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Sample records for pirani gages

  1. Silicon nanowire based Pirani sensor for vacuum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, T.; Mercier, D.; Koumela, A.; Marcoux, C.; Duraffourg, L.

    2012-10-01

    Nano-Pirani vacuum gauges based on the physical properties of suspended silicon nanowires have been fabricated and characterized. With a 160 × 260 nm2 rectangular section and a 5.2 μm length, they are 50 times smaller than the smallest silicon based vacuum sensor and they exhibits much lower power consumption. The nano-Pirani constructed are capable of measuring pressures from 50 to 105 Pa. Moreover, their fabrication is compatible with microelectronic and micromachining fabrication techniques making them suitable for in-situ monitoring of micro and nano systems vacuum packaging.

  2. Streamflow Gaging Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer shows selected streamflow gaging stations of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, in 2013. Gaging stations, or gages, measure...

  3. Storage Gage Precipitation Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A storage gage is a precipitation gage that requires reading and maintenance only monthly or seasonal intervals. This library includes reports from such gages,...

  4. Nanoporous Pirani sensor based on anodic aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Gwang-Jae; Kim, Woo Young; Shim, Hyun Bin; Lee, Hee Chul

    2016-09-01

    A nanoporous Pirani sensor based on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is proposed, and the quantitative relationship between the performance of the sensor and the porosity of the AAO membrane is characterized with a theoretical model. The proposed Pirani sensor is composed of a metallic resistor on a suspended nanoporous membrane, which simultaneously serves as the sensing area and the supporting structure. The AAO membrane has numerous vertically-tufted nanopores, resulting in a lower measurable pressure limit due to both the increased effective sensing area and the decreased effective thermal loss through the supporting structure. Additionally, the suspended AAO membrane structure, with its outer periphery anchored to the substrate, known as a closed-type design, is demonstrated using nanopores of AAO as an etch hole without a bulk micromachining process used on the substrate. In a CMOS-compatible process, a 200 μm × 200 μm nanoporous Pirani sensor with porosity of 25% was capable of measuring the pressure from 0.1 mTorr to 760 Torr. With adjustment of the porosity of the AAO, the measurable range could be extended toward lower pressures of more than one decade compared to a non-porous membrane with an identical footprint.

  5. Wide vacuum pressure range monitoring by Pirani SAW sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolay, Pascal; Elmazria, Omar; Sarry, Frederic; Bouvot, Laurent; Kambara, Hisanori; Singh, Kanwar J; Alnot, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    A new kind of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor has been developed to measure sub-atmospheric pressure below 100 mtorr with accuracy better than 0.1 mtorr. It provides an efficient measuring solution in the pressure range inaccessible in past by conventional diaphragm-based SAW sensors. Indeed, because of the small bending force in lower pressure and limited sensitivity, diaphragm-based SAW sensors are only suited to monitor relatively high pressure with a precision hardly better than 0.5 torr. To reach precision level better than 1 mtorr at sub-atmospheric pressure for vacuum technology applications, a radically different SAW-based solution is necessary. Our device aims to measure sub-atmospheric pressure less than 100 mtorr with a threshold resolution better than 0.1 mtorr. The concept is similar to the one used by Pirani pressure gauges. However, it is claimed that a heated and suspended SAW device should have better sensitivity. A theoretical model based on the basic concepts of gas kinetic theory and thermodynamics is presented. The validity of the model is checked by comparison between theoretical and experimental results.

  6. GAGES-II: Geospatial Attributes of Gages for Evaluating Streamflow

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset, termed "GAGES II", an acronym for Geospatial Attributes of Gages for Evaluating Streamflow, version II, provides geospatial data and classifications...

  7. Interobserver variability in Pirani clubfoot severity scoring system between the orthopedic surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital talipes equinovarus (clubfoot is one of the most common congenital pediatric orthopedic foot deformity, which varies in severity and clinical course. Assessment of severity of the club foot deformity is essential to assess the initial severity of deformity, to monitor the progress of treatment, to prognosticate, and to identify early relapse. Pirani′s scoring system is most acceptable and popular for club foot deformity assessment because it is simple, quick, cost effective, and easy. Since the scoring system is subjective in nature it has inter- and intra-observer variability, it is widely used. Hence, the interobserver variability between orthopedic surgeons in assessing the club foot severity by Pirani scoring system. Materials and Methods: We assessed the interobserver variability between five orthopedic surgeons of comparable skills, in assessing the club foot severity by Pirani scoring system in 80 feet of 60 children (20 bilateral and 40 unilateral with club foot deformity. All the five different orthopedic surgeons were familiar with Pirani clubfoot severity scoring and Ponseti cast manipulation, as they had already worked in CTEV clinics for at least 2 months. Each of them independently scored, each foot as per the Pirani clubfoot scoring system and recorded total score (TS, Midfoot score (MFS, Hind foot score (HFS, posterior crease (PC, emptiness of heel (EH, rigidity of equnius (RE, medial crease (MC, curvature of lateral border (CLB, and lateral head of talus (LHT. Interobserver variability was calculated using kappa statistic for each of these signs and was judged as poor (0.00-0.20, fair (0.21-0.40, moderate (0.41-0.60, substantial (0.61-0.80, or almost perfect (0.81-1.00. Results: The mean age was 137 days (range 21-335 days. The mean Pirani score was 3.86. We found the overall consistency to be substantial for overall score (total score kappa - 0.71 and also for midfoot (0.68 and hindfoot (0.66 separately

  8. GAGES-II: Geospatial Attributes of Gages for Evaluating Streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, James A.

    2011-01-01

    This dataset, termed "GAGES II", an acronym for Geospatial Attributes of Gages for Evaluating Streamflow, version II, provides geospatial data and classifications for 9,322 stream gages maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). It is an update to the original GAGES, which was published as a Data Paper on the journal Ecology's website (Falcone and others, 2010b) in 2010. The GAGES II dataset consists of gages which have had either 20+ complete years (not necessarily continuous) of discharge record since 1950, or are currently active, as of water year 2009, and whose watersheds lie within the United States, including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Reference gages were identified based on indicators that they were the least-disturbed watersheds within the framework of broad regions, based on 12 major ecoregions across the United States. Of the 9,322 total sites, 2,057 are classified as reference, and 7,265 as non-reference. Of the 2,057 reference sites, 1,633 have (through 2009) 20+ years of record since 1950. Some sites have very long flow records: a number of gages have been in continuous service since 1900 (at least), and have 110 years of complete record (1900-2009) to date. The geospatial data include several hundred watershed characteristics compiled from national data sources, including environmental features (e.g. climate – including historical precipitation, geology, soils, topography) and anthropogenic influences (e.g. land use, road density, presence of dams, canals, or power plants). The dataset also includes comments from local USGS Water Science Centers, based on Annual Data Reports, pertinent to hydrologic modifications and influences. The data posted also include watershed boundaries in GIS format. This overall dataset is different in nature to the USGS Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN; Slack and Landwehr 1992), whose data evaluation ended with water year 1988. The HCDN identifies stream gages which at some point in their history had

  9. Multifunctional Platform with CMOS-Compatible Tungsten Microhotplate for Pirani, Temperature, and Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A multifunctional platform based on the microhotplate was developed for applications including a Pirani vacuum gauge, temperature, and gas sensor. It consisted of a tungsten microhotplate and an on-chip operational amplifier. The platform was fabricated in a standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS process. A tungsten plug in standard CMOS process was specially designed as the serpentine resistor for the microhotplate, acting as both heater and thermister. With the sacrificial layer technology, the microhotplate was suspended over the silicon substrate with a 340 nm gap. The on-chip operational amplifier provided a bias current for the microhotplate. This platform has been used to develop different kinds of sensors. The first one was a Pirani vacuum gauge ranging from 1-1 to 105 Pa. The second one was a temperature sensor ranging from -20 to 70 °C. The third one was a thermal-conductivity gas sensor, which could distinguish gases with different thermal conductivities in constant gas pressure and environment temperature. In the fourth application, with extra fabrication processes including the deposition of gas-sensitive film, the platform was used as a metal-oxide gas sensor for the detection of gas concentration.

  10. Tube-shaped Pirani gauge for in situ hermeticity monitoring of SiN thin-film encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagata, F.; Creemer, J. F.; Iervolino, E.; Sarro, P. M.

    2012-10-01

    Here the integration of a tube-shaped Pirani gauge with a SiN thin-film encapsulation process is presented. The tube geometry gives the sensor a very low detection limit with a small footprint, since the tube is buried under the silicon surface. The Pirani tube is very suitable for in situ evaluation of MEMS vacuum packaging. Moreover, since the Pirani gap is all around the tube and deep below the silicon surface, the deflection of the encapsulation shell is not a concern and wafer-level measurement of the device is possible. Pirani tubes with different lengths are encapsulated inside SiN micropackages in order to measure the resulting vacuum level achieved after the encapsulation step. The longest tube shows a detection limit of 0.1 Pa for a noise level of 50 μV and it has a footprint of only 0.006 mm2. The pressure inside the sealed micropackage was extracted to be 0.7 kPa. Furthermore, the pressure is monitored over time to evaluate the hermeticity of the packages. A leak rate of 8× 10-18 Pa m3 s-1 was measured over four months time.

  11. Streamflow Gaging Stations of the United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer shows selected streamflow gaging stations of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, in 2013. Gaging stations, or gages, measure...

  12. 46 CFR 197.458 - Gages and timekeeping devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gages and timekeeping devices. 197.458 Section 197.458... § 197.458 Gages and timekeeping devices. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) Each depth gage and timekeeping device is tested or calibrated against a master reference gage or time-keeping...

  13. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  14. A Fast Response Thermal Conductivity Gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    NUMBER(s) N.ATOR(&) IM JAME~S 0. PILCiEIR, 11 MELINDA B. KRUZMPICH 9LPERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK AREA 6... area of the temperature gage. The gage was then removed and the beam 15 placed in im.ltipulse mode. The energy delivered by each pulse was calculated...Army AMCCOM, ARDC HQDA ATTN: SMCAR-SCMI- DAMA-ART-M SMCAR-SCS, B. Brodman Washington, D.C. 20310 SMCAR-SCS, T. Hung SMCAR-SCA, W. Cadomski Commander

  15. DL-6A型电阻真空计的误差%The error of DL-6A Pirani gauge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王逊

    2011-01-01

    本文介绍DL-6A型电阻真空计的误差.DL-6A型电阻真空计测量范围是10-1~105 Pa,在10~5×103 Pa,误差为10%,在小于10 Pa和大于5×103 Pa误差为35%.%The error of DL-6A Pirani gauge was described in this paper. The measurement range of this gauge is 10-1 ~ 105Pa, and the measurement error is about 10% in the range of 10Pa~5×103Pa. When the pressure is lower than 10Pa or higher than 5×103Pa, the error is about 35%.

  16. Sensitivity of hot-cathode ionization vacuum gages in several gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.

    1972-01-01

    Four hot-cathode ionization vacuum gages were calibrated in 12 gases. The relative sensitivities of these gages were compared to several gas properties. Ionization cross section was the physical property which correlated best with gage sensitivity. The effects of gage accelerating voltage and ionization-cross-section energy level were analyzed. Recommendations for predicting gage sensitivity according to gage type were made.

  17. High temperature static strain gage development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, C. O.; Bailey, R. S.; Grant, H. P.; Anderson, W. L.; Przybyszewski, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Final results are presented from a program to develop a thin film static strain gage for use on the blades and vanes of running, test stand gas turbine engines with goals of an 3 x 3 mm gage area and total errors of less than 10 pct. of + or - 2,000 microstrain after 50 hrs at 1250 K. Pd containing 13 Wt. pct. Cr was previously identified as a new strain sensor alloy that appeared to be potentially usable to 1250 K. Subsequently, it was discovered, in contrast with its behavior in bulk, that Pd-13Cr suffered from oxidation attack when prepared as a 4.5 micron thick thin film. Continuing problems with electrical leakage to the substrate and the inability of sputtered alumina overcoats to prevent oxidation led to the discovery that sputtered alumina contains appreciable amounts of entrapped argon. After the argon has been exsolved by heating to elevated temperatures, the alumina films undergo a linear shrinkage of about 2 pct. resulting in formation of cracks. These problems can be largely overcome by sputtering the alumina with the substrate heated to 870 K. With 2 micron thick hot sputtered alumina insulation and overcoat films, total 50 hr drifts of about 100 microstrain (2 tests) and about 500 microstrain (1 test) were observed at 1000 and 1100 K, respectively. Results of tests on complete strain gage systems on constant moment bend bars with Pd temperature compensation grids revealed that oxidation of the Pd grid was a major problem even when the grid was overcoated with a hot or cold sputtered alumina overcoat.

  18. Buried wire gage for wall shear stress measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, V. S.; Rose, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    A buried wire gage for measuring wall shear stress in fluid flow was studied and further developed. Several methods of making this relatively new type of gage were examined to arrive at a successful technique that is well-suited for wind-tunnel testing. A series of measurements was made to demonstrate the adequacy of a two-point calibration procedure for these gages. The buried wire gage is also demonstrated to be ideally suited for quantitative measurement of wall shear stress in wind-tunnel testing.

  19. Strain Gage Selection Criteria for Textile Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, John E.

    1996-01-01

    This report will provide a review of efforts to establish a set of strain gage selection guidelines for textile reinforced composite materials. A variety of strain gages were evaluated in the study to determine the sensitivity of strain measurements to the size of the strain gage. The strain gages were chosen to provide a range of gage lengths and widths. The gage aspect ratio (the length-to-width ratio) was also varied. The gages were tested on a diverse collection of textile composite laminates. Test specimens featured eleven different textile architectures: four 2-D triaxial braids, six 3-D weaves, and one stitched uniweave architecture. All specimens were loaded in uniaxial tension. The materials' moduli were measured in both the longitudinal (parallel to the O deg. yarns) and the transverse (perpendicular to the O deg. yarns) directions. The results of these measurements were analyzed to establish performance levels for extensometers and strain gages on textile composite materials. Conclusions are expressed in a summary that discusses instrumentation practices and defines strain gage selection criteria.

  20. 46 CFR 197.318 - Gages and timekeeping devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gages and timekeeping devices. 197.318 Section 197.318... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.318 Gages and timekeeping devices... timekeeping device must be at each dive location....

  1. 49 CFR 179.400-19 - Valves and gages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valves and gages. 179.400-19 Section 179.400-19...-19 Valves and gages. (a) Valves. Manually operated shut-off valves and control valves must be... liquid flow rates. All valves must be made from approved materials compatible with the lading and...

  2. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Streamflow Gaging Stations of the United States 201403 Shapefile

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer shows selected streamflow gaging stations of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, in 2013. Gaging stations, or gages, measure...

  3. Theory and Practice of Shear/Stress Strain Gage Hygrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Fenner, Ralph L.

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical hygrometry has progressed during the last several decades from crude hygroscopes to state-of-the art strain-gage sensors. The strain-gage devices vary from different metallic beams to strain-gage sensors using cellulose crystallite elements, held in full shear restraint. This old technique is still in use but several companies are now actively pursuing development of MEMS miniaturized humidity sensors. These new sensors use polyimide thin film for water vapor adsorption and desorption. This paper will provide overview about modern humidity sensors.

  4. Manual for leveling at gaging stations in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N.O.; Jackson, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    This manual was prepared to serve several purposes in the U.S. Geological Survey North Carolina District. This manual sets forth District policy as to frequency of levels, accuracy criteria, procedures for checking the datum and setting of the various types of gages, general rules to follow in establishing the original datum of a gage, and contains sample notes to be used as guides in level notekeeping. The manual also serves as a training tool in that the reasoning behind District policy is explained and reasons are given for following the recommended techniques to assist in a better understanding of the purpose of levels and maintaining gage datum.

  5. The role of GAGE cancer/testis antigen in metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Terp, Mikkel Green; Hansen, Malene Bredahl;

    2016-01-01

    with migratory and invasive properties and were found to be upregulated in cancer cells with metastasizing potential in a gastric cancer model. METHODS: We have addressed the direct role of GAGE proteins in supporting metastasis using an isogenic metastasis model of human cancer, consisting of 4 isogenic cell......) and moderately metastatic clones (LM3), stable downregulation of GAGE expression did not affect the ability of CL16 cells to establish primary tumors and form metastasis in the lungs of immunodeficient mice. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that GAGE proteins per se do not support metastasis and that further...

  6. High temperature strain measurement with a resistance strain gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Fichtel, ED; Mcdaniel, Amos

    1993-01-01

    A PdCr based electrical resistance strain gage was demonstrated in the laboratory to be a viable sensor candidate for static strain measurement at high temperatures. However, difficulties were encountered while transferring the sensor to field applications. This paper is therefore prepared for recognition and resolution of the problems likely to be encountered with PdCr strain gages in field applications. Errors caused by the measurement system, installation technique and lead wire attachment are discussed. The limitations and some considerations related to the temperature compensation technique used for this gage are also addressed.

  7. Vision system for dial gage torque wrench calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Doiron, Theodore D.; Sanghera, Paramjeet S.

    1993-11-01

    In this paper, we present the development of a fast and robust vision system which, in conjunction with the Dial Gage Calibration system developed by AKO Inc., will be used by the U.S. Army in calibrating dial gage torque wrenches. The vision system detects the change in the angular position of the dial pointer in a dial gage. The angular change is proportional to the applied torque. The input to the system is a sequence of images of the torque wrench dial gage taken at different dial pointer positions. The system then reports the angular difference between the different positions. The primary components of this vision system include modules for image acquisition, linear feature extraction and angle measurements. For each of these modules, several techniques were evaluated and the most applicable one was selected. This system has numerous other applications like vision systems to read and calibrate analog instruments.

  8. Strain gage selection in loads equations using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, structural loads are measured using strain gages. A loads calibration test must be done before loads can be accurately measured. In one measurement method, a series of point loads is applied to the structure, and loads equations are derived via the least squares curve fitting algorithm using the strain gage responses to the applied point loads. However, many research structures are highly instrumented with strain gages, and the number and selection of gages used in a loads equation can be problematic. This paper presents an improved technique using a genetic algorithm to choose the strain gages used in the loads equations. Also presented are a comparison of the genetic algorithm performance with the current T-value technique and a variant known as the Best Step-down technique. Examples are shown using aerospace vehicle wings of high and low aspect ratio. In addition, a significant limitation in the current methods is revealed. The genetic algorithm arrived at a comparable or superior set of gages with significantly less human effort, and could be applied in instances when the current methods could not.

  9. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355... Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs... distance between the gage line of a frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face,...

  10. Skin Friction Gage for Measurements in Hypersonic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francois Falempin; Marat Goldfeld; Roman Nestoulia

    2003-01-01

    A description and results of tests of a new small-scale gage for direct measurement of skin friction force are presented in the paper. The gage design provides separated measurement of longitudinal and transversal component of friction force. Application of this scheme provides high sensitivity and necessary high-frequency response of the gage. The tests of the gage were carried out in a blow down wind tunnel at Mach numbers of 2 and 4 within the range of Reynolds numbers Rex from 0.8 to 5 million and in the hot-shot wind tunnel at Mach number 6 and Reynolds numbers Rex= 2.5-10 million. The measurements of skin friction were carried out on a flat plate and on a ramp beyond the shock wave. Simultaneously with the direct measurement of friction in the blow down wind tunnel, the measurements of profiles of average velocities and mass flow rate pulsations were realised. Analysis of measurement errors has shown that the friction gage permits to measure skin friction coefficient on a flat plate with mistake not more than 10%.

  11. Restriction of GAGE protein expression to subpopulations of cancer cells is independent of genotype and may limit the use of GAGE proteins as targets for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, M F; Johansen, L E; Nielsen, O

    2006-01-01

    The GAGE cancer testis antigen gene family encodes products that can be recognized by autologous T cells, and GAGE proteins have been suggested as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Analysis of GAGE expression in tumours has primarily been performed at the level of gene transcription......, whereas little is known about GAGE expression at the protein level. To evaluate the potential of GAGE proteins as targets for cancer-specific immunotherapy, we studied the expression of these proteins in normal and malignant cells/tissues using a novel panel of monoclonal antibodies. Immunohistochemical...... analysis of more than 250 cancer specimens demonstrated that GAGE proteins were frequently expressed in numerous cancer types and correlated with the expression of the cancer testis antigens MAGE-A1 and NY-ESO-1. Significant intercellular and subcellular differences in GAGE protein levels were observed...

  12. High temperature strain gage technology for gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, Edward J.; McDaniel, Amos D.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a six month study that addressed specific issues to transfer the Pd-13Cr static strain sensor to a gas turbine engine environment. The application issues that were addressed include: (1) evaluation of a miniature, variable potentiometer for use as the ballast resistor, in conjunction with a conventional strain gage signal conditioning unit; (2) evaluation of a metal sheathed, platinum conductor leadwire assembly for use with the three-wire sensor; and (3) subjecting the sensor to dynamic strain cyclic testing to determine fatigue characteristics. Results indicate a useful static strain gage system at all temperature levels up to 1350 F. The fatigue characteristics also appear to be very promising, indicating a potential use in dynamic strain measurement applications. The procedure, set-up, and data for all tests are presented in this report. This report also discusses the specific strain gage installation technique for the Pd-13Cr gage because of its potential impact on the quality of the output data.

  13. GAGE12 mediates human gastric carcinoma growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Song, Kyung-A; Chae, Ji-Hye; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2015-05-15

    The spontaneous metastasis from human gastric carcinoma (GC) remains poorly reproduced in animal models. Here, we established an experimental mouse model in which GC progressively developed in the orthotopic stomach wall and metastasized to multiple organs; the tumors colonized in the ovary exhibited typical characteristics of Krukenberg tumor. The expression of mesenchymal markers was low in primary tumors and high in those in intravasating and extravasating veins. However, the expression of epithelial markers did not differ, indicating that the acquisition of mesenchymal markers without a concordant loss of typical epithelial markers was associated with metastasis. We identified 35 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in GC cells metastasized to ovary, among which overexpression of GAGE12 family genes, the top-ranked DEGs, were validated. In addition, knockdown of the GAGE12 gene family affected transcription of many of the aforementioned 35 DEGs and inhibited trans-well migration, tumor sphere formation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. In accordance, GAGE12 overexpression augmented migration, tumor sphere formation and sustained in vivo tumor growth. Taken together, the GAGE12 gene family promotes GC growth and metastasis by modulating the expression of GC metastasis-related genes.

  14. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Streamflow Gaging Stations of the United States 201403 FileGDB 10.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer shows selected streamflow gaging stations of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, in 2013. Gaging stations, or gages, measure...

  15. Development and calibration of buried wire gages for wall shear stress measurements in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Sreedhara V.; Steinle, Frank W.

    1988-01-01

    Special methods were developed to arrange 'Buried Wire Gage' inserts flush to the contoured flow surfaces of instrument plugs of a boundary-layer flow apparatus. The fabrication process was aimed at producing proper bonding of the sensor wire to the substrate surface, without causing excessive surface waviness. A large number of gages were built and first calibrated for the resistance-temperature characteristics. The gages were then installed in a flow calibration apparatus and operated from a constant temperature anemometer system for a series of flow settings to derive the calibration constants of each of the gages. The flow settings included a range of subsonic freestream Mach numbers in order to help establish the gage calibration characteristics for compressible flow fields. This paper provides a description of the buried wire gage technique, an explanation of the method evolved for making proper gages, the procedure for calibrating the gages and the results of measurements performed for determining the calibration constants.

  16. Development and characterization of PdCr temperature-compensated wire resistance strain gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1989-10-01

    A temperature-compensated resistance static strain gage with potential to be used to 600 C was recently developed. Gages were fabricated from specially developed palladium-13 w/o chromium (Pd-13Cr) wire and platinum (Pt) compensator. When bonded to high temperature Hastelloy X, the apparent strain from room temperature to 600 C was within 400 microstrain for gages with no preheat treatment and within 3500 microstrain for gages with 16 hours prestabilization at 640 C. The apparent strain versus temperature relationship of stabilized PdCr gages were repeatable with the reproducibility within 100 microstrain during three thermal cycles to 600 C and an 11 hours soak at 600 C. The gage fabrication, construction and installation is described. Also, the coating system used for this compensated resistance strain gage is explained. The electrical properties of the strain sensing element and main characteristics of the compensated gage including apparent strain, drift and reproducibility are discussed.

  17. Development and characterization of PdCr temperature-compensated wire resistance strain gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1989-01-01

    A temperature-compensated resistance static strain gage with potential to be used to 600 C was recently developed. Gages were fabricated from specially developed palladium-13 w/o chromium (Pd-13Cr) wire and platinum (Pt) compensator. When bonded to high temperature Hastelloy X, the apparent strain from room temperature to 600 C was within 400 microstrain for gages with no preheat treatment and within 3500 microstrain for gages with 16 hours prestabilization at 640 C. The apparent strain versus temperature relationship of stabilized PdCr gages were repeatable with the reproducibility within 100 microstrain during three thermal cycles to 600 C and an 11 hours soak at 600 C. The gage fabrication, construction and installation is described. Also, the coating system used for this compensated resistance strain gage is explained. The electrical properties of the strain sensing element and main characteristics of the compensated gage including apparent strain, drift and reproducibility are discussed.

  18. Method of predicting ionization-type vacuum gage sensitivity for various gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.

    1973-01-01

    Sensitivity of gage for one gas can be correlated to its sensitivity for other gases by the ratio of gas ionization cross sections. Ionization cross sections which best correlate with gage sensitivites vary according to gage type and ionization cross section energy level.

  19. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.143... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the...

  20. Alumina Encapsulated Strain Gage Not Mechanically Attached To The Substrate, Used to Temperature Compensate an Active High Temperature Gage In A Half-Bridge Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Anthony (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A temperature compensation element for a high-temperature strain gage and the method of fabricating the same. Preferably, the element is a "dummy" strain gage not mechanically attached to the substrate. The element is encapsulated in an insulative material and used to compensate an active high-temperature strain gage and wired in a half-bridge configuration. The temperature compensation element and high-temperature strain gage are fabricated using the method of the present invention. This method includes temporarily adhering the element to a heat sink, encapsulated in an insulative material and then removed from the heat sink. Next, the element is either stacked or placed near the active gage. Ideally, the element and the active gage have substantially similar heat transfer and electrical properties.

  1. Analysis of strain gage reliability in F-100 jet engine testing at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.

    1983-01-01

    A reliability analysis was performed on 64 strain gage systems mounted on the 3 rotor stages of the fan of a YF-100 engine. The strain gages were used in a 65 hour fan flutter research program which included about 5 hours of blade flutter. The analysis was part of a reliability improvement program. Eighty-four percent of the strain gages survived the test and performed satisfactorily. A post test analysis determined most failure causes. Five failures were caused by open circuits, three failed gages showed elevated circuit resistance, and one gage circuit was grounded. One failure was undetermined.

  2. Differences between nipher and slter shielded rain gages at two Colorado deposition monitoring sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, David S.; Denning, A. Scott

    1990-01-01

    In the last decade the United States and Canada have made significant progress in establishing spatial ad temporal estimates of atmospheric deposition throughout North America. Fundamental to the wet-deposition portion of these estimates is the accurate and precise measurement of precipitation amount. Goodison and others (I-3) have reported on a new type of shielded snow gage known as the Canadian MSC Nipher shielded snow gage. Because this shielded snow gage has been shown to be superior to other precipitation gages for the estimation of snowfall amount, its design was adapted to the Universal Belfort precipitation gage (4), the dominant precipitation gage used at deposition monitoring sites in the United States. Favorable results taken from monitoring sites using this modified Nipher shielded snow gage (3-6) have prompted the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Electric Power Research Institute to adopt the Nipher shielded Belfort gage as a standard piece of equipment in the Acid MODES and Operational Evaluation Network (OEN) monitoring programs and to propose that is be included as a standard snow gage in other North American deposition monitoring programs. This communication details preliminary results from two of nine NADP/NTN deposition monitoring sites selected by the Environmental Protection Agency to compare Nipher shielded Belfort precipitation gage volumes to volumes obtained from the standard Belfort gage used in the NADP/NTN monitoring program.

  3. Standard test method for ambient temperature fatigue life of metallic bonded resistance strain gages

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a uniform procedure for the determination of strain gage fatigue life at ambient temperature. A suggested testing equipment design is included. 1.2 This test method does not apply to force transducers or extensometers that use bonded resistance strain gages as sensing elements. 1.3 Strain gages are part of a complex system that includes structure, adhesive, gage, leadwires, instrumentation, and (often) environmental protection. As a result, many things affect the performance of strain gages, including user technique. A further complication is that strain gages, once installed, normally cannot be reinstalled in another location. Therefore, it is not possible to calibrate individual strain gages; performance characteristics are normally presented on a statistical basis. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices ...

  4. Strain gage installation and survivability on geosynthetics used in flexible pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jeremy A.

    The use of foil type strain gages on geosynthetics is poorly documented. In addition, very few individuals are versed in proper installation techniques or calibration methods. Due to the limited number of knowledgeable technicians there is no information regarding the susceptibility of theses gages to errors in installation by inexperienced installers. Also lacking in the documentation related to the use of foil type strain gages on geosynthetics is the survivability of the gages in field conditions. This research documented procedures for installation, calibration, and survivability used by the project team to instruments a full scale field installation in Marked Tree, AR. This research also addressed sensitivity to installation errors on both geotextile and geogrid. To document the process of gage installation an experienced technician, Mr. Joe Ables, formerly of the UASCE Waterways Experiment Station, was consulted. His techniques were combined with those discovered in related literature and those developed by the research team to develop processes that were adaptable to multiple gage geometries and parent geosynthetics. These processes were described and documented in a step by step manner with accompanying photographs, which should allow virtually anyone with basic electronics knowledge to install these gages properly. Calibration of the various geosynthetic / strain gage combinations was completed using wide width tensile testing on multiple samples of each material. The tensile testing process was documented and analyzed using digital photography to analyze strain on the strain gage itself. Calibration factors for each geosynthtics used in the full scale field testing were developed. In addition, the process was thoroughly documented to allow future researchers to calibrate additional strain gage and geosynthetic combinations. The sensitivity of the strain gages to installation errors was analyzed using wide width tensile testing and digital photography to

  5. Near Net Manufacturing Using Thin Gage Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Jennifer; Potter, David; Holquin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) and near net spin forming of FSW aluminumn blanks were investigated for large-scale pressure vessel applications. With a specific focus on very thin gage 2xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys, the program concentrated on the following: the criteria used for material selection, a potential manufacturing flow, and the effectiveness and associated risks of near net spin forming. Discussion will include the mechanical properties of the friction stir welds and the parent material from before and after the spin forming process. This effort was performed under a NASA Space Exploration initiative focused on increasing the affordability, reliability and performance of pressure vessels larger than 10 ft. diameter.

  6. Development of buried wire gages for measurement of wall shear stress in Blastane experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, S. V.; Steinle, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    Buried Wire Gages operated from a Constant Temperature Anemometer System are among the special types of instrumentation to be used in the Boundary Layer Apparatus for Subsonic and Transonic flow Affected by Noise Environment (BLASTANE). These Gages are of a new type and need to be adapted for specific applications. Methods were developed to fabricate Gage inserts and mount those in the BLASTANE Instrumentation Plugs. A large number of Gages were prepared and operated from a Constant Temperature Anemometer System to derive some of the calibration constants for application to fluid-flow wall shear-stress measurements. The final stage of the calibration was defined, but could not be accomplished because of non-availability of a suitable flow simulating apparatus. This report provides a description of the Buried Wire Gage technique, an explanation of the method evolved for making proper Gages and the calibration constants, namely Temperature Coefficient of Resistance and Conduction Loss Factor.

  7. High temperature static strain measurement with an electrical resistance strain gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1992-01-01

    An electrical resistance strain gage that can supply accurate static strain measurement for NASP application is being developed both in thin film and fine wire forms. This gage is designed to compensate for temperature effects on substrate materials with a wide range of thermal expansion coefficients. Some experimental results of the wire gage tested on one of the NASP structure materials, i.e., titanium matrix composites, are presented.

  8. In-situ shear stress indicator using heated strain gages at the flow boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chi-An; Yang, Fuling

    2011-11-01

    This work borrows the concept of hot-wire anemometry and sketch a technique that uses local heat transfer to infer the flow field and the corresponding stress. Conventional strain gages were mounted at the flow solid boundary as the heat source and acrylic boundary was chosen for its low thermal conductivity ensuring heat accumulation when a gage is energized. The gage would now work in slightly overheated state and its self-heating leads to an additional thermal strain. When exposed to a flow field, heat is brought away by local forced convection, resulting in deviations in gage signal from that developed in quiescent liquid. We have developed a facility to achieve synchronous gage measurements at different locations on a solid boundary. Three steady flow motions were considered: circular Couette flow, rectilinear uniform flow, and rectilinear oscillating flow. Preliminary tests show the gage reading does respond to the imposed flow through thermal effects and greater deviation was measured in flows of higher shear strain rates. The correlation between the gage signals and the imposed flow field is further examined by theoretical analysis. We also introduced a second solid boundary to the vicinity of the gage in the two rectilinear flows. The gage readings demonstrate rises in its magnitudes indicating wall amplification effect on the local shear strain, agreeing to the drag augmentation by a second solid boundary reported in many multiphase flow literatures.

  9. Field manual for the collection of Navajo Nation streamflow-gage data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert J.; Fisk, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    The Field Manual for the Collection of Navajo Nation Streamflow-Gage Data (Navajo Field Manual) is based on established (standard) U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging methods and provides guidelines specifically designed for the Navajo Department of Water Resources personnel who establish and maintain streamflow gages. The Navajo Field Manual addresses field visits, including essential field equipment and the selection of and routine visits to streamflow-gaging stations, examines surveying methods for determining peak flows (indirect measurements), discusses safety considerations, and defines basic terms.

  10. Evaluation of static and dynamic contact stresses in simulated granular particles using strain gages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Shukla, A. (Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The application of strain gages for the determination of static and dynamic contact loads in granular particles is demonstrated. For experimental convenience, the granular particles are simulated by circular disks fabricated from Homalite-100, a brittle polyester material. Stress field equations in the vicinity of the contact points are carefully evaluated to optimize the relative position of strain gages. The results obtained from strain gages were compared with those obtained using the optical technique of photoelasticity for both static and dynamic problems. Finally, as an example, strain gages are used to study wave propagation in a single chain assembly of disks.

  11. Detection and Use of Load and Gage Output Repeats of Wind Tunnel Strain-Gage Balance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2017-01-01

    Criteria are discussed that may be used for the detection of load and gage output repeats of wind tunnel strain-gage balance data. First, empirical thresholds are introduced that help determine if the loads or electrical outputs of a pair of balance calibration or check load data points match. A threshold of 0.01 percent of the load capacity is suggested for the identification of matching loads. Similarly, a threshold of 0.1 microV/V is recommended for the identification of matching electrical outputs. Two examples for the use of load and output repeats are discussed to illustrate benefits of the implementation of a repeat point detection algorithm in a balance data analysis software package. The first example uses the suggested load threshold to identify repeat data points that may be used to compute pure errors of the balance loads. This type of analysis may reveal hidden data quality issues that could potentially be avoided by making calibration process improvements. The second example uses the electrical output threshold for the identification of balance fouling. Data from the calibration of a six-component force balance is used to illustrate the calculation of the pure error of the balance loads.

  12. Matilda Joslyn Gage: A Nineteenth-Century Women's Rights Historian Looks at Witchcraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Explores the ideas of the nineteenth century female historian, Matilda Joslyn Gage, who authored the book, "Woman, Church, and State." Focuses on Gage's ideas about women's history, particularly related to the role of the church and women persecuted for witchcraft. (CMK)

  13. Durability investigation of a group of strain gage pressure transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, P. S.; Hilten, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A durability investigation was conducted on a group of eighteen bonded-wire strain gage pressure transducers with ranges of 0 to 15 psig and 0 to 100 psig using an improved version of a previously developed technique. Some of the transducers were subjected to 40 million pressure cycles at a 5-Hz rate at laboratory ambient conditions, others were cycled at a temperature of 150 F (65.6 C). The largest change in sensitivity observed was 0.22% for a 100-psig transducer subjected to 40 million pressure cycles at 150 F. The largest change in zero pressure output observed was 0.91% FS for the same transducer. None of the transducers failed completely as a result of cycling at or below full scale pressure.

  14. An evaluation of Idaho stream-gaging networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillian, E.W.; Harenberg, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Network Analysis for Regional Information (NARI) and the Cost-Effectiveness Procedure were tested by applying them to stream-gaging networks in Idaho. NARI was used to determine network design strategies that would maximize the value of additional data. Value of data was measured as the decrease in the probable true standards error of regional regression equations. NARI indicated that no significant decrease in regression error can be achieved by the collection of additional data and that better models should be sought. No major modifications to NARI are necessary to make it widely applicable. The Cost-Effectiveness Procedure was used to determine optimal network operation strategies. It showed network uncertainty can be reduced when six- or one-visit per year minimum constraints are in force. Sensitivity to various cost factors was examined. Attempts to model networks that included sites for collection of groundwater and water-quality data were unsuccessful. (USGS)

  15. Response of hot element wall shear stress gages in laminar oscillating flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Murphy, J. D.; Giddings, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time-dependent response of hot element wall shear stress gages in unsteady periodic air flows is reported. The study has focused on wall shear stress in laminar oscillating flows produced on a flat plate by a free stream velocity composed of a mean component and a superposed sinusoidal variation. Two types of hot element gages, platinum film and flush wire, were tested for values of reduced frequency ranging from 0.14 to 2.36. Values of the phase angle of the wall shear stress variation relative to the free stream velocity, as indicated by the hot element gages, are compared with numerical prediction. The comparisons show that the gages indicate a wall shear stress variation that lags the true variation, and that the gages will also not indicate the correct wall shear stress variation in periodic turbulent flows.

  16. The index gage method to develop a flow duration curve from short-term streamflow records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenxing

    2017-10-01

    The flow duration curve (FDC) is one of the most commonly used graphical tools in hydrology and provides a comprehensive graphical view of streamflow variability at a particular site. For a gaged site, an FDC can be easily estimated with frequency analysis. When no streamflow records are available, regional FDCs are used to synthesize FDCs. However, studies on how to develop FDCs for sites with short-term records have been very limited. Deriving representative FDC when there are short-term hydrologic records is important. For instance, 43% of the 394 streamflow gages in Illinois have records of 20 years or fewer, and these short-term gages are often distributed in headwaters and contain valuable hydrologic information. In this study, the index gage method is proposed to develop FDCs using short-term hydrologic records via an information transfer technique from a nearby hydrologically similar index gage. There are three steps: (1) select an index gage; (2) determine changes of FDC; and (3) develop representative FDCs. The approach is tested using records from 92 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gages in Illinois. A jackknife experiment is conducted to assess the performance. Bootstrap resampling is used to simulate various periods of records, i.e., 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years of records. The results demonstrated that the index gage method is capable of developing a representative FDC using short-term records. Generally, the approach performance is improved when more hydrologic records are available, but the improvement appears to level off when the short-term gage has 10 years or more records.

  17. High-Temperature Extensometry and PdCr Temperature-Compensated Wire Resistance Strain Gages Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A detailed experimental evaluation is underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center to compare and contrast the performance of the PdCr/Pt dual-element temperature-compensated wire resistance strain gage with that of conventional high-temperature extensometry. The advanced PdCr gage, developed by researchers at Lewis, exhibits desirable properties and a relatively small and repeatable apparent strain to 800 C. This gage represents a significant advance in technology because existing commercial resistance strain gages are not reliable for quasi-static strain measurements above approx. 400 C. Various thermal and mechanical loading spectra are being applied by a high-temperature thermomechanical uniaxial testing system to evaluate the two strain-measurement systems. This is being done not only to compare and contrast the two strain sensors, but also to investigate the applicability of the PdCr strain gage to the coupon-level specimen testing environment typically employed when the high-temperature mechanical behavior of structural materials is characterized. Strain measurement capabilities to 800 C are being investigated with a nickel-base superalloy, Inconel 100 (IN 100), substrate material and application to TMC's is being examined with the model system, SCS-6/Ti-15-3. Furthermore, two gage application techniques are being investigated in the comparison study: namely, flame-sprayed and spot welding. The apparent strain responses of both the weldable and flame-sprayed PdCr wire strain gages were found to be cyclically repeatable on both IN 100 and SCS-6/Ti-15-3 [0]_8. In general, each gage exhibited some uniqueness with respect to apparent strain behavior. Gages mounted on the IN 100 specimens tended to show a repeatable apparent strain within the first few cycles, because the thermal response of IN 100 was stable. This was not the case, however, for the TMC specimens, which typically required several thermal cycles to stabilize the thermal strain response. Thus

  18. Gage for Measuring Decrease in Dimension of Test Specimen in Tensile Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    respect to the frame member and provides an output signal proportional to displacement. Elastic bands are used to support the test gage on a tensile test machine which is used to apply a stress to the test specimen. (Author)

  19. U.S. Geological Survey Stream Gages located in the Central Valley, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the locations of, and links to USGS gages on the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central...

  20. Drainage basin delineations for selected USGS streamflow-gaging stations in Virginia (Drainage_Basin)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Drainage_Basin polygon feature class was created as a digital representation of drainage basins for more than 1,650 continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations,...

  1. Demonstration test of burner liner strain measurements using resistance strain gages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, H. P.; Anderson, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    A demonstration test of burner liner strain measurements using resistance strain gages as well as a feasibility test of an optical speckle technique for strain measurement are presented. The strain gage results are reported. Ten Kanthal A-1 wire strain gages were used for low cycle fatigue strain measurements to 950 K and .002 apparent strain on a JT12D burner can in a high pressure (10 atmospheres) burner test. The procedure for use of the strain gages involved extensive precalibration and postcalibration to correct for cooling rate dependence, drift, and temperature effects. Results were repeatable within + or - .0002 to .0006 strain, with best results during fast decels from 950 K. The results agreed with analytical prediction based on an axisymmetric burner model, and results indicated a non-uniform circumferential distribution of axial strain, suggesting temperature streaking.

  2. Levels at Streamflow Gaging Stations--A CD-ROM Based Training Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, K. Michael; Jacobson, Nathan; Erickson, Robert; Landon, Stanley

    2003-01-01

    Streamgages record the elevation of the water surface above some reference surface, or datum. This datum is assumed to remain unchanged throughout the life of the gage. However, the elevation of gages and their supporting structures often change over time as a result of earthmovement, floods, ice, and debris. The surveying practice of leveling is used to establish datum for new gage structures and to check for vertical movement of those structures over time. Vertical changes in gage structures can affect stage-discharge relations and, thus, could result in incorrect discharge determinations. Datum checks are used to correct stage-discharge relations and allow the USGS to document gage datum throughout the life of a gage. This training presentation describes methods currently used by the U.S. Geological Survey to run levels at gaging stations. The presentation is narrated, but you control the pace of the presentation. If the computer you are using can view 'MPEG' videos you will be able to take advantage of videos found within the presentation. A test, found at the end of the presentation, can be taken to assess how well you understood the training material. The class is registered as class SW1307 with the National Training Center of the U.S. Geologcial Survey. The presentation was developed using Macromedia Director 8.5(1) and is contained in the file 'WRI-4002.exe', which should auto-launch after the CD-ROM is inserted in the PC. The program only runs on a windows-based personal computer (PC). A sound card and speakers are necessary to take advantage of the narration that accompanies the presentation. Text of narrations is provided, if you are unable to listen to the narrations. Instructions for installing and running the presentation are included in the file ' Intro.html'. The file 'Intro.html' is on the CD-ROM containing the presentation and is available from the presentation's help menu.

  3. Expression, purification and characterization of the cancer-germline antigen GAGE12I: a candidate for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Besir, Hüseyin; Larsen, Martin R

    2010-01-01

    for immunotherapy and candidates for cancer vaccines. Recombinant proteins may be superior to peptides as immunogens, since they have the potential to prime both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and are not dependent on patient HLA-type. We have developed a method for production of highly pure recombinant GAGE12I......GAGE cancer-germline antigens are frequently expressed in a broad range of different cancers, while their expression in normal tissues is limited to the germ cells of the immune privileged organs, testis and ovary. GAGE proteins are immunogenic in humans, which make them promising targets...... filtration and formaldehyde cross-linking indicated that GAGE12I forms tetramers. The purified recombinant GAGE12I represents a candidate molecule for vaccination of cancer patients and will form the basis for further structural analysis of GAGE proteins....

  4. An overview of the GAGE cancer/testis antigen family with the inclusion of newly identified members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, M F; Ditzel, H J

    2008-01-01

    GAGE cancer/testis antigens are frequently expressed in many different types of cancer, whereas their expression in normal tissues is limited to the germ cells of the immune-privileged organs, testis and ovary. Thus, GAGE proteins may be attractive candidates for immunotherapy of cancer....... This review describes the structure and phylogeny of the GAGE family members and presents a revised nomenclature, which will enable a more clear distinction of genes and gene products. The GAGE gene locus at chromosome X p11.23 consists of at least 16 genes, each of which is located in one of an equal number...... cell biology. When expressed in tumor cells, GAGE proteins can elicit both cellular and humoral immune responses, indicating that they are appropriate targets for cancer immunotherapy. The potential use of GAGE proteins in cancer immunotherapy, including possible limitations, is also discussed....

  5. Improved Regression Analysis of Temperature-Dependent Strain-Gage Balance Calibration Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2015-01-01

    An improved approach is discussed that may be used to directly include first and second order temperature effects in the load prediction algorithm of a wind tunnel strain-gage balance. The improved approach was designed for the Iterative Method that fits strain-gage outputs as a function of calibration loads and uses a load iteration scheme during the wind tunnel test to predict loads from measured gage outputs. The improved approach assumes that the strain-gage balance is at a constant uniform temperature when it is calibrated and used. First, the method introduces a new independent variable for the regression analysis of the balance calibration data. The new variable is designed as the difference between the uniform temperature of the balance and a global reference temperature. This reference temperature should be the primary calibration temperature of the balance so that, if needed, a tare load iteration can be performed. Then, two temperature{dependent terms are included in the regression models of the gage outputs. They are the temperature difference itself and the square of the temperature difference. Simulated temperature{dependent data obtained from Triumph Aerospace's 2013 calibration of NASA's ARC-30K five component semi{span balance is used to illustrate the application of the improved approach.

  6. GAGE cancer-germline antigens bind DNA and are recruited to the nuclear envelope by Germ cell-less

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Rösner, Heike; Pedersen, Christina Bøg

    GAGE genes encode a highly similar, primate-specific protein family with unique primary structure and undefined roles in germ cells, various fetal cells and cancer cells. We report that GAGE proteins are intrinsically disordered proteins that provide novel interfaces between chromatin and the nuc......GAGE genes encode a highly similar, primate-specific protein family with unique primary structure and undefined roles in germ cells, various fetal cells and cancer cells. We report that GAGE proteins are intrinsically disordered proteins that provide novel interfaces between chromatin...... and the nuclear envelope. Structural analysis by NMR and CD spectroscopy showed GAGE proteins lack distinct secondary or tertiary structure and are therefore intrinsically disordered. In normal cells and cancer cells GAGE proteins localize predominantly in the nucleus; we found GAGE proteins formed stable......) at the nuclear envelope. Furthermore, exogenous and endogenous GAGE proteins were recruited to the nuclear envelope in GCL-overexpressing cells. Gene expression analysis and immunohistochemical staining suggest GAGE proteins and GCL interact physiologically in human cells that express both, including male germ...

  7. Wind Tunnel Strain-Gage Balance Calibration Data Analysis Using a Weighted Least Squares Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.; Volden, T.

    2017-01-01

    A new approach is presented that uses a weighted least squares fit to analyze wind tunnel strain-gage balance calibration data. The weighted least squares fit is specifically designed to increase the influence of single-component loadings during the regression analysis. The weighted least squares fit also reduces the impact of calibration load schedule asymmetries on the predicted primary sensitivities of the balance gages. A weighting factor between zero and one is assigned to each calibration data point that depends on a simple count of its intentionally loaded load components or gages. The greater the number of a data point's intentionally loaded load components or gages is, the smaller its weighting factor becomes. The proposed approach is applicable to both the Iterative and Non-Iterative Methods that are used for the analysis of strain-gage balance calibration data in the aerospace testing community. The Iterative Method uses a reasonable estimate of the tare corrected load set as input for the determination of the weighting factors. The Non-Iterative Method, on the other hand, uses gage output differences relative to the natural zeros as input for the determination of the weighting factors. Machine calibration data of a six-component force balance is used to illustrate benefits of the proposed weighted least squares fit. In addition, a detailed derivation of the PRESS residuals associated with a weighted least squares fit is given in the appendices of the paper as this information could not be found in the literature. These PRESS residuals may be needed to evaluate the predictive capabilities of the final regression models that result from a weighted least squares fit of the balance calibration data.

  8. GAGE cancer-germline antigens are recruited to the nuclear envelope by germ cell-less (GCL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Rösner, Heike Ilona; Pedersen, Christina Bøg

    2012-01-01

    GAGE proteins are highly similar, primate-specific molecules with unique primary structure and undefined cellular roles. They are restricted to cells of the germ line in adult healthy individuals, but are broadly expressed in a wide range of cancers. In a yeast two-hybrid screen we identified the...... different dsDNA fragments, suggesting sequence-nonspecific binding. Dual association of GAGE family members with GCL at the nuclear envelope inner membrane in cells, and with dsDNA in vitro, implicate GAGE proteins in chromatin regulation in germ cells and cancer cells....... the metazoan transcriptional regulator, Germ cell-less (GCL), as an interaction partner of GAGE12I. GCL directly binds LEM-domain proteins (LAP2β, emerin, MAN1) at the nuclear envelope, and we found that GAGE proteins were recruited to the nuclear envelope inner membrane by GCL. Based on yeast two...

  9. "The Crack between Nature Illusory and Nature Real": Matilda Joslyn Gage's Visions of Feminist Spirit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Hayes

    Born in Cicero, New York, in 1826, Matilda Joslyn Gage became one of the leaders of the American women's rights movement. Her book "Woman, Church, and State," first published in 1893, is a work of feminist history and theory that anticipates many of the feminist critiques which are now familiar: social class, imperialism, sexual…

  10. Vacuum gage calibration system for 10 to the minus 8th power to 10 torr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.

    1969-01-01

    Calibration system consists of a gas source, a source pressure gage, source volume, transfer volume and test chamber, plus appropriate piping, valves and vacuum source. It has been modified to cover as broad a range as possible while still providing accuracy and convenience.

  11. Silicon strain gages bonded on stainless steel using glass frit for strain sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zongyang; Cheng, Xingguo; Leng, Yi; Cao, Gang; Liu, Sheng

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a steel pressure sensor using strain gages bonded on a 17-4 PH stainless steel (SS) diaphragm based on glass frit technology is proposed. The strain gages with uniform resistance are obtained by growing an epi-silicon layer on a single crystal silicon wafer using epitaxial deposition technique. The inorganic glass frits are used as the bonding material between the strain gages and the 17-4 PH SS diaphragm. Our results show that the output performances of sensors at a high temperature of 125 °C are almost equal those at room temperature, which indicates that the glass frit bonding is a good method and may lead to a significant advance in the high temperature applicability of silicon strain gage sensors. Finally, the microstructure of the cured organic adhesive and the fired glass frit are compared. It may be concluded that the defects of the cured organic adhesive deteriorate the hysteresis and repeatability errors of the sensors.

  12. Nuclear Technology. Course 27: Metrology. Module 27-3, Gage Blocks, Mechanical Comparators and Electronic Comparators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleck, Ben; Espy, John

    This third in a series of eight modules for a course titled Metrology describes gage blocks and mechanical and electronic comparators. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject matter, (6) materials needed, (7)…

  13. Nuclear Technology. Course 27: Metrology. Module 27-2, Fixed Gages, Dividers, Calipers, and Micrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleck, Ben; Espy, John

    This second in a series of eight modules for a course titled Metrology dscribes fixed gages, dividers, calipers, vernier and dial calipers, and micrometers. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (l) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject matter, (6)…

  14. Colorado Plateau Rapid Ecoregion Assessment Management Question B3: What are seasonal discharge maxima and minima for the Colorado River and major tributaries at gaging stations?

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior — This map shows average seasonal minimum and maximum flow rates at major gaging stations. The period of record varies for each gaging station; averages were for the...

  15. High temperature static strain gage development contract, tasks 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, C. O.; Bailey, R. S.; Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.

    1987-07-01

    Results are presented for the first two tasks to develop resistive strain gage systems for use up to 1250 K on blades and vanes in gas turbine engines under tests. The objective of these two tasks was to further improve and evaluate two static strain gage alloys identified as candidates in a previous program. Improved compositions were not found for either alloy. Further efforts on the Fe-11.9Al-10.6Cr weigth percent alloy were discontinued because of time dependent drift problems at 1250 K in air. When produced as a 6.5 micrometer thick sputtered film, the Pd-13Cr weight percent alloys is not sufficiently stable for this use in air at 1250 K and a protective overcoat system will need to be developed.

  16. Combined Load Diagram for a Wind Tunnel Strain-Gage Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2010-01-01

    Combined Load Diagrams for Direct-Read, Force, and Moment Balances are discussed in great detail in the paper. The diagrams, if compared with a corresponding combined load plot of a balance calibration data set, may be used to visualize and interpret basic relationships between the applied balance calibration loads and the load components at the forward and aft gage of a strain-age balance. Lines of constant total force and moment are identified in the diagrams. In addition, the lines of pure force and pure moment are highlighted. Finally, lines of constant moment arm are depicted. It is also demonstrated that each quadrant of a Combined Load Diagram has specific regions where the applied total calibration force is at, between, or outside of the balance gage locations. Data from the manual calibration of a Force Balance is used to illustrate the application of a Combined Load Diagram to a realistic data set.

  17. Utilizing Photogrammetry and Strain Gage Measurement to Characterize Pressurization of an Inflatable Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Gerard D.; Selig, Molly; Litteken, Doug; Oliveras, Ovidio

    2012-01-01

    This paper documents the integration of a large hatch penetration into an inflatable module. This paper also documents the comparison of analytical load predictions with measured results utilizing strain measurement. Strain was measured by utilizing photogrammetric measurement and through measurement obtained from strain gages mounted to selected clevises that interface with the structural webbings. Bench testing showed good correlation between strain measurement obtained from an extensometer and photogrammetric measurement especially after the fabric has transitioned through the low load/high strain region of the curve. Test results for the full-scale torus showed mixed results in the lower load and thus lower strain regions. Overall strain, and thus load, measured by strain gages and photogrammetry tracked fairly well with analytical predictions. Methods and areas of improvements are discussed.

  18. Solar furnace for flux gage calibration and thermal-effects testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, R. M.; Richards, E. H.; Mulholland, G. P.

    A solar furnace to calculate gauge flux and thermal effects was studied. The solar furnace consists of a 7.4 m square heliostat, a 6.7 m diameter concentrator, an attenuator designed to vary the flux density at the test area, and a three axis positioning table at the test area. Its primary function is the calibration of flux gages but other tasks and/or experiments will be considered as time permits.

  19. Design, analysis, and initial testing of a fiber-optic shear gage for three-dimensional, high-temperature flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Matthew W.

    This investigation concerns the design, analysis, and initial testing of a new, two-component wall shear gage for 3D, high-temperature flows. This gage is a direct-measuring, non-nulling design with a round head surrounded by a small gap. Two flexure wheels are used to allow small motions of the floating head. Fiber-optic displacement sensors measure how far the polished faces of counterweights on the wheels move in relation to a fixed housing as the primary measurement system. No viscous damping was required. The gage has both fiber-optic instrumentation and strain gages mounted on the flexures for validation of the newer fiber optics. The sensor is constructed of Haynes RTM 230RTM, a high-temperature nickel alloy. The gage housing is made of 316 stainless steel. All components of the gage in pure fiber-optic form can survive to a temperature of 1073 K. The bonding methods of the backup strain gages limit their maximum temperature to 473 K. The dynamic range of the gage is from 0--500 Pa (0--10g) and higher shears can be measured by changing the floating head size. Extensive use of finite element modeling was critical to the design and analysis of the gage. Static structural, modal, and thermal analyses were performed on the flexures using the ANSYS finite element package. Static finite element analysis predicted the response of the flexures to a given load, and static calibrations using a direct force method confirmed these results. Finite element modal analysis results were within 16.4% for the first mode and within 30% for the second mode when compared with the experimentally determined modes. Vibration characteristics of the gage were determined from experimental free vibration data after the gage was subjected to an impulse. Uncertainties in the finished geometry make this level of error acceptable. A transient thermal analysis examined the effects of a very high heat flux on the exposed head of the gage. The 100,000 W/m2 heat flux used in this analysis is

  20. A New Load Residual Threshold Definition for the Evaluation of Wind Tunnel Strain-Gage Balance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.; Volden, T.

    2016-01-01

    A new definition of a threshold for the detection of load residual outliers of wind tunnel strain-gage balance data was developed. The new threshold is defined as the product between the inverse of the absolute value of the primary gage sensitivity and an empirical limit of the electrical outputs of a strain{gage. The empirical limit of the outputs is either 2.5 microV/V for balance calibration or check load residuals. A reduced limit of 0.5 microV/V is recommended for the evaluation of differences between repeat load points because, by design, the calculation of these differences removes errors in the residuals that are associated with the regression analysis of the data itself. The definition of the new threshold and different methods for the determination of the primary gage sensitivity are discussed. In addition, calibration data of a six-component force balance and a five-component semi-span balance are used to illustrate the application of the proposed new threshold definition to different types of strain{gage balances. During the discussion of the force balance example it is also explained how the estimated maximum expected output of a balance gage can be used to better understand results of the application of the new threshold definition.

  1. Detection of serum autoantibody against GAGE-7 in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma%GAGE-7自身抗体在食管鳞状细胞癌中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王皓; 钟理; 徐家馨; 张小刚; 王建飞

    2010-01-01

    目的:检测癌-睾丸抗原GAGE-7的自身抗体在食管鳞状细胞癌患者和正常人血清中表达的差异,评价GAGE家族作为肿瘤诊断标志物的可行性.方法:在原核细菌中表达并纯化重组GAGE-7蛋白.采用ELISA检测GAGE-7自身抗体在105份食管鳞状细胞癌患者血清和86份正常人血清中的表达水平.同时检测各血清中总IgG的表达量,计算GAGE-7自身抗体在总IgG中所占比例的差异.结果:血清中GAGE-7抗体在食管鳞状细胞癌中的含量与正常组比较差异显著(P<0.001),而GAGE-7抗体与总IgG比例,患者组明显高于正常组,逻辑回归模型分析c值为0.717,敏感性和特异性分别达到0.72和0.62,且差异显著(P<0.0001).结论:癌-睾丸抗原GAGE-7的自身抗体在食管鳞状细胞癌血清中有较高表达,且与正常组比较有显著差异,其表达特性可被看做是较为理想的癌症检测标志物.

  2. Rapid Binary Gage Function to Extract a Pulsed Signal Buried in Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagaria William J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The type of signal studied in this paper is a periodic pulse, with the pulse length short compared to the period, and the signal is buried in noise. If standard techniques such as the fast Fourier transform are used to study the signal, the data record needs to be very long. Additionally, there would be a very large number of calculations. The rapid binary gage function was developed to quickly determine the period of the signal, and the start time of the first pulse in the data. Once these two parameters are determined, the pulsed signal can be recovered using a standard data folding and adding technique.

  3. Establishing a Multi-scale Stream Gaging Network in the Whitewater River Basin, Kansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J.A.; Kean, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Investigating the routing of streamflow through a large drainage basin requires the determination of discharge at numerous locations in the channel network. Establishing a dense network of stream gages using conventional methods is both cost-prohibitive and functionally impractical for many research projects. We employ herein a previously tested, fluid-mechanically based model for generating rating curves to establish a stream gaging network in the Whitewater River basin in south-central Kansas. The model was developed for the type of channels typically found in this watershed, meaning that it is designed to handle deep, narrow geomorphically stable channels with irregular planforms, and can model overbank flow over a vegetated floodplain. We applied the model to ten previously ungaged stream reaches in the basin, ranging from third- to sixth-order channels. At each site, detailed field measurements of the channel and floodplain morphology, bed and bank roughness, and vegetation characteristics were used to quantify the roughness for a range of flow stages, from low flow to overbank flooding. Rating curves that relate stage to discharge were developed for all ten sites. Both fieldwork and modeling were completed in less than 2 years during an anomalously dry period in the region, which underscores an advantage of using theoretically based (as opposed to empirically based) discharge estimation techniques. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  4. A curvature based approach using long-gage fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliewer, Kaitlyn; Glisic, Branko

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors offer a significant advantage for structural health monitoring due to their ability to simultaneously monitor both static and dynamic strain while being durable, lightweight, capable of multiplexing, and immune to electro-magnetic interference. Drawing upon the benefits of FBG sensors, this research explores the use of a series of long-gage fiber optic sensors for damage detection of a structure through dynamic strain measurements and curvature analysis. Typically structural monitoring relies upon detecting structural changes through frequency and acceleration based analysis. However, curvature and strain based analysis may be a more reliable means for structural monitoring as they show more sensitivity to damage compared to modal parameters such as displacement mode shapes and natural frequency. Additionally, long gage FBG strain sensors offer a promising alternative to traditional dynamic measurement methods as the curvature can be computed directly from the FBG strain measurements without the need for numerical differentiation. Small scale experimental testing was performed using an aluminum beam instrumented with a series of FBG optical fiber sensors. Dynamic strain measurements were obtained as the aluminum beam was subjected to various loading and support conditions. From this, a novel normalized parameter based on the curvature from the dynamic strain measurements has been identified as a potential damage sensitive feature. Theoretical predictions and experimental data were compared and conclusions carried out. The results demonstrated the potential of the novel normalized parameter to facilitate dynamic monitoring at both the local and global scale, thus allowing assessment of the structures health.

  5. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000ÀC showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  6. Les objets sous contrainte. Gages, saisies, confiscations, vols,pillages, recel au Moyen Âge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Feller

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Du jeudi 20 au samedi 21 novembre 2009, à l’initiative d’Ana Rodriguez et de Laurent Feller, s’est tenu à Auxerre, dans la maison du Coche d’Eau, un séminaire d’études international portant sur Les objets sous contrainte. Gages, saisies, confiscation, vol, pillage, recel au Moyen Âge. Organisée conjointement par le Lamop, l’université de Paris 1 et le CCHS (CSIC de Madrid, partiellement financée par un projet Picasso de l’association Égide, l’opération a bénéficié du soutien de l’université ...

  7. Review of Trackside Monitoring Solutions: From Strain Gages to Optical Fibre Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Kouroussis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent research on structural monitoring in railway industry is proposed in this paper, with a special focus on stress-based solutions. After a brief analysis of the mechanical behaviour of ballasted railway tracks, an overview of the most common monitoring techniques is presented. A special attention is paid on strain gages and accelerometers for which the accurate mounting position on the track is requisite. These types of solution are then compared to another modern approach based on the use of optical fibres. Besides, an in-depth discussion is made on the evolution of numerical models that investigate the interaction between railway vehicles and tracks. These models are used to validate experimental devices and to predict the best location(s of the sensors. It is hoped that this review article will stimulate further research activities in this continuously expanding field.

  8. Assessment of the Uniqueness of Wind Tunnel Strain-Gage Balance Load Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2016-01-01

    A new test was developed to assess the uniqueness of wind tunnel strain-gage balance load predictions that are obtained from regression models of calibration data. The test helps balance users to gain confidence in load predictions of non-traditional balance designs. It also makes it possible to better evaluate load predictions of traditional balances that are not used as originally intended. The test works for both the Iterative and Non-Iterative Methods that are used in the aerospace testing community for the prediction of balance loads. It is based on the hypothesis that the total number of independently applied balance load components must always match the total number of independently measured bridge outputs or bridge output combinations. This hypothesis is supported by a control volume analysis of the inputs and outputs of a strain-gage balance. It is concluded from the control volume analysis that the loads and bridge outputs of a balance calibration data set must separately be tested for linear independence because it cannot always be guaranteed that a linearly independent load component set will result in linearly independent bridge output measurements. Simple linear math models for the loads and bridge outputs in combination with the variance inflation factor are used to test for linear independence. A highly unique and reversible mapping between the applied load component set and the measured bridge output set is guaranteed to exist if the maximum variance inflation factor of both sets is less than the literature recommended threshold of five. Data from the calibration of a six{component force balance is used to illustrate the application of the new test to real-world data.

  9. A Universal Tare Load Prediction Algorithm for Strain-Gage Balance Calibration Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm is discussed that may be used to estimate tare loads of wind tunnel strain-gage balance calibration data. The algorithm was originally developed by R. Galway of IAR/NRC Canada and has been described in the literature for the iterative analysis technique. Basic ideas of Galway's algorithm, however, are universally applicable and work for both the iterative and the non-iterative analysis technique. A recent modification of Galway's algorithm is presented that improves the convergence behavior of the tare load prediction process if it is used in combination with the non-iterative analysis technique. The modified algorithm allows an analyst to use an alternate method for the calculation of intermediate non-linear tare load estimates whenever Galway's original approach does not lead to a convergence of the tare load iterations. It is also shown in detail how Galway's algorithm may be applied to the non-iterative analysis technique. Hand load data from the calibration of a six-component force balance is used to illustrate the application of the original and modified tare load prediction method. During the analysis of the data both the iterative and the non-iterative analysis technique were applied. Overall, predicted tare loads for combinations of the two tare load prediction methods and the two balance data analysis techniques showed excellent agreement as long as the tare load iterations converged. The modified algorithm, however, appears to have an advantage over the original algorithm when absolute voltage measurements of gage outputs are processed using the non-iterative analysis technique. In these situations only the modified algorithm converged because it uses an exact solution of the intermediate non-linear tare load estimate for the tare load iteration.

  10. The effect of machining the gage section on Biaxial Tension/Shear plasticity experiments of DP780 sheet steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental approach for determining the effect of machining the gage section of specimens for quasi-static, biaxial tension/shear testing of sheet steels is described. This method is demonstrated by comparing the results found by an existing testing method with a reduced thickness (Mohr and Osw

  11. MAGE-A1, GAGE and NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen expression during human gonadal development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Ole;

    2007-01-01

    by single and double immunohistochemical staining. RESULTS: We found that GAGE was expressed in the primordial germ cells of the gonadal primordium, whereas MAGE-A1 and NY-ESO-1 were first detected in germ cells of both testis and ovary after sexual differentiation was initiated. The number of positive germ...

  12. A Universal Threshold for the Assessment of Load and Output Residuals of Strain-Gage Balance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.; Volden, T.

    2017-01-01

    A new universal residual threshold for the detection of load and gage output residual outliers of wind tunnel strain{gage balance data was developed. The threshold works with both the Iterative and Non{Iterative Methods that are used in the aerospace testing community to analyze and process balance data. It also supports all known load and gage output formats that are traditionally used to describe balance data. The threshold's definition is based on an empirical electrical constant. First, the constant is used to construct a threshold for the assessment of gage output residuals. Then, the related threshold for the assessment of load residuals is obtained by multiplying the empirical electrical constant with the sum of the absolute values of all first partial derivatives of a given load component. The empirical constant equals 2.5 microV/V for the assessment of balance calibration or check load data residuals. A value of 0.5 microV/V is recommended for the evaluation of repeat point residuals because, by design, the calculation of these residuals removes errors that are associated with the regression analysis of the data itself. Data from a calibration of a six-component force balance is used to illustrate the application of the new threshold definitions to real{world balance calibration data.

  13. Nuclear Technology. Course 27: Metrology. Module 27-4, Angle Measurement Instruments, Optical Projections and Surface Texture Gages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleck, Ben; Espy, John

    This fourth in a series of eight modules for a course titled Metrology describes the universal bevel protractor and the sine bar, the engineering microscope and optical projector, and several types of surface texture gages. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3)…

  14. In situ measurements of atmospheric methane at GAGE/AGAGE sites during 1985-2000 and resulting source inferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnold, D. M.; Steele, L. P.; Fraser, P. J.; Simmonds, P. G.; Prinn, R. G.; Weiss, R. F.; Porter, L. W.; O'Doherty, S.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Krummel, P. B.; Wang, H. J.; Emmons, L.; Tie, X. X.; Dlugokencky, E. J.

    2002-07-01

    Continuous measurements of methane since 1986 at the Global Atmospherics Gases Experiment/Advanced Global Atmospherics Gases Experiment (GAGE/AGAGE) surface sites are described. The precisions range from approximately 10 ppb at Mace Head, Ireland, during GAGE to better than 2 ppb at Cape Grim, Tasmania, during AGAGE (i.e., since 1993). The measurements exhibit good agreement with coincident measurements of air samples from the same locations analyzed by Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) except for differences of approximately 5 ppb before 1989 (GAGE lower) and about 4 ppb from 1991 to 1995 (GAGE higher). These results are obtained before applying a factor of 1.0119 to the GAGE/AGAGE values to place them on the Tohoku University scale. The measurements combined with a 12-box atmospheric model and an assumed atmospheric lifetime of 9.1 years indicates net annual emissions (emissions minus soil sinks) of 545 Tg CH4 with a variability of only +/-20 Tg from 1985 to 1997 but an increase in the emissions in 1998 of 37 +/- 10 Tg. The effect of OH changes inferred by Prinn et al. [2001] is to increase the estimated methane emissions by approximately 20 Tg in the mid-1980s and to reduce them by 20 Tg in 1997 and by more thereafter. Using a two-dimensional (2-D), 12-box model with transport constrained by the GAGE/AGAGE chlorofluorocarbon measurements, we calculate that the proportion of the emissions coming from the Northern Hemisphere is between 73 and 81%, depending on the OH distribution used. However, this result includes an adjustment of 5% derived from a simulation of the 2-D estimation procedure using the 3-D MOZART model. This adjustment is needed because of the very different spatial emission distributions of the chlorofluorocarbons and methane which makes chlorofluorocarbons derived transport rates inaccurate for the 2-D simulation of methane. The 2-D model combined with the annual cycle in OH from Spivakovsky et al. [2000] provide an acceptable

  15. Regression Model Term Selection for the Analysis of Strain-Gage Balance Calibration Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Norbert Manfred; Volden, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the selection of regression model terms for the analysis of wind tunnel strain-gage balance calibration data. Different function class combinations are presented that may be used to analyze calibration data using either a non-iterative or an iterative method. The role of the intercept term in a regression model of calibration data is reviewed. In addition, useful algorithms and metrics originating from linear algebra and statistics are recommended that will help an analyst (i) to identify and avoid both linear and near-linear dependencies between regression model terms and (ii) to make sure that the selected regression model of the calibration data uses only statistically significant terms. Three different tests are suggested that may be used to objectively assess the predictive capability of the final regression model of the calibration data. These tests use both the original data points and regression model independent confirmation points. Finally, data from a simplified manual calibration of the Ames MK40 balance is used to illustrate the application of some of the metrics and tests to a realistic calibration data set.

  16. Flexible Riser Monitoring Using Hybrid Magnetic/Optical Strain Gage Techniques through RLS Adaptive Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipa Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible riser is a class of flexible pipes which is used to connect subsea pipelines to floating offshore installations, such as FPSOs (floating production/storage/off-loading unit and SS (semisubmersible platforms, in oil and gas production. Flexible risers are multilayered pipes typically comprising an inner flexible metal carcass surrounded by polymer layers and spiral wound steel ligaments, also referred to as armor wires. Since these armor wires are made of steel, their magnetic properties are sensitive to the stress they are subjected to. By measuring their magnetic properties in a nonintrusive manner, it is possible to compare the stress in the armor wires, thus allowing the identification of damaged ones. However, one encounters several sources of noise when measuring electromagnetic properties contactlessly, such as movement between specimen and probe, and magnetic noise. This paper describes the development of a new technique for automatic monitoring of armor layers of flexible risers. The proposed approach aims to minimize these current uncertainties by combining electromagnetic measurements with optical strain gage data through a recursive least squares (RLSs adaptive filter.

  17. A stream-gaging network analysis for the 7-Day, 10-year annual low flow in New Hampshire streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    The 7-day, 10-year (7Q10) low-flow-frequency statistic is a widely used measure of surface-water availability in New Hampshire. Regression equations and basin-characteristic digital data sets were developed to help water-resource managers determine surface-water resources during periods of low flow in New Hampshire streams. These regression equations and data sets were developed to estimate streamflow statistics for the annual and seasonal low-flow-frequency, and period-of-record and seasonal period-of-record flow durations. generalized-least-squares (GLS) regression methods were used to develop the annual 7Q10 low-flow-frequency regression equation from 60 continuous-record stream-gaging stations in New Hampshire and in neighboring States. In the regression equation, the dependent variables were the annual 7Q10 flows at the 60 stream-gaging stations. The independent (or predictor) variables were objectively selected characteristics of the drainage basins that contribute flow to those stations. In contrast to ordinary-least-squares (OLS) regression analysis, GLS-developed estimating equations account for differences in length of record and spatial correlations among the flow-frequency statistics at the various stations. A total of 93 measurable drainage-basin characteristics were candidate independent variables. On the basis of several statistical parameters that were used to evaluate which combination of basin characteristics contribute the most to the predictive power of the equations, three drainage-basin characteristics were determined to be statistically significant predictors of the annual 7Q10: (1) total drainage area, (2) mean summer stream-gaging station precipitation from 1961 to 90, and (3) average mean annual basinwide temperature from 1961 to 1990. To evaluate the effectiveness of the stream-gaging network in providing regional streamflow data for the annual 7Q10, the computer program GLSNET (generalized-least-squares NETwork) was used to analyze the

  18. Selected Discharge Measurements at Stream-Gaging Stations on Lower Platte River near Ashland, Duncan, Leshara, Louisville, and North Bend, Nebraska, 1934-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The accompanying "Lower_Platte_GAGES5" data release consists of two parts, a spatial data layer composed of a vector point data set representing five USGS streamflow...

  19. Estimating Low-Flow Frequency Statistics and Hydrologic Analysis of Selected Streamflow-Gaging Stations, Nooksack River Basin, Northwestern Washington and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Christopher A.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2009-01-01

    Low-flow frequency statistics were computed at 17 continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations and 8 miscellaneous measurement sites in and near the Nooksack River basin in northwestern Washington and Canada, including the 1, 3, 7, 15, 30, and 60 consecutive-day low flows with recurrence intervals of 2 and 10 years. Using these low-flow statistics, 12 regional regression equations were developed for estimating the same low-flow statistics at ungaged sites in the Nooksack River basin using a weighted-least-squares method. Adjusted R2 (coefficient of determination) values for the equations ranged from 0.79 to 0.93 and the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) expressed as a percentage ranged from 77 to 560 percent. Streamflow records from six gaging stations located in mountain-stream or lowland-stream subbasins of the Nooksack River basin were analyzed to determine if any of the gaging stations could be removed from the network without significant loss of information. Using methods of hydrograph comparison, daily-value correlation, variable space, and flow-duration ratios, and other factors relating to individual subbasins, the six gaging stations were prioritized from most to least important as follows: Skookum Creek (12209490), Anderson Creek (12210900), Warm Creek (12207750), Fishtrap Creek (12212050), Racehorse Creek (12206900), and Clearwater Creek (12207850). The optimum streamflow-gaging station network would contain all gaging stations except Clearwater Creek, and the minimum network would include Skookum Creek and Anderson Creek.

  20. Internships and UNAVCO: Training the Future Geoscience Workforce Through the NSF GAGE Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.; MacPherson-Krutsky, C. C.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Bartel, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Facilities are uniquely positioned to both serve a broad, national audience and provide unique workforce experience to students and recent graduates. Intentional efforts dedicated to broadening participation in the future geoscience workforce at the NSF GAGE (Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope) Facility operated by UNAVCO, are designed to meet the needs of the next generation of students and professionals. As a university-governed consortium facilitating research and education in the geosciences, UNAVCO is well-situated to both prepare students for geoscience technical careers and advanced research positions. Since 1998, UNAVCO has offered over 165 student assistant or intern positions including engineering, data services, education and outreach, and business support. UNAVCO offers three formal programs: the UNAVCO Student Internship Program (USIP), Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS), and the Geo-Launchpad (GLP) internship program. Interns range from community college students up through graduate students and recent Masters graduates. USIP interns gain real-world work experience in a professional setting, collaborate with teams toward a common mission, and contribute their knowledge, skills, and abilities to the UNAVCO community. RESESS interns conduct authentic research with a scientist in the Front Range area as well as participate in a structured professional development series. GLP students are in their first 2 years of higher education and work alongside UNAVCO technical staff gaining valuable work experience and insight into the logistics of supporting scientific research. UNAVCO's efforts in preparing the next generation of scientists largely focuses on increasing diversity in the geosciences, whether continuing academic studies or moving into the workforce. To date, well over half of our interns and student assistants come from backgrounds historically underrepresented in the geosciences. Over 80% of former interns

  1. Flight Test Results from the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment on the F-15B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Michael; Ratnayake, Nalin

    2011-01-01

    The results are described of the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment (RAGE), which was designed and fabricated to support the flight test of a new supersonic inlet design using Dryden's Propulsion Flight Test Fixture (PFTF) and F-15B testbed airplane (see figure). The PFTF is a unique pylon that was developed for flight-testing propulsion-related experiments such as inlets, nozzles, and combustors over a range of subsonic and supersonic flight conditions. The objective of the RAGE program was to quantify the local flowfield at the aerodynamic interface plane of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment (CCIE). The CCIE is a fixed representation of a conceptual mixed-compression supersonic inlet with a translating biconic centerbody. The primary goal of RAGE was to identify the relationship between free-stream and local Mach number in the low supersonic regime, with emphasis on the identification of the particular free-stream Mach number that produced a local Mach number of 1.5. Measurements of the local flow angularity, total pressure distortion, and dynamic pressure over the interface plane were also desired. The experimental data for the RAGE program were obtained during two separate research flights. During both flights, local flowfield data were obtained during straight and level acceleration segments out to steady-state test points. The data obtained from the two flights showed small variations in Mach number, flow angularity, and dynamic pressure across the interface plane at all flight conditions. The data show that a free-stream Mach number of 1.65 will produce the desired local Mach number of 1.5 for CCIE. The local total pressure distortion over the interface plane at this condition was approximately 1.5%. At this condition, there was an average of nearly 2 of downwash over the interface plane. This small amount of downwash is not expected to adversely affect the performance of the CCIE inlet.

  2. Direct measurements of wall shear stress by buried wire gages in a shock-wave boundary-layer interaction region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, V. S.; Rose, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed measurements of wall shear stress (skin friction) were made with specially developed buried wire gages in the interaction regions of a Mach 2.9 turbulent boundary layer with externally generated shocks. Separation and reattachment points inferred by these measurements support the findings of earlier experiments which used a surface oil flow technique and pitot profile measurements. The measurements further indicate that the boundary layer tends to attain significantly higher skin-friction values downstream of the interaction region as compared to upstream. Comparisons between measured wall shear stress and published results of some theoretical calculation schemes show that the general, but not detailed, behavior is predicted well by such schemes.

  3. Measuring unsteady pressure on rotating compressor blades. [with semiconductor strain gages under gas turbine engine operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, D. R.; Grant, H. P.; Lanati, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The capability for accurate measurement of unsteady pressure on the surface of compressor and fan blades during engine operation was established. Tests were run on miniature semiconductor strain gage pressure transducers mounted in several arrangements. Both surface mountings and recessed flush mountings were tested. Test parameters included mounting arrangement, blade material, temperature, local strain in the blade, acceleration normal to the transducer diaphragm, centripetal acceleration, and pressure. Test results showed no failures of transducers or mountings and indicated an uncertainty of unsteady pressure measurement of approximately + or - 6%, plus 0.1 kPa for a typical application.

  4. Force Reconstruction from Ejection Tests of Stores from Aircraft Used for Model Predictions and Missing/Bad Gages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Michael; Cap, Jerome S.; Starr, Michael J.; Urbina, Angel; Brink, Adam Ray

    2015-12-01

    One of the more severe environments for a store on an aircraft is during the ejection of the store. During this environment it is not possible to instrument all component responses, and it is also likely that some instruments may fail during the environment testing. This work provides a method for developing these responses from failed gages and uninstrumented locations. First, the forces observed by the store during the environment are reconstructed. A simple sampling method is used to reconstruct these forces given various parameters. Then, these forces are applied to a model to generate the component responses. Validation is performed on this methodology.

  5. Analysis of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigen expression in early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen E; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2013-10-08

    The unique expression pattern and immunogenic properties of cancer/testis antigens make them ideal targets for immunotherapy of cancer. The MAGE-A3 cancer/testis antigen is frequently expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and vaccination with MAGE-A3 in patients with MAGE-A3-positive NSCLC has shown promising results. However, little is known about the expression of other cancer/testis antigens in NSCLC. In the present study the expression of cancer/testis antigens GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was investigated in patients with completely resected, early stage, primary NSCLC. Tumor biopsies from normal lung tissue and from a large cohort (n = 169) of NSCLC patients were examined for GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis. The expression of these antigens was further matched to clinical and pathological features using univariate cox regression analysis. GAGE and NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigens were not expressed in normal lung tissue, while SP17 was expressed in ciliated lung epithelia. The frequency of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 expression in NSCLC tumors were 26.0% (44/169), 11.8% (20/169) and 4.7% (8/169), respectively, and 33.1% (56/169) of the tumors expressed at least one of these antigens. In general, the expression of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was not significantly associated with a specific histotype (adenocarcinoma vs. squamous cell carcinoma), but high-level GAGE expression (>50%) was more frequent in squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.02). Furthermore, the frequency of GAGE expression was demonstrated to be significantly higher in stage II-IIIa than stage I NSCLC (17.0% vs. 35.8%; p = 0.02). Analysis of the relation between tumor expression of GAGE and NY-ESO-1 and survival endpoints revealed no significant associations. Our study demonstrates that GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigens are candidate targets for immunotherapy of NSCLC and further suggest that multi-antigen vaccines may be beneficial.

  6. 电阻应变计用UV胶盖面方案浅析%Shallowly talking about using spraying UV cured resin to encapsulate the stain gage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁昌锐

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays when people produce resistance strain gages, the encapsulating process is very complex, and to cure the encapsulating resin using the clip will produce internal stress, will take a long time to be released. Our new concept using spraying UV cured resin to encapsulate the strain gage facilitates the automation of production, not only greatly enhance the production efficiency, reduce the cost, but also can reduce the internal stress of the strain gage. Choosing good UV cured resin can also improve the protective performance of the encapsulated strain gage, improve the quality of strain gage.%现在生产电阻应变计盖面时工艺很复杂,而且固化时要上夹子会产生应力,需要一定的时日才能释放出来,新概念改用喷Uv胶的方法盖面,便于自动化大生产,不仅大大提高了生产效率,降低了成本,还可以减小盖面时应变计的内部应力,选择良好的Uv胶还可以改进盖面胶的防护性能,提高应变计的质量。

  7. Reliability analysis of forty-five strain-gage systems mounted on the first fan stage of a YF-100 engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.; Frause, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The reliability of 45 state-of-the-art strain gage systems under full scale engine testing was investigated. The flame spray process was used to install 23 systems on the first fan rotor of a YF-100 engine; the others were epoxy cemented. A total of 56 percent of the systems failed in 11 hours of engine operation. Flame spray system failures were primarily due to high gage resistance, probably caused by high stress levels. Epoxy system failures were principally erosion failures, but only on the concave side of the blade. Lead-wire failures between the blade-to-disk jump and the control room could not be analyzed.

  8. The development of a bearing spectral analyzer and algorithms to detect turbopump bearing wear from deflectometer and strain gage data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Carol L.

    1992-07-01

    Over the last several years, Rocketdyne has actively developed condition and health monitoring techniques and their elements for rocket engine components, specifically high pressure turbopumps. Of key interest is the development of bearing signature analysis systems for real-time monitoring of the cryogen-cooled turbopump shaft bearings, which spin at speeds up to 36,000 RPM. These system elements include advanced bearing vibration sensors, signal processing techniques, wear mode algorithms, and integrated control software. Results of development efforts in the areas of signal processing and wear mode identification and quantification algorithms based on strain gage and deflectometer data are presented. Wear modes investigated include: inner race wear, cage pocket wear, outer race wear, differential ball wear, cracked inner race, and nominal wear.

  9. Correlation of Breech Erosion Gage to Accuracy for M16A1 Rifle with Chrome Plated Barrel Bores

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-03-01

    b.0 0 V 4 0 0 0 wl + - -4M 0.0 4’ 1 it 0 If 11 N1 NIf A Q0 0: .0 m0 J=O3 04A L 1 1 C14 02 o 44 .0 .0 x0 .0 .0 000*~l N m % ~0 r- 000\\ .0.0. .0.0...0 C4 9-4 VNN -4 9-4 VcMi-vc ~ ~ ~ C Oc 0 C’- E. N Et~N -4 E-4 E~N-4 14’ ’A., -.;; 25 igated closely for the best performing gage. All the larger diF

  10. Bayesian WLS/GLS regression for regional skewness analysis for regions with large crest stage gage networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Andrea G.; Stedinger, Jery R.; Eash, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes methodological advances in regional log-space skewness analyses that support flood-frequency analysis with the log Pearson Type III (LP3) distribution. A Bayesian Weighted Least Squares/Generalized Least Squares (B-WLS/B-GLS) methodology that relates observed skewness coefficient estimators to basin characteristics in conjunction with diagnostic statistics represents an extension of the previously developed B-GLS methodology. B-WLS/B-GLS has been shown to be effective in two California studies. B-WLS/B-GLS uses B-WLS to generate stable estimators of model parameters and B-GLS to estimate the precision of those B-WLS regression parameters, as well as the precision of the model. The study described here employs this methodology to develop a regional skewness model for the State of Iowa. To provide cost effective peak-flow data for smaller drainage basins in Iowa, the U.S. Geological Survey operates a large network of crest stage gages (CSGs) that only record flow values above an identified recording threshold (thus producing a censored data record). CSGs are different from continuous-record gages, which record almost all flow values and have been used in previous B-GLS and B-WLS/B-GLS regional skewness studies. The complexity of analyzing a large CSG network is addressed by using the B-WLS/B-GLS framework along with the Expected Moments Algorithm (EMA). Because EMA allows for the censoring of low outliers, as well as the use of estimated interval discharges for missing, censored, and historic data, it complicates the calculations of effective record length (and effective concurrent record length) used to describe the precision of sample estimators because the peak discharges are no longer solely represented by single values. Thus new record length calculations were developed. The regional skewness analysis for the State of Iowa illustrates the value of the new B-WLS/BGLS methodology with these new extensions.

  11. Evaluating a slope-stability model for shallow rain-induced landslides using gage and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatheendradas, S.; Kirschbaum, D.; Baum, Rex L.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    Improving prediction of landslide early warning systems requires accurate estimation of the conditions that trigger slope failures. This study tested a slope-stability model for shallow rainfall-induced landslides by utilizing rainfall information from gauge and satellite records. We used the TRIGRS model (Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-based Regional Slope-stability analysis) for simulating the evolution of the factor of safety due to rainfall infiltration. Using a spatial subset of a well-characterized digital landscape from an earlier study, we considered shallow failure on a slope adjoining an urban transportation roadway near the Seattle area in Washington, USA.We ran the TRIGRS model using high-quality rain gage and satellite-based rainfall data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Preliminary results with parameterized soil depth values suggest that the steeper slope values in this spatial domain have factor of safety values that are extremely close to the failure limit within an extremely narrow range of values, providing multiple false alarms. When the soil depths were constrained using a back analysis procedure to ensure that slopes were stable under initial condtions, the model accurately predicted the timing and location of the landslide observation without false alarms over time for gage rain data. The TRMM satellite rainfall data did not show adequately retreived rainfall peak magnitudes and accumulation over the study period, and as a result failed to predict the landslide event. These preliminary results indicate that more accurate and higher-resolution rain data (e.g., the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission) are required to provide accurate and reliable landslide predictions in ungaged basins.

  12. Influence of the Testing Gage Length on the Strength, Young's Modulus and Weibull Modulus of Carbon Fibres and Glass Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Claudio Pardini

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibres and glass fibres are reinforcements for advanced composites and the fiber strength is the most influential factor on the strength of the composites. They are essentially brittle and fail with very little reduction in cross section. Composites made with these fibres are characterized by a high strength/density ratio and their properties are intrisically related to their microstructure, i.e., amount and orientation of the fibres, surface treatment, among other factors. Processing parameters have an important role in the fibre mechanical behaviour (strength and modulus. Cracks, voids and impurities in the case of glass fibres and fibrillar misalignments in the case of carbon fibres are created during processing. Such inhomogeneities give rise to an appreciable scatter in properties. The most used statistical tool that deals with this characteristic variability in properties is the Weibull distribution. The present work investigates the influence of the testing gage length on the strength, Young's modulus and Weibull modulus of carbon fibres and glass fibres. The Young's modulus is calculated by two methods: (i ASTM D 3379M, and (ii interaction between testing equipment/specimen The first method resulted in a Young modulus of 183 GPa for carbon fibre, and 76 GPa for glass fibre. The second method gave a Young modulus of 250 GPa for carbon fibre and 50 GPa for glass fibre. These differences revelead differences on how the interaction specimen/testing machine can interfere in the Young modulus calculations. Weibull modulus can be a tool to evaluate the fibre's homogeneity in terms of properties and it is a good quality control parameter during processing. In the range of specimen gage length tested the Weibull modulus for carbon fibre is ~ 3.30 and for glass fibres is ~ 5.65, which indicates that for the batch of fibres tested, the glass fibre is more uniform in properties.

  13. Streamflow characteristics based on data through water year 2009 for selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana: Chapter E in Montana StreamStats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Peter M.

    2016-04-05

    Chapter E of this Scientific Investigations Report documents results from a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality and the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, to provide an update of statewide streamflow characteristics based on data through water year 2009 for streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana. Streamflow characteristics are presented for 408 streamflow-gaging stations in Montana and adjacent areas having 10 or more years of record. Data include the magnitude and probability of annual low and high streamflow, the magnitude and probability of low streamflow for three seasons (March–June, July–October, and November–February), streamflow duration statistics for monthly and annual periods, and mean streamflows for monthly and annual periods. Streamflow is considered to be regulated at streamflow-gaging stations where dams or other large-scale human modifications affect 20 percent or more of the contributing drainage basin. Separate streamflow characteristics are presented for the unregulated and regulated periods of record for streamflow-gaging stations with sufficient data.

  14. Quantification of uncertainties in the 100-year flow at an ungaged site near a gaged station and its application in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Huidae; Bones, Emma

    2016-08-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency has introduced the concept of the "1-percent plus" flow to incorporate various uncertainties in estimation of the 100-year or 1-percent flow. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no clear directions for calculating the 1-percent plus flow have been defined in the literature. Although information about standard errors of estimation and prediction is provided along with the regression equations that are often used to estimate the 1-percent flow at ungaged sites, uncertainty estimation becomes more complicated when there is a nearby gaged station because regression flows and the peak flow estimate from a gage analysis should be weighted to compute the weighted estimate of the 1-percent flow. In this study, an equation for calculating the 1-percent plus flow at an ungaged site near a gaged station is analytically derived. Also, a detailed process is introduced for calculating the 1-percent plus flow for an ungaged site near a gaged station in Georgia as an example and a case study is performed. This study provides engineers and practitioners with a method that helps them better assess flood risks and develop mitigation plans accordingly.

  15. Analysis of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigen expression in early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    NSCLC has shown promising results. However, little is known about the expression of other cancer/testis antigens in NSCLC. In the present study the expression of cancer/testis antigens GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was investigated in patients with completely resected, early stage, primary NSCLC....

  16. Flood of April 2007 and Flood-Frequency Estimates at Streamflow-Gaging Stations in Western Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    A spring nor'easter affected the East Coast of the United States from April 15 to 18, 2007. In Connecticut, rainfall varied from 3 inches to more than 7 inches. The combined effects of heavy rainfall over a short duration, high winds, and high tides led to widespread flooding, storm damage, power outages, evacuations, and disruptions to traffic and commerce. The storm caused at least 18 fatalities (none in Connecticut). A Presidential Disaster Declaration was issued on May 11, 2007, for two counties in western Connecticut - Fairfield and Litchfield. This report documents hydrologic and meteorologic aspects of the April 2007 flood and includes estimates of the magnitude of the peak discharges and peak stages during the flood at 28 streamflow-gaging stations in western Connecticut. These data were used to perform flood-frequency analyses. Flood-frequency estimates provided in this report are expressed in terms of exceedance probabilities (the probability of a flood reaching or exceeding a particular magnitude in any year). Flood-frequency estimates for the 0.50, 0.20, 0.10, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01, and 0.002 exceedance probabilities (also expressed as 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2- percent exceedance probability, respectively) were computed for 24 of the 28 streamflow-gaging stations. Exceedance probabilities can further be expressed in terms of recurrence intervals (2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year recurrence interval, respectively). Flood-frequency estimates computed in this study were compared to the flood-frequency estimates used to derive the water-surface profiles in previously published Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Flood Insurance Studies. The estimates in this report update and supersede previously published flood-frequency estimates for streamflowgaging stations in Connecticut by incorporating additional years of annual peak discharges, including the peaks for the April 2007 flood. In the southwest coastal region of Connecticut, the

  17. Relative sea-level rise as indicated by gage data along the Mississippi and Alabama Gulf Coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wilson, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Global warming, or the increasing of earth's temperatures, leads to rising sea level as polar ice caps and mountain glaciers melt and ocean water undergoes thermal expansion. Tidal records collected by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE), Mobile District, at Gulfport, Biloxi, and Pascagoula, Mississippi, and at Mobile, Alabama, indicate trends of water-surface elevations increasing with time (relative sea-level rise). The trends indicated by the COE data were compared to relative sea-level trends indicated by the National Ocean Survey gages in the Gulf of Mexico. The average global rate of sea level rise has been suggested to approach about 2 mm/yr (0.007 ft/yr). Some leading scientists have suggested rates of sea level rise that are greater than 2 mm/yr, when accounting for effects of greenhouse gas emissions. As the sea level rises and inundates the coastal plain, structures along the existing coast and structures located in the back bays of estuaries will be even more adversely affected by future flooding. Also, if the land surface adjacent to the water also sinks due to soil compaction and other geologic processes (collectively call subsidence), additional land will be inundated. Copyright ASCE 2004.

  18. Hydrography - HYDROGRAPHY_HIGHRES_POINT_NHD_USGS: Gaging Stations, Gates, Lock Chambers, Reservoirs, Springs, Seeps, Sinks, Rises, Waterfalls, and Wells in Watersheds of Indiana (U.S. Geological Survey, 1:24,000, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — HYDROGRAPHY_HIGHRES_POINT_NHD_USGS.SHP is a point shapefile that contains locations of gaging stations, gates, lock chambers, reservoirs, springs, seeps, sinks,...

  19. Merenje torzionih oscilacija pomoću mernih traka / Measurement of torsional vibrations by using strain gages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Trifković

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available U ovom radu prikazan je metod merenja torzionih oscilacija mehaničkih sistema na osnovu merenja torzionog napona pomoću mernih traka. Ovaj metod naročito je pogodan za proveru nivoa naprezanja elemenata sistema, koji prenose promenljive obrtne momente i torziono osciluju. Osim toga, mogu se određivati i kritične brzine obrtanja elemenata sistema, pri kojima se javljaju rezonantna naprezanja i otkazi sistema, kao što su: pojačana buka, trošenje zupčanika, zamor materijala, oštećenja i lomovi vratila, spojnica i si. Predložen je merni lanac u kojem centralno mesto zauzima suvremeni mobilni merni sistem Spider 8, koji omogućava merenje, obradu i prikaz rezultata pomoću računara. / In this work the measuring method of torsion vibrations is presented according to the measurement of torsion stress using strain gages. This method is particularly suitable in checking the system elements strain level that transfers changeable torsion moments and oscillate torsionally. Besides that, the system elements critical velocity rotation can be estimated, folio-wed by the resonant strain and problems in the function of that system such as: amplified noise, -wearing-out of gears, fatigue crack, damage and break of shafts and junctions etc. The measuring chain is proposed in -which the central part is a contemporary mobile system Spider 8, -which enables measurement, processing and displays measured results on a computer.

  20. A biomechanical assessment of modular and monoblock revision hip implants using FE analysis and strain gage measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papini Marcello

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bone loss associated with revision surgery or pathology has been the impetus for developing modular revision total hip prostheses. Few studies have assessed these modular implants quantitatively from a mechanical standpoint. Methods Three-dimensional finite element (FE models were developed to mimic a hip implant alone (Construct A and a hip implant-femur configuration (Construct B. Bonded contact was assumed for all interfaces to simulate long-term bony ongrowth and stability. The hip implants modeled were a Modular stem having two interlocking parts (Zimmer Modular Revision Hip System, Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA and a Monoblock stem made from a single piece of material (Stryker Restoration HA Hip System, Stryker, Mahwah, NJ, USA. Axial loads of 700 and 2000 N were applied to Construct A and 2000 N to Construct B models. Stiffness, strain, and stress were computed. Mechanical tests using axial loads were used for Construct A to validate the FE model. Strain gages were placed along the medial and lateral side of the hip implants at 8 locations to measure axial strain distribution. Results There was approximately a 3% average difference between FE and experimental strains for Construct A at all locations for the Modular implant and in the proximal region for the Monoblock implant. FE results for Construct B showed that both implants carried the majority (Modular, 76%; Monoblock, 66% of the 2000 N load relative to the femur. FE analysis and experiments demonstrated that the Modular implant was 3 to 4.5 times mechanically stiffer than the Monoblock due primarily to geometric differences. Conclusions This study provides mechanical characteristics of revision hip implants at sub-clinical axial loads as an initial predictor of potential failure.

  1. Pre-Test Assessment of the Use Envelope of the Normal Force of a Wind Tunnel Strain-Gage Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the aerodynamic lift force generated by a wind tunnel model, the model weight, and the measured normal force of a strain-gage balance is investigated to better understand the expected use envelope of the normal force during a wind tunnel test. First, the fundamental relationship between normal force, model weight, lift curve slope, model reference area, dynamic pressure, and angle of attack is derived. Then, based on this fundamental relationship, the use envelope of a balance is examined for four typical wind tunnel test cases. The first case looks at the use envelope of the normal force during the test of a light wind tunnel model at high subsonic Mach numbers. The second case examines the use envelope of the normal force during the test of a heavy wind tunnel model in an atmospheric low-speed facility. The third case reviews the use envelope of the normal force during the test of a floor-mounted semi-span model. The fourth case discusses the normal force characteristics during the test of a rotated full-span model. The wind tunnel model's lift-to-weight ratio is introduced as a new parameter that may be used for a quick pre-test assessment of the use envelope of the normal force of a balance. The parameter is derived as a function of the lift coefficient, the dimensionless dynamic pressure, and the dimensionless model weight. Lower and upper bounds of the use envelope of a balance are defined using the model's lift-to-weight ratio. Finally, data from a pressurized wind tunnel is used to illustrate both application and interpretation of the model's lift-to-weight ratio.

  2. Determination of Baseline Periods of Record for Selected Streamflow-Gaging Stations in New Jersey for Determining Ecologically Relevant Hydrologic Indices (ERHI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esralew, Rachel A.; Baker, Ronald J.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrologic changes in New Jersey stream basins resulting from human activity can affect the flow and ecology of the streams. To assess future changes in streamflow resulting from human activity an understanding of the natural variability of streamflow is needed. The natural variability can be classified using Ecologically Relevant Hydrologic Indices (ERHIs). ERHIs are defined as selected streamflow statistics that characterize elements of the flow regime that substantially affect biological health and ecological sustainability. ERHIs are used to quantitatively characterize aspects of the streamflow regime, including magnitude, duration, frequency, timing, and rate of change. Changes in ERHI values can occur as a result of human activity, and changes in ERHIs over time at various stream locations can provide information about the degree of alteration in aquatic ecosystems at or near those locations. New Jersey streams can be divided into four classes (A, B, C, or D), where streams with similar ERHI values (determined from cluster analysis) are assigned the same stream class. In order to detect and quantify changes in ERHIs at selected streamflow-gaging stations, a 'baseline' period is needed. Ideally, a baseline period is a period of continuous daily streamflow record at a gaging station where human activity along the contributing stream reach or in the stream's basin is minimal. Because substantial urbanization and other development had already occurred before continuous streamflow-gaging stations were installed, it is not possible to identify baseline periods that meet this criterion for many reaches in New Jersey. Therefore, the baseline period for a considerably altered basin can be defined as a period prior to a substantial human-induced change in the drainage basin or stream reach (such as regulations or diversions), or a period during which development did not change substantially. Index stations (stations with minimal urbanization) were defined as streamflow-gaging

  3. Dismal Swamp Staff Gages

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Well design - Dismal Swamp Shallow observation wells - these are the early wells put in during 1975, 1976. They are black ABS plastic, 2-inch diameter, open at the...

  4. Peak-Flow Frequency Estimates Based on Data through Water Year 2001 for Selected Streamflow-Gaging Stations in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; Driscoll, Daniel G.; Parrett, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Numerous users, including the South Dakota Department of Transportation, have continuing needs for peak-flow information for the design of highway infrastructure and many other purposes. This report documents results from a cooperative study between the South Dakota Department of Transportation and the U.S. Geological Survey to provide an update of peak-flow frequency estimates for South Dakota. Estimates of peak-flow magnitudes for 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals are reported for 272 streamflow-gaging stations, which include most gaging stations in South Dakota with 10 or more years of systematic peak-flow records through water year 2001. Recommended procedures described in Bulletin 17B were used as primary guidelines for developing peak-flow frequency estimates. The computer program PEAKFQ developed by the U.S. Geological Survey was used to run the frequency analyses. Flood frequencies for all stations were initially analyzed by using standard Bulletin 17B default procedures for fitting the log-Pearson III distribution. The resulting preliminary frequency curves were then plotted on a log-probability scale, and fits of the curves with systematic data were evaluated. In many cases, results of the default Bulletin 17B analyses were determined to be satisfactory. In other cases, however, the results could be improved by using various alternative procedures for frequency analysis. Alternative procedures for some stations included adjustments to skew coefficients or use of user-defined low-outlier criteria. Peak-flow records for many gaging stations are strongly influenced by low- or zero-flow values. This situation often results in a frequency curve that plots substantially above the systematic record data points at the upper end of the frequency curve. Adjustments to low-outlier criteria reduced the influence of very small peak flows and generally focused the analyses on the upper parts of the frequency curves (10- to 500-year

  5. Adjusted peak-flow frequency estimates for selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana based on data through water year 2011: Chapter D in Montana StreamStats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; Sando, Roy; McCarthy, Peter M.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-04-05

    The climatic conditions of the specific time period during which peak-flow data were collected at a given streamflow-gaging station (hereinafter referred to as gaging station) can substantially affect how well the peak-flow frequency (hereinafter referred to as frequency) results represent long-term hydrologic conditions. Differences in the timing of the periods of record can result in substantial inconsistencies in frequency estimates for hydrologically similar gaging stations. Potential for inconsistency increases with decreasing peak-flow record length. The representativeness of the frequency estimates for a short-term gaging station can be adjusted by various methods including weighting the at-site results in association with frequency estimates from regional regression equations (RREs) by using the Weighted Independent Estimates (WIE) program. Also, for gaging stations that cannot be adjusted by using the WIE program because of regulation or drainage areas too large for application of RREs, frequency estimates might be improved by using record extension procedures, including a mixed-station analysis using the maintenance of variance type I (MOVE.1) procedure. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Transportation and the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, completed a study to provide adjusted frequency estimates for selected gaging stations through water year 2011.The purpose of Chapter D of this Scientific Investigations Report is to present adjusted frequency estimates for 504 selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana based on data through water year 2011. Estimates of peak-flow magnitudes for the 66.7-, 50-, 42.9-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities are reported. These annual exceedance probabilities correspond to the 1.5-, 2-, 2.33-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals, respectively.The at-site frequency estimates were

  6. Research on the Traceability Value Methord of Tyre Pattern Depth Gage%轮胎花纹深度检测尺量值溯源方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建群; 林景星

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there is no domestic specification of verification or calibration on the tyre pattern depth gage (hereinafter referred as the" depth gage "). In order to ensure an accurate and reliable traeebility value of the depth gage and its testing data, according to its working principle and measurement characteristics, this paper puts forward a calibration method on it and an uncertainty evaluation method of the depth gage, thus as a technical referrence of calibration of the depth gage.%目前国内尚无检定或校准轮胎花纹深度检测尺(以下简称“深度尺”)的计量检定规程或校准技术规范,为了确保开展深度尺量值溯源与检测数据准确可靠,根据其工作原理与计量特性,本文提出深度尺的校准方法及其校准结果的不确定度评定方法,作为开展深度尺校准使用的技术依据。

  7. Statistical summaries of streamflow data for selected gaging stations on and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, through September 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M.A.J.; Mann, Larry J.; Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    Statistical summaries and graphs of streamflow data were prepared for 13 gaging stations with 5 or more years of continuous record on and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Statistical summaries of streamflow data for the Big and Little Lost Rivers and Birch Creek were analyzed as a requisite for a comprehensive evaluation of the potential for flooding of facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The type of statistical analyses performed depended on the length of streamflow record for a gaging station. Streamflow statistics generated for stations with 5 to 9 years of record were: (1) magnitudes of monthly and annual flows; (2) duration of daily mean flows; and (3) maximum, median, and minimum daily mean flows. Streamflow statistics generated for stations with 10 or more years of record were: (1) magnitudes of monthly and annual flows; (2) magnitudes and frequencies of daily low, high, instantaneous peak (flood frequency), and annual mean flows; (3) duration of daily mean flows; (4) exceedance probabilities of annual low, high, instantaneous peak, and mean annual flows; (5) maximum, median, and minimum daily mean flows; and (6) annual mean and mean annual flows.

  8. Annual and average estimates of water-budget components based on hydrograph separation and PRISM precipitation for gaged basins in the Appalachian Plateaus Region, 1900-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, David L.; Messinger, Terence; McCoy, Kurt J.

    2015-07-14

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Groundwater Resources Program study of the Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, annual and average estimates of water-budget components based on hydrograph separation and precipitation data from parameter-elevation regressions on independent slopes model (PRISM) were determined at 849 continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations from Mississippi to New York and covered the period of 1900 to 2011. Only complete calendar years (January to December) of streamflow record at each gage were used to determine estimates of base flow, which is that part of streamflow attributed to groundwater discharge; such estimates can serve as a proxy for annual recharge. For each year, estimates of annual base flow, runoff, and base-flow index were determined using computer programs—PART, HYSEP, and BFI—that have automated the separation procedures. These streamflow-hydrograph analysis methods are provided with version 1.0 of the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Toolbox, which is a new program that provides graphing, mapping, and analysis capabilities in a Windows environment. Annual values of precipitation were estimated by calculating the average of cell values intercepted by basin boundaries where previously defined in the GAGES–II dataset. Estimates of annual evapotranspiration were then calculated from the difference between precipitation and streamflow.

  9. Statistical summaries of streamflow data for selected gaging stations on and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, through September 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M.A.J.; Mann, L.J.; Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1993-11-01

    Statistical summaries and graphs of streamflow data were prepared for 13 gaging stations with 5 or more years of continuous record on and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Statistical summaries of streamflow data for the Big and Little Lost Rivers and Birch Creek were analyzed as a requisite for a comprehensive evaluation of the potential for flooding of facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The type of statistical analyses performed depended on the length of streamflow record for a gaging station. Streamflow statistics generated for stations with 5 to 9 years of record were: Magnitudes of monthly and annual flows; duration of daily mean flows; and maximum, median, and minimum daily mean flows. Streamflow statistics generated for stations with 10 or more years of record were: Magnitudes of monthly and annual flows; magnitudes and frequencies of daily low, high, instantaneous peak (flood frequency), and annual mean flows; duration of daily mean flows; exceedance probabilities of annual low, high, instantaneous peak, and mean annual flows; maximum, median, and minimum daily mean flows; and annual mean and mean annual flows.

  10. Temporal trends and stationarity in annual peak flow and peak-flow timing for selected long-term streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana through water year 2011: Chapter B in Montana StreamStats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; McCarthy, Peter M.; Sando, Roy; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-04-05

    A large-scale study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Transportation and the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, was done to investigate general patterns in peak-flow temporal trends and stationarity through water year 2011 for 24 long-term streamflow-gaging stations (hereinafter referred to as gaging stations) in Montana. Hereinafter, all years refer to water years; a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the year in which it ends. The primary focus of the study was to identify general patterns in peak-flow temporal trends and stationarity that are relevant to application of peak-flow frequency analyses within a statewide gaging-station network.

  11. 一款微型汽车塑料保险杠专用检具通用化设计%Universal design A miniature car plastic bumper special gage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄好; 谭克京

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the basis of a miniature car plastic rear bumper special gage, combined with the inspection requirements of the new rear bumper design, universal design and alteration for the existing special gage to meet the gage design and manufacturing requirements, shorten new product development cycle, reduce the cost of new product develop- ment%本文重点分析了在现有的一款微型汽车塑料后保险杠专用检具的基础上,结合新设计的保险杠产品检测要求,对现有的专用检具进行通用化设计和改造,满足检具的设计和制造要求,缩短新产品开发周期,降低新产品开发成本。

  12. Estimating peak-flow frequency statistics for selected gaged and ungaged sites in naturally flowing streams and rivers in Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Skinner, Kenneth D.; Veilleux, Andrea G.

    2016-06-27

    -central Idaho (average standard error of prediction=46.4 percent; pseudo-R2>92 percent) and region 5 in central Idaho (average standard error of prediction=30.3 percent; pseudo-R2>95 percent). Regression model fit was poor for region 7 in southern Idaho (average standard error of prediction=103 percent; pseudo-R2equations if peak-flow estimates are desired at an ungaged site that is close to a streamgage selected for inclusion in this study. The alternative drainage area ratio-adjustment method is appropriate for use when the drainage area ratio between the ungaged and gaged sites is between 0.5 and 1.5.The updated regional peak-flow regression equations had lower total error (standard error of prediction) than all regression equations presented in a 1982 study and in four of six regions presented in 2002 and 2003 studies in Idaho. A more extensive streamgage screening process used in the current study resulted in fewer streamgages used in the current study than in the 1982, 2002, and 2003 studies. Fewer streamgages used and the selection of different explanatory variables were likely causes of increased error in some regions compared to previous studies, but overall, regional peak‑flow regression model fit was generally improved for Idaho. The revised statistical procedures and increased streamgage screening applied in the current study most likely resulted in a more accurate representation of natural peak-flow conditions.The updated, regional peak-flow regression equations will be integrated in the U.S. Geological Survey StreamStats program to allow users to estimate basin and climatic characteristics and peak-flow statistics at ungaged locations of interest. StreamStats estimates peak-flow statistics with quantifiable certainty only when used at sites with basin and climatic characteristics within the range of input variables used to develop the regional regression equations. Both the regional regression equations and StreamStats should be used to estimate peak

  13. Estimating peak-flow frequency statistics for selected gaged and ungaged sites in naturally flowing streams and rivers in Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Skinner, Kenneth D.; Veilleux, Andrea G.

    2016-06-27

    -central Idaho (average standard error of prediction=46.4 percent; pseudo-R2>92 percent) and region 5 in central Idaho (average standard error of prediction=30.3 percent; pseudo-R2>95 percent). Regression model fit was poor for region 7 in southern Idaho (average standard error of prediction=103 percent; pseudo-R2<78 percent) compared to other regions because few streamgages in region 7 met the criteria for inclusion in the study, and the region’s semi-arid climate and associated variability in precipitation patterns causes substantial variability in peak flows.A drainage area ratio-adjustment method, using ratio exponents estimated using generalized least-squares regression, was presented as an alternative to the regional regression equations if peak-flow estimates are desired at an ungaged site that is close to a streamgage selected for inclusion in this study. The alternative drainage area ratio-adjustment method is appropriate for use when the drainage area ratio between the ungaged and gaged sites is between 0.5 and 1.5.The updated regional peak-flow regression equations had lower total error (standard error of prediction) than all regression equations presented in a 1982 study and in four of six regions presented in 2002 and 2003 studies in Idaho. A more extensive streamgage screening process used in the current study resulted in fewer streamgages used in the current study than in the 1982, 2002, and 2003 studies. Fewer streamgages used and the selection of different explanatory variables were likely causes of increased error in some regions compared to previous studies, but overall, regional peak‑flow regression model fit was generally improved for Idaho. The revised statistical procedures and increased streamgage screening applied in the current study most likely resulted in a more accurate representation of natural peak-flow conditions.The updated, regional peak-flow regression equations will be integrated in the U.S. Geological Survey StreamStats program to allow

  14. Peak data for U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations, Texas network and computer program to estimate peak-streamflow frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, R.M.; Asquith, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    About 23,000 annual peak streamflows and about 400 historical peak streamflows exist for about 950 stations in the surface-water data-collection network of Texas. These data are presented on a computer diskette along with the corresponding dates, gage heights, and information concerning the basin, and nature or cause for the flood. Also on the computer diskette is a U.S. Geological Survey computer program that estimates peak-streamflow frequency based on annual and historical peak streamflow. The program estimates peak streamflow for 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year recurrence intervals and is based on guidelines established by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data. Explanations are presented for installing the program, and an example is presented with discussion of its options.

  15. Bromide, Chloride, and Sulfate Concentrations and Loads at U.S. Geological Survey Streamflow-Gaging Stations 07331600 Red River at Denison Dam, 07335500 Red River at Arthur City, and 07336820 Red River near DeKalb, Texas, 2007-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldys, Stanley; Churchill, Christopher J.; Mobley, Craig A.; Coffman, David K.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Dallas Water Utilities Division, did a study to characterize bromide, chloride, and sulfate concentrations and loads at three U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations on the reach of the Red River from Denison Dam, which impounds Lake Texoma, to the U.S. Highway 259 bridge near DeKalb, Texas. Bromide, chloride, and sulfate concentrations and loads were computed for streamflow-gaging stations on the study reach of the Red River. Continuous streamflow and specific conductance data and discrete samples for bromide, chloride, sulfate, and specific conductance were collected at three main-stem streamflow-gaging stations on the Red River: 07331600 Red River at Denison Dam near Denison, Texas (Denison Dam gage), 07335500 Red River at Arthur City, Texas (Arthur City gage), and 07336820 Red River near DeKalb, Texas (DeKalb gage). At each of these streamflow-gaging stations, discrete water-quality data were collected during January 2007-February 2009; continuous water-quality data were collected during March 2007-February 2009. Two periods of high flow resulted from floods during the study; floods during June-July 2007 resulted in elevated flow during June-September 2007 and smaller floods during March-April 2008 resulted in elevated flow during March-April 2008. Bromide, chloride, and sulfate concentrations in samples collected at the three gages decreased downstream. Median bromide concentrations ranged from 0.32 milligram per liter at the Denison Dam gage to 0.19 milligram per liter at the DeKalb gage. Median chloride concentrations ranged from 176 milligrams per liter at the Denison Dam gage to 108 milligrams per liter at the DeKalb gage, less than the 300-milligrams per liter secondary maximum contaminant level established by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Median sulfate concentrations ranged from 213 milligrams per liter at the Denison Dam gage to 117 milligrams per liter at the De

  16. Design of a sediment-monitoring gaging network on ephemeral tributaries of the Colorado River in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Ronald E.; Topping, David J.; Anderson, Robert S.; Hancock, Gregory S.; Melis, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    Management of sediment in rivers downstream from dams requires knowledge of both the sediment supply and downstream sediment transport. In some dam-regulated rivers, the amount of sediment supplied by easily measured major tributaries may overwhelm the amount of sediment supplied by the more difficult to measure lesser tributaries. In this first class of rivers, managers need only know the amount of sediment supplied by these major tributaries. However, in other regulated rivers, the cumulative amount of sediment supplied by the lesser tributaries may approach the total supplied by the major tributaries. The Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon has been hypothesized to be one such river. If this is correct, then management of sediment in the Colorado River in the part of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area downstream from the dam and in Grand Canyon National Park may require knowledge of the sediment supply from all tributaries. Although two major tributaries, the Paria and Little Colorado Rivers, are well documented as the largest two suppliers of sediment to the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, the contributions of sediment supplied by the ephemeral lesser tributaries of the Colorado River in the lowermost Glen Canyon, and Marble and Grand Canyons are much less constrained. Previous studies have estimated amounts of sediment supplied by these tributaries ranging from very little to almost as much as the amount supplied by the Paria River. Because none of these previous studies relied on direct measurement of sediment transport in any of the ephemeral tributaries in Glen, Marble, or Grand Canyons, there may be significant errors in the magnitudes of sediment supplies estimated during these studies. To reduce the uncertainty in the sediment supply by better constraining the sediment yield of the ephemeral lesser tributaries, the U.S. Geological Survey Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center established eight sediment-monitoring gaging

  17. Simulation of daily streamflows at gaged and ungaged locations within the Cedar River Basin, Iowa, using a Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Daniel E.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, conducted a study to examine techniques for estimation of daily streamflows using hydrological models and statistical methods. This report focuses on the use of a hydrologic model, the U.S. Geological Survey's Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System, to estimate daily streamflows at gaged and ungaged locations. The Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System is a modular, physically based, distributed-parameter modeling system developed to evaluate the impacts of various combinations of precipitation, climate, and land use on surface-water runoff and general basin hydrology. The Cedar River Basin was selected to construct a Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model that simulates the period from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2010. The calibration period was from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2004, and the validation periods were from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2010 and January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2010. A Geographic Information System tool was used to delineate the Cedar River Basin and subbasins for the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model and to derive parameters based on the physical geographical features. Calibration of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model was completed using a U.S. Geological Survey calibration software tool. The main objective of the calibration was to match the daily streamflow simulated by the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model with streamflow measured at U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gages. The Cedar River Basin daily streamflow model performed with a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency ranged from 0.82 to 0.33 during the calibration period, and a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency ranged from 0.77 to -0.04 during the validation period. The Cedar River Basin model is meeting the criteria of greater than 0.50 Nash-Sutcliffe and is a good fit for streamflow conditions for the calibration period at all but one location, Austin, Minnesota

  18. Techniques and equipment required for precise stream gaging in tide-affected fresh-water reaches of the Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Winchell

    1971-01-01

    Current-meter measurements of high accuracy will be required for calibration of an acoustic flow-metering system proposed for installation in the Sacramento River at Chipps Island in California. This report presents an analysis of the problem of making continuous accurate current-meter measurements in this channel where the flow regime is changing constantly in response to tidal action. Gaging-system requirements are delineated, and a brief description is given of the several applicable techniques that have been developed by others. None of these techniques provides the accuracies required for the flowmeter calibration. A new system is described--one which has been assembled and tested in prototype and which will provide the matrix of data needed for accurate continuous current-meter measurements. Analysis of a large quantity of data on the velocity distribution in the channel of the Sacramento River at Chipps Island shows that adequate definition of the velocity can be made during the dominant flow periods--that is, at times other than slack-water periods--by use of current meters suspended at elevations 0.2 and 0.8 of the depth below the water surface. However, additional velocity surveys will be necessary to determine whether or not small systematic corrections need be applied during periods of rapidly changing flow. In the proposed system all gaged parameters, including velocities, depths, position in the stream, and related times, are monitored continuously as a boat moves across the river on the selected cross section. Data are recorded photographically and transferred later onto punchcards for computer processing. Computer programs have been written to permit computation of instantaneous discharges at any selected time interval throughout the period of the current meter measurement program. It is anticipated that current-meter traverses will be made at intervals of about one-half hour over periods of several days. Capability of performance for protracted

  19. Vertical datum conversion process for the inland and coastal gage network located in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and South Atlantic-Gulf hydrologic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlund, Jr., Paul H.; Noll, Michael L.

    2017-03-07

    Datum conversions from the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 among inland and coastal gages throughout the hydrologic regions of New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and the South Atlantic-Gulf have implications among river and storm surge forecasting, general commerce, and water-control operations. The process of data conversions may involve the application of a recovered National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929–North American Vertical Datum of 1988 offset, a simplistic datum transformation using VDatum or VERTCON software, or a survey, depending on a gaging network datum evaluation, anticipated uncertainties for data use among the cooperative water community, and methods used to derive the conversion. Datum transformations from National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 to North American Vertical Datum of 1988 using VERTCON purport errors of ± 0.13 foot at the 95 percent confidence level among modeled points, claiming more consistency along the east coast. Survey methods involving differential and trigonometric leveling, along with observations using Global Navigation Satellite System technology, afford a variety of approaches to establish or perpetuate a datum during a survey. Uncertainties among leveling approaches are generally control or construction projects and ±0.16 foot for Federal Emergency Management Agency field surveys and checkpoint surveys used for mapping. River level forecasts generally are defined as ± 0.10 foot among the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration–National Weather Service. Collaboration and communication among the cooperative water community is necessary during a datum conversion or datum change. Datum notification time-change requirements set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration–National Weather Service vary from 30 to 120 days, depending on datum conversion or datum-change case scenarios. Notification times associated with these case scenarios may

  20. A new crank arm based load cell, with built-in conditioning circuit and strain gages, to measure the components of the force applied by a cyclist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigatto, Andre V; Moura, Karina O A; Favieiro, Gabriela W; Balbinot, Alexandre; Pigatto, Andre V; Moura, Karina O A; Favieiro, Gabriela W; Balbinot, Alexandre; Moura, Karina O A; Favieiro, Gabriela W; Balbinot, Alexandre; Pigatto, Andre V

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the development of a force platform based on instrumented load cells with built-in conditioning circuit and strain gages to measure and acquire the components of the force that is applied to the bike crank arm during pedaling in real conditions, and save them on a SD Card. To accomplish that, a complete new crank arm 3D solid model was developed in the SolidWorks, with dimensions equivalent to a commercial crank set and compatible with a conventional road bike, but with a compartment to support all the electronics necessary to measure 3 components of the force applied to the pedal during pedaling. After that, a 6082 T6 Aluminum Crankset based on the solid model was made and instrumented with three Wheatstone bridges each. The signals were conditioned on a printed circuit board, made on SMD technology, and acquired using a microcontroller with a DAC. Static deformation analysis showed a linearity error below 0.6% for all six channels. Dynamic analysis showed a natural frequency above 136Hz. A one-factor experiment design was performed with 5 amateur cyclists. ANOVA showed that the cyclist weight causes significant variation on the force applied to the bicycle pedal and its bilateral symmetry.

  1. Peak-flow frequency analyses and results based on data through water year 2011 for selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana: Chapter C in Montana StreamStats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; McCarthy, Peter M.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-04-05

    Chapter C of this Scientific Investigations Report documents results from a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Transportation and the Montana Department of Natural Resources, to provide an update of statewide peak-flow frequency analyses and results for Montana. The purpose of this report chapter is to present peak-flow frequency analyses and results for 725 streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana based on data through water year 2011. The 725 streamflow-gaging stations included in this study represent nearly all streamflowgaging stations in Montana (plus some from adjacent states or Canadian Provinces) that have at least 10 years of peak-flow records through water year 2011. For 29 of the 725 streamflow-gaging stations, peak-flow frequency analyses and results are reported for both unregulated and regulated conditions. Thus, peak-flow frequency analyses and results are reported for a total of 754 analyses. Estimates of peak-flow magnitudes for 66.7-, 50-, 42.9-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities are reported. These annual exceedance probabilities correspond to 1.5-, 2-, 2.33-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals.

  2. Low-flow analysis and selected flow statistics representative of 1930-2002 for streamflow-gaging stations in or near West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Jeffrey B.

    2006-01-01

    Five time periods between 1930 and 2002 are identified as having distinct patterns of annual minimum daily mean flows (minimum flows). Average minimum flows increased around 1970 at many streamflow-gaging stations in West Virginia. Before 1930, however, there might have been a period of minimum flows greater than any period identified between 1930 and 2002. The effects of climate variability are probably the principal causes of the differences among the five time periods. Comparisons of selected streamflow statistics are made between values computed for the five identified time periods and values computed for the 1930-2002 interval for 15 streamflow-gaging stations. The average difference between statistics computed for the five time periods and the 1930-2002 interval decreases with increasing magnitude of the low-flow statistic. The greatest individual-station absolute difference was 582.5 percent greater for the 7-day 10-year low flow computed for 1970-1979 compared to the value computed for 1930-2002. The hydrologically based low flows indicate approximately equal or smaller absolute differences than biologically based low flows. The average 1-day 3-year biologically based low flow (1B3) and 4-day 3-year biologically based low flow (4B3) are less than the average 1-day 10-year hydrologically based low flow (1Q10) and 7-day 10-year hydrologic-based low flow (7Q10) respectively, and range between 28.5 percent less and 13.6 percent greater. Seasonally, the average difference between low-flow statistics computed for the five time periods and 1930-2002 is not consistent between magnitudes of low-flow statistics, and the greatest difference is for the summer (July 1-September 30) and fall (October 1-December 31) for the same time period as the greatest difference determined in the annual analysis. The greatest average difference between 1B3 and 4B3 compared to 1Q10 and 7Q10, respectively, is in the spring (April 1-June 30), ranging between 11.6 and 102.3 percent

  3. GAGE COUNTY DETAILED HYDRAULICS, GAGE COUNTY,NE USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  4. "Fuel Gage" for Electric Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlette, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Gas-emmission and time-integrated-current measurements indicate battery charge state. Tests indicate possibility of monitoring state of charge of lead/acid batteries at any stage in charging cycle by measuring charging current and either gas evolution or electrode potential. Data then processed by microcomputer. Uses include cell voltage, cell pressure, cell temperature and rate of gas recombination on catalyst.

  5. Examination of Direct Discharge Measurement Data and Historic Daily Data for Selected Gages on the Middle Mississippi River, 1861-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    An examination of data from two continuous stage and discharge streamgages and one continuous stage-only gage on the Middle Mississippi River was made to determine stage-discharge relation changes through time and to investigate cause-and-effect mechanisms through evaluation of hydraulic geometry, channel elevation and water-surface elevation data. Data from discrete, direct measurements at the streamgages at St. Louis, Missouri, and Chester, Illinois, during the period of operation by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1933 to 2008 were examined for changes with time. Daily stage values from the streamgages at St. Louis (1861-2008) and Chester (1891-2008) and the stage-only gage at Cape Girardeau, Missouri (1896-2008), throughout the historic period of record also were examined for changes with time. Stage and discharge from measurements and stage-discharge relations at the streamgages at St. Louis and Chester indicate that stage for a given discharge has changed with time at both locations. An apparent increase in stage for a given discharge at increased flows (greater than flood stage) likely is caused by the raising of levees on the flood plains, and a decrease in stage for a given discharge at low flows (less than one-half flood stage) likely is caused by a combination of dikes in the channel that deepen the channel thalweg at the end of the dikes, and reduced sediment flux into the Middle Mississippi River. Since the 1960s at St. Louis, Missouri, the stage-discharge relations indicated no change or a decrease in stage for a given discharge for all discharges, whereas at Chester, Illinois, the stage-discharge relations indicate increasing stage for a given discharge above bankfull because of sediment infilling of the overflow channel. Top width and average velocity from measurements at a given discharge for the streamgage at St. Louis, Missouri, were relatively constant through time, with the only substantial change in top width resulting from the change in

  6. Estimating flood magnitude and frequency at gaged and ungaged sites on streams in Alaska and conterminous basins in Canada, based on data through water year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Janet H.; Barth, Nancy A.; Veilleux, Andrea G.; Ourso, Robert T.

    2016-03-16

    -based geographic information system application that facilitates retrieval of streamflow statistics and associated information. StreamStats retrieves published data for gaged sites and, for user-selected ungaged sites, delineates drainage areas from topographic and hydrographic data, computes basin characteristics, and computes flood frequency estimates using the regional regression equations.

  7. Regression Equations for Estimating Concentrations of Selected Water-Quality Constituents for Selected Gaging Stations in the Red River of the North Basin, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Sether, Tara

    2004-01-01

    The Dakota Water Resources Act, passed by the U.S. Congress on December 15, 2000, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to conduct a comprehensive study of future water-quantity and quality needs of the Red River of the North Basin in North Dakota and possible options to meet those water needs. Previous Red River of the North Basin studies conducted by the Bureau of Reclamation used streamflow and water-quality data bases developed by the U.S. Geological Survey that included data for 1931-84. As a result of the recent congressional authorization and results of previous studies by the Bureau of Reclamation, redevelopment of the streamflow and water-quality data bases with current data through 1999 are needed in order to evaluate and predict the water-quantity and quality effects within the Red River of the North Basin. This report provides updated statistical summaries of selected water-quality constituents and streamflow and the regression relations between them. Available data for 1931-99 were used to develop regression equations between 5 selected water-quality constituents and streamflow for 38 gaging stations in the Red River of the North Basin. The water-quality constituents that were regressed against streamflow were hardness (as CaCO3), sodium, chloride, sulfate, and dissolved solids. Statistical summaries of the selected water-quality constituents and streamflow for the gaging stations used in the regression equations development and the applications and limitations of the regression equations are presented in this report.

  8. Addition of the pirani condition to the Mathisson-Papapetrou equations in a Schwarzschild Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plyatsko, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper obtains relations that allow one to distinguish a unique center of mass of a rotating test body as it moves in the equatorial plane of a Schwarzchild field. This center of mass can be thought of as the instantaneous analog of the classical center of mass.

  9. Analysis on Management of Tank Ullage Gaging under Marketing-by-Liter Mode%升进升出管理模式下罐车空高的计量管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵兴伟

    2011-01-01

    Oil tank ullage gaging plays an important role in the process of oil product loading, handover, and discharging. Because of the characteristics of oil product, the temperature and density can affect it greatly. Based on the consideration of some issues ab%为了使经油罐车运送到加油站油品的数量得到保证,在升进升出的计量管理模式下,探索了油罐车在油库装油后采用油罐车空高计量的管理方法,介绍了在某油库实施该方法所做的数据采集、整理、汇总等基础工作和计算机程序的编写、数据库的建立以及相应的油罐车空高计量管理办法等,经过两年的工作,相关加油站反映效果不错,但仍需对相关制度进行强化和完善。

  10. DETAILED HYDROLOGY, GAGE COUNTY,NE USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  11. Development of High-Temperature Strain Gages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-03-17

    lengths the article is either dipped in a slip (finely divided tend to require a support for the grid, while shorter coating material suspended in a...liquid) or the lengths require too many loops to achieve the slip is sprayed onto the article , followed in both cases by high-temperature fusion. An...Electrochemistry. Electrical Instruments. Magnetic Measurements. Dielectrics. Metrology. Photometry and Colorimetry. Refractometry . Photographic Research

  12. 统一螺纹量规标准研究及其在AP1000反应堆压力容器主螺栓制造中的应用%Study on Standard of Gages for Unified Screw Threads and Application on AP1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel Main Stud Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易飞; 杨杰

    2015-01-01

    研究了按ASME B1. 2标准规定的统一螺纹量规(通、 止规)的设计原则, 介绍了统一螺纹量规功能、 公差设置、 量规尺寸确定等, 并针对AP1000反应堆压力容器主螺栓螺纹制造和检测提出建议, 为业内及其他统一螺纹制造和检测提供参考.%This paper studies the design principles, function and determination of tolerances and dimensions of gages for unified inch screw thread according to ASME B1. 2 standard, based on which some suggestions are given for AP1000 reactor pressure vessel main studs manufacturing and testing, as reference for in industry sectors.

  13. An Elastic Tube Gage for Measuring Static and Dynamic Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1948-05-01

    f^pm the free ends by means of ä spring-clip With rubberrpadded jaws*. Before the Wire is wound, the tube Is coated with cement; after the winding...Compounds such as beeswax or ceresin wax were first employed for waterproofing, but their brittleness at low temperatures was found to be ob- jectionable...Engineering Company,- New Castle, Delaware, is given in the following: 1. Apply one coat of primer, with a brush or ä spray gun, and allow It to dry one-half

  14. Wireless Zigbee strain gage sensor system for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Abdi, Frank; Miraj, Rashid; Dang, Chau; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Sauer, Bruce

    2009-05-01

    A compact cell phone size radio frequency (ZigBee) wireless strain measurement sensor system to measure the structural strain deformation was developed. The developed system provides an accurate strain measurement data stream to the Internet for further Diagnostic and Prognostic (DPS) correlation. Existing methods of structural measurement by strain sensors (gauges) do not completely satisfy problems posed by continuous structural health monitoring. The need for efficient health monitoring methods with real-time requirements to bidirectional data flow from sensors and to a commanding device is becoming critical for keeping our daily life safety. The use of full-field strain measurement techniques could reduce costly experimental programs through better understanding of material behavior. Wireless sensor-network technology is a monitoring method that is estimated to grow rapidly providing potential for cost savings over traditional wired sensors. The many of currently available wireless monitoring methods have: the proactive and constant data rate character of the data streams rather than traditional reactive, event-driven data delivery; mostly static node placement on structures with limited number of nodes. Alpha STAR Electronics' wireless sensor network system, ASWN, addresses some of these deficiencies, making the system easier to operate. The ASWN strain measurement system utilizes off-the-shelf sensors, namely strain gauges, with an analog-to-digital converter/amplifier and ZigBee radio chips to keep cost lower. Strain data is captured by the sensor, converted to digital form and delivered to the ZigBee radio chip, which in turn broadcasts the information using wireless protocols to a Personal Data Assistant (PDA) or Laptop/Desktop computers. From here, data is forwarded to remote computers for higher-level analysis and feedback using traditional cellular and satellite communication or the Ethernet infrastructure. This system offers a compact size, lower cost, and temperature insensitivity for critical structural applications, which require immediate monitoring and feedback.

  15. Alfred P. Gage and the Introductory Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    This article is about a late 19th-century teacher of secondary school physics. I was originally interested in the apparatus that he sold. This led me to the physics books that he wrote, and these took me to his unusual ideas about ways to use laboratory time to introduce students to the phenomena of physics. More than 100 years later educational…

  16. Terrain, BIG BLUE RIVER TRIBUTARY NO 44, GAGE COUNTY, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. 49 CFR 213.110 - Gage restraint measurement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... test will not be considered valid until contact with these components is restored under static loading... applying an increasing lateral force from 0 to 4,000 pounds on the web/base fillet of each rail...

  18. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, GAGE COUNTY, NEBRASKA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  19. Chemical Composition and in vitro Biological Activities of Essential Oils from Conchocarpus fontanesianus (A. St.-Hil.) Kallunki & Pirani (Rutaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Rodrigo S; Suffredini, Ivana B; Young, Maria C M

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at assessing the chemical composition of the essential oils from leaves and fruits of Conchocarpus fontanesianus, an endemic Brazilian species of Rutaceae. The plant material was harvested from two regions of the Atlantic rainforest in the State of São Paulo. The volatile compounds in the essential oils were extracted by hydrodistillation (HD), and analyzed by GC/FID and GC/MS, allowing the quantification and identification of 54 components in total, which comprise about 97% of the total oil composition. From the leaves collected in Caraguatatuba and Juréia-Itatins, the major volatile compounds identified were as follows: spathulenol (22.32% and 16.67%) and α-cadinol (9.7% and 14.76%). However, β-myrcene (34.56%), (+)-epi-bicyclosesquiphellandrene (8.71%), and bicyclogermacrene (5.80%) were dominant in the fruits collected only in Juréia-Itatins. The in vitro biological activities were tested to evaluate the cytotoxic, antifungal, and antioxidant potential of essential oils from leaves and fruits. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zürich.

  20. A Multiple Bridge for Elimination of Contact-Resistance Errors in Resistance Strain-Gage Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-03-01

    g@ge. ‘ ,, 3. If’&’ ms a,b or h)k are used and a m&ing-coil galva- nometersis the’detector, an appreciable &Gsistance is introductid ‘into this...denoglnator because]it would oontrihuto only third-order % ms .” I;merting equation (39) into the identity- . . iGl ( )‘iG2””b ‘Gl”- ‘G2 (40) (37) may...measurement of alternating strains through slip .rings. --- Ii .,+- ● A A s r r Rh s Two-pole multipla -” position switch R Single-pole multiple

  1. The Strain Gage Method for Determination of Input Working Life Parameters of Pipes in Compressor Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trebuňa, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available For determination of safety operation of compressor stations and assessment of their residual working life is necessary to know the levels of residual stresses, operational loading as well as functionality of real support elements and influence of history of previous loading. The method described in the paper was verified several times during solution of problems concerning safety operation of piping yards. The method was also verified by the numerical methods of mechanics.

  2. Productive Discomfort: Dialogue, Reproductive Choice and Social Justice Education at the Matilda Joslyn Gage Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch Wagner, Sally; Eckler, Tori; Leighton, Maxinne Rhea

    2013-01-01

    Museums in the past have been static institutions, exhibiting their collections as public displays. Today, the public has come to expect more from these institutions, seeing them as safe havens where conversations can begin. As reproductive rights have moved to the forefront of political and social debate, dialogue seems to be a step in the right…

  3. Standard test method for determining residual stresses by the hole-drilling strain-gage method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 Residual Stress Determination: 1.1.1 This test method specifies a hole-drilling procedure for determining residual stress profiles near the surface of an isotropic linearly elastic material. The test method is applicable to residual stress profile determinations where in-plane stress gradients are small. The stresses may remain approximately constant with depth (“uniform” stresses) or they may vary significantly with depth (“non-uniform” stresses). The measured workpiece may be “thin” with thickness much less than the diameter of the drilled hole or “thick” with thickness much greater than the diameter of the drilled hole. Only uniform stress measurements are specified for thin workpieces, while both uniform and non-uniform stress measurements are specified for thick workpieces. 1.2 Stress Measurement Range: 1.2.1 The hole-drilling method can identify in-plane residual stresses near the measured surface of the workpiece material. The method gives localized measurements that indicate the...

  4. LA OBRA DE THOMAS GAGE: UNA MIRADA HACÍA AMÉRICA DESDE AFUERA.

    OpenAIRE

    Méndez González, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    En 1492 el encuentro con América vendría a cambiar desde ese año las relaciones, que tenían los países de Europa entre si y con el Oriente asiático. Dicho acontecimiento vendría a transformar el desarrollo de los nexos políticos que hasta entonces se sostenían entre las potencias hegemónicas del Viejo Mundo, por la entrada en escena de un nuevo y vastísimo continente. El descubrimiento de América vino a trastocar y polemizar todos los ámbitos que la cultura Occidental tenía ...

  5. Water resource inventory and assessment, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, 1989 stream discharge gaging data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This progress report provides an accounting of the accomplishments made during the second year of a multi-year water resource inventory in the coastal plain (1002...

  6. Strain-gage målinger på bro nr. 462-0012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornung, H. B.

    Denne rapport omhandler tøjningsmålinger på lejefundamenter og lejekonsoller for klapfagene på bro nr. 462-0012, Ny Hadsundbro.......Denne rapport omhandler tøjningsmålinger på lejefundamenter og lejekonsoller for klapfagene på bro nr. 462-0012, Ny Hadsundbro....

  7. International Students' Social Network: Network Mapping to Gage Friendship Formation and Student Engagement on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFaul, Susannah

    2016-01-01

    Addressing the importance of international student engagement on campus and creating friendships with host-country nationals during their time abroad, this small-scale study explores the question of, "Are there trends in how or through what means international students are making connections with co-national, multi-national, or host-national…

  8. Productive Discomfort: Dialogue, Reproductive Choice and Social Justice Education at the Matilda Joslyn Gage Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch Wagner, Sally; Eckler, Tori; Leighton, Maxinne Rhea

    2013-01-01

    Museums in the past have been static institutions, exhibiting their collections as public displays. Today, the public has come to expect more from these institutions, seeing them as safe havens where conversations can begin. As reproductive rights have moved to the forefront of political and social debate, dialogue seems to be a step in the right…

  9. Calibration of Breech Erosion Gage for 5.56mm Chrome-Plated Bores

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    34 tft.. CantoiIlate Olft.) Ill TEUIy CLASS. (of ffile .oepot) Unclassified ISO . DECL ASSi VIC ATION’DOW94GRADING 16. DISTRIOUTION STATEMENT (of Wit9...6.3 8.9 13.4 7.6 7.3 6.3 6.2 7.1 26000 16.1 9.1 10.9 13.9 8.9 6.4 6.3 3.1 4.9 27000 12.4 8.4 11.2 13.1 8.3 6.5 7.3 3.4 4.3 28000 12.1 6.9 19.3 11.4

  10. ELECTROHYDRAULIC SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATIC GAGE CONTROL (AGC FOR TANDEM COLD MILL PLANT IN SARTID SMEDEREVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Stefanovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electro hydraulic servosystem for the AGC has better characteristics than electromechanic (fivetimesgreater speed of rolling, greater speed of positioning ,smaller dead–zone, smaller time of roll gap adjusting start, smaller time of maximum speed reaching,greater unloading speed.

  11. Design of Gages for Direct Skin Friction Measurements in Complex Turbulent Flows with Shock Impingement Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-07

    www.ansys.com/ 30 Figliola, p. 87-91. 31 Pilkey, p. 564. 32 Fogiel, p. 1112. 33 Hibbeler , R.C. Engineering Mechanics Static and Dynamics 5th Edition...Macmillan Publishing Company, Inc., New York, 1989 pp. 486, 511. 34 Hibbeler , pp. 486, 511. 35 Figliola, p. 89. 36 Fogiel, p. 258. 37

  12. Use of Precious Metal-Modifed Nickel-Base Superalloys for Thin Gage Applications (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Historically, sandwich construction MTPS (outer surface-Alloy 617 nickel-base superalloy honeycomb core and face sheets; inner surface titanium alloy honeycomb ...National Aeronautics and Space Administration ( NASA ) X-33 vehicle2, a wedged-shaped subscale prototype of a reusable launch vehicle4 designed by...MTPS, materials under consideration must be very thin, 0.17 mm-0.25 mm for a typical face sheet and 0.05mm-0.10 mm for honeycomb core. One

  13. Study of Six-Component Internal Strain Gage Balances for Use in the HIRT Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    bridges, also provides a backlog of s t ress information on which to base this study. The two-shell balance has been an important instrument in the...Reference 1) Ftu (ksi) 300 Fty (ksi) 280 Fsu (ksi) 170 Elongation (%) 5 E (106 psi) 27,0 G (106psi) 10.2 Charpy V-notch (ft-lb) 17 KIC (ksi ~-n...varying BMC location can be used to attain higher normal force for given runs, thus allowing for more test points. Figure 7 is a graphic

  14. Standard test methods for performance characteristics of metallic bonded resistance strain gages

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1992-01-01

    1.1 The purpose of this standard is to provide uniform test methods for the determination of strain gauge performance characteristics. Suggested testing equipment designs are included. 1.2 Test Methods E 251 describes methods and procedures for determining five strain gauge parameters: Section Part I—General Requirements 7 Part II—Resistance at a Reference Temperature 8 Part III—Gauge Factor at a Reference Temperature 9 Part IV—Temperature Coefficient of Gauge Factor\t10 Part V—Transverse Sensitivity\t11 Part VI—Thermal Output\t12 1.3 Strain gauges are very sensitive devices with essentially infinite resolution. Their response to strain, however, is low and great care must be exercised in their use. The performance characteristics identified by these test methods must be known to an acceptable accuracy to obtain meaningful results in field applications. 1.3.1 Strain gauge resistance is used to balance instrumentation circuits and to provide a reference value for measurements since all data are...

  15. Global and local characteristics of an autogenous single pass electron beam weld in thick gage UNS S41500 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarafan, S., E-mail: Sheida.Sarafan.1@ens.etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada); National Research Council Canada, Aerospace, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada); Wanjara, P., E-mail: priti.wanjara@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada, Aerospace, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada); Gholipour, J., E-mail: Javad.gholipour@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada, Aerospace, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada); Champliaud, H., E-mail: henri.champliaud@etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    Electron beam welding of UNS S41500, a low carbon martensitic stainless steel utilized in hydroelectric turbine manufacturing, was investigated by applying a single pass autogenous process to penetrate a section thickness of 72 mm without preheating. In the as-welded and post-weld heat treated conditions, the evolution in microhardness and microstructure across the weldments, as well as the global and local tensile properties, were evaluated. In the as-welded condition, assessment of the microhardness and the associated microstructure across the welds led to the identification of six regions, including the fusion zone, four heat affected zones and the base metal; each of these regions consisted of different phase constituents, such as tempered martensite, untempered martensite, delta ferrite and retained austenite. Post-weld heat treatment, undertaken to temper the untempered martensite in the as-welded microstructure, was effective in homogenizing the hardness across the weldment. The mechanical response of the welds, determined through tensile testing at room temperature with an automated non-contact three-dimensional deformation measurement system, indicated that the global tensile properties in the as-welded and post-weld heat treated conditions met the acceptance criteria in the ASME Section IX standard. Also, evaluation of the local tensile properties in the fusion and heat affected zones of the as-welded samples allowed a more comprehensive understanding of the strength and ductility associated with the different microstructures in the “composite” nature of the weldment. Fractographic analysis demonstrated dimpled features on the tensile fracture surfaces and failure was associated with debonding between the martensitic matrix and the secondary phases (such as delta ferrite and retained austenite) that resulted in the formation, growth and coalescence of voids into a macroscale crack.

  16. Preliminary Estimates of Frequency-Direction Spectra Derived from the SAMSON Pressure Gage Array, November 1990 to May 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    collection after the primary SAMSON experiment is credited to Dr. C. Linwood Vincent, CERC. The efforts of Ms. Janean Shirley, Information Technology ...Wave HeLsht DjLreStL2M. Periodaflet talen Date TUme8 ..im 8 p pi Tpt le Xpi 4.r D*Pth - -- 2 A MU. AML 411L. -JM -M5 - - - 0U. 910203 1900 0.54 0.50

  17. Magnitude, frequency, and trends of floods at gaged and ungaged sites in Washington, based on data through water year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Mark C.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Veilleux, Andrea G.; Tecca, Alison E.

    2016-09-20

    An investigation into the magnitude and frequency of floods in Washington State computed the annual exceedance probability (AEP) statistics for 648 U.S. Geological Survey unregulated streamgages in and near the borders of Washington using the recorded annual peak flows through water year 2014. This is an updated report from a previous report published in 1998 that used annual peak flows through the water year 1996. New in this report, a regional skew coefficient was developed for the Pacific Northwest region that includes areas in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and western Montana within the Columbia River drainage basin south of the United States-Canada border, the coastal areas of Oregon and western Washington, and watersheds draining into Puget Sound, Washington. The skew coefficient is an important term in the Log Pearson Type III equation used to define the distribution of the log-transformed annual peaks. The Expected Moments Algorithm was used to fit historical and censored peak-flow data to the log Pearson Type III distribution. A Multiple Grubb-Beck test was employed to censor low outliers of annual peak flows to improve on the frequency distribution. This investigation also includes a section on observed trends in annual peak flows that showed significant trends (p-value set of equations for eight selected AEPs and for each region were constructed. Selected AEP statistics included the annual peak flows that equaled or exceeded 50, 20, 10, 4, 2, 1, 0.5 and 0.2 percent of the time equivalent to peak flows for peaks with a 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals, respectively. Annual precipitation and drainage area were the significant basin characteristics in the regression equations for all four regression regions in Washington and forest cover was significant for the two regression regions in eastern Washington. Average standard error of prediction for the regional regression equations ranged from 70.19 to 125.72 percent for Regression Regions 1 and 2 on the eastern side of the Cascade Mountains and from 43.22 to 58.04 percent for Regression Regions 3 and 4 on the western side of the Cascade Mountains. The pseudo coefficient of determination (where a value of 100 signifies a perfect regression model) ranged from 68.39 to 90.68 for Regression Regions 1 and 2, and 92.35 to 95.44 for Regions 3 and 4.The calculated AEP statistics for the streamgages and the regional regression equations are expected to be incorporated into StreamStats after the publication of this report. StreamStats is the interactive Web-based map tool created by the U.S. Geological Survey to allow the user to choose a streamgage and obtain published statistics or choose ungaged locations where the program automatically applies the regional regression equations and computes the estimates of the AEP statistics.

  18. 75 FR 12674 - Amendment of Jet Routes and VOR Federal Airways in the Vicinity of Gage, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, via El Paso, TX; INT El Paso 070 and Pinon, NM, 219 radials; Pinon; Chisum, NM... September 15, 2009, is amended as follows: Paragraph 2004 Jet Routes. * * * * * J-26 From Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, via El Paso, TX; INT of El Paso 070 and Chisum, NM, 215 radials; Chisum; Panhandle, TX;...

  19. Stream-gage locations where streamflow gains/losses were quantified along the Central Valley surface-water network

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the name and location for the diversions from the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central...

  20. Magnitude, frequency, and trends of floods at gaged and ungaged sites in Washington, based on data through water year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Mark C.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Veilleux, Andrea G.; Tecca, Alison E.

    2016-09-20

    An investigation into the magnitude and frequency of floods in Washington State computed the annual exceedance probability (AEP) statistics for 648 U.S. Geological Survey unregulated streamgages in and near the borders of Washington using the recorded annual peak flows through water year 2014. This is an updated report from a previous report published in 1998 that used annual peak flows through the water year 1996. New in this report, a regional skew coefficient was developed for the Pacific Northwest region that includes areas in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and western Montana within the Columbia River drainage basin south of the United States-Canada border, the coastal areas of Oregon and western Washington, and watersheds draining into Puget Sound, Washington. The skew coefficient is an important term in the Log Pearson Type III equation used to define the distribution of the log-transformed annual peaks. The Expected Moments Algorithm was used to fit historical and censored peak-flow data to the log Pearson Type III distribution. A Multiple Grubb-Beck test was employed to censor low outliers of annual peak flows to improve on the frequency distribution. This investigation also includes a section on observed trends in annual peak flows that showed significant trends (p-value publication of this report. StreamStats is the interactive Web-based map tool created by the U.S. Geological Survey to allow the user to choose a streamgage and obtain published statistics or choose ungaged locations where the program automatically applies the regional regression equations and computes the estimates of the AEP statistics.

  1. Response of Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panel with Minimum Gage GFRP Face-Sheets to Compression Loading After Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2011-01-01

    A compression after impact study has been conducted to determine the residual strength of three sandwich panel constructions with two types of thin glass fiber reinforced polymer face-sheets and two hexagonal honeycomb Nomex core densities. Impact testing is conducted to first determine the characteristics of damage resulting from various impact energy levels. Two modes of failure are found during compression after impact tests with the density of the core precipitating the failure mode present for a given specimen. A finite element analysis is presented for prediction of the residual compressive strength of the impacted specimens. The analysis includes progressive damage modeling in the face-sheets. Preliminary analysis results were similar to the experimental results; however, a higher fidelity core material model is expected to improve the correlation.

  2. A study on the ultrasonic application for the efficiency elevation of the hydrogen fuel production: by the pressure sensor gage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Eun Sun; Song, Min Guen; Son, Seung Woo [Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    The production of hydrogen fuel depends basically on the water electrolysis. The ultrasonic effects the decrease of the overpotential in a water electrolysis. A study on the overpotential which activates the hydrogen production is the core to elevate the hydrogen production efficiency on the principle. A pressure sensor system by a new idea is developed and applied. Solutions are 4 kinds of KOH concentration such as 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30%. Two frequency bands of the ultrasonic transducer are 28kHz and 2MHz. The directions of ultrasonic forcing are the vertical direction and the horizontal direction. The temperatures are two states, i.e., no constant and constant. Experiments are carried out sequentially in order in three cases of no ultrasonic forcing, ultrasonic forcing, and ultrasonic discontinuation. In results, it is clarified that the ultrasonic effects the decrease of overpotential to elevate the efficiency of hydrogen production.

  3. Distinct GAGE and MAGE-A expression during early human development indicate specific roles in lineage differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Harkness, Linda; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    and RT-PCR, we investigated the expression of CTAs in differentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and in late embryos and early fetuses. RESULTS: We found that melanoma antigen A (MAGE-A) family members were expressed during differentiation of hESC to embryoid bodies and in teratomas, and overlapped...

  4. Continuous Tidal Streamflow and Gage-Height Data for Bass and Cinder Creeks on Kiawah Island, South Carolina, September 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Paul A.; Erbland, John W.

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of Bass and Cinder Creeks on Kiawah Island, South Carolina, was developed to evaluate methodologies for determining fecal coliform total maximum daily loads for shellfish waters. To calibrate the model, two index-velocity sites on the creeks were instrumented with continuous acoustic velocity meters and water-level sensors to compute a 21-day continuous record of tidal streamflows. In addition to monitoring tidal cycles, streamflow measurements were made at the index-velocity sites, and tidal-cycle streamflow measurements were made at the mouth of Bass Creek and on the Stono River to characterize the streamflow dynamics near the ocean boundary of the three-dimensional model at the beginning, September 6, 2007, and end, September 26, 2007, of the index-velocity meter deployment. The maximum floodtide and ebbtide measured on the Stono River by the mouth of Bass Creek for the two measurements were -155,000 and 170,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). At the mouth of Bass Creek, the maximum floodtide and ebbtide measurements during the 2 measurement days were +/-10,200 ft3/s. Tidal streamflows for the 21-day deployment on Bass Creek ranged from -2,510 ft3/s for an incoming tide to 4,360 ft3/s for an outgoing tide. On Cinder Creek, the incoming and outgoing tide varied from -2,180 to 2,400 ft3/s during the same period.

  5. Matters of Gravity, The Newsletter of the Division of Gravitational Physics of the American Physical Society, Volume 47, June 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Garfinkle, David

    2016-01-01

    DGRAV News: DGRAV we hear that.... Research Briefs: GW150914 Obituaries: Remembering Felix Pirani Remembering David Finkelstein Steve, the physicist Remembering Sergio Dain Editorial: Gravitational physics in the modern university

  6. Average Estimates of Water-Budget Components Based on Hydrograph Separation and PRISM Precipitation for Gaged Basins in the Appalachian Plateaus Region, 1900-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Groundwater Resources Program study of the Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, estimates of annual water-budget components were...

  7. Towards the determination of deformation rates - pinch-and-swell structures as a natural and simulated paleo-strain rate gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Max; Poulet, Thomas; Karrech, Ali; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Herwegh, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Layered rocks deformed under viscous deformation conditions frequently show boudinage, a phenomenon that results from differences in effective viscosity between the involved layers. In the case of continuous necking of a mechanically stiffer layer embedded in a weaker matrix, symmetric boudins are interpreted as the result of dominant visco-plastic deformation (Goscombe et al., 2004). However, information on the physical conditions, material properties and deformation processes are yet unknown. Natural samples deformed under low-grade (Trelatively high extensional strains. REFERENCES Austin, N. and Evans, B. (2007). Paleowattmeters: A scaling relation for dynamically recrystallized grain size. Geology, 35. Goscombe, B.D., Passchier, C.W. and Hand, M. (2004). Boudinage classification: End-member boudin types and modified boudin structures, Journal of Structural Geology, 26. Herwegh, M., Poulet, T., Karrech, A. and Regenauer-Lieb, K. (in press). From transient to steady state deformation and grain size: A thermodynamic approach using elasto-visco-plastic numerical modeling. Journal of Geophysical Research. Karrech, A., Regenauer-Lieb, K. and Poulet, T. (2011a). A Damaged visco-plasticity model for pressure and temperature sensitive geomaterials. Journal of Engineering Science 49. Regenauer-Lieb, K. and Yuen, D. (2004). Positive feedback of interacting ductile faults from coupling of equation of state, rheology and thermal-mechanics. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 142. Schmalholz, S.M. and Maeder, X. (2012). Pinch-and-swell structure and shear zones in viscoplastic layers. Journal of Structural Geology, 34.

  8. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_8: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 62,300 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  9. F/A-18(A-D) Wing Root Fatigue Life Expended (FLE) Prediction Without the Use of Strain Gage Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    divided by 7.5) rNzMin Minimum G’s (divided by 7.5) RBM Reference Bending Moment RH Right Hand RSE Residual Standard Error SAFE...quantile-quantile plot exhibits a normality with deviations of less than 0.01 at the ends. With a residual standard error ( RSE ) of 0.00799, a maximum...increases to 0.9107, and the RSE decreases to 0.00761. Shown in Figure 6, the plots retain the same properties as the original model which leads to

  10. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_4: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 27,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  11. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_7: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 46,800 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  12. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_6: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 39,900 at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  13. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_3: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 21,450 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  14. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_5: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 33,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  15. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_1: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 12,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  16. Estimating flood magnitude and frequency at gaged and ungaged sites on streams in Alaska and conterminous basins in Canada, based on data through water year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Janet H.; Barth, Nancy A.; Veilleux, Andrea G.; Ourso, Robert T.

    2016-03-16

    Estimates of the magnitude and frequency of floods are needed across Alaska for engineering design of transportation and water-conveyance structures, flood-insurance studies, flood-plain management, and other water-resource purposes. This report updates methods for estimating flood magnitude and frequency in Alaska and conterminous basins in Canada. Annual peak-flow data through water year 2012 were compiled from 387 streamgages on unregulated streams with at least 10 years of record. Flood-frequency estimates were computed for each streamgage using the Expected Moments Algorithm to fit a Pearson Type III distribution to the logarithms of annual peak flows. A multiple Grubbs-Beck test was used to identify potentially influential low floods in the time series of peak flows for censoring in the flood frequency analysis.For two new regional skew areas, flood-frequency estimates using station skew were computed for stations with at least 25 years of record for use in a Bayesian least-squares regression analysis to determine a regional skew value. The consideration of basin characteristics as explanatory variables for regional skew resulted in improvements in precision too small to warrant the additional model complexity, and a constant model was adopted. Regional Skew Area 1 in eastern-central Alaska had a regional skew of 0.54 and an average variance of prediction of 0.45, corresponding to an effective record length of 22 years. Regional Skew Area 2, encompassing coastal areas bordering the Gulf of Alaska, had a regional skew of 0.18 and an average variance of prediction of 0.12, corresponding to an effective record length of 59 years. Station flood-frequency estimates for study sites in regional skew areas were then recomputed using a weighted skew incorporating the station skew and regional skew. In a new regional skew exclusion area outside the regional skew areas, the density of long-record streamgages was too sparse for regional analysis and station skew was used for all estimates. Final station flood frequency estimates for all study streamgages are presented for the 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities.Regional multiple-regression analysis was used to produce equations for estimating flood frequency statistics from explanatory basin characteristics. Basin characteristics, including physical and climatic variables, were updated for all study streamgages using a geographical information system and geospatial source data. Screening for similar-sized nested basins eliminated hydrologically redundant sites, and screening for eligibility for analysis of explanatory variables eliminated regulated peaks, outburst peaks, and sites with indeterminate basin characteristics. An ordinary least‑squares regression used flood-frequency statistics and basin characteristics for 341 streamgages (284 in Alaska and 57 in Canada) to determine the most suitable combination of basin characteristics for a flood-frequency regression model and to explore regional grouping of streamgages for explaining variability in flood-frequency statistics across the study area. The most suitable model for explaining flood frequency used drainage area and mean annual precipitation as explanatory variables for the entire study area as a region. Final regression equations for estimating the 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability discharge in Alaska and conterminous basins in Canada were developed using a generalized least-squares regression. The average standard error of prediction for the regression equations for the various annual exceedance probabilities ranged from 69 to 82 percent, and the pseudo-coefficient of determination (pseudo-R2) ranged from 85 to 91 percent.The regional regression equations from this study were incorporated into the U.S. Geological Survey StreamStats program for a limited area of the State—the Cook Inlet Basin. StreamStats is a national web-based geographic information system application that facilitates retrieval of streamflow statistics and

  17. Annual Estimates of Water-Budget Components Based on Hydrograph Separation and PRISM Precipitation for Gaged Basins in the Appalachian Plateaus Region, 1900-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Groundwater Resources Program study of the Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, estimates of annual water-budget components were...

  18. How To Increase Use Life of Whorl Cirque Gages%如何提高螺纹环规使用寿命

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜娟

    2010-01-01

    本文阐述了我们公司现在检验螺纹环规所使用的校对量规的偏差不合理,造成新人厂螺纹环规的使用周期短,使用中的螺纹环规报废量大,以及如何配备科学合理的校对量规来提高螺纹环规的使用寿命.

  19. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_2: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 15,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  20. Design of Mass Strain Gages Information Management Systems based on Delphi%基于Delphi的海量应变片信息管理系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左佳; 张建锋

    2013-01-01

    为了对静力试验中海量应变片信息进行有效的管理,基于Delphi开发平台,结合SQL Server 2000数据库,开发了海量应变片管理系统程序.实践验证,该系统结构合理、界面简洁美观,能够大大促进工作积极性,提高工作效率.

  1. Static Force and Moment Test of the Holloman Narrow-Gage Rocket Sled at Mach Numbers from 3.5 to 5.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    N 4NN Lc t- * * -~~ c. 2 0 0 a CL v W" *7 m V4 r4 𔃾A r4N r14.O 4 .F- X .b .b . .. CC!I a. . . -t- 9.9.. L2 In V Lobbl Ul dd lbI a.. 0. 418n nInI - F...00 0 U2 *SSSIC d in cot N 4r ~ 0 ~300 00 00 NI , 61’ AinI *V- -n r-0. wo W) a, C𔃾N 4-~~ O0 0 Uk r. In 0 0 01000c 100 ninI u I- CLa a *Z * 4a 4 C4 t

  2. Evaluation of Neglected Idiopathic Ctev Managed by Ligamentotaxis Using Jess: A Long-Term Followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the role of Ligamentotaxis in the management of neglected clubfeet managed by ligamentotaxis using Joshi's External Stabilisation System (JESS. Method & Material. Total 20 subjects (28 feet were studied, which were corrected by differential ligamentotaxis using JESS. All were evaluated clinically, radiologically, podogrammically, and by Catterall Pirani Scoring System, both before and after the correction. Results. Severity of the deformities and clinical correction was assessed by Pirani score. All patients achieved good clinical results as per Pirani score, which was statistically significant. Radiological evaluation showed that all subjects achieved the normal range of values. The pre- and postcorrection difference in FBA was statistically significant. Conclusion. Differential distraction by fixator for the correction of neglected idiopathic CTEV is an effective and patient-friendly method of management.

  3. Omnidirectional Gravitational Wave Detector with a Laser-Interferometric Gravitational Compass

    CERN Document Server

    Maia, M D; Sousa, Claudio M G; Magalhaes, Nadja S; Frajuca, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Based on the Szekeres-Pirani gravitational compass we suggest the addition of a fourth, non-coplanar mass/mirror to the presently existing laser based gravitational wave observatories, enabling them to operate omnidirectionally, to filter out ambiguous interpretations and to point out the direction of the gravitational wave source.

  4. Quasi-Hamiltonian description of classical spin

    CERN Document Server

    Matsyuk, Roman

    2015-01-01

    A family of Lagrange functions is considered, each producing the classical relativistic free spinning particle equation of motion of the third order. On this grounds a generalized Hamilton-Ostrohrads'kyj description of the free relativistic spherical top is proposed, which comply with the Pirani supplementary conditions.

  5. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_5b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 33,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  6. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_6b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 39,900 at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  7. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_1b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 12,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  8. Development of brush holder pressure gage for locomotive traction motor%机车牵引电机刷握压力电子检测仪的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单国庆

    2008-01-01

    对内燃机车牵引电机刷握压力检测误差大及检测精度低的原因进行了分析,介绍了新研制的机车牵引电机刷握压力电子检测仪的结构和特点.新检测仪提高了电机刷握压力检测的准确度,解决了内燃机车牵引电机刷握压力检测的工艺技术难题.

  9. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_3b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 21,450 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  10. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_7b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 46,800 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  11. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_8b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 62,300 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  12. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_4b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 27,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  13. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_2b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 15,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  14. Point Locations of 849 Continuous Record Streamflow Gages Used to Estmate Annual and Average Values of Water-Budget Components Based on Hydrograph Separation and PRISM Precipitation in the Appalachian Plateaus Region, 1900-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Groundwater Resources Program study of the Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, estimates of annual water-budget components were...

  15. DS-777 Spatial Location of Gages with Total Flow and estimated Base Flow, for the Predevelopment Simulation Period for the Northern High Plains Groundwater-Flow Model in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Baseflow is the portion of streamflow derived from groundwater flow. It is an important component of the groundwater budget, and can be estimated using known total...

  16. Genetic variants of immunoglobulin γ and κ chains influence humoral immunity to the cancer-testis antigen XAGE-1b (GAGED2a) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, J P; Namboodiri, A M; Ohue, Y; Oka, M; Nakayama, E

    2014-04-01

    GM (γ marker) allotypes, genetic variants of immunoglobulin γ chains, have been reported to be associated strongly with susceptibility to lung cancer, but the mechanism(s) underlying this association is not known. One mechanism could involve their contribution to humoral immunity to lung tumour-associated antigens. In this study, we aimed to determine whether particular GM and KM (κ marker) allotypes were associated with antibody responsiveness to XAGE-1b, a highly immunogenic lung tumour-associated cancer-testis antigen. Sera from 89 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were allotyped for eight GM and two KM determinants and characterized for antibodies to a synthetic XAGE-1b protein. The distribution of various GM phenotypes was significantly different between XAGE-1b antibody-positive and -negative patients (P = 0·023), as well as in the subgroup of XAGE-1b antigen-positive advanced NSCLC (P = 0·007). None of the patients with the GM 1,17 21 phenotype was positive for the XAGE-1b antibody. In patients with antigen-positive advanced disease, the prevalence of GM 1,2,17 21 was significantly higher in the antibody-positive group than in those who lacked the XAGE-1b antibody (P = 0·026). This phenotype also interacted with a particular KM phenotype: subjects with GM 1,2,17 21 and KM 3,3 phenotypes were almost four times (odds ratio = 3·8) as likely to be positive for the XAGE-1b antibody as the subjects who lacked these phenotypes. This is the first report presenting evidence for the involvement of immunoglobulin allotypes in immunity to a cancer-testis antigen, which has important implications for XAGE-1b-based immunotherapeutic interventions in lung adenocarcinoma.

  17. Tandem pressure measurements in a hostile environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, P. B.

    1981-03-01

    Both carbon gages and quartz gages were calibrated with gas guns utilizing thin flyers. Experiments are described which compare the response of the two types of gages to a nonplaner stress pulse generated by the detonation of an explosive, silver acetylide-silver nitrate. It was concluded from 18 pairs of gages tested at three impulse levels that detonation of the explosive at no less than 100 points square cm would produce equal peak stress currents from the two types of gages within 25 percent. Impulse derived by integrating the pressure time profile from the carbon gages mounted on quartz gages did not agree with ballistic pendulum impulse data, possibly because of early cracking of quartz beneath the carbon gage. However, similar integration of the pressure profile of carbon gages mounted on flat aluminum, extrapolated for long times along a theoretical curve, gave an impulse practically equal to the directly measured impulse.

  18. Extended Theories of Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatibene Lorenzo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of extended theories of gravitation we shall discuss physical equivalences among different formalisms and classical tests. As suggested by the Ehlers-Pirani-Schild framework, the conformal invariance will be preserved and its effect on observational protocols discussed. Accordingly, we shall review standard tests showing how Palatini f(R-theories naturally passes solar system tests. Observation protocols will be discussed in this wider framework.

  19. A Novel Vacuum Packaging Design Process for Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Quad-Mass Gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    axes, respectively. The drive mode is driven into forced vibration mode with a prescribed amplitude and angular frequency . The sense mode acts to...respectively. A DC constant-current bridge approach was implemented, instead of a DC constant- voltage bridge, to regulate current throughput through the die...when melting Superglue Ethyl cyanoacrylate Releases NOx , CO, CO2 when heated PTCD10 die Pirani gauge N/A QMG Silicon-based N/A The results for the

  20. Flood-frequency characteristics of Wisconsin streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, W.R.; Conger, D.H.; Gebert, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Flood-frequency characteristics for 269 gaged sites on Wisconsin streams are presented for recurrence intervals of 2 to 100 years. Annual flood peaks for the period of record for each gaged site are included.

  1. Microcomputer Checks Butt-Weld Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clisham, W.; Garner, W.; Cohen, C.; Beal, J.; Polen, R.; Lloyd, J.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical gage and microcomputer eliminate time-consuming manual measurements. Alinement and angle of plates on either side of butt weld are measured and recorded automatically by hand-held gage and desk-top microcomputer. Gage/micro-computer quickly determine whether weld is within dimensional tolerances or whether reworking is needed. Microcomputer prints out measurements while operator moves gage from point to point along weld. Out-of-tolerance measurements are marked by an asterisk on printout.

  2. Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle Procedures Guides: Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    can open and close fully and locks in both OPEN and CLOSED positions. 8. Check that safety pin is not missing. Internal fire suppression handles 9...that safety pin is not missing. Driver’s instrument panel 19. Check VOLTS gage. 20. Check ENGINE COOLANT TEMP gage. 21. Check ENGINE OIL gage. 22

  3. Instrumentation of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Div.; Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship, D.A.; DeYonge, W.F.; Schiermeister, D.M. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Baird, G.T. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories had the responsibility for the experimental activities at the WIPP and fielded several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The instrumentation of these tests involved the placement of over 4,200 gages including room closure gages, borehole extensometers, stress gages, borehole inclinometers, fixed reference gages, borehole strain gages, thermocouples, thermal flux meters, heater power gages, environmental gages, and ventilation gages. Most of the gages were remotely read instruments that were monitored by an automated data acquisition system, but manually read instruments were also used to provide early deformation information and to provide a redundancy of measurement for the remote gages. Instruments were selected that could operate in the harsh environment of the test rooms and that could accommodate the ranges of test room responses predicted by pretest calculations. Instruments were tested in the field prior to installation at the WIPP site and were modified to improve their performance. Other modifications were made to gages as the TSI tests progressed using knowledge gained from test maintenance. Quality assurance procedures were developed for all aspects of instrumentation including calibration, installation, and maintenance. The instrumentation performed exceptionally well and has produced a large quantity of quality information.

  4. High-temperature Strain Sensor and Mounting Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W. Dan; Lei, Jih-Fen; Reardon, Lawrence F.; Krake, Keith; Lemcoe, M. M.; Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, Thomas C., Sr.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes Government Work Package Task 29 (GWP29), whose purpose was to develop advanced strain gage technology in support of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) Program. The focus was on advanced resistance strain gages with a temperature range from room temperature to 2000 F (1095 C) and on methods for reliably attaching these gages to the various materials anticipated for use in the NASP program. Because the NASP program required first-cycle data, the installed gages were not prestabilized or heat treated on the test coupons before first-cycle data were recorded. NASA Lewis Research Center, the lead center for GWP29, continued its development of the palladium-chromium gage; NASA Langley Research Center investigated a new concept gage using Kanthal A1; and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center chose the well-known BCL-3 iron-chromium-aluminum gage. Each center then tested all three gages. The parameters investigated were apparent strain, drift strain, and gage factor as a function of temperature, plus gage size and survival rate over the test period. Although a significant effort was made to minimize the differences in test equipment between the three test sites (e.g., the same hardware and software were used for final data processing), the center employed different data acquisition systems and furnace configurations so that some inherent differences may be evident in the final results.

  5. O encéfalo de Phineas Gage: Contribuição da neuropsicologia para a compreensão das alterações cognitivas, psicopatológicas e do processo de tomada de decisão em indivíduos com traumatismo crânio-encefálico

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Dissertação de Mestrado em Psicopatologia e Psicologia Clínica Nesta dissertação apresenta-se uma investigação sobre as alterações neurocomportamentais, psicopatológicas e no processo de tomada de decisões pessoais e sociais após a ocorrência de um Traumatismo Crânio-Encefálico (T.C.E.). Os T.C.E. constituem uma epidemia silenciosa que incapacita milhares de indivíduos anualmente em todo o mundo. As suas alterações "neurológicas" são bem conhecidas, mas as suas alterações "psicológicas"...

  6. DS-777 Spatial Location of Gages with Total Flow and estimated Base Flow, organized by Seasonal Stress Periods for the Development Simulation Period for the Northern High Plains Groundwater-Flow Model in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Baseflow is the portion of streamflow derived from groundwater flow. It is an important component of the groundwater budget, and can be estimated using known total...

  7. O encéfalo de Phineas Gage: Contribuição da neuropsicologia para a compreensão das alterações cognitivas, psicopatológicas e do processo de tomada de decisão em indivíduos com traumatismo crânio-encefálico

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, Maria Aparecida Gonçalves

    1999-01-01

    Dissertação de Mestrado em Psicopatologia e Psicologia Clínica Nesta dissertação apresenta-se uma investigação sobre as alterações neurocomportamentais, psicopatológicas e no processo de tomada de decisões pessoais e sociais após a ocorrência de um Traumatismo Crânio-Encefálico (T.C.E.). Os T.C.E. constituem uma epidemia silenciosa que incapacita milhares de indivíduos anualmente em todo o mundo. As suas alterações "neurológicas" são bem conhecidas, mas as suas alterações "psicológicas"...

  8. Comparison of Ponseti and Kite′s method of treatment for idiopathic clubfoot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rijal Raju

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The manipulation and corrective cast application for club foot was known to be done by Kite′s method. The Kite′s method of manipulation (center of rotation of malaligned foot and fulcrum on cuboid was modified by Ponseti (fulcrum on head of talus. Recently, Ponseti′s method has gained popularity and vastly improved results are reported. We report randomized controlled trial where manipulation of club foot was done by Ponseti′s and Kite′s method and correction evaluated by Pirani score to compare the outcome of treatment. Materials and Methods: Sixty feet in 38 patients, 22 with bilateral and 16 with unilateral clubfeet in children less than two years of age and without any prior manipulation or surgical treatment were randomly allocated to the Ponseti (30 feet and Kite (30 feet methods of manipulation. This process resulted in the right and left feet of the same patient in 12 bilateral cases being compared with one another (Paired analysis. In the remaining 10 bilateral cases, four patients had both feet treated by Ponseti and six had both feet treated by Kite (unpaired analysis. Finally, in 16 unilateral cases, 10 feet were allocated to the Ponseti and six to Kite methods of manipulation (unpaired analysis. Feet were followed up weekly for 10 weeks for change of cast and recording of hindfoot, midfoot and total Pirani scores. Correction was measured as a difference between hindfoot, mid foot and total Pirani scores weekly from weeks 1 to 10 and corresponding baseline scores. Absolute correction and rate of correction in (i bilateral clubfeet treated by Ponseti′s method on one side and Kite′s method on the other side in the same patient were compared using paired Student′s t test and (ii patients with unilateral clubfoot (where either of the methods was used or those with bilateral clubfoot (where both feet treated by either of the two methods on both the sides were compared using difference between means (mean

  9. Pembuatan Sistem Instrumentasi dan Kendali (SIK Kevakuman dan Sistem Pewaktu Proses Nitridasi Plasma Menggunakan Super PLC T100MD1616+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashar Punto Nurwendo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Bidang Teknologi Akselerator dan Fisika Nuklir (BTAFN Pusat Teknologi Akselerator dan Proses Bahan (PTAPB BATAN Yogyakarta mengembangkan mesin nitridasi plasma untuk menambah tingkat kekerasan permukaan logam dan meningkatkan ketahanan aus serta tahan korosi. Mesin nitridasi plasma tersebut masih dioperasikan secara manual. Sistem Instrumentasi dan Kendali (SIK Kevakuman dan Sistem Pewaktu Proses Nitridasi Plasma dibuat agar mesin nitridasi plasma dapat dioperasikan secara otomatis. Sistem instrumentasi dan kendali ini menggunakan Super PLC T100MD1616+ sebagai pusat kontrol dan terdiri dari sistem akuisisi data tekanan gas dan sistem kendali regulator gas N2. Sistem akuisisi data tekanan gas menggunakan sensor Pirani PRL 10 K dan Vacuum Meter Pirani 1001 untuk memantau perubahan tekanan gas di dalam bejana nitridasi plasma. Pengolahan data hasil akuisisi data tekanan gas dilakukan dengan menggunakan metode lookup table. Nilai tekanan gas yang dihasilkan oleh sistem akuisisi data tekanan gas digunakan sebagai umpan balik (feedback untuk sistem kendali tekanan gas.Kendali tekanan gas diatur oleh regulator gas N2 dengan menggunakan stepper motor sebagai aktuator. Sistem Instrumentasi dan Kendali Kevakuman dapat mengontrol kestabilan tekanan gas yang dibutuhkan pada proses nitridasi plasma. Sistem pewaktu proses digunakan untuk mengatur durasi proses nitridasi plasma. Dengan dibuatnya Sistem Instrumentasi dan Kendali (SIK Kevakuman dan Sistem Pewaktu Proses Nitridasi Plasma, pengguna dimudahkan dalam mengoperasikan mesin dan dapat meningkatkan kualitas hasil proses nitridasi plasma. Kata kunci— Nitridasi Plasma, tekanan gas,  PLC, pirani, pengkondisi sinyal, stepper motor.   Abstract Accelerator Technology and Nuclear Physics Division (BTAFN of the Center for Accelerator Technology and Material Process (PTAPB BATAN Yogyakarta develops plasma nitridation machinery to increase surface hardness, wear resistance and corrosion resistance of

  10. National transonic facility Mach number system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, F. A.; Knight, C. W.; Zasimowich, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Mach number system for the Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility was designed to measure pressures to determine Mach number to within + or - 0.002. Nine calibration laboratory type fused quartz gages, four different range gages for the total pressure measurement, and five different range gages for the static pressure measurement were used to satisfy the accuracy requirement over the 103,000-890,000 Pa total pressure range of the tunnel. The system which has been in operation for over 1 year is controlled by a programmable data process controller to select, through the operation of solenoid valves, the proper range fused quartz gage to maximize the measurement accuracy. The pressure gage's analog outputs are digitized by the process controller and transmitted to the main computer for Mach number computation. An automatic two-point on-line calibration of the nine quartz gages is provided using a high accuracy mercury manometer.

  11. Anticholinesterase activity evaluation of alkaloids and coumarin from stems of Conchocarpus fontanesianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo S. Cabral

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Conchocarpus fontanesianus (A. St.-Hill. Kallunki & Pirani, Rutaceae, popularly known as pitaguará, is a native and endemic tree from São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro States, Brazil. Based in the information that anticholinesterasic derivatives could act as new prototypes to treatment of Alzheimer disease, this work describes the fractionation guided by evaluation of the anticholinesterase activity of the ethanolic stems extract from C. fontanesianus. This procedure afforded the alkaloids dictamnine (1, γ-fagarine (2, skimianine (3, and 2-phenyl-1-methyl-4-quinolone (4, as well as the coumarin marmesin (5.

  12. On a Representation of Mathisson-Papaetrou-Dixon Equations in the Kerr Metric

    CERN Document Server

    Plyatsko, Roman; Fenyk, Mykola

    2011-01-01

    New representation of the exact Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations at the Mathisson-Pirani condition in the Kerr metric which does not contain the third-order derivatives of the coordinates of a spinning particle is obtained. For this purpose the integrals of energy and angular momentum of the spinning particle as well as a differential relationship following from the Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations are used. The form of these equations is adapted for their computer integration with the aim of further investigations of the influence of the spin-curvature interaction on the particle's behavior in the gravitational field without restrictions on its velocity and spin orientation.

  13. Os gêneros Zanthoxylum L. e Esenbeckia Kunth (Rutaceae) no Estado de Pernambuco, Brasil The genera Zanthoxylum L. and Esenbeckia Kunth (Rutaceae) in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Maria de Fátima Figueiredo Melo; Carmen Sílvia Zickel

    2004-01-01

    Este trabalho consiste no levantamento das espécies dos gêneros Zanthoxylum e Esenbeckia ocorrentes em Pernambuco. Foi baseado nos caracteres morfológicos das espécies obtidas em campo e nos materiais de 16 herbários brasileiros. Foram registradas nove espécies de Zanthoxylum: Z. caribaeum Lam., Z. fagara (L.) Sarg., Z. gardneri Engl., Z. hamadryadicum Pirani, Z. monogynum A. St.-Hil., Z. petiolare A. St.-Hil & Tul., Z. rhoifolium Lam., Z. stelligerum Turcz. e Z. syncarpum Tul. Para Esenbecki...

  14. Os gêneros Zanthoxylum L. e Esenbeckia Kunth (Rutaceae) no Estado de Pernambuco, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Melo,Maria de Fátima Figueiredo; Zickel,Carmen Sílvia

    2004-01-01

    Este trabalho consiste no levantamento das espécies dos gêneros Zanthoxylum e Esenbeckia ocorrentes em Pernambuco. Foi baseado nos caracteres morfológicos das espécies obtidas em campo e nos materiais de 16 herbários brasileiros. Foram registradas nove espécies de Zanthoxylum: Z. caribaeum Lam., Z. fagara (L.) Sarg., Z. gardneri Engl., Z. hamadryadicum Pirani, Z. monogynum A. St.-Hil., Z. petiolare A. St.-Hil & Tul., Z. rhoifolium Lam., Z. stelligerum Turcz. e Z. syncarpum Tul. Para Esenb...

  15. The memory effect for plane gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.-M.; Duval, C.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horvathy, P. A.

    2017-09-01

    We give an account of the gravitational memory effect in the presence of the exact plane wave solution of Einstein's vacuum equations. This allows an elementary but exact description of the soft gravitons and how their presence may be detected by observing the motion of freely falling particles. The theorem of Bondi and Pirani on caustics (for which we present a new proof) implies that the asymptotic relative velocity is constant but not zero, in contradiction with the permanent displacement claimed by Zel'dovich and Polnarev. A non-vanishing asymptotic relative velocity might be used to detect gravitational waves through the ;velocity memory effect;, considered by Braginsky, Thorne, Grishchuk, and Polnarev.

  16. 77 FR 64465 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the United Arab Emirates: Final Affirmative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ....D. and 0.165 inch wall thickness (gage 8) 4.000 inch O.D. and 0.148 inch wall thickness (gage 9) 4.000 inch O.D. and 0.165 inch wall thickness (gage 8) 4.500 inch O.D. and 0.203 inch wall thickness... Industries LLC All-Others 4.12 In accordance with section 705(c)(1)(C) of the Act, we are directing...

  17. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, 2013 water year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Arin J.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Kansas Water Science Center (KSWSC), in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring gages in the State of Kansas. These include 195 real-time streamflow-gaging stations (herein gages) and 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations. These data and associated analysis, accumulated for many years, provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve our understanding of our water resources.

  18. Engineering and Design: Ice-Influenced Flood Stage Frequency Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-31

    ETL 1110-2-325 31Ju1 91 freezeup jams, formed by the collection of pieces of floating ice during the pe- riods of relatively steady flow experienced...the potential for gage freezeup because of cold weather, ice effects on the gage rat- ing curve, the location of the gage relative to the ice...project, it may be necessary to split the sample population into two or more subsets, such as open water, freezeup , solid ice cover, and breakup. (1

  19. Tensile Deformation and Adiabatic Heating in Post-Yield Response of Polycarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    strain histories for max and gage length and b) stress-strain behavior of PC at intermediate rate for max and gage length 8 3.4 Rate Effects on... frame . To determine the variations in yield and post-yield response at different locations of the gage area of the specimen, digital image...significant rate-sensitive mechanical response. 15. SUBJECT TERMS polycarbonate, tension, rate effects , thermal, heating 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  20. Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 3. Colorado River basin, Lavaca River basin, Guadalupe River basin, Nueces River basin, Rio Grande basin, and intervening coastal basins. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Volume 3 contains records for water discharge at 110 gaging stations; stage only at 1 gaging station; stage and contents at 12 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 53 gaging stations; and data for 38 partial-record stations comprised of 9 flood-hydrograph, 17 low-flow, and 12 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations.

  1. Deterministic and Stochastic Wavefield in the Near-Field from Explosive Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-03

    were placed. The gage cannisters were placed in boreholes and then filled with uniformly rained sand. The emplacement of gages within drill holes is a... Spallation and the generation of surface waves by an underground explosion, J. Geophys. Res. 78, 2475- 2487. Werth, G. C. and R. F. Herbst (1963...first number next to each gage is the spell dwell time in as and the number in parenthesis is the velocity at spallation C in c/s. 23 Figure 9: The three

  2. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Handling Efficiency Improvement Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project determined specific performance metrics and discrete technology development goals with which to gage proposed investments in ground propellant systems...

  3. Real-time, continuous water-quality monitoring in Indiana and Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Megan E.; Lathrop, Timothy R.; Risch, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Water-quality “super” gages (also known as “sentry” gages) provide real-time, continuous measurements of the physical and chemical characteristics of stream water at or near selected U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgages in Indiana and Kentucky. A super gage includes streamflow and water-quality instrumentation and representative stream sample collection for laboratory analysis. USGS scientists can use statistical surrogate models to relate instrument values to analyzed chemical concentrations at a super gage. Real-time, continuous and laboratory-analyzed concentration and load data are publicly accessible on USGS Web pages.

  4. Identifying streamgage networks for maximizing the effectiveness of regional water balance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, L. M.; Hunter, T. S.; Phanikumar, M. S.; Fortin, V.; Gronewold, A. D.

    2013-05-01

    One approach to regional water balance modeling is to constrain rainfall-runoff models with a synthetic regionalized hydrologic response. For example, the Large Basin Runoff Model (LBRM), a cornerstone of hydrologic forecasting in the Laurentian Great Lakes basin, was calibrated to a synthetic discharge record resulting from a drainage area ratio method (ARM) for extrapolating beyond gaged areas. A challenge of such approaches is the declining availability of observations for development of synthetic records. To advance efficient use of the declining gage network in the context of regional water balance modeling, we present results from an assessment of ARM. All possible combinations of "most-downstream" gages were used to simulate runoff at the gaged outlet of Michigan's Clinton River watershed in order to determine the influence of gages' drainage area and other physical characteristics on model skill. For nearly all gage combinations, ARM simulations resulted in good model skill. However, the gages' catchment area relative to that of the outlet's catchment is not an unquestionable predictor of model performance. Results indicate that combinations representing less than 30% of the total catchment area (less than 10% in some cases) can provide very good discharge simulations, but that similarity of the gaged catchments' developed and cultivated area, stream density, and permeability relative to the outlet's catchment is also important for successful simulations. Recognition of thresholds on the relationship between the number of gages and their relative value in simulating flow over large area provides an opportunity for improving historical records for regional hydrologic modeling.

  5. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain using four connecting wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Allen R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new signal-conditioning technique for measuring strain and temperature which uses fewer connecting wires than conventional techniques. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain has been achieved by using thermocouple wire to connect strain gages to signal conditioning. This signal conditioning uses a new method for demultiplexing sampled analog signals and the Anderson current loop circuit. Theory is presented along with data to confirm that strain gage resistance change is sensed without appreciable error because of thermoelectric effects. Furthermore, temperature is sensed without appreciable error because of voltage drops caused by strain gage excitation current flowing through the gage resistance.

  6. Myocardial wall-thickness transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H.

    1976-01-01

    Device consists of highly compliant circular beam attached to piezoresistive strain gage and barbed needle. Radial deflection of myocardium is measured with minimal disturbance of normal heart functions.

  7. Management of Congenital Talipes Equino Varus (CTEV by Ponseti Casting Technique in Neonates: Our Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Md Noor-ul Ferdous

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of Ponseti technique in the management of congenital Talipes Equino Varus (CTEV in neonatal age group. Methods: It is a prospective observational study, conducted during the period of July 2010 to December 2011 at the Department of Pediatric Surgery in a tertiary hospital. All the neonates with CTEV were treated with Ponseti casting technique. Neonates with other congenital deformities, arthrogryposis and myelomeningocele were excluded.Results: Total 58 CTEV feet of 38 neonates were treated. Twenty six were males and 12 were females. Thirty seven (63.8% feet were of rigid variety and 21(36.2 % feet were of non-rigid variety. Twenty patients had bilateral and 18 had unilateral involvement. Mean pre-treatment Pirani score of study group was 5.57. Mean number of plaster casts required per CTEV was 3.75 (range: 2-6. Thirty five rigid and 15 non-rigid (total 86.2% feet required percutaneous tenotomy. Out of 58 feet 56 (96.6% were managed successfully. Three (5.2% patients developed complications like skin excoriation and blister formation. Mean post-treatment Pirani score of the study group was: 0.36 ± 0.43. Conclusion: The Ponseti technique is an excellent, simple, effective, minimally invasive, and inexpensive procedure for the treatment CTEV deformity. Ideally it can be performed as a day case procedure without general anesthesia even in neonatal period.

  8. Management of Congenital Talipes Equino Varus (CTEV by Ponseti Casting Technique in Neonates: Our Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saif Ullah

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of Ponseti technique in the management of congenital Talipes Equino Varus (CTEV in neonatal age group.Methods: It is a prospective observational study, conducted during the period of July 2010 to December 2011 at the Department of Pediatric Surgery in a tertiary hospital. All the neonates with CTEV were treated with Ponseti casting technique. Neonates with other congenital deformities, arthrogryposis and myelomeningocele were excluded.Results: Total 58 CTEV feet of 38 neonates were treated. Twenty six were males and 12 were females. Thirty seven (63.8% feet were of rigid variety and 21(36.2 % feet were of non-rigid variety. Twenty patients had bilateral and 18 had unilateral involvement. Mean pre-treatment Pirani score of study group was 5.57. Mean number of plaster casts required per CTEV was 3.75 (range: 2-6. Thirty five rigid and 15 non-rigid (total 86.2% feet required percutaneous tenotomy. Out of 58 feet 56 (96.6% were managed successfully. Three (5.2% patients developed complications like skin excoriation and blister formation. Mean post-treatment Pirani score of the study group was: 0.36 ± 0.43.Conclusion: The Ponseti technique is an excellent, simple, effective, minimally invasive, and inexpensive procedure for the treatment CTEV deformity. Ideally it can be performed as a day case procedure without general anesthesia even in neonatal period.

  9. Fiber Bragg grating sensors for real-time monitoring of evacuation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guru Prasad, A. S.; Hegde, Gopalkrishna M.; Asokan, S.

    2010-03-01

    Fiber bragg grating (FBG) sensors have been widely used for number of sensing applications like temperature, pressure, acousto-ultrasonic, static and dynamic strain, refractive index change measurements and so on. Present work demonstrates the use of FBG sensors in in-situ measurement of vacuum process with simultaneous leak detection capability. Experiments were conducted in a bell jar vacuum chamber facilitated with conventional Pirani gauge for vacuum measurement. Three different experiments have been conducted to validate the performance of FBG sensor in monitoring vacuum creating process and air bleeding. The preliminary results of FBG sensors in vacuum monitoring have been compared with that of commercial Pirani gauge sensor. This novel technique offers a simple alternative to conventional method for real time monitoring of evacuation process. Proposed FBG based vacuum sensor has potential applications in vacuum systems involving hazardous environment such as chemical and gas plants, automobile industries, aeronautical establishments and leak monitoring in process industries, where the electrical or MEMS based sensors are prone to explosion and corrosion.

  10. Robust hermetic packaging techniques for MEMS integrated microsystems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Junseok (University of Michigan); Stark, Brian H. (University of Michigan); Kuo, Andrew (University of Michigan); Oliver, Andrew David; Najafi, Khalil (University of Michigan)

    2005-03-01

    This work is the result of a Sandia National Laboratories LDRD funded fellowship at the University of Michigan. Although, guidance and suggestions were offered by Sandia, the work contained here is primarily the work of Brian H. Stark, and his advisor, Professor Khalil Najafi. Junseok Chae, Andrew Kuo, and their coworkers at the University of Michigan helped to record some of the data. The following is an abstract of their work. We have developed a vacuum packaging technology using a thick nickel film to seal MEMS structures at the wafer level. The package is fabricated in a three-mask process by electroplating a 40 micro-meter thick nickel film over an 8 micro-meter sacrificial photoresist that is removed prior to package sealing. Implementation of electrical feedthroughs in this process requires no planarization. The large release channel enables an 800x800 micro-meter package to be released in less than three hours. Several mechanisms, based upon localized melting and lead/tin solder bumping, for sealing the release channel have been investigated. We have also developed Pirani gauges, integrated with this package, which can be used to establish the hermeticity of the different sealing technologies. They have measured a sealing pressure of approximately 1.5 Torr. Our work differs from previous Pirani gauges in that we utilize a novel doubly anchored structure that stiffens the structural membrane while not substantially degrading performance in order to measure fine leak rates.

  11. Novel dielectric reduces corona breakdown in ac capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehner, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Dielectric system was developed which consists of two layers of 25-gage paper separated by one layer of 50-gage polypropylene to reduce corona breakdown in ac capacitors. System can be used in any alternating current application where constant voltage does not exceed 400 V rms. With a little research it could probably be increased to 700 to 800 V rms.

  12. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.E.; Thomas, D.G.

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  13. Basin Centroid Points for Unregulated Streamgagages in and near West Virginia 1930-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Correlation of flows at pairs of streamgages were evaluated using a Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient to better identify gages that can be used as index gages...

  14. Streamflow Correlation Map Grids in and near West Virginia 1930-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Correlation of flows at pairs of streamgages were evaluated using a Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient to better identify gages that can be used as index gages...

  15. An Application of Signal Analysis and Pattern Recognition to Study a Simple Ground Motion Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    via Visual Examination 40 Table 4. List of Features 41 Table 5. Basic Studies - Prediction Results 43 Table 6. Single Feature Study - Prediction Results...CCC CCC D -4-- CD0000 -~ - - z a -44 39- TABLE 3. POOR WAVEFORMS VIA VISUAL EXAMINATION Test/Gage Problem A304* bandedge A306 probable gage failure, TOA

  16. Stemcell Information: SKIP000875 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CR ... Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for...tudies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jiangsu Normal ...University--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovati... Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Ji

  17. 29 CFR 1910.94 - Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... A pressure gage shall be installed to show the pressure drop across the filters. This gage shall be marked to show the pressure drop at which the filters require cleaning or replacement. Filters shall be..., repairs shall be made as soon as possible. (b) The static pressure drop at the exhaust ducts leading...

  18. Finding the Effective Mass and Spring Constant of a Force Probe from Simple Harmonic Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nathaniel R.; Gill, Tom; Eyerly, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Force probes are versatile tools in the physics lab, but their internal workings can introduce artifacts when measuring rapidly changing forces. The Dual-Range Force Sensor by Vernier uses strain gage technology to measure force, based on the bending of a beam. Strain gages along the length of the beam change resistance as the beam bends. The…

  19. Assessing plague risk and presence through surveys of small mammal flea communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. M. Friggens; P. L. Ford; R. R. Parmenter; M. Boyden; K. Gage

    2011-01-01

    Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, remains a threat to human and wildlife populations in the Western United States (Gage and Kosoy 2005). Several rodent species have been implicated as important maintenance hosts in the U.S., including Peromyscus maniculatus and Dipodomys spp. Fleas are a critical component of plague foci (Gage and Kosoy 2005)....

  20. Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison in Bismarck, North Dakota, from 1988 through 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, Karen R.; Emerson, Douglas G.; Macek-Rowland, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    A solid precipitation measurement intercomparison was recommended by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and was initiated after approval by the ninth session of the Commission for Instruments and Methods of Observation. The goal of the intercomparison was to assess national methods of measuring solid precipitation against methods whose accuracy and reliability were known. A field study was started in Bismarck, N. Dak., during the 1988-89 winter as part of the intercomparison. The last official field season of the WMO intercomparison was 1992-93; however, the Bismarck site continued to operate through the winter of 1996-97. Precipitation events at Bismarck were categorized as snow, mixed, or rain on the basis of descriptive notes recorded as part of the solid precipitation intercomparison. The rain events were not further analyzed in this study. Catch ratios (CRs) - the ratio of the precipitation catch at each gage to the true precipitation measurement (the corrected double fence intercomparison reference) - were calculated. Then, regression analysis was used to develop equations that model the snow and mixed precipitation CRs at each gage as functions of wind speed and temperature. Wind speed at the gages, functions of temperature, and upper air conditions (wind speed and air temperature at 700 millibars pressure) were used as possible explanatory variables in the multiple regression analysis done for this study. The CRs were modeled by using multiple regression analysis for the Tretyakov gage, national shielded gage, national unshielded gage, AeroChem gage, national gage with double fence, and national gage with Wyoming windshield. As in earlier studies by the WMO, wind speed and air temperature were found to influence the CR of the Tretyakov gage. However, in this study, the temperature variable represented the average upper air temperature over the duration of the event. The WMO did not use upper air conditions in its analysis. The national shielded and

  1. Numerical Analysis of a Radiant Heat Flux Calibration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanjuan; Horn, Thomas J.; Dhir, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    A radiant heat flux gage calibration system exists in the Flight Loads Laboratory at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. This calibration system must be well understood if the heat flux gages calibrated in it are to provide useful data during radiant heating ground tests or flight tests of high speed aerospace vehicles. A part of the calibration system characterization process is to develop a numerical model of the flat plate heater element and heat flux gage, which will help identify errors due to convection, heater element erosion, and other factors. A 2-dimensional mathematical model of the gage-plate system has been developed to simulate the combined problem involving convection, radiation and mass loss by chemical reaction. A fourth order finite difference scheme is used to solve the steady state governing equations and determine the temperature distribution in the gage and plate, incident heat flux on the gage face, and flat plate erosion. Initial gage heat flux predictions from the model are found to be within 17% of experimental results.

  2. Effectiveness of modified ankle foot orthosis of low-temperature thermoplastics in idiopathic congenital talipes equino varus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Punita Vasant; Sheth, Binoti Arun; Poduval, Murali; Sams, Stephen Brian Austin

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to study the effectiveness of modified ankle foot orthosis fabricated from low-temperature thermoplastics, as an alternative orthosis for the maintenance of correction in idiopathic congenital talipes equino varus (CTEV) deformity. The study was conducted in infants after the completion of the Ponseti serial manipulation and cast treatment, with or without, percutaneous Achilles tenotomy. Both male and female infants with unilateral or bilateral CTEV deformity were included in our study. A custom-made modified ankle foot orthosis was fabricated on the day of the removal of the last plaster of Paris cast. Initial clinical assessment, including medical history, Pirani score, modified Dimeglio score, clinical method of evaluating tibial torsion, ankle and foot range of motion were carried out on the day of the fabrication of the orthosis. Follow-up assessments were carried out at regular intervals for a duration of 6 months. All infants were provided with a set of exercises in the outpatient department three to five times per week, and other sessions were carried out by the caregivers in the form of home exercise programmes, daily every 2 h. In our study, we had 40 infants. Of these, 12 were lost to follow-up. The remaining 28 infants (22 males and six females) were included in the study. Of the 28 infants, six were left sided, seven were right sided and 15 were bilateral cases. The age at which cast treatment was initiated ranged from 1 week to 8 months, and the age at which modified ankle foot orthosis was given ranged from 1 month 1 week to 15 months. The average number of plaster of Paris casts given was six. Sixteen infants required tenotomy. We found that there was a significant reduction in the Pirani and modified Dimeglio scores from baseline to the third and to the sixth months, that is, improvement and/or maintenance of the baseline scores of Pirani and modified Dimeglio was observed (P0.05). The difference was independent of the

  3. Integrated High-Fidelity CFD/FE FSI Code Development and Benchmark Full-Scale Validation EFD for Slamming Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-30

    stainless steel "skeleton", Fig. 2, which is well suited to mount accelerometers to and measure "rigid body" accelerations. Two of these "rigid body...Strain gage locations. Left: strain gages on composites sandwich bottom panels. Right: strain gages on stainless steel skeleton. Arrows indicate...bottom panel in bay 4. A slam occurred at 0.6 s; the question is happened just after 0.5 s. An FFT ofthe signal, Fig. 19, does not appear to reveal

  4. Stemcell Information: SKIP000867 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jiangsu Normal U...niversity--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovatio...Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jia...ngsu Normal University--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborat...nstitute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jun Yao--Fred H. Gage Jun Yao--Fred H. Gage Information Only Jiangsu Collabor

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000868 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jiangsu Normal U...niversity--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovatio...Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jia...ngsu Normal University--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborat...nstitute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jun Yao--Fred H. Gage Jun Yao--Fred H. Gage Information Only Jiangsu Collabor

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP000866 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jiangsu Normal U...niversity--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovatio...Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jia...ngsu Normal University--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborat...nstitute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jun Yao--Fred H. Gage Jun Yao--Fred H. Gage Information Only Jiangsu Collabor

  7. Stemcell Information: SKIP000869 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jiangsu Normal U...niversity--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovatio...Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jia...ngsu Normal University--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborat...nstitute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jun Yao--Fred H. Gage Jun Yao--Fred H. Gage Information Only Jiangsu Collabor

  8. Results of solar testing of circular foil heat-flux sensors at the White Sands solar furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, B. L.

    1982-06-01

    A pair of circular foil heat flux sensors were tested against a Kendall radiometer. The gages are a form of the circular foil type in that a mirrored ellipsoidal cavity is positioned in front of the foil surface. A small diameter aperture is used to reduce convective losses and the susceptibility of the gage to handling damage. An error analysis performed on the data acquired during the five day test program, indicates that atmospheric conditions and limitations of the facility preclude the accurate comparison of the heat flux sensors to the Kendall radiometer. Details about the data acquisition, error analysis, and consideration about the proper gage calibration procedure are included.

  9. Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 1. Arkansas River basin, Red River basin, Sabine River basin, Neches River basin, Trinity River basin, and intervening coastal basins. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 112 gaging stations; stage only at 4 gaging stations; stage and contents at 34 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 76 gaging stations; and data for 15 partial-record stations comprised of 9 flood-hydrograph, 3 low-flow, and 3 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  10. Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 2. San Jacinto River basin, Brazos River basin, San Bernard River basin, and intervening coastal basins. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Volume 2 contains records for water discharge at 74 gaging stations; stage only at 6 gaging stations; stage and contents at 19 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 41 gaging stations; and data for 44 partial-record stations comprised of 18 flood-hydrograph, 10 low-flow, and 16 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  11. Shock Induced Starting of Gasdynamic Laser Nozzles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    Operating Frequency, Hertz y Ratio of Specific Heat at Constant Pressure to Specific Heat at Constant Volume Hg Mercury hir Measured Mercury Manometer Column...Heraeus type E-70 vacuum pump and measured with a mercury manometer . Minimum attainable pressure was approximately 2.0 inches of mercury absolute. The...P4/ . Atm Pressurization P I Bleed Valve P Valve Gage Atm Shutoff P4 Bleed Valve Valve P Gage Shutoff Valve P4 Gage P 1 Mercury Manometer 0-30 in Hg

  12. Extended Theories of Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatibene Lorenzo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Extended theories of gravitation are naturally singled out by an analysis inspired by the Ehelers-Pirani-Schild framework. In this framework the structure of spacetime is described by a Weyl geometry which is enforced by dynamics. Standard General Relativity is just one possible theory within the class of extended theories of gravitation. Also all Palatini f(R theories are shown to be extended theories of gravitation. This more general setting allows a more general interpretation scheme and more general possible couplings between gravity and matter. The definitions and constructions of extended theories will be reviewed. A general interpretation scheme will be considered for extended theories and some examples will be considered.

  13. New pyranoflavones and trypanocidal activity of compounds isolated from Conchocarpus heterophyllus; Piranoflavonas ineditas e atividades tripanocidas das substancias isoladas de Conchocarpus heterophyllus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrozin, Alessandra Regina Pepe; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; Fernandes, Joao Batista; Silva, Maria Fatima das Gracas Fernandes da [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: paulo@dq.ufscar.br; Albuquerque, Sergio de [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Analises Clinicas, Toxicologicas e Bromatologicas

    2008-07-01

    The phytochemical investigation of trypanocidal extracts from leaves and stems of Conchocarpus heterophyllus (A. St.-Hil.) Kallunki and Pirani (Rutaceae) afforded new pyranoflavones along with the known compounds flavone, 7-methoxyflavone, 5-hydroxyflavone, haplotusine, 1-methyl-2-phenyl-4-quinolone alkaloid, {beta}sitosterol, stigmasterol, and {beta}-sitosteryl benzoate. Their structures were established based on their spectral data. NMR data for the alkaloid haplotusine and the new pyranoflavones are described for the first time herein. These compounds were assayed on the tripomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Among them, haplotusine and 1-methyl-2-phenyl-4-quinolone showed moderate values of IC{sub 50} 136.9 and 144.9 {mu}M, respectively. (author)

  14. Frenkel electron on an arbitrary electromagnetic background and magnetic Zitterbewegung

    CERN Document Server

    Deriglazov, Alexei A

    2014-01-01

    We present Lagrangian which implies both necessary constraints and dynamical equations for position and spin of relativistic spin one-half particle. The model is consistent for any value of magnetic moment $\\mu$ and for arbitrary electromagnetic background. Our equations coincide with those of Frenkel in the approximation in which the latter have been obtained by Frenkel. Transition from approximate to exact equations yields two structural modifications of the theory. First, Frenkel condition on spin-tensor turns into the Pirani condition. Second, canonical momentum is no more proportional to velocity. Due to this, even when $\\mu=1$ (Frenkel case), the complete and approximate equations predict different behavior of spinning particle. The difference of momentum from velocity means extra contribution into spin-orbit interaction. To estimate the contribution, we found exact solution to complete equations for the case of uniform magnetic field. While BMT electron moves around the circle, our particle experiences...

  15. Inertia and gravitation the fundamental nature and structure of space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Pfister, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the phenomena of inertia and gravitation, one objective being to shed some new light on the basic laws of gravitational interaction and the fundamental nature and structures of spacetime. Chapter 1 is devoted to an extensive, partly new analysis of the law of inertia. The underlying mathematical and geometrical structure of Newtonian spacetime is presented from a four-dimensional point of view, and some historical difficulties and controversies - in particular the concepts of free particles and straight lines - are critically analyzed, while connections to projective geometry are also explored. The relativistic extensions of the law of gravitation and its intriguing consequences are studied in Chapter 2. This is achieved, following the works of Weyl, Ehlers, Pirani and Schild, by adopting a point of view of the combined conformal and projective structure of spacetime. Specifically, Mach’s fundamental critique of Newton’s concepts of ‘absolute space’ and ‘absolute time’ was a d...

  16. Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations in the Schwarzschild and Kerr backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyatsko, R. M.; Stefanyshyn, O. B.; Fenyk, M. T.

    2011-10-01

    A new representation, which does not contain the third-order derivatives of the coordinates, of the exact Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations, describing the motion of a spinning test particle, is obtained under the assumption of the Mathisson-Pirani condition in a Kerr background. For this purpose the integrals of energy and angular momentum of the spinning particle as well as a differential relationship following from the Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations are used. The form of these equations is adapted for their computer integration with the aim to investigate the influence of the spin-curvature interaction on the particle's behavior in the gravitational field without restrictions on its velocity and spin orientation. Some numerical examples for a Schwarzschild background are presented.

  17. Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations in the Schwarzschild and Kerr backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Plyatsko, Roman; Fenyk, Mykola

    2011-01-01

    A new representation, which does not contain the third-order derivatives of the coordinates, of the exact Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations, describing the motion of a spinning test particle, is obtained under the assumption of the Mathisson-Pirani condition in a Kerr background. For this purpose the integrals of energy and angular momentum of the spinning particle as well as a differential relationship following from the Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations are used. The form of these equations is adapted for their computer integration with the aim to investigate the influence of the spin-curvature interaction on the particle's behavior in the gravitational field without restrictions on its velocity and spin orientation. Some numerical examples for a Schwarzschild background are presented.

  18. Analogy between general relativity and electromagnetism for slowly moving particles in weak gravitational fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Edward G.

    1991-05-01

    Starting from the equations of general relativity, equations similar to those of electromagnetic theory are derived. It is assumed that the particles are slowly moving (v≪c), and the gravitational field is sufficiently weak that nonlinear terms in Einstein's field equations can be neglected. For static fields, the analogy to electrostatics and magnetostatics is very close. Results are compared with those of a previous derivation by Braginsky, Caves, and Thorne [Phys. Rev. D 15, 2047-2068 (1977)]. These results lead to very simple derivations of the Lense-Thirring precession [Phys. Z. 19, 156-163 (1918)] and the spin-curvature force of Papepetrou [Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 209, 248-258 (1951)] and Pirani [Acta Phys. Pol. 15, 389-405 (1956)].

  19. Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations in the Schwarzschild and Kerr backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plyatsko, R M; Stefanyshyn, O B; Fenyk, M T, E-mail: plyatsko@lms.lviv.ua [Pidstryhach Institute of Applied Problems in Mechanics and Mathematics, Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, 3-b Naukova Str., Lviv, 79060 (Ukraine)

    2011-10-07

    A new representation, which does not contain the third-order derivatives of the coordinates, of the exact Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations, describing the motion of a spinning test particle, is obtained under the assumption of the Mathisson-Pirani condition in a Kerr background. For this purpose the integrals of energy and angular momentum of the spinning particle as well as a differential relationship following from the Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations are used. The form of these equations is adapted for their computer integration with the aim to investigate the influence of the spin-curvature interaction on the particle's behavior in the gravitational field without restrictions on its velocity and spin orientation. Some numerical examples for a Schwarzschild background are presented.

  20. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Chemical Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Arunpama B.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional thermal conductivity gauges (e.g. Pirani gauges) lend themselves to applications such as leak detectors, or in gas chromatographs for identifying various gas species. However, these conventional gauges are physically large, operate at high power, and have a slow response time. A single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWNT)-based chemical sensing gauge relies on differences in thermal conductance of the respective gases surrounding the CNT as it is voltage-biased, as a means for chemical identification. Such a sensor provides benefits of significantly reduced size and compactness, fast response time, low-power operation, and inexpensive manufacturing since it can be batch-fabricated using Si integrated-circuit (IC) process technology.

  1. Mathisson's helical motions demystified

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, L Filipe O; Zilhão, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    The motion of spinning test particles in general relativity is described by Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations, which are undetermined up to a spin supplementary condition, the latter being today still an open question. The Mathisson-Pirani (MP) condition is known to lead to rather mysterious helical motions which have been deemed unphysical, and for this reason discarded. We show that these assessments are unfounded and originate from a subtle (but crucial) misconception. We discuss the kinematical explanation of the helical motions, and dynamically interpret them through the concept of hidden momentum, which has an electromagnetic analogue. We also show that, contrary to previous claims, the frequency of the helical motions coincides exactly with the zitterbewegung frequency of the Dirac equation for the electron.

  2. Superconductive silicon nanowires using gallium beam lithography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Michael David; Jarecki, Robert Leo,

    2014-01-01

    This work was an early career LDRD investigating the idea of using a focused ion beam (FIB) to implant Ga into silicon to create embedded nanowires and/or fully suspended nanowires. The embedded Ga nanowires demonstrated electrical resistivity of 5 m-cm, conductivity down to 4 K, and acts as an Ohmic silicon contact. The suspended nanowires achieved dimensions down to 20 nm x 30 nm x 10 m with large sensitivity to pressure. These structures then performed well as Pirani gauges. Sputtered niobium was also developed in this research for use as a superconductive coating on the nanowire. Oxidation characteristics of Nb were detailed and a technique to place the Nb under tensile stress resulted in the Nb resisting bulk atmospheric oxidation for up to years.

  3. Paul Weiss and the genesis of canonical quantization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickles, Dean; Blum, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the life and work of a figure who, we argue, was of primary importance during the early years of field quantisation and (albeit more indirectly) quantum gravity. A student of Dirac and Born, he was interned in Canada during the second world war as an enemy alien and after his release never seemed to regain a good foothold in physics, identifying thereafter as a mathematician. He developed a general method of quantizing (linear and non-linear) field theories based on the parameters labelling an arbitrary hypersurface. This method (the `parameter formalism' often attributed to Dirac), though later discarded, was employed (and viewed at the time as an extremely important tool) by the leading figures associated with canonical quantum gravity: Dirac, Pirani and Schild, Bergmann, DeWitt, and others. We argue that he deserves wider recognition for this and other innovations.

  4. A wafer-level vacuum package using glass-reflowed silicon through-wafer interconnection for nano/micro devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Joo-Young; Yoo, Seung-Hyun; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2012-07-01

    We propose a vacuum wafer-level packaging (WLP) process using glass-reflowed silicon via for nano/micro devices (NMDs). A through-wafer interconnection (TWIn) substrate with silicon vias and reflowed glass is introduced to accomplish a vertical feed-through of device. NMDs are fabricated in the single crystal silicon (SCS) layer which is formed on the TWIn substrate by Au eutectic bonding including Cr adhesion layer. The WLPof the devices is achieved with the capping glass wafer anodically bonded to the SCS layer. In order to demonstrate the successful hermetic packaging, we fabricated the micro-Pirani gauge in the SCS layer, and packaged it in the wafer-level. The vacuum level inside the packaging was measured to be 3.1 Torr with +/- 0.12 Torr uncertainty, and the packaging leakage was not detected during 24 hour after the packaging.

  5. Os gêneros Zanthoxylum L. e Esenbeckia Kunth (Rutaceae no Estado de Pernambuco, Brasil The genera Zanthoxylum L. and Esenbeckia Kunth (Rutaceae in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Figueiredo Melo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho consiste no levantamento das espécies dos gêneros Zanthoxylum e Esenbeckia ocorrentes em Pernambuco. Foi baseado nos caracteres morfológicos das espécies obtidas em campo e nos materiais de 16 herbários brasileiros. Foram registradas nove espécies de Zanthoxylum: Z. caribaeum Lam., Z. fagara (L. Sarg., Z. gardneri Engl., Z. hamadryadicum Pirani, Z. monogynum A. St.-Hil., Z. petiolare A. St.-Hil & Tul., Z. rhoifolium Lam., Z. stelligerum Turcz. e Z. syncarpum Tul. Para Esenbeckia foram verificadas cinco espécies: E. almawillia Kaastra, E. febrifuga (A. St.-Hil. Juss. ex Mart., E. garandiflora Mart., E. leiocarpa Engl. e E. pilocarpoides Kunth. Para reconhecimento das espécies são apresentadas chaves de identificação, descrições, ilustrações, distribuição geográfica, comentários e nomes vulgares.This work is a survey of the species of Zanthoxylum and Esenbeckia occuring in the State of Pernambuco. It was based on morphological characters of the species obtained during field trips and of specimens from 16 Brazilian herbaria. Nine species were recorded for Zanthoxylum: Z. caribaeum Lam., Z. fagara (L. Sarg., Z. gardneri Engl., Z. hamadryadicum Pirani, Z. monogynum A. St.-Hil., Z. petiolare A. St.-Hil & Tul., Z. rhoifolium Lam., Z. stelligerum Turcz., and Z. syncarpum Tul. Esenbeckia comprised five species: E. almawillia Kaastra, E. febrifuga (A. St.Hil. Juss. ex Mart., E. grandiflora Mart., E. leiocarpa Engl., and E. pilocarpoides Kunth. Identication keys, descriptions, ilustrations, geographic distribution, common names, and comments on the species are presented.

  6. WATSTORE Stream Flow Basin Characteristics File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Stream Flow Basin Characteristics file contains information about the drainage basins of selected USGS gaging stations. Data elements of this file were converted...

  7. Flow-Angle and Airspeed Sensor System (FASS) Using Flush-Mounted Hot-Films Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Micron-thin surface hot-film gages are used to develop flow-angle and airspeed sensor system (FASS). Unlike Pitot-static and other pressure-based devices, which...

  8. Composite Structure Monitoring using Direct Write Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Direct Write (DW) sensors deposited directly and precisely on to complex (3D) components are proposed. Sensors proposed include strain gages and thermocouples,...

  9. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 1:1,000,000-Scale Hydrographic Geodatabase of the United States - Conterminous United States 201403 FileGDB 10.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase contains streams, waterbodies and wetlands, streamflow gaging stations, and coastlines for the conterminous United States. The streams are...

  10. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 1:1,000,000-Scale Hydrographic Geodatabase of the United States - Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands 201403 FileGDB 10.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase contains streams, waterbodies and wetlands, streamflow gaging stations, and coastlines for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The streams are...

  11. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 1998 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Shaull; M. R. Alexander; R. P. Reynolds; C. T. McLean; R. P. Romero

    1999-02-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 19 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Caiion de Vane.

  12. U.S. Hourly Precipitation Data Publication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This publication contains hourly precipitation amounts obtained from recording rain gages located at National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and...

  13. Digital Data Sets of Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma, USGS OFR 99-463.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These geospatial data sets consist of precipitation stations used in a regional precipitation frequency analysis for Oklahoma. Data were used from precipitation gage...

  14. 16 CFR 1500.43a - Method of test for flashpoint of volatile flammable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (cooling) fluid is solid carbon dioxide (dry ice) and acetone. If the refrigerant charged cooling module is... test flame, are required. These flames may be fueled by piped gas service. A gage ring 4mm (5/32 in...

  15. Summary of Activities for Health Monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels Updated January 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skow, Miles G.

    2014-01-01

    This three year project (FY12-14) will design and demonstrate the ability of new Magnetic Stress Gages for the measurement of stresses on the inner diameter of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel overwrap.

  16. Surface-water data and statistics from U.S. Geological Survey data-collection networks in New Jersey on the World Wide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Robert G.; Watson, Kara M.; Chang, Ming; Nieswand, Steven P.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with other Federal, State, and local agencies, operates and maintains a variety of surface-water data-collection networks throughout the State of New Jersey. The networks include streamflow-gaging stations, low-flow sites, crest-stage gages, tide gages, tidal creststage gages, and water-quality sampling sites. Both real-time and historical surface-water data for many of the sites in these networks are available at the USGS, New Jersey District, web site (http://nj.usgs.gov/), and water-quality data are available at the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) web site (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/). These data are an important source of information for water managers, engineers, environmentalists, and private citizens.

  17. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 1:1,000,000-Scale Hydrographic Geodatabase of the United States - Hawaii 201403 FileGDB 10.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase contains streams, waterbodies and wetlands, streamflow gaging stations, and coastlines for Hawaii. The streams are incorporated into a geometric...

  18. Rating of new outlet structures for MacFarlane Reservoir

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Memorandum explaining the new work on the outlet structure at MacFarlane Reservoir. Flow measurements were taken at different staff gage elevations and this data is...

  19. Detection and location of metal fragments in the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. L.; Neuschaefer, R. W.

    1970-01-01

    Portable electronic device, based on the design of an eddy current gage, detects ferrous and nonferrous metal fragments. Device is more easily transported than X-ray equipment and does not present a radiation hazard.

  20. USGS data that is publicly available from their website

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data are mean daily discharge data at United States Geological Survey gages. Once column provides the date (mm/dd/yyyy) and the other column provides the mean...

  1. Finite element stress analysis of a compression mold. Final report. [Using SASL and WILSON codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watterson, C.E.

    1980-03-01

    Thermally induced stresses occurring in a compression mold during production molding were evaluated using finite element analysis. A complementary experimental stress analysis, including strain gages and thermocouple arrays, verified the finite element model under typical loading conditions.

  2. History of U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging on the Souris River in and near Minot, North Dakota, 1903–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kevin K.; Robinson, Steven M.

    2016-09-07

    The U.S. Geological Survey began collecting streamflow data, in cooperation with the North Dakota State Water Commission, on the Souris River in and near Minot, North Dakota, in April 1903. The gage was started up to better understand the water resources available in North Dakota. Currently (2016), water availability is still important as well as the flood monitoring and forecasting that has become an important component of this gage. Gage-height and streamflow data for the Souris River in and near Minot have been collected at five different streamgage locations during the years. This fact sheet describes the history of streamgaging (locations, gage-height data, and streamflow data) and flooding on the Souris River in and near Minot since 1903.

  3. Real Time River Forecasting Center Quantitative Precipitation Estimate

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Radar indicated-rain gage verified and corrected hourly precipitation estimate on a corrected ~4km HRAP grid. This archive contains hourly estimates of precipitation...

  4. River Forecasting Center Quantitative Precipitation Estimate Archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Radar indicated-rain gage verified and corrected hourly precipitation estimate on a corrected ~4km HRAP grid. This archive contains hourly estimates of precipitation...

  5. QA/QC Issues Related to Data From Volunteer Citizen Scientist Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, G. C.; Crimmins, M.; Vazquez, R.; Rupprecht, C.

    2007-12-01

    Earth science researchers increasingly are using field data gathered by volunteer citizen scientists, particularly where there is a need for dense or far-flung networks of instruments, or qualitative observations of environmental conditions (e.g., drought-caused plant stress, bird migration, spring ice break-up). Precipitation monitoring is a popular form of citizen science, with hundreds of local networks, and two regional networks - CoCoRaHS with observers in over 20 states, and RainLog, with over 1,200 observers in the Southwestern U.S. Dense networks of rain gages are especially valuable for capturing localized, convective storm events, with the data used for multiple purposes, including research, flood early warning, drought monitoring, and weather reporting. Researchers may be hesitant to use data collected by citizen scientists because of Quality Assurance/Quality Control issues associated with networks of volunteers. Gages vary in precision and accuracy, and citizen scientists have different levels of skill and experience. Backyard gages are not always ideally sited with respect to buildings and trees. Data entry issues include delays in reporting and input errors. Missing data are not only more prevalent than for official gages, the missing data are non-random. Spatial patterns of volunteers' gages reflect development patterns and socio-demographic factors, resulting in clusters and voids in gage distribution. Current interpolation methodologies do not handle these gage patterns well. RainLog is systematically quantifying these QA/QC issues, and where possible, developing procedures to mitigate them. Citizen scientists are kept informed and engaged and informed through a variety of web-based data visualization approaches. Automated monthly data reviews glean missing data and offer an opportunity to check outlier values. Various statistical approaches are used to estimate accuracy and precision for each gage. Finally, we are developing and implementing more

  6. Foreign Object Impact Design Criteria. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    obtained using strain gages and an ex- tensometer . The change in diameter is used to calculate Poisson’s ratio. The high strain rate tests are...with high resistance strain gages. For the through-the-thickness and torsion rod specimens, it is planned to use an ex- tensometer to measure...strength test is an attempt to classify damage to specimens in terms of an equivalent stress concentration factor. Holes and cracks will be machined in

  7. Power consumption and lumber yields for reduced-kerf circular saws cutting hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald G. Cuppett

    1982-01-01

    Two 50-inch diameter headsaws were used for sawing (a) hardwood cants into boards, and (b) hardwood bolts into pallet parts. One saw had a 9x10 gage plate with 114-inch kerf teeth, and the other had a 7x8 gage plate with 9/32-inch kerf teeth. Power consumption for the two saws was determined with a watt-hour meter, measuring power used for paired cuts in 6-inch thick...

  8. Proceedings of the Ship Control Systems Symposium (5th), Held at U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland on October 30 - November 3, 1978. Volume 4,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-03

    gages having levels of severity marked in colors or with the use of alarm devices. Such devices, however, may be of little use beyond the...identification of problem areas and in a complex operation it is conceivable that a large number of gages, colors or alarms may be required. Step 3, the...induced motions and drift forces. P 4-33 REFERENCES (1) Ist IFAC/IFIP Symposium on Ship Operation Automation, Oslo, July 1973 (2) Semana Internacional sobre

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP000872 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Lang...s, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jiangsu Normal Unive...rsity--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Ce...ogical Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jiangsu

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP000870 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available RT-PCR Yes qRT-PCR ... Yes ... Yes RT-PCR ... Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jiangsu Collabor...ity--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Cent...er for Language Ability, Jiangsu Normal University--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collabo...ormal University--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative In

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP000873 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ing, RT-PCR Yes qRT-PCR ... Yes ... Yes RT-PCR ... Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jiangsu Collabor...iversity--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation...ry of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jian...gsu Normal University--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborati

  12. Stemcell Information: SKIP000871 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ens--Fred H. Gage Jerome Mertens--Fred H. Gage Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation C...lk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative...s, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jiangsu Normal Unive... of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jiangsu Normal University--The Sa...enter for Language Ability, Jiangsu Normal University--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory

  13. 各種トランスデューサによる衝撃荷重の測定における問題点

    OpenAIRE

    神宮, 利夫; 松本, 浩之; 根津, 紀久雄; 坂本, 賢治

    1988-01-01

    Transducers consisting of a strain gage or accelerometer and piezo-electric sensor are popular instruments used to evaluate dynamic response. Although the observation of transmitted strain by means of the strain gage method assures accuracy, it is not convenient to estimate the dynamic response of materials having a large cross-sectional area. On the other hand, there is little restriction in measuring of dynamic response using an accelerometer since it is small and light. It is easy to fabri...

  14. The Aluminum Ship Evaluation Model (ASEM) Static Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    0-.-SI -SO 0 3 9906 N -272 2 9996 179i s79 60071 8 -2 7’ 3 8975 -1 2 NN 779 063 9012611 059 -27 70 4890 3 -7 4 9 7794 779 IC 98181 -BSR 20. 72 2 8724...TABLE B.5 (Continued) P MAXIMUM MEASURED STRAIN .&MAIMUM. PREDICTED SYRAI. CAGE GAGE GAGE IASSUMES MEASIIXCO P MOMENT PRECICTEG PRED IEC OMN MEASUE 662

  15. International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering (2nd) Held in Rolla, Missouri on 1-5 June 1988. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-30

    standard special measures. These included application references ( Coraing et al, 1975) by assuming of straw or fleece to the exposed ground to that the...of the upper floors of the taller 2. Determine which part of the system is structures will be compensated, since each critical, wall will be plumbed...footings, strain gages were mounted on two columns within the taller The loading information noted previously refers building core area. These gages

  16. Mount St. Helens Project. Cowlitz River Levee Systems, 2009 Level of Flood Protection Update Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    Cowlitz River near Kosmos , WA 14233500 1040 Cowlitz River at Mossyrock, WA 14235000 1162 Tilton River above Bear Canyon near Cinebar, WA 14236200 141...Cowlitz Falls dam, the Cowlitz River near Randle gage was abandoned in 1994; however, the Cowlitz River near Kosmos , WA (#14233500) was in place just...downstream. The drainage areas are within 1% of eachother, so no adjustments were made to the Kosmos gage data. The Cowlitz River at Mossyrock, WA

  17. Integrated Design and Analysis Tools for Reduced Weight, Affordable Fiber Steered Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-15

    reduced gradients for QPRLT $ Number of Fletcher Reeves Steps for GRG 901 20 1 10 3 20 >CGAGE $-ABS--|- PID1 --|-PID2--|-NLA1--|-NLA2--|--GCL--|--GCU...PERC-|- PID1 --|-PID2--|-NLA1--|-NLA2--|--GCL--|--GCU--| $ ABS : Absolute input of gage constraints $ PERC : Percentage input of gage constraints...225 $ PID1 : Starting property ID $ PID2 : Ending property ID. $ NLA1 : Starting layer number $ NLA2 : Ending layer number. $ If ABS is used: $ GCL

  18. Citizen Hydrology and Compressed-Air Hydropower for Rural Electrification in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    At the present time, only one in eight residents of Haiti has access to electricity. Two recent engineering and statistical innovations have the potential for vastly reducing the cost of installation of hydropower in Haiti and the rest of the developing world. The engineering innovation is that wind, solar and fluvial energy have been used to compress air for generation of electricity for only 20 per megawatt-hour, in contrast to the conventional World Bank practice of funding photovoltaic cells for 156 per megawatt-hour. The installation of hydropower requires a record of stream discharge, which is conventionally obtained by installing a gaging station that automatically monitors gage height (height of the water surface above a fixed datum). An empirical rating curve is then used to convert gage height to stream discharge. The multiple field measurements of gage height and discharge over a wide range of discharge values that are required to develop and maintain a rating curve require a manpower of hydrologic technicians that is prohibitive in remote and impoverished areas of the world. The statistical innovation is that machine learning has been applied to the USGS database of nearly four million simultaneous measurements of gage height and discharge to develop a new classification of rivers so that a rating curve can be developed solely from the stream slope, channel geometry, horizontal and vertical distances to the nearest upstream and downstream confluences, and two pairs of discharge - gage height measurements. The objective of this study is to organize local residents to monitor gage height at ten stream sites in the northern peninsula of Haiti over a one-year period in preparation for installation of hydropower at one of the sites. The necessary baseline discharge measurements and channel surveying are being carried out for conversion of gage height to discharge. Results will be reported at the meeting.

  19. Effect of specimen thickness of fatigue-crack-growth behavior and fracture toughness of 7075-T6 and 7178-T6 aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, C. M.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A study was made to determine the effects of specimen thickness on fatigue crack growth and fracture behavior of 7075-T6 and 7178-T6 aluminum alloy sheet and plate. Specimen thicknesses ranged from 5.1 to 12.7 mm (0.20 to 0.50 in.) for 7075-T6 and from 1.3 to 6.4 mm (0.05 to 0.25 in.) for 7178-T6. The stress ratios R used in the crack growth experiments were 0.02 and 0.50. For 7075-T6, specimen thickness had relatively little effect on fatigue-crack growth. However, the fracture toughness of the thickness of the thickest gage of 7075-T6 was about two-thirds of the fracture toughness of the thinner gages of 7075-T6. For 7178-T6, fatigue cracks generally grew somewhat faster in the thicker gages than in the thinnest gage. The fracture toughness of the thickest gage of 7178-T6 was about two-thirds of the fracture toughness of the thinner gages of 7178-T6. Stress intensity methods were used to analyze the experimental results. For a given thickness and value of R, the rate of fatigue crack growth was essentially a single-valued function of the stress intensity range for 7075-T6 and 7178-T6. An empirical equation developed by Forman, Kearney, and Engle fit the 7075-T6 and 7178-T6 crack growth data reasonably well.

  20. Estimates of Median Flows for Streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10 years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the gaging stations on uncontrolled stream segments used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a model standard error of prediction of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a model standard error of prediction of 0.250 logarithmic units. These regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the

  1. The effect of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, strain sensitivity and crack sensitivity of steel fiber reinforced smart cement composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teomete, Egemen

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes, material degradations and other environmental factors necessitate structural health monitoring (SHM). Metal foil strain gages used for SHM have low durability and low sensitivity. These factors motivated researchers to work on cement based strain sensors. In this study, the effects of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivity) and crack sensitivity were determined for steel fiber reinforced cement based composite. A rapid increase of electrical resistance at 200 °C was observed due to damage occurring between cement paste, aggregates and steel fibers. The moisture—electrical resistance relationship was investigated. The specimens taken out of the cure were saturated with water and had a moisture content of 9.49%. The minimum electrical resistance was obtained at 9% moisture at which fiber-fiber and fiber-matrix contact was maximum and the water in micro voids was acting as an electrolyte, conducting electrons. The variation of compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivities) and crack sensitivity were investigated by conducting compression, split tensile and notched bending tests with different moisture contents. The highest gage factor for the compression test was obtained at optimal moisture content, at which electrical resistance was minimum. The tensile strain gage factor for split tensile test and crack sensitivity increased by decreasing moisture content. The mechanisms between moisture content, electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivity were elucidated. The relations of moisture content with electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivities have been presented for the first time in this study for steel fiber reinforced cement based composites. The results are important for the development of self sensing cement based smart materials.

  2. Evaluation of TRMM rainfall estimates over a large Indian river basin (Mahanadi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kneis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the quality of satellite-based precipitation estimates for the Lower Mahanadi River Basin (Eastern India. The considered data sets known as 3B42 and 3B42-RT (version 7/7A are routinely produced by the tropical rainfall measuring mission (TRMM from passive microwave and infrared recordings. While the 3B42-RT data are disseminated in real time, the gage-adjusted 3B42 data set is published with a delay of some months. The quality of the two products was assessed in a two-step procedure. First, the correspondence between the remotely sensed precipitation rates and rain gage data was evaluated at the sub-basin scale. Second, the quality of the rainfall estimates was assessed by analyzing their performance in the context of rainfall-runoff simulation. At sub-basin level (4000 to 16 000 km2 the satellite-based areal precipitation estimates were found to be moderately correlated with the gage-based counterparts (R2 of 0.64–0.74 for 3B42 and 0.59–0.72 for 3B42-RT. Significant discrepancies between TRMM data and ground observations were identified at high intensity levels. The rainfall depth derived from rain gage data is often not reflected by the TRMM estimates (hit rate 80 mm day−1. At the same time, the remotely sensed rainfall rates frequently exceed the gage-based equivalents (false alarm ratios of 0.2–0.6. In addition, the real time product 3B42-RT was found to suffer from a spatially consistent negative bias. Since the regionalization of rain gage data is potentially associated with a number of errors, the above results are subject to uncertainty. Hence, a validation against independent information, such as stream flow, was essential. In this case study, the outcome of rainfall–runoff simulation experiments was consistent with the above-mentioned findings. The best fit between observed and simulated stream flow was obtained if rain gage data were used as model input (Nash–Sutcliffe Index of 0.76–0.88 at gages not

  3. Analysis of Sting Balance Calibration Data Using Optimized Regression Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.; Bader, Jon B.

    2010-01-01

    Calibration data of a wind tunnel sting balance was processed using a candidate math model search algorithm that recommends an optimized regression model for the data analysis. During the calibration the normal force and the moment at the balance moment center were selected as independent calibration variables. The sting balance itself had two moment gages. Therefore, after analyzing the connection between calibration loads and gage outputs, it was decided to choose the difference and the sum of the gage outputs as the two responses that best describe the behavior of the balance. The math model search algorithm was applied to these two responses. An optimized regression model was obtained for each response. Classical strain gage balance load transformations and the equations of the deflection of a cantilever beam under load are used to show that the search algorithm s two optimized regression models are supported by a theoretical analysis of the relationship between the applied calibration loads and the measured gage outputs. The analysis of the sting balance calibration data set is a rare example of a situation when terms of a regression model of a balance can directly be derived from first principles of physics. In addition, it is interesting to note that the search algorithm recommended the correct regression model term combinations using only a set of statistical quality metrics that were applied to the experimental data during the algorithm s term selection process.

  4. A self-strain feedback tuning-fork-shaped ionic polymer metal composite clamping actuator with soft matter elasticity-detecting capability for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guo-Hua; Huang, Wei-Lun

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a smart tuning-fork-shaped ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) clamping actuator for biomedical applications. The two fingers of the actuator, which perform the clamping motion, can be electrically controlled through a unique electrode design on the IPMC material. The generated displacement or strain of the fingers can be sensed using an integrated soft strain-gage sensor. The IPMC actuator and associated soft strain gage were fabricated using a micromachining technique. A 13.5×4×2 mm(3) actuator was shaped from Nafion solution and a selectively grown metal electrode formed the active region. The strain gage consisted of patterned copper foil and polyethylene as a substrate. The relationship between the strain gage voltage output and the displacement at the front end of the actuator's fingers was characterized. The equivalent Young's modulus, 13.65 MPa, of the soft-strain-gage-integrated IPMC finger was analyzed. The produced clamping force exhibited a linear increasing rate of 1.07 mN/s, based on a dc driving voltage of 7 V. Using the developed actuator to clamp soft matter and simultaneously acquire its Young's modulus was achieved. This demonstrated the feasibility of the palpation function and the potential use of the actuator in minimally invasive surgery.

  5. Full Flight Envelope Direct Thrust Measurement on a Supersonic Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Timothy R.; Sims, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Direct thrust measurement using strain gages offers advantages over analytically-based thrust calculation methods. For flight test applications, the direct measurement method typically uses a simpler sensor arrangement and minimal data processing compared to analytical techniques, which normally require costly engine modeling and multisensor arrangements throughout the engine. Conversely, direct thrust measurement has historically produced less than desirable accuracy because of difficulty in mounting and calibrating the strain gages and the inability to account for secondary forces that influence the thrust reading at the engine mounts. Consequently, the strain-gage technique has normally been used for simple engine arrangements and primarily in the subsonic speed range. This paper presents the results of a strain gage-based direct thrust-measurement technique developed by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and successfully applied to the full flight envelope of an F-15 aircraft powered by two F100-PW-229 turbofan engines. Measurements have been obtained at quasi-steady-state operating conditions at maximum non-augmented and maximum augmented power throughout the altitude range of the vehicle and to a maximum speed of Mach 2.0 and are compared against results from two analytically-based thrust calculation methods. The strain-gage installation and calibration processes are also described.

  6. Minimizing errors in phase change correction measurements for gauge blocks using a spherical contact technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoup, John R.; Faust, Bryon S.; Doiron, Theodore D.

    1998-09-01

    One of the most elusive measurement elements in gage block interferometry is the correction for the phase change on reflection. Techniques used to quantify this correction have improved over the year, but the measurement uncertainty has remained relatively constant because some error sources have proven historically difficult to reduce. The precision engineering division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology has recently developed a measurement technique that can quantify the phase change on reflection correction directly for individual gage blocks and eliminates some of the fundamental problems with historical measurement methods. Since only the top surface of the gage block is used in the measurement, wringing film inconsistencies are eliminated with this technique thereby drastically reducing the measurement uncertainty for the correction. However, block geometry and thermal issues still exist. This paper will describe the methods used to minimize the measurement uncertainty of the phase change on reflection evaluation using a spherical contact technique. The work focuses on gage block surface topography and drift eliminating algorithms for the data collection. The extrapolation of the data to an undeformed condition and the failure of these curves to follow theoretical estimates are also discussed. The wavelength dependence of the correction was directly measured for different gage block materials and manufacturers and the data will be presented.

  7. Experimental Marvin Windshield Effects on Precipitation Records in Leadville, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Robert D.; Crow, Loren W.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation of the Leadville, Colorado, precipitation records that include a reported record-breaking storm (and flood) at higher elevations in the Rocky Mountains has indicated that the use of an experimental Marvin windshield (designed to decrease the effects of wind on precipitation-gage catchment of snow during winter) resulted in substantially overregistered summer precipitation for 1919 to 1938. The July monthly precipitation for these years was over-registered by an average of 157 percent of the long-term July monthly precipitation at Leadville. The cause of the overregistration of precipitation was the almost 4-foot-top-diameter cone-shaped windshield that had the effect of 'funneling' hail and rain splash into the rain gage. Other nearby precipitation gages, which did not use this Marvin windshield, did not have this trend of increased precipitation for the same period. Streamflow records from the Leadville area also do not indicate an increase in streamflow from 1919 to 1938.

  8. Techniques for estimating flood-frequency discharges for streams in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eash, David A.

    2001-01-01

    A statewide study was conducted to develop regression equations for estimating flood-frequency discharges for ungaged stream sites in Iowa. Thirty-eight selected basin characteristics were quantified and flood-frequency analyses were computed for 291 streamflow-gaging stations in Iowa and adjacent States. A generalized-skew-coefficient analysis was conducted to determine whether generalized skew coefficients could be improved for Iowa. Station skew coefficients were computed for 239 gaging stations in Iowa and adjacent States, and an isoline map of generalized-skew-coefficient values was developed for Iowa using variogram modeling and kriging methods. The skew map provided the lowest mean square error for the generalized-skew- coefficient analysis and was used to revise generalized skew coefficients for flood-frequency analyses for gaging stations in Iowa.

  9. Estimation of rainfall using remote sensing for Riyadh climate, KSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHassoun, Saleh A.

    2013-05-01

    Rainfall data constitute an important parameter for studying water resources-related problems. Remote sensing techniques could provide rapid and comprehensive overview of the rainfall distribution in a given area. Thus, the infrared data from the LandSat satellite in conjunction with the Scofield-oliver method were used to monitor and model rainfall in Riyadh area as a resemble of any area in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia(KSA). Four convective clouds that covered two rain gage stations were analyzed. Good estimation of rainfall was obtained from satellite images. The results showed that the satellite rainfall estimations were well correlated to rain gage measurements. The satellite climate data appear to be useful for monitoring and modeling rainfall at any area where no rain gage is available.

  10. Auger electron spectroscopy study of oxidation of a PdCr alloy used for high-temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Darwin L.; Zeller, Mary V.; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1993-01-01

    A Pd-13 wt. percent Cr solid solution is a promising high-temperature strain gage alloy. In bulk form it has a number of properties that are desirable in a resistance strain gage material, such as a linear electrical resistance versus temperature curve to 1000 C and stable electrical resistance in air at 1000 C. However, unprotected fine wire gages fabricated from this alloy perform well only to 600 C. At higher temperatures severe oxidation degrades their electrical performance. In this work Auger electron spectroscopy was used to study the oxidation chemistry of the alloy wires and ribbons. Results indicate that the oxidation is caused by a complex mechanism that is not yet fully understood. As expected, during oxidation, a layer of chromium oxide is formed. This layer, however, forms beneath a layer of metallic palladium. The results of this study have increased the understanding of the oxidation mechanism of Pd-13 wt. percent Cr.

  11. Analysis of water-level fluctuations of Lakes Winona and Winnemissett-- two landlocked lakes in a karst terrane in Volusia County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    The water levels of Lakes Winona and Winnemissett in Volusia County, Fla., correlate reasonably well during dry spells but only poorly during wet spells. Disparities develop mostly at times when the lake levels rise abruptly owing to rainstorms passing over the lake basins. The lack of correlation is attributed to the uneven distribution of the storm rainfall, even though the average annual rainfall at National Weather Service gages in the general area of the lakes is about the same. Analyses of the monthly rainfall data show that the rainfall variability between gages is sufficient to account for most of the disparity between monthly changes in the levels of the two lakes. The total annual rainfall at times may differ between rainfall gages by as much as 15 to 20 inches. Such differences tend to balance over the long term but may persist in the same direction for two or more years, causing apparent anomalies in lake-level fluctuations. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. MANAGEMENT OF CONGENITAL TALIPES EQUINOVARUS BY PONSETI METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV, a congenital deformity that has plagued the medical profession and society before the days of Hippocrates. Most of the orthopedic surgeons are now of the opinion that the initial treatment of clubfoot should be non-operative. Many different method of non- surgical treatment are being used with reported success rate from 15 to 90%. Sir Ignatio Ponseti a leading advocate of conservative treatment of clubfoot by serial casting achieves excellent result if instituted early. The present study, therefore, has been undertaken to determine the treatment outcomes of patients treated with ponseti casting technique and establish if results produced by ponseti method is reproducible. AIMS OF STUDY: 1. To study and evaluate the Ponseti method of treatment of congenital talipes equinovarus. 2. To obtain a painless, plantigrade, pliable, cosmetically and functionally acceptable foot. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was conducted in the Department of Orthopedics, Hindu rao hospitals between July2009 to nov2010. A total of 30 feet of 25 patients were included in the study between the age of 1week to 6 months. INCLUSION CRITERIA Children with virgin idiopathic clubfoot in the age group of 1week to 6 months. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: a. Secondary clubfoot. b. Those that has already treated by other than Ponseti method. c. children with age 6 months. Clinical assessment Quantification of various components of clubfoot deformity using the Pirani score. RESULTS: In the present study with 25 patients with 30 feet, total duration of our study was 16 months. With average follow up of 11 months. ranges from 6 to 15months, 1 patient with bilateral clubfoot lost in follow up, 4 were shifted to surgical treatment the cause being, severe deformity and noncompliance to conservative technique. Of the remaining 20 patient with 24 feet where treated by ponseti method and the clinical results were assessed and compared

  13. Accuracy evaluation of a lower-cost and four higher-cost laser scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Valentina; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2016-01-04

    Knowing the accuracy of laser scanners is imperative to select the best scanner to generate bone models. However, errors stated by manufacturers may not apply to bones. The three objectives of this study were to determine: 1) whether the overall error stated by the manufacturers of five laser scanners was different from the root mean squared error (RMSE) computed by scanning a gage block; 2) the repeatability of 3D models generated by the laser scanners when scanning a complex freeform surface such as a distal femur and whether this differed from the repeatability when scanning a gage block; 3) whether the errors for one lower-cost laser scanner are comparable to those of four higher-cost laser scanners. The RMSEs in scanning the gage block were 2 to 52µm lower than the overall errors stated by the manufacturers. The repeatability in scanning the bovine femur 10 times was significantly worse than that in scanning the gage block 10 times. The precision of the lower-cost laser scanner was comparable to that of the higher-cost laser scanners, but the bias was an order of magnitude greater. The contributions of this study are that 1) the overall errors stated by the manufacturers are an upper bound when simple geometric objects like a gage block are scanned, 2) the repeatability is worse on average three times when scanning a complex freeform surface compared to scanning the gage block, and 3) the main difference between the lower-cost and the higher-cost laser scanners is the bias.

  14. Sources of suspended-sediment loads in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary, south Texas, 1958–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Wehmeyer, Loren L.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District; City of Corpus Christi; Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority; San Antonio River Authority; and San Antonio Water System, developed, calibrated, and tested a Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) watershed model to simulate streamflow and suspended-sediment concentrations and loads during 1958-2010 in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary in south Texas. Data available to simulate suspended-sediment concentrations and loads consisted of historical sediment data collected during 1942-82 in the study area and suspended-sediment concentration data collected periodically by the USGS during 2006-7 and 2010 at three USGS streamflow-gaging stations (08211000 Nueces River near Mathis, Tex. [the Mathis gage], 08211200 Nueces River at Bluntzer, Tex. [the Bluntzer gage], and 08211500 Nueces River at Calallen, Tex. [the Calallen gage]), and at one ungaged location on a Nueces River tributary (USGS station 08211050 Bayou Creek at Farm Road 666 near Mathis, Tex.). The Mathis gage is downstream from Wesley E. Seale Dam, which was completed in 1958 to impound Lake Corpus Christi. Suspended-sediment data collected before and after completion of Wesley E. Seale Dam provide insights to the effects of the dam and reservoir on suspended-sediment loads transported by the lower Nueces River downstream from the dam to the Nueces Estuary. Annual suspended-sediment loads at the Nueces River near the Mathis, Tex., gage were considerably lower for a given annual mean discharge after the dam was completed than before the dam was completed.

  15. Accuracy and versatility of the NIST M48 coordinate measuring machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoup, John R.; Doiron, Theodore D.

    2001-10-01

    The NIST Is continuing to develop the ability to perform accurate, traceable measurements on a wide range of artifacts using a very precise, error-mapped coordinate measuring machine (CMM). The NIST M48 CMM has promised accuracy and versatility for many ears. Recently, these promises have been realized in a reliable, reproducible way for many types of 1D, 2D, and 3D engineering metrology artifacts. The versatility of the machine has permitted state-of-the-art, accurate measurements of one meter step gages and precision ball plates as well as 500 micrometer holes and small precision parts made of aluminum or glass. To accomplish this wide range of measurements the CMM has required extensive assessment of machine positioning and straightness errors, probe response, machine motion control and speed, environmental stability, and measurement procedures. The CMM has been used as an absolute instrument and as a very complicated comparator. The data collection techniques have been designed to acquire statistical information on the machine and probe performance and to evaluate and remove any potential thermal drift in the machine coordinate system during operation. This paper will present the data collection and measurement techniques used by NIST to achieve excellent measurement results for gage blocks, long end standards, step gages, ring and plug gages, small holes, ball plates, and angular artifacts. Comparison data with existing independent primary measuring instruments will also be presented to show agreement and correlation with those historical methods. Current plans for incorporating the CMM into existing measurement services, such as plain ring gages, large plug gages, and long end standards, will be presented along with other proposed development of this CMM.

  16. Montana StreamStats—A method for retrieving basin and streamflow characteristics in Montana: Chapter A in Montana StreamStats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Peter M.; Dutton, DeAnn M.; Sando, Steven K.; Sando, Roy

    2016-04-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides streamflow characteristics and other related information needed by water-resource managers to protect people and property from floods, plan and manage water-resource activities, and protect water quality. Streamflow characteristics provided by the USGS, such as peak-flow and low-flow frequencies for streamflow-gaging stations, are frequently used by engineers, flood forecasters, land managers, biologists, and others to guide their everyday decisions. In addition to providing streamflow characteristics at streamflow-gaging stations, the USGS also develops regional regression equations and drainage area-adjustment methods for estimating streamflow characteristics at locations on ungaged streams. Regional regression equations can be complex and often require users to determine several basin characteristics, which are physical and climatic characteristics of the stream and its drainage basin. Obtaining these basin characteristics for streamflow-gaging stations and ungaged sites traditionally has been time consuming and subjective, and led to inconsistent results.StreamStats is a Web-based geographic information system application that was created by the USGS to provide users with access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resource planning and management. StreamStats allows users to easily obtain streamflow and basin characteristics for USGS streamflow-gaging stations and user-selected locations on ungaged streams. The USGS, in cooperation with Montana Department of Transportation, Montana Department of Environmental Quality, and Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, completed a study to develop a StreamStats application for Montana, compute streamflow characteristics at streamflow-gaging stations, and develop regional regression equations to estimate streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites. Chapter A of this Scientific Investigations Report describes the Montana Stream

  17. Summary of significant floods in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands, 1970 through 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Charles A.; Aldridge, Byron N.; Ross, Heather C.

    2001-01-01

    This volume is a compilation of significant floods that occurred throughout the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands during 1970 through 1989. A summary of most devastating floods according to amount of damage and lives lost is provided for each year. State-by-state compilations include a description of the general hydroclimatology and conditions that produce significant floods, a description of climate and basin characteristics that significantly affect maximum flows, tables of data that compare each significant flood during 1970 through 1989 with the maximum flood for the entire period of record at selected streamflow-gaging stations, and maps showing the location of the streamflow-gaging stations.

  18. Somerset County Flood Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Heidi L.

    2007-01-01

    The timely warning of a flood is crucial to the protection of lives and property. One has only to recall the floods of August 2, 1973, September 16 and 17, 1999, and April 16, 2007, in Somerset County, New Jersey, in which lives were lost and major property damage occurred, to realize how costly, especially in terms of human life, an unexpected flood can be. Accurate forecasts and warnings cannot be made, however, without detailed information about precipitation and streamflow in the drainage basin. Since the mid 1960's, the National Weather Service (NWS) has been able to forecast flooding on larger streams in Somerset County, such as the Raritan and Millstone Rivers. Flooding on smaller streams in urban areas was more difficult to predict. In response to this problem the NWS, in cooperation with the Green Brook Flood Control Commission, installed a precipitation gage in North Plainfield, and two flash-flood alarms, one on Green Brook at Seeley Mills and one on Stony Brook at Watchung, in the early 1970's. In 1978, New Jersey's first countywide flood-warning system was installed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Somerset County. This system consisted of a network of eight stage and discharge gages equipped with precipitation gages linked by telephone telemetry and eight auxiliary precipitation gages. The gages were installed throughout the county to collect precipitation and runoff data that could be used to improve flood-monitoring capabilities and flood-frequency estimates. Recognizing the need for more detailed hydrologic information for Somerset County, the USGS, in cooperation with Somerset County, designed and installed the Somerset County Flood Information System (SCFIS) in 1990. This system is part of a statewide network of stream gages, precipitation gages, weather stations, and tide gages that collect data in real time. The data provided by the SCFIS improve the flood forecasting ability of the NWS and aid Somerset County and municipal agencies in

  19. MEANS FOR DETERMINING CENTRIFUGE ALIGNMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W.Q.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for remotely determining the alignment of a centrifuge. The centrifage shaft is provided with a shoulder, upon which two followers ride, one for detecting radial movements, and one upon the shoulder face for determining the axial motion. The followers are attached to separate liquid filled bellows, and a tube connects each bellows to its respective indicating gage at a remote location. Vibrations produced by misalignment of the centrifuge shaft are transmitted to the bellows, and tbence through the tubing to the indicator gage. This apparatus is particularly useful for operation in a hot cell where the materials handled are dangerous to the operating personnel.

  20. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1997 water year. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P.; McLean, C.T.

    1998-01-01

    This annual water data report from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contains flow data from 19 stream-gaging stations that cover most of the Laboratory`s property. The authors focused data collection on the Laboratory`s downstream boundary, approximated by New Mexico State Highway 4; the upstream boundary is approximated by New Mexico State Highway 501. Some of the gaging stations are within Laboratory boundaries and were originally installed to assist groups other than the Water Quality and Hydrology Group (ESH-18) that also conduct site-specific earth science research. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Canon de Valle.

  1. Pressure Measurements on a Deforming Surface in Response to an Underwater Explosion in a Water-Filled Aluminum Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chambers

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments have been conducted to benchmark DYSMAS computer code calculations for the dynamic interaction of water with cylindrical structures. Small explosive charges were suspended using hypodermic needle tubing inside Al tubes filled with distilled water. Pressures were measured during shock loading by tourmaline crystal, carbon resistor and ytterbium foil gages bonded to the tube using a variety of adhesives. Comparable calculated and measured pressures were obtained for the explosive charges used, with some gages surviving long enough to record results after cavitation with the tube wall.

  2. Limited SP17 expression within tumors diminishes its therapeutic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, M F; Ditzel, H J

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the expression of the tumor antigen sperm protein 17 (SP17) in a large panel of human cancers and compared it with the expression of two well-characterized families of tumor antigens, melanoma-associated antigen-A (MAGE-A) and G antigen (GAGE). We found that SP17...... positive tumors in contrast to MAGE-A and GAGE proteins, which were homogenously expressed in large foci. Our results suggest that SP17 may not be an optimal target for cancer vaccines....

  3. Comparación de los resultados de los volúmenes encontrados a partir de los métodos: calibración líquida api 2555 y calibración por medidas api 2552 para un tanque esferoidal de la refinería la libertad

    OpenAIRE

    Murrieta Reasco, Atilio Javier; Malavé Carrera, Carlos Alfredo; Gallegos O., Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    This work presents in the first section the procedure for the measurement and calibration of a smooth spheroidal tank using API Standard 2552 - ASTM D 1408-65 and the Liquid Calibration or API Standard 2555 - ASTM D 1406. We developed the gage table using the API Standard 2552 and the other gage table obtained for a company of calibration of tanks using Liquid Calibration. Calculations were made for a tank of Refinería La Libertad. The final section we concluded that the precision of resul...

  4. Hydrologic Record Extension of Water-Level Data in the Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) Using Artificial Neural Network Models, 2000-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Paul A.; Roehl, Edwin A.

    2007-01-01

    The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) is an integrated network of real-time water-level gaging stations, ground-elevation models, and water-surface models designed to provide scientists, engineers, and water-resource managers with current (2000-present) water-depth information for the entire freshwater portion of the greater Everglades. The U.S. Geological Survey Greater Everglades Priority Ecosystem Science provides support for EDEN and the goal of providing quality assured monitoring data for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. To increase the accuracy of the water-surface models, 25 real-time water-level gaging stations were added to the network of 253 established water-level gaging stations. To incorporate the data from the newly added stations to the 7-year EDEN database in the greater Everglades, the short-term water-level records (generally less than 1 year) needed to be simulated back in time (hindcasted) to be concurrent with data from the established gaging stations in the database. A three-step modeling approach using artificial neural network models was used to estimate the water levels at the new stations. The artificial neural network models used static variables that represent the gaging station location and percent vegetation in addition to dynamic variables that represent water-level data from the established EDEN gaging stations. The final step of the modeling approach was to simulate the computed error of the initial estimate to increase the accuracy of the final water-level estimate. The three-step modeling approach for estimating water levels at the new EDEN gaging stations produced satisfactory results. The coefficients of determination (R2) for 21 of the 25 estimates were greater than 0.95, and all of the estimates (25 of 25) were greater than 0.82. The model estimates showed good agreement with the measured data. For some new EDEN stations with limited measured data, the record extension

  5. Flood of June 22-24, 2006, in North-Central Ohio, With Emphasis on the Cuyahoga River Near Independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James M.; Ebner, Andrew D.; Koltun, G.F.; Astifan, Brian M.

    2007-01-01

    Heavy rains caused severe flooding on June 22-24, 2006, and damaged approximately 4,580 homes and 48 businesses in Cuyahoga County. Damage estimates in Cuyahoga County for the two days of flooding exceed $47 million; statewide damage estimates exceed $150 million. Six counties (Cuyahoga, Erie, Huron, Lucas, Sandusky, and Stark) in northeast Ohio were declared Federal disaster areas. One death, in Lorain County, was attributed to the flooding. The peak streamflow of 25,400 cubic feet per second and corresponding peak gage height of 23.29 feet were the highest recorded at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging station Cuyahoga River at Independence (04208000) since the gaging station began operation in 1922, exceeding the previous peak streamflow of 24,800 cubic feet per second that occurred on January 22, 1959. An indirect calculation of the peak streamflow was made by use of a step-backwater model because all roads leading to the gaging station were inundated during the flood and field crews could not reach the station to make a direct measurement. Because of a statistically significant and persistent positive trend in the annual-peak-streamflow time series for the Cuyahoga River at Independence, a method was developed and applied to detrend the annual-peak-streamflow time series prior to the traditional log-Pearson Type III flood-frequency analysis. Based on this analysis, the recurrence interval of the computed peak streamflow was estimated to be slightly less than 100 years. Peak-gage-height data, peak-streamflow data, and recurrence-interval estimates for the June 22-24, 2006, flood are tabulated for the Cuyahoga River at Independence and 10 other USGS gaging stations in north-central Ohio. Because flooding along the Cuyahoga River near Independence and Valley View was particularly severe, a study was done to document the peak water-surface profile during the flood from approximately 2 miles downstream from the USGS streamflow-gaging station at

  6. Stages and Discharges of the Mississippi River and Tributaries and Other Watersheds in the New Orleans District for 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    RAILROAD HRIJGE AT PILE 2q.5 FROM lEAU . lolA . 03oT60.) , ,. % ,%* IAIE. -414L .LO-T TYPE. * ,LNELRAL p’lFURmATIlUN. GAGE READ ANO MAINTAINED BY NATIONAL...4 %. % 98 DAILY STAGES FCR 1981% LCD LAKE AT MOOR2NGSPCRT, LA.% LOLA TI ON. LAT. 34-41-52, LONG. 93-57-213. FIGh’%AY 530 BRIDOGE. (SYA. 1960024...MANGE. 1700 FEET ABOVE LAKE CHICO ’. (STA. 4959009.) GAGE. STAFF TYPE, RANGE 15. ZERO, MSVD . . .. .. 6.-.i .W v V ’K .11 I TV ’u1W % V gr N F L - 1T

  7. Cylinder valve packing nut studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, S.C. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

  8. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of four boron nitride coated ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Six types of uncoated ceramic fibers were static tensile and tensile creep tested at various elevated temperatures. Three types of boron nitride coated fibers were also tested. Room temperature static tensile tests were initially performed on all fibers, at gage lengths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, to determine the magnitude of end effects from the gripping system used. Tests at one elevated temperature, at gage lengths of 8 and 10 inches, were also conducted, to determine end effects at elevated temperatures. Fiber cross sectional shapes and areas were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Creep testing was typically performed for 4 hours, in an air atmosphere.

  9. Development of Interpretation Algorithm for Optical Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors for Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kara

    2002-12-01

    Increasingly, optical fiber sensors, and in particular Bragg grating sensors, are being used in aerospace structures due to their immunity to electrical noise and the ability to multiplex hundreds of sensors into a single optical fiber. This significantly reduces the cost per sensor as the number of fiber connections and demodulation systems required is also reduced. The primary objective of this project is to study the effects of mounting issues such as adhesion, surface roughness, and high strain gradients on the interpretation of the measured strain. This is performed through comparison with electrical strain gage benchmark data. The long-term goal is to integrate such optical fiber Bragg grating sensors into a structural integrity monitoring system for the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle. Previously, researchers at NASA Langley instrumented a composite wingbox with both optical fiber Bragg grating sensors and electrical strain gages during laboratory load-to-failure testing. A considerable amount of data was collected during these tests. For this project, data from two of the sensing optical fibers (each containing 800 Bragg grating sensors) were analyzed in detail. The first fiber studied was mounted in a straight line on the upper surface of the wingbox far from any structural irregularities. The results from these sensors showed a relatively large amount of noise compared to the electrical strain gages, but measured the same averaged strain curve. It was shown that the noise could be varied through the choice of input parameters in the data interpretation algorithm. Based upon the assumption that the strain remains constant along the gage length (a valid assumption for this fiber as confirmed by the measured grating spectra) this noise was significantly reduced. The second fiber was mounted on the lower surface of the wingbox in a pattern that circled surface cutouts and ran close to sites of impact damage, induced before the loading tests. As

  10. Response Measurements on an Echinodome Subjected to Explosive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.M.M. El-Deeb

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Free field explosion experiments were carried out to determine the general characteristics of the pressure pulse generated by a detonator underwater. An echinodome – an axisymmetric shell structure of optimum form – was subjected to a shock wave from the same type of detonator, the structure being in a floating submerged and tethered state. Some indication of the influence of the structure on the incident pressure wave was obtained from a surface mounted miniature pressure gage. Structural response was measured with the aid of strain gages from which principal stress data were deduced. Consideration was given to the theoretical modelling aspects of the problem.

  11. Analysis of Directional Spectra and Reflection Coefficients in Incident and Reflected Wave Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳淑学; 俞聿修

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the modified Bayesian method for the analysis of directional wave spectra and reflection coefficients is verified by numerical and physical simulation of waves. The results show that the method can basically separate the incident and reflected directional spectra. In addition, the effect of the type of wave gage arrays, the number of measured wave properties, and the distance between the wave gage array and the reflection line on the resolution of the method are investigated. Some suggestions are proposed for practical application.

  12. High-temperature strain measurement techniques: Current developments and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemcoe, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1987, a very substantial amount of R&D has been conducted in an attempt to develop reliable strain sensors for the measurements of structural strains during ground testing and hypersonic flight, at temperatures up to at least 2000 deg F. Much of the effort has been focused on requirements of the NASP Program. This presentation is limited to the current sensor development work and characterization studies carried out within that program. It is basically an assessment as to where we are now and what remains to be done in the way of technical accomplishments to meet the technical challenges posed by the requirements and constraints established for the NASP Program. The approach for meeting those requirements and constraints has been multi-disciplinary in nature. It was recognized early on that no one sensor could meet all these requirements and constraints, largely because of the large temperature range (cryogenic to at least 2000 deg F) and many other factors, including the most challenging requirement that the sensor system be capable of obtaining valid 'first cycle data'. Present candidate alloys for resistance-type strain gages include Fe-Cr-Al and Pd-Cr. Although they have superior properties regarding withstanding very high temperatures, they exhibit large apparent strains that must either be accounted for or cancelled out by various techniques, including the use of a dual-element, half-bridge dummy gage, or electrical compensation networks. A significant effort is being devoted to developing, refining, and evaluating the effectiveness of those techniques over a broad range in temperature and time. In the quest to obtain first-cycle data, ways must be found to eliminate the need to prestabilize or precondition the strain gage, before it is attached to the test article. It should be noted that present NASP constraints do not permit prestabilization of the sensor, in situ. Gages are currently being 'heat treated' during manufacture in both the wire- and foil

  13. Use of nanoporous columnar thin film in the wafer-level packaging of MEMS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Kee; Choi, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Jun-Bo

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a new packaging technology that uses a nanoporous columnar thin film to seal microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices at the wafer level. In the proposed packaging process, the processing temperature is 350 °C. The process is relatively inexpensive compared to wafer level packaging processes, because the wafer-bonding step is eliminated and the die size is shrunk. In the suggested approach, a sputtered columnar thin film at room temperature forms vertical nanopores as etch holes, and an air cavity is formed by the removal of a sacrificial layer through the nanopores in the columnar membrane. Subsequent hermetic vacuum packaging of the cavity is achieved by depositing thin films over the membrane under low pressure. The hermeticity of the packaging was verified by using an optical surface morphology microscope to measure the deflection change of the sealing membrane before and after breaking of the vacuum through an interconnected membrane. The long-term hermeticity was monitored by measuring the maximum central deflection of the PECVD sealing layer over a period of 170 days. The precise pressure (0.7 Torr) and short-term (30 days) pressure change inside the cavity were measured by encapsulated Ni Pirani gauges, representing packaged freestanding MEMS devices.

  14. Design and fabrication of high performance wafer-level vacuum packaging based on glass-silicon-glass bonding techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinwen; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Jilong; Yang, Huabing

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a high performance wafer-level vacuum packaging technology based on GSG triple-layer sealing structure for encapsulating large mass inertial MEMS devices fabricated by silicon-on-glass bulk micromachining technology is presented. Roughness controlling strategy of bonding surfaces was proposed and described in detail. Silicon substrate was thinned and polished by CMP after the first bonding with the glass substrate and was then bonded with the glass micro-cap. Zr thin film was embedded into the concave of the micro-cap by a shadow-mask technique. The glass substrate was thinned to about 100 µm, wet etched through and metalized for realizing vertical feedthrough. During the fabrication, all patterning processes were operated carefully so as to reduce extrusive fragments to as little as possible. In addition, a high-performance micro-Pirani vacuum gauge was integrated into the package for monitoring the pressure and the leak rate further. The result shows that the pressure in the package is about 120 Pa and has no obvious change for more than one year indicating 10-13 stdcc s-1 leak rate.

  15. Space-time Philosophy Reconstructed via Massive Nordstr\\"om Scalar Gravities? Laws vs. Geometry, Conventionality, and Underdetermination

    CERN Document Server

    Pitts, J Brian

    2015-01-01

    Klein-Gordon gravity, 1920s-30s particle physics, and 1890s Neumann-Seeliger modified gravity suggest a "graviton mass term" *algebraic* in the potential. Unlike Nordstr\\"om's "massless" theory, massive scalar gravity is invariant under the Poincar\\'e group but not the 15-parameter conformal group. It thus exhibits the whole Minkowski space-time structure, indirectly for volumes. Massive scalar gravity is plausible as a field theory, but violates Einstein's principles of general covariance, general relativity, equivalence, and Mach. Geometry is a poor guide: matter sees a conformally flat metric due to universal coupling, but gravity sees the rest of the flat metric (on long distances) in the mass term. What is the `true' geometry, in line with Poincar\\'e's modal conventionality argument? Infinitely many theories exhibit this bimetric `geometry,' all with the total stress-energy's trace as source; geometry does not explain the field equations. The irrelevance of the Ehlers-Pirani-Schild construction to conven...

  16. Proper Time in Weyl space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Avalos, R; Romero, C

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the question of whether or not a general Weyl structure is a suitable mathematical model of space-time. This is an issue that has been in debate since Weyl formulated his unified field theory for the first time. We do not present the discussion from the point of view of a particular unification theory, but instead from a more general standpoint, in which the viability of such a structure as a model of space-time is investigated. Our starting point is the well known axiomatic approach to space-time given by Elhers, Pirani and Schild (EPS). In this framework, we carry out an exhaustive analysis of what is required for a consistent definition for proper time and show that such a definition leads to the prediction of the so-called "second clock effect". We take the view that if, based on experience, we were to reject space-time models predicting this effect, this could be incorporated as the last axiom in the EPS approach. Finally, we provide a proof that, in this case, we are led to a Weyl integrable ...

  17. Chemical composition of essential oils of leaves, flowers and fruits of Hortia oreadica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danillo L. Santos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hortia oreadica Groppo, Kallunki & Pirani, Rutaceae, known as “para-tudo”, “quina”, and “quina-do-campo”, is used in traditional medicine locally to treat stomach pain and fevers. The aims of this study were: analyze the chemical composition of essential oils from leaves, flowers and fruits of H. oreadica and verify the seasonal variation of the chemical components of essential oils from leaves. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger type apparatus and analyzed by GC/MS. The major components found in the samples of the essential oils were the amorpha-4,7(11-diene (29.27% – flowers, 20.26% – fruits, 27.66–37.89% – leaves, bicyclogermacrene (23.28% – flowers, 20.64% – fruits, 14.71% to 31.37% – leaves. This work represents the first study of the chemical composition of essential oils from leaves, flowers and fruits and seasonal variation in the essential oils from leaves of H. oreadica.

  18. LHC : The World's Largest Vacuum Systems being commissioned at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, J M

    2008-01-01

    When it switches on in 2008, the 26.7 km Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, will have the world's largest vacuum system operating over a wide range of pressures and employing an impressive array of vacuum technologies. This system is composed by 54 km of UHV vacuum for the circulating beams and 50 km of insulation vacuum around the cryogenic magnets and the liquid helium transfer lines. Over the 54 km of UHV beam vacuum, 48 km of this are at cryogenic temperature (1.9 K). The remaining 6 km of beam vacuum containing the insertions for "cleaning" the proton beams, radiofrequency cavities for accelerating the protons as well as beam-monitoring equipment is at ambient temperature and uses non-evaporable getter (NEG) coatings - a vacuum technology that was born and industrialized at CERN. The pumping scheme is completed using 780 ion pumps to remove noble gases and to provide pressure interlocks to the 303 vacuum safety valves. Pressure readings are provided by 170 Bayard-Alpert gauges and 1084 gauges (Pirani a...

  19. Experimental determination of the Ta–Ge phase diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araújo Pinto da Silva, Antonio Augusto, E-mail: aaaps@ppgem.eel.usp.br [EEL/USP – Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Pólo Urbo-Industrial Gleba AI-6, 12602-810 Lorena, SP (Brazil); Coelho, Gilberto Carvalho [EEL/USP – Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Pólo Urbo-Industrial Gleba AI-6, 12602-810 Lorena, SP (Brazil); UniFoa – Centro Universitário de Volta Redonda, Núcleo de Pesquisa, Campus Três Poços, Avenida Paulo Erlei Alves Abrantes, 1325, Bairro Três Poços, 27240-560 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Nunes, Carlos Angelo; Suzuki, Paulo Atsushi [EEL/USP – Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Pólo Urbo-Industrial Gleba AI-6, 12602-810 Lorena, SP (Brazil); Fiorani, Jean Marc; David, Nicolas; Vilasi, Michel [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Faculté des Sciences et Technologies, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)

    2013-11-05

    Highlights: •Ta–Ge phase diagram propose for the first time. •The phase αTa{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} was not observed in samples investigated in this work. •Three eutectics reactions where determined with the liquid compositions at 20.5; 28.0; 97.0 at.% Ge. -- Abstract: In the present work, the Ta–Ge phase diagram has been experimentally studied, considering the inexistence of a Ta–Ge phase diagram in the literature. The samples were prepared via arc melting and characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The intermetallics phases βTa{sub 3}Ge, αTa{sub 3}Ge, βTa{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} and TaGe{sub 2} where confirmed in this system. Three eutectics reactions where determined with the liquid compositions at 20.5; 28.0; 97.0 at.% Ge. The phases βTa{sub 3}Ge and βTa{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} solidifies congruently while TaGe{sub 2} is formed through a peritectic transformation. The temperature of the Ta-rich eutectic (L ↔ Ta{sub ss} + βTa{sub 3}Ge) was measured by the Pirani-Alterthum method at 2440 °C and the Ge-rich eutectic (L ↔ TaGe{sub 2} + Ge{sub ss}) by DTA at 937 °C.

  20. Penning ionization electron spectroscopy of hydrogen sulfide by metastable helium and neon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcinelli, Stefano; Candori, Pietro; Bettoni, Marta; Pirani, Fernando; Vecchiocattivi, Franco

    2014-08-21

    The dynamics of the Penning ionization of hydrogen sulfide molecules by collision with helium and metastable neon atoms, occurring in the thermal energy range, has been studied by analyzing the energy spectra of the emitted electrons obtained in our laboratory in a crossed beam experiment. These spectra are compared with the photoelectron spectra measured by using He(I) and Ne(I) photons under the same experimental conditions. In this way we obtained the negative energy shifts for the formation of H2S(+) ions in the first three accessible electronic states by He*(2(3,1)S1,0) and Ne*((3)P2,0) Penning ionization collisions: the 2b1 (X̃(2)B1) fundamental one, the first 5a1 (Ã(2)A1), and the second 2b2 (B̃(2)B2) excited states, respectively. The recorded energy shifts indicate that in the case of He* and Ne*-H2S the autoionization dynamics depends on the features of the collision complex and is mainly driven by an effective global attraction that comes from a balance among several non covalent intermolecular interaction components. This suggests that the Penning ionization should take place, in a specific range of intermolecular distances, as we have already observed in the case of Penning ionization of water molecules [Brunetti, B. G.; Candori, P.; Falcinelli, S.; Pirani, F.; Vecchiocattivi, F. J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 139, 164305-1-164305-8].

  1. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 to 80 km altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Shannon; Gausa, Michael; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 80 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on two sounding rockets to the mesosphere. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void behind (relative to the direction of motion) an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed forward of an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened during flight to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region behind it. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ∼80 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  2. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 - 75 km altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, S.; Gausa, M. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 75 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on the two sounding rockets of the CHAMPS (CHarge And mass of Meteoritic smoke ParticleS) rocket campaign which were launched into the mesosphere in October 2011 from Andøya Rocket Range, Norway. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void beneath an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed above an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened on the downleg to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region below. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ~75 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  3. The gravitational force on a gyroscope and the electromagnetic force on a magnetic dipole as analogous tidal effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, L Filipe O; Herdeiro, Carlos A R, E-mail: filipezola@fc.up.p, E-mail: crherdei@fc.up.p [Centro de Fisica do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2010-05-01

    We compare the covariant expression of the electromagnetic force exerted on a magnetic dipole with Papapetrou's equation for the gravitational force exerted on a spinning test particle. We show that if Pirani's supplementary spin condition holds, there is an exact, covariant, and fully general analogy relating these two forces: both are determined by a contraction of the spin 4-vector with a magnetic-type tidal tensor. Moreover, these tidal tensors obey strikingly analogous equations which are covariant forms for (some of) Maxwell's and Einstein's field equations. These equations allow for an insightful comparison between the two interactions. It is shown that, in the special case that the gyroscope/dipole are 'at rest' and far away from a stationary source, the two forces are similar (in accordance with the results known from linearized theory); but that for generic dynamics key differences arise. In particular we show that the time projection of the force on a dipole is the power transferred to it by Faraday's induction, whereas the fact that the force on a gyroscope is spatial signals the absence of an analogous gravitational effect; that whereas the total work done on a magnetic dipole by a stationary magnetic field is zero, a stationary gravitomagnetic field, by contrast, does work on mass currents, which quantitatively explains the Hawking-Wald spin interaction energy.

  4. Spinning test-body orbiting around Schwarzschild black hole: circular dynamics and gravitational-wave fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Harms, Enno; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Nagar, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We consider a spinning test-body in circular motion around a nonrotating black hole and analyze different prescriptions for the body's dynamics. We compare, for the first time, the Mathisson-Papapetrou formalism under the Tulczyjew spin-supplementary-condition (SSC), the Pirani SSC and the Ohashi-Kyrian-Semerak SSC, and the spinning particle limit of the effective-one-body Hamiltonian of [Phys.~Rev.~D.90,~044018(2014)]. We analyze the four different dynamics in terms of the ISCO shifts and in terms of the coordinate invariant binding energies, separating higher-order spin contributions from spin-orbit contributions. The asymptotic gravitational wave fluxes produced by the spinning body are computed by solving the inhomogeneous $(2+1)D$ Teukolsky equation and contrasted for the different cases. For small orbital frequencies $\\Omega$, all the prescriptions reduce to the same dynamics and the same radiation fluxes. For large frequencies, ${x \\equiv (M \\Omega)^{2/3} >0.1 }$, where $M$ is the black hole mass, and ...

  5. Whitey SCHe Ball Valves Provide Test Port Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-09-15

    These valves are 1/4 inch ball valves fabricated of 316 stainless steel. Packing is TFE (standard). They are used as normally closed isolation valves for test ports in the SCHe System between the gage root valve and the pressure indicator.

  6. Precipitation Depth-Duration-Frequency Analysis for the Nevada National Security Site and Surrounding Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Li [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States). Division of Hydrologic Sciences; Miller, Julianne J. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States). Division of Hydrologic Sciences

    2016-08-01

    Accurate precipitation frequency data are important for Environmental Management Soils Activities on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are important for environmental assessments performed for regulatory closure of Soils Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Sites, as well as engineering mitigation designs and post-closure monitoring strategies to assess and minimize potential contaminant migration from Soils CAU Sites. Although the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Atlas 14 (Bonnin et al., 2011) provides precipitation frequency data for the NNSS area, the NNSS-specific observed precipitation data were not consistent with the NOAA Atlas 14 predicted data. This is primarily due to the NOAA Atlas 14 products being produced from analyses without including the approximately 30 NNSS precipitation gage records, several of which approach or exceed 50 year of record. Therefore, a study of precipitation frequency that incorporated the NNSS precipitation gage records into the NOAA Atlas 14 dataset, was performed specifically for the NNSS to derive more accurate site-specific precipitation data products. Precipitation frequency information, such as the depth-duration-frequency (DDF) relationships, are required to generate synthetic standard design storm hydrographs and assess actual precipitation events. In this study, the actual long-term NNSS precipitation gage records, some of which are the longest gage records in southern and central Nevada, were analyzed to allow for more accurate precipitation DDF estimates to be developed for the NNSS. Gridded maps of precipitation frequency for the NNSS and surrounding areas were then produced.

  7. 77 FR 3500 - Reading Powder Coatings, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Berks and Beyond Employment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ...] Reading Powder Coatings, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Berks and Beyond Employment Services and Gage Personnel Reading, PA; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker... Assistance and Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance on October 19, 2011, applicable to workers of...

  8. 30 CFR 77.413 - Boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boilers. 77.413 Section 77.413 Mineral... Mechanical Equipment § 77.413 Boilers. (a) Boilers shall be equipped with guarded, well-maintained water... the gages shall be kept clean and free of scale and rust. (b) Boilers shall be equipped with...

  9. Alloying-Element Loss during High-Temperature Processing of a Nickel-Base Superalloy (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    composition uniformity. For example, at such small thicknesses, finish grinding to eliminate gage irregularities or surface contamination may be...Metals, 1978, vol. 12, pp. 413-438. 22. C.A. Stearns, F.J. Kohl, and G.C. Fryburg: J. Electrochem . Soc., 1974, vol. 121, pp. 945-951. 23. B. Gleeson

  10. 49 CFR Appendix E to Part 178 - Flame Penetration Resistance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the test burner cone. (4) Thermocouples. The seven thermocouples to be used for testing must be 1/16 inch ceramic sheathed, type K, grounded thermocouples with a nominal 30 American wire gage (AWG) size conductor. The seven thermocouples must be attached to a steel angle bracket to form a thermocouple rake...

  11. Flexible Case - Grain Interaction in Ballistic Weapon Systems. Volume I. Technical Accomplishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    October 1976). 8. “Simulation Testing of a Modified Bomb Dumy Uni t (BDU)”, AFRPL- TR-72- 107 (December 1972). 9. Briar , H. P.,and Bills , Jr. , K...10. Briar , H. P.,and Bills , Jr., K. W., and Schapery, R. A. , “Design and Test of the Operational In-Situ Gage for Solid Propellant - - Surveillance

  12. Selective Mode Excitation And Detection Of Micromachined Resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prak, Albert; Elwenspoek, Miko; Fluitman, Jan H.J

    1992-01-01

    Distributed mechanical systems such as micromachined resonant strain gages possess an infinite number of modes of vibration. Mostly, one is interested in only one or a few modes. A method is described with which only the desired modes are excited and detected. This is achieved by geometrically shapi

  13. Application of Nano-Scale Precipitate Engineering of TiN-NbC Composite in 32mm K60-E2 Grade Plate Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, S. V.; Xiaoping, Ma; Wenjin, Nie; Xiaobing, Zhang

    A cost effective alloy design based on niobium microalloying was developed by Shagang for the production of 32 mm gage K60-E2 steel plate for manufacturing LSAW pipes of 1422 mm diameter. Two metallurgical challenges are (i) to meet enhanced CTOD toughness and (ii) to ensure consistent DWTT performance in accordance with the specification laid out by Gazprom Vniigaz.

  14. SUPERDUCK Nearshore Processes Experiment: Summary of Studies, CERC (Coastal Engineering Research Facility) Field Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    celc its-Il 1 Odeinlrmrk opttes rsece terv~esdea hsfra I .of, aeayadtoa eakcmuain rsec# nterv t$d fsfr Figure 12. Littoral Environment... resonant tuning by the bar under broad-banded wind wave forcing. 49. The offshore wind wave directional array (discussed under Linear Array Wave Gage in

  15. Damage Mechanisms/Failure Mechanics of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    cutting method was used to minimize material waste, not because * carbon-carbon is difficult to machine . 2.2 Tension Testing 2.2.1 Specimen Configuration...was made to bond the strain gages to fiber bundles if possible rather than to a layer of matrix material. Ex- tensometers were also employed to measure

  16. Extreme Temperature Strain Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    Road, Lantham, New York 12110, Phone (518) 785-2323, noncontacting, " Fotonic " fiber bundle sensor * Dual Core Fiber Optic Strain Gage with Laser input...Lantham, New York 12110, Phone (518) 456-4131, Reflective Light, Fiber bundles, " Fotonic Sensors", to 600°F "• Moire’ Technique, optical interference

  17. Sting Interference Effects as Determined by Measurements of Dynamic Stability Derivatives, Surface Pressure, and Base Pressure for Mach Numbers 2 through 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    essentially proportional to the heat flux imposed on the constantan foil. Gardon gage wall temperature measurements were made with iron-constantan...can- figura tion was influenced by the presence of the sting. 4. The free-flight drag data for the blunt configuration was 15 percent higher than

  18. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2000 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A.Shaull; M.R.Alexander; R.P.Reynolds; R.P.Romero; E.T.Riebsomer; C.T.McLean

    2001-06-02

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 23 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs, two that flow into Canon del Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  19. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2002 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Shaull; D. Ortiz; M.R. Alexander; R.P. Romero

    2003-03-03

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 34 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data from 16 stations.

  20. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1999 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Shaull; M. R. Alexander; R. P. Reynolds; C. T. McLean; R. P. Romero

    2000-04-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 22 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory with one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Canon de Valle and nine partial-record storm water stations.

  1. Conveyance characteristics of the Nueces River, Cotulla to Simmons, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Bernard C.; Reeves, William E.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of discharge hydrographs for streamflow-gaging stations on the Nueces River at Cotulla, Tilden, and Simmons indicate that significant water losses occur along the 108-mile reach from Cotulla to Simmon during storm-runoff periods. Computed losses along the 83-mile reach from Cotulla to Tilden for 15 storm periods range from 32 to 59 percent of the total runoff volume passing the Cotulla gage. For six storm periods that occurred while the gage at Simmons was in operation, computed losses from Cotulla to Simmons averaged 48 percent of the storm runoff passing the Cotulla gage. Estimates of total-annual losses were made with the aid of a regression model developed to relate monthly rainfall totals to monthly runoff. Total annual water losses, estimated with the aid of the regression model, ranged from 46,000 acre-feet during 1969 to 368,500 acre-feet during 1967, and averaged about 174,000 acre-feet for 1966-77. (USGS)

  2. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2008 water year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, David; Cata, Betsy; Kuyumjian, Gregory

    2009-09-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  3. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2006 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.P. Romero, D. Ortiz, G. Kuyumjian

    2007-08-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 44 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data for 44 stations.

  4. Variable Time Base Integrator Circuit for Buffet Signal Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batts, Colossie N.

    1973-01-01

    A measurement circuit to obtain buffet data from wind tunnel models wherein a signal proportional to the average RMS value of buffet data is produced for subsequent recording. Feedback means are employed to suppress the D.C. portion of signals developed by the strain gages during dynamic testing. Automatic recording of gain settings of amplifiers employed in the circuit is also provided.

  5. Water‐Data Report 411214091070601 Lake Odessa at Schafer Landing nr Wapello Iowa - 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Location is Lat. 41° 12 ’14” N Long. 91° 7’ 6” W near Wapello, Iowa in Wapello County at Schafer Landing near Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge. Gage is mounted...

  6. 49 CFR 192.507 - Test requirements for pipelines to operate at a hoop stress less than 30 percent of SMYS and at...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test requirements for pipelines to operate at a hoop stress less than 30 percent of SMYS and at or above 100 p.s.i. (689 kPa) gage. 192.507 Section 192... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Test Requirements § 192.507...

  7. A NEW HYSTERESIS COMPENSATION METHOD FOR LOAD CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuZijian; ChenRenwen

    2002-01-01

    A new hysteresis compensation method is presented.After analyzing the characteristics of strain-gage based load cells under loading & unloading conditions, mathe-matical models are established.A solution to compensate the hysteresis of the load cell by the experiments.It is shown that the method is reliable and can effectively re-duce the hysteresis.

  8. 2-D Biaxial Testing and Failure Predictions of IM7/977-2 Carbon/Epoxy Quasi-Isotropic Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    laminate plates from which the desired cruci- form specimen shape, including gage section, was machined out using a computer numeric controlled ( CNC ) mill...and high-speed router . That is, in physically machining the spec- imen to the desired thickness, the (0/90) portions of the lam- inate was removed from

  9. Application of nuclear techniques in Poland; Perspektywy wykorzystania atomistyki w Polsce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Owczarczyk, A.; Urbanski, P. [Instytut Chemii i Techniki Jadrowej, Warsaw (Poland); Romanowski, M. [Biuro Studiow i Projektow Techniki Jadrowej `Proatom`, Warsaw (Poland); Stegowski, Z. [Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland); Nowak, K. [Osrodek Badawczo-Rozwojowy Izotopow, Swierk-Otwock (Poland); Pachan, A. [Instytut Problemow Jadrowych, Swierk-Otwock (Poland); Tanczyk, R. [Centralne Laboratorium Ochrony Radiologicznej, Warsaw (Poland); Jablonski, R. [Zaklad Techniki Izotopowej `Polon-Izot`, Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    The commercial applications of nuclear techniques in Poland have been presented. The special attention have been paid at: radiation technologies, application of radiometric gages in different branches of industry, tracer techniques, production and application of radiation sources in medicine, industry and material testing. 10 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs.

  10. 49 CFR 192.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS... a person who engages in the transportation of gas. Outer Continental Shelf means all submerged lands...) gage at 100 °F (38 °C). Pipe means any pipe or tubing used in the transportation of gas, including pipe...

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP000874 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available --Fred H. Gage Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language Ability, Jian...gsu Normal University--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborati...ies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Language ...Ability, Jiangsu Normal University--The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics Jiangsu Collabor

  12. Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

  13. Flood characteristics of streams in Owyhee County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, H.C.; Harenberg, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    Channel-width measurements were used to estimate annual peaks with a recurrence interval of 10 years at 79 sites in Owyhee County, Idaho, and adjacent areas. These discharges and those from 33 gaging stations are plotted on a map of the area. The map will allow the user to interpolate between sites. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Characteristics of ground motion and threshold values for colluvium slope displacement induced by heavy rainfall: a case study in northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Ching-Jiang; Sue, Dar-Zen

    2016-06-01

    The Huafan University campus is located in the Ta-lun Shan area in northern Taiwan, which is characterized by a dip slope covered by colluvium soil of various depths. For slope disaster prevention, a monitoring system was constructed that consisted of inclinometers, tiltmeters, crack gages, groundwater level observation wells, settlement and displacement observation marks, rebar strain gages, concrete strain gages, and rain gages. The monitoring data derived from hundreds of settlement and displacement observation marks were analyzed and compared with the displacement recorded by inclinometers. The analysis results revealed that the maximum settlement and displacement were concentrated on the areas around the Hui-Tsui, Zhi-An, and Wu-Ming buildings and coincided with periods of heavy rainfall. The computer program STABL was applied for slope stability analysis and modeling of slope failure. For prevention of slope instability, a drainage system and tieback anchors with additional stability measures were proposed to discharge excess groundwater following rainfall. Finally, threshold value curves of rainfall based on slope displacement were proposed. The curves can be applied for predicting slope stability when typhoons are expected to bring heavy rainfall and should be significant in slope disaster prevention.

  15. Water‐Data Report 394031093062801 ELK CREEK NEAR ROTHVILLE MO, STUTMAN RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39040’31”N, Long. 9306’28”W, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is located at southwest corner of bridge crossing on...

  16. Modelling the Somatic Electrical Response of Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    non-linear, time-varying conductances in the soma, including those that underly three putative sodium currents , (IN.-tr,, INa-tail, and INa-rep), a...for excitation and propagation of the nerve impulse. Biophysics Journal. 6:, 1966. [12] C. French and P. Gage. A threshold sodium current in pyramidal

  17. Water‐Data Report 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39 deg 39’ 37”N, long. 93 deg 9’ 9”W, 23 miles east southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is on the right bank, 75 feet south of bridge...

  18. Water‐Data Report 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39 deg 39’ 37”N, long. 93 deg 9’ 9”W, 23 miles east southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is on the right bank, 75 feet south of bridge...

  19. Water‐Data Report 394031093062801 ELK CREEK NEAR ROTHVILLE MO, STUTMAN RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39040’31”N, Long. 9306’28”W, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is located at southwest corner of bridge crossing on...

  20. Water‐Data Report 393619093074801 YELLOW CREEK NR MENDON MO, HWY CC ON SWAN LAKE NWR-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39036’19”N, long. 9307’48”W near Swan Lake NWR, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, in Charlton County. Gage is mounted 9 feet off the ground on...

  1. Water‐Data Report 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39 deg 39’ 37”N, long. 93 deg 9’ 9”W, 23 miles east southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is on the right bank, 75 feet south of bridge...

  2. Water‐Data Report 394031093062801 ELK CREEK NEAR ROTHVILLE MO, STUTMAN RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39040’31”N, Long. 9306’28”W, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is located at southwest corner of bridge crossing on...

  3. Effects of Surface Water Withdrawal on Fishes in Rivers of Northeast Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    the monthly volume of water that occurred at each representative gage location during wet to dry water conditions (30- to 90-percent exceedance val...multiplied by the volume of water for wet to dry water conditions (see Table 4). As discussed in the main text, this procedure assumed that water removed

  4. Hydrostatic Testing and Analysis of Graphite-Epoxy Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    locations of 00 and 450 behave in a manner that makes this method of determining pont feasible. However, the fact that the strains from the gage...34 Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn , Report No. 171-A, June 1951. 19. Timoshenko, Stephen P., Theory of Elastic Stability, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc

  5. 最佳反馈控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    An Experimental Research on Active Control of Vibration Strain in a Flexible Linkage with Piezoceramic Actuators and Gage Sensors.Applications of the eigenvalue theorem on approximate optimizations of nonlinear regulators.Approximations to Optimal Feedback Control Using a Successive Wavelet Collocation Algorithm.Computation of Feedback Operators for Distributed Parameter Systems with Non-Normal Linearizations.

  6. Shock-Induced Borehole Waves and Fracture Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H.; Smeulders, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    We perform wave experiments using a vertical shock tube setup. Shock waves are generated by the rupture of a thin membrane. In the test section, the incident pressure waves generate borehole-guided waves along water-saturated samples. The tube is equipped with side wall gages and a mobile pressure p

  7. Effects for ICBM Basing. Volume 6. Numerical Simulation and Evaluation of Non-Ideal Airblast

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    non-rectangular grid system in the one-dimensional sense . The FCT scheme in both codes was originally implemented based on the assumption of a...MSEC) 240.0-1 1 -------- HML GENERIC MODELO .- GAGE 203 HELIUM LAYER S0 -DUST 190.0 *:P -- CLEAN 0 cooo CERF DATA @HST6-60 140.0- a 210 204 PRESSURE

  8. Flood forecasting for River Mekong with data-based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Khurram M.; Plate, Erich J.

    2014-09-01

    In many regions of the world, the task of flood forecasting is made difficult because only a limited database is available for generating a suitable forecast model. This paper demonstrates that in such cases parsimonious data-based hydrological models for flood forecasting can be developed if the special conditions of climate and topography are used to advantage. As an example, the middle reach of River Mekong in South East Asia is considered, where a database of discharges from seven gaging stations on the river and 31 rainfall stations on the subcatchments between gaging stations is available for model calibration. Special conditions existing for River Mekong are identified and used in developing first a network connecting all discharge gages and then models for forecasting discharge increments between gaging stations. Our final forecast model (Model 3) is a linear combination of two structurally different basic models: a model (Model 1) using linear regressions for forecasting discharge increments, and a model (Model 2) using rainfall-runoff models. Although the model based on linear regressions works reasonably well for short times, better results are obtained with rainfall-runoff modeling. However, forecast accuracy of Model 2 is limited by the quality of rainfall forecasts. For best results, both models are combined by taking weighted averages to form Model 3. Model quality is assessed by means of both persistence index PI and standard deviation of forecast error.

  9. Manual for estimating selected streamflow characteristics of natural-flow streams in the Colorado River basin in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, R.C.; Johnson, E.B.; Plantz, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    Methods are presented for estimating 10 streamflow characteristics at three types of sites on natural flow streams in the Colorado River Basin in Utah. The streamflow characteristics include average discharge and annual maximum 1-, 7-, and 15-day mean discharges for recurrence intervals of 10, 50 and 100 years. At or near gaged sites, two methods weight gaging station data with regression equation values to estimate streamflow characteristics. At sites on ungaged streams, a method estimates streamflow characteristics using regression equations. The regression equations relate the streamflow characteristics to the following basin and climatic characteristics: contributing drainage area, mean basin elevation, mean annual precipitation, main channel slope, and forested area. Separate regression equations were developed for four hydrologically distinct regions in the study area. The standard error of estimate for the 10 streamflow characteristics ranges from 13% to 87%. Basin, climatic, and streamflow characteristics, available as of September 30, 1981, are presented for 135 gaging stations in Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and Wyoming. In addition, weighted estimates of the streamflow characteristics based on station data and the regression equation estimates are provided for most gaging stations. (Author 's abstract)

  10. 49 CFR 195.106 - Internal design pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal design pressure. 195.106 Section 195.106... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.106 Internal design pressure. (a) Internal design pressure for the pipe... pressure in p.s.i. (kPa) gage. S=Yield strength in pounds per square inch (kPa) determined in accordance...

  11. The Calibration of a Low-Frequency Calibrating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-08-20

    to measure the pressure changes because such changes were too small to be measured with a mercury manometer or conventional gage, 4.222 Data The data...volume displacement of the water If the chamber is infinitely stiff, all -the volume displacement will be passed through the mercury manometer , causing a

  12. Nuclear and radiation techniques - state of art and development trends; Techniki jadrowe i radiacyjne - stan obecny oraz kierunki rozwoju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, A.G. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The state of art and development trends of nuclear and radiation techniques in Poland and worldwide have been presented. Among them the radiometric gages, radiation technologies, radiotracer methods and measuring systems for pipeline and vessels, brightness control have been described and their applications in industry, agriculture, health and environment protection have been shown and discussed. 35 refs, 1 fig.

  13. X-Wray Stats and Performance EXplorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Auto, Succ , Corr) A = (T, Desr, Auto, Succ , Serv, Type) 2. Test Bed Architecture The test bed architecture consists of a mini-cluster with one...We conducted a Gage R&R study to prove that the X-Wray SPEX test bed reliably measures key indicators of efficiency. We used this test bed to

  14. E-2C Loads Calibration in DFRC Flight Loads Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Lawrence S.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: a) Safely and efficiently perform structural load tests on NAVAIR E-2C aircraft to calibrate strain gage instrumentation installed by NAVAIR; b) Collect load test data and derive loads equations for use in NAVAIR flight tests; and c) Assist flight test team with use of loads equations measurements at PAX River.

  15. Potential-scour assessments and estimates of maximum scour at selected bridges in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, E.E.

    1995-01-01

    The results of potential-scour assessments at 130 bridges and estimates of maximum scour at 10 bridges in Iowa are presented. All of the bridges evaluated in the study are constructed bridges (not culverts) that are sites of active or discontinued streamflow-gaging stations and peak-stage measurement sites. The period of the study was from October 1991 to September 1994.

  16. Rainfall estimation using raingages and radar — A Bayesian approach: 1. Derivation of estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, D.-J.; Smith, J. A.

    1991-03-01

    Procedures for estimating rainfall from radar and raingage observations are constructed in a Bayesian framework. Given that the number of raingage measurements is typically very small, mean and variance of gage rainfall are treated as uncertain parameters. Under the assumption that log gage rainfall and log radar rainfall are jointly multivariate normal, the estimation problem is equivalent to lognormal co-kriging with uncertain mean and variance of the gage rainfall field. The posterior distribution is obtained under the assumption that the prior for the mean and inverse of the variance of log gage rainfall is normal-gamma 2. Estimate and estimation variance do not have closed-form expressions, but can be easily evaluated by numerically integrating two single integrals. To reduce computational burden associated with evaluating sufficient statistics for the likelihood function, an approximate form of parameter updating is given. Also, as a further approximation, the parameters are updated using raingage measurements only, yielding closed-form expressions for estimate and estimation variance in the Gaussian domain. With a reduction in the number of radar rainfall data in constructing covariance matrices, computational requirements for the estimation procedures are not significantly greater than those for simple co-kriging. Given their generality, the estimation procedures constructed in this work are considered to be applicable in various estimation problems involving an undersampled main variable and a densely sampled auxiliary variable.

  17. Stress state in turbopump bearing induced by shrink fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, P.; Zee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The stress generated by shrink fitting in bearing-like geometries is studied. The feasibility of using strain gages to determine the strain induced by shrink fitting process is demonstrated. Results from a ring with a uniform cross section reveal the validity of simple stress mechanics calculations for determining the stress state induced in this geometry by shrink fitting.

  18. Water‐Data Report 393619093074801 YELLOW CREEK NR MENDON MO, HWY CC ON SWAN LAKE NWR-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39036’19”N, long. 9307’48”W near Swan Lake NWR, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, in Charlton County. Gage is mounted 9 feet off the ground on...

  19. Shock-Induced Borehole Waves and Fracture Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H.; Smeulders, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    We perform wave experiments using a vertical shock tube setup. Shock waves are generated by the rupture of a thin membrane. In the test section, the incident pressure waves generate borehole-guided waves along water-saturated samples. The tube is equipped with side wall gages and a mobile pressure p

  20. Acousto-Elastic Fastener Preload Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-01

    Selection A. R. Robinson, Torque Wrench Integration, Calibration Standard Design W. A. Rogers , Finite Elements Calculations R. A. Carmin, Non Uniform...Waltham, MA 02154. 6. Digital Thickness Gage, Automation Industries, Inc., Sperry Division, Shelter Rock Road, Danbury, CT 06810. 7. Ultrasonic Digital

  1. Le labyrinthe de la cité radieuse. Les pérégrinations de Bérenger chez Ionesco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satijn, Nicolaas Alexander Gerardus

    1982-01-01

    In this study we have made an analysis of the Bérenger-cycle, and more in particular of Tueur sans gages, focussed on some elements which seem to us of essential importance for the study of any literary text. In the order in which they are dealt with these elements are: space, time, language and com

  2. Chinese descendants in East Asia under Japanese colonialism: the workshop on border societies ICAS 8, Macao, 25 June 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douw, L.

    2013-01-01

    Our workshop en gaged with the history of Chinese migrations around the countries of East Asia. There is a big challenge involved in this, especially when discussing the period of Japanese colonialism (1895-1945). For decades, the assertion of national interests has been preponderant in the public

  3. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2008 water year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, David; Cata, Betsy; Kuyumjian, Gregory

    2009-09-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  4. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2009 water year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, David; McCullough, Betsy

    2010-05-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 73 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  5. 46 CFR 193.10-5 - Fire pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Minimum number of pumps Hose and hydrant size, inches Nozzle orifice size, inches Length of hose, feet 100... tube pressure may not be less than 35 p.s.i. (d) Fire pumps shall be fitted on the discharge side with... this amount. (e) Fire pumps shall be fitted with a pressure gage on the discharge side of the pumps....

  6. The use of crosshead displacement in determining fracture parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, C.L.; Voormeeren, L.O.; Janssen, M.

    2013-01-01

    In determining the fracture toughness of a test specimen, standards currently require either locally-measured load-line displacements or clip gage displacements. In order to measure these parameters, secondary sensors generally need to be installed and calibrated, which often comes at a higher cost.

  7. ASR ORTOLAN Seakeeping Trials (As Build Configuration)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-01

    points out that rolling and corkscrew motions were also reduced, resulting in a significant improvement in the general seaworthiness of the HAYES. The...arnle 8. Ship’s speed log 8. Pressure gage P-8 9. Vertical acceleration 9. Bow acceleration 10. Sway acceleration 10. Mode 11. Ultrasonic (Relative Bow

  8. The Future of Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Frank H., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Seven past presidents of the American Educational Research Association discuss trends and the probable nature of educational research in the 1980s. Authors include N.L. Gage, Benjamin S. Bloom, David R. Krathwohl, Robert M. Gagne, Robert Glaser, Robert Ebel, and Robert L. Thorndike. (GC)

  9. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative High Speed Shaft Tapered Roller Bearing Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; McNiff, B.

    2013-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) is a project investigating gearbox reliability primarily through testing and modeling. Previous dynamometer testing focused upon acquiring measurements in the planetary section of the test gearbox. Prior to these tests, the strain gages installed on the planetary bearings were calibrated in a load frame.

  10. Water‐Data Report 393619093074801 YELLOW CREEK NR MENDON MO, HWY CC ON SWAN LAKE NWR-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39036’19”N, long. 9307’48”W near Swan Lake NWR, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, in Charlton County. Gage is mounted 9 feet off the ground on...

  11. Water‐Data Report 393556093132501 ELK CREEK NR SUMNER MO, DS ON SWAN LAKE REFUGE-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 390 35’ 56.0” N, long. 930 13’ 25” W, at Swan Lake NWR, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillecothe, MO, in Charlton County. Gage is located near abandoned...

  12. Effects of Stress on the Electrical Resistance of Ytterbium and Calibration of Ytterbium Stress Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-08-01

    approximately 1,9 cm thick. The gage leads were brought out through holes drilled in the back piece. In order to improve the probability of lead...bump occurring at about 3.5 nsec is a fracture signal arising from a wave reflection from new free surfaces caused by spallation of the target

  13. Response of a Plain and Filled Elastomer (Solithane 113) to High Strain-Rate Compression, Shear, and Tension Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    conducted at a higher impact velocity, showed macro- scopic spallation . A scanning microscope picture showing the internal * surfaces is presented in Figure...To fabricate the gages, it is necessary to drill through the walls of the cylindrical mold. Wires were carefully stretched and welded (see Figure 3.7

  14. Shape Factor Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    10 3. Shape Factor Distributions for Natural Fragments 12 3.1 Platonic Solids and Uniform Viewing from All Viewpoints 12 3.2 Natural Fragments from...12 Fig. 9 The 5 Platonic solids. ............................................................. 12 Fig. 10 Mean shape factor of...of the 5 Platonic solids............................................ 13 Table 3 Sequence of viewing angles in Icosahedron Gage

  15. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage,...

  16. Force Measurements in Vibration and Acoustic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharton, T. D.

    1996-01-01

    The advent of triaxial, piezoelectric force gages and the associated signal processing is a precursor to several dynamics testing innovations. This new technology is applicable to spacecraft programs that JPL manages. An application of force measurement is force limiting (when testing spacecraft in random vibration tests). Base-drive and acoustic modal testing is a potential application.

  17. "Artificial intelligence" at streamgaging stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. B. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Two types of problems are related to collecting hydrologic data at stream gaging stations. One includes the technical/logistical questions associated with measuring and transferring data for processing. Effort spent on these problems ranges from improving devices for sensing data to using electronic data loggers.

  18. Mathematical Storage-Battery Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C. P.; Aston, M.

    1985-01-01

    Empirical formula represents performance of electrical storage batteries. Formula covers many battery types and includes numerous coefficients adjusted to fit peculiarities of each type. Battery and load parameters taken into account include power density in battery, discharge time, and electrolyte temperature. Applications include electric-vehicle "fuel" gages and powerline load leveling.

  19. Water‐Data Report 432139084024201 SHIAWASSEE RIVER AT JAMES TOWNSHIP MI ON SHIAWASSEE NWR-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 43o21’38” N, long. 84o02’18’’W, approximately 4 miles southwest of Saginaw, MI, Saginaw County. Gage is located on Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge...

  20. Water‐Data Report 432139084024201 SHIAWASSEE RIVER AT JAMES TOWNSHIP MI ON SHIAWASSEE NWR-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 43o21’38” N, long. 84o02’18’’W, approximately 4 miles southwest of Saginaw, MI, Saginaw County. Gage is located on Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge...

  1. August Median Streamflow on Ungaged Streams in Eastern Aroostook County, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.; Tasker, Gary D.; Nielsen, Martha G.

    2003-01-01

    Methods for estimating August median streamflow were developed for ungaged, unregulated streams in the eastern part of Aroostook County, Maine, with drainage areas from 0.38 to 43 square miles and mean basin elevations from 437 to 1,024 feet. Few long-term, continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations with small drainage areas were available from which to develop the equations; therefore, 24 partial-record gaging stations were established in this investigation. A mathematical technique for estimating a standard low-flow statistic, August median streamflow, at partial-record stations was applied by relating base-flow measurements at these stations to concurrent daily flows at nearby long-term, continuous-record streamflow- gaging stations (index stations). Generalized least-squares regression analysis (GLS) was used to relate estimates of August median streamflow at gaging stations to basin characteristics at these same stations to develop equations that can be applied to estimate August median streamflow on ungaged streams. GLS accounts for varying periods of record at the gaging stations and the cross correlation of concurrent streamflows among gaging stations. Twenty-three partial-record stations and one continuous-record station were used for the final regression equations. The basin characteristics of drainage area and mean basin elevation are used in the calculated regression equation for ungaged streams to estimate August median flow. The equation has an average standard error of prediction from -38 to 62 percent. A one-variable equation uses only drainage area to estimate August median streamflow when less accuracy is acceptable. This equation has an average standard error of prediction from -40 to 67 percent. Model error is larger than sampling error for both equations, indicating that additional basin characteristics could be important to improved estimates of low-flow statistics. Weighted estimates of August median streamflow, which can be used when

  2. Monitoring of stage and velocity, for computation of discharge in the Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois, 2010-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin K.; Goodwin, Greg E.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Michigan diversion accounting is the process used by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers to quantify the amount of water that is diverted from the Lake Michigan watershed into the Illinois and Mississippi River Basins. A network of streamgages within the Chicago area waterway system monitor tributary river flows and the major river flow on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal near Lemont as one of the instrumental tools used for Lake Michigan diversion accounting. The mean annual discharges recorded by these streamgages are used as additions or deductions to the mean annual discharge recorded by the main stream gaging station currently used in the Lake Michigan diversion accounting process, which is the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal near Lemont, Illinois (station number 05536890). A new stream gaging station, Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois (station number 414757087490401), was installed on September 23, 2010, for the purpose of monitoring stage, velocity, and discharge through the Summit Conduit for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in accordance with Lake Michigan diversion accounting. Summit Conduit conveys flow from a small part of the lower Des Plaines River watershed underneath the Des Plaines River directly into the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal. Because the Summit Conduit discharges into the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal upstream from the stream gaging station at Lemont, Illinois, but does not contain flow diverted from the Lake Michigan watershed, it is considered a flow deduction to the discharge measured by the Lemont stream gaging station in the Lake Michigan diversion accounting process. This report offers a technical summary of the techniques and methods used for the collection and computation of the stage, velocity, and discharge data at the Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois stream gaging station for the 2011 and 2012 Water Years. The stream gaging station Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois (station number 414757087490401) is an

  3. Engineering evaluation of alternatives: Managing the assumed leak from single-shell Tank 241-T-101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Jenkins, C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    At mid-year 1992, the liquid level gage for Tank 241-T-101 indicated that 6,000 to 9,000 gal had leaked. Because of the liquid level anomaly, Tank 241-T-101 was declared an assumed leaker on October 4, 1992. SSTs liquid level gages have been historically unreliable. False readings can occur because of instrument failures, floating salt cake, and salt encrustation. Gages frequently self-correct and tanks show no indication of leak. Tank levels cannot be visually inspected and verified because of high radiation fields. The gage in Tank 241-T-101 has largely corrected itself since the mid-year 1992 reading. Therefore, doubt exists that a leak has occurred, or that the magnitude of the leak poses any immediate environmental threat. While reluctance exists to use valuable DST space unnecessarily, there is a large safety and economic incentive to prevent or mitigate release of tank liquid waste into the surrounding environment. During the assessment of the significance of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid level gage readings, Washington State Department of Ecology determined that Westinghouse Hanford Company was not in compliance with regulatory requirements, and directed transfer of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid contents into a DST. Meanwhile, DOE directed WHC to examine reasonable alternatives/options for safe interim management of Tank 241-T-101 wastes before taking action. The five alternatives that could be used to manage waste from a leaking SST are: (1) No-Action, (2) In-Tank Stabilization, (3) External Tank Stabilization, (4) Liquid Retrieval, and (5) Total Retrieval. The findings of these examinations are reported in this study.

  4. Estimates of monthly streamflow characteristics at selected sites in the upper Missouri River basin, Montana, base period water years 1937-86

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrett, Charles; Johnson, D.R.; Hull, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Estimates of streamflow characteristics (monthly mean flow that is exceeded 90, 80, 50, and 20 percent of the time for all years of record and mean monthly flow) were made and are presented in tabular form for 312 sites in the Missouri River basin in Montana. Short-term gaged records were extended to the base period of water years 1937-86, and were used to estimate monthly streamflow characteristics at 100 sites. Data from 47 gaged sites were used in regression analysis relating the streamflow characteristics to basin characteristics and to active-channel width. The basin-characteristics equations, with standard errors of 35% to 97%, were used to estimate streamflow characteristics at 179 ungaged sites. The channel-width equations, with standard errors of 36% to 103%, were used to estimate characteristics at 138 ungaged sites. Streamflow measurements were correlated with concurrent streamflows at nearby gaged sites to estimate streamflow characteristics at 139 ungaged sites. In a test using 20 pairs of gages, the standard errors ranged from 31% to 111%. At 139 ungaged sites, the estimates from two or more of the methods were weighted and combined in accordance with the variance of individual methods. When estimates from three methods were combined the standard errors ranged from 24% to 63 %. A drainage-area-ratio adjustment method was used to estimate monthly streamflow characteristics at seven ungaged sites. The reliability of the drainage-area-ratio adjustment method was estimated to be about equal to that of the basin-characteristics method. The estimate were checked for reliability. Estimates of monthly streamflow characteristics from gaged records were considered to be most reliable, and estimates at sites with actual flow record from 1937-86 were considered to be completely reliable (zero error). Weighted-average estimates were considered to be the most reliable estimates made at ungaged sites. (USGS)

  5. 一种可用于飞行载荷测量的改进遗传算法%An Improved Genetic Algorithm for Flight Load Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵燕; 高尚; 张多源

    2012-01-01

    The selection of strain gages is important in determining flight loads by strain gage measurement, which has large effects on the prediction of load equations. An improved genetic algorithm of selecting strain gages in the measurements of flight loads was proposed in this paper by considering the elimination of the irrelevant gages. Also, the performances of improved genetic algorithm were analyzed compared with those of exhaustive search and genetic algorithms. Further, the improved genetic algorithm was applied to select the strain gages in the load measurements of certain landing gear. The test example shows that the improved genetic algorithm in this paper could obtain the high-quality load equations with acceptable accuracy and small irrelevance.%应变电桥选择直接决定着飞行载荷测量的精度。通过消除不相关应变电桥,给出了一种适用于飞行载荷测量应变电桥选择的改进遗传算法。通过和穷尽搜索法及传统遗传算法的比较,分析了该改进遗传算法的性能,并将该算法应用于某起落架载荷测量。结果表明:该改进遗传算法可获得具有可接受精度及较小不相关性的高质量载荷方程。

  6. Estimated Flood-Inundation Mapping for the Upper Blue River, Indian Creek, and Dyke Branch in Kansas City, Missouri, 2006-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.; Huizinga, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    In the interest of improved public safety during flooding, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Kansas City, Missouri, completed a flood-inundation study of the Blue River in Kansas City, Missouri, from the U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gage at Kenneth Road to 63rd Street, of Indian Creek from the Kansas-Missouri border to its mouth, and of Dyke Branch from the Kansas-Missouri border to its mouth, to determine the estimated extent of flood inundation at selected flood stages on the Blue River, Indian Creek, and Dyke Branch. The results of this study spatially interpolate information provided by U.S. Geological Survey gages, Kansas City Automated Local Evaluation in Real Time gages, and the National Weather Service flood-peak prediction service that comprise the Blue River flood-alert system and are a valuable tool for public officials and residents to minimize flood deaths and damage in Kansas City. To provide public access to the information presented in this report, a World Wide Web site (http://mo.water.usgs.gov/indep/kelly/blueriver) was created that displays the results of two-dimensional modeling between Hickman Mills Drive and 63rd Street, estimated flood-inundation maps for 13 flood stages, the latest gage heights, and National Weather Service stage forecasts for each forecast location within the study area. The results of a previous study of flood inundation on the Blue River from 63rd Street to the mouth also are available. In addition the full text of this report, all tables and maps are available for download (http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2008/5068). Thirteen flood-inundation maps were produced at 2-foot intervals for water-surface elevations from 763.8 to 787.8 feet referenced to the Blue River at the 63rd Street Automated Local Evaluation in Real Time stream gage operated by the city of Kansas City, Missouri. Each map is associated with gages at Kenneth Road, Blue Ridge Boulevard, Kansas City (at Bannister Road), U.S. Highway 71

  7. Flood-inundation maps for Lake Champlain in Vermont and in northern Clinton County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.; Hayes, Laura

    2016-06-30

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an approximately100-mile length of Lake Champlain in Addison, Chittenden, Franklin, and Grand Isle Counties in Vermont and northern Clinton County in New York were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the International Joint Commission (IJC). The flood-inundationmaps, which can be accessed through the International Joint Commission (IJC) Web site at http://www.ijc.org/en_/, depict estimates of the areal extent flooding correspondingto selected water levels (stages) at the USGS lake gage on the Richelieu River (Lake Champlain) at Rouses Point, N.Y. (station number 04295000). In this study, wind and seiche effects (standing oscillating wave with a long wavelength) were not taken into account and the flood-inundation mapsreflect 11 stages (elevations) for Lake Champlain that are static for the study length of the lake. Near-real-time stages at this lake gage, and others on Lake Champlain, may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at the Richelieu River (Lake Champlain) at Rouses Point.Static flood boundary extents were determined for LakeChamplain in Addison, Chittenden, Franklin, and Grand Isle Counties in Vermont and northern Clinton County in New York using recently acquired (2013–2014) lidar (light detection and ranging) and may be referenced to any of the five USGS lake gages on Lake Champlain. Of these five lakgages, USGS lake gage 04295000, Richelieu River (Lake Champlain) at Rouses Point, N.Y., is the only USGS lake gage that is also a National Weather Service prediction location. Flood boundary extents for the Lake Champlain static flood-inundation map corresponding to the May 201 flood(103.2 feet [ft], National Geodetic Vertical Datum [NGVD] 29) were evaluated by comparing these boundary

  8. Performance evaluation of laser guided leveler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Hoque

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted at Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI farm on clay loam soil during Rabi season of 2010-2011. The treatments consisted of laser land leveling (T1 and control (non-leveled (T2. A preliminary field survey was done using staff gage. Initially a base station was established to dispense laser ray uniformly. The laser ray erected from base station guided the sensor of the stuff gage and the leveler. Elevation data was collected from the different points of the field and made an average. The maximum gage reading were 247.0 cm and the minimum gage reading was 219.2 cm. Average gage readings of the laser leveled plot was 235.66 cm that was settled for auto adjustment. Therefore, huge amount of soils (16.46 cm high was cut from the highest point and subsequently had to fill to the low points. Finally, an equal gage reading of 235.66 cm was observed after leveling the plot. The laser leveler (Leica MLS700 was used hitching with a TAFE tractor. The field was leveled with manual control initially and finally it was operated with auto adjustment. Two operators, 25 litter diesels and total 6 hours time were required during this leveling. Wheat was cultivated in leveled land (T1 and non-leveled land (T2. Laser leveling was insured for improvement in nutrient use efficiencies, option for precision farming, reduces weed problems, and improves uniformity of crop maturity. There was better distribution of water in leveled plot, which helped to reduce irrigation application time 1 hour. Due to uniformity of moisture content improved germination and crop establishment was found which reflected in higher plant population (239 m-2. Maximum yield (3.41 t ha-1 was obtained in T1 due to longer panicle (10.89 cm, more grain per plant (27.47 and 1000 grain weight (47.38 g compared to yield of T2 (2.62 t ha-1.

  9. Estimates of Flow Duration, Mean Flow, and Peak-Discharge Frequency Values for Kansas Stream Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    Streamflow statistics of flow duration and peak-discharge frequency were estimated for 4,771 individual locations on streams listed on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. These statistics included the flow-duration values of 90, 75, 50, 25, and 10 percent, as well as the mean flow value. Peak-discharge frequency values were estimated for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods. Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating flow-duration values of 90, 75, 50, 25, and 10 percent and the mean flow for uncontrolled flow stream locations. The contributing-drainage areas of 149 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Kansas and parts of surrounding States that had flow uncontrolled by Federal reservoirs and used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. Logarithmic transformations of climatic and basin data were performed to yield the best linear relation for developing equations to compute flow durations and mean flow. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were contributing-drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. The analyses yielded a model standard error of prediction range of 0.43 logarithmic units for the 90-percent duration analysis to 0.15 logarithmic units for the 10-percent duration analysis. The model standard error of prediction was 0.14 logarithmic units for the mean flow. Regression equations used to estimate peak-discharge frequency values were obtained from a previous report, and estimates for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods were determined for this report. The regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute flow durations, mean flow, and estimates of peak-discharge frequency for locations along uncontrolled flow streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Flow durations, mean

  10. Result of Congenital Talipes Equinovarus Treated with Ponseti Method in Little Infants%Ponseti方法治疗小婴儿先天性马蹄内翻足疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康映泉; 邱宏; 陈锦云

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To compare current results by using Ponseti method treating congenital talipes equinovarus ( CTE) in patients 0~3 months old and 3~6 months old.Methods:Thirty nine feet in cases younger than six months of CTE were treated with Ponseti meth-od from August, 2010 to September 2012.According to the age differences ,they were divided into younger infancy group (0~3 month, 21 feet) and older infancy group(3~6 month,18 feet).The deformation degree of CTE was evaluated by the Pirani scoring system .A sco-ring of 0-0.5 was regarded as being excellent .For each group,we evaluated the percentage of excellence result according to the Pirani score,the number of casts used ,and the percentage of percutaneous achillotenotomy .The result was compared between the two groups .Re-sults:The excellence rate showed no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05).Both the number of casts used and the per-centage of percutaneous achillotenotomy in the younger infancy group were less than that in the older group .There was obvious difference between the two groups(P<0.05).Conclusion:Using Ponseti method can achieve excellent results for CTE in little infants .Less than 3 months is the best age for treatment of congenital talipes equinovarus .%目的:比较Ponseti方法治疗0~3个月和3~6个月小婴儿先天性马蹄内翻足的近期疗效。方法:2010年8月~2012年9月采用Ponseti方法治疗6个月以内先天性马蹄内翻足39足,其中0~3个月21足,3~6个月18足。对所有患足进行Pirani评分,将0~0.5分判为优良,比较2组的优良率、应用石膏次数及跟腱切断手术率。结果:2组患儿优良率无显著性差异(P>0.05)。0~3个月组应用石膏次数及跟腱切断手术率比3~6个月组少,2组间有显著性差异(P<0.05)。结论:Ponseti方法治疗小婴儿先天性马蹄内翻足效果满意,3个月以内是治疗先天性马蹄内翻足的最佳年龄。

  11. The effect of dryer load on freeze drying process design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sajal M; Jameel, Feroz; Pikal, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    Freeze-drying using a partial load is a common occurrence during the early manufacturing stages when insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are available. In such cases, the immediate production needs are met by performing lyophilization with less than a full freeze dryer load. However, it is not obvious at what fractional load significant deviations from full load behavior begin. The objective of this research was to systematically study the effects of variation in product load on freeze drying behavior in laboratory, pilot and clinical scale freeze-dryers. Experiments were conducted with 5% mannitol (high heat and mass flux) and 5% sucrose (low heat and mass flux) at different product loads (100%, 50%, 10%, and 2%). Product temperature was measured in edge as well as center vials with thermocouples. Specific surface area (SSA) was measured by BET gas adsorption analysis and residual moisture was measured by Karl Fischer. In the lab scale freeze-dryer, the molar flux of inert gas was determined by direct flow measurement using a flowmeter and the molar flux of water vapor was determined by manometric temperature measurement (MTM) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) techniques. Comparative pressure measurement (capacitance manometer vs. Pirani) was used to determine primary drying time. For both 5% mannitol and 5% sucrose, primary drying time decreases and product temperature increases as the load on the shelves decreases. No systematic variation was observed in residual moisture and vapor composition as load decreased. Further, SSA data suggests that there are no significant freezing differences under different load conditions. Independent of dryer scale, among all the effects, variation in radiation heat transfer from the chamber walls to the product seems to be the dominant effect resulting in shorter primary drying time as the load on the shelf decreases (i.e., the fraction of edge vials increases).

  12. Tarsal Bone Dysplasia in Clubfoot as Measured by Ultrasonography: Can It be Used as a Prognostic Indicator in Congenital Idiopathic Clubfoot? A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakanth, Udayakumar; Sudesh, Pebam; Gopinathan, NirmalRaj; Prakash, Mahesh; Goni, Vijay G

    2016-01-01

    Congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV )/clubfoot is the most common congenital orthopedic condition. The success rate of Ponseti casting in the hands of the legend himself is not 100%. The prediction of difficult to correct foot and recurrences still remains a mystery to be solved. We all know that tarsal bones are dysplastic in clubfoot and considering it; we hypothesize that the amount of tarsal dysplasia can predict management duration and outcome. In literature we were not able to find studies that satisfactorily quantify the amount of tarsal dysplasia. Hence, it was considered worthwhile to quantify the amount of dysplasia in tarsal bone and to correlate these parameters with the duration and outcome of treatment by conventional method. A total of 25 infants with unilateral idiopathic clubfoot that have not taken any previous treatment were included in the study. An initial ultrasonography was done before start of treatment in 3 standard planes to measure the maximum length of 3 tarsal bones (talus, calcaneus, and navicular). Ponseti method of treatment was used; pirani scoring was done at each OPD (out patient department) visit. Number of casts required for complete correction and need for any surgical intervention were taken as the outcome parameters. We found that there is a significant correlation between number of casts required and the dysplasia of talus (α error=0.05). We also found a significant negative correlation between relative dysplasia of talus and number of casts required (r=-0.629 sig=0.001, r=-0.552 sig=0.004). Tarsal bone dysplasia as quantified by using ultrasonography can be used as a prognostic indicator in congenital idiopathic clubfoot. Although promising the method needs further studies and can be more useful after long-term follow-up where recurrences if any can be documented. Level II.

  13. The stereodynamics of the Penning ionization of water by metastable neon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni; Candori, Pietro; Falcinelli, Stefano; Pirani, Fernando; Vecchiocattivi, Franco

    2013-10-28

    The stereodynamics of the Penning ionization of water molecules by collision with metastable neon atoms, occurring in the thermal energy range, is of great relevance for the understanding of fundamental aspects of the physical chemistry of water. This process has been studied by analyzing the energy spectrum of the emitted electrons previously obtained in our laboratory in a crossed beam experiment [B. G. Brunetti, P. Candori, D. Cappelletti, S. Falcinelli, F. Pirani, D. Stranges, and F. Vecchiocattivi, Chem. Phys. Lett. 539-540, 19 (2012)]. For the spectrum analysis, a novel semiclassical method is proposed, that assumes ionization events as mostly occurring in the vicinities of the collision turning points. The potential energy driving the system in the relevant configurations of the entrance and exit channels, used in the spectrum simulation, has been formulated by the use of a semiempirical method. The analysis puts clearly in evidence how different approaches of the metastable atom to the water molecule lead to ions in different electronic states. In particular, it provides the angular acceptance cones where the selectivity of the process leading to the specific formation of each one of the two energetically possible ionic product states of H2O(+) emerges. It is shown how the ground state ion is formed when neon metastable atoms approach water mainly perpendicularly to the molecular plane, while the first excited electronic state is formed when the approach occurs preferentially along the C2v axis, on the oxygen side. An explanation is proposed for the observed vibrational excitation of the product ions.

  14. Rain rate and modeled fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from five years of network rain gauge measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Krichevsky, Vladimir; Gebo, Norman

    1992-01-01

    Five years of rain rate and modeled slant path attenuation distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from a network of 10 tipping bucket rain gages was examined. The rain gage network is located within a grid 70 km north-south and 47 km east-west in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States in the vicinity of Wallops Island, Virginia. Distributions were derived from the variable integration time data and from one minute averages. It was demonstrated that for realistic fade margins, the variable integration time results are adequate to estimate slant path attenuations at frequencies above 20 GHz using models which require one minute averages. An accurate empirical formula was developed to convert the variable integration time rain rates to one minute averages. Fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz were derived employing Crane's Global model because it was demonstrated to exhibit excellent accuracy with measured COMSTAR fades at 28.56 GHz.

  15. Geochemical and hydrologic data for San Marcos Springs recharge characterization near San Marcos, Texas, November 2008--December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Cassi L.

    2012-01-01

    During 2008–10, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, collected geochemical and hydrologic data in Bexar, Comal, and Hays Counties, Texas, to define and characterize the sources of recharge to San Marcos Springs. Precipitation samples were collected for stable isotope analysis at 1 site and water-quality samples were collected at 7 springs, 21 wells, and 9 stream sites in the study area between November 2008 and December 2010. Continuous water-quality monitors were installed in three springs, two wells, and at one stream site. Three continuous stream-gaging stations were installed to measure gage height and a stagedischarge rating was developed at two of the three sites. Depth to water below land surface was continuously measured in two wells.

  16. Effects of light wavelength and coherence in structured light sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Kevin; Ramamurthy, Rajesh; Zhai, Zirong; Han, Jie; Yang, Dongmin

    2016-05-01

    Structured light methods are used by many commercial products on the market today. Many such systems using white light projectors while many line gages use standard red laser diodes. However, in recent years there has been much claimed about using blue light, polarized light and partially coherent systems to obtain better performance. Unlike interferometers, moving from red to blue light for a system using only geometric shape information does not gain an automatic advantage from the shorter wavelength. The sensitivity metric does not have a wavelength component to it. But there are other factors that can improve gage performance. The ability to measure some feature is also a function of other parameters such as signal to noise ratio, reflectivity variations, and depth-of-field over which a clear pattern can be seen. This paper will explore the theoretical and experimental data relating to what works and what can be expected from variations on the old methods.

  17. Hydrologic record extension of water-level data in the Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN), 1991-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Paul A.; Petkewich, Matthew D.; O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Telis, Pamela A.

    2015-01-01

    The real-time Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) has been established to support a variety of scientific and water management purposes. The expansiveness of the Everglades, limited number of gaging stations, and extreme sensitivity of the ecosystem to small changes in water depth have created a need for accurate water-level and water-depth maps. The EDEN water-surface elevation model uses data from approximately 240 gages in the Everglades to create daily continuous interpolations of the water-surface elevation and water depth for the freshwater portion of the Everglades from 2000 to the present (2014). These maps provide hydrologic data previously unavailable for assessing biological and ecological studies.

  18. A computer program for plotting stress-strain data from compression, tension, and torsion tests of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, A.; Baker, D. J.; Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program for plotting stress-strain curves obtained from compression and tension tests on rectangular (flat) specimens and circular-cross-section specimens (rods and tubes) and both stress-strain and torque-twist curves obtained from torsion tests on tubes is presented in detail. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 language for the Control Data 6000 series digital computer with the SCOPE 3.0 operating system and requires approximately 110000 octal locations of core storage. The program has the capability of plotting individual strain-gage outputs and/or the average output of several strain gages and the capability of computing the slope of a straight line which provides a least-squares fit to a specified section of the plotted curve. In addition, the program can compute the slope of the stress-strain curve at any point along the curve. The computer program input and output for three sample problems are presented.

  19. Streamflow characteristics related to channel geometry of streams in western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, E.R.; Osterkamp, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Assessment of surface-mining and reclamation activities generally requires extensive hydrologic data. Adequate streamflow data from instrumented gaging stations rarely are available, and estimates of surface- water discharge based on rainfall-runoff models, drainage area, and basin characteristics sometimes have proven unreliable. Channel-geometry measurements offer an alternative method of quickly and inexpensively estimating stream-flow characteristics for ungaged streams. The method uses the empirical development of equations to yield a discharge value from channel-geometry and channel-material data. The equations are developed by collecting data at numerous streamflow-gaging sites and statistically relating those data to selected discharge characteristics. Mean annual runoff and flood discharges with selected recurrence intervals can be estimated for perennial, intermittent, and ephemeral streams. The equations were developed from data collected in the western one-half of the conterminous United States. The effect of the channel-material and runoff characteristics are accounted for with the equations.

  20. Development of Rainfall-Discharge Model for Future NPP candidate Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Ji-hong; Yee, Eric [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    By this study, most suitable model for future nuclear power plant site in Yeongdeok to be used to predict peak amount of riverine flooding was developed by examining historical rainfall and discharge data from the nearest gage station which is Jodong water level gage station in Taehwa basin. Sitting a nuclear power plant (NPP) requires safety analyses that include the effects of extreme events such as flooding or earthquake. In light of South Korean government's 15-year power supply plan that calls for the construction of new nuclear power station in Yeongdeok, it becomes more important to site new station in a safe area from flooding. Because flooding or flooding related accidents mostly happen due to extremely intense rainfall, it is necessary to find out the relationship between rainfall and run-off by setting up feasible model to figure out the peak flow of the river around nuclear related facilities.

  1. Strength Estimation of Self-Piercing Rivets using Lower Bound Limit Load Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2005-08-01

    This paper summarizes the authors' work on strength and failure mode estimation of self-piercing rivets (SPR) for automotive applications. First, the static cross tension strength of an SPR joint is estimated using a lower bound limit load based strength estimator. Failure mode associated with the predicted failure strength can also be identified. It is shown that the cross tension strength of an SPR joint depends on the material and gage combinations, rivet design, die design and riveting direction. The analytical rivet strength estimator is then validated by experimental rivet strength measurements and failure mode observations from nine SPR joint populations with various material and gage combinations. Next, the estimator is used to optimize rivet strength. Two illustrative examples are presented in which rivet strength is improved by changing rivet length and riveting direction from the original manufacturing parameters.

  2. Liquid salt environment stress-rupture testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weiju; Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-03-22

    Disclosed herein are systems, devices and methods for stress-rupture testing selected materials within a high-temperature liquid salt environment. Exemplary testing systems include a load train for holding a test specimen within a heated inert gas vessel. A thermal break included in the load train can thermally insulate a load cell positioned along the load train within the inert gas vessel. The test specimen can include a cylindrical gage portion having an internal void filled with a molten salt during stress-rupture testing. The gage portion can have an inner surface area to volume ratio of greater than 20 to maximize the corrosive effect of the molten salt on the specimen material during testing. Also disclosed are methods of making a salt ingot for placement within the test specimen.

  3. Report of progress of stream measurements for the calendar year 1905, Part XI, Colorado River drainage above Yuma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderlider, M.C.; Swendsen, G.L.

    1906-01-01

    The hydrographic work of the United States Geological Survey includes the collection of facts concerning and the study of conditions affecting the behavior of water from the time it reaches the earh as rain or snow until it joins the oceans or great navigable rivers. These investigations became a distinct feature of the work of the Survey in the fall of 1888, when an instruction camp was established at Embudo, N. Mex. The frist specific appropriation for gaging streams was amde by the act of August 18, 1894, which contained an item of $12, 500 'for gaging the streams and determining the water supply of the United States, including the investigation of underground currents and artesian wells in the arid and semiarid sections.'

  4. Selected developments in laser wire stripping. [cutting insulation from aerospace-type wires and cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The operation of mechanical and thermal strippers and the early development of laser wire strippers are reviewed. NASA sponsored development of laser wire stripping for space shuttle includes bench-type strippers as well as an advanced portable hand-held stripper which incorporates a miniaturized carbon dioxide laser and a rotating optics unit with a gas-jet assist and debris exhaust. Drives and controls girdle the wire and slit the remaining slug without manual assistance. This unit can strip wire sizes 26 through 12 gage. A larger-capacity hand-held unit for wire sizes through 1/0 gage was built using a neodynium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. The hand-held units have a flexible umbilical cable to an accompanying cart that carries the power supply, gas supply, cooling unit, and the controls.

  5. APPLICATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC MATERIAL FILM PVDF (Polyvinylidene Flouride AS LIQUID VISCOSITY SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananto F. S, Santoso D.R., Julius

    2012-03-01

    Research was done by taking 10 samples of oil and 3 different size ofPVDF film and a strain gage,that are: 1 cm x 3 cm (PVDF1; 1 cm x 2 cm (PVDF2; 1 cm x 1 cm (PVDF3. Results showed that the resolution of  PVDF1,  PVDF2 and PVDF3 are  4.6  mv/cPois;  3.1  mv/cPois and 1.5  mv/cPois respectively, while the strain gage produce a resolution of 1.2  mv/cPois. The average resolution of PVDF is 1.53 mv.cPois-1.cm-2, which means that every 1 cm2   PVDF film area and the increase of 1 cPois of viscosity of the material will produce 1.53 millivolts.

  6. Measurement component technology. Volume 1: Cryogenic pressure measurement technology, high pressure flange seals, hydrogen embrittlement of pressure transducer material, close coupled versus remote transducer installation and temperature compensation of pressure transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, K. K.; Udell, D. R.; Iwata, M. M.; Lytle, C. F.; Chrisco, R. M.; Greenough, C. S.; Walling, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of an investigation into the availability and performance capability of measurement components in the area of cryogenic temperature, pressure, flow and liquid detection components and high temperature strain gages. In addition, technical subjects allied to the components were researched and discussed. These selected areas of investigation were: (1) high pressure flange seals, (2) hydrogen embrittlement of pressure transducer diaphragms, (3) The effects of close-coupled versus remote transducer installation on pressure measurement, (4) temperature transducer configuration effects on measurements, and (5) techniques in temperature compensation of strain gage pressure transducers. The purpose of the program was to investigate the latest design and application techniques in measurement component technology and to document this information along with recommendations for upgrading measurement component designs for future S-2 derivative applications. Recommendations are provided for upgrading existing state-of-the-art in component design, where required, to satisfy performance requirements of S-2 derivative vehicles.

  7. Tensile Split Hopkinson Bar Technique: Numerical Analysis of the Problem of Wave Disturbance and Specimen Geometry Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panowicz Robert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A method of tensile testing of materials in dynamic conditions based on a slightly modified compressive split Hopkinson bar system using a shoulder is described in this paper. The main goal was to solve, with the use of numerical modelling, the problem of wave disturbance resulting from application of a shoulder, as well as the problem of selecting a specimen geometry that enables to study the phenomenon of high strain-rate failure in tension. It is shown that, in order to prevent any interference of disturbance with the required strain signals at a given recording moment, the positions of the strain gages on the bars have to be correctly chosen for a given experimental setup. Besides, it is demonstrated that - on the basis of simplified numerical analysis - an appropriate gage length and diameter of a material specimen for failure testing in tension can be estimated.

  8. Evaluation of multi-brush anode systems in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Lanas, Vanessa

    2013-11-01

    The packing density of anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was examined here using four different graphite fiber brush anode configurations. The impact of anodes on performance was studied in terms of carbon fiber length (brush diameter), the number of brushes connected in parallel, and the wire current collector gage. MFCs with different numbers of brushes (one, three or six) set perpendicular to the cathode all produced similar power densities (1200±40mW/m2) and coulombic efficiencies (60%±5%). Reducing the number of brushes by either disconnecting or removing them reduced power, demonstrating the importance of anode projected area covering the cathode, and therefore the need to match electrode projected areas to maintain high performance. Multi-brush reactors had the same COD removal as single-brush systems (90%). The use of smaller Ti wire gages did not affect power generation, which will enable the use of less metal, reducing material costs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Serration Phenomena Occurring During Tensile Tests of Three High-Manganese Twinning-Induced Plasticity (TWIP) Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seokmin; Shin, Sang Yong; Lee, Junghoon; Ahn, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Chin, Kwang-Geun; Lee, Sunghak

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the serration phenomena of two high-Mn TWIP steels and an Al-added TWIP steel were examined by tensile tests, and were explained by the microstructural evolution including formation of localized Portevin-Le Chatelier deformation bands and twins. In stress-strain curves of the high-Mn steels, serrations started in a fine and short shape, and their height and periodic interval increased with increasing strain, whereas the Al-added steel did not show any serrations. According to digital images of strain rate and strain obtained from a vision strain gage system, deformation bands were initially formed at the upper region of the gage section, and moved downward along the tensile loading direction. The time when the band formation started was matched with the time when one serration occurred in the stress-time curve. This serration behavior was generally explained by dynamic strain aging, which was closely related with the formation of deformation bands.

  10. Helmet blastometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, William C; King, Michael J

    2015-03-24

    A helmet blastometer for characterizing the direction, speed, magnitude, and duration of a blast event to determine the likelihood of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (biTBI). Time of arrival (TOA) gage sensors are mounted on a rigid outer shell of the helmet each producing a TOA signal in response to a fast rising blast induced positive pressure change above a predetermined threshold. A receiver analyzes the positive pressure changes from the gages to determine direction, speed, and magnitude of a blast. Other TOA gauge sensors can be used to produce a TOA signal in response to a negative pressure change below a predetermined threshold. The positive and negative pressure change TOA signals are used to determine blast duration. A second set of internal contact pressure sensors is connected to an inner liner of the helmet to detect contact pressure on a user's head to determine if biTBI has been sustained.

  11. Effects of the pre-transformation microstructures on the grain refining of medium-carbon 5Cr-Mo-V steels; Chutanso 5Cr-Mo-V ko no gyaku hentai sairyuka ni oyobosu zenhentai soshiki no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukauda, Y.; Shibata, T.; Ono, S.; Ishiguro, T. [Nippon Steel Works, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    For the purpose of obtaining refined grains over full cross section for improved ductility in heavy-gage products of a medium carbon 5Cr- Mo-V steel, the effects of pre-transformation microstructures on the grain refining during austenitizing were investigated. Samples were prepared to possess either one of three different microstructures , pearlite, bainite and martensite. These samples were heated slowly to the desired austenitizing temperature followed by rapid cooling, and the formation of new austenite grains was examined. Though austenite grains were not refined in cases of martensite and bainite microstructures, these were remarkably refined in case of pearlite. Portions of pearlite were enriched with carbon, where the transformation temperature into austenite was lower, and this is considered to be the reason that finer austenite grains were formed.Above results show that arranging pearlite microstructure before quenching heat treatment is effective for obtaining refined grains over full cross section in heavy-gage products. (author)

  12. Analysis of the Magnitude and Frequency of Peak Discharge and Maximum Observed Peak Discharge in New Mexico and Surrounding Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltemeyer, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the magnitude and frequency of peak discharges are necessary for the reliable design of bridges, culverts, and open-channel hydraulic analysis, and for flood-hazard mapping in New Mexico and surrounding areas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Department of Transportation, updated estimates of peak-discharge magnitude for gaging stations in the region and updated regional equations for estimation of peak discharge and frequency at ungaged sites. Equations were developed for estimating the magnitude of peak discharges for recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years at ungaged sites by use of data collected through 2004 for 293 gaging stations on unregulated streams that have 10 or more years of record. Peak discharges for selected recurrence intervals were determined at gaging stations by fitting observed data to a log-Pearson Type III distribution with adjustments for a low-discharge threshold and a zero skew coefficient. A low-discharge threshold was applied to frequency analysis of 140 of the 293 gaging stations. This application provides an improved fit of the log-Pearson Type III frequency distribution. Use of the low-discharge threshold generally eliminated the peak discharge by having a recurrence interval of less than 1.4 years in the probability-density function. Within each of the nine regions, logarithms of the maximum peak discharges for selected recurrence intervals were related to logarithms of basin and climatic characteristics by using stepwise ordinary least-squares regression techniques for exploratory data analysis. Generalized least-squares regression techniques, an improved regression procedure that accounts for time and spatial sampling errors, then were applied to the same data used in the ordinary least-squares regression analyses. The average standard error of prediction, which includes average sampling error and average standard error of regression, ranged from 38 to 93 percent

  13. An Analysis of Shock-Compression in Mo-Si Powder Mixtures Using Recovery and Time-Resolved Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    1999-06-01

    The densification and reaction characteristics in the Mo-Si system were investigated utilizing recovery experiments as well as time resolved measurements with in-situ stress gages. The starting sample in all cases consisted of statically pressed Mo + 2 Si powder mixtures ( ~55% TMD). The recovery experiments were performed using the Sandia Momma Bear and Momma Bear A fixtures with baratol and composition B explosives respectively. The instrumented experiments were performed in a capsule design similar to that of the Momma Bear, but modified to incorporate poly-vinyl di-flouride (PVDF) stress gages at the front and rear surfaces of the powder. These experiments were performed using a single stage gas gun in the velocity range of 500 m/s to 1 km/s. The instrumented experiments allow the crush strength, densification history, and reaction threshold to be mapped at increasing pressure to correlate with reaction observed in the recovery experiments.

  14. Characterization of long-gauge fiber optic sensors for structural identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suzhen; Wu, Zhishen

    2005-05-01

    To monitor structural behavior of large-scale civil infrastructures such as long-span bridges, it requires direct and accurate measurement of "macroscopic" strains which are more representative of the deformation of entire structural element. On the other hand, quasi-distributed measurements are also supposed to serve the purpose to catch the characters of whole structure. In this regard, a novel packaging method for practical adaptation of long-gage FBG strain sensor in civil structures is proposed. After a series of tests including uniaxial tension and compression, bending, free-vibration and shaking table tests, the ability of the packaged FBG sensors fixed on different specimen for macro-strain measurements has been characterized by comparing with conventional foil strain gauges in both static and dynamic cases. Combined with the parametric identification method based on macro-stains, the applicability of quasi-distributed long-gage FBG sensors in structural parameter estimation and damage detection is discussed.

  15. On the spring and mass of the Dirac oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The Dirac oscillator is a relativistic generalization of the quantum harmonic oscillator. In particular, the square of the Hamiltonian for the Dirac oscillator yields the Klein-Gordon equation with a potential of the form: (ar(sub 2) + b(L x S)), where a and b are constants. To obtain the Dirac oscillator, a 'minimal substitution' is made in the Dirac equation, where the ordinary derivative is replaced with a covariant derivative. However, an unusual feature of the covariant derivative in this case is that the potential is a non-trivial element of the Clifford algebra. A theory which naturally gives rise to gage potentials which are non-trivial elements of the Clifford algebra is that based on local automorphism invariance. An exact solution of the automorphism gage field equations which reproduces both the potential term and the mass term of the Dirac oscillator is presented.

  16. SIM regional comparison SIM.L-K4.2009 on the calibration of internal and external diameter standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Theodore; Pires Alves, J. A.; Gastaldi, Bruno R.; Navarrete, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The Inter-American Metrology System (SIM) has carried out a key comparison of diameter measurements. The artifacts studied were four ring gages and four plug gages. The measurand was a specified diameter of each gauge at 20 °C and corrected to zero force. This report presents results obtained by the individual participants and an analysis of the results and their uncertainties. The results are in good agreement with one another, well within the range expected based on the measurement uncertainties claimed by the participants. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  17. Peak streamflow on selected streams in Arkansas, December 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, Brian K.

    2017-01-11

    Heavy rainfall during December 2015 resulted in flooding across parts of Arkansas; rainfall amounts were as high as 12 inches over a period from December 27, 2015, to December 29, 2015. Although precipitation accumulations were highest in northwestern Arkansas, significant flooding occurred in other parts of the State. Flood damage occurred in several counties as water levels rose in streams, and disaster declarations were declared in 32 of the 75 counties in Arkansas.Given the severity of the December 2015 flooding, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), conducted a study to document the meteorological and hydrological conditions prior to and during the flood; compiled flood-peak gage heights, streamflows, and flood probabilities at USGS streamflow-gaging stations; and estimated streamflows and flood probabilities at selected ungaged locations.

  18. Interactive programs for low-flow frequency analyses for use in regional studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyndman, J. R.; Huff, D. D.

    1978-08-01

    Seven-day ten-year low-flow values have been used as indices of water availability for regional energy facility siting. This paper describes an automated system for generating low-flow frequency distributions for United States Geological Survey streamflow gaging sites. Since no single frequency distribution will match the low flow frequencies at all stream gaging stations, it is necessary to examine several possible distributions for each station to determine the most useful one. Four representative low flow frequency distributions, Gumbel's limited distribution of the smallest value, the Pearson Type III, the Log-Pearson III, and the Log-Normal distributions, have been chosen for inclusion in an interactive set of programs, named LOFL02. LOFL02 forms one analysis module of the ORNL Water Analysis System (WAS), and when used in conjunction with other WAS programs makes frequency analysis viable on a regional scale by facilitating the handling of large amounts of data for large numbers of stations.

  19. Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin: Statewide project data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

    1992-03-01

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Ohio each water year. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, 95 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and content records for 5 streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality for 40 streamflow-gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and (4) water levels for 431 observation wells.

  20. Occurrence and transport of selected constituents in streams near the Stibnite mining area, Central Idaho, 2012–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheridge, Alexandra B.

    2015-12-07

    Mining of stibnite (antimony sulfide), tungsten, gold, silver, and mercury near the town of Stibnite in central Idaho has left a legacy of trace element contamination in local streams. Water-quality and streamflow monitoring data from a network of five streamflow-gaging stations were used to estimate trace-element and suspended-sediment loads and flow-weighted concentrations in the Stibnite mining area between 2012 and 2014. Measured concentrations of arsenic exceeded human health-based water-quality criteria at each streamflow-gaging station, except for Meadow Creek (site 2), which was selected to represent background conditions in the study area. Measured concentrations of antimony exceeded human health-based water-quality criteria at sites 3, 4, and 5.

  1. Numerical analysis of drilling hole work-hardening effects in hole-drilling residual stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Liu, Y. H.

    2008-11-01

    The hole-drilling strain gage method is an effective semi-destructive technique for determining residual stresses in the component. As a mechanical technique, a work-hardening layer will be formed on the surface of the hole after drilling, and affect the strain relaxation. By increasing Young's modulus of the material near the hole, the work-hardening layer is simplified as a heterogeneous annulus. As an example, two finite rectangular plates submitted to different initial stresses are treated, and the relieved strains are measured by finite element simulation. The accuracy of the measurement is estimated by comparing the simulated residual stresses with the given initial ones. The results are shown for various hardness of work-hardening layer. The influence of the relative position of the gages compared with the thickness of the work-hardening layer, and the effect of the ratio of hole diameter to work-hardening layer thickness are analyzed as well.

  2. International Conference on Experimental Mechanics, Beijing, People's Republic of China, Oct. 7-10, 1985, Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.; Yang, L.

    1985-01-01

    The topics discussed in this volume include strain gage techniques, photoelasticity and photoplasticity, optical methods, dynamic measurements, nondestructive testing, structural analysis and testing, residual stress and X-ray analysis, instrumentation, image processing and data acquisition techniques, and experimental mechanics applied to fracture mechanics and to biomechanics. Papers are presented on high temperature strain gage alloys, application of conjugate images in holographic interferometry, dispersion of stress waves in a laminated composite, fatigue crack closure study by using the acoustic emission technique, and cyclic creep testing of lead alloy beams. Consideration is also given to experimental studies on residual stresses in injection molded plastics by means of photoelasticity and Liesegang's rings, multicomponent dynamometers for control of parasitic components on force standard machines, application of image processing techniques to stress measurement by copper electroplating, and fatigue crack closure in polymers.

  3. Ponseti方法治疗延迟就诊的儿童先天性马蹄内翻足%Ponseti method in the management of delayed admission of congenital clubfoot in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱光辉; 梅海波; 伍江雁; 刘昆; 唐进; 赫荣国

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the outcome of Ponseti method in management of delayed admission of congenital clubfoot in children. Methods 19 cases (28 feet) of congenital clubfoot patients aged between 12 ~36 months were managed by Ponseti method, and the outcome was assessed by the Pirani score system and International Clubfoot Study Group (ICFSG) score. Results The times of cast immobilization were 4~10(6. 0 ± 1. 3). The duration of cast immobilization was 7~13 ( 9. 0 ± 1. 3 ) weeks. 26 feet ( 26/28 ) needed percutaneous tendo-achilles tenotomy. The Pirani score before surgery was 3~6(4. 9 ± 0. 9), while 3 weeks postoperation, it decreased to 0~1. 5(0. 4 ± 0. 5). According to Pirani criteria, the excellent-good rate was 22/28. 2 cases had degree Ⅰ cast pressure sore, which was cured by cast removal,dress changing and other management. None had incision infection, vessel injury or nerve injury. In the last follow-up, the ICFSG score was 1~33(13. 8 ± 11. 1), 8 cases with excellent results, 10 good, 4 fair and 6 poor. The excellent-good rate was 18/28. 6 feet(6/28) had relapse with 3 feet treated by re-cast-ing and tibialis anterior transfer, 2 feet managed by Achilles tenotomy, capsulotomy and tibialis anterior transfer, 1 foot with Achilles tenotomy, mid-tarsal osteotomy fixed by Kirschner wires. Conclusions Ponseti method has a fa-vorable outcome in management of delayed admission between 12~36 months in children with congenital clubfoot. It can avoid extensive soft tissue release. The relapse rate is higher than younger children, which is needed by further surgery.%目的:评价Ponseti方法治疗延迟就诊的儿童先天性马蹄内翻足的临床疗效。方法采用Ponseti方法治疗19例(28足)12~36月龄的先天性马蹄内翻足患儿,按 Pirani系统和国际马蹄内翻足学会评分系统(ICFSG)进行效果评价。结果石膏固定4~10(6.0±1.3)次,石膏固定总时间7~13(9.0±1.3)周。26足(26/28)的患儿

  4. Steering Performance, Tactical Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-29

    NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Automotive Instrumentation Division (TEDT-AT-AD-I) U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center 400...characterize the on-center vehicle responses of military vehicles for the purposes of influencing vehicle design and ensuring military truck steering... mechanism attached to the test vehicle’s steering wheel (or replaces the steering wheel) that is strain gaged and calibrated to measure the steering effort

  5. Comparative simulations of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami with MOST and Cliffs

    CERN Document Server

    Tolkova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Wet-dry interface which appreciably increases accuracy of tsunami simulations with the MOST model (Method of Splitting Tsunamis, adapted by the NOAA for tsunami forecasting operations) is highlighted here with a few comparative simulations. The new solution, termed Cliffs, exceeds all MOST versions in accuracy of computing later waves. This is demonstrated with simulation of the Tohoku-2011 tsunami to Monterey Bay, CA, and into fiords, bays, and inlets of southeastern Alaska, followed by comparison with tide gage records.

  6. Testing Brain Overgrowth and Synaptic Models of Autism Using NPC’s and Neurons from Patient-Derived IPS Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    interaction, and limited and repetitive interests and behavior. Recent studies have led to two major hypotheses for autism pathogenesis : early brain...interests and behavior. Recent studies have led to two major hypotheses for autism pathogenesis . First, early brain overgrowth appears to be a critical...Models of Autism Using NPC’s and Neurons from Patient- Derived IPS Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Fred H. Gage, Ph.D

  7. The Cowpens Staff Ride and Battlefield Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    the New England Army. In 1775, they became the basis of the Continental Army. only in time, and with the expert and perceptive advice of General Baron ...1690, and Montesquieu , L ‘Esprit des lois, 1748. 2. In that action, the British commander, General Gage, sent several hundred of his troops from...Steuben was neither a general nor a baron , but Benjamin Franklin, who discovered him, correctly identified the Prussian officer as ideally suited to

  8. Des bains au tourisme: la tentation de l'eau au début de la Troisième République

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Bruston

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Les monographies départementales d’Adolphe Joanne permettent de proposer une image touristique de la France des années 1880. Par une analyse du corpus linguistique, on propose de voir les grandes tendances à l’œuvre mais également la variété des situations, d’où se dégage un constat d’importance: le lien originel entre les pratiques de bains et le tourisme.

  9. Instrument evaluation, calibration, and installation for the heater experiments at Stripa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrauf, T.; Pratt, H.; Simonson, E.; Hustrulid, W.; Nelson, P.; DuBois, A.; Binnall, E.; Haught, R.

    1979-12-01

    Borehole instrumentation for the measurement of temperature, displacement, and stress was evaluated, modified, calibrated, and installed in an underground site at Stripa, Sweden where experiments are currently underway to investigate the suitability of granite as a storage medium for nuclear waste. Three arrays of borehole instrumentation measure the thermomechanical effects caused by electrical heaters which simulate the thermal output of canisters of radioactive waste. Because most rock mechanics investigations are carried out at modest temperatures, a sustained operating temperature as high as 200/sup 0/C was an unusual and most important criterion governing the instrumentation program. Extensive laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect of high temperature on instrument behavior and also to develop calibration and data-reduction procedures. The rod extensometers were tested for anchor creep, the selection of a suitable high-temperature pressurizing fluid, and the thermal stability of the grout. Four temperature corrections are incorporated into the data reduction of the USBM borehole deformation measurement: the bridge voltage offset correction, the change in calibration factor induced by temperature, and the thermal expansion of the gage and of the rock. The vibrating wire gages were calibrated in the laboratory by loading gages installed in a granite block at pressures up to 13 MPa and at temperatures ranging from 20/sup 0/ to 200/sup 0/C. Both the slope and offset of the response equation are corrected for temperature effects. Most thermocouples were calibrated in an oven at the field site. Thermocouples were emplaced with individual gages and into holes backfilled with sand or grout.

  10. Fuel-Air Explosive Simulation of Far-Field Nuclear Airblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-31

    average jet width as a funtion of time and Figures 19 and 20 are plots of the heaa trajectories of characteristic vertical jets. In both ot the latter two...t.e nuclear static overpressure data were obtained with variable reluctance or strain gage transducers in conjunction with magnetic tape recording...These are high frequency piezoelectric transducers with a built-in voltage-follower amplifier. The rise time of these transducers is ,i ps. Resonant

  11. Maine StreamStats: a water-resources web application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Maine StreamStats is a tool that any user with Internet access can use to delineate a basin on the fly and estimate a wide variety of streamflow statistics for ungaged sites on rivers and streams in Maine. Estimates are based on regression equations or are from data from similar gaged locations on the stream. Maine StreamStats is based on a national StreamStats application that can be used for streamflow estimates in many other states across the country.

  12. Development of an Inlet Pressure Sensor for Control in a Left Ventricular Assist Device

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    A Tesla type continuous flow left ventricular assist device (VAD) has been designed by Penn State and Advanced Bionics, Inc. (ABI). When a continuous flow device is employed, care must be taken to limit low pressures in the ventricle that can produce an obstruction to the inlet cannula or trigger arrhythmias. Design of an inexpensive, semi-conductor strain gage inlet pressure sensor to detect suction has been completed. The research and design analysis included finite element modeling of the ...

  13. Overwash Processes and Foredune Ecology, Nauset Spit, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    played a major role in the infilling of Laguna Madre behind Padre Island, Texas . Washover deposits were subsequently reworked by the wind, which...stabilization experiments have been undertaken along the U.S. barrier coastline from Massachusetts to Texas (Savage, 1963; Gage, 1970; Dahl, et al., 1975...embayment in the mainland at the Chatham Fish Pier (Fig. $ 90). In this region the barrier widened to as much as 800 meters. In 1938 New North Beach was 4.1

  14. Environmental Durability of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    linear variable capacitor (displacement measuring device) xxvii of applied far-field stress at fracture instability Giys intercept yield strength Outs...humidity. Two varieties of F M73 were tested: F M®73M containing a non-woven polyester scrim cloth (Figure 6a); and F M®73U, an unsupported "neat...those from the Gr-BMI/AF-191M/Gr-BMI system) or an SLVC (super linear variable capacitor ) capacitance gage transducer for specimens experiencing small

  15. Studies of Transitional Flow, Unsteady Separation Phenomena and Particle Induced Augmentation Heating on Ablated Nose Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    empiricism in their approaches. In correlating measurements of transition made in wind tunnels, we are faced with the problem of evaluating the influence...resonance, a special mounting system was developed (as shown in Figure 84) to lock the gage firmly into the model. A thin insulating barrier of...d) Illinois Institute of Technology Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Chicago, XL 60616 (1) The Johns Hopkins

  16. The Senior Visiting Surgeons Program: A Model for Sustained Military-Civilian Collaboration in Times of War and Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    and Air Force) who work collaboratively with the single goal of providing immediate surgical therapy , stabilization, and critical care services while...recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa). This drug which was designed and approved for treatment of patients with hemophilia who had developed antibodies to factor...Ohio Wayne Meredith, North Carolina Gene Moore, Colorado Frederick Moore, Florida Peter Musket, Ohio Gage Ochsner, Georgia Andrew Peitzman, Pennsylvania

  17. Annual Historical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Development Plan V 41 _ MRSA Field Evaluation on SDC Program V 41 ,-. SMART at AMCCOM V 41 MOP Shop Relocation V 42 M249 Squad Automatic Weapon V 42 Technical... robotics , and measurements and qualification of auto gages at Mississippi Army Ammunition Plant. Major General 0. Decker (retired) conducted an...be telerobotically operated to eliminate human contact with dud ammunition. The Human Engineering Laboratory (HEL) had an ongoing robotic test project

  18. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1995 water year. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barks, R. [ed.; Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P.

    1996-08-01

    The principle investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 15 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The United States Department of Interior Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, operates two of the stations under a subcontract; these are identified in the station manuscripts. Included in this report are data from one seepage run conducted in Los Alamos Canyon during the 1995 water year.

  19. Generation of a Sediment Rating and Load Curve Demonstrated at the Mackinaw River Confluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Demonstrated at the Mackinaw River Confluence by Jeremy A. Sharp and Ronald E. Heath PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note...the gage), flood flow frequency analysis, and normal depth computations. These data are calculated using the collected data. Once gathered, the...have a long (at least 20 years) period of record. This provides the means to calculate the flood flow frequency curve. Additional collected data are

  20. Erosion Control of Scour during Construction. Report 5. Experimental Measurements of Refraction and Diffraction Downcoast of an Oblique Breakwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    atrraymgiiit No . , Itit 7. .Al I dat a from these two gage a r ringetritts tesi I t ed ini a dat aj ,(t t ha t presented Ldie, wave hieights a t 1 - ft...34 TO ? 11 A C2 K) P 6 C INT N NU - - .-- L[ CLAT P Ip CIDE -𔃻T WAvE PAY PwASE INTEGRAL FRO’- C -- ------------------- TIP x-SEC lION