the VSF change with areas and profile depths. From Case II to Case I, the forward scattering in 20°, which is mainly due to relatively large suspended particles, varied about three orders magnitude with highest values observed in Case II waters. In Case I waters, form the surface layer to the deeper layer, the magnitude of the VSFs firstly decreased with the depth, and then increased with the depth until reached a maximum scattering layer between 30 to 50m, and then decreased with depth until reached the maximum measurement depth. In Case II waters, the vertical profile distributions of VSF are complex, but in almost all profile, the magnitude of the VSFs firstly decreased with the depth, and then increased with the depth until reached the maximum measurement depth. The result of analysis also showed that in almost all of these stations, in the surface water, based on the light scattering by bubbles at shallow depths, the angle scattering at 60º-80º has a significant "shoulder", and the wind plays a key role in the bubble scattering.

  11. Modification of Classical SPM for Slightly Rough Surface Scattering with Low Grazing Angle Incidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the impedance/admittance rough boundaries, the reflection coefficients and the scattering cross section with low grazing angle incidence are obtained for both VV and HH polarizations. The error of the classical perturbation method at grazing angle is overcome for the vertical polarization at a rough Neumann boundary of infinite extent. The derivation of the formulae and the numerical results show that the backscattering cross section depends on the grazing angle to the fourth power for both Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions with low grazing angle incidence. Our results can reduce to that of the classical small perturbation method by neglecting the Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions.

  12. Understanding inelastically scattered neutrons from water on a time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument

    CERN Document Server

    Doa, Changwoo; Stanley, Christopher; Gallmeier, Franz X; Doucet, Mathieu; Smith, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    It is generally assumed by most of the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) user community that a neutrons energy is unchanged during SANS measurements. Here, the scattering from water, specifically light water, was measured on the EQ-SANS instrument, a time-of-flight SANS instrument located at the Spallation Neutron Source of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A significant inelastic process was observed in the TOF spectra of neutrons scattered from water. Analysis of the TOF spectra from the sample showed that the scattered neutrons have energies consistent with room-temperature thermal energies (~20 meV) regardless of the incident neutron energy. With the aid of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations, we conclude that the thermalization process within the sample results in faster neutrons that arrive at the detector earlier than expected based on the incident neutron energies. This thermalization process impacts the measured SANS intensities in a manner that will ultimately be sample- and temperature-depe...

  13. Near-critical-angle scattering for the characterization of clouds of bubbles: particular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofri, Fabrice R A; Krzysiek, Mariusz A; Barbosa, Séverine; Messager, Valérie; Ren, Kuan-Fang; Mroczka, Janusz

    2011-10-20

    We report experimental investigations on the influence of various optical effects on the far-field scattering pattern produced by a cloud of optical bubbles near the critical scattering angle. Among the effects considered, there is the change of the relative refractive index of the bubbles (gas bubbles or some liquid-liquid droplets), the influence of intensity gradients induced by the laser beam intensity profile and by the spatial filtering of the collection optics, the coherent and multiple scattering effects occurring for densely packed bubbles, and the tilt angle of spheroidal optical bubbles. The results obtained herein are thought to be fundamental for the development of future works to model these effects and for the extension of the range of applicability of an inverse technique (referenced herein as the critical angle refractometry and sizing technique), which is used to determine the size distribution and composition of bubbly flows.

  14. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jixie; Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Rondon, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    The applicability of pQCD to exclusive reactions at medium energies is a subject of considerable interest. Real Compton scattering (RCS) has the potential to provide insight to this unsettled issue. In pQCD, three active quarks and two hard gluons are involved when describing RCS. But the cross sections do not agree with the pQCD predictions. In contrast, a handbag dominance model, involving only one single quark coupling to the spectator through generalized parton distributions (GPDs) does a good job of matching the cross section data. A measurement of the longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL was found inconsistent with predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations within the hand-bag mechanism. Further Miller's handbag approach, which including quark and hadron helicity flip, contradicts pQCD and others which demands that KLL =ALL , the initial state helicity correlation asymmetry, by finding that KLL ≠ALL . The first ever measurement of ALL has been proposed to run in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. This experiment will utilize an untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and the longitudinally polarized UVA/JLAB proton target. After a brief introduction to the physics, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  15. Limiting cases of the small-angle scattering approximation solutions for the propagation of laser beams in anisotropic scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, M. A.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The propagation of photons in a medium with strongly anisotropic scattering is a problem with a considerable history. Like the propagation of electrons in metal foils, it may be solved in the small-angle scattering approximation by the use of Fourier-transform techniques. In certain limiting cases, one may even obtain analytic expressions. This paper presents some of these results in a model-independent form and also illustrates them by the use of four different phase-function models. Sample calculations are provided for comparison purposes

  16. Large-angle. pi. /sup +/p elastic scattering at 66. 8 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brack, J.T.; Kraushaar, J.J.; Rilett, D.J.; Ristinen, R.A.; Ottewell, D.F.; Smith, G.R.; Jeppesen, R.G.; Stevenson, N.R.

    1988-11-01

    Pion-proton elastic scattering measurements at six angles from 101/sup 0/ to 147/sup 0/ center of mass at 66.8 MeV verify previously published differential cross sections which are at variance with earlier data of others and with generally accepted phase-shift solutions which incorporate these earlier data. The present single-arm measurements were made with solid targets and an array of scintillation counters which measured the time of flight of scattered pions.

  17. Do angles of obliquity apply to 30 degrees scattered radiation from megavoltage beams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Peter J; Styczynski, John R

    2008-10-01

    The angle of obliquity is used in radiation shielding calculations to account for the longer path length x rays will see when obliquely incident on the protective barrier. According to the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), use of the angle of obliquity is explicitly assumed for primary radiation, so that an angle of obliquity for secondary radiation is never addressed. However, in the example section of the latest report, it specifically recommends against using an angle of obliquity for scattered radiation. To check this assumption, the existence or not of an angle of obliquity for scattered radiation has been investigated for bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV and for barriers consisting of concrete, lead, and steel using a Monte Carlo approach. The MCNP Monte Carlo code, v4.2C, has been used to generate scattered radiation at 30 degrees from a water phantom and incident on a secondary barrier at the same angle relative to the normal to the barrier. The barrier thickness was increased from zero to a thickness sufficient to reduce the fluence (f4 tally) to concrete (5 energies) show an average angle of obliquity of 21.7 degrees +/- 5.6 degrees , and for the first two TVLs averaged 29.7 degrees +/- 3.9 degrees . The results for the first TVL in lead (3 energies) show an average angle of obliquity of 27.7 degrees +/- 4.0 degrees , and for the first two TVLs averaged 20.5 degrees +/- 5.8 degrees . There are no data in the NCRP reports for 30 degrees scattered radiation attenuated by steel with which to make a comparison.

  18. Ultrasmall Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS) and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) Studies on the Complex Metal Hydride NaAlH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, Tabbetha; Bennett, Christopher; Torres, James; Ilavsky, Jan

    This research seeks to understand the role of ScCl , ZrCl , and VCl catalysts in NaAlH. We have examined these hydrides at multiple length scales using an X-ray scattering instrument which is capable of measuring scattering wave vector, Q, of 0.0001Å to 6.0 Å . The ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) instrument sector 9ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) simultaneously collects using USAXS, SAXS, and WAXS detectors. Studies were performed during in-situ heating up to 170C (just below the H desorption temperature for uncatalyzed NaAlH). Results showed that NaAlH has a surface fractal (highly porous) morphology. Isothermal studies performed at 30C, 65C, 100C, 135C, and 170C reveals changes at low Q (Q~0.001 Å to 0.01 Å) associated with highly interconnected intraparticle porosity which is suitably described by a power-law slope for a Gaussian polymer chain structure of p~2. At high scattering wave vector, Q~0.03 Å , the presence of a pore population which obeys Porod scattering and appears to have a size at 21nm is present. These fine pores increase in their population density as temperature is elevated. The WAXS data reveals thermal expansion to occur, but no solid state phase transformation to the product phase. Currently at NASA-Goddard.

  19. Exploitation of the UV Aerosol Index scattering angle dependence: Properties of Siberian smoke plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning de Vries, Marloes; Beirle, Steffen; Sihler, Holger; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) is a simple measure of aerosols from satellite that is particularly sensitive to elevated layers of absorbing particles. It has been determined from a range of instruments including TOMS, GOME-2, and OMI, for almost four decades and will be continued in the upcoming Sentinel missions S5-precursor, S4, and S5. Despite its apparent simplicity, the interpretation of UVAI is not straightforward, as it depends on aerosol abundance, absorption, and altitude in a non-linear way. In addition, UVAI depends on the geometry of the measurement (viewing angle, solar zenith and relative azimuth angles), particularly if viewing angles exceed 45 degrees, as is the case for OMI and TROPOMI (on S5-precursor). The dependence on scattering angle complicates the interpretation and further processing (e.g., averaging) of UVAI. In certain favorable cases, however, independent information on aerosol altitude and absorption may become available. We present a detailed study of the scatter angle dependence using SCIATRAN radiative transfer calculations. The model results were compared to observations of an extensive Siberian smoke plume, of which parts reached 10-12 km altitude. Due to its large extent and the high latitude, OMI observed the complete plume in five consecutive orbits under a wide range of scattering angles. This allowed us to deduce aerosol characteristics (absorption and layer height) that were compared with collocated CALIOP lidar measurements.

  20. Small angle scattering by ellipsoids of revolution: Polidispersity and limitations of the Mellin transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barocci, S.; Melone, S.; Puliti, P.; Turchetti, E. (Ancona Univ. (Italy). Facolta di Ingegneria)

    1984-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of validity of the Mellin transform when applied to small angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons by a polydisperse set of ellipsoids of revolution. It constitutes a continuation of a previous work performing the same kind of analysis for a set of diffusing particles, consisting of nearly spherical particles. In particular the analysis was focused on the accuracy associated to the size distribution, average radius, total volume of scattering particles as obtained by applying the Mellin transform to the scattering patterns.

  1. Small angle scattering by ellipsoids of revolution: Polidispersity and limitations of the Mellin transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barocci, S.; Melone, S.; Puliti, P.; Turchetti, E.

    1984-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of validity of the Mellin transform when applied to small angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons by a polydisperse set of ellipsoids of revolution. It constitutes a continuation of a previous work performing the same kind of analysis for a set of diffusing particles, consisting of nearly spherical particles. In particular the analysis was focused on the accuracy associated to the size distribution, average radius, total volume of scattering particles as obtained by applying the Mellin transform to the scattering patterns. (orig.).

  2. A small angle neutron scattering study of mica based glass-ceramics with applications in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcoyne, S. H.; Bentley, P. M.; Al-Jawad, M.; Bubb, N. L.; Al-Shammary, H. A. O.; Wood, D. J.

    2004-07-01

    We are currently developing machinable and load-bearing mica-based glass-ceramics for use in restorative dental surgery. In this paper we present the results of an ambient temperature small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of several such ceramics with chemical compositions chosen to optimise machinability and strength. The SANS spectra are all dominated by scattering from the crystalline-amorphous phase interface and exhibit Q-4 dependence (Porod scattering) indicating that, on a 100Å scale, the surface of the crystals is smooth.

  3. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  4. The measurement and modelling of light scattering by phytoplankton cells at narrow forward angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Iain; Cunningham, Alex; McKee, David

    2004-07-01

    A procedure has been devised for measuring the angular dependence of light scattering from suspensions of phytoplankton cells at forward angles from 0.25° to 8°. The cells were illuminated with a spatially-filtered laser beam and the angular distribution of scattered light measured by tracking a photodetector across the Fourier plane of a collecting lens using a stepper-motor driven stage. The procedure was calibrated by measuring scattering from latex bead suspensions with known size distributions. It was then used to examine the scattering from cultures of the unicellular algae Isochrysis galbana (4 µm × 5 µm), Dunaliella primolecta (6 µm × 7 µm) and Rhinomonas reticulata (5 µm × 11 µm). The results were compared with the predictions of Mie theory. Excellent agreement was obtained for spherical particles. A suitable choice of spherical-equivalent scattering parameters was required to enable reasonable agreement within the first diffraction lobe for ellipsoidal particles.

  5. Angle-resolved photon-coincidence measurements in a multiple-scattering medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Muskens, Otto L.; Lagendijk, Ad

    2011-01-01

    We present angle-resolved correlation measurements between photons after propagation through a three-dimensional disordered medium. The multiple-scattering process induces photon correlations that are directly measured for light sources with different photon statistics. We find that multiple...

  6. Analysis of small-angle scattering data from micelles and microemulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    The free-form methods for analyzing small-angle scattering data have, during the last years, found more widespread use for micelles and microemulsions. Recent developments have made them applicable also to systems with size polydispersity and particle correlations, however, model fitting still...

  7. Ultra Small-angle X-ray Scattering Study of Flocculation in Silica-filled Rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihara, S.; Datta, R.N.; Dierkes, W.K.; Noordermeer, J.W.M.; Amino, N.; Ishikawa, Y.; Nishitsuji, S.; Takenaka, M.

    2014-01-01

    The flocculation of silica during vulcanization is monitored using the ultra small-angle X-ray scattering technique for two different types of silica: a highly dispersible silica (HD) and a conventional silica (CV), mixed into a blend of S-SBR and BR rubbers. The cutoff length of the silica aggregat

  8. Small-angle neutron scattering from multilamellar lipid bilayers: Theory, model, and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemmich, Jesper; Mortensen, Kell; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1996-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering data obtained from fully hydrated, multilamellar phospholipid bilayers with deuterated acyl chains of different length are presented and analyzed within a paracrystalline theory and a geometric model that permit the bilayer structure to be determined under condition...

  9. Reversible membrane reorganizations during photosynthesis in vivo: revealed by small-angle neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, Gergely; Posselt, Dorthe; Kovacs, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we determined characteristic repeat distances of the photosynthetic membranes in living cyanobacterial and eukaryotic algal cells, and in intact thylakoid membranes isolated from higher plants with time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering. This non-invasive technique rev...

  10. Investigation of metallic and ceramic materials by small-angle neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smirnov, YI; Elyutin, NO

    2004-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering measurements on a double-crystal spectrometer with perfect monochromator and analyzer crystals were used to follow microstructural changes in the aluminum alloy VD-17. refractory alloy ZhS-6, and dispersion-hardened zirconia-based ceramics with yttria additions. The me

  11. In situ microfluidic dialysis for biological small-angle X-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Magda; Skou, Soren; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam;

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the demand for low sample consumption and automated sample changing capabilities at synchrotron small-angle X-ray (solution) scattering (SAXS) beamlines, X-ray microfluidics is receiving continuously increasing attention. Here, a remote-controlled microfluidic device is presented for sim...

  12. Ultrasmall-angle X-ray scattering analysis of photonic crystal structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramova, V.V.; Sinitskii, A.S.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Grigoriev, S.V.; Belov, D.V.; Petukhov, A.V.; Mistonov, A.A.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Tretyakov, Y.D.

    2009-01-01

    The results of an ultrasmall angle X ray scattering study of iron(III) oxide inverse opal thin films are presented. The photonic crystals examined are shown to have fcc structure with amount of stacking faults varying among the samples. The method used in this study makes it possible to easily disti

  13. Small-angle scattering study of mesoscopic structures in charged gel and their evolution on dehydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Annaka, Masahiko; Hara, Kazuhiro

    2003-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures, with length scales similar to10(2) Angstrom, were investigated by small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) in several N-isopropylacrylamide-sodium acrylate (NIPA-SA) copolymeric hydrogels with varying [NIPA]/[SA] ratios and water contents. The SAXS experimen...

  14. Spin-Echo Small Angle Neutron Scattering analysis of liposomes and bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Heijkamp, L.F., et al.

    2010-01-01

    Two types of liposomes, commonly used in drug delivery studies, and E. coli bacteria, all prepared in H2O, were resuspended in D2O and measured with Small Angle Spin-Echo Neutron Scattering (SESANS). Modeling was performed using correlation functions for solid spheres and hollow spheres. The signal

  15. Small-angle neutron scattering from poly(NIPA-co-AMPS) gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travas-Sejdic, J.; Easteal, A.; Knott, R.;

    2000-01-01

    The microstructure of the poly( N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamido- 2-methyl-1-propane sulphonic acid) gel, poly( NIPA-co-AMPS), was investigated as a function of temperature and cross-link density using the small angle neutron scattering technique. The sample temperature was varied in the range...

  16. Informing the improvement of forest products durability using small angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayomi Plaza-Rodriguez; Sai Venkatesh Pingali; Shuo Qian; William T. Heller; Joseph E. Jakes

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of how wood nanostructure swells with moisture is needed to accelerate the development of forest products with enhanced moisture durability. Despite its suitability to study nanostructures, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) remains an underutilized tool in forest products research. Nanoscale moisture-induced structural changes in intact and...

  17. Temperature dependent small-angle neutron scattering of CTABr-magnetic fluid emulsion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Aswal; J V Joshi; P S Goyal; Rajesh Patel; R V Upadhyay; R V Mehta

    2004-08-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering studies have been carried out to check the structural integrity of citryltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) micelles in a magnetic fluid for different magnetic fluid concentrations at two different temperatures 303 and 333 K. It is found that the CTABr micelles grow with increasing magnetic fluid concentration and there is a decrease in the micellar size with increase in temperature.

  18. Coulomb Correction to the Screening Angle of the Moliere Multiple Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kuraev, E A; Tarasov, A V

    2012-01-01

    Coulomb correction to the screening angular parameter of the Moliere multiple scattering theory is found. Numerical calculations are presented in the range of nuclear charge from Z=4 to Z=82. Comparison with the approximate Moliere result for the screening angle reveals up to 30% deviation from it for sufficiently heavy elements of the target material.

  19. A small-angle neutron scattering study of cholic acid-based organogel systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemen, H.M.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Bouwman, W.G.; Deme, B.; Terech, P.

    2004-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering measurements were performed on some cholic acid-based gel systems in order to gain detailed information about the network structure. The presence of thin fibers with a radius of about 10-20 Å was found for various gelators. Two types of interaction between different so

  20. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Fanelli, C; Hamilton, D J; Salme, G; Wojtsekhowski, B; Ahmidouch, A; Annand, J R M; Baghdasaryan, H; Beaufait, J; Bosted, P; Brash, E J; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Christy, E; Chudakov, E; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Degtyarenko, P; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Fowler, M; Frlez, E; Gaskell, D; Gilman, R; Horn, T; Huber, G M; de Jager, C W; Jensen, E; Jones, M K; Kelleher, A; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; Kohl, M; Kumbartzki, G; Lassiter, S; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Lovelace, H; Luo, W; Mack, D; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Meziane, M; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Mulholland, J; Nelyubin, V; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Prok, Y; Puckett, A J R; Punjabi, V; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Slifer, K; Smith, G; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zheng, X

    2015-01-01

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of \\cma$= 70^\\circ$. The longitudinal transfer \\KLL, measured to be $0.645 \\pm 0.059 \\pm 0.048$, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is $\\sim$3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  1. Grazing-incidence small-angle neutron scattering from structures below an interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhi, Shirin; Hellsing, Maja S; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Rennie, Adrian R

    2017-08-01

    Changes of scattering are observed as the grazing angle of incidence of an incoming beam increases and probes different depths in samples. A model has been developed to describe the observed intensity in grazing-incidence small-angle neutron scattering (GISANS) experiments. This includes the significant effects of instrument resolution, the sample transmission, which depends on both absorption and scattering, and the sample structure. The calculations are tested with self-organized structures of two colloidal samples with different size particles that were measured on two different instruments. The model allows calculations for various instruments with defined resolution and can be used to design future improved experiments. The possibilities and limits of GISANS for different studies are discussed using the model calculations.

  2. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, A. R.; Wilkinson, S. J.; Hall, C. J.; Rogers, K. D.; Glatter, O.; Wess, T.; Ellis, I. O.

    2005-09-01

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique.

  3. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Round, A R [Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, S J [Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Hall, C J [Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Rogers, K D [Department of Materials and Medical Sciences, Cranfield University, Swindon, SN6 8LA (United Kingdom); Glatter, O [Department of Chemistry, University of Graz (Austria); Wess, T [School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3NB, Wales (United Kingdom); Ellis, I O [Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-07

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique.

  4. Noctilucent Clouds Polarimetry: Twilight Measurements in a Wide Range of Scattering Angles

    CERN Document Server

    Ugolnikov, Oleg S; Kozelov, Boris V; Dlugach, Janna M

    2015-01-01

    Wide-field polarization measurements of the twilight sky background during the several nights with bright and expanded noctilucent clouds in central and northern Russia in 2014 and 2015 are used to build the phase dependency of polarization of emission scattered by clouds particles in a wide range of scattering angles (from 40 to 130 degrees). This range covers the polarization maximum near 90 degrees and large-angle slope of the curve which are most sensitive to the particle size. The method of separation of scattering on clouds particles on the twilight background is presented. Results are compared with T-matrix simulations for different sizes and shapes of ice particles, the most probable radius of particles (0.06 microns) and maximum radius (about 0.1 microns) are estimated.

  5. Electron pitch angle variations recorded at the high magnetic latitude boundary layer by the NUADU instrument on the TC-2 spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The NUADU (NeUtral Atom Detector Unit experiment aboard TC-2 recorded, with high temporal and spatial resolution, 4π solid angle images of electrons (~50-125 keV spiraling around geomagnetic field lines at high northern magnetic latitudes (L>10, during its in-orbit commissioning phase (September 2004. The ambient magnetic field, as well as electrons in other energy ranges, were simultaneously measured by the TC-2 magnetometer (FGM, the plasma electron and current experiment (PEACE, the low energy ion detector (LEID and the high energy electron detector (HEED. The NUADU data showed that up-flowing electron beams could form "ring-like" and "dumbbell-type" pitch angle distributions (PADs in the region sampled. Changes in these pitch angle distributions due to transient magnetic variations are suggested to have been associated with electron acceleration along the geomagnetic field lines. A nested magnetic bottle configuration that formed due to the propagation towards the Earth of a magnetic pulse, is proposed to have been associated with this process.

  6. Structural features of various kinds of carbon fibers as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Denghua; Du, Sujun [Shanxi Transportation Research Institute, National and Local Joint Engineering Laboratory of Advanced Road Materials, Taiyuan (China); Lu, Chunxiang; Wu, Gangping; Yang, Yu; Wang, Lina [Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Engineering Laboratory for Carbon Fiber Technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Taiyuan (China)

    2016-11-15

    The structural features of polyacrylonitrile and pitch-based carbon fibers were analyzed from a comprehensive point of view by X-ray measurements and related techniques. The results indicated that the undulating graphite ribbon with embedded microvoid was the main structural unit for graphitic fibers. The void's parameters for these fibers could be obtained directly by small-angle X-ray scattering following the classic method deduced based on the typical two-phase system (i.e., Porod's law, Guinier's law and Debye's law). The non-graphitic fibers, however, were composed of two-dimensional turbostratic crystallites in the aggregation of microfibril and thus had a quasi two-phase structure (microfibril, interfibrillar amorphous structure and microvoid embedded within the microfibril). The extended Debye or Beaucage model in this case should be applied in order to obtain the structural parameters. It also revealed that the quasi two-phase system would complete its transformation to two-phase system during high-temperature graphitization. Therefore, the degree of graphitization was speculated to be the essential indicator distinguishing graphitic fibers from non-graphitic ones and would be helpful in understanding the transformation of structural features during the graphitization of carbon fibers. (orig.)

  7. Structural features of various kinds of carbon fibers as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Denghua; Lu, Chunxiang; Du, Sujun; Wu, Gangping; Yang, Yu; Wang, Lina

    2016-11-01

    The structural features of polyacrylonitrile and pitch-based carbon fibers were analyzed from a comprehensive point of view by X-ray measurements and related techniques. The results indicated that the undulating graphite ribbon with embedded microvoid was the main structural unit for graphitic fibers. The void's parameters for these fibers could be obtained directly by small-angle X-ray scattering following the classic method deduced based on the typical two-phase system (i.e., Porod's law, Guinier's law and Debye's law). The non-graphitic fibers, however, were composed of two-dimensional turbostratic crystallites in the aggregation of microfibril and thus had a quasi two-phase structure (microfibril, interfibrillar amorphous structure and microvoid embedded within the microfibril). The extended Debye or Beaucage model in this case should be applied in order to obtain the structural parameters. It also revealed that the quasi two-phase system would complete its transformation to two-phase system during high-temperature graphitization. Therefore, the degree of graphitization was speculated to be the essential indicator distinguishing graphitic fibers from non-graphitic ones and would be helpful in understanding the transformation of structural features during the graphitization of carbon fibers.

  8. Atomistic modelling of scattering data in the Collaborative Computational Project for Small Angle Scattering (CCP-SAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Stephen J; Wright, David W; Zhang, Hailiang; Brookes, Emre H; Chen, Jianhan; Irving, Thomas C; Krueger, Susan; Barlow, David J; Edler, Karen J; Scott, David J; Terrill, Nicholas J; King, Stephen M; Butler, Paul D; Curtis, Joseph E

    2016-12-01

    The capabilities of current computer simulations provide a unique opportunity to model small-angle scattering (SAS) data at the atomistic level, and to include other structural constraints ranging from molecular and atomistic energetics to crystallography, electron microscopy and NMR. This extends the capabilities of solution scattering and provides deeper insights into the physics and chemistry of the systems studied. Realizing this potential, however, requires integrating the experimental data with a new generation of modelling software. To achieve this, the CCP-SAS collaboration (http://www.ccpsas.org/) is developing open-source, high-throughput and user-friendly software for the atomistic and coarse-grained molecular modelling of scattering data. Robust state-of-the-art molecular simulation engines and molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo force fields provide constraints to the solution structure inferred from the small-angle scattering data, which incorporates the known physical chemistry of the system. The implementation of this software suite involves a tiered approach in which GenApp provides the deployment infrastructure for running applications on both standard and high-performance computing hardware, and SASSIE provides a workflow framework into which modules can be plugged to prepare structures, carry out simulations, calculate theoretical scattering data and compare results with experimental data. GenApp produces the accessible web-based front end termed SASSIE-web, and GenApp and SASSIE also make community SAS codes available. Applications are illustrated by case studies: (i) inter-domain flexibility in two- to six-domain proteins as exemplified by HIV-1 Gag, MASP and ubiquitin; (ii) the hinge conformation in human IgG2 and IgA1 antibodies; (iii) the complex formed between a hexameric protein Hfq and mRNA; and (iv) synthetic 'bottlebrush' polymers.

  9. Characterization of Nanocomposite filler Morphology using Ultra Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justice, Ryan S.; Schaefer, Dale W. (UCIN); (AFRL)

    2010-10-22

    Loading polymer matrices with nanoscale fillers is widely believed to have the potential to push polymer properties to extreme values. Realization of anticipated properties, however, has proven elusive. Recent nanocomposite research suggests better characterization of the large-scale morphology will provide insight explaining these shortfalls. This work will present ultra-small angle X-ray scattering as a viable tool for elucidating the hierarchical filler morphology that exists within polymer nanocomposites. Scattering analysis tools developed by our group will be applied to scattering data from nanocomposites filled with carbon nanotubes, layered silicates, and colloidal silica. The relationship between imaging data and scattering data will be discussed in the context of filler dispersion. Finally, the impact of large-scale filler morphology on mechanical and electrical properties will be discussed.

  10. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering from Lipid-Bound Myelin Basic Protein in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, H.; Oliveira, C. L. P.; Torriani, I. L.; Polverini, E.; Fasano, A.; Carlone, G.; Cavatorta, P.; Riccio, P.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of myelin basic protein (MBP), purified from the myelin sheath in both lipid-free (LF-MBP) and lipid-bound (LB-MBP) forms, was investigated in solution by small angle x-ray scattering. The water-soluble LF-MBP, extracted at pH 7.0. Under all conditions, the scattering from the two protein forms was different, indicating different molecular shapes. For the LB-MBP, well-defined scattering curves were obtained, suggesting that the protein had a unique, compact (but not globular) structure. Furthermore, these data were compatible with earlier results from molecular modeling calculations on the MBP structure which have been refined by us. In contrast, the LF-MBP data were in accordance with the expected open-coil conformation. The results represent the first direct structural information from x-ray scattering measurements on MBP in its native lipidic environment in solution. PMID:14695288

  11. Low-angle polarized neutron and X-ray scattering from magnetic nanolayers and nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Amitesh

    2017-01-01

    This research monograph presents the latest results related to the characterization of low dimensional systems. Low-angle polarized neutron scattering and X-ray scattering at grazing incidence are used as the two main techniques to explore various physical phenomena of these systems. Special focus is put on systems like thin film transition metal and rare-earth layers, oxide heterostructures, hybrid systems, self-assembled nanostructures and self-diffusion.  Readers will gain in-depth knowledge about the usage of specular scattering and off-specular scattering techniques. Investigation of in-plane and out-of-plane structures and magnetism with vector magnetometric information is illustrated comprehensively. The book caters to a wide audience working in the field of nano-dimensional magnetic systems and the neutron and X-ray reflectometry community in particular.

  12. Understanding inelastically scattered neutrons from water on a time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Changwoo, E-mail: doc1@ornl.gov [Biology and Soft Matter Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Heller, William T.; Stanley, Christopher [Biology and Soft Matter Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Gallmeier, Franz X. [Instrument and Source Design Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Doucet, Mathieu [Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Smith, Gregory S. [Biology and Soft Matter Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-02-11

    It is generally assumed by most of the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) user community that a neutron's energy is unchanged during SANS measurements. Here, the scattering from water, specifically light water, was measured on the EQ-SANS instrument, a time-of-flight (TOF) SANS instrument located at the Spallation Neutron Source of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A significant inelastic process was observed in the TOF spectra of neutrons scattered from water. Analysis of the TOF spectra from the sample showed that the scattered neutrons have energies consistent with room-temperature thermal energies (∼20 meV) regardless of the incident neutron's energy. With the aid of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations, we conclude that the thermalization process within the sample results in faster neutrons that arrive at the detector earlier than expected based on the incident neutron energies. This thermalization process impacts the measured SANS intensities in a manner that will ultimately be sample- and temperature-dependent, necessitating careful processing of the raw data into the SANS cross-section.

  13. Surface Diffuseness Anomaly in 16O+208pb Quasi-elastic Scattering at Backward Angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Hui-Ming; XU Xin-Xing; BAI Chun-Lin; YU Ning; LIN Cheng-Jian; ZHANG Huan-Qiao; LIU Zu-Hua; YANG Feng; JIA Fei; ZHANG Chun-Lei; AN Guang-Peng; WU Zhen-Dong

    2008-01-01

    @@ The quasi-elastic scattering excitation function of the doubly magic 16O+208pb system at a backward angle is measured at sub-barrier energies with high precision. The diffuseness parameters extracted from both the single-channel and the coupled-channels calculations give almost the same value α = 0.76±0.04 fm. The results show that the coupling effect is negligible for the spherical system. The obtained value is smaller than the extracted value from the fusion excitation function, but larger than the value of α = 0.63 fm, which is from the systematic analysis of elastic scattering data.

  14. Spectral behavior of the linear polarization degree at right-angle scattering configuration for nanoparticle systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setien, B; Albella, P; Saiz, J M; Gonzalez, F; Moreno, F, E-mail: morenof@unican.e [Grupo de Optica, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Cantabria, Avda de los Castros S/N, 39005 Santander (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    We present a numerical study of the spectral evolution of the linear polarization degree at right-angle scattering configuration (P{sub L}(90{sup 0})) for two different particle systems: an isolated nanosphere and a nanodimer composed of two finite size spherical particles separated by a gap distance d. We shall focus on the influence of charge oscillation modes other than the dipolar on the linear polarization degree of the scattered light. The possibility of using this alternative parameter for characterizing nanoparticle systems and particle interaction is analyzed.

  15. Improved performances of 36 m small-angle neutron scattering spectrometer BATAN in Serpong Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putra, Edy Giri Rachman [Neutron Scattering Laboratory, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Gedung 40 Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15314 (Indonesia)], E-mail: giri@batan.go.id; Bharoto; Santoso, Eddy; Ikram, Abarrul [Neutron Scattering Laboratory, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Gedung 40 Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15314 (Indonesia)

    2009-02-21

    SMARTer, a 36 m small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) spectrometer owned by the National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) was installed at the Neutron Scattering Laboratory (NSL) in Serpong, Indonesia. Lots of works on replacing, upgrading and improving the control system, experimental methods, data collection and reduction in the last two years have been carried out to optimize the performance of SMARTer. Some standard samples such as silver behenate, monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticle, porous silica and block copolymer PS-PEP film were measured for the inter-laboratory comparison.

  16. Determination of hydrodynamic properties of biopolymers from small-angle X-ray scattering data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, J.J.; Damaschun, H.; Damaschun, G.; Gast, K.; Plietz, P.; Zirwer, D. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Molekularbiologie)

    1984-10-17

    Sedimentation coefficients and translational diffusion coefficients can be determined semi-empirically from small angle X-ray scattering data. In general, the deviations of these coefficients from the experimental ones are less than 10% for proteins and small anisometrical RNA molecules within the range of molar masses from 1.7 x 10/sup 4/ to 3.5 x 10/sup 5/ g mol/sup -1/. The method can be used, furthermore, to test the consistency of experimental hydrodynamic and X-ray scattering data.

  17. Micromagnetic simulation of magnetic small-angle neutron scattering from two-phase nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michels, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.michels@uni.lu [Physics and Materials Science Research Unit, University of Luxembourg, 162A Avenue de la Faïencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Erokhin, Sergey; Berkov, Dmitry; Gorn, Nataliya [INNOVENT Technology Development, Prüssingstraße 27B, D-07745 Jena (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    The recent development of a micromagnetic simulation methodology—suitable for multiphase magnetic nanocomposites—permits the computation of the magnetic microstructure and of the associated magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) cross section of these materials. In this review we summarize results on the micromagnetic simulation of magnetic SANS from two-phase nanocomposites. The decisive advantage of this approach resides in the possibility to scrutinize the individual magnetization Fourier contributions to the total magnetic SANS cross section, rather than their sum, which is generally obtained from the experiment. The procedure furnishes unique and fundamental information regarding magnetic neutron scattering from nanomagnets.

  18. From small angle x-ray scattering to reflectivity: Instrumentation and sample study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, D.W. [Center for Micro-Engineered Ceramics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-6041 (United States); Beaucage, G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0012 (United States); Kent, M.S. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    In this study, we described the first results from an x-ray reflectometer which has been modified from an existing Kratky small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) camera at the UNM/Sandia scattering center. Typically, seven orders of magnitude of reflectivity can be obtained over a range of 0.02 to 0.5 A{sup {minus}1} in {ital q}. This allows the resolution of surface features of 10 to 1000 A. The conversion to reflectometer is reversible and can be achieved in a short time, allowing for dual use of an existing Kratky camera. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  19. Structure of Fullerene Aggregates in Pyridine/Water Solutions by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Aksenov, V L; Belushkin, A V; Mihailovic, D; Mrzel, A; Rosta, L; Serdyuk, I N; Timchenko, A A

    2001-01-01

    Results of small-angle neutron scattering experiments on fullerenes (Co_{60}) in pyridine/water solutions are reported. They confirm conclusions of the previous studies, in particular, dynamic light scattering experiments. Aggregates with characteristic radius of about 20 nm are formed in the solutions. The contrast variation using different combinations of protonated/deuterated components (water and pyridine) of the solutions points to the small pyridine content inside the aggregates. This fact testifies that the aggregates consist of a massive fullerene core covered by a thin pyridine shell.

  20. Small angle neutron scattering study of pore microstructure in ceria compacts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Patra; P U Sastry; Srirupa T Mukherjee; Vinila Bedekar; A K Tyagi

    2008-11-01

    Ceria powders were prepared by gel combustion process using cerium nitrate and hitherto unexplored amino acids such as aspartic acid, arginine and valine as fuels. The powders have been characterized by X-ray and laser diffraction. Cold pressed compacts of these powders have been sintered at 1250°C for 2 h. Internal pore microstructure of the sintered compacts has been investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) over a scattering wave vector range of 0.003–0.17 nm-1. The SANS profiles indicate surface fractal morphology of the pore space with fractal dimensionality lying between 2.70 and 2.76.

  1. Characteristics of Pitch Angle Distributions of 100s Kev Electrons in the Slot Region and Inner Radiation Belt­­­­­­­­

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Malaspina, D.

    2014-12-01

    The pitch angle distribution (PAD) of energetic electrons in the slot region and inner radiation belt received little attention in the past decades due to the lack of quality measurements. Using the state-of-art pitch-angle-resolved data from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument onboard the Van Allen Probes, a detailed analysis of 100s keV electron PADs below L =4 is performed, in which the PADs is categorized into three types: normal (flux peaking at 90°), cap (exceedingly peaking narrowly around 90°) and 90°-minimum (lower flux at 90°) PADs. By examining the characteristics of the PADs of 460 keV electrons for over a year, we find that the 90°-minimum PADs are generally present in the inner belt (Lbelt and relatively constant in the inner belt but changes significantly in the slot region (2mechanism can hardly explain the formation of 90°-minimum PADs at the center of inner belt. These new and compelling observations, made possible by the high-quality measurements of MagEIS, present a challenge for the wave modelers, and future work is still needed to fully understand them.

  2. Static properties of polystyrene in semidilute solutions: A comparison of Monte Carlo simulation and small-angle neutron scattering results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J.S.; Schurtenberger, P.

    1999-01-01

    determined for the simulations as well as experimentally for polystyrene in d-toluene by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), and excellent agreement is found. Interpolations of the MC scattering functions fit the SANS data in the full measured range of scattering vectors, demonstrating agreement almost...

  3. Angle-beam shear wave scattering from buried crack-like defects in bonded specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Carson T.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Weng, Yu; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic wavefield imaging, which refers to the measurement of wave motion on a 2-D rectilinear grid resulting from a fixed source, has been previously applied to angle-beam shear wave propagation in simple plates with through-holes and far-surface notches. In this prior work, scattered waves were analyzed using baseline subtraction of wavefields acquired before and after a notch was introduced. In practice, however, defects of interest often occur between bonded layers and it is generally not possible to record data from the same specimen in both the undamaged and damaged states, even in the laboratory. Direct baseline subtraction of wavefields thus becomes impractical as a tool for analyzing scattering. This present work considers measurement and analysis of angle-beam waves in bonded specimens with and without buried defects originating from fastener holes. Data from fastener holes with and without simulated damage in the form of notches are compared, and it is shown that wavefield baseline subtraction, even after correcting for misalignment between scans, is ineffective for isolating scattering from the notch. A combination of frequency-wavenumber filtering and spatial windowing is proposed and implemented as an alternative approach to quantify scattering from damage. Despite unavoidable deviations from specimen-to-specimen caused by factors such as variations in bonding, transducer mounting, and fastener hole machining, it is shown that scattering from buried notches can be clearly visualized in recorded wavefield data of bonded plates containing a buried defect as opposed to "baseline" wavefield data taken from a nominally similar specimen with no defect present. Backscattering is further quantified in the form of scattering patterns at different scattering frames to quantify the effect of the notch on the total backscattered wavefield.

  4. Small-angle scattering from precipitates: Analysis by use of a polydisperse hard-sphere model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    A general polydisperse hard-sphere model for analyzing small-angle-scattering data from spherical precipitates in alloys is presented. In the model the size distribution is chosen as a Weibull density distribution and the hard-sphere interaction radius is taken as being proportional to the radius...... very good fits to the experimental data and the results are in agreement with a Li content of 25% in the precipitates. The concentration of Li in the matrix is also in good agreement with the phase diagram of Al-Li found in the literature. Results from the application of a monodisperse hard-sphere...... of the precipitates. The Weibull distribution is monomodal, and depending on the parameters describing the distribution, it can skew to either side. Small-angle x-ray- and neutron-scattering data, taken from the literature, from spherical delta' precipitates in Al-Li alloys have been analyzed with the model. It gives...

  5. Development and prospect of Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Zuo, Taisen; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Wang, Fang-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) is an upgrade of the traditional Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique which can cover three orders of magnitude of length scale from one nanometer to one micrometer. It is a powerful tool for structure calibration in polymer science, biology, material science and condensed matter physics. Since the first VSANS instrument, D11 in Grenoble, was built in 1972, new collimation techniques, focusing optics (multi-beam converging apertures, material or magnetic lenses, and focusing mirrors) and higher resolution detectors combined with the long flight paths and long incident neutron wavelengths have been developed. In this paper, a detailed review is given of the development, principles and application conditions of various VSANS techniques. Then, beam current gain factors are calculated to evaluate those techniques. A VSANS design for the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is thereby presented.

  6. Development and prospects of Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuo, Tai-Sen; Cheng, He; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Wang, Fang-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) is an upgrade of the traditional Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique which can cover three orders of magnitude of length scale from one nanometer to one micrometer. It is a powerful tool for structure calibration in polymer science, biology, material science and condensed matter physics. Since the first VSANS instrument, D11 in Grenoble, was built in 1972, new collimation techniques, focusing optics (multi-beam converging apertures, material or magnetic lenses, and focusing mirrors) and higher resolution detectors combined with the long flight paths and long incident neutron wavelengths have been developed. In this paper, a detailed review is given of the development, principles and application conditions of various VSANS techniques. Then, beam current gain factors are calculated to evaluate those techniques. A VSANS design for the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is thereby presented. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (21474119, 11305191)

  7. Large-angle scattering of multi-GeV muons on thin Lead targets

    CERN Document Server

    Longhin, A; Pupilli, F

    2015-01-01

    The probability of large-angle scattering for multi-GeV muons in thin ($t/X_0 \\sim 10^{-1}$) lead targets is studied. The new estimates presented here are based both on simulation programs (GEANT4 libraries) and theoretical calculations. In order to validate the results provided by simulation, a comparison is drawn with experimental data from the literature. This study is particularly relevant when applied to muons originating from $\

  8. Optical characterization of bubbly flows with a near-critical-angle scattering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onofri, Fabrice R.A.; Krzysiek, Mariusz [IUSTI, UMR, CNRS, University of Provence, Polytech' DME, Technopole Chateau-Gombert, Marseille (France); Mroczka, Janusz [CEPM, Technical University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland); Ren, Kuan-Fang [CORIA, UMR, CNRS, University of Rouen, Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray (France); Radev, Stefan [IMECH, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Bonnet, Jean-Philippe [M2P2, UMR, CNRS, University Paul Cezanne, Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2009-10-15

    The newly developed critical angle refractometry and sizing technique (CARS) allows simultaneous and instantaneous characterization of the local size distribution and the relative refractive index (i.e. composition) of a cloud of bubbles. The paper presents the recent improvement of this technique by comparison of different light scattering models and inversion procedures. Experimental results carried in various air/water and air/water-ethanol bubbly flows clearly demonstrate the efficiency and the potential of this technique. (orig.)

  9. Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Study on Nanostructures of Polyimide Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Xu; YIN Jing-Hua; SUN Dao-Bin; BU Wen-Bin; CHENG Wei-Dong; WU Zhong-Hua

    2010-01-01

    @@ Inorganic nanohybrid polyimide(PI)is widely applied in electrical and electronic devices for its outstanding insulating properties.Samples 100CR and 100NH are made in Dupont.Among them,100NH is a kind of pure PI films; however,100CR is a kind of inorganic nanohybrid PI/films with excellent corona-resistance.The nanostructure of PI films is investigated with small-angle x-ray scattering technique and transmission electron microscopy(TEM).

  10. SFF analysis of the small angle scattering data for investigation of a vesicle systems structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Kiselev, M. A.; Zhabitskaya, E. I.; Gruzinov, A. Yu.; Aksenov, V. L.; Ipatova, O. M.; Druzhilovskaya, O. S.

    2016-06-01

    Experimental data on the small angle synchrotron X-ray scattering (SAXS) are analyzed on a basis of Separated form factors method (SFF) for a study of the drug delivery Phospholipid Transport Nano System (PTNS). Basic parameters of polydispersed population of PTNS nanoparticles (average radius of PTNS-particles, polydispersity of radius, thickness of membrane) have been determined. The results are discussed in comparison with the SFF results for the “classical” vesicular system of dimyristoylphosphocholine (DMPC).

  11. Two-dimensional position-sensitive detectors for small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhaney, S.A.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1990-05-01

    In this paper, various detectors available for small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are discussed, along with some current developments being actively pursued. A section has been included to outline the various methodologies of position encoding/decoding with discussions on trends and limitations. Computer software/hardware vary greatly from institute and experiment and only a general discussion is given to this area. 85 refs., 33 figs.

  12. Precise measurement of the weak mixing angle in neutrino-nucleon scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo, C.G.; King, B.J.; Bachmann, K.T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Bolton, T.; Foudas, C.; Lefmann, W.C.; Leung, W.C.; Mishra, S.R.; Oltman, E.; Quintas, P.Z.; Rabinowitz, S.A.; Sciulli, F.J.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H. (Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)); Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Schumm, B.A. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)); Bernstein, R.H.; Borcherding, F.; Fisk, H.E.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Merritt, K.W.B.; Schellman, H.M.; Yovanovitch, D.D. (Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)); Bodek, A.; Budd, H.S.; de Barbaro, P.; Sakumoto, W.K. (University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)); Kinnel, T.; Sandler, P.H.; Smith, W.H. (University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States))

    1994-05-30

    We report a precise measurement of the weak mixing angle from the ratio of neutral current to charged current inclusive cross sections in deep-inelastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. The data were gathered at the CCFR neutrino detector in the Fermilab quadrupole-triplet beam, with neutrino energies up to 600 GeV. Using the on-shell definition, sin[sup 2][theta][sub [ital W

  13. Characterisation of porous solids using small-angle scattering and NMR cryoporometry\\ud

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The characteristics of several porous systems have been studied by the use of small-angle neutron scattering [SANS] and nuclear magnetic resonance [NMR] techniques. The measurements reveal different characteristics for sol-gel silicas, activated carbons and ordered mesoporous silicas of the MCM and SBA type. Good agreement is obtained between gas adsorption measurements and the NMR and SANS results for pore sizes above 10 nm. Recent measurements of the water/ice phase transformation in SBA si...

  14. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of sodium butyl benzene sulfonate aggregates in aqueous solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O R Pal; V G Gaikar; J V Joshi; P S Goyal; V K Aswal

    2004-08-01

    The aggregation behaviour of a hydrotrope, sodium -butyl benzene sulfonate (Na-NBBS), in aqueous solutions is investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Nearly ellipsoidal aggregates of Na-NBBS at concentrations well above its minimum hydrotrope concentration were detected by SANS. The hydrotrope seems to form self-assemblies with aggregation number of 36–40 with a substantial charge on the aggregate. This aggregation number is weakly affected by the hydrotrope concentration.

  15. A phased rotating collimator for a pulsed-neutron fixed scattering angle spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahba, M. (Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Engineering Physics and Mathematics)

    1991-06-01

    The design principle of a phased rotating collimator for a pulsed-neutron fixed scattering angle spectrometer is given. The collimator's dimensions were selected to match the curved slot rotor of the spectrometer which is in operation at the ET-RR-1 reactor. The collimator has one slot, whose shape was determined to satisfy a 100% transmission of the polyenergetic neutron bursts produced by the curved slot rotor. (orig.).

  16. Small angle x-ray scattering and electron microscopy of nanoparticles formed in an electrical arc

    OpenAIRE

    Carvou, E; J. L. Le Garrec; Pérez, J.(University Autonoma Madrid, Department of Theoretical Physics, Madrid, Spain); J. Praquin; M. Djeddi; Mitchell, J.B.A.

    2013-01-01

    Small Angle X-ray Scattering has been used to characterize nanoparticles generated by electrical arcing between metallic (AgSnO2) electrodes. The particles are found to have diameters between 30 and 40 nm and display smooth surfaces suggesting that they are either in liquid form or have solidified from the liquid state. Particles collected around the electrodes were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscopy and were seen to be much larger than those seen in the SAXS measurement, to be sphe...

  17. Reconstruction of three-dimensional anisotropic structure from small-angle scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guan-Rong; Wang, Yangyang; Wu, Bin; Wang, Zhe; Do, Changwoo; Smith, Gregory S.; Bras, Wim; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Péter; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2017-08-01

    When subjected to flow, the structures of many soft-matter systems become anisotropic due to the symmetry breaking of the spatial arrangements of constituent particles at the microscopic level. At present, it is common practice to use various small-angle scattering techniques to explore flow-induced microstructural distortion. However, there has not been a thorough discussion in the literature on how a three-dimensional anisotropic structure can be faithfully reconstructed from two-dimensional small-angle scattering spectra. In this work, we address this issue rigorously from a mathematical perspective by using real spherical harmonic expansion analysis. We first show that, except for cases in which mechanical perturbation is sufficiently small, the existing small-angle scattering techniques generally do not provide complete information on structural distortion. This limitation is caused by the linear dependence of certain real spherical harmonic basis vectors on the flow-vorticity and flow-velocity gradient planes in the Couette shear cell. To circumvent the constraint imposed by this geometry, an alternative approach is proposed in which a parallel sliding plate shear cell is used with a central rotary axis along the flow direction. From the calculation of rotation of the reference frame, we demonstrate the feasibility of this experimental implementation for a fully resolved three-dimensional anisotropic structure via a case study of sheared polymers.

  18. Full waveform inversion based on scattering angle enrichment with application to real dataset

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2015-08-19

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI). However, the drawback of the existing RWI methods is inability to utilize diving waves and the extra sensitivity to the migrated image. We propose a combined FWI and RWI optimization problem through dividing the velocity into the background and perturbed components. We optimize both the background and perturbed components, as independent parameters. The new objective function is quadratic with respect to the perturbed component, which will reduce the nonlinearity of the optimization problem. Solving this optimization provides a true amplitude image and utilizes the diving waves to update the velocity of the shallow parts. To insure a proper wavenumber continuation, we use an efficient scattering angle filter to direct the inversion at the early stages to direct energy corresponding to large (smooth velocity) scattering angles to the background velocity update and the small (high wavenumber) scattering angles to the perturbed velocity update. This efficient implementation of the filter is fast and requires less memory than the conventional approach based on extended images. Thus, the new FWI procedure updates the background velocity mainly along the wavepath for both diving and reflected waves in the initial stages. At the same time, it updates the perturbation with mainly reflections (filtering out the diving waves). To demonstrate the capability of this method, we apply it to a real 2D marine dataset.

  19. Polarimetric Scattering Properties of Landslides in Forested Areas and the Dependence on the Local Incidence Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Shibayama

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the local incidence angle dependence of several polarimetric indices corresponding to landslides in forested areas. Landslide is deeply related to the loss of human lives and their property. Various kinds of remote sensing techniques, including aerial photography, high-resolution optical satellite imagery, LiDAR and SAR interferometry (InSAR, have been available for landslide investigations. SAR polarimetry is potentially an effective measure to investigate landslides because fully-polarimetric SAR (PolSAR data contain more information compared to conventional single- or dual-polarization SAR data. However, research on landslide recognition utilizing polarimetric SAR (PolSAR is quite limited. Polarimetric properties of landslides have not been examined quantitatively so far. Accordingly, we examined the polarimetric scattering properties of landslides by an assessment of how the decomposed scattering power components and the polarimetric correlation coefficient change with the local incidence angle. In the assessment, PolSAR data acquired from different directions with both spaceborne and airborne SARs were utilized. It was found that the surface scattering power and the polarimetric correlation coefficient of landslides significantly decrease with the local incidence angle, while these indices of surrounding forest do not. This fact leads to establishing a method of effective detection of landslide area by polarimetric information.

  20. Structure Factor of Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine Unilamellar Vesicles Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Study

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, M A; Kisselev, A M; Lesieur, P; Aksenov, V L

    2003-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments have been performed on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) unilamellar vesicles in 40 % aqueous sucrose solution. Model of separated form factors was applied for the evaluation of SAXS curves from large unilamellar vesicles. For the first time vesicle structure factor, polydispersity, average radius and membrane thickness were calculated simultaneously from the SAXS curves at T=306{\\circ}C for DMPC concentrations in the range from 15 to 75 mM (1-5 % w/w). Structure factor correction to the scattering curve was shown to be negligibly small for the lipid concentration of 15 mM (1 % w/w). It was proved to be necessary to introduce structure factor correction to the scattering curves for lipid concentrations {\\ge}30 mM (2 % w/w).

  1. Nanopores in track-etched polymer membranes characterized by small-angle x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelius, T W; Schiedt, B; Severin, D; Trautmann, C [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Pepy, G [Institute for Solid State Physics, SzFKI, POB 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Toulemonde, M [Center of Research on Ions Materials and Photonics (CIMAP), CEA, CNRS, ENSICAEN, University of Caen, BP 5133, Bd H Becquerel, 14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Apel, P Yu [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie Street 6, Dubna (Russian Federation); Boesecke, P, E-mail: thomas.cornelius@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2010-04-16

    Nanochannels and nanowires with diameters ranging from 30 to 400 nm were produced by etching ion tracks in thin polyarylate and polycarbonate foils. The shape and the size distribution of dry and wet nanochannels, as well as of nanowires grown therein, were examined by small-angle x-ray scattering. The x-ray intensity as a function of the scattering vector exhibits pronounced oscillations showing that both the channels and the wires have a highly cylindrical geometry and a very narrow size distribution. UV exposure before chemical etching significantly improves the monodispersity of the nanopores. For fixed etching conditions, the scattering patterns provide evidence that the diameter of dry and water-filled channels as well as for embedded nanowires are identical, demonstrating that the pores in the polymer are completely filled.

  2. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering of a micelle-to-vesicle transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egelhaaf, S.U. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 -Grenoble (France); Schurtenberger, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-04-01

    Amphiphilic molecules spontaneously self-assemble in solution to form a variety of aggregates. Only limited information is available on the kinetics of the structural transitions as well as on the existence of non-equilibrium or metastable states. Aqueous mixtures of lecithin and bile salt are very interesting biological model-systems which exhibit a spontaneous transition from polymer-like mixed micelles to vesicles upon dilution. The small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument D22, with its very high neutron flux and the broad range of scattering vectors covered in a single instrumental setting, allowed us for the first time to perform time-resolved scattering experiments in order to study the micelle-to-vesicle transition. The temporal evolution of the aggregate structures were followed and detailed information was obtained even on molecular length-scales. (author). 5 refs.

  3. Polymer boosting effect in the droplet phase studied by small-angle neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Frielinghaus, H; Allgaier, J; Richter, D; Jakobs, B; Sottmann, T; Strey, R

    2002-01-01

    Small-angle neutron-scattering experiments were performed in order to obtain the six partial scattering functions of a droplet microemulsion containing water, decane, C sub 1 sub 0 E sub 4 surfactant and PEP sub 5 -PEO sub 8 sub 0. We systematically varied the contrast around the polymer contrast, where only the polymer becomes visible, and we also measured bulk and film contrasts. With the singular value decomposition method we could extract the desired six partial scattering functions from the 15 measured spectra. We find a sphere-shell-shell structure of the droplets, where the innermost sphere consists of oil, the middle shell of surfactant and the outer shell is a depletion zone where the polymer is almost not present. (orig.)

  4. Nucleon-nucleon scattering at small angles, measured at ANKE-COSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdasarian, Z.

    2016-03-01

    The most accepted approach to describe nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction is the partial wave analysis (PWA), which translates various experimental observables to the common language of the partial waves. The reliable analysis relies not only on the quality experimental data, but also on the measurements of scattering observables over preferably the full angular range. Small angle scattering has been measured for six beam energies between 0.8 and 2.4 GeV using polarized proton beam incident on both proton and deuteron unpolarized targets at COSY-ANKE. This proceeding will report on the published and preliminary results for both pp and pn scattering from this and other recent experiments at ANKE. This study aims to provide the valuable observables to the SAID group in order to improve the phenomenological understanding of the nucleon-nucleon interaction.

  5. Application of small-angle X-ray scattering for differentiation among breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changizi V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS is an X-ray diffraction-based technique where a narrow collimated beam of X-rays is focused onto a sample and the scattered X-rays recorded by a detector. The pattern of the scattered X-rays carries information on the molecular structure of the material. As breast cancer is the most widespread cancer in women and differentiation among its tumors is important, this project compared the results of coherent X-ray scattering measurements obtained from benign and malignant breast tissues. The energy-dispersive method with a setup including X-ray tube, primary collimator, sample holder, secondary collimator and high-purity germanium (HpGe detector was used. One hundred thirty-one breast-tissue samples, including normal, fibrocystic changes and carcinoma, were studied at the 6° scattering angle. Diffraction profiles (corrected scattered intensity versus momentum transfer of normal, fibrocystic changes and carcinoma were obtained. These profiles showed a few peak positions for adipose (1.15 ± 0.06 nm -1 , mixed normal (1.15 ± 0.06 nm -1 and 1.4 ± 0.04 nm -1 , fibrocystic changes (1.46 ± 0.05 nm -1 and 1.74 ± 0.04 nm -1 and carcinoma (1.55 ± 0.04 nm -1 , 1.73 ± 0.06 nm -1 , 1.85 ± 0.05 nm -1 . We were able to differentiate between normal, fibrocystic changes (benign and carcinoma (malignant breast tissues by SAXS. However, we were unable to differentiate between different types of carcinoma.

  6. A Microbeam Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Study on Enamel Crystallites in Subsurface Lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, N; Ohta, N; Matsuo, T [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tanaka, T; Terada, Y; Kamasaka, H; Kometani, T, E-mail: yagi@spring8.or.j [Ezaki Glico Co. Ltd., 4-6-5 Utajima, Nishiyodogawa-ku, Osaka 555-8502 (Japan)

    2010-10-01

    The early caries lesion in bovine tooth enamel was studied by two different X-ray diffraction systems at the SPring-8 third generation synchrotron radiation facility. Both allowed us simultaneous measurement of the small and large angle regions. The beam size was 6{mu}m at BL40XU and 50{mu}m at BL45XU. The small-angle scattering from voids in the hydroxyapatite crystallites and the wide-angle diffraction from the hydroxyapatite crystals were observed simultaneously. At BL40XU an X-ray image intensifier was used for the small-angle and a CMOS flatpanel detector for the large-angle region. At BL45XU, a large-area CCD detector was used to cover both regions. A linear microbeam scan at BL40XU showed a detailed distribution of voids and crystals and made it possible to examine the structural details in the lesion. The two-dimensional scan at BL45XU showed distribution of voids and crystals in a wider region in the enamel. The simultaneous small- and wide-angle measurement with a microbeam is a powerful tool to elucidate the mechanisms of demineralization and remineralization in the early caries lesion.

  7. Two-particle scattering on the lattice: Phase shifts, spin-orbit coupling, and mixing angles

    CERN Document Server

    Borasoy, Bugra; Krebs, Hermann; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2007-01-01

    We determine two-particle scattering phase shifts and mixing angles for quantum theories defined with lattice regularization. The method is suitable for any nonrelativistic effective theory of point particles on the lattice. In the center-of-mass frame of the two-particle system we impose a hard spherical wall at some fixed large radius. For channels without partial-wave mixing the partial-wave phase shifts are determined from the energies of the nearly-spherical standing waves. For channels with partial-wave mixing further information is extracted by decomposing the standing wave at the wall boundary into spherical harmonics, and we solve coupled-channels equations to extract the phase shifts and mixing angles. The method is illustrated and tested by computing phase shifts and mixing angles on the lattice for spin-1/2 particles with an attractive Gaussian potential containing both central and tensor force parts.

  8. Facilitating model reconstruction for single-particle scattering using small-angle X-ray scattering methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shufen; Liu, Haiguang

    2016-04-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers generate intense femtosecond X-ray pulses, so that high-resolution structure determination becomes feasible from noncrystalline samples, such as single particles or single molecules. At the moment, the orientation of sample particles cannot be precisely controlled, and consequently the unknown orientation needs to be recovered using computational algorithms. This delays the model reconstruction until all the scattering patterns have been re-oriented, which often entails a long elapse of time and until the completion of the experiment. The scattering patterns from single particles or multiple particles can be summed to form a virtual powder diffraction pattern, and the low-resolution region, corresponding to the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) regime, can be analysed using existing SAXS methods. This work presents a pipeline that converts single-particle data sets into SAXS data, from which real-time model reconstruction is achieved using the model retrieval approach implemented in the software package SASTBX [Liu, Hexemer & Zwart (2012). J. Appl. Cryst.45, 587-593]. To illustrate the applications, two case studies are presented with real experimental data sets collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

  9. Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering studies of biological macromolecules in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Boldon, Lauren; Urquhart, Melissa; Wang, Xiangyu

    2013-01-08

    In this paper, Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SWAXS) analysis of macromolecules is demonstrated through experimentation. SWAXS is a technique where X-rays are elastically scattered by an inhomogeneous sample in the nm-range at small angles (typically 0.1 - 5°) and wide angles (typically > 5°). This technique provides information about the shape, size, and distribution of macromolecules, characteristic distances of partially ordered materials, pore sizes, and surface-to-volume ratio. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) is capable of delivering structural information of macromolecules between 1 and 200 nm, whereas Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) can resolve even smaller Bragg spacing of samples between 0.33 nm and 0.49 nm based on the specific system setup and detector. The spacing is determined from Bragg's law and is dependent on the wavelength and incident angle. In a SWAXS experiment, the materials can be solid or liquid and may contain solid, liquid or gaseous domains (so-called particles) of the same or another material in any combination. SWAXS applications are very broad and include colloids of all types: metals, composites, cement, oil, polymers, plastics, proteins, foods, and pharmaceuticals. For solid samples, the thickness is limited to approximately 5 mm. Usage of a lab-based SWAXS instrument is detailed in this paper. With the available software (e.g., GNOM-ATSAS 2.3 package by D. Svergun EMBL-Hamburg and EasySWAXS software) for the SWAXS system, an experiment can be conducted to determine certain parameters of interest for the given sample. One example of a biological macromolecule experiment is the analysis of 2 wt% lysozyme in a water-based aqueous buffer which can be chosen and prepared through numerous methods. The preparation of the sample follows the guidelines below in the Preparation of the Sample section. Through SWAXS experimentation, important structural parameters of lysozyme, e.g. the radius of gyration, can be analyzed.

  10. Structure of the capsid of Kilham rat virus from small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wobbe, C.R.; Mitra, S.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    1984-12-18

    The structure of empty capsids of Kilham rat virus, an autonomous parvovirus with icosahedral symmetry, was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. From the forward scatter, the molecular weight was determined to be 4.0 x 10(6), and from the Guinier region, the radius of gyration was found to be 105 A in D2O and 104 A in H/sub 2/O. On the basis of the capsid molecular weight and the molecular weights and relative abundances of the capsid proteins, the authors propose that the capsid has a triangulation number of 1. Extended scattering curves and mathematical modeling revealed that the capsid consists of two shells of protein, the inner shell extending from 58 to 91 A in D2O and from 50 to 91 A in H/sub 2/O and containing 11% of the capsid scattering mass, and the outer shell extending to 121 A in H/sub 2/O and D2O. The inner shell appears to have a higher content of basic amino acids than the outer shell, based on its lower scattering density in D2O than in H/sub 2/O. The authors propose that all three capsid proteins contribute to the inner shell and that this basic region serves DNA binding and partial charge neutralization functions.

  11. Comparison of models and measurements of angle-resolved scatter from irregular aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, Adam B.; Richardson, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and validated a method for modeling the elastic scattering properties of biological and inert aerosols of irregular shape at near- and mid-wave infrared wavelengths. The method, based on Gaussian random particles, calculates the ensemble-average optical cross section and Mueller scattering matrix, using the measured aerodynamic size distribution and previously-reported refractive index as inputs. The utility of the Gaussian particle model is that it is controlled by only two parameters (σ and Γ) which we have optimized such that the model best reproduces the full angle-resolved Mueller scattering matrices measured at λ=1.55 μm in the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST). The method has been applied to wet-generated singlet biological spore samples, dry-generated biological spore clusters, and kaolin. The scattering computation is performed using the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA), which requires significant computational resources, and is thus implemented on LLGrid, a large parallel grid computer. For the cases presented, the best fit Gaussian particle model is in good qualitative correspondence with microscopy images of the corresponding class of particles. The measured and computed cross sections agree well within a factor of two overall, with certain cases bearing closer correspondence. In particular, the DDA reproduces the shape of the measured scatter function more accurately than Mie predictions. The DDA-computed depolarization factors are also in good agreement with measurement.

  12. Small-angle scattering from polymeric mass fractals of arbitrary mass-fractal dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaucage, G. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-04-01

    The Debye equation for polymer coils describes scattering from a polymer chain that displays Gaussian statistics. Such a chain is a mass fractal of dimension 2 as evidenced by a power-law decay of -2 in the scattering at intermediate q. At low q, near q{approx_equal}2{pi}/R{sub g}, the Debye equation describes an exponential decay. For polymer chains that are swollen or slightly collapsed, such as is due to good and poor solvent conditions, deviations from a mass-fractal dimension of 2 are expected. A simple description of scattering from such systems is not possible using the approach of Debye. Integral descriptions have been derived. In this paper, asymptotic expansions of these integral forms are used to describe scattering in the power-law regime. These approximations are used to constrain a unified equation for small-angle scattering. A function suitable for data fitting is obtained that describes polymeric mass fractals of arbitrary mass-fractal dimension. Moreover, this approach is extended to describe structural limits to mass-fractal scaling at the persistence length. The unified equation can be substituted for the Debye equation in the RPA (random phase approximation) description of polymer blends when the mass-fractal dimension of a polymer coil deviates from 2. It is also used to gain new insight into materials not conventionally thought of as polymers, such as nanoporous silica aerogels. (orig.).

  13. Bistatic, above-critical angle scattering measurements of fully buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) and clutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Z J; Simpson, H J; Sarkissian, A; Dey, S; Houston, B H; Bucaro, J A; Yoder, T J

    2012-11-01

    Laboratory grade bistatic scattering measurements are conducted in order to examine the acoustic response of realistic fully buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) from above-critical angle insonification, between 2 and 40 kHz. A 127 mm diameter rocket UXO, a 155 mm diameter artillery shell, a natural rock of approximately the same size, and a cinder block are fully buried in water-saturated medium grained sand (mean grain diameter, 240 μm) at depths of 10 cm below the water-sediment interface. A two-dimensional array of bistatic scattering measurements is generated synthetically by scanning a single hydrophone in steps of 3 cm over a 1 m × 1 m patch directly above the targets at a height of 20 cm above the water-sediment interface. Three-dimensional volumetric acoustic images generated from the return waveforms reveal scattering components attributed to geometric and elastic scattering, as well as multiple-scattering interactions of returns between the sediment-water interface and the buried objects. The far-field target strength of the objects is estimated through extrapolation of the angular spectrum. Agreement is found between experimental data and simulated data generated from a finite-element-based, three-dimensional time-harmonic model (2-25 kHz). Separation of the measured UXO from the clutter objects is demonstrated through exploitation of structural-acoustics-based features.

  14. Nanostructure surveys of macroscopic specimens by small-angle scattering tensor tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebi, Marianne; Georgiadis, Marios; Menzel, Andreas; Schneider, Philipp; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Bunk, Oliver; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel

    2015-11-19

    The mechanical properties of many materials are based on the macroscopic arrangement and orientation of their nanostructure. This nanostructure can be ordered over a range of length scales. In biology, the principle of hierarchical ordering is often used to maximize functionality, such as strength and robustness of the material, while minimizing weight and energy cost. Methods for nanoscale imaging provide direct visual access to the ultrastructure (nanoscale structure that is too small to be imaged using light microscopy), but the field of view is limited and does not easily allow a full correlative study of changes in the ultrastructure over a macroscopic sample. Other methods of probing ultrastructure ordering, such as small-angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons, can be applied to macroscopic samples; however, these scattering methods remain constrained to two-dimensional specimens or to isotropically oriented ultrastructures. These constraints limit the use of these methods for studying nanostructures with more complex orientation patterns, which are abundant in nature and materials science. Here, we introduce an imaging method that combines small-angle scattering with tensor tomography to probe nanoscale structures in three-dimensional macroscopic samples in a non-destructive way. We demonstrate the method by measuring the main orientation and the degree of orientation of nanoscale mineralized collagen fibrils in a human trabecula bone sample with a spatial resolution of 25 micrometres. Symmetries within the sample, such as the cylindrical symmetry commonly observed for mineralized collagen fibrils in bone, allow for tractable sampling requirements and numerical efficiency. Small-angle scattering tensor tomography is applicable to both biological and materials science specimens, and may be useful for understanding and characterizing smart or bio-inspired materials. Moreover, because the method is non-destructive, it is appropriate for in situ measurements and

  15. Nanostructure surveys of macroscopic specimens by small-angle scattering tensor tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebi, Marianne; Georgiadis, Marios; Menzel, Andreas; Schneider, Philipp; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Bunk, Oliver; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The mechanical properties of many materials are based on the macroscopic arrangement and orientation of their nanostructure. This nanostructure can be ordered over a range of length scales. In biology, the principle of hierarchical ordering is often used to maximize functionality, such as strength and robustness of the material, while minimizing weight and energy cost. Methods for nanoscale imaging provide direct visual access to the ultrastructure (nanoscale structure that is too small to be imaged using light microscopy), but the field of view is limited and does not easily allow a full correlative study of changes in the ultrastructure over a macroscopic sample. Other methods of probing ultrastructure ordering, such as small-angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons, can be applied to macroscopic samples; however, these scattering methods remain constrained to two-dimensional specimens or to isotropically oriented ultrastructures. These constraints limit the use of these methods for studying nanostructures with more complex orientation patterns, which are abundant in nature and materials science. Here, we introduce an imaging method that combines small-angle scattering with tensor tomography to probe nanoscale structures in three-dimensional macroscopic samples in a non-destructive way. We demonstrate the method by measuring the main orientation and the degree of orientation of nanoscale mineralized collagen fibrils in a human trabecula bone sample with a spatial resolution of 25 micrometres. Symmetries within the sample, such as the cylindrical symmetry commonly observed for mineralized collagen fibrils in bone, allow for tractable sampling requirements and numerical efficiency. Small-angle scattering tensor tomography is applicable to both biological and materials science specimens, and may be useful for understanding and characterizing smart or bio-inspired materials. Moreover, because the method is non-destructive, it is appropriate for in situ measurements and

  16. Study of human blood and hemocomponents irradiated by low angle x ray scattering (LAXS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Nivia G. Villela; Barroso, Regina C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada e Termodinamica], e-mail: nitatag@gmail.com; Mota, Carla L.S.; Almeida, Andre P.; Azeredo, Soraia R.; Braz, Delson [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear], e-mail: delson@lin.ufrj.br

    2009-07-01

    Irradiation of blood and blood components is currently practiced in developed and in a few developing countries. The main purpose of this process is the prevention of graft versus host disease in immunodeficient patients. The Food and Drug Administration recommends a dose range of 15 Gy to 25 Gy for these blood components. When x-ray photons are scattered from biological samples, their angular distribution shows one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are characteristic for the investigated samples. Due to its wide range of biological and medical applications, low-angle x-ray scattering has attracted the attention of many authors. Thus in this present work was studied the possible variations in scattering profiles due to the irradiation when the gender of patients was considered. Fresh blood specimens were obtained from volunteers using vacutainer tubes containing EDTA, at the Dr. Eliel Figueiredo Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro. All the samples were lyophilized for 48 hours in a freeze drier in order to remove the water. The scattering measurements were carried out in e-2e reflection geometry using a powder diffractometer Shimadzu XRD- 6000. The measured characterization parameters for LAXS were associated with epidemiological data (gender). The mean values of the different parameters were compared using the Students's t-test for each characterization parameters. The scattering profiles from plasma and formed elements are characterized by the presence of two peaks in the forward direction of scattering. For epidemiological data (gender) analyzed was not found significant changes in the mostly of characterization parameters (p>0.05). (author)

  17. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering from thin polymer films with lamellar structures - the scattering cross section in the distorted-wave Born approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posselt, Dorthe; Busch, Peter; Rauscher, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering of thin polymer films reveals information about the ordering and preferential orientations of the phase-separated microdomains within the films. The grazing-incidence geometry enhances the surface sensitivity; however, the scattering has t...

  18. A Precision Low-Energy Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastromarino, P.

    2005-01-26

    The E-158 experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) measures the parity-violating cross-section asymmetry in electron-electron (Moeller) scattering at low Q{sup 2}. This asymmetry, whose Standard Model prediction is roughly -150 parts per billion (ppb), is directly proportional to (1-4 sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}), where {theta}{sub W} is the weak mixing angle. Measuring this asymmetry to within 10% provides an important test of the Standard Model at the quantum loop level and probes for new physics at the TeV scale. The experiment employs the SLAC 50 GeV electron beam, scattering it off a liquid hydrogen target. A system of magnets and collimators is used to isolate and focus the Moeller scattering events into an integrating calorimeter. The electron beam is generated at the source using a strained, gradient-doped GaAs photocathode, which produces roughly 5 x 10{sup 11} electrons/pulse (at a beam rate of 120 Hz) with {approx} 80% longitudinal polarization. The helicity of the beam can be rapidly switched, eliminating problems associated with slow drifts. Helicity-correlations in the beam parameters (charge, position, angle and energy) are minimized at the source and corrected for using precision beam monitoring devices.

  19. SASfit: A comprehensive tool for small-angle scattering data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Breßler, Ingo; Thünemann, Andreas F

    2015-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering experiments are used in many fields of the life sciences and condensed matter research to obtain answers to questions about the shape and size of nano-sized structures, typically in the range of 1 to 100 nm. It provides good statistics for large numbers of structural units for short measurement times. With the ever-increasing quantity and quality of data acquisition, the value of appropriate tools that are able to extract valuable information is steadily increasing. SASfit has been one of the mature programs for small-angle scattering data analysis available for many years. We describe the basic data processing and analysis work-flow along with recent developments in the SASfit program package (version 0.94.6). They include (i) advanced algorithms for reduction of oversampled data sets (ii) improved confidence assessment in the optimized model parameters and (iii) a flexible plug-in system for custom user-provided models. A scattering function of a mass fractal model o...

  20. Proton energy and scattering angle radiographs to improve proton treatment planning: a Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegun, A. K.; Takatsu, J.; Nakaji, T.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Koffeman, E. N.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.

    2016-12-01

    The novel proton radiography imaging technique has a large potential to be used in direct measurement of the proton energy loss (proton stopping power, PSP) in various tissues in the patient. The uncertainty of PSPs, currently obtained from translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) images, should be minimized from 3-5% or higher to less than 1%, to make the treatment plan with proton beams more accurate, and thereby better treatment for the patient. With Geant4 we simulated a proton radiography detection system with two position-sensitive and residual energy detectors. A complex phantom filled with various materials (including tissue surrogates), was placed between the position sensitive detectors. The phantom was irradiated with 150 MeV protons and the energy loss radiograph and scattering angles were studied. Protons passing through different materials in the phantom lose energy, which was used to create a radiography image of the phantom. The multiple Coulomb scattering of a proton traversing different materials causes blurring of the image. To improve image quality and material identification in the phantom, we selected protons with small scattering angles. A good quality proton radiography image, in which various materials can be recognized accurately, and in combination with xCT can lead to more accurate relative stopping powers predictions.

  1. Optical characterization of liposomes by right angle light scattering and turbidity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, K; Murase, O; Sugishita, K; Yoneyama, S; Akada, K; Ueha, M; Nakamura, A; Kobayashi, S

    2000-07-31

    Liposomes have frequently been used as models of biomembranes or vehicles for drug delivery. However, the systematic characterization of lipid vesicles by right angle light scattering and turbidity has not been carried out despite the usefulness of such studies for size estimation. In this study, liposomes of various sizes were prepared by sonication and extrusion. The mean cumulant radii of the vesicles were determined by dynamic light scattering. The lamellarities were estimated based on fluorescence quenching of N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)dipalmitoyl-L-alpha-phosph ati dylethanolamine by sodium dithionite. Right angle light scattering intensity and optical density at 436 nm per unit lipid concentration were measured as a function of vesicle radius. With a vesicle radius < or =100 nm, the optical parameters could be well explained by the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye theory in which the liposomes were modeled as homogeneous spheres with mean refractive indices determined by the volume fractions of lipids in vesicles.

  2. Small-angle neutron and dynamic light scattering study of gelatin coacervates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, B.; Aswal, V. K.; Goyal, P. S.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2004-08-01

    The state of intermolecular aggregates and that of folded gelatin molecules could be characterized by dynamic laser light and small-angle neutron scattering experiments, which implied spontaneous segregation of particle sizes preceding coacervation, which is a liquid-liquid phase transition phenomenon. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) data analysis revealed two particle sizes until precipitation was reached. The smaller particles having a diameter of 50 nm (stable nanoparticles prepared by coacervation method) were detected in the supernatant, whereas the inter-molecular aggregates having a diameter of 400 nm gave rise to coacervation. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments revealed that typical mesh size of the networks exist in polymer dense phase (coacervates) [1]. Analysis of the SANS structure factor showed the presence of two length scales associated with this system that were identified as the correlation length or mesh size, xi = 10.6 Å of the network and the other is the size of inhomogeneities = 21.4 Å. Observations were discussed based on the results obtained from SANS experiments performed in 5% (w/v) gelatin solution at 60oC (xi = 50 Å, zeta = 113 Å) and 5% (w/v) gel at 28oC (xi = 47 Å, zeta = 115 Å) in aqueous phase [2] indicating smaller length scales in coacervate as compared to sol and gel.

  3. Small-angle neutron and dynamic light scattering study of gelatin coacervates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Mohanty; V K Aswal; P S Goyal; H B Bohidar

    2004-08-01

    The state of intermolecular aggregates and that of folded gelatin molecules could be characterized by dynamic laser light and small-angle neutron scattering experiments, which implied spontaneous segregation of particle sizes preceding coacervation, which is a liquid-liquid phase transition phenomenon. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) data analysis revealed two particle sizes until precipitation was reached. The smaller particles having a diameter of ∼ 50 nm (stable nanoparticles prepared by coacervation method) were detected in the supernatant, whereas the inter-molecular aggregates having a diameter of ∼ 400 nm gave rise to coacervation. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments revealed that typical mesh size of the networks exist in polymer dense phase (coacervates) [1]. Analysis of the SANS structure factor showed the presence of two length scales associated with this system that were identified as the correlation length or mesh size, = 10.6 Å of the network and the other is the size of inhomogeneities = 21.4 Å. Observations were discussed based on the results obtained from SANS experiments performed in 5% (w/v) gelatin solution at 60° C ( = 50$ Å, = 113 Å) and 5% (w/v) gel at 28° C ( = 47 Å, = 115 Å) in aqueous phase [2] indicating smaller length scales in coacervate as compared to sol and gel.

  4. Structural analysis of Fe–Mn–O nanoparticles in glass ceramics by small angle scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghuwanshi, Vikram Singh, E-mail: vikram.raghuwanshi@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Harizanova, Ruzha [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Tatchev, Dragomir [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str. Bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Hoell, Armin [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Rüssel, Christian [Friedrich Schiller University, Fraunhoferstr. 6, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic nanocrystals containing Fe and Mn were obtained by annealing of silicate glasses with the composition 13.6Na{sub 2}O–62.9SiO{sub 2}–8.5MnO–15.0Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3−x} (mol%) at 580 °C for different periods of time. Here, we present Small Angle Neutron Scattering using Polarized neutrons (SANSPOL) and Anomalous Small Angle X-ray Scattering (ASAXS) investigation on these glass ceramic samples. Analysis of scattering data from both methods reveals the formation of spherical core–shell type of nanoparticles with mean sizes between 10 nm and 100 nm. ASAXS investigation shows the particles have higher concentration of iron atoms and the shell like region surrounding the particles is enriched in SiO{sub 2}. SANSPOL investigation shows the particles are found to be magnetic and are surrounded by a non-magnetic shell-like region. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic spherical core–shell nanoparticles in glass ceramics: SANSPOL and ASAXS investigations. - Highlights: • Formation and growth mechanisms of magnetic nanoparticles in silicate glass. • SANSPOL and ASAXS methods employed to evaluate quantitative information. • Analyses showed formation of nanoparticles with spherical core–shell structures. • Core of the particle is magnetic and surrounded by weak magnetic shell like region.

  5. Optimization study for small angle neutron scattering spectrometer at the ET-RR-1 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashry, A.

    1997-09-01

    The design principle of a Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) spectrometer is based on producing monochromatic neutron bursts using two phased rotors with curved slots. An optimization study of their number and shape to achieve the highly available intensity of monoenergetic neutrons at the required resolution is given. The study was applied to the improvement of the performance of the pulsed monochromatic double rotor system at ET-RR-1 to operate as SANS spectrometer. It is shown that for rotors having 19 slots each with radius of curvature 96.8 cm, the intensity gain factor is 13. The proposed SANS spectrometer could cover the neutron wavelength range from 2 Å up to 6 Å through small angles of scattering from 5 × 10 -3 rad to 0.1 rad, i.e., the scattering wavevector transfer between 0.6 Å -1 and 0.01 Å -1. The maximum neutron intensity on the specimen is 2 × 10 6 n s -1.

  6. Optimization study for small angle neutron scattering spectrometer at the ET-RR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashry, A. [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Physics

    1997-09-01

    The design principle of a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) spectrometer is based on producing monochromatic neutron bursts using two phased rotors with curved slots. An optimization study of their number and shape to achieve the highly available intensity of monoenergetic neutrons at the required resolution is given. The study was applied to the improvement of the performance of the pulsed monochromatic double rotor system at ET-RR-1 to operate as SANS spectrometer. It is shown that for rotors having 19 slots each with radius of curvature 96.8 cm, the intensity gain factor is 13. The proposed SANS spectrometer could cover the neutron wavelength range from 2 A up to 6 A through small angles of scattering from 5 x 10{sup -3} rad to 0.1 rad, i.e., the scattering wavevector transfer between 0.6 A{sup -1} and 0.01 A{sup -1}. The maximum neutron intensity on the specimen is 2 x 10{sup 6} ns{sup -1}. (orig.). 19 refs.

  7. Pitch-angle diffusion of electrons through growing and propagating along a magnetic field electromagnetic wave in Earth's radiation belts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C.-R., E-mail: crchoi@kaist.ac.kr; Dokgo, K.; Min, K.-W. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, M.-H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, E.-J. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 674, Greenbelt, Maryland 20770 (United States); Hwang, J.; Park, Y.-D. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D.-Y. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The diffusion of electrons via a linearly polarized, growing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagating along a uniform magnetic field is investigated. The diffusion of electrons that interact with the growing EM wave is investigated through the autocorrelation function of the parallel electron acceleration in several tens of electron gyration timescales, which is a relatively short time compared with the bounce time of electrons between two mirror points in Earth's radiation belts. Furthermore, the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient is derived for the resonant and non-resonant electrons, and the effect of the wave growth on the electron diffusion is discussed. The results can be applied to other problems related to local acceleration or the heating of electrons in space plasmas, such as in the radiation belts.

  8. A double area detector system for simultaneous small and wide-angle X-ray scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Pokric, B; Ryan, A J; Fairclough, P; Dobson, B R; Derbyshire, G E; Helsby, W; Long, G; Moon, K

    2002-01-01

    A novel area detector has been designed for material science SR studies, capable of simultaneously collecting the diffraction data in two angular regimes. The detector for collecting wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) data consists of four taper-coupled CCDs arranged as a 2x2 mosaic with a central aperture about 40 mm in diameter, so permitting the inclusion of a distant on-axis CCD detector for small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The distance of the SAXS detector from the sample can be varied over the range 0.27 m to about 2 m. The overall aperture of WAXS detector is approximately 200x200 mm sup 2 allowing the measurement of the diffraction patterns from 5 deg. to 45 deg. with an average angular resolution of 0.05 deg. The parallax error for large angles is substantially reduced as the individual WAXS CCDs are tilted towards the specimen location. Both WAXS and SAXS diffraction data are simultaneously collected at 30 MB/s data rate, which is equivalent to 6 complete frames per second. Each pixel value is d...

  9. Analysis of the Data from Compton X-ray Polarimeters which Measure the Azimuthal and Polar Scattering Angles

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    X-ray polarimetry has the potential to make key-contributions to our understanding of galactic compact objects like binary black hole systems and neutron stars, and extragalactic objects like active galactic nuclei, blazars, and neutron stars. Furthermore, several particle astrophysics topics can be addressed including uniquely sensitive tests of Lorentz invariance. In the energy range from 10-20 keV to several MeV, Compton polarimeters achieve the best performance. In this paper we evaluate the benefit that comes from using the azimuthal and polar angles of the Compton scattered photons in the analysis, rather than using the azimuthal scattering angles alone. We study the case of an ideal Compton polarimeter and show that a Maximum Likelihood analysis which uses the two scattering angles lowers the Minimum Detectable Polarization (MDP) by ~20% compared to a standard analysis based on the azimuthal scattering angles alone. The accuracies with which the polarization fraction and the polarization direction can ...

  10. Small-angle neutron scattering study of organic-phase aggregation in the TALSPEAK process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Travis S; Jensen, Mark P; Debeer-Schmidt, Lisa; Littrell, Ken; Nash, Kenneth L

    2012-11-26

    The Trivalent Actinide-Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorus reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) process is a solvent extraction based method for separating trivalent lanthanides (Ln(3+)) from trivalent actinide cations in used nuclear fuel reprocessing. In conventional TALSPEAK, the extractant solution is di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in 1,4-diisopropylbenzene (DIPB). The aqueous medium is diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N″,N″-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) in a concentrated lactic acid (HL) buffer. Lanthanides are extracted by HDEHP/DIPB, while the actinides remain in the aqueous phase as DTPA complexes. Lactic acid is extracted both independently of the lanthanides and as Ln/HL/HDEHP mixed complex(es). Previous results indicate that lanthanides are extracted both as the mixed complex and as a binary Ln(DEHP·HDEHP)(3) species. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been applied to study the self-organization properties of solute molecules in xylene solutions containing HDEHP, HL, selected lanthanide ions, and water. The scattering results demonstrate that the dominant HDEHP species is the hydrogen bonded dimer, (HDEHP)(2). Absent lanthanides, lactic acid is extracted as the 1:3 complex (HL·(HDEHP)(3)). Scattering in samples containing up to 0.005 M lanthanides (prepared by extracting lanthanides from aqueous media containing 1.0 M buffered lactic acid) indicates that the dominant metal complex is Ln(DEHP·HDEHP)(3). At 0.013 M extracted lanthanide, the scattering results indicate lower Ln:DEHP stoichiometry and larger scattering particles. At higher metal concentrations, the SANS results indicate large aggregates, the largest aggregates achieving a size equivalent to 20 HDEHP monomers as the primary scattering entity. Analysis of particle shapes indicates best fits with a uniform oblate spheroid particle. These results are discussed in connection with the results of a number of complementary observations that have been made on this system.

  11. Characterization of nanoparticles of lidocaine in w/o microemulsions using small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Shukla; M A Kiselev; A Hoell; R H H Neubert

    2004-08-01

    Microemulsions (MEs) are of special interest because a variety of reactants can be introduced into the nanometer-sized aqueous domains, leading to materials with controlled size and shape [1,2]. In the past few years, significant research has been conducted in the reverse ME-mediated synthesis of organic nanoparticles [3,4]. In this study, a w/o ME medium was employed for the synthesis of lidocaine by direct precipitation in w/o microemulsion systems: water/isopropylpalmitat/Tween80/Span80. The particle size as well as the location of nanoparticles in the ME droplet were characterized by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is observed that lidocaine precipitated in the aqueous cores because of its insolubility in water. Hydrodynamic radius and gyration radius of microemulsion droplets were estimated as ∼ 15 nm and ∼ 4.50 nm from DLS and SANS respectively. Furthermore, different size parameters obtained by DLS and SANS experiments were compared

  12. Internal structures of agar-gelatin co-hydrogels by light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering and rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santinath Singh, S; Aswal, V K; Bohidar, H B

    2011-06-01

    Internal structures of agar-gelatin co-hydrogels were investigated as a function of their volumetric mixing ratio, [Formula: see text] , 1.0 and 2.0 using dynamic light scattering (DLS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and rheology. The degree of non-ergodicity ( X = 0.2 ± 0.02) , which was extracted as a heterodyne contribution from the measured dynamic structure factor data remained less than that of homogeneous solutions where ergodicity is expected (X = 10. The static structure factor, I(q) , results obtained from SANS were interpreted in the Guinier regime (low-q , which implied the existence of ≈ 250 nm long rod-like structures (double-helix bundles), and the power law (intermediate-q regions) yielded I (q) ~ q(−α) with α = 2.3 , 1.8 and 1.6 for r = 0.5 , 1.0 and 2.0. This is indicative of the presence of Gaussian chains at low r , while at r = 2 there was a propensity of rod-shaped structures. The gel strength and transition temperatures measured from frequency sweep and temperature ramp studies were suggestive of the presence of a stronger association between the two biopolymer networks at higher r . The results indicate that the internal structures of agar-gelatin co-hydrogels were highly dependent on the volumetric mixing ratio.

  13. Modelling small-angle scattering data from complex protein-lipid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kynde, Søren Andreas Røssell

    geometric objects and the discrete approach were models are build from a large number of points. It is the basic hypothesis of this thesis, that analysis of smallangle scattering data can be approached in a way that combines the continuous and the discrete modelling methods, and that such an approach can...... the techniques very well suited for the study of the nanodisc system. Chapter 3 explains two different modelling approaches that can be used in the analysis of small-angle scattering data from lipid-protein complexes. These are the continuous approach where the system of interest is modelled as a few regular...... of bacteriorhodopsin and a continuous model of the nanodisc. The position and orientation of the membrane protein relative to the nanodisc is determined as well as the structural changes of the nanodisc. Paper II describes the use of the same approach to determine the relative position of a nanodisc and the membrane...

  14. Polyhydroxyalkanoate-based natural synthetic hybrid copolymer films: A small-angle neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, L. John R.; Knott, Robert; Sanguanchaipaiwong, Vorapat; Holden, Peter J.

    2006-11-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates have attracted attention as biodegradable alternatives to conventional thermoplastics and as biomaterials. Through modification of their biosynthesis using Pseudomonas oleovorans, we have manipulated the material properties of these biopolyesters and produced a natural-synthetic hybrid copolymer of polyhydroxyoctanoate- block-diethylene glycol (PHO- b-DEG). A mixture of PHO and PHO-DEG were solvent cast from analytical grade chloroform and analysed using small-angle neutron scattering. A scattering pattern, easily distinguished above the background, was displayed by the films with a diffraction ring at q∼0.12 Å -1. This narrow ring of intensity is suggestive of a highly ordered system. Analysis of the diffraction pattern supported this concept and showed a d-spacing of approximately 50 Å. In addition, conformation of the hybrid polymer chains can be manipulated to support their self-assembly into ordered microporous films.

  15. Small-angle neutron scattering and Molecular Dynamics structural study of gelling DNA nanostars

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Castanon, Javier; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Zanatta, Marco; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Comez, Lucia; Porcar, Lionel; Jafta, Charl J; Fadda, Giulia C; Bellini, Tommaso; Sciortino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    DNA oligomers with properly designed sequences self-assemble into well defined constructs. Here, we exploit this methodology to produce bulk quantities of tetravalent DNA nanostars (each one composed by 196 nucleotides) and to explore the structural signatures of their aggregation process. We report small-angle neutron scattering experiments focused on the evaluation of both the form factor and the temperature evolution of the scattered intensity at a nano star concentration where the system forms a tetravalent equilibrium gel. We also perform molecular dynamics simulations of one isolated tetramer to evaluate the form factor theoretically, without resorting to any approximate shape. The numerical form factor is found to be in very good agreement with the experimental one. Simulations predict an essentially temperature independent form factor, offering the possibility to extract the effective structure factor and its evolution during the equilibrium gelation.

  16. Small angle neutron scattering study on short and long chain phosphatidylcholine mixture in trehalose solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi [Department of Physics, Gunma University, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    Trehalose protects cells and proteins against various stresses due to low temperatures or dryness. In order to clarify the molecular mechanism of cryoprotective function of trehalose, we have studied the interaction between trehalose and phosphatidylcholine (PC) which is a main lipid component of cell membranes. In this study, the structural change of a binary PC mixture by the presence of trehalose was investigated by means of small angle neutron scattering. The PC binary mixture studied contains dihexanoyl-PC (diC{sub 6}PC) and dihexadecy-PC (DHPC). The former has short hydrocarbon chains and the latter has long hydrocarbon chains. The scattering profiles from the DHPC/diC{sub 6}PC mixture were changed, depending on trehalose concentrations. This change can be interpreted as suggesting that the presence of trehalose reduces the interfacial area between water and PCs. (author)

  17. Polyhydroxyalkanoate-based natural-synthetic hybrid copolymer films: A small-angle neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, L. John R. [Bio/polymer Research Group and Centre for Advanced Macromolecular Design, School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: J.Foster@unsw.edu.au; Knott, Robert [Bragg Institute, Institute for Nuclear Geophysiology, Australian Nucelar Science and Technology Organisation, Menai NSW2234 (Australia); Sanguanchaipaiwong, Vorapat [Bio/polymer Research Group and Centre for Advanced Macromolecular Design, School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW2052 (Australia); Holden, Peter J. [Institute for Nuclear Geophysiology, Australian Nucelar Science and Technology Organisation, Menai NSW2234 (Australia)

    2006-11-15

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates have attracted attention as biodegradable alternatives to conventional thermoplastics and as biomaterials. Through modification of their biosynthesis using Pseudomonas oleovorans, we have manipulated the material properties of these biopolyesters and produced a natural-synthetic hybrid copolymer of polyhydroxyoctanoate-block-diethylene glycol (PHO-b-DEG). A mixture of PHO and PHO-DEG were solvent cast from analytical grade chloroform and analysed using small-angle neutron scattering. A scattering pattern, easily distinguished above the background, was displayed by the films with a diffraction ring at q{approx}0.12 A{sup -1}. This narrow ring of intensity is suggestive of a highly ordered system. Analysis of the diffraction pattern supported this concept and showed a d-spacing of approximately 50 A. In addition, conformation of the hybrid polymer chains can be manipulated to support their self-assembly into ordered microporous films.

  18. Small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics structural study of gelling DNA nanostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Castanon, J.; Bomboi, F.; Rovigatti, L.; Zanatta, M.; Paciaroni, A.; Comez, L.; Porcar, L.; Jafta, C. J.; Fadda, G. C.; Bellini, T.; Sciortino, F.

    2016-08-01

    DNA oligomers with properly designed sequences self-assemble into well defined constructs. Here, we exploit this methodology to produce bulk quantities of tetravalent DNA nanostars (each one composed of 196 nucleotides) and to explore the structural signatures of their aggregation process. We report small-angle neutron scattering experiments focused on the evaluation of both the form factor and the temperature evolution of the scattered intensity at a nanostar concentration where the system forms a tetravalent equilibrium gel. We also perform molecular dynamics simulations of one isolated tetramer to evaluate the form factor numerically, without resorting to any approximate shape. The numerical form factor is found to be in very good agreement with the experimental one. Simulations predict an essentially temperature-independent form factor, offering the possibility to extract the effective structure factor and its evolution during the equilibrium gelation.

  19. Microstructural investigations on Russian reactor pressure vessel steels by small-angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, A.; Boehmert, J.; Strunz, P.; Dewhurst, C.; Mathon, M.-H.

    The effect of radiation embrittlement has a high safety significance for Russian VVER reactor pressure vessel steels. Heats of base and weld metals of the as-received state, irradiated state and post-irradiation annealed state were investigated using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to obtain insight about the microstructural features caused by fast neutron irradiation. The SANS intensities increase in the momentum transfer range between 0.8 and 3 nm-1 for all the material compositions in the irradiated state. The size distribution function of the irradiation-induced defect clusters has a pronounced maximum at 1 nm in radius. Their content varies between 0.1 and 0.7 vol.% dependent on material composition and increases with the neutron fluence. The comparison of nuclear and magnetic scattering indicates that the defects differ in their composition. Thermal annealing reduces the volume fraction of irradiation defect clusters.

  20. Magnetic microstructure of nanocrystalline gadolinium: a small-angle neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebrich, Frank [University of Luxembourg, 162A Avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Eckerlebe, Helmut; Sharp, Melissa [GKSS Forschungszentrum, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Birringer, Rainer [Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Michels, Andreas [University of Luxembourg, 162A Avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg)

    2011-07-01

    We report on grain-size dependent magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments on nanocrystalline Gd, which was synthesized using the low-capturing isotope {sup 160}Gd. The angular variation of the two-dimensional SANS cross-section at different applied magnetic fields is discussed with a special focus on the rather unusual scattering contribution of the clover-leaf-type found for nanocrystalline Gd at intermediate field values. Additionally we have calculated from experimental data the autocorrelation function of the spin misalignment. This approach allows in particular for the extraction of the field-dependent correlation length of static spin misalignment fluctuations induced by microstructural defects. The data analysis suggests that the grain boundaries constitute a major source of spin disorder in this material, which may be attributed to local atomic site disorder and modified coupling at internal interfaces.

  1. Nucleic acid structure characterization by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jordan E.; Butcher, Samuel E.

    2013-01-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a powerful method for investigating macromolecular structure in solution. SAXS data provide information about the size and shape of a molecule with a resolution of approximately 2–3 nm. SAXS is particularly useful for the investigation of nucleic acids, which scatter X-rays strongly due to the electron-rich phosphate backbone. Therefore, SAXS has become an increasingly popular method for modeling nucleic acid structures, an endeavor made tractable by the highly regular helical nature of nucleic acid secondary structures. Recently, we used SAXS in combination with NMR to filter and refine all-atom models of a U2/U6 small nuclear RNA complex. In this unit we present general protocols for sample preparation, data acquisition, and data analysis and processing. Additionally, examples of correctly and incorrectly processed SAXS data and expected results are provided. PMID:23255205

  2. Modelling small-angle scattering data from complex protein-lipid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kynde, Søren Andreas Røssell

    the techniques very well suited for the study of the nanodisc system. Chapter 3 explains two different modelling approaches that can be used in the analysis of small-angle scattering data from lipid-protein complexes. These are the continuous approach where the system of interest is modelled as a few regular...... geometric objects and the discrete approach were models are build from a large number of points. It is the basic hypothesis of this thesis, that analysis of smallangle scattering data can be approached in a way that combines the continuous and the discrete modelling methods, and that such an approach can......This thesis consists of two parts. The rst part is divided into five chapters. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction to the bio-molecular systems that have been studied. These are membrane proteins and their lipid environments in the form of phospholipid nanodiscs. Membrane proteins...

  3. Data reduction for time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering with virtual neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rong; Tian, Haolai; Zuo, Taisen; Tang, Ming; Yan, Lili; Zhang, Junrong

    2017-09-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is an experimental technique to detect material structures in the nanometer to micrometer range. The solution of the structural model constructed from SANS strongly depends on the accuracy of the reduced data. The time-of-flight (TOF) SANS data are dependent on the wavelength of the pulsed neutron source. Therefore, data reduction must be handled very carefully to transform measured neutron events into neutron scattering intensity. In this study, reduction algorithms for TOF SANS data are developed and optimized using simulated data from a virtual neutron experiment. Each possible effect on the measured data is studied systematically, and suitable corrections are performed to obtain high-quality data. This work will facilitate scientific research and the instrument design at China Spallation Neutron Source.

  4. Joint small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data analysis of asymmetric lipid vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Barbara; Heberle, Frederick A.; Marquardt, Drew; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Katsaras, John

    2017-01-01

    Low- and high-resolution models describing the internal transbilayer structure of asymmetric lipid vesicles have been developed. These models can be used for the joint analysis of small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data. The models describe the underlying scattering length density/electron density profiles either in terms of slabs or through the so-called scattering density profile, previously applied to symmetric lipid vesicles. Both models yield structural details of asymmetric membranes, such as the individual area per lipid, and the hydrocarbon thickness of the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. The scattering density profile model, however, comes at a cost of increased computational effort but results in greater structural resolution, showing a slightly lower packing of lipids in the outer bilayer leaflet of ∼120 nm diameter palmitoyl­oleoyl phosphatidyl­choline (POPC) vesicles, compared to the inner leaflet. Analysis of asymmetric dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine/POPC vesicles did not reveal evidence of transbilayer coupling between the inner and outer leaflets at 323 K, i.e. above the melting transition temperature of the two lipids. PMID:28381971

  5. A time dependent kinetic small angle neutron scattering study of a novel YFe phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, L M; Bentley, P M; Al-Jawad, M; Kilcoyne, S H

    2013-06-26

    Crystallization of amorphous Y67Fe33 into the YFe2 C15 Laves phase via a novel 'YFe' intermediate phase has been observed through to completion using time-resolved small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The nucleation and growth kinetics of the phase transformations have been studied at annealing temperatures below the crystallization temperatures for both the 'YFe' phase and the YFe2 phase. The SANS results agree with previously reported neutron diffraction and SANS data. At the annealing temperatures of 360, 370 and 380 °C, changes in the scattering intensity I(Q) occur as a result of the contrast between the amorphous matrix and the nucleating and growing Y and 'YFe' phases. Critical scattering occurs during each of the isotherms, relating to the full crystallization of Y67Fe33, and extrapolation gives a crystallization temperature of 382 °C. Beyond critical scattering, isotherms at 435, 450, and 465 °C reveal the details of the continuing transformation of the 'YFe' intermediate phase into the YFe2 C15 Laves phase.

  6. Effect of Cobalt Fillers on Polyurethane Segmentations Investigated by Synchrotron Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krit Koyvanich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The segmentation between rigid and rubbery chains in polyurethanes (PUs influences polymeric properties and implementations. Several models have successfully been proposed to visualize the configuration between the hard segment (HS and soft segment (SS. For particulate PU composites, the arrangement of HS and SS is more complicated because the fillers tend to disrupt the chain formation and segmentation. In this work, the effect of ferromagnetic cobalt (Co powders (average diameter 2 μm on PU synthesized from a reaction between polyether polyol (soft segment and diphenylmethane-4,4′-diisocyanate (hard segment was studied with varying loadings (0, 20, 40, and 60 wt.%. The 300 μm thick PU/Co samples were tape-casted and then received heat treatment at 80°C for 180 min. From synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, the plot of the X-ray scattering intensity (I against the scattering vector (q exhibited a typical single peak of PU whose intensity was reduced by the increase in the Co loading. Characteristic SAXS peaks in the case of 0-20 wt.% Co agreed well with the scattering by globular hard segment domains according to Zernike-Prins and Percus-Yevick models. The higher Co loadings led to larger deviations from all theoretical models.

  7. Measurement of the analysing power in proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Bagdasarian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The proton analysing power in p→p elastic scattering has been measured at small angles at COSY-ANKE at 796 MeV and five other beam energies between 1.6 and 2.4 GeV using a polarised proton beam. The asymmetries obtained by detecting the fast proton in the ANKE forward detector or the slow recoil proton in a silicon tracking telescope are completely consistent. Although the analysing power results agree well with the many published data at 796 MeV, and also with the most recent partial wave solution at this energy, the ANKE data at the higher energies lie well above the predictions of this solution at small angles. An updated phase shift analysis that uses the ANKE results together with the World data leads to a much better description of these new measurements.

  8. Precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Møller Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, P. L.; Arnold, R. G.; Arroyo, C.; Bega, K.; Biesiada, J.; Bosted, P. E.; Bower, G.; Cahoon, J.; Carr, R.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cooke, M.; Decowski, P.; Deur, A.; Emam, W.; Erickson, R.; Fieguth, T.; Field, C.; Gao, J.; Gary, M.; Gustafsson, K.; Hicks, R. S.; Holmes, R.; Hughes, E. W.; Humensky, T. B.; Jones, G. M.; Kaufman, L. J.; Keller, L.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kumar, K. S.; Laviolette, P.; Lhuillier, D.; Lombard-Nelsen, R. M.; Marshall, Z.; Mastromarino, P.; McKeown, R. D.; Michaels, R.; Niedziela, J.; Olson, M.; Paschke, K. D.; Peterson, G. A.; Pitthan, R.; Relyea, D.; Rock, S. E.; Saxton, O.; Singh, J.; Souder, P. A.; Szalata, Z. M.; Turner, J.; Tweedie, B.; Vacheret, A.; Walz, D.; Weber, T.; Weisend, J.; Woods, M.; Younus, I.

    2005-08-01

    We report on a precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in fixed target electron-electron (Møller) scattering: APV=[-131±14(stat)±10(syst)]×10-9, leading to the determination of the weak mixing angle sin⁡2θWeff=0.2397±0.0010(stat)±0.0008(syst), evaluated at Q2=0.026GeV2. Combining this result with the measurements of sin⁡2θWeff at the Z0 pole, the running of the weak mixing angle is observed with over 6σ significance. The measurement sets constraints on new physics effects at the TeV scale.

  9. Elevation angle alignment of quasi optical receiver mirrors of collective Thomson scattering diagnostic by sawtooth measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moseev, D.; Meo, Fernando; Korsholm, Søren Bang;

    2012-01-01

    Localized measurements of the fast ion velocity distribution function and the plasma composition measurements are of significant interest for the fusion community. Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics allow such measurements with spatial and temporal resolution. Localized measurements...... require a good alignment of the optical path in the transmission line. Monitoring the alignment during the experiment greatly benefits the confidence in the CTS measurements. An in situ technique for the assessment of the elevation angle alignment of the receiver is developed. Using the CTS diagnostic...

  10. [Evaluation of molecular weights of hyaluronate preparations by multi-angle laser light scattering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomota, Chikako

    2003-01-01

    Hyaluronate (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polysaccharide, has been used for osteoarthritis, periartritis of the shoulder and rheumatoid arthritis by intraarticular administration, and in ophthalmic surgery such as anterior segment surgery, and eye lotion. In this study, the molecular weight (Mw) of HA preparations were estimated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) system consisted of a refractometer (RI) and a multi-angle laser light scattering (MALS). From the results, it has been clarified that a successful characterization of HA samples with Mw up to 2 - 3 x 10(6) g/mol was possible by multidetector system.

  11. Structure of Co–Zn ferrite ferrofluid: A small angle neutron scattering analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prashant Acharya; Rucha Desai; V K Aswal; R V Upadhyay

    2008-11-01

    A hydrothermal synthesis route is used to synthesize nanomagnetic particles of Co0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4 ferrite ferrofluids with particle diameter ranging from 5.5–9 nm. XRD analysis shows the formation of a single phase spinel structure. EDX results confirm the stoichiometric composition of the cations. Small angle neutron scattering technique is used to determine the size and size distribution of Co0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4 ferrofluid. The sizes thus obtained are in the range of 5.4 to 8.4 nm. These results are in agreement with magnetic measurements.

  12. Integrative structural modeling with small angle X-ray scattering profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneidman-Duhovny Dina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent technological advances enabled high-throughput collection of Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS profiles of biological macromolecules. Thus, computational methods for integrating SAXS profiles into structural modeling are needed more than ever. Here, we review specifically the use of SAXS profiles for the structural modeling of proteins, nucleic acids, and their complexes. First, the approaches for computing theoretical SAXS profiles from structures are presented. Second, computational methods for predicting protein structures, dynamics of proteins in solution, and assembly structures are covered. Third, we discuss the use of SAXS profiles in integrative structure modeling approaches that depend simultaneously on several data types.

  13. Small angle neutron scattering study of mixed micelles of oppositely charged surfactants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J V Joshi; V K Aswal; P S Goyal

    2008-11-01

    Structures of mixed micelles of oppositely charged surfactants dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) have been studied using small angle neutron scattering. The concentration of one of the components was kept fixed (0.3 M) and that of another varied in the range 0 to 0.1 M. The aggregation number and micellar size increase and fractional charge decreases dramatically with the addition of small amount of oppositely charged surfactant. The effect of addition of SDS on DTAB is significantly different from that of the addition of DTAB on SDS. The contrast variation SANS experiments using deuterated surfactant suggests the homogeneous mixing of two components in mixed micellar system.

  14. Small angle neutron scattering studies on the interaction of cationic surfactants with bovine serum albumin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nuzhat Gull; S Chodankar; V K Aswal; Kabir-Ud-Din

    2008-11-01

    The structure of the protein–surfactant complex of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cationic surfactants has been studied by small angle neutron scattering. At low concentrations, the CTAB monomers are observed to bind to the protein leading to an increase in its size. On the other hand at high concentrations, surfactant molecules aggregate along the unfolded polypeptide chain of the protein resulting in the formation of a fractal structure representing a necklace model of micelle-like clusters randomly distributed along the polypeptide chain. The fractal dimension as well as the size and number of micelles attached to the complex have been determined.

  15. Cylindrical aggregates of chlorophylls studied by small-angle neutron scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worcester, D.L. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbus, MO (United States); Katz, J.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron small-angle scattering has demonstrated tubular chlorophyll aggregates formed by self-assembly of a variety of chlorophyll types in nonpolar solvents. The size and other properties of the tubular aggregates can be accounted for by stereochemical properties of the chlorophyll molecules. Features of some of the structures are remarkably similar to light harvesting chlorophyll complexes in vivo, particularly for photosynthetic bacteria. These nanotube chlorophyll structures may have applications as light harvesting biomaterials where efficient energy transfer occurs from an excited state which is highly delocalized.

  16. Small angle scattering polarization biopsy: a comparative analysis of various skin diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Alonova, M. V.; Yermolenko, S. B.; Ivashko, P. V.; Reshetnikova, E. M.; Galkina, E. M.; Utz, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    An approach to differentiation of the morphological features of normal and pathological human epidermis on the base of statistical analysis of the local polarization states of laser light forward scattered by in-vitro tissue samples is discussed. The eccentricity and the azimuth angle of local polarization ellipses retrieved for various positions of the focused laser beam on the tissue surface, and the coefficient of collimated transmittance are considered as the diagnostic parameters for differentiation. The experimental data obtained with the psoriasis, discoid lupus erythematosus, alopecia, lichen planus, scabies, demodex, and normal skin samples are presented.

  17. Use of Small Angle Neutron Scattering to Study Various Properties of Wool and Mohair Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn, C. B.; Török, Gy.

    2011-12-01

    To maintain a competitive edge in the wool and mohair industry, a detailed knowledge and understanding of the properties of wool fibres is essential. Standard techniques are used to determine fibre diameter, length and strength; however, properties such as hydroscopicity, lustre and changes in fibre structure following chemical or mechanical treatment are not so well understood. The unique capabilities of small angle neutron scattering to study changes in the supermolecular structure of wool fibres, particularly at the level of the microfibril-matrix complex, have been used to provide previously unknown features of the fibres. The results of these studies are presented.

  18. Small angle neutron scattering data of polymer electrolyte membranes partially swollen in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we show the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS data obtained from the polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs equilibrated at a given relative humidity. We apply Hard-Sphere (HS structure model with Percus–Yervick interference interactions to analyze the dataset. The molecular structure of these PEMs and the morphologies of the fully water-swollen membranes have been elucidated by Zhao et al. “Elucidation of the morphology of the hydrocarbon multi-block copolymer electrolyte membranes for proton exchange fuel cells” [1].

  19. Use of Small Angle Neutron Scattering to Study Various Properties of Wool and Mohair Fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklyn, C. B. [Radiation Science Department, Necsa, PO Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Toeroek, Gy. [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary)

    2011-12-13

    To maintain a competitive edge in the wool and mohair industry, a detailed knowledge and understanding of the properties of wool fibres is essential. Standard techniques are used to determine fibre diameter, length and strength; however, properties such as hydroscopicity, lustre and changes in fibre structure following chemical or mechanical treatment are not so well understood. The unique capabilities of small angle neutron scattering to study changes in the supermolecular structure of wool fibres, particularly at the level of the microfibril-matrix complex, have been used to provide previously unknown features of the fibres. The results of these studies are presented.

  20. Characteristics of AOT Microemulsion Structure: a Small Angle X-ray Scattering Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The method of synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SR-SAXS) has been used to obtain structural ;nformation on the system of bis2(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/ H2O/isooctane. By using the Guinier plot (Ln I (q) versus q ) on the data sets in a defined small q range (0.03-0.06A-), the gyration radius at different water/surfactant molar ratio, W0, was obtained. With the increase of W0, the gyration radius (Rg) increased at the range of 23.2~52.7 A.

  1. Intercomparison of small biomolecules by gel filtration and small angle scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, P.; Stepanik, T.M.; Szabo, A.G. (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes how small angle neutron scattering (SANS) can be used to confirm that gel filtration results are free of dimerization effects. After characterization by analytical gel filtration, concentrated solutions (in heavy water, D2O) of a cobra neurotoxin, a cytotoxin, and a cytotoxin analog are studied by SANS. Small differences in shape are shown to be discernible by means of least-square fits to ellipsoidal models. The parallel axis theorem is then invoked to assess dimerization levels statistically. The results are briefly discussed on the basis of function in relation to structure.

  2. Effect of Dzyaloshinski-Moriya interaction on elastic small-angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Andreas; Mettus, Denis; Honecker, Dirk; Metlov, Konstantin L.

    2016-08-01

    For magnetic materials containing many lattice imperfections (e.g., nanocrystalline magnets), the relativistic Dzyaloshinski-Moriya (DM) interaction may result in nonuniform spin textures due to the lack of inversion symmetry at interfaces. Within the framework of the continuum theory of micromagnetics, we explore the impact of the DM interaction on the elastic magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) cross section. It is shown that the DM interaction gives rise to a polarization-dependent asymmetric term in the spin-flip SANS cross section. Analysis of this feature may provide a means to determine the DM constant.

  3. Small angle scattering investigation of nanostructured binary Au-Fe alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergenti, I.; Deriu, A.; Spizzo, F.; Ronconi, F.; Bosco, E.; Baricco, M

    2004-07-15

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering measurements have been performed on granular materials with composition Au{sub 100-x}Fe{sub x} (x=20, 27, 30, 38) obtained in the form of melt spun ribbons and of co-sputtered thin films. The as cast melt spun ribbons, show only the presence of nearly atomic iron precipitates, subsequent thermal treatments induce the formation of lamellar-shaped iron precipitates. In the co-sputtered films the iron nanoparticles are non-uniformly distributed in the Au matrix.

  4. Modeling and measurement of angle-beam wave propagation in a scatterer-free plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    Wavefield imaging has been shown to be a powerful tool for improving the understanding and characterization of wave propagation and scattering in plates. The complete measurement of surface displacement over a 2-D grid provided by wavefield imaging has the potential to serve as a useful means of validating ultrasonic models. Here, a preliminary study of ultrasonic angle-beam wave propagation in a scatterer-free plate using a combination of wavefield measurements and 2-D finite element models is described. Both wavefield imaging and finite element analysis are used to study the propagation of waves at a refracted angle of 56.8° propagating in a 6.35 mm thick aluminum plate. Wavefield imaging is performed using a laser vibrometer mounted on an XYZ scanning stage, which is programmed to move point-to-point on a rectilinear grid to acquire waveform data. The commercial finite element software package, PZFlex, which is specifically designed to handle large, complex ultrasonic problems, is used to create a 2-D cross-sectional model of the transducer and plate. For model validation, vertical surface displacements from both the wavefield measurements and the PZFlex finite element model are compared and found to be in excellent agreement. The validated PZFlex model is then used to explain the mechanism of Rayleigh wave generation by the angle-beam wedge. Since the wavefield measurements are restricted to the specimen surface, the cross-sectional PZFlex model is able to provide insights the wavefield data cannot. This study illustrates how information obtained from ultrasonic experiments and modeling results can be combined to improve understanding of angle-beam wave generation and propagation.

  5. Porosity and structural parameters of Karelian shungites according to the data of small-angle synchrotron radiation scattering and microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubev, Ye. A., E-mail: golubev@geo.komisc.ru; Ulyashev, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geology, Komi Science Center, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Veligzhanin, A. A. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The nanoporosity and structure of natural carbons has been investigated on the example of Karelian carbon-rich shungites by comparing the data of small-angle synchrotron radiation scattering and highresolution microscopy. The analysis of small-angle scattering data is based on the model of scattering spheres with lognormal size distribution. It is found that the structure of samples from the Maksovo and Zazhogino deposits subjected to high temperatures in the geological medium and (also to a lesser extent) a sample from the Shunga deposit can be described as an aggregation of polydisperse scattering spheres with lognormal size distribution; the characteristic scatterer size is determined for them. A comparison with microscopy data shows that these scatterers are mainly associated with pores, and the character of their size distribution is similar to that previously established for nanoglobules in schungites.

  6. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  7. Branch Point Withdrawal in Elongational Startup Flow by Time-Resolved Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Ruocco, N.

    2016-05-27

    We present a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) investigation of a blend composed of a dendritic polymer and a linear matrix with comparable viscosity in start-up of an elongational flow at Tg + 50. The two-generation dendritic polymer is diluted to 10% by weight in a matrix of a long well-entangled linear chains. Both components consist of mainly 1,4-cis-polyisoprene but differ in isotopic composition. The resulting scattering contrast is sufficiently high to permit time-resolved measurements of the system structure factor during the start-up phase and to follow the retraction processes involving the inner sections of the branched polymer in the nonlinear deformation response. The outer branches and the linear matrix, on the contrary, are in the linear deformation regime. The linear matrix dominates the rheological signature of the blend and the influence of the branched component can barely be detected. However, the neutron scattering intensity is predominantly that of the (branched) minority component so that its dynamics is clearly evident. In the present paper, we use the neutron scattering data to validate the branch point withdrawal process, which could not be unambiguously discerned from rheological measurements in this blend. The maximal tube stretch that the inner branches experience, before the relaxed outer arm material is incorporated into the tube is determined. The in situ scattering experiments demonstrate for the first time the leveling-off of the strain as the result of branch point withdrawal and chain retraction directly on the molecular level. We conclude that branch point motion in the mixture of architecturally complex polymers occurs earlier than would be expected in a purely branched system, presumably due to the different topological environment that the linear matrix presents to the hierarchically deep-buried tube sections. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  8. Large angle elastic and inelastic scattering of 14.93 keV photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, P.; Mehta, D.; Kumar, S.; Sharma, M.; Puri, S.; Shahi, J.S.; Singh, N. E-mail: nsingh@pu.ac.in

    2004-07-01

    Elastic and inelastic scattering cross-sections for the 14.93 keV photons (Y-K{alpha} X-rays) were measured at an angle of 141 deg. in the elements with 6 {<=} Z {<=} 92 and 1 {<=} Z {<=} 50, respectively. A reflection mode geometrical arrangement involving a Y-foil excited by the 59.54 keV {gamma}-rays from the {sup 241}Am radioisotope as photon source and an HPGe/Si(Li) detector was used. The measurements were performed under vacuum {approx}10{sup -2} Torr. Special care was taken in determination of the incident photon intensity and geometrical factors and to check effects due to occurrence of Bragg diffraction from the target lattice. The measured elastic scattering cross-sections have been compared with predictions from the form-factor formalism and relativistic second-order S-matrix calculations. The modified form-factor (MF) cross-sections are higher up to 50% than the measured ones in the case of elements with the electron binding energy (BE) in vicinity of the incident photon energy and are lower up to 20% for the other elements. These deviations are smoothed by incorporating the Anomalous Scattering Factors (ASFs) to the MF values [Acta Cryst. A 46 (1990) 170]. The S-matrix values exhibit general agreement with the measured cross-sections. The measured inelastic scattering cross-sections are found to be in good agreement with those calculated using the Klein-Nishina cross-section incorporating the Hartree-Fock incoherent scattering function (ISF)

  9. Focused-ion-beam-fabricated homogeneous acute-angled Au nanorods for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivashanmugan, Kundan; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Haochih Liu, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    Well-ordered acute-angled Au nanorod (NR) arrays were fabricated using a focused ion beam (FIB) (fibAu_NR). The angle between the NRs and the substrate was tilted at 30-90°. A fibAu_NR with an angle of less than 90° significantly increased the effect of surface-enhanced Raman scattering, which was evaluated using low-concentration rose bengal (milk solution with good reproducibility.

  10. The solution structure of stilbenoid dendrimers: a small-angle scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Karpuk, Elena; Lehmann, Matthias; Meier, Herbert; Lindner, Peter; Harnau, Ludger; Ballauff, Matthias

    2006-10-13

    The spatial structure of a stilbenoid dendrimer is investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in dilute solution. All measurements are performed in toluene. The dendrimer consists of a stilbenoid scaffold with appended hexyloxy chains. SAXS is mainly sensitive to the dendrimer scaffold whereas SANS intensity, measured in fully deuterated toluene, derives from the solute molecules. The resulting SAXS and SANS intensities are analyzed by comparison with various models. It is found that the model of a circular disk gives the best description of the data. SAXS data demonstrate that the stilbenoid scaffold is flat as expected for benzene rings conjugated through vinylene units. Thus, it can be described by a circular disk with a radius of 1.6 nm and a thickness of 0.7 nm. SANS, on the other hand, shows that the hexyloxy chains are not confined in the plane defined by the core. This is derived from modeling the SANS data with a much thicker circular disk (radius: 2.4 nm, thickness: 1.8 nm). The structure factor S(q), describing the interaction of the dendrimers at higher concentrations, is modeled quantitatively with the "polymer reference interaction site model" (PRISM) integral equation formalism for hard plates such as particles. Here the structural data obtained from the analysis of the SANS data are used so that no new adjustable parameter is necessary for this description.

  11. Small-angle x-ray scattering study on the structure of microcrystalline and nanofibrillated cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaenen, Kirsi; Pirkkalainen, Kari; Penttilae, Paavo; Serimaa, Ritva [Division of Materials Physics, Department of Physics, P.O.B. 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Sievaenen, Jenni [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kotelnikova, Nina, E-mail: kirsi.leppanen@helsinki.f [Institute of Macromolecular Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Bolshoy pr. 31, St. Petersburg 199004 (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-01

    The effects of different solvents on the structure of microcrystalline and nanofibrillated cellulose (MCC, NFC) were studied using small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). MCC was immersed in water, ethanol, and acetone, and NFC was immersed only in water and ethanol, but studied also in the form of foam-like water-NFC-gel in wet, air-dried and re-wet states. The solvent affected the average chord length, which reveals the typical length scale of the structure of the sample: 2.4 {+-} 0.1 nm was obtained for MCC-water, 2.5 {+-} 0.1 nm for re-wet NFC-gel, 1.6 {+-} 0.1 nm for MCC-ethanol, 1.2 {+-} 0.1 nm for NFC-ethanol, and 1.3 {+-} 0.1 nm for MCC-acetone. The specific surface of cellulose increased strongly when MCC and NFC were immersed in the solvents compared to dry cellulose. The specific surface of cellulose was determined to be larger for NFC-water than MCC-water, and slightly larger for dry NFC powder than for dry MCC, which can be explained by the fact that the width of cellulose crystallites perpendicular to the cellulose chain direction was slightly larger in MCC than in NFC on the basis of wide-angle x-ray scattering results.

  12. A small-angle x-ray scattering system with a vertical layout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Xiaowei; Meng, Lingpu; Cui, Kunpeng; Wu, Lihui; Li, Liangbin

    2014-12-01

    A small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) system with a vertical layout (V-SAXS) has been designed and constructed for in situ detection on nanostructures, which is well suitable for in situ study on self-assembly of nanoparticles at liquid interface and polymer processing. A steel-tower frame on a reinforced basement is built as the supporting skeleton for scattering beam path and detector platform, ensuring the system a high working stability and a high operating accuracy. A micro-focus x-ray source combining parabolic three-dimensional multi-layer mirror and scatteringless collimation system provides a highly parallel beam, which allows us to detect the very small angle range. With a sample-to-detector distance of 7 m, the largest measurable length scale is 420 nm in real space. With a large sample zone, it is possible to install different experimental setups such as film stretching machine, which makes the system perfect to follow the microstructures evolution of materials during processing. The capability of the V-SAXS on in situ study is tested with a drying experiment of a free latex droplet, which confirms our initial design.

  13. Nuclear effects on ion heating within the small-angle charged-particle elastic-scattering regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, A.; Hale, G. M.

    1984-10-01

    The effects of nuclear forces (in contrast to pure Coulomb interaction) on the ion heating rate which results from small-angle scattering processes between charged particles in plasmas are investigated within the framework of Fokker-Planck theory. These effects are included through the addition of analytic Coulomb-nuclear interference and nuclear elastic cross sections in the scattering integrals of the dynamical friction coefficient and dispersion tensor. It is found that corrections to traditional Fokker-Planck predictions of the ion-ion energy exchange rate can be calculated and that these corrections are sensitive to the choice of the maximum scattering angle defining the cutoff between small- and large-angle scattering.

  14. Fast computation of high energy elastic collision scattering angle for electric propulsion plume simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Samuel J.

    2016-11-01

    In the plumes of Hall thrusters and ion thrusters, high energy ions experience elastic collisions with slow neutral atoms. These collisions involve a process of momentum exchange, altering the initial velocity vectors of the collision pair. In addition to the momentum exchange process, ions and atoms can exchange electrons, resulting in slow charge-exchange ions and fast atoms. In these simulations, it is particularly important to accurately perform computations of ion-atom elastic collisions in determining the plume current profile and assessing the integration of spacecraft components. The existing models are currently capable of accurate calculation but are not fast enough such that the calculation can be a bottleneck of plume simulations. This study investigates methods to accelerate an ion-atom elastic collision calculation that includes both momentum- and charge-exchange processes. The scattering angles are pre-computed through a classical approach with ab initio spin-orbit free potential and are stored in a two-dimensional array as functions of impact parameter and energy. When performing a collision calculation for an ion-atom pair, the scattering angle is computed by a table lookup and multiple linear interpolations, given the relative energy and randomly determined impact parameter. In order to further accelerate the calculations, the number of collision calculations is reduced by properly defining two cut-off cross-sections for the elastic scattering. In the MCC method, the target atom needs to be sampled; however, it is confirmed that initial target atom velocity does not play a significant role in typical electric propulsion plume simulations such that the sampling process is unnecessary. With these implementations, the computational run-time to perform a collision calculation is reduced significantly compared to previous methods, while retaining the accuracy of the high fidelity models.

  15. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U.-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Water's behavior near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. By monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (αp) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. In addition, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated αp peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.

  16. The contribution of small angle and quasi-elastic scattering to the physics of liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, José

    2017-05-01

    Many properties of liquid water at low temperature show anomalous behaviour. For example, density, isothermal compressibility, heat capacity pass by maxima or minima and transport properties show a super-Arrhenius behaviour. Extrapolations performed beyond the homogeneous nucleation temperature are at the origin of models that predict critical points, liquid-liquid transitions or dynamic cross-overs in the large domain of temperature and pressure not accessible to experiments because of ice nucleation. A careful analysis of existing data can be used to test some of these models. Small angle X-ray or neutron scattering data are incompatible with models where two liquids or heterogeneities are present. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering, taking advantage and combining both coherent and incoherent scattering show that two relaxation times are present in liquid water and that one of them, related to hydrogen bond dynamics, has an Arrhenian behaviour, suggesting that the associated dynamics of the bonds, similar to the β relaxation of polymers, determines the glass transition temperature of water.

  17. Quasielastic small-angle neutron scattering from heavy water solutions of cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmin, André; Lechner, Ruep E; Saenger, Wolfram

    2011-01-14

    We present a model for quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) by an aqueous solution of compact and inflexible molecules. This model accounts for time-dependent spatial pair correlations between the atoms of the same as well as of distinct molecules and includes all coherent and incoherent neutron scattering contributions. The extension of the static theory of the excluded volume effect [A. K. Soper, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 9, 2399 (1997)] to the time-dependent (dynamic) case allows us to obtain simplified model expressions for QENS spectra in the low Q region in the uniform fluid approximation. The resulting expressions describe the quasielastic small-angle neutron scattering (QESANS) spectra of D(2)O solutions of native and methylated cyclodextrins well, yielding in particular translational and rotational diffusion coefficients of these compounds in aqueous solution. Finally, we discuss the full potential of the QESANS analysis (that is, beyond the uniform fluid approximation), in particular, the information on solute-solvent interactions (e.g., hydration shell properties) that such an analysis can provide, in principle.

  18. Preliminary analysis of the distribution of water in human hair by small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Yash; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Ramaprasad, Ram

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion and distribution of water in hair can reveal the internal structure of hair that determines the penetration of various products used to treat hair. The distribution of water into different morphological components in unmodified hair, cuticle-free hair, and hair saturated with oil at various levels of humidity was examined using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) by substituting water with deuterium oxide (D(2)O). Infrared spectroscopy was used to follow hydrogen-deuterium exchange. Water present in hair gives basically two types of responses in SANS: (i) interference patterns, and (ii) central diffuse scattering (CDS) around the beam stop. The amount of water in the matrix between the intermediate filaments that gives rise to interference patterns remained essentially constant over the 50-98% humidity range without swelling this region of the fiber extensively. This observation suggests that a significant fraction of water in the hair, which contributes to the CDS, is likely located in a different morphological region of hair that is more like pores in a fibrous structure, which leads to significant additional swelling of the fiber. Comparison of the scattering of hair treated with oil shows that soybean oil, which diffuses less into hair, allows more water into hair than coconut oil. These preliminary results illustrate the utility of SANS for evaluating and understanding the diffusion of deuterated liquids into different morphological structures in hair.

  19. Measurement of Aerodynamic Forces for Various Mean Angles of Attack on an Airfoil Oscillating in Pitch and on Two Finite-span Wings Oscillating in Bending with Emphasis on Damping in the Stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, A Gerald

    1957-01-01

    The oscillating air forces on a two-dimensional wing oscillating in pitch about the midchord have been measured at various mean angles of attack and at Mach numbers of 0.35 and 0.7. The magnitudes of normal-force and pitching-moment coefficients were much higher at high angles of attack than at low angles of attack for some conditions. Large regions of negative damping in pitch were found, and it was shown that the effect of increasing the Mach number 0.35 to 0.7 was to decrease the initial angle of attack at which negative damping occurred. Measurements of the aerodynamic damping of a 10-percent-thick and of a 3-percent-thick finite-span wing oscillating in the first bending mode indicate no regions of negative damping for this type of motion over the range of variables covered. The damping measured at high angles of attack was generally larger than that at low angles of attack. (author)

  20. Comparison of the Calcaneal Pitch Angle and Modified Projection Area Per Length Squared Method for Medial Longitudinal Arch Evaluation of the Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat Kıter2

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the calcaneal pitch angle (CPA values measured on direct lateral radiographs of feet, and the modified projection area per length squared (PAL, which was calculated as a new method for the evaluation of the medial longitudinal arch (MLA of the foot.Material and Methods: Direct lateral radiographs of patients who had weightbearing feet radiographies for any reason except trauma were retrospectively obtained from the archives. Direct lateral radiographs of the feet were printed and a transparent sheet was placed on it. A straight line was drawn between the most plantar process of the calcaneus and the head of the first metatarsal bone for the calculation of the PAL of the MLA. Two semilunar arcs were drawn upon this straight line. PAL1 and PAL2 were estimated using a point-counting technique. The CPA, lateral talo-calcaneal angles (LTCA, and talo-first metatarsal angles (TFMA were measured. The correlations between PAL1, PAL2 of right and left feet and CPA, LTCA, and TFMA were explored.Results: Fifty patients (27 females, 23 males with a mean age of 40.12 (4-78 years were evaluated. Significant correlations were detected between PAL1, PAL2 and CPA, and TFMA for both right and left feet (p<0.05. Conclusion: A significant correlation was detected between the modified PAL method as a new technique and the standard CPA method for MLA evaluation. The PAL method is suggested as a simple and practical method for MLA evaluation.

  1. Calculation of accurate small angle X-ray scattering curves from coarse-grained protein models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stovgaard Kasper

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects have expanded the gap between the amount of known protein sequences and structures. The limitations of current high resolution structure determination methods make it unlikely that this gap will disappear in the near future. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS is an established low resolution method for routinely determining the structure of proteins in solution. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for the efficient calculation of accurate SAXS curves from coarse-grained protein models. Such a method can for example be used to construct a likelihood function, which is paramount for structure determination based on statistical inference. Results We present a method for the efficient calculation of accurate SAXS curves based on the Debye formula and a set of scattering form factors for dummy atom representations of amino acids. Such a method avoids the computationally costly iteration over all atoms. We estimated the form factors using generated data from a set of high quality protein structures. No ad hoc scaling or correction factors are applied in the calculation of the curves. Two coarse-grained representations of protein structure were investigated; two scattering bodies per amino acid led to significantly better results than a single scattering body. Conclusion We show that the obtained point estimates allow the calculation of accurate SAXS curves from coarse-grained protein models. The resulting curves are on par with the current state-of-the-art program CRYSOL, which requires full atomic detail. Our method was also comparable to CRYSOL in recognizing native structures among native-like decoys. As a proof-of-concept, we combined the coarse-grained Debye calculation with a previously described probabilistic model of protein structure, TorusDBN. This resulted in a significant improvement in the decoy recognition performance. In conclusion, the presented method shows great promise for

  2. A Rejection Sampling Based Method for Determining Thermal Scattering Angle and Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugen, Carl C.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.

    2017-09-01

    Most high performance computing systems being deployed currently and envisioned for the future are based on making use of heavy parallelism across many computational nodes and many concurrent cores. These types of heavily parallel systems often have relatively little memory per core but large amounts of computing capability. This places a significant constraint on how data storage is handled in many Monte Carlo codes. This is made even more significant in fully coupled multiphysics simulations, which requires simulations of many physical phenomena be carried out concurrently on individual processing nodes, which further reduces the amount of memory available for storage of Monte Carlo data. As such, there has been a move towards on-the-fly nuclear data generation to reduce memory requirements associated with interpolation between pre-generated large nuclear data tables for a selection of system temperatures. Methods have been previously developed and implemented in MIT’s OpenMC Monte Carlo code for both the resolved resonance regime and the unresolved resonance regime, but are currently absent for the thermal energy regime. While there are many components involved in generating a thermal neutron scattering cross section on-the-fly, this work will focus on a proposed method for determining the energy and direction of a neutron after a thermal incoherent inelastic scattering event. This work proposes a rejection sampling based method using the thermal scattering kernel to determine the correct outgoing energy and angle. The goal of this project is to be able to treat the full S (a, ß) kernel for graphite, to assist in high fidelity simulations of the TREAT reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The method is, however, sufficiently general to be applicable in other thermal scattering materials, and can be initially validated with the continuous analytic free gas model.

  3. Initial characterization of mudstone nanoporosity with small angle neutron scattering using caprocks from carbon sequestration sites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCray, John (Colorado School of Mines); Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis (Colorado School of Mines); Mouzakis, Katherine (Colorado School of Mines); Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rother, Gernot (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2010-11-01

    Geological carbon sequestration relies on the principle that CO{sub 2} injected deep into the subsurface is unable to leak to the atmosphere. Structural trapping by a relatively impermeable caprock (often mudstone such as a shale) is the main trapping mechanism that is currently relied on for the first hundreds of years. Many of the pores of the caprock are of micrometer to nanometer scale. However, the distribution, geometry and volume of porosity at these scales are poorly characterized. Differences in pore shape and size can cause variation in capillary properties and fluid transport resulting in fluid pathways with different capillary entry pressures in the same sample. Prediction of pore network properties for distinct geologic environments would result in significant advancement in our ability to model subsurface fluid flow. Specifically, prediction of fluid flow through caprocks of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoirs is a critical step in evaluating the risk of leakage to overlying aquifers. The micro- and nanoporosity was analyzed in four mudstones using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). These mudstones are caprocks of formations that are currently under study or being used for carbon sequestration projects and include the Marine Tuscaloosa Group, the Lower Tuscaloosa Group, the upper and lower shale members of the Kirtland Formation, and the Pennsylvanian Gothic shale. Total organic carbon varies from <0.3% to 4% by weight. Expandable clay contents range from 10% to {approx}40% in the Gothic shale and Kirtland Formation, respectively. Neutrons effectively scatter from interfaces between materials with differing scattering length density (i.e. minerals and pores). The intensity of scattered neutrons, I(Q), where Q is the scattering vector, gives information about the volume of pores and their arrangement in the sample. The slope of the scattering data when plotted as log I(Q) vs. log Q provides information about the fractality or geometry of

  4. Investigation on the effect of beam divergence angle upon output waveform based on stimulated Brillouin scattering optical limiting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasi Wu-Li-Ji; Lu Huan-Huan; Gong Sheng; Fu Mei-Ling; Lin Zhi-Wei; Lin Dian-Yang; He Wei-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of beam divergence angle on output waveform based on stimulated Brillouin scattering optical limiting. Output waveforms in the case of different pump divergence angles are numerically simulated,and validated in a Nd:YAG seed-injected laser system. The results indicate that a small pump divergence angle can lead to good interaction between pump and Stokes, and a platform can be easily realized in the transmitted waveform.In contrast, a peak followed by the platform appears when the divergence angle becomes large.

  5. Gracing incidence small angle neutron scattering of incommensurate magnetic structures in MnSi thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Birgit; Pfleiderer, Christian; Boeni, Peter [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Zhang, Shilei; Hesjedal, Thorsten [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Khaydukov, Yury; Soltwedel, Olaf; Keller, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung (Germany); Max Planck Society, Outstation at FRM-II (Germany); Muehlbauer, Sebastian [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier Leibnitz, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Chacon, Alfonso [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier Leibnitz, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The topological stability of skyrmions in bulk samples of MnSi and the observation of spin transfer torque effects at ultra-low current densities have generated great interest in skyrmions in chiral magnets as a new route towards next generation spintronics devices. Yet, the formation of skyrmions in MBE grown thin films of MnSi reported in the literature is highly controversial. We report gracing incidence small angle neutron scattering (GISANS) of the magnetic order in selected thin films of MnSi grown by state of the art MBE techniques. In combination with polarised neutron reflectometry (PNR) and magnetisation measurements of the same samples our data provide direct reciprocal space information of the incommensurate magnetic order, clarifying the nature of magnetic phase diagram.

  6. Study of (Cyclic Peptide)-Polymer Conjugate Assemblies by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Ming Liang; FitzGerald, Paul A; Warr, Gregory G; Jolliffe, Katrina A; Perrier, Sébastien

    2016-12-19

    We present a fundamental study into the self-assembly of (cyclic peptide)-polymer conjugates as a versatile supramolecular motif to engineer nanotubes with defined structure and dimensions, as characterised in solution using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). This work demonstrates the ability of the grafted polymer to stabilise and/or promote the formation of unaggregated nanotubes by the direct comparison to the unconjugated cyclic peptide precursor. This ideal case permitted a further study into the growth mechanism of self-assembling cyclic peptides, allowing an estimation of the cooperativity. Furthermore, we show the dependency of the nanostructure on the polymer and peptide chemical functionality in solvent mixtures that vary in the ability to compete with the intermolecular associations between cyclic peptides and ability to solvate the polymer shell.

  7. Elucidating the Molecular Deformation Mechanism of Entangled Polymers in Fast Flow by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangyang; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis; Cheng, Shiwang; Hong, Kunlun; Chen, Wei-Ren; Liu, Jianning; Lin, Panpan; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Understanding the viscoelastic properties of polymers is of fundamental and practical importance because of the vast and ever expanding demand of polymeric materials in daily life. Our current theoretical framework for describing the nonlinear flow behavior of entangled polymers is built upon the tube model pioneered by de Gennes, Doi, and Edwards. In this work, we critically examine the central hypothesis of the tube model for nonlinear rheology using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). While the tube model envisions a unique non-affine elastic deformation mechanism for entangled polymers, our SANS measurements show that the evolution of chain conformation of a well-entangled polystyrene melt closely follows the affine deformation mechanism in uniaxial extension, even when the Rouse Weissenberg number is much smaller than unity. This result provides a key clue for understanding the molecular deformation mechanism of entangled polymers in fast flow. Several implications from our analysis will be discussed in this talk.

  8. Small-angle neutron scattering from polymer hydrogels with memory effect for medicine immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulvelis, Yu. V., E-mail: kulvelis@pnpi.spb.ru; Lebedev, V. T.; Trunov, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Orlova roshcha, Konstantinov Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Pavlyuchenko, V. N. [Kirov Military Medical Academy (Russian Federation); Ivanchev, S. S.; Primachenko, O. N.; Khaikin, S. Ya. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, St. Petersburg Branch (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    Hydrogels synthesized based on cross-linked copolymers of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and functional monomers (acrylic acid or dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate), having a memory effect with respect to target medicine (cefazolin), have been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. The hydrogels are found to have a two-level structural organization: large (up to 100 nm) aggregates filled with network cells (4-7 nm in size). The structural differences in the anionic, cationic, and amphiphilic hydrogels and the relationship between their structure and the ability of hydrogels to absorb moisture are shown. A relationship between the memory effect during cefazolin immobilization and the internal structure of hydrogels, depending on their composition and type of functional groups, is established.

  9. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of nonionic surfactant: Effect of sugars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Shivaji Sharma; J V Joshi; V K Aswal; P S Goyal; A K Rakshit

    2004-08-01

    Micellar solution of nonionic surfactant -dodecyloligo ethyleneoxide surfactant, decaoxyethylene monododecyl ether [CH3(CH2)11(OCH2CH2)10OH], C12E10 in D2O solution have been analysed by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) at different temperatures (30, 45 and 60°C) both in the presence and absence of sugars. The structural parameters like micelle shape and size, aggregation number and micellar density have been determined. It is found that the micellar structure significantly depends on the temperature and concentration of sugars. The micelles are found to be prolate ellipsoids at 30°C and the axial ratio of the micelle increases with the increase in temperature. The presence of lower concentration of sugar reduces the size of micelles and it grows at higher concentration of sugar. The structure of micelles is almost independent of the different types of sugars used.

  10. Micelle structural studies on oil solubilization by a small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putra, Edy Giri Rachman [Neutron Science Division, HANARO Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 1045 Daedok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Neutron Scattering Laboratory, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Gedung 40 Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15314 (Indonesia)], E-mail: giri@batan.go.id; Seong, Baek Seok [Neutron Science Division, HANARO Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 1045 Daedok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ikram, Abarrul [Neutron Scattering Laboratory, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Gedung 40 Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15314 (Indonesia)

    2009-02-21

    A small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique was applied to reveal the micelle structural changes. The micelle structural changes of 0.3 M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration by addition of various oil, i.e. n-hexane, n-octane, and n-decane up to 60% (v/v) have been investigated. It was found that the size, aggregation number and the structures of the micelles changed exhibiting that the effective charge on the micelle decreases with an addition of oil. There was a small increase in minor axis of micelle while the correlation peak shifted to a lower momentum transfer Q and then to higher Q by a further oil addition.

  11. Small-angle x-ray scattering study of polymer structure: Carbosilane dendrimers in hexane solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtykova, E. V.; Feigin, L. A.; Volkov, V. V.; Malakhova, Yu. N.; Streltsov, D. R.; Buzin, A. I.; Chvalun, S. N.; Katarzhanova, E. Yu.; Ignatieva, G. M.; Muzafarov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The three-dimensional organization of monodisperse hyper-branched macromolecules of regular structure—carbosilane dendrimers of zero, third, and sixth generations—has been studied by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in solution. The use of modern methods of SAXS data interpretation, including ab initio modeling, has made it possible to determine the internal architecture of the dendrimers in dependence of the generation number and the number of cyclosiloxane end groups (forming the shell of dendritic macromolecules) and show dendrimers to be spherical. The structural results give grounds to consider carbosilane dendrimers promising objects for forming crystals with subsequent structural analysis and determining their structure with high resolution, as well as for designing new materials to be used in various dendrimer-based technological applications.

  12. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton-proton elastic scattering at small angles

    CERN Document Server

    Mchedlishvili, D; Dymov, S; Bagdasarian, Z; Barsov, S; Gebel, R; Gou, B; Hartmann, M; Kacharava, A; Keshelashvili, I; Khoukaz, A; Kulessa, P; Kulikov, A; Lehrach, A; Lomidze, N; Lorentz, B; Maier, R; Macharashvili, G; Merzliakov, S; Mikirtychyants, S; Nioradze, M; Ohm, H; Prasuhn, D; Rathmann, F; Serdyuk, V; Schroer, D; Shmakova, V; Stassen, R; Stein, H J; Stockhorst, H; Strakovsky, I I; Ströher, H; Tabidze, M; Täschner, A; Trusov, S; Tsirkov, D; Uzikov, Yu; Valdau, Yu; Wilkin, C; Workman, R L; Wüstner, P

    2015-01-01

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12-16 degrees to 25-30 degrees, depending on the energy. Absolute normalisations of typically 3% were achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon a partial wave analysis. After extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.

  13. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mchedlishvili

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The differential cross section for proton–proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam kinetic energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12°–16° to 25°–30°, depending on the energy. A precision in the overall normalisation of typically 3% was achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon the results of a partial wave analysis. After extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.

  14. Small angle neutron scattering studies on protein denaturation induced by different methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chodankar; V K Aswal; J Kohlbrecher; R Vavrin; A G Wagh

    2008-11-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study conformational changes in protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) as induced by varying temperature and in the presence of protein denaturating agents urea and surfactant. BSA has pro-late ellipsoidal shape and is found to be stable up to 60°C above which it denaturates and subsequently leads to aggregation. The protein solution exhibits a fractal structure at temperatures above 64°C, with fractal dimension increasing with temperature. BSA protein is found to unfold in the presence of urea at concentrations greater than 4 M and acquires a random coil Gaussian chain conformation. The conformation of the unfolded protein in the presence of surfactant has been determined directly using contrast variation SANS measurements by contrast matching surfactant molecules. The protein acquires a random coil Gaussian conformation on unfolding with its radius of gyration increasing with increase in surfactant concentration

  15. Search for narrow baryons in pi /sup -/p elastic scattering at large angles

    CERN Document Server

    Baillon, Paul; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; Chew, D; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Kahane, J; Lellouch, D; Leruste, P; Liaud, P; Moreau, F; Perreau, J M; Séguinot, Jacques; Sené, R; Tocqueville, J; Urban, M

    1980-01-01

    Hoping to find resonant structures in the momentum dependence of pi /sup -/p elastic scattering the authors have measured the differential cross section for this reaction at c.m. angles near 90 degrees . An intense pion beam ( approximately=10/sup 7/ pi /s) has been used, together with a high incident momentum resolution (dP/P approximately =2*10/sup -4/), to scan the region of laboratory momenta from 5.75 to 13.02 GeV/c (c.m. energy from 3.42 to 5.03 GeV). The sensitivity attained by the experiment is such that signals would have been seen corresponding to the formation of non-strange baryon resonances having width larger than approximately=0.1 MeV and elasticity larger than a few per cent. Within these limits no resonances were sighted. (4 refs) .

  16. Characterisation of creep cavitation damage in a stainless steel pressure vessel using small angle neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, P J; Treimer, W

    2002-01-01

    Grain-boundary cavitation is the dominant failure mode associated with initiation of reheat cracking, which has been widely observed in austenitic stainless steel pressure vessels operating at temperatures within the creep range (>450 C). Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments at the LLB PAXE instrument (Saclay) and the V12 double-crystal diffractometer of the HMI-BENSC facility (Berlin) are used to characterise cavitation damage (in the size range R=10-2000 nm) in a variety of creep specimens extracted from ex-service plant. Factors that affect the evolution of cavities and the cavity-size distribution are discussed. The results demonstrate that SANS techniques have the potential to quantify the development of creep damage in type-316H stainless steel, and thereby link microstructural damage with ductility-exhaustion models of reheat cracking. (orig.)

  17. Small-angle scattering studies of intrinsically disordered proteins and their complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Cordeiro, Tiago; Urbanek, Annika; Estaña, Alejandro; Cortés, Juan; Sibille, Nathalie; Bernadó, Pau

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) perform a broad range of biological functions. Their relevance has motivated intense research activity seeking to characterize their sequence/structure/function relationships. However, the conformational plasticity of these molecules hampers the application of traditional structural approaches, and new tools and concepts are being developed to address the challenges they pose. Small-Angle Scattering (SAS) is a structural biology technique that probes the size and shape of disordered proteins and their complexes with other biomolecules. The low-resolution nature of SAS can be compensated with specially designed computational tools and its combined interpretation with complementary structural information. In this review, we describe recent advances in the application of SAS to disordered proteins and highly flexible complexes and discuss current challenges.

  18. Towards weighing individual atoms by high-angle scattering of electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Argentero, G; Kotakoski, J; Eder, F R; Meyer, J C

    2015-01-01

    We consider theoretically the energy loss of electrons scattered to high angles when assuming that the primary beam can be limited to a single atom. We discuss the possibility of identifying the isotopes of light elements and of extracting information about phonons in this signal. The energy loss is related to the mass of the much heavier nucleus, and is spread out due to atomic vibrations. Importantly, while the width of the broadening is much larger than the energy separation of isotopes, only the shift in the peak positions must be detected if the beam is limited to a single atom. We conclude that the experimental case will be challenging but is not excluded by the physical principles as far as considered here. Moreover, the initial experiments demonstrate the separation of gold and carbon based on a signal that is related to their mass, rather than their atomic number.

  19. Small angle neutron scattering study of martensitic/ferritic ODS alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathon, M.H., E-mail: mhmathon@cea.fr [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Perrut, M., E-mail: mikael.perrut@onera.fr [DMSM, ONERA, 29 Avenue de la Division Leclerc, F-92322 Chatillon (France); Zhong, S.Y., E-mail: shengyi.zhong@cea.fr [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Carlan, Y. de, E-mail: yann.decarlan@cea.fr [Nuclear Materials Department, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-09-15

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a key tool in material study at the nanoscale. This method allows characterization, in a non-destructive way, of small particles (precipitates, cavities, etc.) ranging in size between 1 and 100 nm. This technique, giving statistical data representative of the whole sample, is particularly adapted to the study of steels. We will present an overview of the SANS possibilities applied to the ODS ferritic/martensitic steels. The main objective is to study the evolution of the oxide dispersion during the different stages of the fabrication, that is, after mechanical alloying, consolidation process (extrusion or HIP) and after thermal treatments. The treatments of SANS data obtained on different ODS Fe9-14%Cr alloys are detailed by discussing the strengths and limitations of the technique. Various Fe-Cr-W-Ti experimental alloys have been characterized.

  20. PREFACE Proceedings of the XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephen; Terrill, Nicholas

    2010-10-01

    The XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009, was held in Oxford UK, 13-18 September 2009, and was jointly organised under the auspices of the International Union of Crystallography Commission on SAS by a team from the Diamond Light Source and the ISIS Pulsed Neutron Source - their first such joint venture - with help from the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council. It was the first time that this long running and successful series of conferences on the application, science and technology of small-angle scattering techniques had been staged in the UK. The UK has a proud heritage in small-angle scattering: as home to one of the world's first SANS instruments (at AERE Harwell), as the site of the world's first 2nd generation X-ray Synchrotron (the SRS at Daresbury with its suite of SAXS beamlines), and latterly as the location of the world's most successful pulsed source SANS instrument. Indeed, 2009 also marked the 25th Anniversary of neutron operations at ISIS and the opening of a Second Target Station. Whilst the SRS ceased operations in 2008, its mantle has been inherited by the Diamond synchrotron. Many delegates took the opportunity to visit both Diamond and ISIS during a conference excursion. Despite the prevailing global economic downturn, we were delighted that 434 delegates from 32 different countries were able to attend SAS-2009; two-thirds were drawn from the UK, Germany, Japan, the USA and France, but there were also sizeable contingents from Australia, Korea, Taiwan and South America. In many ways this geographical spread reflects the present and emerging distribution, respectively, of 3rd generation X-ray synchrotrons and high-flux neutron sources, although the scope of the conference was not solely limited to these probes. Financial support from the IUCr enabled us to grant bursaries to attend SAS-2009 to 12 delegates from emerging countries (Algeria, Argentina, Brazil, India, Nepal, Romania, Russia and the Ukraine). The

  1. Investigation of nanoscale structures by small-angle X-ray scattering in a radiochromic dosimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyt, Peter Sandegaard; Jensen, Grethe Vestergaard; Wahlstedt, Isak Hannes

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the nanoscale structures in a radiochromic dosimeter that was based on leuco-malachite-green dye and the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) suspended in a gelatin matrix. Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to investigate the structures of a range of compositions...... of the dosimeter. When omitting gelatin, ellipsoidal micelles of SDS were formed with a core radius near 15 Å, an eccentricity of 1.6, and a head-group shell thickness near 7 Å. Gelatin significantly changed the micelles to a cylindrical shape with around three times lower core radius and four times larger shell...... thickness, which shows that the gelatin is present in the shell and the outer part of the core. Insight into the detailed structure might help to improve the dosimeter performance and increase the dose response to clinically relevant dose levels....

  2. Systematics in back-angle alpha-particle scattering: Sc, Ti, V, and Cr isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhard, K.A.; Wit, M.; Schiele, J.; Trombik, W.; Zipper, W.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1976-12-01

    Elastic ..cap alpha..-scattering cross sections from /sup 45/Sc, /sup 49/,/sup 50/Ti, /sup 50/,/sup 52/,/sup 53/Cr and /sup 50/,/sup 51/V have been measured between 140degree and 180degree at a bombarding energy of E/sub b/(lab) = 25 MeV. All angular distributions are similar and show no evidence of an anomalous backward enhancement. No evidence for a spin dependence of the cross section within experimental uncertainties, is found for these nuclei, where the spins range from I = 0 (/sup 50/Ti, /sup 50/Cr) to I = 6 (/sup 50/V). Back-angle integrated cross sections (140degree--180degree) are compared with neighbor target nuclei between A approx. = 40 and A approx. = 60. (AIP)

  3. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IOM-CNR), Sede di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Montoncello, F.; Giovannini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Ferrara, Via G. Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Madami, M.; Carlotti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O. [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2015-06-29

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission.

  4. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS and V-SANS) study of asphaltene aggregates in crude oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headen, Thomas F; Boek, Edo S; Stellbrink, Jörg; Scheven, Ulrich M

    2009-01-06

    We report small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments on two crude oils. Analysis of the high-Q SANS region has probed the asphaltene aggregates in the nanometer length scale. We find that the radius of gyration decreases with increasing temperature. We show that SANS measurements on crude oils give similar aggregate sizes to those found from SANS measurements of asphaltenes redispersed in deuterated toluene. The combined use of SANS and V-SANS on crude oil samples has allowed the determination of the radius of gyration of large scale asphaltene aggregates of approximately 0.45 microm. This has been achieved by the fitting of Beaucage functions over two size regimes. Analysis of the fitted Beaucage functions at very low-Q has shown that the large scale aggregates are not simply made by aggregation of all the smaller nanoaggregates. Instead, they are two different aggregates coexisting.

  5. Small-angle neutron scattering study of structural evolution of different phases in protein solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Aswal; S Chodankar; J Kohlbrecher; R Vavrin; A G Wagh

    2008-10-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the structural evolution of different phases in protein solution leading to crystallization, denaturation and gelation. The protein solution under crystallization mostly consists of monomers and dimers, and higher-mers are not observed as they are perhaps formed in very small numbers. The onset and the rate of crystallization strongly depend on the salt concentration. Protein denaturation on addition of surfactant occurs due to the formation of micelle-like clusters along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The structure of such protein{surfactant complex is found to be independent of the size of the micelles in their pure surfactant solutions. The structure of temperature-induced protein gels shows a fractal structure. Rheology of these gels shows a strong dependence on varying pH or protein concentration, whereas the structure of such gels is found to be similar.

  6. Robust, high-throughput solution structural analyses by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hura, Greg L.; Menon, Angeli L.; Hammel, Michal; Rambo, Robert P.; Poole II, Farris L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Jenney Jr, Francis E.; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Yang, Sungjae; Scott, Joseph W.; Dillard, Bret D.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Tainer, John A.

    2009-07-20

    We present an efficient pipeline enabling high-throughput analysis of protein structure in solution with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our SAXS pipeline combines automated sample handling of microliter volumes, temperature and anaerobic control, rapid data collection and data analysis, and couples structural analysis with automated archiving. We subjected 50 representative proteins, mostly from Pyrococcus furiosus, to this pipeline and found that 30 were multimeric structures in solution. SAXS analysis allowed us to distinguish aggregated and unfolded proteins, define global structural parameters and oligomeric states for most samples, identify shapes and similar structures for 25 unknown structures, and determine envelopes for 41 proteins. We believe that high-throughput SAXS is an enabling technology that may change the way that structural genomics research is done.

  7. Small angle x-ray scattering and electron microscopy of nanoparticles formed in an electrical arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carvou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Small Angle X-ray Scattering has been used to characterize nanoparticles generated by electrical arcing between metallic (AgSnO2 electrodes. The particles are found to have diameters between 30 and 40 nm and display smooth surfaces suggesting that they are either in liquid form or have solidified from the liquid state. Particles collected around the electrodes were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscopy and were seen to be much larger than those seen in the SAXS measurement, to be spherical in form and composed of silver metal with irregular tin oxide particles deposited on their surface. Mixed metal nanoparticles can have important practical applications and the use of mixed sintered electrodes may be a direct method for their production.

  8. Small angle x-ray scattering and electron microscopy of nanoparticles formed in an electrical arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvou, E.; Garrec, J. L. Le; Pérez, J.; Praquin, J.; Djeddi, M.; Mitchell, J. B. A.

    2013-03-01

    Small Angle X-ray Scattering has been used to characterize nanoparticles generated by electrical arcing between metallic (AgSnO2) electrodes. The particles are found to have diameters between 30 and 40 nm and display smooth surfaces suggesting that they are either in liquid form or have solidified from the liquid state. Particles collected around the electrodes were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscopy and were seen to be much larger than those seen in the SAXS measurement, to be spherical in form and composed of silver metal with irregular tin oxide particles deposited on their surface. Mixed metal nanoparticles can have important practical applications and the use of mixed sintered electrodes may be a direct method for their production.

  9. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Nano Sized Precipitates in Ferrous Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Soo; Park, Duck-Gun; Kobayashi, Satoru

    2015-11-01

    Nano-sized precipitates in a Fe-1 wt% Cu alloy were studied by SANS (Small Angle Neutron Scattering). The SANS experiments were performed with the 40 m SANS instrument at HANARO. Due to the ferromagnetic nature of the ferrous alloys, a horizontal magnetic field of 1 Tesla was applied during the SANS experiment. The nano-sized Cu precipitates were quantitatively analyzed by SANS in the Fe-1 wt% Cu alloy. The size of the precipitates increased from 2 nm to 4 nm with increasing aging time from 20 min. to 1800 min. at 753 K. The measured A-ratio obtained from SANS data increased from 2.2 to 6.6 with increasing aging time. It is surmised that Cu clusters containing a large amount of Fe are initiated at the early stage of aging and the Fe content in the Cu precipitate decreases with increasing aging time and eventually an almost pure BCC Cu precipitate is formed.

  10. Demonstration of a novel focusing small-angle neutron scattering instrument equipped with axisymmetric mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Dazhi; Gubarev, Mikhail V; Robertson, J Lee; Crow, Lowell; Ramsey, Brian D; Moncton, David E

    2013-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is the most significant neutron technique in terms of impact on science and engineering. However, the basic concept of SANS facilities has not changed since the technique's inception about 40 years ago, as all SANS instruments, save a few, are still designed as pinhole cameras. Here we demonstrate a novel concept for a SANS instrument, based on axisymmetric focusing mirrors. We build and test a small prototype, which shows a performance comparable to that of conventional large SANS facilities. By using a detector with 50-micron pixels, we build the most compact SANS instrument in the world. This work, together with the recent demonstration that such mirrors could increase the signal rate at least 50-fold, while improving resolution, paves the way to novel SANS instruments, thus affecting a broad community of scientists and engineers.

  11. Enhanced small-angle scattering connected to the Widom line in simulations of supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikfeldt, K T; Huang, C; Nilsson, A; Pettersson, L G M

    2011-06-07

    We present extensive simulations on the TIP4P∕2005 water model showing significantly enhanced small-angle scattering (SAS) in the supercooled regime. The SAS is related to the presence of a Widom line (T(W)) characterized by maxima in thermodynamic response functions and Ornstein-Zernike correlation length. Recent experimental small-angle x-ray scattering data [Huang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 134504 (2010)] are excellently reproduced, albeit with an increasing temperature offset at lower temperatures. Assuming the same origin of the SAS in experiment and model this suggests the existence of a Widom line also in real supercooled water. Simulations performed at 1000 bar show an increased abruptness of a crossover from dominating high-density (HDL) to dominating low-density (LDL) liquid and strongly enhanced SAS associated with crossing T(W), consistent with a recent determination of the critical pressure of TIP4P∕2005 at 1350 bar. Furthermore, good agreement with experimental isothermal compressibilities at 1000, 1500, and 2000 bar shows that the high pressure supercooled thermodynamic behavior of water is well described by TIP4P∕2005. Analysis of the tetrahedrality parameter Q reveals that the HDL-LDL structural transition is very sharp at 1000 bar, and that structural fluctuations become strongly coupled to density fluctuations upon approaching T(W). Furthermore, the tetrahedrality distribution becomes bimodal at ambient temperatures, an observation that possibly provides a link between HDL-LDL fluctuations and the structural bimodality in liquid water indicated by x-ray spectroscopic techniques. Computed x-ray absorption spectra are indeed found to show sensitivity to the tetrahedrality parameter.

  12. ORNL 10-m small-angle X-ray scattering camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendricks, R.W.

    1979-12-01

    A new small-angle x-ray scattering camera utilizing a rotating anode x-ray source, crystal monochromatization of the incident beam, pinhole collimation, and a two-dimensional position-sensitive proportional counter was developed. The sample, and the resolution element of the detector are each approximately 1 x 1 mm/sup 2/, the camera was designed so that the focal spot-to-sample and sample-to-detector distances may each be varied in 0.5-m increments up to 5 m to provide a system resolution in the range 0.5 to 4.0 mrad. A large, general-purpose specimen chamber has been provided into which a wide variety of special-purpose specimen holders can be mounted. The detector has an active area of 200 x 200 mm and has up to 200 x 200 resolution elements. The data are recorded in the memory of a minicomputer by a high-speed interface which uses a microprocessor to map the position of an incident photon into an absolute minicomputer memory address. The data recorded in the computer memory can be processed on-line by a variety of programs designed to enhance the user's interaction with the experiment. At the highest angular resolution (0.4 mrad), the flux incident on the specimen is 1.0 x 10/sup 6/ photons/s with the x-ray source operating at 45 kV and 100 mA. SAX and its associated programs OVF and MOT are high-priority, pre-queued, nonresident foreground tasks which run under the ModComp II MAX III operating system to provide complete user control of the ORNL 10-m small-angle x-ray scattering camera.

  13. Accuracy and efficiency considerations for wide-angle wavefield extrapolators and scattering operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, C. J.

    2005-10-01

    Several observations are made concerning the numerical implementation of wide-angle one-way wave equations, using for illustration scalar waves obeying the Helmholtz equation in two space dimensions. This simple case permits clear identification of a sequence of physically motivated approximations of use when the mathematically exact pseudo-differential operator (PSDO) one-way method is applied. As intuition suggests, these approximations largely depend on the medium gradients in the direction transverse to the main propagation direction. A key point is that narrow-angle approximations are to be avoided in the interests of accuracy. Another key consideration stems from the fact that the so-called `standard-ordering' PSDO indicates how lateral interpolation of the velocity structure can significantly reduce computational costs associated with the Fourier or plane-wave synthesis lying at the heart of the calculations. A third important point is that the PSDO theory shows what approximations are necessary in order to generate an exponential one-way propagator for the laterally varying case, representing the intuitive extension of classical integral-transform solutions for a laterally homogeneous medium. This exponential propagator permits larger forward stepsizes. Numerical comparisons with Helmholtz (i.e. full) wave-equation finite-difference solutions are presented for various canonical problems. These include propagation along an interfacial gradient, the effects of a compact inclusion and the formation of extended transmitted and backscattered wave trains by model roughness. The ideas extend to the 3-D, generally anisotropic case and to multiple scattering by invariant embedding. It is concluded that the method is very competitive, striking a new balance between simplifying approximations and computational labour. Complicated wave-scattering effects are retained without the need for expensive global solutions, providing a robust and flexible modelling tool.

  14. A triple axis double crystal multiple reflection camera for ultra small angle X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambard, Jacques; Lesieur, Pierre; Zemb, Thomas

    1992-06-01

    To extend the domain of small angle X-ray scattering requires multiple reflection crystals to collimate the beam. A double crystal, triple axis X-ray camera using multiple reflection channel cut crystals is described. Procedures for measuring the desmeared scattering cross-section on absolute scale are described as well as the measurement from several typical samples : fibrils of collagen, 0.3 μm diameter silica spheres, 0.16 μm diameter interacting latex spheres, porous lignite coal, liquid crystals in a surfactant-water system, colloidal crystal of 0.32 μm diameter silica spheres. L'extension du domaine de diffusion des rayons-X vers les petits angles demande l'emploi de cristaux à réflexions multiples pour collimater le faisceau. Nous décrivons une caméra à rayons-X à trois axes où les réflexions multiples sont réalisées dans deux cristaux à gorge. Nous donnons ensuite les procédures de déconvolution pour obtenir la section efficace de diffusion en échelle absolue, ainsi que les résultats des mesures effectuées avec plusieurs échantillons typiques : fibres de collagène, sphères de silice de 0,3 μm de diamètre, sphères de latex de 0,16 μm de diamètre en interaction, charbon lignite poreux, cristaux liquides formés dans un système eau-tensioactif, solution colloïdale de sphères de silice de 0,32 μm de diamètre.

  15. A Precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering at Low Q^2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G.

    2005-01-28

    The electroweak theory has been probed to a high level of precision at the mass scale of the Z{sup 0} through the joint contributions of LEP at CERN and the SLC at SLAC. The E158 experiment at SLAC complements these results by measuring the weak mixing angle at a Q{sup 2} of 0.026 (GeV/c){sup 2}, far below the weak scale. The experiment utilizes a 48 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on unpolarized atomic electrons in a target of liquid hydrogen to measure the parity-violating asymmetry A{sup PV} in Moeller scattering. The tree-level prediction for A{sup PV} is proportional to 1-4 sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. Since sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} {approx} 0.25, the effect of radiative corrections is enhanced, allowing the E158 experiment to probe for physics effects beyond the Standard Model at the TeV scale. This work presents the results from the first two physics runs of the experiment, covering data collected in the year 2002. The parity-violating asymmetry A{sup PV} was measured to be A{sup PV} = -158 ppb {+-} 21 ppb (stat) {+-} 17 ppb (sys). The result represents the first demonstration of parity violation in Moeller scattering. The observed value of A{sup PV} corresponds to a measurement of the weak mixing angle of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2380 {+-} 0.0016(stat) {+-} 0.0013(sys), which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2385 {+-} 0.0006 (theory).

  16. Scanning of Adsorption Hysteresis In Situ with Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, Athanasios Ch.; Favvas, Evangelos P.; Stefanopoulos, Konstantinos L.; Vansant, Etienne F.

    2016-01-01

    Everett’s theorem-6 of the domain theory was examined by conducting adsorption in situ with small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) supplemented by the contrast matching technique. The study focuses on the spectrum differences of a point to which the system arrives from different scanning paths. It is noted that according to this theorem at a common point the system has similar macroscopic properties. Furthermore it was examined the memory string of the system. We concluded that opposite to theorem-6: a) at a common point the system can reach in a finite (not an infinite) number of ways, b) a correction for the thickness of the adsorbed film prior to capillary condensation is necessary, and c) the scattering curves although at high-Q values coincide, at low-Q values are different indicating different microscopic states. That is, at a common point the system holds different metastable states sustained by hysteresis effects. These metastable states are the ones which highlight the way of a system back to a return point memory (RPM). Entering the hysteresis loop from different RPMs different histories are implanted to the paths toward the common point. Although in general the memory points refer to relaxation phenomena, they also constitute a characteristic feature of capillary condensation. Analogies of the no-passing rule and the adiabaticity assumption in the frame of adsorption hysteresis are discussed. PMID:27741263

  17. Monomeric Amyloid Beta Peptide in Hexafluoroisopropanol Detected by Small Angle Neutron Scattering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang-Haagen

    Full Text Available Small proteins like amyloid beta (Aβ monomers are related to neurodegenerative disorders by aggregation to insoluble fibrils. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS is a nondestructive method to observe the aggregation process in solution. We show that SANS is able to resolve monomers of small molecular weight like Aβ for aggregation studies. We examine Aβ monomers after prolonged storing in d-hexafluoroisopropanol (dHFIP by using SANS and dynamic light scattering (DLS. We determined the radius of gyration from SANS as 1.0±0.1 nm for Aβ1-40 and 1.6±0.1 nm for Aβ1-42 in agreement with 3D NMR structures in similar solvents suggesting a solvent surface layer with 5% increased density. After initial dissolution in dHFIP Aβ aggregates sediment with a major component of pure monomers showing a hydrodynamic radius of 1.8±0.3 nm for Aβ1-40 and 3.2±0.4 nm for Aβ1-42 including a surface layer of dHFIP solvent molecules.

  18. Real-Time Small-Angle X-ray Scattering from Rubber-Modified Thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubeck, R. A.

    1997-03-01

    Real-time small-angle X-ray scattering (RTSAXS) studies have been performed on a series of rubber-modified thermoplastics. These include: High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS), (2) Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene copolymers (ABS), (3) weatherable ABS-type resins containing grafted rubber particles derived from acrylonitrile ethylene styrene (AES) or acrylonitrile styrene acrylate (ASA), and (4) rubber-toughened syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS). Scattering patterns were measured at successive time intervals of from 2 to 3 ms. and were analyzed to determine the plastic strain due to crazing. Simultaneous measurements of the absorption of the primary beam by the sample allowed the total plastic strain to be computed. The plastic strain due to other deformation mechanisms (e.g. particle cavitation and macroscopic shear deformation) was determined by the difference. The contribution from microscopic shear deformation was determined from video-based optical data obtained along with the RTSAXS data. One example is an experimental AES system in an SAN matrix with insufficient gel particle graft which was found to lack substantial contributions from crazing and microshear yielding mechanisms. Manipulating the graft and cross linking levels in the AES system results in a ten-fold increase in microshear yield, but not much additional cavitation and crazing.

  19. Small-angle scattering from GP zones in Al–Cu alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K T Kashyap; Praveennath G Koppad

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that Guinier Preston (GP) zones form in Al–Cu alloys upon solutionizing and artificial aging, which are extensively used in commercial practice. It is well established that GP zones are discshaped precipitates, i.e. disks of clusters of copper atoms in the FCC aluminium matrix. These disks have coherency strain fields in aluminium that give the alloy its high yield strength. The formation of GP zones in the supersaturated aluminium matrix is thought to be heterogeneous nucleation and growth. Some authors have believed that the formation of GP zones is by spinodal decomposition of the supersaturated Al–Cu solid solution. The main objective of the present work is to test whether spinodal decomposition is responsible for the formation of GP zones in Al–Cu alloy. The experimental alloy AA2219 was selected for its high copper content (Al–6%Cu–0.2%Zr). After solutionizing and artificial aging, the aging curve was plotted and smallangle scattering experiments were carried on the powdered samples as a function of time during artificial aging. Small-angle scattering data were analysed, and evidence has been obtained for the occurrence of spinodal decomposition as the mechanism responsible in the early stages of formation of GP zones.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of statistical errors in small-angle X-ray scattering measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlak, Steffen M.; Bruetzel, Linda K.; Lipfert, Jan

    2017-03-29

    A new model is proposed for the measurement errors incurred in typical small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments, which takes into account the setup geometry and physics of the measurement process. The model accurately captures the experimentally determined errors from a large range of synchrotron and in-house anode-based measurements. Its most general formulation gives for the variance of the buffer-subtracted SAXS intensity σ2(q) = [I(q) + const.]/(kq), whereI(q) is the scattering intensity as a function of the momentum transferq;kand const. are fitting parameters that are characteristic of the experimental setup. The model gives a concrete procedure for calculating realistic measurement errors for simulated SAXS profiles. In addition, the results provide guidelines for optimizing SAXS measurements, which are in line with established procedures for SAXS experiments, and enable a quantitative evaluation of measurement errors.

  1. Spin-Echo Small Angle Neutron Scattering analysis of liposomes and bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijkamp, Leon F van; Sevcenco, Ana-Maria; Abou, Diane; Luik, Remko van; Krijger, Gerard C; Schepper, Ignatz M de; Wolterbeek, Bert; Bouwman, Wim G [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Department of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands); Koning, Gerben A, E-mail: l.f.vanheijkamp@tudelft.n, E-mail: w.g.bouwman@tudelft.n [Laboratory Experimental Surgical Oncology, Section Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Erasmus Medical Center, POBox 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-10-01

    Two types of liposomes, commonly used in drug delivery studies, and E. coli bacteria, all prepared in H{sub 2}O, were resuspended in D{sub 2}O and measured with Small Angle Spin-Echo Neutron Scattering (SESANS). Modeling was performed using correlation functions for solid spheres and hollow spheres. The signal strength and curve shape were more indicative of hollow particles, indicating that the H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2}O exchange occurred too fast to be observed with the available time resolution. Fitting the particle diameter and membrane thickness of the hollow sphere model to the data, gave results which were in good agreement with Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) data and literature, showing as a proof-of-principle that SESANS is able to investigate such systems. SESANS may become a good alternative to conventional tritium studies or a tool with which to study intracellular vesicle transport phenomena, with possible in vivo applications. Calculations show that a substantial change in numbers of a mixed system of small and large biological particles should be observable. A possible application is the destruction by external means of great numbers of liposomes in the presence of tumor cells for triggered drug release in cancer treatment. Since SESANS is both non-invasive and non-destructive and can handle relatively thick samples, it could be a useful addition to more conventional techniques.

  2. Small-angle neutron scattering investigation of polyurethane aged in dry and wet air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Tian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures of Estane 5703 aged at 70°C in dry and wet air have been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. The samples were swollen in deuterated toluene for enhancing the contrast. The scattering data show the characteristic domain structure of polyurethanes consisting of soft and hard segments. Debye-Anderson-Brumberger function used with hard sphere structure factor, and the Teubner-Strey model are used to analyze the two-phase domain structure of the polymer. The combined effects of temperature and humidity have a strong disruption effect on the microstructures of Estane. For the sample aged at 70°C in wet air for 1 month, the domain size, described by the correlation length, increases from 2.3 to 3.8 nm and their distance, expressed by hard-sphere interaction radius, increases from 8.4 to 10.6 nm. The structure development is attributed to degradation of polymer chains as revealed by gel permeation chromatography. The hydrolysis of ester links on polymer backbone at 70°C in the presence of water humidity is the main reason for the changes of the microstructure. These findings can contribute to developing predictive models for the safety, performance, and lifetime of polyurethanes.

  3. Discovering New Features of Protein Complexes Structures by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C. L. P.; Vorup-Jensen, T.; Andersen, C. B. F.; Andersen, G. R.; Pedersen, J. S.

    In spite of the recent advances in the X-Ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, the determination of the quaternary structure of large protein complexes is still a challenge in molecular biology and biological sciences. In this respect, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a key technique, enabling the determination of the possible structural conformation of complexes in an almost native state. Despite of this book being devoted to scattering techniques by synchrotron radiation, in this chapter we present two examples of application of laboratory-based SAXS to protein solution. The fundaments of the technique are obviously the same and have been deeply described in Chap. 2. In this chapter, we will introduce the application of SAXS to protein solution. Special emphasis is done on data reduction and absolute units calibration. As an example to illustrate the power of this technique, two new data sets for two protein complexes will be presented. This will show how high-quality SAXS data combined with advanced model strategies enables the determination of the quaternary structure of protein complexes.

  4. Particle-scale structure in frozen colloidal suspensions from small-angle x-ray scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Spannuth, Melissa

    2011-02-01

    During directional solidification of the solvent in a colloidal suspension, the colloidal particles segregate from the growing solid, forming high-particle-density regions with structure on a hierarchy of length scales ranging from that of the particle-scale packing to the large-scale spacing between these regions. Previous work has concentrated mostly on the medium- to large-length scale structure, as it is the most accessible and thought to be more technologically relevant. However, the packing of the colloids at the particle scale is an important component not only in theoretical descriptions of the segregation process, but also to the utility of freeze-cast materials for new applications. Here we present the results of experiments in which we investigated this structure across a wide range of length scales using a combination of small-angle x-ray scattering and direct optical imaging. As expected, during freezing the particles were concentrated into regions between ice dendrites forming a microscopic pattern of high- and low-particle-density regions. X-ray scattering indicates that the particles in the high-density regions were so closely packed as to be touching. However, the arrangement of the particles does not conform to that predicted by standard interparticle pair potentials, suggesting that the particle packing induced by freezing differs from that formed during equilibrium densification processes. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  5. Structural evaluation of an amyloid fibril model using small-angle x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Eshan; Choi, Mina; Alam, Nadia; Bhirde, Ashwinkumar A.; Beaucage, Serge L.; Badano, Aldo

    2017-08-01

    Amyloid fibrils are highly structured protein aggregates associated with a wide range of diseases including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. We report a structural investigation of an amyloid fibril model prepared from a commonly used plasma protein (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) using small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) technique. As a reference, the size estimates from SAXS are compared to dynamic light scattering (DLS) data and the presence of amyloid-like fibrils is confirmed using Congo red absorbance assay. Our SAXS results consistently show the structural transformation of BSA from spheroid to rod-like elongated structures during the fibril formation process. We observe the elongation of fibrils over two months with fibril length growing from 35.9  ±  3.0 nm to 51.5  ±  2.1 nm. Structurally metastable fibrils with distinct SAXS profiles have been identified. As proof of concept, we demonstrate the use of such distinct SAXS profiles to detect fibrils in the mixture solutions of two species by estimating their volume fractions. This easily detectable and well-characterized amyloid fibril model from BSA can be readily used as a control or standard reference to further investigate SAXS applications in the detection of structurally diverse amyloid fibrils associated with protein aggregation diseases.

  6. High-resolution proton scattering off {sup 70}Zn under extreme forward angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Andreas; Martin, Dirk; Neumann-Cosel, Peter von; Pietralla, Norbert [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Tamii, Atsushi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka (Japan); Collaboration: E377-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    A high-resolution scattering experiment was performed with a 295 MeV proton beam at the Research Center of Nuclear Physics in Osaka, Japan. The nucleus {sup 70}Zn has been measured under scattering angles of 0 {sup circle}, 3 {sup circle} and 4.5 {sup circle}. From the angular distributions it is possible to distinguish spin-M1 and E1 response. The spin-M1 response is assumed to be affected by the shell evolution due to the tensor force towards the exotic neutron-rich doubly magic nuclei {sup 78}Ni. The experiments will also provide important information on the evolution of the pygmy dipole resonance with neutron excess by comparison with unstable neutron-rich isotones {sup 68}Ni discovered recently at GSI. During the analysis procedure, ion optical correction methods, drift time to distance conversion, high-resolution corrections and an energy calibration are applied. After the background subtraction, double differential cross sections can be extracted.

  7. Characterization of Physically and Chemically Separated Athabasca Asphaltenes Using Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amundaraín Hurtado, Jesús Leonardo; Chodakowski, Martin; Long, Bingwen; Shaw, John M. (Alberta)

    2012-02-07

    Athabasca asphaltenes were characterized using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Two methods were used to separate asphaltenes from the Athabasca bitumen: namely, chemical separation by precipitation with n-pentane and physical separation by nanofiltration using a zirconia membrane with a 20 nm average pore size. The permeate and chemically separated samples were diluted in 1-methylnaphtalene and n-dodecane prior to SAXS measurements. The temperature and asphaltene concentration ranges were 50-310 C and 1-10.4 wt %, respectively. Model-independent analysis of SAXS data provided the radius of gyration and the scattering coefficients. Model-dependent fits provided size distributions for asphaltenes assuming that they are dense and spherical. Model-independent analysis for physically and chemically separated asphaltenes showed significant differences in nominal size and structure, and the temperature dependence of structural properties. The results challenge the merits of using chemically separated asphaltene properties as a basis for asphaltene property prediction in hydrocarbon resources. While the residuals for model-dependent fits are small, the results are inconsistent with the structural parameters obtained from model-independent analysis.

  8. Size And Shape of Detergent Micelles Determined By Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, Jan; Columbus, Linda; Chu, Vincent B.; Lesley, Scott A.; Doniach, Sebastian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL /Pasteur Inst., Paris /Scripps Res. Inst. /Novartis Res. Found.

    2009-04-29

    We present a systematic analysis of the aggregation number and shape of micelles formed by nine detergents commonly used in the study of membrane proteins. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements are reported for glucosides with 8 and 9 alkyl carbons (OG/NG), maltosides and phosphocholines with 10 and 12 alkyl carbons (DM/DDM and FC-10/FC-12), 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine (DHPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (LPPG), and 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate (CHAPS). The SAXS intensities are well described by two-component ellipsoid models, with a dense outer shell corresponding to the detergent head groups and a less electron dense hydrophobic core. These models provide an intermediate resolution view of micelle size and shape. In addition, we show that Guinier analysis of the forward scattering intensity can be used to obtain an independent and model-free measurement of the micelle aggregation number and radius of gyration. This approach has the advantage of being easily generalizable to protein-detergent complexes, where simple geometric models are inapplicable. Furthermore, we have discovered that the position of the second maximum in the scattering intensity provides a direct measurement of the characteristic head group-head group spacing across the micelle core. Our results for the micellar aggregation numbers and dimensions agree favorably with literature values as far as they are available. We de novo determine the shape of FC-10, FC-12, DM, LPPG, and CHAPS micelles and the aggregation numbers of FC-10 and OG to be ca. 50 and 250, respectively. Combined, these data provide a comprehensive view of the determinants of micelle formation and serve as a starting point to correlate detergent properties with detergent-protein interactions.

  9. Characterization of polymer adsorption onto drug nanoparticles using depletion measurements and small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Daniel J; Sepassi, Shadi; King, Stephen M; Holland, Simon J; Martini, Luigi G; Lawrence, M Jayne

    2013-11-04

    Production of polymer and/or surfactant-coated crystalline nanoparticles of water-insoluble drugs (nanosuspensions) using wet bead milling is an important formulation approach to improve the bioavailability of said compounds. Despite the fact that there are a number of nanosuspensions on the market, there is still a deficiency in the characterization of these nanoparticles where further understanding may lead to the rational selection of polymer/surfactant. To this end small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements were performed on drug nanoparticles milled in the presence of a range of polymers of varying molecular weight. Isotopic substitution of the aqueous solvent to match the scattering length density of the drug nanoparticles (i.e., the technique of contrast matching) meant that neutron scattering resulted only from the adsorbed polymer layer. The layer thickness and amount of hydroxypropylcellulose adsorbed on nabumetone nanoparticles derived from fitting the SANS data to both model-independent and model dependent volume fraction profiles were insensitive to polymer molecular weight over the range Mv = 47-112 kg/mol, indicating that the adsorbed layer is relatively flat but with tails extending up to approximately 23 nm. The constancy of the absorbed amount is in agreement with the adsorption isotherm determined by measuring polymer depletion from solution in the presence of the nanoparticles. Insensitivity to polymer molecular weight was similarly determined using SANS measurements of nabumetone or halofantrine nanoparticles stabilized with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose or poly(vinylpyrrolidone). Additionally SANS studies revealed the amount adsorbed, and the thickness of the polymer layer was dependent on both the nature of the polymer and drug particle surface. The insensitivity of the adsorbed polymer layer to polymer molecular weight has important implications for the production of nanoparticles, suggesting that lower molecular weight polymers

  10. Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-Ray Scattering: Technique and Application to Discontinuous Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joanne Rachel

    1990-01-01

    During the early stages of thin film growth in many thin film-substrate systems, adsorbate atoms form discrete three-dimensional islands, typically 10 A to 150 A in size. In order to study these islands, surface sensitive small angle x-ray scattering has been done for the first time by using a grazing incidence geometry (GISAXS). In this method, the substrate is aligned for total external reflection and the islands produce small angle scattering from the refracted beam crossing the substrate surface. The motivation for developing the GISAXS technique is the advantages GISAXS offers. First, because GISAXS works in reflection, there are no substrate thickness restrictions. Second, there is no sample conductivity requirement. Third, there are no x-ray beam induced sample changes. Finally, the x-ray beam samples all of the islands in the beam path simultaneously. In order to examine thin films in situ with GISAXS, an ultra-high vacuum chamber has been built which can be attached to a rotating anode or synchrotron x-ray source. This chamber is equipped with a pair of beryllium windows, a metal evaporator, a sample heater, and a precision rotary sample holder feedthrough. The GISAXS technique was applied to a model system of gold islands on glass substrates. The glass provides high reflectivity and gold provides strong atomic number contrast. For as-deposited films from 5 A to 15 A in average thickness, average island sizes, heights, and preferred island spacings, and the island surface roughness were determined. From the results of low temperature (< 375^circK) post-deposition annealing experiments, a model was developed which explains the observed slow time-dependence of post-deposition island growth in terms of overlapping diffusion fields and mass transfer by island mobility. The activation energy for this process was determined to be 0.49 eV. These GISAXS results were supplemented with transmission electron micrographs of and grazing incidence wide angle x

  11. Localization of the large-angle foil-scattering beam loss caused by the multiturn charge-exchange injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Kazami; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kinsho, Michikazu

    2013-07-01

    In the 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, significant losses were observed at the branching of the H0 dump line and the beam position monitor that was inserted downstream of the H0 dump branch duct. These losses were caused by the large-angle scattering of the injection and circulating beams at the charge-exchange foil. To realize high-power operation, these losses must be mitigated. Therefore, a new collimation system was developed and installed in October 2011. To efficiently optimize this system, the behavior of particles scattered by the foil and produced by the absorber were simulated, and the optimal position and angle of the absorber were investigated. During this process, an angle regulation method for the absorber was devised. An outline of this system, the angle regulation method for the absorber, and the performance of this new collimation system are described.

  12. Multiaxial deformation of polyethylene and polyethylene/clay nanocomposites: In situ synchrotron small angle and wide angle X-ray scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurun, Bilge; Bucknall, David G.; Thio, Yonathan S.; Teoh, Chin Ching; Harkin-Jones, Eileen (GIT); (Queens)

    2013-01-10

    A unique in situ multiaxial deformation device has been designed and built specifically for simultaneous synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements. SAXS and WAXS patterns of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and HDPE/clay nanocomposites were measured in real time during in situ multiaxial deformation at room temperature and at 55 C. It was observed that the morphological evolution of polyethylene is affected by the existence of clay platelets as well as the deformation temperature and strain rate. Martensitic transformation of orthorhombic into monoclinic crystal phases was observed under strain in HDPE, which is delayed and hindered in the presence of clay nanoplatelets. From the SAXS measurements, it was observed that the thickness of the interlamellar amorphous region increased with increasing strain, which is due to elongation of the amorphous chains. The increase in amorphous layer thickness is slightly higher for the nanocomposites compared to the neat polymer.

  13. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90$^{\\circ}$

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Q; Gillitzer, A; Grzonka, D; Khoukaz, A; Klehr, F; Lehrach, A; Prasuhn, D; Ritman, J; Sefzick, T; Stockmann, T; Täschner, A; Wuestner, P; Xu, H

    2014-01-01

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to 90$^{\\circ}$ are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment.

  14. Testing the Feasibility of Using PERM to Apply Scattering-Angle Filtering in the Image-Domain for FWI Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Hani Ataiq

    2014-09-01

    ABSTRACT Testing the Feasibility of Using PERM to Apply Scattering-Angle Filtering in the Image-Domain for FWI Applications Hani Ataiq Alzahrani Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is a non-linear optimization problem aimed to estimating subsurface parameters by minimizing the mis t between modeled and recorded seismic data using gradient descent methods, which are the only practical choice because of the size of the problem. Due to the high non-linearity of the problem, gradient methods will converge to a local minimum if the starting model is not close to the true one. The accuracy of the long-wavelength components of the initial model controls the level of non-linearity of the inversion. In order for FWI to converge to the global minimum, we have to obtain the long wavelength components of the model before inverting for the short wavelengths. Ultra-low temporal frequencies are sensitive to the smooth (long wavelength) part of the model, and can be utilized by waveform inversion to resolve that part. Un- fortunately, frequencies in this range are normally missing in eld data due to data- acquisition limitations. The lack of low frequencies can be compensated for by uti- lizing wide-aperture data, as they include arrivals that are especially sensitive to the long wavelength components of the model. The higher the scattering angle of a 5 recorded event, the higher the model wavelength it can resolve. Based on this prop- erty, a scattering-angle ltering algorithm is proposed to start the inversion process with events corresponding to the highest scattering angle available in the data, and then include lower scattering angles progressively. The large scattering angles will resolve the smooth part of the model and reduce the non-linearity of the problem, then the lower ones will enhance the resolution of the model. Recorded data is rst migrated using Pre-stack Exploding Re ector Migration (PERM), then the resulting pre-stack image is transformed into angle gathers to which

  15. Nano-scale morphology of melanosomes revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gorniak

    Full Text Available Melanosomes are highly specialized organelles that produce and store the pigment melanin, thereby fulfilling essential functions within their host organism. Besides having obvious cosmetic consequences--determining the color of skin, hair and the iris--they contribute to photochemical protection from ultraviolet radiation, as well as to vision (by defining how much light enters the eye. Though melanosomes can be beneficial for health, abnormalities in their structure can lead to adverse effects. Knowledge of their ultrastructure will be crucial to gaining insight into the mechanisms that ultimately lead to melanosome-related diseases. However, due to their small size and electron-dense content, physiologically intact melanosomes are recalcitrant to study by common imaging techniques such as light and transmission electron microscopy. In contrast, X-ray-based methodologies offer both high spatial resolution and powerful penetrating capabilities, and thus are well suited to study the ultrastructure of electron-dense organelles in their natural, hydrated form. Here, we report on the application of small-angle X-ray scattering--a method effective in determining the three-dimensional structures of biomolecules--to whole, hydrated murine melanosomes. The use of complementary information from the scattering signal of a large ensemble of suspended organelles and from single, vitrified specimens revealed a melanosomal sub-structure whose surface and bulk properties differ in two commonly used inbred strains of laboratory mice. Whereas melanosomes in C57BL/6J mice have a well-defined surface and are densely packed with 40-nm units, their counterparts in DBA/2J mice feature a rough surface, are more granular and consist of 60-nm building blocks. The fact that these strains have different coat colors and distinct susceptibilities to pigment-related eye disease suggest that these differences in size and packing are of biological significance.

  16. Energy and pitch-angle dispersions of LLBL/cusp ions seen at middle altitudes: predictions by the open magnetosphere model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations are presented of the ion distribution functions seen by middle-altitude spacecraft in the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL and cusp regions when reconnection is, or has recently been, taking place at the equatorial magnetopause. From the evolution of the distribution function with time elapsed since the field line was opened, both the observed energy/observation-time and pitch-angle/energy dispersions are well reproduced. Distribution functions showing a mixture of magnetosheath and magnetospheric ions, often thought to be a signature of the LLBL, are found on newly opened field lines as a natural consequence of the magnetopause effects on the ions and their flight times. In addition, it is shown that the extent of the source region of the magnetosheath ions that are detected by a satellite is a function of the sensitivity of the ion instrument . If the instrument one-count level is high (and/or solar-wind densities are low, the cusp ion precipitation detected comes from a localised region of the mid-latitude magnetopause (around the magnetic cusp, even though the reconnection takes place at the equatorial magnetopause. However, if the instrument sensitivity is high enough, then ions injected from a large segment of the dayside magnetosphere (in the relevant hemisphere will be detected in the cusp. Ion precipitation classed as LLBL is shown to arise from the low-latitude magnetopause, irrespective of the instrument sensitivity. Adoption of threshold flux definitions has the same effect as instrument sensitivity in artificially restricting the apparent source region

    Key words. Low-latitude boundary layer · Cusp regions · Open magnetosphere model · Mid-altitudes

  17. An Assessment of Critical Dimension Small Angle X-ray Scattering Metrology for Advanced Semiconductor Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settens, Charles M. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Albany, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous migration of planar transistors to FinFET architectures, the introduction of a plurality of materials to ensure suitable electrical characteristics, and the establishment of reliable multiple patterning lithography schemes to pattern sub-10 nm feature sizes imposes formidable challenges to current in-line dimensional metrologies. Because the shape of a FinFET channel cross-section immediately influences the electrical characteristics, the evaluation of 3D device structures requires measurement of parameters beyond traditional critical dimension (CD), including their sidewall angles, top corner rounding and footing, roughness, recesses and undercuts at single nanometer dimensions; thus, metrologies require sub-nm and approaching atomic level measurement uncertainty. Synchrotron critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering (CD-SAXS) has unique capabilities to non-destructively monitor the cross-section shape of surface structures with single nanometer uncertainty and can perform overlay metrology to sub-nm uncertainty. In this dissertation, we perform a systematic experimental investigation using CD-SAXS metrology on a hierarchy of semiconductor 3D device architectures including, high-aspect-ratio contact holes, H2 annealed Si fins, and a series of grating type samples at multiple points along a FinFET fabrication process increasing in structural intricacy and ending with fully fabricated FinFET. Comparative studies between CD-SAXS metrology and other relevant semiconductor dimensional metrologies, particularly CDSEM, CD-AFM and TEM are used to determine physical limits of CD-SAXS approach for advanced semiconductor samples. CD-SAXS experimental tradeoffs, advice for model-dependent analysis and thoughts on the compatibility with a semiconductor manufacturing environment are discussed.

  18. Size and shape of the repetitive domain of high molecular weight wheat gluten proteins. 1. Small angle neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egelhaaf, SU; van Swieten, E; Bosma, T; de Boef, E; van Dijk, AA; Robillard, GT; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2003-01-01

    The solution structure of the central repetitive domain of high molecular weight (HMW) wheat gluten proteins has been investigated for a range of concentrations and temperatures using mainly small-angle neutron scattering. A representative part of the repetitive domain (dBl) was studied as well as a

  19. Dipolar structures in magnetite ferrofluids studied with small-angle neutron scattering with and without applied magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klokkenburg, M.; Erne, B.H.; Wiedenmann, A.; Petukhov, A.V.; Philipse, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Field-induced structure formation in a ferrofluid with well-defined magnetite nanoparticles with a permanent magnetic dipole moment was studied with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) as a function of the magnetic interactions. The interactions were tuned by adjusting the size of the well-defined

  20. Dipolar structures in magnetite ferrofluids studied with small-angle neutron scattering with and without applied magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klokkenburg, M.; Erne, B.H.; Wiedenmann, A.; Petukhov, A.V.; Philipse, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Field-induced structure formation in a ferrofluid with well-defined magnetite nanoparticles with a permanent magnetic dipole moment was studied with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) as a function of the magnetic interactions. The interactions were tuned by adjusting the size of the well-defined

  1. Low-temperature dynamics of magnetic colloids studied by time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedenmann, A.; Keiderling, U.; Meissner, M.; Wallacher, D.; Gähler, R.; May, R.P.; Prévost, S.; Klokkenburg, M.; Erne, B.H.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of ordering and relaxation processes in magnetic colloids has been studied by means of stroboscopic small angle neutron scattering techniques in an oscillating magnetic field. Surfactant stabilized ferrofluids (FFs) of Fe3O4 and Co nanoparticles have been investigated as a function of t

  2. UNIBAB, version 2.2 Monte Carlo event generation for large angle Bhabha scattering at LEP and SLC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Anlauf, H; Manakos, P; Ohl, T

    1995-01-01

    This manual describes version 2.2 of the Monte Carlo event generator UNIBAB for large angle Bhabha scattering at LEP and SLC. UNIBAB implements higher order electromagnetic radiative corrections and the effects of soft photon exponentiation in a photon shower approach. Weak corrections are included through the use of an electroweak library.

  3. Studies of protein structure in solution and protein folding using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lingling [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) has been applied to the structural study of several biological systems, including the nitrogenase complex, the heat shock cognate protein (hsc70), and lysozyme folding. The structural information revealed from the SAXS experiments is complementary to information obtained by other physical and biochemical methods, and adds to our knowledge and understanding of these systems.

  4. Studying nanostructure gradients in injection-molded polypropylene/montmorillonite composites by microbeam small-angle x-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stribeck, Norbert; Schneider, Konrad; Zeinolebadi, Ahmad;

    2014-01-01

    The core–shell structure in oriented cylindrical rods of polypropylene (PP) and nanoclay composites (NCs) from PP and montmorillonite (MMT) is studied by microbeam small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The structure of neat PP is almost homogeneous across the rod showing regular semicrystalline st...

  5. Ultrasmall, small, and wide angle X-ray scattering analysis of diatom biosilica : interspecific differences in fractal properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, EG; Beelen, TPM; Sun, QY; Hazelaar, S; van Santen, RA; Gieskes, WWC

    2004-01-01

    Freshly prepared acid-cleaned biosilica of 21 different diatom species was studied using a combination of wide, small, and ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering analysis (WAXS, SAXS, and USAXS) in order to determine whether the structural and fractal properties from the subnanometer level up to dimensio

  6. Are Thermoresponsive Microgels Model Systems for Concentrated Colloidal Suspensions? A Rheology and Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, M.A.; Pedersen, J.S.; Lindner, P.; Richtering, W.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of concentrated temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) microgel suspensions has been investigated employing rheology and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). A previously described model expression for the particle form factor Pinho(q) is extended by a model hard

  7. Parallel GPGPU Evaluation of Small Angle X-ray Scattering Profiles in a Markov Chain Monte Carlo Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonov, Lubomir Dimitrov; Andreetta, Christian; Hamelryck, Thomas Wim

    2013-01-01

    Inference of protein structure from experimental data is of crucial interest in science, medicine and biotechnology. Low-resolution methods, such as small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), play a major role in investigating important biological questions regarding the structure of proteins in soluti......, and implements a caching procedure employed in the partial forward model evaluations within a Markov chain Monte Carlo framework....

  8. Application of Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS for Differentiation between Normal and Cancerous Breast Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Small angle, between 3° and 10°, X ray scattering is predominantly coherent giving rise to diffraction effects that can be observed as constructive and destructive interferences. These interferences carry information about the molecular structure of the tissue and hence can be used to identify changes that occur due to cancer. Method: In this study an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction method was used. The optimum scattering angle, determined from a series of measurements on adipose breast tissue at several angles from 4 to 7.3 degrees, was found to be 6.5°. Once optimized the system was used to measure the diffraction profiles (corrected scattered intensity versus momentum transfer of a total of 99 breast tissue samples. The samples were both normal and tumour samples. Results: Adipose tissue showed a sharp, high intensity peak at low momentum transfer values of approximately 1.1nm-1. Adipose tissue, mixed tissue (adipose & fibroglandular and tumor have peaks at different values of momentum transfer that can be used to identify the tissue. Benign and malignant breast tissues can also be differentiated by both peak positions and peak heights. It was also observed that the results were reproducible even after the tissue had been preserved at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Conclusion: We were able to differentiate between normal, benign and malignant breast tissues by using energy dispersive small angle x-ray scattering.

  9. Elucidation of density profile of self-assembled sitosterol + oryzanol tubules with small-angle neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, A.; Gilbert, E.P.; Bouwman, W.G.; Sawalha, H.I.M.; Adel, den R.; Garamus, V.M.; Venema, P.; Linden, van der E.; Flöter, E.

    2012-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments have been performed on self-assembled tubules of sitosterol and oryzanol in triglyceride oils to investigate details of their structure. Alternative organic phases (deuterated and non-deuterated decane, limonene, castor oil and eugenol) were used to

  10. Parallel GPGPU Evaluation of Small Angle X-ray Scattering Profiles in a Markov Chain Monte Carlo Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonov, Lubomir Dimitrov; Andreetta, Christian; Hamelryck, Thomas Wim

    2013-01-01

    Inference of protein structure from experimental data is of crucial interest in science, medicine and biotechnology. Low-resolution methods, such as small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), play a major role in investigating important biological questions regarding the structure of proteins in solution...

  11. Role of Molecular Flexibility and Colloidal Descriptions of Proteins in Crowded Environments from Small-Angle Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Clark, Nicholas J; Watson, Max C; Krueger, Susan; McAuley, Arnold; Curtis, Joseph E

    2016-12-15

    Small-angle scattering is a powerful technique to study molecular conformation and interactions of proteins in solution and in amorphous solids. We have investigated the role of multiple protein configurations in the interaction parameters derived from small-angle scattering for proteins in concentrated solutions. In order to account for the wide configurational space sampled by proteins, we generate ensembles of atomistic structures for lysozyme and monoclonal antibodies, representing globular and flexible proteins, respectively. While recent work has argued that a colloidal approach is inadequate to model proteins, because of the large configurational space that they sample in solution, we find a range of length scales where colloidal models can be used to describe solution scattering data while simultaneously accounting for structural flexibility. We provide insights to determine the length scales where isotropic colloidal models can be used, and find smoothly varying sets of interaction parameters that encompass ensembles of structures. This approach may play an important role in the definition of long-range interactions in coarse-grained models of flexible proteins with experimental scattering constraints. Additionally, we apply the decoupling approximation to ensembles of lysozyme structures with atomistic detail and observe remarkably different results when using geometric solids, such as ellipsoids. The insights from this study provide guidelines for the analysis of small-angle scattering profiles of proteins in crowded environments.

  12. Carbide precipitates in solution-quenched PH13-8 Mo stainless steel: A small-angle neutron scattering investigation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Sen; A K Patra; S Mazumder; J Mittra; G K Dey; P K De

    2004-08-01

    This paper deals with the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) investigation on solution-quenched PH13-8 Mo stainless steel. From the nature of the variation of the functionality of the profiles for varying specimen thickness and also from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it has been established that the small-angle scattering signal predominantly originates from the block-like metallic carbide precipitates in the specimen. The contribution due to double Bragg reflection is not significant in the present case. The single scattering profile has been extracted from the experimental profiles corresponding to different values of specimen thickness. In order to avoid complexity and non-uniqueness of the multi-parameter minimization for randomly oriented polydisperse block-like precipitate model, the data have been analyzed assuming randomly oriented polydisperse cylindrical particle model with a locked aspect ratio.

  13. Effective interaction of charged platelets in aqueous solution: investigations of colloid laponite suspensions by static light scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Harnau, L; Rosenfeldt, S; Ballauff, M

    2005-11-01

    We study dilute aqueous solutions of charged disklike mineral particles (laponite) by a combination of static light scattering (SLS) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Laponite solutions are known to form gels above a certain critical concentration that must be described as nonequilibrium states. Here we focus on the investigation by SLS and SAXS at concentrations below gelation (cLaponite platelets as well as the structure factor describing their interaction at finite concentration. A detailed analysis of the combined sets of data proves that the solutions are in a well-defined equilibrium state. Moreover, this analysis demonstrates the internal consistency and accuracy of the scattering functions obtained at finite concentrations. We find that laponite particles interact through an effective pair potential that is attractive on short range but repulsive on longer range. This finding demonstrates that Laponite solutions exhibit only a limited stability at the concentration of added salt used herein. Raising the ionic strength to 0.005M already leads to slow flocculation as is evidenced from the enhanced scattering intensity at smallest scattering angles. All data strongly suggest that the gelation occurring at higher concentration is related to aggregation.

  14. The new small-angle neutron scattering instrument SANS-1 at MLZ-characterization and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbauer, S.; Heinemann, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Karge, L.; Ostermann, A.; Defendi, I.; Schreyer, A.; Petry, W.; Gilles, R.

    2016-10-01

    A thorough characterization of the key features of the new small-angle neutron scattering instrument SANS-1 at MLZ, a joint project of Technische Universität München and Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, is presented. Measurements of the neutron beam profile, divergency and flux are given for various positions along the instrument including the sample position, and agree well with Monte Carlo simulations of SANS-1 using the program McStas. Secondly, the polarization option of SANS-1 is characterized for a broad wavelength band. A key feature of SANS-1 is the large accessible Q-range facilitated by the sideways movement of the detector. Particular attention is hence paid to the effects that arise due to large scattering angles on the detector where a standard cos3 solid angle correction is no longer applicable. Finally the performance of the instrument is characterized by a set of standard samples.

  15. Energy-dispersive small-angle X-ray scattering with cone collimation using X-ray capillary optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-09-01

    Energy-dispersive small-angle X-ray scattering (ED-SAXS) with an innovative design of cone collimation based on an ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL) had been explored. Using this new cone collimation system, scattering angle 2θ has a theoretical minimum angle related to the mean half-opening angle of the hollow cone beam of 1.42 mrad, and with the usable X-ray energy ranging from 4 to 30 keV, the resulting observable scattering vector q is down to a minimum value of about 0.003 Å-1 (or a Bragg spacing of about 2100 Å). However, the absorption of lower energies by X-ray capillary optics, sample transmission, and detector response function limits the application range to lower energy. Cone collimation ED-SAXS experiments carried out on pure water, Lupolen, and in situ temperature-dependent measurement of diacetylenic acid/melamine micelle solid were presented at three different scattering angles 2θ of 0.18°, 0.70° and 1.18° to illustrate the new opportunities offered by this technique as well as its limitations. Also, a comparison has been made by replacing the PPXRL with a pinhole, and the result shows that cone collimation ED-SAXS based on ESBC with PPXRL was helpful in improving the signal-to-noise ratio (i.e., reducing the parasitic background scattering) than ESBC with a pinhole. The cone collimation instrument based on X-ray capillary optics could be considered as a promising tool to perform SAXS experiments, especially cone collimation ED-SAXS has potential application for the in situ temperature-dependent studying on the kinetics of phase transitions.

  16. Molecular weight–gyration radius relation of globular proteins: a comparison of light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering and structure-based data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilgies, Detlef-M.; Folta-Stogniew, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The molecular weight–gyration radius relation for a number of globular proteins based on experimental light scattering data is compared with small-angle X-ray scattering data recently published by Mylonas & Svergun [J. Appl. Cryst. (2007 ▸), 40, s245–s249]. In addition, other recent experimental data and theoretical calculations are reviewed. It is found that the M W–R g relation for the globular proteins is well represented by a power law with an exponent of 0.37 (2). PMID:26500468

  17. Structure of PEP-PEO block copolymer micelles: Exploiting the complementarity of small-angle X-ray scattering and static light scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Grethe Vestergaard; Shi, Qing; Hernansanz, María J.

    2011-01-01

    . The present work shows that the same information can be obtained by combining static light scattering (SLS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), which provide information on, respectively, large and short length scales. Micelles of a series of block copolymers of poly(ethylene propylene)-b-poly(ethylene...... oxide) (PEP-PEO) in a 70% ethanol solution are investigated. The polymers have identical PEP blocks of 5.0 kDa and varying PEO blocks of 2.8-49 kDa. The SLS contrasts of PEP and PEO are similar, providing a homogeneous contrast, making SLS ideal for determining the overall micelle morphology. The SAXS...

  18. Unified model-independent S -matrix description of nuclear rainbow, prerainbow, and anomalous large-angle scattering in 4He-40Ca elastic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korda, V. Yu.; Molev, A. S.; Klepikov, V. F.; Korda, L. P.

    2015-02-01

    Using the evolutionary model-independent S -matrix approach, we show that a simultaneous correct description of the pictures of nuclear rainbow, prerainbow, and anomalous large-angle scattering (ALAS) in the 4He-40Ca elastic scattering can be achieved with help of the S -matrix moduli and the real nuclear phases exhibiting smooth monotonic dependencies on angular momentum, while the quantum deflection functions have a form characteristic of the nuclear rainbow case. The special role of the surface partial waves in the formation of ALAS is revealed.

  19. Design and Construction of the Control System for Batan Small Angle Neutron Scattering Spectrometer (SMARter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Santoso

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A 36 m Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS Spectrometer (SMARTer has been installed in Serpong, Indonesia in 1992. As time goes by, the original main computer was out of order and the instrument had not been operated since 2003. In order to activate the SMARTer, in the year 2005, a work on designing and constructing a new control system for SMARTer was carried out. The main component of this control system is a programmable peripheral I/O (IC PPI 8255 and was assembled as a plug-in board at an ISA slot of a personal computer. An IC PPI 8255 was programmed to control the mechanical movements of the instrument’s components: four neutron guide tubes, six pinholes collimator, a detector and a beam stopper. The test either with or without neutron beam has shown that this control system can be implemented for the mechanical movements of SMARTer. Error of moving the detector in the distance range of 1.5 m – 18 m is only 1 mm and the other movements have no error at all (precise.

  20. The accurate assessment of small-angle X-ray scattering data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Thomas D. [Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); Luft, Joseph R. [Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); SUNY Buffalo, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); Carter, Lester G.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M.; Martel, Anne [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS69, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Snell, Edward H., E-mail: esnell@hwi.buffalo.edu [Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); SUNY Buffalo, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A set of quantitative techniques is suggested for assessing SAXS data quality. These are applied in the form of a script, SAXStats, to a test set of 27 proteins, showing that these techniques are more sensitive than manual assessment of data quality. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has grown in popularity in recent times with the advent of bright synchrotron X-ray sources, powerful computational resources and algorithms enabling the calculation of increasingly complex models. However, the lack of standardized data-quality metrics presents difficulties for the growing user community in accurately assessing the quality of experimental SAXS data. Here, a series of metrics to quantitatively describe SAXS data in an objective manner using statistical evaluations are defined. These metrics are applied to identify the effects of radiation damage, concentration dependence and interparticle interactions on SAXS data from a set of 27 previously described targets for which high-resolution structures have been determined via X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The studies show that these metrics are sufficient to characterize SAXS data quality on a small sample set with statistical rigor and sensitivity similar to or better than manual analysis. The development of data-quality analysis strategies such as these initial efforts is needed to enable the accurate and unbiased assessment of SAXS data quality.

  1. Dynamic Conformations of Nucleosome Arrays in Solution from Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steven C.

    Chromatin conformation and dynamics remains unsolved despite the critical role of the chromatin in fundamental genetic functions such as transcription, replication, and repair. At the molecular level, chromatin can be viewed as a linear array of nucleosomes, each consisting of 147 base pairs (bp) of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) wrapped around a protein core and connected by 10 to 90 bp of linker dsDNA. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we investigated how the conformations of model nucleosome arrays in solution are modulated by ionic condition as well as the effect of linker histone proteins. To facilitate ensemble modeling of these SAXS measurements, we developed a simulation method that treats coarse-grained DNA as a Markov chain, then explores possible DNA conformations using Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) sampling. This algorithm extends the functionality of SASSIE, a program used to model intrinsically disordered biological molecules, adding to the previous methods for simulating protein, carbohydrates, and single-stranded DNA. Our SAXS measurements of various nucleosome arrays together with the MC generated models provide valuable solution structure information identifying specific differences from the structure of crystallized arrays.

  2. Study on porosity of ceramic SiC using small angle neutron scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李际周; Y.Ito

    1996-01-01

    The mechanical properties of functional heat-resistant ceramics SiC are significantly influenced by the concentration and idmensions of pores.Small angle neutron scattering measurements for 3 SiC samples with different densities are performed on C1-2 SANS instrument of the University of Tokyo.Two groups of the neutron data are obtained using 8 and 16m of secondary flight path,1 and 0.7 nm of neutron wave lengths,respectively,After deduction of background measurement and transmission correction,both neutron data are linked up with each other,The patterns of neutron data of 3 samples with Q range from 0.028-0.5nm-1 are almost with axial symmetry,showing that the shape of pores is almost spherical.Using Mellin transform,size distributions of pores in 3 samples are obtained.The average size (-19nm)of pores for hot-pressed SiC sample with higher density is smaller than the others (-21nm).It seems to be the reason why the density of hot-pressed SiC sample is higher than not hot-pressed sample.

  3. Quantifying radiation damage in biomolecular small-angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Jesse B; Thorne, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an increasingly popular technique that provides low-resolution structural information about biological macromolecules in solution. Many of the practical limitations of the technique, such as minimum required sample volume, and of experimental design, such as sample flow cells, are necessary because the biological samples are sensitive to damage from the X-rays. Radiation damage typically manifests as aggregation of the sample, which makes the collected data unreliable. However, there has been little systematic investigation of the most effective methods to reduce damage rates, and results from previous damage studies are not easily compared with results from other beamlines. Here a methodology is provided for quantifying radiation damage in SAXS to provide consistent results between different experiments, experimenters and beamlines. These methods are demonstrated on radiation damage data collected from lysozyme, glucose isomerase and xylanase, and it is found that no single metric is sufficient to describe radiation damage in SAXS for all samples. The radius of gyration, molecular weight and integrated SAXS profile intensity constitute a minimal set of parameters that capture all types of observed behavior. Radiation sensitivities derived from these parameters show a large protein dependence, varying by up to six orders of magnitude between the different proteins tested. This work should enable consistent reporting of radiation damage effects, allowing more systematic studies of the most effective minimization strategies.

  4. Scattering angle resolved optical coherence tomography for in vivo murine retinal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Michael R.; Katta, Nitesh; McElroy, Austin; Baruah, Vikram; Rylander, H. G.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal imaging contributes to understanding central nervous system (CNS) diseases because the eye is an anatomical "window to the brain" with direct optical access to nonmylenated retinal ganglion cells. However, many CNS diseases are associated with neuronal changes beyond the resolution of standard OCT retinal imaging systems. Though studies have shown the utility of scattering angle resolved (SAR) OCT for particle sizing and detecting disease states ex vivo, a compact SAR-OCT system for in vivo rodent retinal imaging has not previously been reported. We report a fiber-based SAR-OCT system (swept source at 1310 nm +/- 65 nm, 100 kHz scan rate) for mouse retinal imaging with a partial glass window (center aperture) for angular discrimination of backscattered light. This design incorporates a dual-axis MEMS mirror conjugate to the ocular pupil plane and a high collection efficiency objective. A muring retina is imaged during euthanasia, and the proposed SAR-index is examined versus time. Results show a positive correlation between the SAR-index and the sub-cellular hypoxic response of neurons to isoflurane overdose during euthanasia. The proposed SAR-OCT design and image process technique offer a contrast mechanism able to detect sub-resolution neuronal changes for murine retinal imaging.

  5. Small-angle light scattering by airborne particulates: Environnement S.A. continuous particulate monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Thaury, Claire; Mineau, Jean-Luc; Gaubicher, Bertrand

    2010-08-01

    Airborne particulate matter may have an effect on human health. It is therefore necessary to determine and control in real time the evolution of the concentration and mass of particulates in the ambient air. These parameters can be obtained using optical methods. We propose here a new instrument, 'CPM' (continuous particulate monitor), for the measurement of light scattered by ambient particulates at small angles. This geometry allows simultaneous and separate detections of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 fractions of airborne particulate matter, with no influence of their chemical nature and without using theoretical calculations. The ambient air is collected through a standard sampling head (PM10 inlet according to EN 12341, PM2.5 inlet according to EN 14907; or PM1, TSP inlets, standard US EPA inlets). The analysis of the first measurements demonstrates that this new instrument can detect, for each of the seven defined size ranges, real-time variations of particulate content in the ambient air. The measured concentrations (expressed in number per liter) can be converted into total mass concentrations (expressed in micrograms per cubic meter) of all fractions of airborne particulate matters sampled by the system. Periodic comparison with a beta-attenuation mass monitor (MP101M Beta Gauge Analyzer from Environnement S.A. company) allows the calculation of a calibration factor as a function of the mean particulate density that is used for this conversion. It is then possible to provide real-time relative variations of aerosol mass concentration.

  6. A semi-numerical model for near-critical angle scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradkin, Larissa Ju; Darmon, Michel; Chatillon, Sylvain; Calmon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Numerous phenomena in the fields of physics and mathematics as seemingly different as seismology, ultrasonics, crystallography, photonics, relativistic quantum mechanics, and analytical number theory are described by integrals with oscillating integrands that contain three coalescing criticalities, a branch point, stationary phase point, and pole as well as accumulation points at which the speed of integrand oscillation is infinite. Evaluating such integrals is a challenge addressed in this paper. A fast and efficient numerical scheme based on the regularized composite Simpson's rule is proposed, and its efficacy is demonstrated by revisiting the scattering of an elastic plane wave by a stress-free half-plane crack embedded in an isotropic and homogeneous solid. In this canonical problem, the head wave, edge diffracted wave, and reflected (or compensating) wave each can be viewed as a respective contribution of a branch point, stationary phase point, and pole. The proposed scheme allows for a description of the non-classical diffraction effects near the "critical" rays (rays that separate regions irradiated by the head waves from their respective shadow zones). The effects include the spikes present in diffraction coefficients at the critical angles in the far field as well as related interference ripples in the near field.

  7. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Spontaneous Formation of Unilamellar Vesicles: Potential Vehicles for Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaras, John

    2004-03-01

    Unilamellar vesicles (ULVs) are single-bilayer shells with radii commonly between 10 and 100 nm, and are widely used as model membranes, drug delivery systems, microreactors and substrates for a variety of enzymes and proteins. A common method of making ULVs is the extrusion of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) through synthetic membranes of known pore size. These extruded ULVs are invariably unstable and in due time, revert back to MLVs. Over the years there have been reports of the spontaneous formation of stable ULVs in surfactant, lipid, and lipid/detergent mixtures. These ULVs have sometimes been shown to be monodisperse and their radii were found, almost without exception, to vary with concentration. We have carried-out small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments on a biomimetic system composed of the phospholipids dimyristoyl and dihexanoyl phosphorylcholine (DMPC and DHPC, respectively). Doping DMPC/DHPC multilamellar vesicles with either the negatively charged lipid dimyristoyl phosphorylglycerol (DMPG, net charge -1) or the divalent cation, calcium (Ca2+) leads to the spontaneous formation of monodisperse unilamellar vesicles whose radii are concentration independent, in contrast to previous experimental observations.

  8. Towards weighing individual atoms by high-angle scattering of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argentero, G.; Mangler, C.; Kotakoski, J.; Eder, F.R.; Meyer, J.C., E-mail: Jannik.Meyer@univie.ac.at

    2015-04-15

    We consider theoretically the energy loss of electrons scattered to high angles when assuming that the primary beam can be limited to a single atom. We discuss the possibility of identifying the isotopes of light elements and of extracting information about phonons in this signal. The energy loss is related to the mass of the much heavier nucleus, and is spread out due to atomic vibrations. Importantly, while the width of the broadening is much larger than the energy separation of isotopes, only the shift in the peak positions must be detected if the beam is limited to a single atom. We conclude that the experimental case will be challenging but is not excluded by the physical principles as far as considered here. Moreover, the initial experiments demonstrate that the separation of gold and carbon based on a signal that is related to their mass, rather than their atomic number. - Highlights: • We explore how energy loss spectroscopy could be used to obtain information about the mass, rather than the charge, of atoms. • The dose and precision that would be needed to distinguish between the two isotopes of carbon, C12 and C13, is estimated. • Signal broadening due to phonons is included in the calculation. • Initial experiments show the separation between gold and carbon based on their mass rather than charge.

  9. Alzheimer's disease imaging biomarkers using small-angle x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mina; Alam, Nadia; Dahal, Eshan; Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badano, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    There is a need for novel imaging techniques for the earlier detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Two hallmarks of AD are amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques and tau tangles that are formed in the brain. Well-characterized x-ray cross sections of Aβ and tau proteins in a variety of structural states could potentially be used as AD biomarkers for small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) imaging without the need for injectable probes or contrast agents. First, however, the protein structures must be controlled and measured to determine accurate biomarkers for SAXS imaging. Here we report SAXS measurements of Aβ42 and tau352 in a 50% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution in which these proteins are believed to remain monomeric because of the stabilizing interaction of DMSO solution. Our SAXS analysis showed the aggregation of both proteins. In particular, we found that the aggregation of Aβ42 slowly progresses with time in comparison to tau352 that aggregates at a faster rate and reaches a steady-state. Furthermore, the measured signals were compared to the theoretical SAXS profiles of Aβ42 monomer, Aβ42 fibril, and tau352 that were computed from their respective protein data bank structures. We have begun the work to systematically control the structural states of these proteins in vitro using various solvent conditions. Our future work is to utilize the distinct SAXS profiles of various structural states of Aβ and tau to build a library of signals of interest for SAXS imaging in brain tissue.

  10. Small angle neutron scattering study of two nonionic surfactants in water micellar solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajewska Aldona

    2008-11-01

    Two classic nonionic surfactants – C14E7 (heptaethylene glycol monotetra-decyl ether) and C10E7 (heptaethylene glycol monodecyl ether) were investigated in heavy water solution for concentration = 0.17% (dilute regime) at different temperatures in the range = 10–35°C by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) method. In the case of C14E7 surfactant – for all temperatures at = 0.17% there are two axial ellipsoidal micelles with longer axis 15 nm at 10°C and 49.5 nm at 35°C in investigated solutions. For C10E7 surfactant at the same concentration of solution and temperature – two axial ellipsoidal micelles were observed, too. The longer axis is equal to 7.5 nm at 10°C, 9 nm at 20°C and at 35°C this axis is equal to 12 nm. Micelles of C10E7 nonionic surfactant are smaller than those of C14E7 surfactant in the same experimental conditions.

  11. Structural formation of huntingtin-like aggregates probed by small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, Christopher B [ORNL; Perevozchikova, Tatiana [ORNL; Berthelier-Jung, Valerie M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In several neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington s disease (HD), aspects concerning the earliest of protein structures that form along the aggregation pathway have increasingly gained attention since these particular species are likely to be neurotoxic. We used time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to probe in solution these transient structures formed by peptides having the N-terminal sequence context of mutant huntingtin (Htt) exon 1. We obtained snapshots of the formed aggregates as the kinetic reaction ensued to yield quantitative information on their size and mass. At the early stage, small precursor species with an initial radius of gyration (Rg) of 16.1 5.9 and average mass of a dimer to trimer were monitored. Structural growth was treated as two modes with a transition from three-dimensional early aggregate formation to two-dimensional fibril growth and association. Our SANS results on the internal structure of the mature fibrils demonstrate loose packing with about 1 peptide per 4.75 -sheet repeat distance, which is shown to be quantitatively consistent with a -helix model. This research provides new insights into the structures forming along the pathway of Htt exon 1 aggregation and should assist in determining the role that precursors play in neuronal toxicity.

  12. Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering to Detect Nanoscopic Lipid Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Petruzielo, Robin S [Cornell University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The cell plasma membrane is a complex system, which is thought to be capable of exhibiting non-random lateral organization. Studies of live cells and model membranes have yielded mechanisms responsible for the formation, growth, and maintenance of nanoscopic heterogeneities, although the existence and mechanisms that give rise to these heterogeneities remain controversial. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is a tool ideally suited to interrogate lateral heterogeneity in model membranes, primarily due to its unique spatial resolution (i.e., "5 100 nm) and its ability to resolve structure with minimal perturbation to the membrane. In this review we examine several methods used to analyze the SANS signal arising from freely suspended unilamellar vesicles containing lateral heterogeneity. Specifically, we discuss an analytical model for a single, round domain on a spherical vesicle. We then discuss a numerical method that uses Monte Carlo simulation to describe systems with multiple domains and/or more complicated morphologies. Also discussed are several model-independent approaches that are sensitive to membrane heterogeneity. The review concludes with several recent applications of SANS to the study of membrane raft mixtures.

  13. Analysis of riboswitch structure and ligand binding using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Nathan J; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2014-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a powerful tool for examining the global conformation of riboswitches in solution, and how this is modulated by binding of divalent cations and small molecule ligands. SAXS experiments, which typically require only minutes per sample, directly yield two quantities describing the size and shape of the RNA: the radius of gyration (Rg) and the maximum linear dimension (Dmax). Examination of these quantities can reveal if a riboswitch undergoes cation-induced compaction. Comparison of the Rg and Dmax values between samples containing different concentrations of ligand reveals the overall structural response of the riboswitch to ligand. The Kratky plot (a graphical representation that emphasizes the higher-resolution SAXS data) and the P(r) plot or pair-probability distribution (an indirect Fourier transform, or power spectrum of the data) can provide additional evidence of riboswitch conformational changes. Simulation methods have been developed for generating three-dimensional reconstructions consistent with the one-dimensional SAXS data. These low-resolution molecular envelopes can aid in deciphering the relative helical arrangement within the RNA.

  14. Structure parameters of synaptic vesicles quantified by small-angle x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorph, Simon; Riedel, Dietmar; Arleth, Lise; Sztucki, Michael; Jahn, Reinhard; Holt, Matthew; Salditt, Tim

    2010-04-07

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are small, membrane-bound organelles that are found in the synaptic terminal of neurons, and which are crucial in neurotransmission. After a rise in internal [Ca(2+)] during neuronal stimulation, SVs fuse with the plasma membrane releasing their neurotransmitter content, which then signals neighboring neurons. SVs are subsequently recycled and refilled with neurotransmitter for further rounds of release. Recently, tremendous progress has been made in elucidating the molecular composition of SVs, as well as putative protein-protein interactions. However, what is lacking is an empirical description of SV structure at the supramolecular level-which is necessary to enable us to fully understand the processes of membrane fusion, retrieval, and recycling. Using small-angle x-ray scattering, we have directly investigated the size and structure of purified SVs. From this information, we deduced detailed size and density parameters for the protein layers responsible for SV function, as well as information about the lipid bilayer. To achieve a convincing model fit, a laterally anisotropic structure for the protein shell is needed, as a rotationally symmetric density profile does not explain the data. Not only does our model confirm many of the preexisting ideas concerning SV structure, but also for the first time, to our knowledge, it indicates structural refinements, such as the presence of protein microdomains.

  15. Progress in small-angle scattering from biological solutions at high-brilliance synchrotrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne T. Tuukkanen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS is an established technique that provides low-resolution structural information on macromolecular solutions. Recent decades have witnessed significant progress in both experimental facilities and in novel data-analysis approaches, making SAXS a mainstream method for structural biology. The technique is routinely applied to directly reconstruct low-resolution shapes of proteins and to generate atomistic models of macromolecular assemblies using hybrid approaches. Very importantly, SAXS is capable of yielding structural information on systems with size and conformational polydispersity, including highly flexible objects. In addition, utilizing high-flux synchrotron facilities, time-resolved SAXS allows analysis of kinetic processes over time ranges from microseconds to hours. Dedicated bioSAXS beamlines now offer fully automated data-collection and analysis pipelines, where analysis and modelling is conducted on the fly. This enables SAXS to be employed as a high-throughput method to rapidly screen various sample conditions and additives. The growing SAXS user community is supported by developments in data and model archiving and quality criteria. This review illustrates the latest developments in SAXS, in particular highlighting time-resolved applications aimed at flexible and evolving systems.

  16. Topological investigation of electronic silicon nanoparticulate aggregates using ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonah, E. O., E-mail: emmanuel.jonah@uct.ac.za; Britton, D. T. [University of Cape Town, Department of Physics, NanoSciences Innovation Centre (South Africa); Beaucage, P.; Rai, D. K.; Beaucage, G. [University of Cincinnati, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering (United States); Magunje, B. [University of Cape Town, Department of Physics, NanoSciences Innovation Centre (South Africa); Ilavsky, J. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, X-ray Science Division (United States); Scriba, M. R.; Haerting, M. [University of Cape Town, Department of Physics, NanoSciences Innovation Centre (South Africa)

    2012-11-15

    The network topology of two types of silicon nanoparticles, produced by high energy milling and pyrolysis of silane, in layers deposited from inks on permeable and impermeable substrates has been quantitatively characterized using ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering, supported by scanning electron microscopy observations. The milled particles with a highly polydisperse size distribution form agglomerates, which in turn cluster to form larger aggregates with a very high degree of aggregation. Smaller nanoparticles with less polydisperse size distribution synthesized by thermal catalytic pyrolysis of silane form small open clusters. The Sauter mean diameters of the primary particles of the two types of nanoparticles were obtained from USAXS particle volume to surface ratio, with values of {approx}41 and {approx}21 nm obtained for the high energy milled and pyrolysis samples, respectively. Assuming a log-normal distribution of the particles, the geometric standard deviation of the particles was calculated to be {approx}1.48 for all the samples, using parameters derived from the unified fit to the USAXS data. The flow properties of the inks and substrate combination lead to quantitative changes in the mean particle separation, with slowly curing systems with good capillary flow resulting in denser networks with smaller aggregates and better contact between particles.

  17. Study of titanium oxide sol-gel condensation using small angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattier, Bruno; Henderson, Mark; Brotons, Guillaume; Gibaud, Alain

    2010-04-29

    Transparent gels prepared from an acid solution of TiOCl(2) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and water have been studied by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The sol-gel transformation of the titanium inorganic polymer was studied as a function of chemical composition of the sol and of the annealing time. Quantitative information was obtained by modeling the SAXS data with the Burford and Beaucage models. From the fits to the data, the radius of gyration of the primary particles, the so-called building blocks, the size xi of the homogeneous objects forming a fractal network in the gel, and the fractal dimension of the gel were obtained. We found fractal dimensions varying between D(f) = 1.75 and 2.2 and a radius of gyration of the building blocks equal to R(g) = 0.46 nm, which remained almost constant for all studied samples. The analysis of the homogeneous domain size xi as a function of the annealing time shows the existence of an incubation time preceding the rapid growth of the aggregates at high titanium concentration.

  18. A new small-angle neutron scattering spectrometer at China Mianyang research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Mei, E-mail: pm740509@163.com; Sun, Liangwei; Chen, Liang; Sun, Guangai; Chen, Bo; Xie, Chaomei; Xia, Qingzhong; Yan, Guanyun; Tian, Qiang; Huang, Chaoqiang; Pang, Beibei; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yun; Liu, Yaoguang; Kang, Wu; Gong, Jian

    2016-02-21

    A new pinhole small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) spectrometer, installed at the cold neutron source of the 20 MW China Mianyang Research Reactor (CMRR) in the Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, has been put into use since 2014. The spectrometer is equipped with a multi-blade mechanical velocity selector, a multi-beam collimation system, and a two-dimensional He-3 position sensitive neutron detector. The q-range of the spectrometer covers from 0.01 nm{sup −1} to 5.0 nm{sup −1}. In this paper, the design and characteristics of the SANS spectrometer are described. The q-resolution calculations, together with calibration measurements of silver behenate and a dispersion of nearly monodisperse poly-methyl-methacrylate nanoparticles indicate that our SANS spectrometer has a good performance and is now in routine service. - Highlights: • A new SANS spectrometer has been put into use since 2014 in China. • One MBR selector possesses a higher resolution compared with traditional selector is used. • The spectrometer has a good performance and is now in routinely service.

  19. Interactive graphical system for small-angle scattering analysis of polydisperse systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konarev, P. V.; Volkov, V. V.; Svergun, D. I.

    2016-09-01

    A program suite for one-dimensional small-angle scattering analysis of polydisperse systems and multiple data sets is presented. The main program, POLYSAS, has a menu-driven graphical user interface calling computational modules from ATSAS package to perform data treatment and analysis. The graphical menu interface allows one to process multiple (time, concentration or temperature-dependent) data sets and interactively change the parameters for the data modelling using sliders. The graphical representation of the data is done via the Winteracter-based program SASPLOT. The package is designed for the analysis of polydisperse systems and mixtures, and permits one to obtain size distributions and evaluate the volume fractions of the components using linear and non-linear fitting algorithms as well as model-independent singular value decomposition. The use of the POLYSAS package is illustrated by the recent examples of its application to study concentration-dependent oligomeric states of proteins and time kinetics of polymer micelles for anticancer drug delivery.

  20. The small angle x-ray scattering of globular proteins in solution during heat denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banuelos, Jose; Urquidi, Jacob

    2008-10-01

    The ability of proteins to change their conformation in response to changes in their environment has consequences in biological processes like metabolism, chemical regulation in cells, and is believed to play a role in the onset of several neurodegenerative diseases. Factors such as a change in temperature, pressure, and the introduction of ions into the aqueous environment of a protein can give rise to the folding/unfolding of a protein. As a protein unfolds, the ratio of nonpolar to polar groups exposed to water changes, affecting a protein's thermodynamic properties. Using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), we are currently studying the intermediate protein conformations that arise during the folding/unfolding process as a function of temperature for five globular proteins. Trends in the observed intermediate structures of these globular proteins, along with correlations with data on protein thermodynamics may help elucidate shared characteristics between all proteins in the folding/unfolding process. Experimental design considerations will be discussed and preliminary results for some of these systems will be presented.

  1. Method to study sample object size limit of small-angle x-ray scattering computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mina; Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) imaging is an emerging medical tool that can be used for in vivo detailed tissue characterization and has the potential to provide added contrast to conventional x-ray projection and CT imaging. We used a publicly available MC-GPU code to simulate x-ray trajectories in a SAXS-CT geometry for a target material embedded in a water background material with varying sample sizes (1, 3, 5, and 10 mm). Our target materials were water solution of gold nanoparticle (GNP) spheres with a radius of 6 nm and a water solution with dissolved serum albumin (BSA) proteins due to their well-characterized scatter profiles at small angles and highly scattering properties. The background material was water. Our objective is to study how the reconstructed scatter profile degrades at larger target imaging depths and increasing sample sizes. We have found that scatter profiles of the GNP in water can still be reconstructed at depths up to 5 mm embedded at the center of a 10 mm sample. Scatter profiles of BSA in water were also reconstructed at depths up to 5 mm in a 10 mm sample but with noticeable signal degradation as compared to the GNP sample. This work presents a method to study the sample size limits for future SAXS-CT imaging systems.

  2. Small-angle light scattering symmetry breaking in polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films with inhomogeneous electrically controlled interface anchoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiko, V. A.; Konkolovich, A. V.; Zyryanov, V. Ya.; Miskevich, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    We have described the method of analyzing and reporting on the results of calculation of the small-angle structure of radiation scattered by a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film with electrically controlled interfacial anchoring. The method is based on the interference approximation of the wave scattering theory and the hard disk model. Scattering from an individual liquid crystal droplet has been described using the anomalous diffraction approximation extended to the case of droplets with uniform and nonuniform interface anchoring at the droplet-polymer boundary. The director field structure in an individual droplet is determined from the solution of the problem of minimizing the volume density of the free energy. The electrooptical effect of symmetry breaking in the angular distribution of scattered radiation has been analyzed. This effect means that the intensities of radiation scattered within angles +θ s and-θ s relative to the direction of illumination in the scattering plane can be different. The effect is of the interference origin and is associated with asymmetry of the phase shift of the wavefront of an incident wave from individual parts of the droplet, which appears due to asymmetry of the director field structure in the droplet, caused by nonuniform anchoring of liquid crystal molecules with the polymer on its surface. This effect is analyzed in the case of normal illumination of the film depending on the interfacial anchoring at the liquid crystal-polymer interface, the orientation of the optical axes of droplets, their concentration, sizes, anisometry, and polydispersity.

  3. Small-angle light scattering symmetry breaking in polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films with inhomogeneous electrically controlled interface anchoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiko, V. A., E-mail: loiko@ifanbel.bas-net.by; Konkolovich, A. V. [National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Stepanov Institute of Physics (Belarus); Zyryanov, V. Ya. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kirensky Institute of Physics, Federal Research Center “Krasnoyarsk Scientific Center,” Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Miskevich, A. A. [National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Stepanov Institute of Physics (Belarus)

    2017-03-15

    We have described the method of analyzing and reporting on the results of calculation of the small-angle structure of radiation scattered by a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film with electrically controlled interfacial anchoring. The method is based on the interference approximation of the wave scattering theory and the hard disk model. Scattering from an individual liquid crystal droplet has been described using the anomalous diffraction approximation extended to the case of droplets with uniform and nonuniform interface anchoring at the droplet–polymer boundary. The director field structure in an individual droplet is determined from the solution of the problem of minimizing the volume density of the free energy. The electrooptical effect of symmetry breaking in the angular distribution of scattered radiation has been analyzed. This effect means that the intensities of radiation scattered within angles +θ{sub s} and–θ{sub s} relative to the direction of illumination in the scattering plane can be different. The effect is of the interference origin and is associated with asymmetry of the phase shift of the wavefront of an incident wave from individual parts of the droplet, which appears due to asymmetry of the director field structure in the droplet, caused by nonuniform anchoring of liquid crystal molecules with the polymer on its surface. This effect is analyzed in the case of normal illumination of the film depending on the interfacial anchoring at the liquid crystal–polymer interface, the orientation of the optical axes of droplets, their concentration, sizes, anisometry, and polydispersity.

  4. Small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering study on the bilayer structure of synthetic and bovine heart cardiolipins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi [Biophysics Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Gunma University, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8510 (Japan); Hayakawa, Tomohiro [Life Science Laboratory, Advanced Materials Laboratories, Sony Corporation, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8510 (Japan); Ito, Kazuki; Takata, Masaki [Structural Materials Science Laboratory, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kobayashi, Toshihide, E-mail: htakahas@chem-bio.gunma-u.ac.j [Lipid Biology Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2010-10-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a membrane phospholipid containing four fatty acid chains. CL plays an important role in energy transformation in mitochondria. The disorder of CL biosynthesis is involved in a genetic disease, Barth syndrome. Alteration of fatty acid composition of CLs has been found in Barth syndrome patients, i.e., the decrease of unsaturated fatty acid chains. In this study, we investigated how the degree of saturation alters the structure of CL bilayers by using X-ray scattering. Bovine heart CL and two synthetic CLs were compared. Fatty acid compositions of these three CLs have different saturation. Small-angle X-ray scattering data showed that the decrease of the number of double bonds in the unsaturated fatty acid chains causes to thicken the CL bilayers. In addition, wide-angle X-ray scattering data suggested that the decrease reduces the degree of disorder of the hydrophobic region in a liquid crystalline phase. These results may be related to the dysfunction of mitochondria in Barth syndrome.

  5. Optimization of limit angle for free variable-pitch vertical axis tidal turbine%潮流能自由变偏角水轮机限位角优化方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张学伟; 张亮; 李志川; 盛其虎; 王树齐

    2012-01-01

    针对潮流能水轮机中的水动力问题,采用基于粘性CFD理论的多体耦合数值模拟方法对影响潮流能自由变偏角水轮机水动力性能的重要参数限位角进行研究.通过对比不同限位角下叶片偏角和水轮机转矩变化规律,阐明了限位角对水轮机运动特性和动力特性的影响规律.以水轮机功率最大化为优化目标,提出了限位角参数优化选取方法,并进行了实例验证.研究表明:当叶片摆动到限位角时,偏角由限位角的大小决定,限位角上限和下限对偏角的控制区域不同,这样可以通过单独调节限位角的上限或者下限分别改善叶片在不同方位角处的水动力特性.%In efforts to solve the hydrodynamic problem of tidal turbines, an investigation utilizing a multi-body coupling numerical method, based on the theory of viscous CFD is examined. The optimization of the limit angle is the most important factor that influences on the hydrodynamic performance of the free variable-pitch vertical axis tidal turbine. By analyzing the variation of the blade pitch angle and the turbine torque at different limit angles, the effect of the limit angle on the kinematics and dynamics characteristics of the turbine was expounded during this study. The optimization of the limit angle was proposed to maximize the turbine power, and it was verified by an example. The results showed the pitch angle was decided by the limit angle when turbine blade reached the bounds of limit angle, the control areas of upper and lower limit angle were different, and so hydrodynamic characteristics of tidal turbine at different azimuths can be improved by adjusting the upper or lower limit angle individually.

  6. Investigation of the structure of unilamellar dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles in aqueous sucrose solutions by small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselev, M. A., E-mail: elena@jinr.ru; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Zhabitskaya, E. I.; Aksenov, V. L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    The structure of a polydispersed population of unilamellar dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) vesicles in sucrose solutions has been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Calculations within the model of separated form factors (SFF) show that the structure of the vesicle system depends strongly on the sucrose concentration.

  7. EDITORIAL Proceedings of the XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Goran; Heenan, Richard

    2010-10-01

    There are 52 papers in these Proceedings. The papers are divided into 10 thematic sections and a section for invited papers and reviews. The sections and the respective section editors are given below. Section Editor(s) Invited Papers and Reviews Peter Griffiths, Wim Bras, Rudolf Winter Beamlines and Instrumentation Elliot Gilbert, Wim Bras, Nigel Rhodes Theory, Data processing and Modelling Jan Skov Pedersen, Carlo Knupp Biological Systems and Membranes Richard Heenan, Cameron Neylon Ceramics, Glasses and Porous Materials Rudolf Winter Colloids and Solutions Peter Griffiths Hierarchical Structures and Fibres Steve Eichhorn, Karen Edler Metallic and Magnetic Systems Armin Hoell Polymers Patrick Fairclough Time resolved Diffraction, Kinetic and Dynamical Studies João Cabral, Christoph Rau We are grateful to all section editors and the many anonymous referees for their invaluable effort which made the publication of the Proceedings possible. The refereeing process was strict and thorough, some papers were rejected and most were improved. The resulting compendium gives a good overview of recent developments in small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering theory, application, methods of analysis and instrumentation. Thus it should be a useful source of reference for a number of years to come. The papers are a good reflection of the material presented at the meeting. Because of the general high quality of the articles, it was difficult to decide which to highlight and be fair to all contributors. The following in particular have caught the attention of the editors. Highlighted papers A statistical survey of publications reporting the application of SAXS and SANS by Aldo Craievich (paper 012003) is recommended reading for anyone needing convincing about the vibrancy of this scientific field and the ever expanding use of these techniques. Two aspects of coherent X-ray scattering, made available by the advent of the 3rd generation synchrotron sources, are discussed in the

  8. 12-D-Hydroxyoctadecanoic acid organogels : a small angle neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terech, P.

    1992-12-01

    An optically active fatty acid derivative, 12-D-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid, gives thermally reversible and plastic gels in a variety of organic solvents. The structural parameters of the fibrous aggregates constituting the gel network are obtained from small angle neutron scattering experiments. The cross-sectional shape can be either a rather monodisperse square or a very elongated rectangle dependent upon the solvent type and concentration. With gels in benzene, the cross-section is a square of 214Åside with ca. 40 molecules per angström length of rigid fibre. The monoclinic symmetry of the crystalline aggregates induces, on the one hand, the appropriate molecular arrangements for an infinite H-bonding sequence along the fibre axis and, on the other hand, the ability to develop ribbon-like structures. Un acide gras optiquement actif, l'acide D-hydroxyl-12 octadécanoïque, donne des gels thermiquement réversibles et plastiques dans une variété de solvants organiques. Les paramètres structuraux des agrégats fibrillaires qui constituent le réseau du gel sont déduit à partir d'expériences de diffusion de neutrons aux petits angles. La forme de la section-droite des fibres peut être soit carrée et relativement monodisperse, soit très rectangulaire selon le type de solvant et la concentration. Pour des gels dans le benzène, la section-droite est un carré de 214Åde côté avec environ 40 molécules par angström de longueur de fibre rigide. La symétrie monoclinique des agrégats cristallins de D-HOA conduit d'une part, aux arrangements moléculaires d'une séquence infinie de liaisons H le long de l'axe de la fibre et d'autre part, à la capacité de développer des structures en rubains.

  9. Morphology of fast-tumbling bicelles: a small angle neutron scattering and NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchette, P A; Vetman, T N; Prosser, R S; Hancock, R E; Nieh, M P; Glinka, C J; Krueger, S; Katsaras, J

    2001-08-06

    Bilayered micelles, or bicelles, which consist of a mixture of long- and short-chain phospholipids, are a popular model membrane system. Depending on composition, concentration, and temperature, bicelle mixtures may adopt an isotropic phase or form an aligned phase in magnetic fields. Well-resolved (1)H NMR spectra are observed in the isotropic or so-called fast-tumbling bicelle phase, over the range of temperatures investigated (10-40 degrees C), for molar ratios of long-chain lipid to short-chain lipid between 0.20 and 1.0. Small angle neutron scattering data of this phase are consistent with the model in which bicelles were proposed to be disk-shaped. The experimentally determined dimensions are roughly consistent with the predictions of R.R. Vold and R.S. Prosser (J. Magn. Reson. B 113 (1996)). Differential paramagnetic shifts of head group resonances of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC), induced by the addition of Eu(3+), are also consistent with the bicelle model in which DHPC is believed to be primarily sequestered to bicelle rims. Selective irradiation of the DHPC aliphatic methyl resonances results in no detectable magnetization transfer to the corresponding DMPC methyl resonances (and vice versa) in bicelles, which also suggests that DHPC and DMPC are largely sequestered in the bicelle. Finally, (1)H spectra of the antibacterial peptide indolicidin (ILPWKWPWWPWRR-NH(2)) are compared, in a DPC micellar phase and the above fast-tumbling bicellar phases for a variety of compositions. The spectra exhibit adequate resolution and improved dispersion of amide and aromatic resonances in certain bicelle mixtures.

  10. Small-angle neutron scattering study of structure and kinetics of temperature-induced protein gelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodankar, S; Aswal, V K; Kohlbrecher, J; Vavrin, R; Wagh, A G

    2009-02-01

    The phase diagram, structural evolution, and kinetics of temperature-induced protein gelation of protein Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) have been studied as a function of solution pH and protein concentration. The protein gelation temperature represents the onset of turbidity in the protein solution, which increases significantly with increasing pH beyond the isoelectric pH of the protein molecule. On the other hand, the gelation temperature decreases with an increase in protein concentration only in the low-protein-concentration regime and shows a small increasing trend at higher protein concentrations. The structural evolution and kinetics of protein gelation have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering. The structure of the protein molecule remains stable up to temperatures very close to the gelation temperature. On increasing the temperature above the gelation temperature, the protein solution exhibits a fractal structure, an indication of gel formation due to aggregation. The fractal dimension of the gel increases with increasing temperature, suggesting an increase in branching between the aggregates, which leads to stronger gels. The increase in both solution pH and protein concentration is found to delay the growth in the fractal structure and its saturation. The kinetics of gelation has been studied using the temperature-jump process of heating. It is found that the structure of the protein gels remains invariant after the heating time ( approximately 1 min), indicating a rapid formation of gel structure within this time. The protein gels prepared through gradual and temperature-jump heating routes do not always show the same structure. In particular, at higher temperatures (e.g., 85 degrees C ), while gradual heating shows a fractal structure, there is collapse of such fractal structure during temperature-jump heating.

  11. Tensile Properties and Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Investigation of Stereoblock Elastomeric Polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pople, John A

    2002-08-06

    Elastomeric polypropylene (ePP) produced from unbridged 2-arylindene metallocene catalysts was studied by uniaxial tensile and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques. The ePP can be separated into three fractions by successive boiling-solvent fractionation method to yield: a low-tacticity fraction soluble in ether (ES), an intermediate-tacticity fraction soluble in heptane (HS), and a high-tacticity fraction insoluble in heptane (HI). Tensile properties of ePP were compared to its solvent fractions, and the role of each solvent fraction residing within ePP was investigated by blending 5 weight % deuterated fraction with ePP. The tensile properties of each fraction vary considerably, exhibiting properties from a weak gum elastomer for ES, to a semi-crystalline thermoplastic for HI. The intermediate-tacticity HS fraction exhibits elastic properties similar to the parent elastomer (ePP). In the melt at 160 C, SANS shows that all deuterated fractions are homogeneously mixed with ePP in a one-phase system. At 25 C upon a slow cooling from the melt, the low-tacticity fraction is preferentially segregated in the amorphous domains induced by different crystallization temperatures and kinetics of the deuterated ES and high-tacticity components. The high-tacticity component within ePP (dHI-ePP) retains its plastic properties in the blend. Despite its low crystallinity ({le} 2%), the low-tacticity fraction can co-crystallize with the crystalline matrix. The dES-ePP shows little or no relaxation when held under strain and recovers readily upon the release of stress.

  12. Evidence for Three-Dimensional Radiative Effects in MODIS Cloud Optical Depths Retrieved at Back Scattering View Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    This study addresses the question whether 1D radiative transfer theory describes well the angular distribution of shortwave cloud reflection. The statistical analysis of a large set of MODIS observations indicates that in oblique backward scattering directions, cloud reflection is stronger than 1D theory would predict. After considering a variety of possible causes, the paper concludes that the most likely reason for the increase lies in 3D radiative interactions. The results' main implication is that cloud optical depths retrieved at back scattering view angles larger than about 50 degrees tend to be overestimated and should be used only with great caution.

  13. Phase separation of a binary liquid in anodic aluminium oxide templates: a structural study by small angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefort, R; Duvail, J-L; Corre, T; Zhao, Y; Morineau, D

    2011-07-01

    The radial nanostructure of the binary liquid triethylamine/water confined in 60 nm diameter independent cylindrical pores of anodic aluminium oxide membranes is studied by small angle neutron scattering. It is shown that composition inhomogeneities are present in the confined mixtures well below the bulk critical point. An analysis of the neutron scattering form factor reveals the existence of an adsorbed water layer of a few nanometers at the liquid/alumina interface, coexisting with a TEA-rich phase in the core.

  14. Power-law correlations and finite-size effects in silica particle aggregates studied by small-angle neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freltoft, T.; Kjems, Jørgen; Sinha, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering from normal, compressed, and water-suspended powders of aggregates of fine silica particles has been studied. The samples possessed average densities ranging from 0.008 to 0.45 g/cm3. Assuming power-law correlations between particles and a finite correlation length ξ.......34±0.1 for the water-suspended samples. The intensity of scattering was found to scale with the correlation length in the manner expected for a fractal system...

  15. Large-angle elastic scattering of. pi. /sup +/ and. pi. /sup -/ from /sup 16/O at 114 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhuga, K.S.; Burleson, G.R.; Faucett, J.A.; Boudrie, R.L.; Cottingame, W.B.; Greene, S.J.; Morris, C.L.; Tanaka, N.; Wang, Z.F.; Nanda, S.

    1985-12-01

    Elastic cross sections have been measured for the scattering of ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ from /sup 16/O at 114 MeV in the angular range of 115/sup 0/ to 175/sup 0/ (c.m.). Large cross sections and large ..pi../sup +//..pi../sup -/ differences have been observed beyond 140/sup 0/ (c.m.). First-order optical model calculations fail to reproduce the large-angle data. Second-order effects generally improve the fits, but the details of the present data together with the results of earlier measurements at smaller angles have not been satisfactorily explained.

  16. Concept for a time-of-flight Small Angle Neutron Scattering instrument at the European Spallation Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaksch, S. [ESS Design Update Programme – Germany, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Jülich Centre for Neutron Science at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Garching (Germany); Martin-Rodriguez, D. [ESS Design Update Programme – Germany, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Jülich Centre for Neutron Science at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Garching (Germany); Neutron Optics and Shielding Group, European Spallation Source AB, Lund (Sweden); Ostermann, A. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Technische Universität Muünchen, Garching (Germany); Jestin, J. [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, LLB, CEA—Saclay, Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Duarte Pinto, S.; Bouwman, W.G. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Uher, J. [Amsterdam Scientific Instruments, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Engels, R. [Zentralinstitut für Elektronik (ZEA-2), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Frielinghaus, H. [ESS Design Update Programme – Germany, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Jülich Centre for Neutron Science at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Garching (Germany)

    2014-10-21

    A new Small Angle Neutron Scattering instrument is proposed for the European Spallation Source. The pulsed source requires a time-of-flight analysis of the gathered neutrons at the detector. The optimal instrument length is found to be rather large, which allows for a polarizer and a versatile collimation. The polarizer allows for studying magnetic samples and incoherent background subtraction. The wide collimation will host VSANS and SESANS options that increase the resolution of the instrument towards µm and tens of µm, respectively. Two 1 m{sup 2} area detectors will cover a large solid angle simultaneously. The expected gains for this new instrument will lie in the range between 20 and 36, depending on the assessment criteria, when compared to up-to-date reactor based instruments. This will open new perspectives for fast kinetics, weakly scattering samples, and multi-dimensional contrast variation studies.

  17. Concept for a Time-of-Flight Small Angle Neutron Scattering Instrument at the European Spallation Source

    CERN Document Server

    Jaksch, S; Ostermann, A; Jestin, J; Pinto, S Duarte; Bouwman, W G; Uher, J; Engels, R; Kemmerling, G; Hanslik, R; Frielinghaus, H

    2014-01-01

    A new Small Angle Neutron Scattering instrument is proposed for the European Spallation Source. The pulsed source requires a time-of-flight analysis of the gathered neutrons at the detector. The optimal instrument length is found to be rather large, which allows for a polarizer and a versatile collimation. The polarizer allows for studying magnetic samples and incoherent background subtraction. The wide collimation will host VSANS and SESANS options that increase the resolution of the instrument towards um and tens of um, respectively. Two 1m2 area detectors will cover a large solid angle simultaneously. The expected gains for this new instrument will lie in the range between 20 and 36, depending on the assessment criteria, when compared to up-to-date reactor based instruments. This will open new perspectives for fast kinetics, weakly scattering samples, and multi-dimensional contrast variation studies.

  18. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering: New tool for studying thin film growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, J.R.; Cohen, J.B.; Chung, Y.W.; Georgopoulos, P. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) is introduced as a method of studying discontinuous thin films. In this method, the incident beam is totally externally reflected from the substrate followed by small-angle scattering of the refacted beam by the thin film. The experiment described establishes the ability of GISAXS to provide size information for islands formed in the initial stages of thin film growth. The data presented are for gold films of 7 and 15 A average thicknesses on Corning 7059 glass substrates. The advantages of this technique are that it is non-destructive, can be done in situ, provides excellent sampling statistics, does not necessarily require a synchrotron source, and is not limited to thin or conducting substrates. (orig.).

  19. Performance of the micro-PIC gaseous area detector in small-angle X-ray scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Kaori; Tsuchiya, Ken'ichi; Ito, Kazuki; Okada, Yoko; Fujii, Kotaro; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Takata, Masaki; Tanimori, Toru; Uekusa, Hidehiro

    2009-03-01

    The application of a two-dimensional photon-counting detector based on a micro-pixel gas chamber (micro-PIC) to high-resolution small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and its performance, are reported. The micro-PIC is a micro-pattern gaseous detector fabricated by printed circuit board technology. This article describes the performance of the micro-PIC in SAXS experiments at SPring-8. A dynamic range of >10(5) was obtained for X-ray scattering from a polystyrene sphere solution. A maximum counting rate of up to 5 MHz was observed with good linearity and without saturation. For a diffraction pattern of collagen, weak peaks were observed in the high-angle region in one accumulation of photons.

  20. Monte-Carlo simulation of an ultra small-angle neutron scattering instrument based on Soller slits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieker, T. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hubbard, P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate an ultra small-angle neutron scattering instrument for use at a pulsed source based on a Soller slit collimator and analyzer. The simulations show that for a q{sub min} of {approximately}le-4 {angstrom}{sup -1} (15 {angstrom} neutrons) a few tenths of a percent of the incident flux is transmitted through both collimators at q=0.

  1. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy study of the Lactobacillus brevis S-layer protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Pentti; Engelhardt, Peter; Hynönen, Ulla; Torkkeli, Mika; Palva, Airi; Serimaa, Ritva

    2010-10-01

    The structure of self-assembly domain containing recombinant truncation mutants of Lactobacillus brevis surface layer protein SlpA in aqueous solution was studied using small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The proteins were found out to interact with each other forming stable globular oligomers of about 10 monomers. The maximum diameter of the oligomers varied between 75 Å and 435 Å.

  2. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy study of the Lactobacillus brevis S-layer protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeaeskelaeinen, Pentti [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, PO Box 2200, FI-02015 Aalto University School of Science and Technology (Finland); Engelhardt, Peter [Haartman Institute, Department of Pathology, PO Box 21, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Hynoenen, Ulla; Palva, Airi [Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences, Division of Microbiology, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Torkkeli, Mika; Serimaa, Ritva, E-mail: ritva.serimaa@helsinki.f [Department of Physics, POB 64, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-10-01

    The structure of self-assembly domain containing recombinant truncation mutants of Lactobacillus brevis surface layer protein SlpA in aqueous solution was studied using small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The proteins were found out to interact with each other forming stable globular oligomers of about 10 monomers. The maximum diameter of the oligomers varied between 75 A and 435 A.

  3. Small angle neutron scattering study of U(VI) third phase formation in HNO3/DHDECMP–-dodecane system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K V Lohithakshan; V K Aswal; S K Aggarwal

    2008-11-01

    Small angle neutron scattering studies (SANS) were carried out to understand the formation of third phase in DHDECMP–dodecane–UO2(NO3)2/HNO3 system. It was observed that third phase formation takes place due to the formation of UO2(NO3)2. DHDECMP reverse micelles in the dodecane phase. SANS data obtained were interpreted with particle interaction model using Baxter sticky spheres model.

  4. INVESTIGATION ON THE CONFORMATION OF THE MAIN-CHAIN NEMATIC POLYMER BY SMALL ANGLE X-RAY SCATTERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhengmin; WANG Huaqin; WANG Xinjiu

    1990-01-01

    The experimental investigation on the conformation of a thermotropic main-chain nematic polymer by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has been carried out. The average radius of gyration of the polymer has been determined in nematic and isotropic state respectively. The experiment shows that the boundary between domains is not sharp but diffuse, and the diffuse - boundary thickness of the polymer as a function of temperature has been given.

  5. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Hung T. [BioMaPS Institute for Quantitative Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Case, David A., E-mail: case@biomaps.rutgers.edu [BioMaPS Institute for Quantitative Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+}) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein–Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko–Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  6. Simultaneous distribution between the deflection angle and the lateral displacement under the Moliere theory of multiple scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsuka, Takao [Okayama Shoka University, Laboratory of Information Science, Okayama (Japan); Okei, Kazuhide [Kawasaki Medical School, Dept. of Information Sciences, Kurashiki (Japan); Iyono, Atsushi [Okayama university of Science, Dept. of Fundamental Science, Faculty of Science, Okayama (Japan); Bielajew, Alex F. [Univ. of Michigan, Dept. Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Simultaneous distribution between the deflection angle and the lateral displacement of fast charged particles traversing through matter is derived by applying numerical inverse Fourier transforms on the Fourier spectral density solved analytically under the Moliere theory of multiple scattering, taking account of ionization loss. Our results show the simultaneous Gaussian distribution at the region of both small deflection angle and lateral displacement, though they show the characteristic contour patterns of probability density specific to the single and the double scatterings at the regions of large deflection angle and/or lateral displacement. The influences of ionization loss on the distribution are also investigated. An exact simultaneous distribution is derived under the fixed energy condition based on a well-known model of screened single scattering, which indicates the limit of validity of the Moliere theory applied to the simultaneous distribution. The simultaneous distribution will be valuable for improving the accuracy and the efficiency of experimental analyses and simulation studies relating to charged particle transports. (orig.)

  7. A forward-angle-scattering method for the determination of optical constants and particle size distribution by collimated laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yatao; Qi, Hong; Yu, Xiaoying; Ruan, Liming

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using a secondary optimization technique and forward-angle-scattering method to retrieve optical constants (or complex refractive indices) and particle size distribution (PSD) simultaneously. In this work, two continuous wave lasers of different wavelengths were applied to irradiate the participating samples, and the scattered light of samples with different acceptance angles was obtained. First, the scattered signals within different acceptance angles were calculated by solving the radiative transfer equation. Then, the complex refractive index and PSD were retrieved simultaneously by applying quantum particle swarm optimization. However, the estimated results of PSD were inaccurate. Thus, a secondary optimization, which using the directional radiative intensity as input, was performed to improve the accuracy of PSD based on the first optimization process. Four commonly used kinds of monomodal PSD functions, i.e., the Rosin-Rammler, standard Normal, Logarithmic Normal, and Junge distribution, were retrieved. All results showed that the proposed technique can estimate the complex refractive index and PSD accurately.

  8. Understanding nucleic acid structural changes by comparing wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) experiments to molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabit, Suzette A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA; Katz, Andrea M. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA; Tolokh, Igor S. [Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA; Drozdetski, Aleksander [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA; Baker, Nathan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Onufriev, Alexey V. [Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA; Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA; Pollack, Lois [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA

    2016-05-24

    Wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) is emerging as a powerful tool for increasing the resolution of solution structure measurements of biomolecules. Compared to its better known complement, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), WAXS targets higher scattering angles and can enhance structural studies of molecules by accessing finer details of solution structures. Although the extension from SAXS to WAXS is easy to implement experimentally, the computational tools required to fully harness the power of WAXS are still under development. Currently, WAXS is employed to study structural changes and ligand binding in proteins; however the methods are not as fully developed for nucleic acids. Here, we show how WAXS can qualitatively char- acterize nucleic acid structures as well as the small but significant structural changes driven by the addition of multivalent ions. We show the potential of WAXS to test all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and to provide insight in understanding how the trivalent ion cobalt(III) hexammine (CoHex) affects the structure of RNA and DNA helices. We find that MD simulations capture the RNA structural change that occurs due to addition of CoHex.

  9. Distribution of Sulfur in Carbon/Sulfur Nanocomposites Analyzed by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Albrecht; Juhl, Anika; Scholz, Jonas; Ufer, Boris; Goerigk, Günter; Fröba, Michael; Ballauff, Matthias; Mascotto, Simone

    2016-03-22

    The analysis of sulfur distribution in porous carbon/sulfur nanocomposites using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is presented. Ordered porous CMK-8 carbon was used as the host matrix and gradually filled with sulfur (20-50 wt %) via melt impregnation. Owing to the almost complete match between the electron densities of carbon and sulfur, the porous nanocomposites present in essence a two-phase system and the filling of the host material can be precisely followed by this method. The absolute scattering intensities normalized per unit of mass were corrected accounting for the scattering contribution of the turbostratic microstructure of carbon and amorphous sulfur. The analysis using the Porod parameter and the chord-length distribution (CLD) approach determined the specific surface areas and filling mechanism of the nanocomposite materials, respectively. Thus, SAXS provides comprehensive characterization of the sulfur distribution in porous carbon and valuable information for a deeper understanding of cathode materials of lithium-sulfur batteries.

  10. Structure of pure SDS and DTAB micelles in brine determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, M.; Pedersen, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    The geometrical structure of pure SDS and DTAB surfactant micelles in the absence of added salt as well as its dependence on the concentration of NaBr have been investigated at 40 degrees C using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). In contrast to previous SANS measurements on the same systems we...... have analysed the scattering data in the entire regime of scattering vectors that are relevant for determining the structure of the micelles. Our obtained results for pure surfactant micelles, as well as those of mixed catanionic micelles presented in a recent study, show somewhat unexpectedly...... that ordinary surfactant micelles are shaped as circular or elongated bilayers (tablets). Both SDS and DTAB micelles appeared to be disk-like in pure D2O and the corresponding data were best fitted with a model for (monodisperse) oblate ellipsoids of revolution with half axes a=12.0 Angstrom, b=20.3 Angstrom...

  11. Structural investigation on gamma-irradiated polyacrylamide hydrogels using small-angle neutron scattering and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sivananatham M; Tata B V R; Aswal V K

    2016-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultraviolet (UV)–visible spectroscopictechniques are used to investigate the microstructural changes in polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels on gamma irradiation. SANS measurements have revealed the presence of inhomogeneities in nanometre scale and reduction of their size with increase in dose. Analysis of SANS data alsorevealed the increase in the correlation length with increase in dose. The extinction coefficient obtained from the UV–visible spectroscopic studies exhibited $\\lambda^{−\\beta}$ dependence between 500 and 700 nm and is understood to arise from the existence of scatterers (inhomogeneities) in submicron scale in PAAm hydrogels. The increase in value of exponent $\\beta$ with increase in dose indicates that the size of scatterers decrease with increase in dose.

  12. KWS-3, the new focusing-mirror ultra small-angle neutron scattering instrument and reflectometer at Jülich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentzinger, E.; Dohmen, L.; Alefeld, B.; Rücker, U.; Stellbrink, J.; Ioffe, A.; Richter, D.; Brückel, Th.

    2004-07-01

    In Jülich, a new high-resolution small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument and reflectometer has been built. The principle of this instrument is a one-to-one image of an entrance aperture on a 2D position-sensitive detector by neutron reflection on a double-focusing toroidal mirror. It permits to perform SANS studies with a scattering wave vector resolution between 10-3 and 10-4Å-1 with considerable intensity advantages over pinhole-SANS instruments. To date, KWS-3 is the worldwide unique SANS instrument running on this principle. We present here the characterization of the image produced by the mirror and a measurement of the scattering from a diffraction grating.

  13. Orientation and Relaxation of Polymer-clay Solutions Studied by Rheology and Small-angle Neutron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malwitz, M. M. [Louisiana State University; Butler, Paul D [ORNL; Porcar, L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Angelette, D. P. [Louisiana State University; Schmidt, G. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    2004-01-01

    The influence of shear on viscoelastic solutions of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and clay [montmorillonite, i.e., Cloisite NA+ (CNA)] was investigated with rheology and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The steady-state viscosity and SANS were used to measure the shear-induced orientation and relaxation of the polymer and clay platelets. Anisotropic scattering patterns developed at much lower shear rates than in pure clay solutions. The scattering anisotropy saturated at low shear rates, and the CNA clay platelets aligned with the flow, with the surface normal parallel to the gradient direction. The cessation of shear led to partial and slow randomization of the CNA platelets, whereas extremely fast relaxation was observed for laponite (LRD) platelets. These PEO-CNA networklike solutions were compared with previously reported PEO-LRD networks, and the differences and similarities, with respect to the shear orientation, relaxation, and polymer-clay interactions, were examined.

  14. Guinier peak analysis for visual and automated inspection of small-angle X-ray scattering data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    The Guinier region in small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) defines the radius of gyration, R g, and the forward scattering intensity, I(0). In Guinier peak analysis (GPA), the plot of qI(q) versus q 2 transforms the Guinier region into a characteristic peak for visual and automated inspection of data. Deviations of the peak position from the theoretical position in dimensionless GPA plots can suggest parameter errors, problematic low-resolution data, some kinds of intermolecular interactions or elongated scatters. To facilitate automated analysis by GPA, the elongation ratio (ER), which is the ratio of the areas in the pair-distribution function P(r) after and before the P(r) maximum, was characterized; symmetric samples have ER values around 1, and samples with ER values greater than 5 tend to be outliers in GPA analysis. Use of GPA+ER can be a helpful addition to SAXS data analysis pipelines.

  15. Cell growth characteristics from angle- and polarization-resolved light scattering: Prospects for two-dimensional correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herran Cuspinera, Roxana M.; Hore, Dennis K.

    2016-11-01

    We highlight the potential of generalized two-dimensional correlation analysis for the fingerprinting of cell growth in solution monitored by light scattering, where the synchronous and asynchronous responses serve as a sensitive marker for the effect of growth conditions on the distribution of cell morphologies. The polarization of the scattered light varies according to the cell size distribution, and so the changes in the polarization over time are an excellent indicator of the dynamic growth conditions. However, direct comparison of the polarization-, time-, and angle-resolved signals between different experiments is hindered by the subtle changes in the data, and the inability to easily adapt models to account for these differences. Using Mie scattering simulations of different growth conditions, and some preliminary experimental data for a single set of conditions, we illustrate that correlation analysis provides rapid and sensitive qualitative markers of growth characteristics.

  16. Measurement of illite particle thickness using a direct Fourier transform of small-angle X-ray scattering data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, C.; Rice, J.A.; Eberl, D.D.; Lin, S.-J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that interstratified illite-smectite (I-S) minerals are composed of aggregates of fundamental particles. Many attempts have been made to measure the thickness of such fundamental particles, but each of the methods used suffers from its own limitations and uncertainties. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can be used to measure the thickness of particles that scatter X-rays coherently. We used SAXS to study suspensions of Na-rectorite and other illites with varying proportions of smectite. The scattering intensity (I) was recorded as a function of the scattering vector, q = (4 ??/??) sin(??/2), where ?? is the X-ray wavelength and ?? is the scattering angle. The experimental data were treated with a direct Fourier transform to obtain the pair distance distribution function (PDDF) that was then used to determine the thickness of illite particles. The Guinier and Porod extrapolation were used to obtain the scattering intensity beyond the experimental q, and the effects of such extrapolations on the PDDF were examined. The thickness of independent rectorite particles (used as a reference mineral) is 18.3 A??. The SAXS results are compared with those obtained by X-ray diffraction peak broadening methods. It was found that the power-law exponent (??) obtained by fitting the data in the region of q = 0.1 -0.6 nm-1 to the power law (I = Ioq-??) is a linear function of illite particle thickness. Therefore, illite particle thickness could be predicted by the linear relationship as long as the thickness is within the limit where ?? <4.0.

  17. Individual Pitch Control. Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Engelen, T.G.; Van der Hooft, E.L. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2005-06-15

    The loads on the rotor blades, drive-train and tower of horizontal axis wind turbines are caused for a significant part by the rotational sampling of turbulence, the tower shadow and the windshear. These loads depend on the azimuthal blade position and are approximately periodic in (multiples of) the rotational speed. It seems attractive to just add pure azimuth dependent variations to the pitch angle of the individual blades. However, a small phase mismatch with respect to the tower shadow and windshear effect will cause higher instead of lower loads. Besides, the stochastic loads from the torationally sampled turbulence are not reduced at all. This inventory study concerns the design and potential of individual feedback pitch control for 3 bladed wind turbines. In this approach the danger of mismatch is avoided and the stochastic blade loads are also reduced. A simple design model is derived for the parametrisation of the feedback loops for individual pitch control around one time the rotational frequency (1p). Rainflow counts and power spectra obtained from time-domain simulations give an indication of the achievable reduction of loads. In addition, the concept of individual pitch control is extended to multiples of the rotational frequency (2p, 3p; multi-mode pitch control). Scoping calculations show a significant further reduction of blade loads as well as a reduction of 3p harmonics in tilt and yaw loads in the nacelle.

  18. Label-free detection and identification of waterborne parasites using a microfluidic multi-angle laser scattering system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Limei; Lei, Lei; Li, Feng

    2017-10-01

    A microfluidic-based multi-angle laser scattering (MALS) system capable of acquiring scattering patterns of a single particle is designed and demonstrated. The system includes a sheathless nozzle microfluidic glass chip, and an on-chip MALS unit being in alignment with the nozzle exit in the chip. The size and relative refractive indices (RI) of polystyrene (PS) microspheres were deduced with accuracies of 60 nm and 0.002 by comparing the experimental scattering patterns with theoretical ones. We measured scattering patterns of waterborne parasites i.e., Cryptosporidium parvum (C.parvum) and Giardia lamblia (G. lamblia), and some other representative species suspended in deionized water at a maximum flow rate of 12 μL/min, and a maximum of 3000 waterborne parasites can be identified within one minute with a mean accuracy higher than 96% by classification of distinctive scattering patterns using a support-vector-machine (SVM) algorithm. The system provides a promising tool for label-free detection of waterborne parasites and other biological contaminants.

  19. Fluid adsorption in ordered mesoporous solids determined by in situ small-angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findenegg, Gerhard H; Jähnert, Susanne; Müter, Dirk; Prass, Johannes; Paris, Oskar

    2010-07-14

    The adsorption of two organic fluids (n-pentane and perfluoropentane) in a periodic mesoporous silica material (SBA-15) is investigated by in situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) using synchrotron radiation. Structural changes are monitored as the ordered and disordered pores in the silica matrix are gradually filled with the fluids. The experiments yield integrated peak intensities from up to ten Bragg reflections from the 2D hexagonal pore lattice, and additionally diffuse scattering contributions arising from disordered (mostly intrawall) porosity. The analysis of the scattering data is based on a separation of these two contributions. Bragg scattering is described by adopting a form factor model for ordered pores of cylindrical symmetry which accounts for the filling of the microporous corona, the formation of a fluid film at the pore walls, and condensation of the fluid in the core. The filling fraction of the disordered intrawall pores is extracted from the diffuse scattering intensity and its dependence on the fluid pressure is analyzed on the basis of a three-phase model. The data analysis introduced here provides an important generalisation of a formalism presented recently (J. Phys. Chem. C, 2009, 13, 15201), which was applicable to contrast-matching fluids only. In this way, the adsorption behaviour of fluids into ordered and disordered pores in periodic mesoporous materials can be analyzed quantitatively irrespective of the fluid density.

  20. A large-solid-angle X-ray Raman scattering spectrometer at ID20 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huotari, S; Sahle, Ch J; Henriquet, Ch; Al-Zein, A; Martel, K; Simonelli, L; Verbeni, R; Gonzalez, H; Lagier, M C; Ponchut, C; Moretti Sala, M; Krisch, M; Monaco, G

    2017-03-01

    An end-station for X-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy at beamline ID20 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility is described. This end-station is dedicated to the study of shallow core electronic excitations using non-resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. The spectrometer has 72 spherically bent analyzer crystals arranged in six modular groups of 12 analyzer crystals each for a combined maximum flexibility and large solid angle of detection. Each of the six analyzer modules houses one pixelated area detector allowing for X-ray Raman scattering based imaging and efficient separation of the desired signal from the sample and spurious scattering from the often used complicated sample environments. This new end-station provides an unprecedented instrument for X-ray Raman scattering, which is a spectroscopic tool of great interest for the study of low-energy X-ray absorption spectra in materials under in situ conditions, such as in operando batteries and fuel cells, in situ catalytic reactions, and extreme pressure and temperature conditions.

  1. A study of effective atomic number and electron density of gel dosimeters and human tissues for scattering of gamma rays: momentum transfer, energy and scattering angle dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this work was to study water- and tissue-equivalent properties of some gel dosimeters, human tissues and water, for scattering of photons using the effective atomic number (Z eff). The Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C) was used to obtain Z eff and electron density (N e ) of gel dosimeters, human tissues and water considering a 10(-2)-10(9) momentum transfer, q (Å(-1)). In the present work, a logarithmic interpolation procedure was used to estimate R/C as well as Z eff of the chosen materials in a wide scattering angle (1°-180°) and energy range (0.001-100 MeV). The Z eff of the chosen materials was found to increase as momentum transfer increases, for q > ~1 Å(-1). At fixed scattering angle and energy, Z eff of the material first increases and then becomes constant for high momentum transfers (q ≥ 3 Å(-1)), which indicates that Z eff is almost independent of energy and scattering angle for the chosen materials. Based on the Z eff data and the continuous momentum transfer range (10(-2)-10(9) Å(-1)), MAGIC, PAGAT and soft tissue were found to be water-equivalent materials, since their differences (%) relative to water are significantly low (≤3.2 % for MAGIC up to 10(3) Å(-1), ≤2.9 % for PAGAT up to 10(9) Å(-1), and ≤3.8 % for soft tissue up to 10(9) Å(-1)), while the Fricke gel was not found to be water equivalent. PAGAT was found to be a soft tissue-equivalent material in the entire momentum transfer range (<4.3 %), while MAGAT has shown to be tissue equivalent for brain (≤8.1 % up to 10 Å(-1)) and lung (<8.2 % up to 10 Å(-1)) tissues. The Fricke gel dosimeter has shown to be adipose tissue equivalent for most of the momentum range considered (<10 %).

  2. Virtual Compton scattering and neutral pion electroproduction in the resonance region up to the deep inelastic region at backward angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laveissiere, Geraud; Degrande, Natalie; Jaminion, Stephanie; Jutier, Christophe; Todor, Luminita; Di Salvo, Rachele; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Alexa, L.C.; Anderson, Brian; Aniol, Konrad; Arundell, Kathleen; Audit, Gerard; Auerbach, Leonard; Baker, F.; Baylac, Maud; Berthot, J.; Bertin, Pierre; Bertozzi, William; Bimbot, Louis; Boeglin, Werner; Brash, Edward; Breton, Vincent; Breuer, Herbert; Burtin, Etienne; Calarco, John; Cardman, Lawrence; Cavata, Christian; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Dale, Daniel; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deur, Alexandre; D' Hose, Nicole; Dodge, Gail; Domingo, John; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Epstein, Martin; Ewell, Lars; Finn, John; Fissum, Kevin; Fonvieille, Helene; Fournier, Guy; Frois, Bernard; Frullani, Salvatore; Furget, Christophe; Gao, Haiyan; Gao, Juncai; Garibaldi, Franco; Gasparian, Ashot; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Glashausser, Charles; Gomez, Javier; Gorbenko, Viktor; Grenier, Philippe; Guichon, Pierre; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Holmes, Richard; Holtrop, Maurik; Howell, Calvin; Huber, Garth; Hyde, Charles; Incerti, Sebastien; Iodice, Mauro; Jardillier, Johann; Jones, Mark; Kahl, William; Kamalov, Sabit; Kato, Seigo; Katramatou, A.T.; Kelly, James; Kerhoas, Sophie; Ketikyan, Armen; Khayat, Mohammad; Kino, Kouichi; Kox, Serge; Kramer, Laird; Kumar, Krishna; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Kuss, Michael; Leone, Antonio; LeRose, John; Liang, Meihua; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Lolos, George; Lourie, Robert; Madey, Richard; Maeda, Kazushige; Malov, Sergey; Manley, D.; Marchand, Claude; Marchand, Dominique; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marroncle, Jacques; Martino, Jacques; McCormick, Kathy; McIntyre, Justin; Mehrabyan, Surik; Merchez, Fernand; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Miller, Gerald; Mougey, Jean; Nanda, Sirish; Neyret, Damien; Offermann, Edmond; Papandreou, Zisis; Perdrisat, Charles; Perrino, R.; Petratos, Gerassimos; Platchkov, Stephane; Pomatsalyuk, Roman; Prout, David; Punjabi, Vina; Pussieux, Thierry; Quemener, Gilles; Ransome, Ronald; Ravel, Oliver; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Renard, F.; Roblin, Yves; Rowntree, David; Rutledge, Gary; Rutt, Paul; Saha, Arunava; Saito, Teijiro; Sarty, Adam; Serdarevic, A.; Smith, T.; Smirnov, G.; Soldi, K.; Sorokin, Pavel; Souder, Paul; Suleiman, Riad; Templon, Jeffrey; Terasawa, Tatsuo; Tiator, Lothar; Tieulent, Raphael; Tomasi-Gustaffson, E.; Tsubota, Hiroaki; Ueno, Hiroaki; Ulmer, Paul; Urciuoli, Guido; Van De Vyver, R.; van der Meer, Rob; Vernin, Pascal; Vlahovic, B.; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Watson, J.W.; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Wilson, R.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Zainea, Dan; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Z.-L.

    2009-01-01

    We have made the first measurements of the virtual Compton scattering (VCS) process via the H(e,e'p)? exclusive reaction in the nucleon resonance region, at backward angles. Results are presented for the W-dependence at fixed Q2=1 GeV2, and for the Q2-dependence at fixed W near 1.5 GeV. The VCS data show resonant structures in the first and second resonance regions. The observed Q2-dependence is smooth. The measured ratio of H(e,e'p)? to H(e,e'p)?0 cross sections emphasizes the different sensitivity of these two reactions to the various nucleon resonances. Finally, when compared to Real Compton Scattering (RCS) at high energy and large angles, our VCS data at the highest W (1.8-1.9 GeV) show a striking Q2-independence, which may suggest a transition to a perturbative scattering mechanism at the quark level.

  3. A posteriori determination of the useful data range for small-angle scattering experiments on dilute monodisperse systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konarev, Petr V; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2015-05-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) experiments on solutions provide rapidly decaying scattering curves, often with a poor signal-to-noise ratio, especially at higher angles. On modern instruments, the noise is partially compensated for by oversampling, thanks to the fact that the angular increment in the data is small compared with that needed to describe adequately the local behaviour and features of the scattering curve. Given a (noisy) experimental data set, an important question arises as to which part of the data still contains useful information and should be taken into account for the interpretation and model building. Here, it is demonstrated that, for monodisperse systems, the useful experimental data range is defined by the number of meaningful Shannon channels that can be determined from the data set. An algorithm to determine this number and thus the data range is developed, and it is tested on a number of simulated data sets with various noise levels and with different degrees of oversampling, corresponding to typical SAXS/SANS experiments. The method is implemented in a computer program and examples of its application to analyse the experimental data recorded under various conditions are presented. The program can be employed to discard experimental data containing no useful information in automated pipelines, in modelling procedures, and for data deposition or publication. The software is freely accessible to academic users.

  4. Large-angle elastic scattering of 88.03-keV photons by elements with 30{<=}Z{<=}92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ajay; Shahi, J.S.; Garg, M.L.; Puri, Sanjiv; Mehta, D.; Singh, Nirmal E-mail: nsingh@panjabuniv.chd.nic.in

    2001-10-01

    Elastic-scattering differential cross-sections for 88.03-keV photons have been measured at an angle of 125 deg. for 17 elements in the atomic region 30{<=}Z{<=}92. The measured elastic-scattering cross-sections have been compared with those obtained in the independent-particle approximation through calculations of the modified-relativistic form factors (MFs), a combination of the MFs and angle-independent 'anomalous' scattering factors (ASFs), and the relativistic second-order S-matrix. The S-matrix cross-sections, in general, represent the trend of the measured data over the whole atomic region under investigation. However, these values are, on an average, lower by 10% than the measured ones. The MF cross-sections, in general, exhibit considerable deviations ({approx}30%) from the measured values. In the case of Bi with K-shell binding energy, E{sub K}(Bi)=90.526 keV, just above the incident photon energy (E{sub inc}) of 88.03 keV, the MF cross-section is found to be enormously ({approx}5 times) higher than the measured value. The MF cross-sections in combination with ASFs are in good agreement with the measured values for all the elements except for Pb (E{sub K}(Pb)=88.004 keV) and Bi, where these values are enormously ({approx}28 times) smaller and higher by 31%, respectively.

  5. Mineral crystal alignment in mineralized fracture callus determined by 3D small-angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yifei; Manjubala, Inderchand; Fratzl, Peter [Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, 14424 Potsdam (Germany); Roschger, Paul [4th Medical Department, Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Osteology at Hanusch Hospital of WGKK and AUVA Trauma Centre Meidling, 1140 Vienna (Austria); Schell, Hanna; Duda, Georg N, E-mail: fratzl@mpikg.mpg.d [Julius Wolff Institut and Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charite- University Medicine Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-10-01

    Callus tissue formed during bone fracture healing is a mixture of different tissue types as revealed by histological analysis. But the structural characteristics of mineral crystals within the healing callus are not well known. Since two-dimensional (2D) scanning small-angle X-ray scattering (sSAXS) patterns showed that the size and orientation of callus crystals vary both spatially and temporally [1] and 2D electron microscopic analysis implies an anisotropic property of the callus morphology, the mineral crystals within the callus are also expected to vary in size and orientation in 3D. Three-dimensional small-angle X-ray scattering (3D SAXS), which combines 2D SAXS patterns collected at different angles of sample tilting, has been previously applied to investigate bone minerals in horse radius [2] and oim/oim mouse femur/tibia [3]. We implement a similar 3D SAXS method but with a different way of data analysis to gather information on the mineral alignment in fracture callus. With the proposed accurate yet fast assessment of 3D SAXS information, it was shown that the plate shaped mineral particles in the healing callus were aligned in groups with their predominant orientations occurring as a fiber texture.

  6. Scattering Density Profile Model of POPG Bilayers as Determined by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Small-Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Holland, B [University of Guelph; Gray, C.G [University of Guelph; Tomberli, B [Brandon University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We combine molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experiment, both small-angle neutron (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), to determine the precise structure of bilayers composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), a lipid commonly encountered in bacterial membranes. Experiment and simulation are used to develop a one-dimensional scattering density profile (SDP) model suitable for the analysis of experimental data. The joint refinement of such data (i.e., SANS and SAXS) results in the area per lipid that is then used in the fixed-area simulations. In the final step, the direct comparison of simulated-to-experimental data gives rise to the detailed structure of POPG bilayers. From these studies we conclude that POPG s molecular area is 66.0 +/- 1.3 ^2, its overall bilayer thickness is 36.7 +/- 0.7 , and its hydrocarbon region thickness is 27.9 ( 0.6 , assuming a simulated value of 1203 ^3 for the total lipid volume.

  7. Determination of structural changes of dispersed clay platelets in a polymer blend during solid-state rheological property measurement by small-angle X-ray scattering

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bandyopadhyay, J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available -1 Polymer Volume 52, Issue 12, 26 May 2011, Pages 2628?2642 Determination of structural changes of dispersed clay platelets in a polymer blend during solid-state rheological property measurement by small-angle X-ray scattering ? Jayita Bandyopadhyaya... frequency and temperature sweep tests. Graphical abstract Keywords ? Blend composites; ? Small-angle X-ray scattering; ? Solid-state rheology ...

  8. Pedestrian quick detection algorithm based on with pitch angle corrected HOG features%基于俯仰角修正的HOG特征快速行人检测算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹巧慧; 葛万成

    2014-01-01

    传统的HOG特征对正视或侧视行人有较好的识别率,但是对俯视行人的识别率仍有所欠缺。对检测图像的HOG特征根据不同的俯仰角进行了转换,同时优化了SVM分类器训练过程,提出了一种改进的快速行人检测算法。测试结果表明,该算法优于基于传统HOG特征的检测方法,有效提高了不同俯仰角视频中行人检测的准确性。%Traditional HOG feature detection method has a preferable recognition rate for envisaging and side-looking pedes-trians,but has a low recognition rate for overlooking pedestrians. An improved pedestrian quick detection algorithm is proposed in this paper,which is realized by converting HOG features in the detected images according to pitch angle and optimizing the SVM classifier training process. The testing result shows that the algorithm is better than the detection methods based on the tra-ditional HOG features and has improved the detection veracity of pedestrians in the different pitch angle video images.

  9. The study of the structural properties of very low viscosity sodium alginate by small-angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badita, C. R.; Aranghel, D.; Radulescu, A.; Anitas, E. M.

    2016-03-01

    Sodium alginate is a linear polymer extract from brown algae and it is used in the biomedical, food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries as solution property modifiers and gelling agents. But despite the extensive studies of the alginate gelation process, still some fundamental questions remain unresolved. The fractal behavior of very low viscosity sodium alginate solutions and their influence on the critical gelation of alginate induced by Ca2+ ions were investigated using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) measurements. SANS data are interpreted using both standard linear plots and the Beaucage model. The scattering intensity is dependent by alginate concentration and Ca2+ concentration. From a critical concentration of 1.0 % w/w our polymer swelled forming spherical structures with rough surfaces. Also the addition of the salt induces the collapse and the appearance of the aggregation and clusters formation.

  10. VecDec4SAS program for analyzing the dynamic processes observed by the small-angle scattering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodenskii, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    A VecDec4SAS program has been developed to provide a fast and easy description of the dynamics of any process occurring in a nanoparticle solution observed by the small-angle scattering technique. The process should be characterized by the some conditional initial and final stages, in fractions of which all intermediate data are expanded. The program makes it possible to estimate the adequacy of two-basis approximation and indicate the presence of an additional process introducing a systematic error into the initial data. Scattering curves for human serum albumin protein in solutions with pH 7.4 and 3.0 and a concentration of 20 mg/mL, obtained on the DICSY station at the National Research Centre "Kurchatov Institute" in the solution temperature range from 25 to 70°C, were taken to be initial data to illustrate the potential of the program.

  11. Suspensions of colloidal plates in a nematic liquid crystal: a small angle x-ray scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzey, Claire [School of Chemistry, Cantock' s Close, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Klein, Susanne [HP Laboratories, Filton Road, Stoke Gifford, Bristol BS34 8QZ (United Kingdom); Leach, Edward [HP Laboratories, Filton Road, Stoke Gifford, Bristol BS34 8QZ (United Kingdom); Duijneveldt, Jeroen S van [School of Chemistry, Cantock' s Close, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Richardson, Robert M [H H Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2004-04-21

    Suspensions of anisometric particles in the nematic phase of a liquid crystalline host solvent were prepared. We chose Claytone AF, a commercial quaternary ammonium surfactant treated montmorillonite, with an aspect ratio of up to 1:2000, and dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide treated Laponite, with an aspect ratio of 1:8 as the dispersed particles. K15, a nematogenic compound (also known as 5CB), was the dispersing medium. The suspensions were characterized by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The liquid crystal delaminates the clays well, but the scattering curves from Claytone suspensions have prominent first and second order pseudo Bragg peaks, indicating that stacking of clay plates has occurred. We report a model for fitting SAXS data based on Hosemann's theory for suspensions of plane parallel sheets.

  12. Quantifying "Softness" of Organic Coatings on Gold Nanoparticles Using Correlated Small-Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diroll, Benjamin T; Weigandt, Katie M; Jishkariani, Davit; Cargnello, Matteo; Murphy, Ryan J; Hough, Lawrence A; Murray, Christopher B; Donnio, Bertrand

    2015-12-09

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering provide powerful tools to selectively characterize the inorganic and organic components of hybrid nanomaterials. Using hydrophobic gold nanoparticles coated with several commercial and dendritic thiols, the size of the organic layer on the gold particles is shown to increase from 1.2 to 4.1 nm. A comparison between solid-state diffraction from self-assembled lattices of nanoparticles and the solution data from neutron scattering suggests that engineering softness/deformability in nanoparticle coatings is less straightforward than simply increasing the organic size. The "dendritic effect" in which higher generations yield increasingly compact molecules explains changes in the deformability of organic ligand shells.

  13. Static and quasi-elastic small angle neutron scattering on biocompatible ionic ferrofluids: magnetic and hydrodynamic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Gazeau, F; Dubois, E; Perzynski, R

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of ionic magnetic fluids (MFs), based on ferrite nanoparticles, dispersed at pH approx 7 either in H sub 2 O or in D sub 2 O. Polarized and non-polarized static small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments in zero magnetic field allow us to study both the magnetic and the nuclear contributions to the neutron scattering. The magnetic interparticle attraction is probed separately from the global thermodynamic repulsion and compares well to direct magnetic susceptibility measurements. The magnetic interparticle correlation is in these fluid samples independent of the probed spatial scale. In contrast, a spatial dependence of the interparticle correlation is evidenced at large PHI by the nuclear structure factor. A model of magnetic interaction quantitatively explains the under-field anisotropy of the SANS nuclear contribution. In a quasi-elastic neutron spin-echo experiment, we probe the Brownian dynamics of translation of the nanoparticles in the range 1.3 sup<=...

  14. Structure and kinetics of chemically cross-linked protein gels from small-angle X-ray scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kaieda, Shuji; Halle, Bertil

    2014-01-01

    Glutaraldehyde (GA) reacts with amino groups in proteins, forming intermolecular cross-links that, at sufficiently high protein concentration, can transform a protein solution into a gel. Although GA has been used as a cross-linking reagent for decades, neither the cross-linking chemistry nor the microstructure of the resulting protein gel have been clearly established. Here we use small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to characterise the microstructure and structural kinetics of gels formed by cross-linking of pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, myoglobin or intestinal fatty acid-binding protein. By comparing the scattering from gels and dilute solutions, we extract the structure factor and the pair correlation function of the gel. The protein gels are spatially heterogeneous, with dense clusters linked by sparse networks. Within the clusters, adjacent protein molecules are almost in contact, but the protein concentration in the cluster is much lower than in a crystal. At the $\\sim$ 1 nm SAXS resolution, the native ...

  15. Small-angle X-ray scattering: a bridge between RNA secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xianyang [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., NCI Small Angle X-ray Scattering Core Facility; Stagno, Jason R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.; Bhandari, Yuba R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.; Zuo, Xiaobing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Wang, Yun-Xing [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., NCI Small Angle X-ray Scattering Core Facility; National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.

    2015-02-01

    Whereas the structures of small to medium-sized well folded RNA molecules often can be determined by either X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy, obtaining structural information for large RNAs using experimental, computational, or combined approaches remains a major interest and challenge. RNA is very sensitive to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) due to high electron density along phosphate-sugar backbones, whose scattering contribution dominates SAXS intensity. For this reason, SAXS is particularly useful in obtaining global RNA structural information that outlines backbone topologies and, therefore, molecular envelopes. Such information is extremely valuable in bridging the gap between the secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures of RNAmolecules, particularly those that have proven difficult to study using other structuredetermination methods. Here we review published results of RNA topological structures derived from SAXS data or in combination with other experimental data, as well as details on RNA sample preparation for SAXS experiments.

  16. The study of the structural properties of very low viscosity sodium alginate by small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badita, C. R., E-mail: ramona@tandem.nipne.ro [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Reactorului 30, RO-077125, POB-MG6, Magurele-Bucharest, Romania, ramona@tandem.nipne.ro, daranghe@nipne.ro (Romania); University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Atomiştilor 405, CP MG - 11, RO – 077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Aranghel, D., E-mail: daranghe@nipne.ro [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Reactorului 30, RO-077125, POB-MG6, Magurele-Bucharest, Romania, ramona@tandem.nipne.ro, daranghe@nipne.ro (Romania); Extreme Light Intrastructure Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), Reactorului 30, RO-077125, POB-MG6, Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Radulescu, A. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, 85747 Garching (Germany); Anitas, E. M. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Reactorului 30, RO-077125, POB-MG6, Magurele-Bucharest, Romania, ramona@tandem.nipne.ro, daranghe@nipne.ro (Romania); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-25

    Sodium alginate is a linear polymer extract from brown algae and it is used in the biomedical, food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries as solution property modifiers and gelling agents. But despite the extensive studies of the alginate gelation process, still some fundamental questions remain unresolved. The fractal behavior of very low viscosity sodium alginate solutions and their influence on the critical gelation of alginate induced by Ca{sup 2+} ions were investigated using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) measurements. SANS data are interpreted using both standard linear plots and the Beaucage model. The scattering intensity is dependent by alginate concentration and Ca{sup 2+} concentration. From a critical concentration of 1.0 % w/w our polymer swelled forming spherical structures with rough surfaces. Also the addition of the salt induces the collapse and the appearance of the aggregation and clusters formation.

  17. Recent Development of a 36 meter Small-Angle Neutron Scattering BATAN Spectrometer (SMARTer) in Serpong Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putra, Edy Giri Rachman; Bharoto [Neutron Scattering Laboratory, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Gedung 40 Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15314 (Indonesia); Seong, Baek Seok, E-mail: giri@batan.go.i [Neutron Science Division, HANARO Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-01

    The 36 meter small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) spectrometer BATAN (SMARTer) in Serpong, Indonesia has been revitalised for several years. The work on replacing, upgrading and improving the control system and the experimental method were conducted in order to setup the spectrometer back in operation. Two main personal computers, one for handling and controlling the mechanical system and another one for acquiring neutron data were employed at the spectrometer. The standard and established SANS data reduction and analysis programs, such as GRASP and NIST Igor have been implemented to subtract the raw scattered neutron data with the backgrounds and then analyse the corrected data. The scattering data of ferrofluids samples, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and MnZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} have been obtained using SANS spectrometers in BATAN Serpong, Indonesia and HANARO-KAERI, Republic of Korea for inter-laboratory comparison and investigation of proposed research interest. The results were comparable from both scattering data analysis.

  18. Fractal Structures on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} Ferrofluid: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putra, Edy Giri Rachman; Ikram, Abarrul [Neutron Scattering Laboratory, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Gedung 40 Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15314 (Indonesia); Seong, Baek Seok; Shin, Eunjoo [Neutron Science Division, HANARO Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ani, Sistin Ari; Darminto, E-mail: giri@batan.go.i [Department of Physics, Faculty on Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sepuluh Nopember Institute of Technology Kampus ITS Sukolilo, Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia)

    2010-10-01

    A small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) which is a powerful technique to reveal the large scale structures was applied to investigate the fractal structures of water-based Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}ferrofluid, magnetic fluid. The natural magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} from iron sand of several rivers in East Java Province of Indonesia was extracted and purified using magnetic separator. Four different ferrofluid concentrations, i.e. 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 Molar (M) were synthesized through a co-precipitation method and then dispersed in tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) as surfactant. The fractal aggregates in ferrofluid samples were observed from their SANS scattering distributions confirming the correlations to their concentrations. The mass fractal dimension changed from about 3 to 2 as ferrofluid concentration increased showing a deviation slope at intermediate scattering vector q range. The size of primary magnetic particle as a building block was determined by fitting the scattering profiles with a log-normal sphere model calculation. The mean average size of those magnetic particles is about 60 - 100 A in diameter with a particle size distribution {sigma} = 0.5.

  19. Systematic Limitations in Concentration Analysis via Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray Scattering in the Small Structure Limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guenter Goerigk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous small angle scattering measurements have been applied to diluted solutions of anionic polyacrylates decorated by specifically-interacting Pb2+ cations, revealing partial collapse of the polyacrylate into pearl-like subdomains with a size on the order of a few nanometers. From the pure-resonant scattering contribution of the Pb2+ cations, and from subsequent analysis of the resonant-invariant, the amount of Pb2+ cations condensed onto the polyanions with respect to the total amount of Pb2+ cations in the solvent was estimated. In order to scrutinize systematic limitations in the determination of the chemical concentrations of resonant scattering counterions in the collapsed phase, Monte Carlo simulations have been performed. The simulations are based on structural confinements at variable size in the range of few nanometers, which represent the collapsed subdomains in the polyanions. These confinements were gradually filled to a high degree of the volume fraction with resonant scattering counterions giving access to a resonant-invariant at a variable degree of filling. The simulations revealed in the limit of small structures a significant underestimation of the true degree of filling of the collapsed subdomains when determining chemical concentrations of Pb2+ cations from the resonant invariant.

  20. Bounce resonance scattering of radiation belt electrons by H+ band EMIC waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xing; Ni, Binbin; Summers, Danny; Bortnik, Jacob; Tao, Xin; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Lou, Yuequn; Gu, Xudong; Fu, Song; Shi, Run; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi

    2017-02-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of bounce-resonant pitch angle scattering of radiation belt electrons due to electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. It is found that EMIC waves can resonate with near-equatorially mirroring electrons over a wide range of L shells and energies. H+ band EMIC waves efficiently scatter radiation belt electrons of energy >100 keV from near 90° pitch angles to lower pitch angles where the cyclotron resonance mechanism can take over to further diffuse electrons into the loss cone. Bounce-resonant electron pitch angle scattering rates show a strong dependence on L shell, wave normal angle distribution, and wave spectral properties. We find distinct quantitative differences between EMIC wave-induced bounce-resonant and cyclotron-resonant diffusion coefficients. Cyclotron-resonant electron scattering by EMIC waves has been well studied and found to be a potentially crucial electron scattering mechanism. The new investigation here demonstrates that bounce-resonant electron scattering may also be very important. We conclude that bounce resonance scattering by EMIC waves should be incorporated into future modeling efforts of radiation belt electron dynamics.