WorldWideScience

Sample records for pipe reactor mohtr

  1. Heat-pipe thermionic reactor concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm Pedersen, E.

    1967-01-01

    Main components are reactor core, heat pipe, thermionic converter, secondary cooling system, and waste heat radiator; thermal power generated in reactor core is transported by heat pipes to thermionic converters located outside reactor core behind radiation shield; thermionic emitters are in direct...

  2. Radionuclide buildup in BWR [boiling water reactor] reactor coolant recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duce, S.W.; Marley, A.W.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-12-01

    Since the spring of 1985, thermoluminescent dosimeter, dose rate, and gamma spectral data have been acquired on the contamination of boiling water reactor primary coolant recirculation systems as part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission funded study. Data have been gathered for twelve facilities by taking direct measurements and/or obtaining plant and vendor data. The project titled, ''Effectiveness and Safety Aspects of Selected Decontamination Processes'' (October 1983) initially reviewed the application of chemical decontamination processes on primary coolant recirculation system piping. Recontamination of the system following pipe replacement or chemical decontamination was studied as a second thrust of this program. During the course of this study, recontamination measurements were made at eight different commercial boiling water reactors. At four of the reactors the primary coolant recirculation system piping was chemically decontaminated. At the other four the piping was replaced. Vendor data were obtained from two boiling water reactors that had replaced the primary coolant recirculation system piping. Contamination measurements were made at two newly operating boiling water reactors. This report discusses the results of these measurements as they apply to contamination and recontamination of boiling water reactor recirculation piping. 16 refs., 29 figs., 9 tabs

  3. Heat pipe nuclear reactor for space power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koening, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A heat-pipe-cooled nuclear reactor has been designed to provide 3.2 MWth to an out-of-core thermionic conversion system. The reactor is a fast reactor designed to operate at a nominal heat-pipe temperature of 1675 K. Each reactor fuel element consists of a hexagonal molybdenum block which is bonded along its axis to one end of a molybdenum/lithium-vapor heat pipe. The block is perforated with an array of longitudinal holes which are loaded with UO2 pellets. The heat pipe transfers heat directly to a string of six thermionic converters which are bonded along the other end of the heat pipe. An assembly of 90 such fuel elements forms a hexagonal core. The core is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield, a thin thermal neutron absorber, and a BeO reflector containing boron-loaded control drums.

  4. Heat transfer capability analysis of heat pipe for space reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huaqi; Jiang Xinbiao; Chen Lixin; Yang Ning; Hu Pan; Ma Tengyue; Zhang Liang

    2015-01-01

    To insure the safety of space reactor power system with no single point failures, the reactor heat pipes must work below its heat transfer limits, thus when some pipes fail, the reactor could still be adequately cooled by neighbor heat pipes. Methods to analyze the reactor heat pipe's heat transfer limits were presented, and that for the prevailing capillary limit analysis was improved. The calculation was made on the lithium heat pipe in core of heat pipes segmented thermoelectric module converter (HP-STMC) space reactor power system (SRPS), potassium heat pipe as radiator of HP-STMC SRPS, and sodium heat pipe in core of scalable AMTEC integrated reactor space power system (SAIRS). It is shown that the prevailing capillary limits of the reactor lithium heat pipe and sodium heat pipe is 25.21 kW and 14.69 kW, providing a design margin >19.4% and >23.6%, respectively. The sonic limit of the reactor radiator potassium heat pipe is 7.88 kW, providing a design margin >43.2%. As the result of calculation, it is concluded that the main heat transfer limit of HP-STMC SRPS lithium heat pipe and SARIS sodium heat pipe is prevailing capillary limit, but the sonic limit for HP-STMC SRPS radiator potassium heat pipe. (authors)

  5. Probabilistic analyses of failure in reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    LLNL is performing probabilistic reliability analyses of PWR and BWR reactor coolant piping for the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Specifically, LLNL is estimating the probability of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) in the reactor coolant loop piping in PWR plants, and in the main stream, feedwater, and recirculation piping of BWR plants. In estimating the probability of DEGB, LLNL considers two causes of pipe break: pipe fracture due to the growth of cracks at welded joints (direct DEGB), and pipe rupture indirectly caused by the seismically-induced failure of critical supports or equipment (indirect DEGB)

  6. Reactor Materials Program probability of indirectly--induced failure of L and P reactor process water piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    The design basis accident for the Savannah River Production Reactors is the abrupt double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of a large process water pipe. This accident is not considered credible in light of the low applied stresses and the inherent ductility of the piping material. The Reactor Materials Program was initiated to provide the technical basis for an alternate credible design basis accident. One aspect of this work is to determine the probability of the DEGB; to show that in addition to being incredible, it is also highly improbable. The probability of a DEGB is broken into two parts: failure by direct means, and indirectly-induced failure. Failure of the piping by direct means can only be postulated to occur if an undetected crack grows to the point of instability, causing a large pipe break. While this accident is not as severe as a DEGB, it provides a conservative upper bound on the probability of a direct DEGB of the piping. The second part of this evaluation calculates the probability of piping failure by indirect causes. Indirect failure of the piping can be triggered by an earthquake which causes other reactor components or the reactor building to fall on the piping or pull it from its supports. Since indirectly-induced failure of the piping will not always produce consequences as severe as a DEGB, this gives a conservative estimate of the probability of an indirectly- induced DEGB. This second part, indirectly-induced pipe failure, is the subject of this report. Failure by seismic loads in the piping itself will be covered in a separate report on failure by direct causes. This report provides a detailed evaluation of L reactor. A walkdown of P reactor and an analysis of the P reactor building provide the basis for extending the L reactor results to P reactor

  7. Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclure, Patrick Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dasari, Venkateswara Rao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reid, Robert Stowers [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    An important niche for nuclear energy is the need for power at remote locations removed from a reliable electrical grid. Nuclear energy has potential applications at strategic defense locations, theaters of battle, remote communities, and emergency locations. With proper safeguards, a 1 to 10-MWe (megawatt electric) mobile reactor system could provide robust, self-contained, and long-term power in any environment. Heat pipe-cooled fast-spectrum nuclear reactors have been identified as a candidate for these applications. Heat pipe reactors, using alkali metal heat pipes, are perfectly suited for mobile applications because their nature is inherently simpler, smaller, and more reliable than “traditional” reactors. The goal of this project was to develop a scalable conceptual design for a compact reactor and to identify scaling issues for compact heat pipe cooled reactors in general. Toward this goal two detailed concepts were developed, the first concept with more conventional materials and a power of about 2 MWe and a the second concept with less conventional materials and a power level of about 5 MWe. A series of more qualitative advanced designs were developed (with less detail) that show power levels can be pushed to approximately 30 MWe.

  8. Application of heat pipes in nuclear reactors for passive heat removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Z.; Yetisir, M., E-mail: haquez@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This paper introduces a number of potential heat pipe applications in passive (i.e., not requiring external power) nuclear reactor heat removal. Heat pipes are particularly suitable for small reactors as the demand for heat removal is significantly less than commercial nuclear power plants, and passive and reliable heat removal is required. The use of heat pipes has been proposed in many small reactor designs for passive heat removal from the reactor core. This paper presents the application of heat pipes in AECL's Nuclear Battery design, a small reactor concept developed by AECL. Other potential applications of heat pipes include transferring excess heat from containment to the atmosphere by integrating low-temperature heat pipes into the containment building (to ensure long-term cooling following a station blackout), and passively cooling spent fuel bays. (author)

  9. Pipe line construction for reactor containment buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masataka; Yoshinaga, Toshiaki

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the missile phenomenon caused by broken fragments due to pipe whip phenomenon in a portion of pipe lines connected to a reactor containment from prevailing to other portions. Constitution: Various pipe lines connected to the pressure vessel are disposed at the outside of the containments and they are surrounded with a plurality of protection partition walls respectively independent from each other. This can eliminate the effect of missile phenomena upon pipe rupture from prevailing to the pipe lines and instruments. Furthermore this can afford sufficient spaces for the pipe lines, as well as for earthquake-proof supports. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. Consequences of pipe ruptures in metal fueled, liquid metal cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, F.E.

    1990-01-01

    The capability to simulate pipe ruptures has recently been added to the SASSYS-1 LMR systems analysis code. Using this capability, the consequences of severe pipe ruptures in both loop-type and pool-type reactors using metal fuel were investigated. With metal fuel, if the control rods scram then either type of reactor can easily survive a complete double-ended break of a single pipe; although, as might be expected, the consequences are less severe for a pool-type reactor. A pool-type reactor can even survive a protected simultaneous breaking of all of its inlet pipes without boiling of the coolant or melting of the fuel or cladding. 2 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  11. Updated pipe break analysis for Advanced Neutron Source Reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Yoder, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) is a research reactor to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will supply the highest continuous neutron flux levels of any reactor in the world. It uses plate-type fuel with high-mass-flux and highly subcooled heavy water as the primary coolant. The Conceptual Safety Analysis for the ANSR was completed in June 1992. The thermal-hydraulic pipe-break safety analysis (performed with a specialized version of RELAP5/MOD3) focused primarily on double-ended guillotine breaks of the primary piping and some core-damage mitigation options for such an event. Smaller, instantaneous pipe breaks in the cold- and hot-leg piping were also analyzed to a limited extent. Since the initial analysis for the conceptual design was completed, several important changes to the RELAP5 input model have been made reflecting improvements in the fuel grading and changes in the elevation of the primary coolant pumps. Also, a new philosophy for pipe-break safety analysis (similar to that adopted for the New Production Reactor) accentuates instantaneous, limited flow area pipe-break accidents in addition to finite-opening-time, double-ended guillotine breaks of the major coolant piping. This paper discloses the results of the most recent instantaneous pipe-break calculations

  12. Structural and piping issues in the design certification of advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.A.; Terao, D.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the design certification of structures and piping for evolutionary and passive advanced light water reactors. Advanced reactor designs are based on a set of assumed site-related parameters that are selected to envelop a majority of potential nuclear power plant sites. Multiple time histories are used as the seismic design basis in order to cover the majority of potential sites in the US. Additionally, design are established to ensure that surface motions at a particular site will not exceed the enveloped standard design surface motions. State-of-the-art soil-structure interaction (SSI) analyses have been performed for the advanced reactors, which include structure-to-structure interaction for all seismic Category 1 structures. Advanced technology has been utilized to exclude the dynamic effects of pipe rupture from structural design by demonstrating that the probability of pipe rupture is extremely low. For piping design, the advanced reactor vendors have developed design acceptance criteria (DAC) which provides the piping design analysis methods, design procedures, and acceptance criteria. In SECY-93-087 the NRC staff recommended that the Commission approve the approach to eliminate the OBE from the design of structures and piping in advanced reactors and provided guidance which identifies the necessary changes to existing seismic design criteria. The supplemental criteria address fatigue, seismic anchor motion, and piping stress limits when the OBE is eliminated

  13. Vibration test on KMRR reactor structure and primary cooling system piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Hoh; Kim, Tae Ryong; Park, Jin Hoh; Park, Jin Suk; Ryoo, Jung Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-01

    Most equipments, piping systems and reactor structures in nuclear power plants are subjected to flow induced vibration due to high temperature and high pressure coolant flowing inside or outside of the equipments, systems and structures. Because the flow induced vibration sometimes causes significant damage to reactor structures and piping systems, it is important and necessary to evaluate the vibration effect on them and to prove their structural integrity. Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR) being constructed by KAERI is 30 MWt pool type research reactor. Since its main structures and piping systems were designed and manufactured in accordance with the standards and guidelines for commercial nuclear power plant, it was decided to evaluate their vibratory response in accordance with the standards and guidelines for commercial NPP. The objective of this vibration test is the assessment of vibration levels of KMRR reactor structure and primary cooling piping system for their structural integrity under the steady-state or transient operating condition. 38 figs, 14 tabs, 2 refs. (Author).

  14. Vibration test on KMRR reactor structure and primary cooling system piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Seung Hoh; Kim, Tae Ryong; Park, Jin Hoh; Park, Jin Suk; Ryoo, Jung Soo

    1994-10-01

    Most equipments, piping systems and reactor structures in nuclear power plants are subjected to flow induced vibration due to high temperature and high pressure coolant flowing inside or outside of the equipments, systems and structures. Because the flow induced vibration sometimes causes significant damage to reactor structures and piping systems, it is important and necessary to evaluate the vibration effect on them and to prove their structural integrity. Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR) being constructed by KAERI is 30 MWt pool type research reactor. Since its main structures and piping systems were designed and manufactured in accordance with the standards and guidelines for commercial nuclear power plant, it was decided to evaluate their vibratory response in accordance with the standards and guidelines for commercial NPP. The objective of this vibration test is the assessment of vibration levels of KMRR reactor structure and primary cooling piping system for their structural integrity under the steady-state or transient operating condition. 38 figs, 14 tabs, 2 refs. (Author)

  15. Gap and impact of LMR [Liquid Metal Reactor] piping systems and reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    Because of high operation temperature, the LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) plant is characterized by the thin-walled piping and components. Gaps are often present to allow free thermal expansion during normal plant operation. Under dynamic loadings, such as seismic excitation, if the relative displacement between the components exceeds the gap distance, impacts will occur. Since the components and piping become brittle over their design lifetime, impact is of important concern for it may lead to fractures of components and other serious effects. This paper deals with gap and impact problems in the LMR reactor components and piping systems. Emphasis is on the impacts due to seismic motion. Eight sections are contained in this paper. The gap and impact problems in LMR piping systems are described and a parametric study is performed on the effects of gap-induced support nonlinearity on the dynamics characteristics of the LMR piping systems. Gap and impact problems in the LMR reactor components are identified and their mathematical models are illustrated, and the gap and impact problems in the seismic reactor scram are discussed. The mathematical treatments of various impact models are also described. The uncertainties in the current seismic impact analyses of LMR components and structures are presented. An impact test on a 1/10-scale LMR thermal liner is described. The test results indicated that several clusters of natural modes can be excited by the impact force. The frequency content of the excited modes depends on the duration of the impact force; the shorter the duration, the higher the frequency content

  16. Study on concept of web-based reactor piping design data platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yu; Zhou Yu; Dong Jianling; Meng Yang

    2005-01-01

    For solving the piping design problems such as design data deficiency, designer communication inconvenience and design project inconsistence, Reactor Piping Design Database Platform, which is the main part of the Integrated Nuclear Project Research Platform, is proposed by analyzing the nuclear piping designs in detail. The functions and system structures of the platform are described in the paper for the sake of the realization of the Reactor Piping Design Database Platform. The platform is constituted by web-based management interface, AutoPlant selected as CAD software, and relation database management system (DBMS). (authors)

  17. Reactor process water (PW) piping inspections, 1984--1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhart, W.S.; Elder, J.B.; Sprayberry, R.E.; Vande Kamp, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    In July 1983, the NRC ordered the shutdown of five boiling water reactors (BWR's) because of concerns about reliability of ultrasonic examination for detecting intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). These concerns arose because of leaking piping at Niagara Mohawk's Nine Mile Point which was attributed to IGSCC. The leaks were detected shortly after completion of ultrasonic examinations of the piping. At that time, the Dupont plant manager at Savannah River (SR) directed that investigations be performed to determine if similar problems could exist in SR reactors. Investigation determined that all conditions believed necessary for the initiation and propagation of IGSCC in austenitic stainless steel exist in SR reactor process water (PW) systems. Sensitized, high carbon, austenitic stainless steel, a high purity water system with high levels of dissolved oxygen, and the residual stresses associated with welding during construction combine to provide the necessary conditions. A periodic UT inspection program is now in place to monitor the condition of the reactor PW piping systems. The program is patterned after NRC NUREG 0313, i.e., welds are placed in categories based on their history. Welds in upgraded or replacement piping are examined on a standard schedule (at least every five years) while welds with evidence of IGSCC, evaluated as acceptable for service, are inspected at every extended outage (15 to 18 months). This includes all welds in PW systems three inches in diameter and above. Welds are replaced when MSCC exceeds the replacement criteria of more than twenty percent of pipe circumference of fifty percent of through-wall depth. In the future, we intend to perform flow sizing with automated UT techniques in addition to manual sizing to provide more information for comparison with future examinations

  18. The installation welding of pressure water reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Feng

    2010-01-01

    Large pressure water reactor nuclear power plants are constructing in our country. There are three symmetry standard loops in reactor coolant system. Each loop possesses a steam generator and a primary poop, in which one of the loops is equipped with a pressurizer. These components are connected with reactor pressure vessel by installation welding of the coolant piping. The integrity of reactor coolant pressure boundary is the second barrier to protect the radioactive substance from release to outside, so the safe operation of nuclear power plant is closely related to the quality of coolant piping installation welding. The heavy tube with super low carbon content austenitic stainless steel is selected for coolant piping. This kind of material has good welding behavior, but the poor thermal conductivity, the big liner expansion coefficient and the big welding deformation will cause bigger welding stress. To reduce the welding deformation, to control the dimension precision, to reduce the residual stress and to ensure the welding quality the installation sequence should be properly designed and the welding technology should be properly controlled. (authors)

  19. Fracture assessment of Savannah River Reactor carbon steel piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertz, G.E.; Stoner, K.J.; Caskey, G.R.; Begley, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors have been in operation since the mid-1950's. One postulated failure mechanism for the reactor piping is brittle fracture of the original A285 and A53 carbon steel piping. Material testing of archival piping determined (1) the static and dynamic tensile properties; (2) Charpy impact toughness; and (3) the static and dynamic compact tension fracture toughness properties. The nil-ductility transition temperature (NDTT), determined by Charpy impact test, is above the minimum operating temperature for some of the piping materials. A fracture assessment was performed to demonstrate that potential flaws are stable under upset loading conditions and minimum operating temperatures. A review of potential degradation mechanisms and plant operating history identified weld defects as the most likely crack initiation site for brittle fracture. Piping weld defects, as characterized by radiographic and metallographic examination, and low fracture toughness material properties were postulated at high stress locations in the piping. Normal operating loads, upset loads, and residual stresses were assumed to act on the postulated flaws. Calculated allowable flaw lengths exceed the size of observed weld defects, indicating adequate margins of safety against brittle fracture. Thus, a detailed fracture assessment was able to demonstrate that the piping systems will not fail by brittle fracture, even though the NDTT for some of the piping is above the minimum system operating temperature

  20. Seismic fragility analysis of buried steel piping at P, L, and K reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wingo, H.E.

    1989-10-01

    Analysis of seismic strength of buried cooling water piping in reactor areas is necessary to evaluate the risk of reactor operation because seismic events could damage these buried pipes and cause loss of coolant accidents. This report documents analysis of the ability of this piping to withstand the combined effects of the propagation of seismic waves, the possibility that the piping may not behave in a completely ductile fashion, and the distortions caused by relative displacements of structures connected to the piping

  1. Evaluation of the influence of seismic restraint characteristics on breeder reactor piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, R.M.; Pollono, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    For the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) heat transport system piping within the reactor containment building, dynamic analyses of the piping loops have been performed to study the effect of restraint stiffness on the dynamic behavior of the piping. In addition, analysis and testing of typical CRBRP restraint system components have been performed for the purpose of quantifying and verifying the basic characteristics of the restraints used in the piping system dynamic analysis

  2. Development of integrated insulation joint for cooling pipe in tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Abe, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Masashi; Yamazaki, Seiichiro.

    1994-08-01

    In a tokamak fusion reactor, an electrically insulated part is needed for an in-vessel piping system in order to break an electric circuit loop. When a closed loop is formed in the piping system, large induced electromagnetic forces during a plasma disruption (rapid plasma current quench) could give damages on the piping system. Ceramic brazing joint is a conventional method for the electric circuit break, but an application to the fusion reactor is not feasible due to its brittleness. Here, a stainless steel/ceramics/stainless steel functionally gradient material (FGM) has been proposed and developed as an integrated insulation joint of the piping system. Both sides of the joint can be welded to the main pipes, and expected to be reliable even in the fusion reactor environment. When the FGM joint is manufactured by way of a sintering process, a residual thermal stress is the key issue. Through detailed computations of the residual thermal stress and several trial productions, tubular elements of FGM joints have been successfully manufactured. (author)

  3. Investigation and evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking in piping of light water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In 1975, a Pipe Cracking Study Group, established by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), reviewed intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Bioling Water Reactors (BWRs) and issued a report. During 1978, IGSCC was reported for the first time in large-diameter piping (> 20 in.) in a BWR in Germany. This discovery, together with the reported questions concerning the interpretation of ultrasonic inspections, led to the activation of a new Pipe Crack Study Group (PCSG) by USNRC. The charter of the new PCSG was expanded: (1) to include review of potential for stress-corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) as well as BWRs, (2) to examine operating experience in foreign reactors relevant to IGSCC, and (3) to study five specific questions. The PCSG limited the scope of the study to BWR and PWR piping runs and safe ends attached to the reactor pressure vessel. Not considered were components such as the reactor pressure vessel, pumps, valves, steam generators, large steam turbines, etc. Throughout this report, as well as in the title, the safe ends are arbitrarily defined as piping

  4. Pressurized water-reactor feedwater piping response to water hammer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, D.

    1978-03-01

    The nuclear power industry is interested in steam-generator water hammer because it has damaged the piping and components at pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Water hammer arises when rapid steam condensation in the steam-generator feedwater inlet of a PWR causes depressurization, water-slug acceleration, and slug impact at the nearest pipe elbow. The resulting pressure pulse causes the pipe system to shake, sometimes violently. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential structural effects of steam-generator water hammer on feedwater piping. This was accomplished by finite-element computation of the response of two sections of a typical feedwater pipe system to four representative water-hammer pulses. All four pulses produced high shear and bending stresses in both sections of pipe. Maximum calculated pipe stresses varied because the sections had different characteristics and were sensitive to boundary-condition modeling

  5. Failure rates in Barsebaeck-1 reactor coolant pressure boundary piping. An application of a piping failure database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydell, B.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents an application of a piping failure database to estimate the frequency of leak and rupture in reactor coolant pressure boundary piping. The study used Barsebaeck-1 as reference plant. The study tried two different approaches to piping failure rate estimation: 1) PSA-style, simple estimation using Bayesian statistics, and 2) fitting of statistical distribution to failure data. A large, validated database on piping failures (like the SKI-PIPE database) supports both approaches. In addition to documenting leak and rupture frequencies, the SKI report describes the use of piping failure data to estimate frequency of medium and large loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). This application study was co sponsored by Barsebaeck Kraft AB and SKI Research

  6. Failure rates in Barsebaeck-1 reactor coolant pressure boundary piping. An application of a piping failure database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydell, B. [RSA Technologies, Vista, CA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    This report documents an application of a piping failure database to estimate the frequency of leak and rupture in reactor coolant pressure boundary piping. The study used Barsebaeck-1 as reference plant. The study tried two different approaches to piping failure rate estimation: 1) PSA-style, simple estimation using Bayesian statistics, and 2) fitting of statistical distribution to failure data. A large, validated database on piping failures (like the SKI-PIPE database) supports both approaches. In addition to documenting leak and rupture frequencies, the SKI report describes the use of piping failure data to estimate frequency of medium and large loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). This application study was co sponsored by Barsebaeck Kraft AB and SKI Research 41 refs, figs, tabs

  7. Piping benchmark problems for the General Electric Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J.; Wang, Y.K.

    1993-08-01

    To satisfy the need for verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for an advanced boiling water reactor standard design, three benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the advanced reactor standard design. It will be required that the combined license holders demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set

  8. Analytical prediction on the pump-induced pulsating pressure in a reactor coolant pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.B.; Im, I.Y.; Lee, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for predicting the amplitudes of pump-induced fluctuating pressures in a reactor coolant pipe using a linear transformation technique which reduces a homogeneous differential equation with non-homogeneous boundary conditions into a nonhomogeneous differential equation with homogeneous boundary conditions. At the end of the pipe, three types of boundary conditions are considered-open, closed and piston-spring supported. Numerical examples are given for a typical reactor. Comparisons of measured pressure amplitudes in the pipe with model prediction are shown to be in good agreement for the forcing frequencies. (author)

  9. Study on unstable fracture characteristics of light water reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Ryoichi

    1998-08-01

    Many testing studies have been conducted to validate the applicability of the leak before break (LBB) concept for the light water reactor piping in the world. It is especially important among them to clarify the condition that an inside surface crack of the piping wall does not cause an unstable fracture but ends in a stable fracture propagating only in the pipe thickness direction, even if the excessive loading works to the pipe. Pipe unstable fracture tests performed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute had been planned under such background, and clarified the condition for the cracked pipe to cause the unstable fracture under monotonous increase loading or cyclic loading by using test pipes with the inside circumferential surface crack. This paper examines the pipe unstable fracture by dividing it into two parts. One is the static unstable fracture that breaks the pipe with the inside circumferential surface crack by increasing load monotonously. Another is the dynamic unstable fracture that breaks the pipe by the cyclic loading. (author). 79 refs

  10. Development of prototype reactor maintenance. (2) Application to piping support of sodium-cooled reactor prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Masanobu; Kunogi, Kosuke; Aizawa, Kosuke; Chikazawa, Yoshitaka; Takaya, Shigeru; Kubo, Shigenobu; Kotake, Shoji; Ito, Takaya; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2017-01-01

    A maintenance program on piping support of prototype fast breeder reactor Monju are studied. Based on degradation mechanism, snubbers in Monju primary cooling system showed lifetime more than the plant lifetime of 30 years by experiments conservatively. For the first step during construction, visual inspection on accessible all supports could be available. In that visual inspection, mounting conditions and damages of all accessible supports could be monitored. One of major features of the Monju primary piping system is large thermal expansion due to large temperature difference between maintenance and operation conditions. Thanks to that large thermal expansion, integrity of piping supports could be monitored by measuring piping displacement. When technologies of piping displacement monitoring are matured in Monju, visual inspection on piping support could be shifted to piping displacement monitoring. At that stage, the visual inspection could be limited only on representative supports. (author)

  11. Repair and preventive maintenance technology for BWR reactor internals and piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsubo, Tooru; Itou, Takashi; Sakashita, Akihiro

    2009-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of welding portion has found in many domestic and foreign BWR reactor internals and Primary Loop Recirculation piping. Also, repair and preventive maintenance technologies for SCC has been developed and/or adopted to BWRs in recent years. This paper introduces the sample of these technologies, such as seal-welding for SCC on BWR reactor internals, preventive maintenance technology for PLR piping such as Corrosion Resistant Cladding, Internal Polishing and Induction Heating Stress Improvement. These technologies are introduced on 'E-Journal of Advanced Maintenance', which is an international journal on a exclusive website of Japan Society of Maintenology. (author)

  12. Accident analysis of heat pipe cooled and AMTEC conversion space reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Yuan; Shan, Jianqiang; Zhang, Bin; Gou, Junli; Bo, Zhang; Lu, Tianyu; Ge, Li; Yang, Zijiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A transient analysis code TAPIRS for HPS has been developed. • Three typical accidents are analyzed using TAPIRS. • The reactor system has the self-stabilization ability under accident conditions. - Abstract: A space power with high power density, light weight, low cost and high reliability is of crucial importance to future exploration of deep space. Space reactor is an excellent candidate because of its unique characteristics of high specific power, low cost, strong environment adaptability and so on. Among all types of space reactors, heat pipe cooled space reactor, which adopts the passive heat pipe (HP) as core cooling component, is considered as one of the most promising choices and is widely studied all over the world. This paper develops a transient analysis code (TAPIRS) for heat pipe cooled space reactor power system (HPS) based on point reactor kinetics model, lumped parameter core heat transfer model, combined HP model (self-diffusion model, flat-front startup model and network model), energy conversion model of Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Conversion units (AMTEC), and HP radiator model. Three typical accidents, i.e., control drum failure, AMTEC failure and partial loss of the heat transfer area of radiator are then analyzed using TAPIRS. By comparing the simulation results of the models and steady state with those in the references, the rationality of the models and the solution method is validated. The results show the following. (1) After the failure of one set of control drums, the reactor power finally reaches a stable value after two local peaks under the temperature feedback. The fuel temperature rises rapidly, however it is still under safe limit. (2) The fuel temperature is below a safe limit under the AMTEC failure and partial loss of the heat transfer area of radiator. This demonstrates the rationality of the system design and the potential applicability of the TAPIRS code for the future engineering application of

  13. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  14. Reactor Primary Coolant System Pipe Rupture Study. Progress report No. 32, July--December 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-03-01

    The pipe rupture study is designed to extend the understanding of failure-causing mechanisms and to provide improved capability for evaluating reactor piping systems to minimize the probability of failures. Following a detailed review to determine the effort most needed to improve nuclear system piping (Phase I), analytical and experimental efforts (Phase II) were started in 1965. This progress report summarizes the recent accomplishments of a broad program in (a) basic fatigue studies focused on Elastic/Plastic ASME Code Design Rules, (b) at-reactor tests of the effect of primary coolant environment on the fatigue behavior of piping steels, and (c) studies directed at quantifying weld sensitization in T-304 stainless steel. (auth)

  15. Rupture hardware minimization in pressurized water reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.K.; Ski, J.J.; Chexal, V.; Norris, D.M.; Goldstein, N.A.; Beaudoin, B.F.; Quinones, D.F.; Server, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    For much of the high-energy piping in light reactor systems, fracture mechanics calculations can be used to assure pipe failure resistance, thus allowing the elimination of excessive rupture restraint hardware both inside and outside containment. These calculations use the concept of leak-before-break (LBB) and include part-through-wall flaw fatigue crack propagation, through-wall flaw detectable leakage, and through-wall flaw stability analyses. Performing these analyses not only reduces initial construction, future maintenance, and radiation exposure costs, but also improves the overall safety and integrity of the plant since much more is known about the piping and its capabilities than would be the case had the analyses not been performed. This paper presents the LBB methodology applied a Beaver Valley Power Station- Unit 2 (BVPS-2); the application for two specific lines, one inside containment (stainless steel) and the other outside containment (ferrutic steel), is shown in a generic sense using a simple parametric matrix. The overall results for BVPS-2 indicate that pipe rupture hardware is not necessary for stainless steel lines inside containment greater than or equal to 6-in. (152-mm) nominal pipe size that have passed a screening criteria designed to eliminate potential problem systems (such as the feedwater system). Similarly, some ferritic steel line as small as 3-in. (76-mm) diameter (outside containment) can qualify for pipe rupture hardware elemination

  16. Underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, V.E.

    1989-01-01

    The author presents a nuclear reactor for generating electricity disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working fluid in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast-acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor

  17. Underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Viktor E.

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working flud in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast-acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor.

  18. Acoustical holographic Siamese image technique for imaging radial cracks in reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.D.; Gribble, R.P.

    1985-04-01

    This paper describes a unique technique (i.e., ''Siamese imaging'') for imaging quasi-vertical defects in reactor pipe weldments. The Siamese image is a bi-symmetrical view of the inner surface defect. Image construction geometry consists of two probes (i.e., source/receiver) operating either from opposite sides or the same side of the defect to be imaged. As the probes are scanned across a lower surface connected defect, they encounter two images - first the normal upright image and then the inverted image. The final integrated image consists of two images connected along their baselines, thus we call it a ''Siamese image.'' The experimental imaging results on simulated and natural cracks in reactor piping weldments graphically illustrate this unique technique. Excellent images of mechanical fatique and thermal cracks were obtained on ferritic and austenitic piping

  19. Reactor primary coolant system pipe rupture study. Progress report No. 33, January--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    The pipe rupture study is designed to extend the understanding of failure-causing mechanisms and to provide improved capability for evaluating reactor piping systems to minimize the probability of failures. Following a detailed review to determine the effort most needed to improve nuclear system piping (Phase 1), analytical and experimental efforts (Phase 2) were started in 1965. This progress report summarizes the recent accomplishments of a broad program in (a) basic fatigue crack growth rate studies focused on LWR primary piping materials in a simulated BWR primary coolant environment, (b) at-reactor tests of the effect of primary coolant environment on the fatigue behavior of piping steels, (c) studies directed at quantifying weld sensitization in Type 304 stainless steel, (d) support studies to characterize the electrochemical potential behavior of a typical BWR primary water environment and (e) special tests related to simulation of fracture surfaces characteristic of IGSCC field failures

  20. Pipe connector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.E.; Pardini, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    A safety test facility for testing sodium-cooled nuclear reactor components includes a reactor vessel and a heat exchanger submerged in sodium in the tank. The reactor vessel and heat exchanger are connected by an expansion/deflection pipe coupling comprising a pair of coaxially and slidably engaged tubular elements having radially enlarged opposed end portions of which at least a part is of spherical contour adapted to engage conical sockets in the ends of pipes leading out of the reactor vessel and in to the heat exchanger. A spring surrounding the pipe coupling urges the end portions apart and into engagement with the spherical sockets. Since the pipe coupling is submerged in liquid a limited amount of leakage of sodium from the pipe can be tolerated

  1. Critical evaluation of molybdenum and its alloys for use in space reactor core heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    The choice of pure molybdenum as the prime candidate material for space reactor core heat pipes is examined, and the advantages and disadvantages of this material are brought into focus. Even though pure molybdenum heat pipes have been built and tested, this metal's high ductile-brittle transition temperature and modest creep strength place significant design restrictions on a core heat pipe made from it. Molybdenum alloys are examined with regard to their promise as potential replacements for pure molybdenum. The properties of TZM and molybdenum-rhenium alloys are examined, and it appears that Mo-Re alloys with 10 to 15 wt % rhenium offer the most advantage as an alternative to pure molybdenum in space reactor core heat pipes

  2. Assessment of cracked pipes in primary piping systems of PWR nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, Rudolf Peter de

    2004-01-01

    Pipes related to the Primary System of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) are manufactured from high toughness austenitic and low alloy ferritic steels, which are resistant to the unstable growth of defects. A crack in a piping system should cause a leakage in a considerable rate allowing its identification, before its growth could cause a catastrophic rupture of the piping. This is the LBB (Leak Before Break) concept. An essential step in applying the LBB concept consists in the analysis of the stability of a postulated through wall crack in a specific piping system. The methods for the assessment of flawed components fabricated from ductile materials require the use of Elasto-Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM). Considering that the use of numerical methods to apply the concepts of EPFM may be expensive and time consuming, the existence of the so called simplified methods for the assessment of flaws in piping are still considered of great relevance. In this work, some of the simplified methods, normalized procedures and criteria for the assessment of the ductile behavior of flawed components available in literature are described and evaluated. Aspects related to the selection of the material properties necessary for the application of these methods are also discussed. In a next .step, the methods are applied to determine the instability load in some piping configurations under bending and containing circumferential through wall cracks. Geometry and material variations are considered. The instability loads, obtained for these piping as the result of the application of the selected methods, are analyzed and compared among them and with some experimental results obtained from literature. The predictions done with the methods demonstrated that they provide consistent results, with good level of accuracy with regard to the determination of maximum loads. These methods are also applied to a specific Study Case. The obtained results are then analyzed in order to give

  3. Specialist meeting on leak before break in reactor piping and vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholome, G.; Bazant, E.; Wellein, R. [Siemens KWU, Stuttgart (Germany)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    A series of research projects sponsored by the Federal Minister for Education, Science, Research and Technology, Bonn are summarized and compared to utility, manufacturer, and vendor tests. The purpose of the evaluation was to experimentally verify Leak-before-Break behavior, confirm the postulation of fracture preclusion for piping (straight pipe, bends and branches), and quantify the safety margin against massive failure. The results are applicable to safety assessment of ferritic and austenitic piping in primary and secondary nuclear power plant circuits. Moreover, because of the wide range of the test parameters, they are also important for the design and assessment of piping in other technical plant. The test results provide justification for ruling out catastrophic fractures, even on pipes of dimensions corresponding to those of a main coolant pipe of a pressurized water reactor plant on the basis of a mechanical deterministic safety analysis in correspondence with the Basis Safety Concept (Principle of Fracture Exclusion).

  4. Investigation of two-phase flow structure in model of draught pipe of water boiling reactor VK-300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efanov, A.D.; Kuznetzov, Y.N.; Kaliakin, S.G.; Lisitza, F.D.; Remizov, O.V.; Serdun, N.P.

    2001-01-01

    VK-300 reactor represents a vessel-type boiling reactor with integral arrangement of assemblies and in-vessel steam separation at one-circuit scheme. The circuit consists of core, draught pipes, and separation facilities. The vessel of VK-300 reactor is chosen on the base of the dimensions of that of VVER-1000 reactor. The following thermal-hydraulic parameters of nuclear power plant (NPP) were investigated experimentally: dependence of void fraction upon the steam quality in mixing chamber (on the draught section input); pressure losses at different, specific zones of up-flow and down-flow sections of the circuit with free circulation; degree of steam separation in the separating chamber (at the first step of phase separation) and its dependence upon steam quality; structure of steam-water flow in draught pipes (distribution of phases over the draught pipe cross- section); presence of steam hovering and height of this hovering in inter-pipe space of draught section. (author)

  5. Piping Flexibility Analysis of the Primary Cooling System of TRIGA 2000 Bandung Reactor due to Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahardjo, H.P.

    2011-01-01

    Earthquakes in a nuclear installation can overload a piping system which is not flexible enough. These loads can be forces, moments and stresses working on the pipes or equipment. If the load is too large and exceed the allowable limits, the piping and equipment can be damaged and lead to overall system operation failure. The load received by piping systems can be reduced by making adequate piping flexibility, so all the loads can be transmitted homogeneously throughout the pipe without load concentration at certain point. In this research the analysis of piping stress has been conducted to determine the size of loads that occurred in the piping of primary cooling system of TRIGA 2000 Reactor, Bandung if an earthquake happened in the reactor site. The analysis was performed using Caesar II software-based finite element method. The ASME code B31.1 arranging the design of piping systems for power generating system (Power Piping Code) was used as reference analysis method. Modeling of piping systems was based on the cooling piping that has already been installed and the existing data reported in Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) of TRIGA 2000 reactor, Bandung. The quake considered in this analysis is the earthquake that occurred due to the Lembang fault, since it has the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) in the Bandung TRIGA 2000 reactor site. The analysis results showed that in the static condition for sustain and expansion loads, the stress fraction in all piping lines does not exceed the allowable limit. However, during operation moment, in dynamic condition, the primary cooling system is less flexible at sustain load, expansion load, and combination load and the stress fraction have reached 95,5%. Therefore a pipeline modification (re-routing) is needed to make pipe stress does not exceed the allowable stress. The pipeline modification was carried out by applied a gap of 3 mm in the X direction of the support at node 25 and eliminate the support at the node 30, also a

  6. Challenges associated with the current processes for ultrasonic inspection of CANDU reactor feeder piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machowski, C. [Babcock & Wilcox Canada Ltd., Cambridge, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    CANDU® PHT Feeder Piping is generally constructed from SA106 Grade B carbon steel, which is known to be susceptible to flow accelerated corrosion when exposed to certain environmental conditions. The configuration of the CANDU reactor promotes thinning of the inside surface of the pipe walls, predominantly at the outlet feeders. Inspection of this piping is currently conducted using ultrasonic techniques and is governed by the requirements established by the CANDU Owners Group (COG). There are many challenges associated with these inspections as a result of the complexity of the reactor piping configuration. Geometrical anomalies on the surface of the pipe and non-circular geometries at the tight radius bends hinder the performance of conventional ultrasonic techniques. This can cause lost signals in areas of interest, which in turn often results in rework in order to satisfy the inspection requirements and justify fitness for service of these components. There are also many inspection sites which have limited access due to physical restrictions on the reactor face; therefore in order to maximize the performance of an inspection campaign, it is paramount that the inspection personnel and the inspection technology be well integrated through training simulations prior to execution. These inspection challenges increase the complexity of the analysis process as ultrasonic signals get distorted and lost as a result of non-circular pipe geometries. In order to ensure a high level of integrity in the analysis results, a conservative process is utilized in which two analysts independently examine the data, and a third analyst reviews their results and submits the final call. A Data Management Software application (DMS) is used to input and store the three analysis results. Another important function of the DMS is to provide a communication link between the different work-groups associated with the inspection activities. The focus of this presentation discusses:

  7. An underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, V.E.

    1988-05-17

    A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working fluid in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast- acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor. 5 figs.

  8. Pipe rupture hardware minimization in pressurized water reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.K.; Szyslowski, J.J.; Chexal, V.; Norris, D.M.; Goldstein, N.A.; Beaudoin, B.; Quinones, D.; Server, W.

    1987-01-01

    For much of the high energy piping in light water reactor systems, fracture mechanics calculations can be used to assure pipe failure resistance, thus allowing the elimination of excessive rupture restraint hardware both inside and outside containment. These calculations use the concept of leak-before-break (LBB) and include part-through-wall flaw fatigue crack propagation, through-wall flaw detectable leakage, and through-wall flaw stability analyses. Performing these analyses not only reduces initial construction, future maintenance, and radiation exposure costs, but the overall safety and integrity of the plant are improved since much more is known about the piping and its capabilities than would be the case had the analyses not been performed. This paper presents the LBB methodology applied at Beaver Valley Power Station - Unit 2 (BVPS-2); the application for two specific lines, one inside containment (stainless steel) and the other outside containment (ferritic steel), is shown in a generic sense using a simple parametric matrix. The overall results for BVPS-2 indicate that pipe rupture hardware is not necessary for stainless steel lines inside containment greater than or equal to 6-in (152 mm) nominal pipe size that have passed a screening criteria designed to eliminate potential problem systems (such as the feedwater system). Similarly, some ferritic steel lines as small as 3-in (76 mm) diameter (outside containment) can qualify for pipe rupture hardware elimination

  9. Determination of two dimensional axisymmetric finite element model for reactor coolant piping nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S. N.; Kim, H. N.; Jang, K. S.; Kim, H. J.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine a two dimensional axisymmetric model through a comparative study between a three dimensional and an axisymmetric finite element analysis of the reactor coolant piping nozzle subject to internal pressure. The finite element analysis results show that the stress adopting the axisymmetric model with the radius of equivalent spherical vessel are well agree with that adopting the three dimensional model. The radii of equivalent spherical vessel are 3.5 times and 7.3 times of the radius of the reactor coolant piping for the safety injection nozzle and for the residual heat removal nozzle, respectively

  10. Calculation of forces on reactor containment fan cooler piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.S.; Ramsden, K.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the Reactor Containment Fan Cooler (RCFC) system piping load calculations. These calculations are based on piping loads calculated using the EPRI methodology and RELAP5 to simulate the hydraulic behavior of the system. The RELAP5 generated loads were compared to loads calculated using the EPRI GL-96-06 methodology. This evaluation was based on a pressurized water reactor's RCFC coils thermal hydraulic behavior during a Loss of Offsite Power (LOOP) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). The RCFC consist of two banks of service water and chill water coils. There are 5 SX and 5 chill water coils per bank. Therefore, there are 4 RCFC units in the containment with 2 banks of coils per RCFC. Two Service water pumps provide coolant for the 4 RCFC units (8 banks total, 2 banks per RCFC unit and 2 RCFC units per pump). Following a LOOP/LOCA condition, the RCFC fans would coast down and upon being re-energized, would shift to low-speed operation. The fan coast down is anticipated to occur very rapidly due to the closure of the exhaust damper as a result of LOCA pressurization effects. The service water flow would also coast down and be restarted in approximately 43 seconds after the initiation of the event. The service water would drain from the RCFC coils during the pump shutdown and once the pumps restart, water is quickly forced into the RCFC coils causing hydraulic loading on the piping. Because of this scenario and the potential for over stressing the piping, an evaluation was performed by the utility using RELAP5 to assess the piping loads. Subsequent to the hydraulic loads being analyzed using RELAP5, EPRI through GL-96-06 provided another methodology to assess loads on the RCFC piping system. This paper presents the results of using the EPRI methodology and RELAP5 to perform thermal hydraulic load calculations. It is shown that both EPRI methodology and RELAP5 calculations can be used to generate hydraulic loads

  11. Water inlet and steam outlet pipes fitted one inside the other for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mc Donald, B.N.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of a combined exhaust nozzle and intake pipe system to support a heat exchanger inside a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. It comprises a generally cylindrical part on the exhaust nozzle, the cylindrical part having an inside passage, a flange around the passage and provided with means to secure the exhaust nozzle to the reactor pressure vessel so as to make it fluidtight. The cylindrical part has an aperture inside to take the intake pipe inside the passage so as to enable the intake pipe to project into the heat exchanger. A collar made on the heat exchanger projects from the heat exchanger to the cylindrical nozzle component to establish communication with the inside passage for the fluid [fr

  12. Hydrogen permeation resistant heat pipe for bi-modal reactors. Final report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    North, M.T.; Anderson, W.G.

    1995-01-01

    The principal objective of this program was to demonstrate technology that will make a sodium heat pipe tolerant of hydrogen permeation for a bimodal space reactor application. Special focus was placed on techniques which enhance the permeation of hydrogen out of the heat pipe. Specific objectives include: define the detailed requirements for the bimodal reactor application; design and fabricate a prototype heat pipe tolerant of hydrogen permeation; and test the prototype heat pipe and demonstrate that hydrogen which permeates into the heat pipe is removed or reduced to acceptable levels. The results of the program were fully successful. Analyses were performed on two different heat pipe designs and an experimental heat pipe was fabricated and tested. A model of the experimental heat pipe was developed to predict the enhancement in the hydrogen permeation rate out of the heat pipe. A significant improvement in the rate at which hydrogen permeates out of a heat pipe was predicted for the use of the special condenser geometry developed here. Agreement between the model and the experimental results was qualitatively good. Inclusion of the additional effects of fluid flow in the heat pipe are recommended for future work

  13. Detection system for location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongbing, E-mail: liuhb07@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education P. R. China, Beijing 100084 (China); Du, Dong, E-mail: dudong@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education P. R. China, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, An; Chang, Baohua; Han, Zandong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education P. R. China, Beijing 100084 (China); He, Ayada [Shanghai Electric Power Generation Group Shanghai Generator Works, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A detection system for locations of pebbles transported in pipes is introduced. • The detection system is based on vibration signal processing, which is original. • The characteristics of the vibration signals of the pipe are analyzed. • The experiment shows that the detection results are accurate. • The research provides an important basis for the design of the reactor. - Abstract: Pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors have many advantages such as inherent safety, high efficiency, etc., and have been considered as a candidate for Generation IV nuclear reactors. During the operation of the reactor, there are thousands of fuel pebbles transported in the pipes outside the core by gravity and helium flow. The pattern of the pipes which consist of straight and arc sections is very complex. When a fuel pebble is transported, it will constantly collide with the pipes, especially in the arc sections. The collisions will lead to the vibration of the pipes. This paper aims to provide a detection system for the location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing. Before the reactor is running, the system acquires the vibration signals of several key sections by sensors. Then the frequency characteristics of the signals are obtained by joint time–frequency analysis. When the reactor is running, the system detects the signals and processes them based on their frequency characteristics in real time. According to the results of the processing, the system can correctly judge whether the fuel pebble has passed through the section and records the time of the passing. The experiment validates the accuracy and reliability of the detection results. In this way, the operational condition of the reactor can be monitored so that the normal running of the reactor can be ensured. Additionally, the detection data are of great significance to the evaluation and optimization of the reactor performance

  14. Detection system for location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hongbing; Du, Dong; Huang, An; Chang, Baohua; Han, Zandong; He, Ayada

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A detection system for locations of pebbles transported in pipes is introduced. • The detection system is based on vibration signal processing, which is original. • The characteristics of the vibration signals of the pipe are analyzed. • The experiment shows that the detection results are accurate. • The research provides an important basis for the design of the reactor. - Abstract: Pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors have many advantages such as inherent safety, high efficiency, etc., and have been considered as a candidate for Generation IV nuclear reactors. During the operation of the reactor, there are thousands of fuel pebbles transported in the pipes outside the core by gravity and helium flow. The pattern of the pipes which consist of straight and arc sections is very complex. When a fuel pebble is transported, it will constantly collide with the pipes, especially in the arc sections. The collisions will lead to the vibration of the pipes. This paper aims to provide a detection system for the location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing. Before the reactor is running, the system acquires the vibration signals of several key sections by sensors. Then the frequency characteristics of the signals are obtained by joint time–frequency analysis. When the reactor is running, the system detects the signals and processes them based on their frequency characteristics in real time. According to the results of the processing, the system can correctly judge whether the fuel pebble has passed through the section and records the time of the passing. The experiment validates the accuracy and reliability of the detection results. In this way, the operational condition of the reactor can be monitored so that the normal running of the reactor can be ensured. Additionally, the detection data are of great significance to the evaluation and optimization of the reactor performance

  15. Fatigue check of nuclear safety class 1 reactor coolant pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qing; Fang Yonggang; Chu Qibao; Xu Yu; Li Hailong

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue and thermal ratcheting analyses of nuclear safety Class 1 reactor coolant pipe in a nuclear power plant were independently carried out in this paper. The software used for calculation is ROCOCO, which is based on RCC-M code. The difference of nuclear safety Class 1 pipe fatigue evaluation between RCC-M code and ASME code was compared. The main aspects of comparison include the calculation scoping of fatigue design, the calculation method of primary plus secondary stress intensity, the elastic-plastic correction coefficient calculation, and the dynamic load combination method etc. By correcting inconsistent algorithm of ASME code within ROCOCO, the fatigue usage factor and thermal ratcheting design margin of 65 mm and 55 mm wall thickness of the pipe were obtained. The results show that the minimum wall thickness of the pipe must exceed 55 mm and the design value of the thermal ratcheting of 55 mm wall thickness reaches 95% of the allowable value. (authors)

  16. Screening reactor steam/water piping systems for water hammer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, P.

    1997-09-01

    A steam/water system possessing a certain combination of thermal, hydraulic and operational states, can, in certain geometries, lead to a steam bubble collapse induced water hammer. These states, operations, and geometries are identified. A procedure that can be used for identifying whether an unbuilt reactor system is prone to water hammer is proposed. For the most common water hammer, steam bubble collapse induced water hammer, six conditions must be met in order for one to occur. These are: (1) the pipe must be almost horizontal; (2) the subcooling must be greater than 20 C; (3) the L/D must be greater than 24; (4) the velocity must be low enough so that the pipe does not run full, i.e., the Froude number must be less than one; (5) there should be void nearby; (6) the pressure must be high enough so that significant damage occurs, that is the pressure should be above 10 atmospheres. Recommendations on how to avoid this kind of water hammer in both the design and the operation of the reactor system are made

  17. Investigation and examination on the cracking of pipings in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This is the report made by the Reactor Safety Technology Expert Committee to the Atomic Energy Commission regarding the investigation and examination on stress corrosion cracking which seems to be the cause of the cracking of pipings in boiling water reactors, the measures to reduce it, and the subjects of research hereafter. Recently, the stress corrosion cracking of primary coolant pipings has been often observed, and this phenomenon occurred in the pressure boundary of primary coolant, consequently it is possible to be linked to the troubles of large scale. The Reactor Material Subcommittee was established on May 14, 1975, and investigated the cracking phenomena in the recirculating system and core spray system of BWRs in Japan and foreign countries. The recent cases have been concentrated to the heat-affected part due to welding of 304 type austenitic stainless steel pipings of from 4 in to 10 in diameter for BWRs. They are the stress corrosion cracking at grain boundaries occurred under the loaded condition and in the environment of high temperature, high pressure water. The cracking of this kind was never experienced in PWRs. The results of the technical examination, the consideration of the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking, and the countermeasures are described. (Kako, I.)

  18. Experimental and analytical studies on creep failure of reactor coolant piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Akio; Maruyama, Yu; Hashimoto, Kazuichiro; Harada, Yuhei; Shibazaki, Hiroaki; Kudo, Tamotsu; Hidaka, Akihide; Sugimoto, Jun [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nakamura, N.

    1999-07-01

    Thermal and structural responses of reactor coolant piping under and elevated internal pressure and temperature are being investigated in WIND project at JAERI. In a recent failure test in which a nuclear grade type 316 stainless steel pipe with an outer diameter of 114.3 mm and a wall thickness of 13.5 mm was used and an internal pressure was kept at approximately 15 MPa. A failure of the piping was observed when the temperature was sustained at 970degC for one hour. In parallel with conducting the tests, post-test analyses were performed. The objective of the analyses is to assess analytical models for the creep deformation and failure of the piping at elevated internal pressure and temperature simulating thermal-hydraulic conditions during a severe accident. The major material properties needed for the analysis were measured at elevated temperatures. Coefficients of a creep constitutive equation including the tertiary stage were determined with the measured creep data and incorporated into ABAQUS code. The analysis reasonably reproduced the time history of the enlargement of the piping diameter, and the wall thickness and the diameter of the piping at the failure. It was also found that the piping failure timing obtained from the analysis agreed well with the test result. (author)

  19. Experimental and analytical studies on creep failure of reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Akio; Maruyama, Yu; Hashimoto, Kazuichiro; Harada, Yuhei; Shibazaki, Hiroaki; Kudo, Tamotsu; Hidaka, Akihide; Sugimoto, Jun; Nakamura, N.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal and structural responses of reactor coolant piping under and elevated internal pressure and temperature are being investigated in WIND project at JAERI. In a recent failure test in which a nuclear grade type 316 stainless steel pipe with an outer diameter of 114.3 mm and a wall thickness of 13.5 mm was used and an internal pressure was kept at approximately 15 MPa. A failure of the piping was observed when the temperature was sustained at 970degC for one hour. In parallel with conducting the tests, post-test analyses were performed. The objective of the analyses is to assess analytical models for the creep deformation and failure of the piping at elevated internal pressure and temperature simulating thermal-hydraulic conditions during a severe accident. The major material properties needed for the analysis were measured at elevated temperatures. Coefficients of a creep constitutive equation including the tertiary stage were determined with the measured creep data and incorporated into ABAQUS code. The analysis reasonably reproduced the time history of the enlargement of the piping diameter, and the wall thickness and the diameter of the piping at the failure. It was also found that the piping failure timing obtained from the analysis agreed well with the test result. (author)

  20. Primary coolant pipe rupture event in liquid metal cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-08-01

    In liquid-metal cooled fast reactors (LMFR) the primary coolant pipes (PCP) connect the primary coolant pumps to the grid plate. A rupture in one of these pipes could cause significant loss of coolant flow to the core with severe consequences. In loop type reactors, all primary pipelines are provided with double envelopes and inter-space coolant leak monitoring systems that permit leak detection before break. Thus, the PCP rupture event can be placed in the beyond design basis event (BDBE) category. Such an arrangement is difficult to incorporate for pool type reactors, and hence it could be argued that the PCP rupture event needs to be analysed in detail as a design basis event (DBE, category 4 event). However, the primary coolant pipes are made of ductile austenitic stainless steel material and operate at temperatures of the cold pool and at comparatively low pressures. For such low stressed piping with negligible creep and embrittlement effects, it is of interest to discuss under what design provisions, for pool type reactors, the guillotine rupture of PCP could be placed in the BDBE category. The topical Technical Meeting (TM) on Primary Coolant Pipe Rupture Event in Liquid Metal Cooled Reactors (Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, India, 13-17 January 2003) was called to enable the specialists to present the philosophy and analyses applied on this topic in the various Member States for different LMFRs. The scope of the technical meeting was to provide a global forum for information exchange on the philosophy applied in the various participating Member States and the analyses performed for different LMFRs with regard to the primary coolant pipe rupture event. More specifically, the objectives of the technical meeting were to review the safety philosophy for the PCP rupture event in pool type LMFR, to assess the structural reliability of the PCP and the probability of rupture under different conditions (with/without in-service inspection), to

  1. Sodium heat pipe module test for the SAFE-30 reactor prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Sena, J. Tom; Martinez, Adam L.

    2001-01-01

    Reliable, long-life, low-cost heat pipes can enable safe, affordable space fission power and propulsion systems. Advanced versions of these systems can in turn allow rapid access to any point in the solar system. Twelve stainless steel-sodium heat pipe modules were built and tested at Los Alamos for use in a non-nuclear thermohydraulic simulation of the SAFE-30 reactor (Poston et al., 2000). SAFE-30 is a near-term, low-cost space fission system demonstration. The heat pipes were designed to remove thermal power from the SAFE-30 core, and transfer this power to an electrical power conversion system. These heat pipe modules were delivered to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in August 2000 and were assembled and tested in a prototypical configuration during September and October 2000. The construction and test of one of the SAFE-30 modules is described

  2. Mechanical Properties of Post Irradiation Primary Cooling Piping of Bandung Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histori; Renaningsih S; Sri Nitiswati; Ari Triyadi

    2003-01-01

    Testing on primary coolant piping of research reactor Bandung have been done. Primary coolant piping were made from Al 6061-T6. The goal of this activity is to investigate the mechanical properties changes caused by aging process after 33 years in irradiated. Type of testing i.e visual examination, thickness measurement, tensile and hardness test were done. The test data shown that there was a deposit at the inside surface of pipe, thickness decreased about 0.2 mm, tensile strength is 293 MPa, yield strength is 262 MPa, while the hardness is about 83 HRE (mean value). The test data than compared with ASTM standard. As the conclusion tensile and yield strength of pipe still fulfill the ASTM requirements, except the hardness is unsignificantly less/decreased. (author)

  3. Transient freezing of molten salts in pipe-flow systems: Application to the direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Brun, N.; Hewitt, G.F.; Markides, C.N.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A thermo-hydraulic model has been proposed to simulate the transient freezing of molten salts in complex piping systems. • The passive safety system DRACS in Generation-IV, molten salt reactor is susceptible to failure due to salt freezing. • For the prototypical 0.2 MW reactor considered in this study considerable freezing occurs after 20 minutes leading to reactor temperatures above 900 °C within 4 hours. • Conservative criteria for the most important/least known variables in the design of DRACS have been discussed. • Over-conservative approaches in designing the NDHX should be used with caution as they can promote pipe clogging due to freezing. - Abstract: The possibility of molten-salt freezing in pipe-flow systems is a key concern for the solar-energy industry and a safety issue in the new generation of molten-salt reactors, worthy of careful consideration. This paper tackles the problem of coolant solidification in complex pipe networks by developing a transient thermohydraulic model and applying it to the ‘Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System’ (DRACS), the passive-safety system proposed for the Generation-IV molten-salt reactors. The results indicate that DRACS, as currently envisioned, is prone to failure due to freezing in the air/molten-salt heat exchanger, which can occur after approximately 20 minutes, leading to reactor temperatures above 900 °C within 4 hours. The occurrence of this scenario is related to an unstable behaviour mode of DRACS in which newly formed solid-salt deposit on the pipe walls acts to decrease the flow-rate in the secondary loop, facilitating additional solid-salt deposition. Conservative criteria are suggested to facilitate preliminary assessments of early-stage DRACS designs. The present study is, to the knowledge of the authors, the first of its kind in serving to illustrate possible safety concerns in molten-salt reactors, which are otherwise considered very safe in the literature. Furthermore

  4. Insulated pipe clamp design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.J.; Hyde, L.L.; Wagner, S.E.; Severud, L.K.

    1980-01-01

    Thin wall large diameter piping for breeder reactor plants can be subjected to significant thermal shocks during reactor scrams and other upset events. On the Fast Flux Test Facility, the addition of thick clamps directly on the piping was undesired because the differential metal temperatures between the pipe wall and the clamp could have significantly reduced the pipe thermal fatigue life cycle capabilities. Accordingly, an insulated pipe clamp design concept was developed. 5 refs

  5. Heat transfer characteristics and operation limit of pressurized hybrid heat pipe for small modular reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Bang, In Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal performances and operation limits of hybrid heat pipe were experimentally studied. • Models for predicting the operation limit of the hybrid heat pipe was developed. • Non-condensable gas affected heat transfer characteristics of the hybrid heat pipe. - Abstract: In this paper, a hybrid heat pipe is proposed for use in advanced nuclear power plants as a passive heat transfer device. The hybrid heat pipe combines the functions of a heat pipe and a control rod to simultaneously remove the decay heat generated from the core and shutdown the reactor under accident conditions. Thus, the hybrid heat pipe contains a neutron absorber in the evaporator section, which corresponds to the core of the reactor pressure vessel. The presence of the neutron absorber material leads to differences in the heated diameter and hydraulic diameter of the heat pipe. The cross-sectional areas of the vapor paths through the evaporator, adiabatic, and condenser sections are also different. The hybrid heat pipe must operate in a high-temperature, high-pressure environment to remove the decay heat. In other words, the operating pressure must be higher than those of the commercially available thermosyphons. Hence, the thermal performances, including operation limit of the hybrid heat pipe, were experimentally studied in the operating pressure range of 0.2–20 bar. The operating pressure of the hybrid heat pipe was controlled by charging the non-condensable gas which is unused method to achieve the high saturation pressure in conventional thermosyphons. The effect of operating pressure on evaporation heat transfer was negligible, while condensation heat transfer was affected by the amount of non-condensable gas in the test section. The operation limit of the hybrid heat pipe increased with the operating pressure. Maximum heat removal capacity of the hybrid heat pipe was up to 6 kW which is meaningful value as a passive decay heat removal device in the nuclear power

  6. The feasibility of remotely separating and rejoining the main coolant pipes of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briaris, D.A.; Stanbridge, J.R.

    1977-09-01

    The generic requirement of a fusion reactor that the first wall and other high neutron dose structures be periodically replaced gives rise to a number of complex engineering operations which need to be performed remotely and with a high degree of reliability. Techniques for the remote separation and rejoining of the helium coolant pipes on the Culham Conceptual Tokamak Reactor Mk. II have been investigated in the form of cutting and welding schemes and the use of a mechanical coupling. A mechanical coupling is the more attractive because the reduced complexity of the operations to separate and join the pipes potentially shortens the reactor down-time. Some assessment of remote joint examination and recovery from faults has also been made. (author)

  7. Evaluation of stress histories of reactor coolant loop piping for pipe rupture prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.; Larder, R.A.; Ma, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the analyses used to evaluate stress histories in the primary coolant loop piping of a selected four-loop PNR power station. In order to make the simulation as realistic as possible, best estimates rather than conservative assumptions were considered throughout. The best estimate solution, however, was aided by a sensitivity study to assess the possible variation of outcomes resulted from uncertainties associated with these assumptions. Sources of stresses considered in the evaluation were pressure, dead weight, thermal expansion, thermal gradients through the pipe wall, residual welding, pump vibrations, and finally seismic excitations. The best estimates of pressure and thermal transient histories arising from plant operations were based on actual plant operation records supplemented by specified plant design conditions. Seismic motions were generated from response spectrum curves developed specifically for the region surrounding the plant site. Stresses due to dead weight and thermal expansion were computed from a three dimensional finite element model which used a combination of pipe, truss, and beam elements to represent the coolant loop piping, the pressure vessel, coolant pumps, steam generators, and the pressurizer. Stresses due to pressure and thermal gradients were obtained by closed form solutions. Seismic stress calculations considered the soil structure interaction, the coupling effect between the containment structure and the reactor coolant system. A time history method was employed for the seismic analysis. Calculations of residual stresses accounted for the actual heat impact, welding speed, weld preparation geometry, and pre- and post-heat treatments. Vibrational stresses due to pump operation were estimated by a dynamic analysis using existing measurements of pump vibrations. (orig./HP)

  8. Tentative design-philosophy for bellows in sodium cooled fast breeder reactors pipings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaller, K; Vrillon, B

    1980-02-01

    Expansion joints have proved to be reliable components, when properly designed and realized, in normal industrial equipment. But nevertheless bellows have not been employed widely in nuclear reactors and almost not in sodium cooled fast breeder reactors, where use of expansion-joints could considerably shorten the length of pipelines and, in consequence, lower the cost of the power plant. In the framework of its research and development program on fast reactors the French Atomic Energy.Commission, in cooperation with the industry, develops guidelines, backed up by experiments, to allow a safe design of pipe-lines and compensating-devices. The main points of these guidelines are discussed in this paper with the understanding, that they are tentative rules subject to changes. The guidelines are a complement to existing rules, like ASME - Code III, Code Case 1481, standards of the EJMA Preliminary Draft for Code Case Class I, Expansion Joints in Piping systems and suppliers' rules for the special case of application to sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. Relatively small diameters and easily accessible expansion joints, on control rods and valves for example, are not concerned. These guidelines do not apply to the bellows which are used as an integral part of a component.

  9. Tentative design-philosophy for bellows in sodium cooled fast breeder reactors pipings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaller, K.; Vrillon, B.

    1980-01-01

    Expansion joints have proved to be reliable components, when properly designed and realized, in normal industrial equipment. But nevertheless bellows have not been employed widely in nuclear reactors and almost not in sodium cooled fast breeder reactors, where use of expansion-joints could considerably shorten the length of pipelines and, in consequence, lower the cost of the power plant. In the framework of its research and development program on fast reactors the French Atomic Energy.Commission, in cooperation with the industry, develops guidelines, backed up by experiments, to allow a safe design of pipe-lines and compensating-devices. The main points of these guidelines are discussed in this paper with the understanding, that they are tentative rules subject to changes. The guidelines are a complement to existing rules, like ASME - Code III, Code Case 1481, standards of the EJMA Preliminary Draft for Code Case Class I, Expansion Joints in Piping systems and suppliers' rules for the special case of application to sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. Relatively small diameters and easily accessible expansion joints, on control rods and valves for example, are not concerned. These guidelines do not apply to the bellows which are used as an integral part of a component

  10. Heat Pipe Reactor Dynamic Response Tests: SAFE-100 Reactor Core Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2005-01-01

    The SAFE-I00a test article at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was used to simulate a variety of potential reactor transients; the SAFEl00a is a resistively heated, stainless-steel heat-pipe (HP)-reactor core segment, coupled to a gas-flow heat exchanger (HX). For these transients the core power was controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. This type of non-nuclear test is expected to provide reasonable approximation of reactor transient behavior because reactivity feedback is very simple in a compact fast reactor (simple, negative, and relatively monotonic temperature feedback, caused mostly by thermal expansion) and calculations show there are no significant reactivity effects associated with fluid in the HP (the worth of the entire inventory of Na in the core is .tests, the point kinetics model was based on core thermal expansion via deflection measurements. It was found that core deflection was a strung function of how the SAFE-100 modules were fabricated and assembled (in terms of straightness, gaps, and other tolerances). To remove the added variable of how this particular core expands as compared to a different concept, it was decided to use a temperature based feedback model (based on several thermocouples placed throughout the core).

  11. Technical meeting on 'Primary coolant pipe rupture event in liquid metal cooled fast reactors'. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In Liquid Metal cooled Fast Reactors (LMFR) or in accelerator driven sub-critical systems (ADS) with LMFR like sub-critical cores, the primary coolant pipes (PCP) connect the primary coolant pumps to the grid plate. A rupture in one of these pipes could cause significant loss of coolant flow to the core with severe consequences. In loop type reactors, all primary pipelines are provided with double envelopes and inter-space coolant leak monitoring systems that permit leak detection before break. Thus, the PCP rupture event can be placed in the beyond design basis event (BDBE) category. Such an arrangement is difficult to incorporate for pool type reactors, and hence it could be argued that the PCP rupture event needs to be analysed in detail as a design basis event (DBE, category 4 event). The primary coolant pipes are made of ductile austenitic stainless steel material and operate at temperatures of the cold pool and at comparatively low pressures. For such low stressed piping with negligible creep and embrittlement effects, it is of interest to discuss under what design provisions, for pool type reactors, the guillotine rupture of PCP could be placed in the BDBE category. The topical Technical Meeting (TM) on 'Primary Coolant Pipe Rupture Event in Liquid Metal Cooled Reactors' was called to enable the specialists to present the philosophy and analyses applied on this topic in the various Member States for different LMFRs. The scope of the Technical Meeting was to provide a global forum for information exchange on the philosophy applied in the various participating Member States and the analyses performed for different LMFRs with regard to the primary coolant pipe rupture event. More specifically, the objectives of the Technical Meeting were to review the safety philosophy for the PCP rupture event in pool type LMFR, to assess the structural reliability of the PCP and the probability of rupture under different conditions (with/without in-service inspection), to

  12. Problems specific to the piping of sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrillon, B.; Befre, J.; Schaller, K.

    1975-01-01

    A certain number of specific problems arising in connection with the sodium pipes in fast neutron reactors, especially those of large diameter, are presented. The supporting system must be designed to achieve the best compromise among stresses due to weight and various stresses of thermal origin. Large-scale experimental studies carried out on actual elements of the intermediate circuit of the Phenix reactor showed that the circuits can withstand considerable deformation collapse of the walls without danger of leakage. Protection studies against earthquakes are mentionned [fr

  13. Small ex-core heat pipe thermionic reactor concept (SEHPTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacox, M.G.; Bennett, R.G.; Lundberg, L.B.; Miller, B.G.; Drexler, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has developed an innovative space nuclear power concept with unique features and significant advantages for both Defense and Civilian space missions. The Small Ex-core Heat Pipe Thermionic Reactor (SEHPTR) concept was developed in response to Air Force needs for space nuclear power in the range of 10 to 40 kilowatts. This paper describes the SEHPTR concept and discusses the key technical issues and advantages of such a system

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels exposed to hot water. Experimental fracture mechanics results are compared with data from the literature and other laboratories. Thus a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge concerning stress corrosion crack growth rates is provided. Several sets of data confirm that 'fast' stress corrosion cracks with growth rates between 10 -8 and 10 -7 m/s and threshold stress intensities around 20 MN m -3/2 can occur under certain conditions. However, it appears possible that specific environmental, mechanical and metallurgical conditions which may prevail in reactors can result in significantly lower stress corrosion crack growth rates. The presently known stress corrosion crack growth rate versus stress intensity curves are discussed with emphasis on their usefulness in establishing safety margins against stress corrosion cracking of components in service. Further substantial research efforts would be helpful to provide a data base which permits well founded predictions as to how stress corrosion cracking in pressure vessels and piping can be reliably excluded or tolerated. It is emphasized, however, that the nucleation of stress corrosion cracks (as opposed to their growth) is difficult and may contribute substantially to the stress corrosion free service behaviour of the overwhelming majority of pressure vessels and pipes. (author)

  15. Method of preventing sodium from flowing when pipes of a fast breeder reactor are injured

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Yasushi; Yamagishi, Yoshiaki; Koga, Tomonari.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To inject high pressure sodium into an inlet nozzle portion when fluid pressure in the inlet nozzle portion of a core cooling pipe on the inlet side is in an abnormal condition, to thereby quickly and positively prevent the flow of sodium in a high pressure chamber in a reactor vessel, when pipes are injured. Structure: When the core cooling pipe on the inlet side is injured and as a consequence the pressure gage detects an abnormal condition of fluid pressure in the inlet nozzle, the valve is opened to allow high pressure sodium to inject into the inlet nozzle through a high pressure sodium supply pipe, thereby blocking a back-flow of sodium in the high pressure chamber into the core cooling pipe. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Model engineering for piping layout of boiling water reactor nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Koji; Uchiyama, Masayuki; Wada, Takanao; Jibu, Noboru.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear power station is made up of a wide variety of equipment, piping, ventilation ducts, conduits, and cable trays, etc. Even if equipment arrangement and piping layout are carefully planned on drawings, troubles such as interference often occur at field installation. Accordingly, it is thought very useful to make thorough examinations with plastic three-dimensional models in addition to drawings in reducing troubles at field, shortening the construction period, and improving economics. Examination with plastic models offers the following features: (1) It permits visual three-dimensional examination. (2) Group thinking and examination is possible. (3) Troubles due to failure to understand complicated drawings can be reduced drastically. Manufacturing a 1/20 scale model of the reactor building of the Tokai No. 2 Power Station of the Japan Atomic Power Co., Hitachi has performed model engineering-solution of interference troubles related to equipment and piping, securing of work space for in-service inspection (ISI), carry-in/installation of various equipment and piping, and determination of the piping route of which only the starting and terminating points were given under the complicated ambient conditions. Success with this procedure has confirmed that model engineering is an effective technique for future plant engineering. (auth.)

  17. Insulated pipe clamp design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.J.; Hyde, L.L.; Wagner, S.E.; Severud, L.K.

    1980-01-01

    Thin wall large diameter piping for breeder reactor plants can be subjected to significant thermal shocks during reactor scrams and other upset events. On the Fast Flux Test Facility, the addition of thick clamps directly on the piping was undesired because the differential metal temperatures between the pipe wall and the clamp could have significantly reduced the pipe thermal fatigue life cycle capabilities. Accordingly, an insulated pipe clamp design concept was developed. The design considerations and methods along with the development tests are presented. Special considerations to guard against adverse cracking of the insulation material, to maintain the clamp-pipe stiffness desired during a seismic event, to minimize clamp restraint on the pipe during normal pipe heatup, and to resist clamp rotation or spinning on the pipe are emphasized

  18. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-01

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept

  19. Automatic welding processes for reactor coolant pipes used in PWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, T.; Nakamura, A.; Nagura, Y.; Sakamoto, N.

    1979-01-01

    The authors developed automatic welding processes (submerged arc welding process and TIG welding process) for application to the welding of reactor coolant pipes which constitute the most important part of the PWR type nuclear power plant. Submerged arc welding process is suitable for flat position welding in which pipes can be rotated, while TIG welding process is suitable for all position welding. This paper gives an outline of the two processes and the results of tests performed using these processes. (author)

  20. Inspection indications, stress corrosion cracks and repair of process piping in nuclear materials production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of Schedule 40 Type 304 stainless steel piping in the process water system of the Savannah River Site reactors has provided indications of discontinuities in less than 10% of the weld heat affected zones. Pipe sections containing significant indications are replaced with Type 304L components. Post removal metallurgical evaluation showed that the indications resulted from stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones and that the overall weld quality was excellent. The evaluation also revealed weld fusion zone discontinuities such as incomplete penetration, incomplete fusion, inclusions, underfill at weld roots and hot cracks. Service induced extension of these discontinuities was generally not significant although stress corrosion cracking in one weld fusion zone was noted. One set of UT indications was caused by metallurgical discontinuities at the fusion boundary of an extra weld. This extra weld, not apparent on the outer pipe surface, was slightly overlapping and approximately parallel to the weld being inspected. This extra weld was made during a pipe repair, probably associated with initial construction processes. The two nearly parallel welds made accurate assessment of the UT signal difficult. The implications of these observations to the inspection and repair of process water systems of nuclear reactors is discussed

  1. Nuclear piping criteria for Advanced Light-Water Reactors, Volume 1--Failure mechanisms and corrective actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This WRC Bulletin concentrates on the major failure mechanisms observed in nuclear power plant piping during the past three decades and on corrective actions taken to minimize or eliminate such failures. These corrective actions are applicable to both replacement piping and the next generation of light-water reactors. This WRC Bulletin was written with the objective of meeting a need for piping criteria in Advanced Light-Water Reactors, but there is application well beyond the LWR industry. This Volume, in particular, is equally applicable to current nuclear power plants, fossil-fueled power plants, and chemical plants including petrochemical. Implementation of the recommendations for mitigation of specific problems should minimize severe failures or cracking and provide substantial economic benefit. This volume uses a case history approach to high-light various failure mechanisms and the corrective actions used to resolve such failures. Particular attention is given to those mechanisms leading to severe piping failures, where severe denotes complete severance, large ''fishmouth'' failures, or long throughwall cracks releasing a minimum of 50 gpm. The major failure mechanisms causing severe failure are erosion-corrosion and vibrational fatigue. Stress corrosion cracking also has been a common problem in nuclear piping systems. In addition thermal fatigue due to mixing-tee and to thermal stratification also is discussed as is microbiologically-induced corrosion. Finally, water hammer, which represents the ultimate in internally-generated dynamic high-energy loads, is discussed

  2. Evaluation of cracking in steam generator feedwater piping in pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.

    1981-05-01

    Cracking in feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to steam generators in 15 pressurized water reactor plants. Sections with cracks from nine plants are examined with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Using transmission electron microscopy, fatigue striations are observed on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a cyclic stress value of 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses and it is concluded that the overriding factor in the cracking problem was the presence of such undocumented cyclic loads

  3. Seismic analysis of nuclear piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, S.K.; Pillai, K.R.V.; Nandakumar, S.

    1975-01-01

    To illustrate seismic analysis of nuclear power plant piping, a simple piping system running between two floors of the reactor building is assumed. Reactor building floor response is derived from time-history method. El Centre earthquake (1940) accelerogram is used for time-history analysis. The piping system is analysed as multimass lumped system. Behaviour of the pipe during the said earthquake is discussed. (author)

  4. Advances in flaw evaluation procedures and acceptance criteria for reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, R.M.; Zahoor, A.; Norris, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    During the past several years, intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC) have been detected in stainless steel piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs) and have resulted in an increased number of flaw evaluations. To reduce the outage time associated with evaluating IGSCC, various research and ASME code groups have spent significant effort to provide utility personnel with efficient means to detect, classify, and size flaws, and to determine suitability for return to service for flawed stainless steel piping. One of the several nondestructive evaluation technologies that has received considerable attention is fracture mechanics, the discipline that considers the failure of flawed material. Fracture mechanics can be used to answer two key questions concerning return to service of flawed pipe: (a) what is the largest flaw size that can be returned to service and still maintain adequate safety margins at the applied loads, and (b) how much operating time remains before the crack reaches the largest allowable size? The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recently developed ASME code Section XI flaw size evaluation procedure and acceptance criteria for stainless steel piping and their application by BWR owners to efficiently determine if flaws found by nondestructive examination are acceptable for continued service

  5. Advances in flaw evaluation procedures and acceptance criteria for reactor piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, R.M.; Zahoor, A.; Norris, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    During the past several years, intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC) have been detected in stainless steel piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs) and have resulted in an increased number of flaw evaluations. To reduce the outage time associated with evaluating IGSCC, various research and ASME code groups have spent significant effort to provide utility personnel with efficient means to detect, classify, and size flaws, and to determine suitability for return to service for flawed stainless steel piping. One of the several nondestructive evaluation technologies that has received considerable attention is fracture mechanics, the discipline that considers the failure of flawed material. Fracture mechanics can be used to answer two key questions concerning return to service of flawed pipe: (a) what is the largest flaw size that can be returned to service and still maintain adequate safety margins at the applied loads, and (b) how much operating time remains before the crack reaches the largest allowable size. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recently developed ASME code Section XI flaw size evaluation procedure and acceptance criteria for stainless steel piping and their application by BWR owners to efficiently determine if flaws found by nondestructive examination are acceptable for continued service.

  6. Investigation and evaluation of cracking incidents in piping in pressurized water reactors. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of known cracking incidents in pressurized water reactor plants. Several instances of cracking in feedwater piping in 1979, together with reported cases of stress corrosion cracking at Three Mile Island Unit 1, led to the establishment of the third Pipe Crack Study Group. Major differences between the scope of the third PCSG and the previous two are: (1) the emphasis given to systems safety implications of cracking, and (2) the consideration given all cracking mechanisms known to affect PWR piping, including the failure of small lines in secondary safety systems. The present PCSG reviewed existing information on cracking of PWR pipe systems, either contained in written records of collected from meetings in the United States, and made recommendations in response to the PCSG charter questions and to othe major items that may be considered to either reduce the potential for cracking or to improve licensing bases

  7. Limit the effects of secondary circuit water or steam piping breaks in the reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachev, N.

    2001-01-01

    The existing design of the WWER-1000 Model 320 does not include provisions against the local mechanical effects of pipe ruptures of the secondary system piping. This situation may lead to accidental effects beyond the design basis of the plant in case of a postulated secondary pipe rupture event. The aim of the present safety enhancement measure is to overcome this safety deficit, that means to carry out some analyses and to suggest protection measures, by which the specified design basis of the plant concerning secondary circuit design basis accidents will be assured. The systems to be considered include the main steam lines (MSL) and the main feedwater lines (MFWL) in the safety related system areas. These areas are the system portions, which are located in the reactor building (containment and room A820 outside the containment). The pipe rupture effects to be considered include the local effects, that means pipe whip impact and jet forces on the adjacent equipment and structures, as well as reaction forces due to blowdown thrust forces and pressure waves in the broken piping system. (author)

  8. Model for cobalt 60/58 deposition on primary coolant piping in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehollander, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    A first principles model for deposition of radioactive metals into the corrosion films of primary coolant piping is proposed. It is shown that the predominant mechanism is the inclusion of the radioactive species such as Cobalt 60 into the spinel structure of the corrosion film during the act of active corrosion. This deposition can occupy only a defined fraction of the available plus 2 valence sites of the spinel. For cobalt ions, this ratio is roughly 4.6 x 10 -3 of the total iron sites. Since no distinction is made between Cobalt 60, Cobalt 58, and Cobalt 59 in this process, the radioactivity associated with this inclusion is a function of the ratio of the radioactive species to the nonradioactive species in the water causing the corrosion of the pipe metal. The other controlling parameter is the corrosion rate of the pipe material. This can be a function of time, for example, and it shown that freshly descaled metal when exposed to the cobalt containing water can incorporate as much as 10 x 10 -3 cobalt ions per iron atom in the initial corrosion period. This has implications for the problem of decontaminating nuclear reactor piping. Equations and selected observations are presented without reference to any specifically identified reactor or utility, so as to protect any proprietary interest

  9. Behavior study on Na heat pipe in passive heat removal system of new concept molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chenglong; Tian Wenxi; Su Guanghui; Zhang Dalin; Wu Yingwei; Qiu Suizheng

    2013-01-01

    The high temperature Na heat pipe is an effective device for transporting heat, which is characterized by remarkable advantages in conductivity, isothermally and passively working. The application of Na heat pipe on passive heat removal system of new concept molten salt reactor (MSR) is significant. The transient performance of high temperature Na heat pipe was simulated by numerical method under the MSR accident. The model of the Na heat pipe was composed of three conjugate heat transfer zones, i.e. the vapor, wick and wall. Based on finite element method, the governing equations were solved by making use of FORTRAN to acquire the profiles of the temperature, velocity and pressure for the heat pipe transient operation. The results show that the high temperature Na heat pipe has a good performance on operating characteristics and high heat transfer efficiency from the frozen state. (authors)

  10. Failure analysis of cracked head spray piping from the Dresden Unit 2 Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Dragel, G.M.

    1983-07-01

    Several sections of Type 304 stainless steel head spray piping, 6.25 cm (2.5 in.) in diameter, from the Dresden Unit 2 Boiling Water Reactor were examined to determine the nature and causes of coolant leakages detected during hydrostatic tests. Extensive pitting was observed on the outside surface of the piping, and three cracks, all located at a helical stripe apparently rubbed onto the outer surface of the piping, were also noted. Metallographic examination revealed that the cracking had initiated at the outer surface of the pipe, and showed it to be transgranular and highly branched, characteristic of chloride stress corrosion cracking. The surface pitting also appeared to have been caused by chlorides. A scanning electron microprobe x-ray analysis of the corrosion product in the cracks confirmed the presence of chlorides and also indicated the presence of calcium

  11. Probabilistic evaluation of main coolant pipe break indirectly induced by earthquakes Savannah River Project L and P Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, S.A.; Wesley, D.A.; Awadalla, N.G.; Kennedy, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    A probabilistic evaluation of seismically-induced indirect pipe break for the Savannah River Project (SRP) L- and P-Reactor main coolant (process water) piping has been conducted. Seismically-induced indirect pipe break can result primarily from: (1) failure of the anchorage of one or more of the components to which the pipe is anchored; or (2) failure of the pipe due to collapse of the structure. the potential for both types of seismically-induced indirect failures was identified during a seismic walkdown of the main coolant piping. This work involved: (1) identifying components or structures whose failure could result in pipe failure; (2) developing seismic capacities or fragilities of these components; (3) combining component fragilities to develop plant damage state fragilities; and (4) convolving the plant seismic fragilities with a probabilistic seismic hazard estimate for the site in order to obtain estimates of seismic risk in terms of annual probability of seismic-induced indirect pipe break

  12. Structural analyses on piping systems of sodium reactors. 2. Eigenvalue analyses of hot-leg pipelines of large scale sodium reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuhashi, Ichiro; Kasahara, Naoto

    2002-01-01

    Two types of finite element models analyzed eigenvalues of hot-leg pipelines of a large-scale sodium reactor. One is a beam element model, which is usual for pipe analyses. The other is a shell element model to evaluate particular modes in thin pipes with large diameters. Summary of analysis results: (1) A beam element model and a order natural frequency. A beam element model is available to get the first order vibration mode. (2) The maximum difference ratio of beam mode natural frequencies was 14% between a beam element model with no shear deformations and a shell element model. However, its difference becomes very small, when shear deformations are considered in beam element. (3) In the first order horizontal mode, the Y-piece acts like a pendulum, and the elbow acts like the hinge. The natural frequency is strongly affected by the bending and shear rigidities of the outer supporting pipe. (4) In the first order vertical mode, the vertical sections of the outer and inner pipes moves in the axial-directional piston mode, the horizontal section of inner pipe behaves like the cantilever, and the elbow acts like the hinge. The natural frequency is strongly affected by the axial rigidity of outer supporting pipe. (5) Both effective masses and participation factors were small for particular shell modes. (author)

  13. The role of heat pipes in intensified unit operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reay, David; Harvey, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Heat pipes are heat transfer devices that rely, most commonly, on the evaporation and condensation of a working fluid contained within them, with passive pumping of the condensate back to the evaporator. They are sometimes referred to as ‘thermal superconductors’ because of their exceptionally high effective thermal conductivity (substantially higher than any metal). This, together with several other characteristics make them attractive to a range of intensified unit operations, particularly reactors. The majority of modern computers deploy heat pipes for cooling of the CPU. The application areas of heat pipes come within a number of broad groups, each of which describes a property of the heat pipe. The ones particularly relevant to chemical reactors are: i. Separation of heat source and sink. ii. Temperature flattening, or isothermalisation. iii. Temperature control. Chemical reactors, as a heat pipe application area, highlight the benefits of the heat pipe based on isothermalisation/temperature flattening device and on being a highly effective heat transfer unit. Temperature control, done passively, is also of relevance. Heat pipe technology offers a number of potential benefits to reactor performance and operation. The aim of increased yield of high purity, high added value chemicals means less waste and higher profitability. Other intensified unit operations, such as those employing sorption processes, can also profit from heat pipe technology. This paper describes several variants of heat pipe and the opportunities for their use in intensified plant, and will give some current examples. -- Highlights: ► Heat pipes – thermal superconductors – can lead to improved chemical reactor performance. ► Isothermalisation within a reactor vessel is an ideal application. ► The variable conductance heat pipe can control reaction temperatures within close limits. ► Heat pipes can be beneficial in intensified reactors

  14. Nonlinear dynamic response analysis in piping system for a loss of coolant accident in primary loop of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiwen; He Feng; Hao Pengfei; Wang Xuefang

    2000-01-01

    Based on the elaborate force and moment analysis with characteristics method and control-volume integrating method for the piping system of primary loop under pressurized water reactor' loss of coolant accident (LOCA) conditions, the nonlinear dynamic response of this system is calculated by the updated Lagrangian formulation (ADINA code). The piping system and virtual underpinning are specially processed, the move displacement of the broken pipe with time is accurately acquired, which is very important and useful for the design of piping system and virtual underpinning

  15. Study on feasibility of replacing 321 with 316LN stainless steel for main reactor coolant pipe material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yijun

    2013-01-01

    The metallurgical, physical and mechanical performance, and the corrosion and welding properties of 00Cr17Ni12Mo2 (controlled Nitrogen, ANSI316LN) and 0Cr18Ni10Ti (ANSI321SS) for main pipe material were analyzed comparatively in this paper. The feasibility of 316LN pipe material manufacturing was studied too. The analysis results showed that under the operation condition of the nuclear reactor, the general properties of 316LN are better than that of 321SS. Therefore, 316LN could be used for main pipe material, replacing 321SS. (authors)

  16. Damage mechanism of piping welded joints made from austenitic Steel for the type RBMK reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karzov, G.; Timofeev, B.; Gorbakony, A.; Petrov, V.; Chernaenko, T.

    1999-01-01

    In the process of operation of RBMK reactors the damages were taking place on welded piping, produced from austenitic stainless steel of the type 08X18H10T. The inspection of damaged sections in piping has shown that in most cases crack-like defects are of corrosion and mechanical character. The paper considers in details the reasons of damages appearance and their development for this type of welded joints of downcomers 325xl6 mm, which were fabricated from austenitic stainless steel using TlG and MAW welding methods. (author)

  17. Demonstration of leak-before-break in Japan Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakai, Takashi; Machida, Hideo; Yoshida, Shinji; Xu, Yang; Tsukimori, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the leak-before-break (LBB) assessment procedure applicable to Japan Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) pipes made of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel. For the sodium pipes of JSFR, the continuous leak monitoring will be adopted as an alternative to a volumetric test of the weld joints under conditions that satisfy LBB. Firstly, a LBB assessment flowchart eliminating uncertainty resulted from small scale leakage, such as self plugging phenomenon and influence of crack surface roughness on leak rate, was proposed. Secondly, a rational unstable fracture assessment technique, taking the compliance changing with crack extension into account, was also proposed. Thirdly, a crack opening displacement (COD) assessment technique was developed, because COD assessment method applicable to JSFR pipes – thin wall and small work hardening material – had not been proposed yet. In addition, fracture toughness tests were performed using compact tension (CT) specimens to obtain the fracture toughness, J IC , and the crack growth resistance (J–R) curve at elevated temperature. Finally, by using the flowchart, proposed techniques and collected data, LBB assessment for the primary sodium pipes of JSFR was conducted. As a result, LBB aspect was successfully demonstrated with sufficient margins

  18. Piping reliability model development, validation and its applications to light water reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    A brief description is provided of a three-year effort undertaken by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the piping reliability project. The ultimate goal of this project is to provide guidance for nuclear piping design so that high-reliability piping systems can be built. Based on the results studied so far, it is concluded that the reliability approach can undoubtedly help in understanding not only how to assess and improve the safety of the piping systems but also how to design more reliable piping systems

  19. US NRC research on the integrity of piping in nuclear reactor primary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpan, C.Z. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    This paper has attempted to provide a ''snapshot'' of the activities underway in NRC on the subject of LWR piping integrity as of the summer and fall of 1983. The paper is necessarily vague on certain topics of policy because they are either under review or are under development and the outcome cannot be accurately forecast at this time. Particularly in the area of BWR pipe cracking, events are very rapid so that positions and actions described in this paper may well be obsolete by the time it is published. Nevertheless, the activities and positions are as accurate as possible at the time of writing. Certainly the longer-range aspects of the research program represent the current direction and intent of NRC; nevertheless, as results come in and actions occur in the licensing and regulation arena of operating reactors, the emphasis of the research programs will necessarily shift to accommodate them so as to remain as relevant as possible. Thus, this paper is useful to show the intentions of NRC in the area of research for LWR piping, and it is also useful to document the status of the regulations on piping for which the research is being performed. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear reactor, reactor core thereof, and device for constituting the reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takiyama, Masashi.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor core is constituted by charging coolants (light water) in a reactor pressure vessel and distributing fuel assemblies, reflecting material sealing pipes, moderator (heavy water and helium gas) sealing pipes, and gas sealing pipes therein. A fuel guide tube is surrounded by a cap and the gap therebetween is made hollow and filled with coolant steams. The cap is supported by a baffle plate. The moderator sealing pipe is disposed in a flow channel of coolants in adjacent with the cap. The position of the moderator sealing tube in the reactor core is controlled by water stream from a hydraulic pump with a guide tube extending below the baffle plate being as a guide. Then, the position of the moderator sealing tube is varied to conduct power control, burnup degree compensation, and reactor shut down. With such procedures, moderator cooling facility is no more necessary to simplify the structure. Further, heat generated from the moderator is transferred to the coolants thereby improving heat efficiency of the reactor. (I.N.)

  1. Heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triggs, G.W.; Lightowlers, R.J.; Robinson, D.; Rice, G.

    1986-01-01

    A heat pipe for use in stabilising a specimen container for irradiation of specimens at substantially constant temperature within a liquid metal cooled fast reactor, comprises an evaporator section, a condenser section, an adiabatic section therebetween, and a gas reservoir, and contains a vapourisable substance such as sodium. The heat pipe further includes a three layer wick structure comprising an outer relatively fine mesh layer, a coarse intermediate layer and a fine mesh inner layer for promoting unimpeded return of condensate to the evaporation section of the heat pipe while enhancing heat transfer with the heat pipe wall and reducing entrainment of the condensate by the upwardly rising vapour. (author)

  2. PIPE STRESS and VERPIP codes for stress analysis and verifications of PEC reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesari, F.; Ferranti, P.; Gasparrini, M.; Labanti, L.

    1975-01-01

    To design LMFBR piping systems following ASME Sct. III requirements unusual flexibility computer codes are to be adopted to consider piping and its guard-tube. For this purpose PIPE STRESS code previously prepared by Southern-Service, has been modified. Some subroutine for detailed stress analysis and principal stress calculations on all the sections of piping have been written and fitted in the code. Plotter can also be used. VERPIP code for automatic verifications of piping as class 1 Sct. III prescriptions has been also prepared. The results of PIPE STRESS and VERPIP codes application to PEC piping are in section III of this report

  3. Remote mechanized equipment for the repair and replacement of boiling water reactor recirculation loop piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauser, D.; Busch, D.F.

    1983-01-01

    Equipment has been assembled for the remote repair or replacement of boiling water reactor nuclear plant piping in the diameter range of 4 to 28 inches (10-71 cm). The objectives of this program were to produce high-quality pipe welds, reduce plant downtime, and reduce man-rem exposure. The repair strategy was to permit repair personnel to install and check out the repair subsystems and then leave the radiation zone allowing the operations to be conducted at a distance of up to 300 feet (91 m) from the operator. The complete repair system comprises subsystems for pipe severing, dimensional gaging, joint preparation, counterboring, welding, postweld nondestructive inspection (conceptual design), and audio, electronic, and visual monitoring of all operations. Components for all subsystems, excluding those for postweld nondestructive inspection, were purchased and modified as needed for integration into the repair system. Subsystems were designed for two sizes of Type 304 stainless steelpipe. For smaller, 12-inch-diameter (30.5 cm) pipe, severing is accomplished by a power hack saw and joint preparation and counterboring by an internally mounted lathe. The 22-inch-diameter (56 cm) pipe is severed, prepared, and counterbored using an externally mounted, single-point machining device. Dimensional gaging is performed to characterize the pipe geometry relative to a fixed external reference surface, allowing the placement of the joint preparation and the counterbore to be optimized. For both pipe sizes, a track-mounted gas tungsten-arc welding head with filler wire feed is used

  4. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  5. Applicability of ANSYS ELBOW290 element for flexibility calculation of tight radius bends on feeder pipes in CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X., E-mail: Xuan.Zhang@candu.com [Candu Energy Inc, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    A curved pipe element, ELBOW290, became available in ANSYS 12. This element was developed based on a simplified shell theory, and maintains the ability to capture cross-sectional deformations of elbows. Numerical testing on the applicability of this element for the flexibility calculation of the tight radius bends in CANDU reactors is carried out to determine the usability of this element in completing stress analyses for feeder pipes. Comparisons are made between the ELBOW290 and the shell element for various feeder bend types found in domestic and overseas CANDU reactors. The comparisons show that the ELBOW290 element is suitable for calculating the flexibility of the tight radius bends. (author)

  6. Research Activities on Development of Piping Design Methodology of High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Nam-Su [Seoul National Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Won, Min-Gu [Sungkyukwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young-Jin [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Inc., Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyeog-Yeon; Kim, Yoo-Gon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A SFR is operated at high temperature and low pressure compared with commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), and such an operating condition leads to time-dependent damages such as creep rupture, excessive creep deformation, creep-fatigue interaction and creep crack growth. Thus, high temperature design and structural integrity assessment methodology should be developed considering such failure mechanisms. In terms of design of mechanical components of SFR, ASME B and PV Code, Sec. III, Div. 5 and RCC-MRx provide high temperature design and assessment procedures for nuclear structural components operated at high temperature, and a Leak-Before-Break (LBB) assessment procedure for high temperature piping is also provided in RCC-MRx, A16. Three web-based evaluation programs based on the current high temperature codes were developed for structural components of high temperature reactors. Moreover, for the detailed LBB analyses of high temperature piping, new engineering methods for predicting creep C*-integral and creep COD rate based either on GE/EPRI or on reference stress concepts were proposed. Finally, the numerical methods based on Garofalo's model and RCC-MRx have been developed, and they have been implemented into ABAQUS. The predictions based on both models were compared with the experimental results, and it has been revealed that the predictions from Garafalo's model gave somewhat successful results to describe the deformation behavior of Gr. 91 at elevated temperatures.

  7. CSNI specialist meeting on leak-before-break in nuclear reactor piping: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    On September 1 and 2, 1983, the CSNI subcommittee on primary system integrity held a special meeting in Monterey, California, on the subject of leak-before-break in nuclear reactor piping systems. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for the exchange of ideas, positions, and research results; to identify areas requiring additional research and development; and to determine the general attitude toward acceptance of the leak-before-break concept. The importance of the leak-before-break issue was evidenced by excellent attendance at the meeting and through active participation by the meeting attendees. Approximately 125 people representing fifteen different nations attended the meeting. The meeting was divided into four technical sessions addressing the following areas: Application of Piping Fracture Mechanics to Leak-Before Break, Leak Rate and Leak Detection, Leak-Before-Break Studies, Methods and Results, Current and Proposed Positions on Leak-Before-Break.

  8. CSNI specialist meeting on leak-before-break in nuclear reactor piping: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    On September 1 and 2, 1983, the CSNI subcommittee on primary system integrity held a special meeting in Monterey, California, on the subject of leak-before-break in nuclear reactor piping systems. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for the exchange of ideas, positions, and research results; to identify areas requiring additional research and development; and to determine the general attitude toward acceptance of the leak-before-break concept. The importance of the leak-before-break issue was evidenced by excellent attendance at the meeting and through active participation by the meeting attendees. Approximately 125 people representing fifteen different nations attended the meeting. The meeting was divided into four technical sessions addressing the following areas: Application of Piping Fracture Mechanics to Leak-Before Break, Leak Rate and Leak Detection, Leak-Before-Break Studies, Methods and Results, Current and Proposed Positions on Leak-Before-Break

  9. Development of FBR piping bellows joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukimori, Kazuyuki; Iwata, Koji

    1991-01-01

    Reduction of construction cost is one of the most important problems to realize a FBR (Fast Breeder Reactor) Plant. Significant reduction of the construction cost of a reactor building, related equipments and facilities can be expected by shortening the length of its long cooling pipes. Since the bellows has a great capacity for absorbing thermal expansion displacement, application of bellows expansion joints is considered as the most influential measure for reduction of the piping length. To confirm technological possibilities of application and practical use of bellows joints in the main piping systems, extensive R and D's, development of various methods for evaluating the strength of bellows, establishment of inspection and maintenance techniques, studies on safety logic, etc., were carried out by PNC from 1983 to 1988. Through these studies, technological possibilities of bellows joints were confirmed and the results were summarized in the 'Structural Design Guide for Class 1 Piping Bellows Expansion Joints of Fast Breeder Reactor for Elevated Temperature Service' and the 'Inspection and Maintenance Standards of Piping bellows expansion Joints'. (author)

  10. Seismic analysis of liquid metal reactor piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Y.

    1987-01-01

    To safely assess the adequacy of the LMR piping, a three-dimensional piping code, SHAPS, has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. This code was initially intended for calculating hydrodynamic-wave propagation in a complex piping network. It has salient features for treating fluid transients of fluid-structure interactions for piping with in-line components. The code also provides excellent structural capabilities of computing stresses arising from internal pressurization and 3-D flexural motion of the piping system. As part of the development effort, the SHAPS code has been further augmented recently by introducing the capabilities of calculating piping response subjected to seismic excitations. This paper describes the finite-element numerical algorithm and its applications to LMR piping under seismic excitations. A time-history analysis technique using the implicit temporal integration scheme is addressed. A 3-D pipe element is formulated which has eight degrees of freedom per node (three displacements, three rotations, one membrane displacement, and one bending rotation) to account for the hoop, flexural, rotational, and torsional modes of the piping system. Both geometric and material nonlinearities are considered. This algorithm is unconditionally stable and is particularly suited for the seismic analysis

  11. IEA-R1 renewed primary coolant piping system stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainer, Gerson; Faloppa, Altair A.; Oliveira, Carlos A. de; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A partial replacement of the IEA-R1 piping system was conducted in 2014. The aim of this work is to perform the stress analysis of the renewed primary piping system of the IEA-R1, taking into account the as built conditions and the pipe modifications. The nuclear research reactor IEA-R1 is a pool type reactor designed by Babcox-Willcox, which is operated by IPEN since 1957. The primary coolant system is responsible for removing the residual heat of the Reactor core. As a part of the life management, a regular inspection detected some degradation in the primary piping system. In consequence, part of the piping system was replaced. The partial renewing of the primary piping system did not imply in major piping layout modifications. However, the stress condition of the piping systems had to be reanalyzed. The structural stress analysis of the primary piping systems is now presented and the final results are discussed. (author)

  12. Gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Masayuki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable direct cooling of reactor cores thereby improving the cooling efficiency upon accidents. Constitution: A plurality sets of heat exchange pipe groups are disposed around the reactor core, which are connected by way of communication pipes with a feedwater recycling device comprising gas/liquid separation device, recycling pump, feedwater pump and emergency water tank. Upon occurrence of loss of primary coolants accidents, the heat exchange pipe groups directly absorb the heat from the reactor core through radiation and convection. Although the water in the heat exchange pipe groups are boiled to evaporate if the forcive circulation is interrupted by the loss of electric power source, water in the emergency tank is supplied due to the head to the heat exchange pipe groups to continue the cooling. Furthermore, since the heat exchange pipe groups surround the entire circumference of the reactor core, cooling is carried out uniformly without resulting deformation or stresses due to the thermal imbalance. (Sekiya, K.)

  13. Analysis of water hammer-structure interaction in piping system for a loss of coolant accident in primary loop of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiwen; Yang Jinglong; He Feng; Wang Xuefang

    2000-01-01

    The conventional analysis of water hammer and dynamics response of structure in piping system is divided into two parts, and the interaction between them is neglected. The mechanism of fluid-structure interaction under the double-end break pipe in piping system is analyzed. Using the characteristics method, the numerical simulation of water hammer-structure interaction in piping system is completed based on 14 parameters and 14 partial differential equations of fluid-piping cell. The calculated results for a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in primary loop of pressurized water reactor show that the waveform and values of pressure and force with time in piping system are different from that of non-interaction between water hammer and structure in piping system, and the former is less than the later

  14. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  15. Residual-stresses in austenitic stainless-steel primary coolant pipes and welds of pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, F.; Leggatt, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Surface and through thickness residual stress measurements were performed on an aged cast austenitic-ferritic stainless steel pipe and on an orbital TIG weld representative of those of primary coolant pipes in pressurized water reactors. An abrasive-jet hole drilling method and a block removal and layering method were used. Surface stresses and through thickness stress profiles are strongly dependent upon heat treatments, machining and welding operations. In the aged cast stainless steel pipe, stresses ranged between -250 and +175 MPa. On and near the orbital TIG weld, the outside surface of the weld was in tension both in the axial and hoop directions, with maximum values reaching 420 MPa in the weld. On the inside surface, the hoop stresses were compressive, reaching -300 MPa. However, the stresses in the axial direction at the root of the weld were tensile within 4 mm depth from the inside surface, locally reaching 280 MPa. (author)

  16. Experimental study on air ingress during a primary pipe rupture accident with a graphite reactor core simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tetsuaki; Hishida, Makoto; Baba, Shinichi

    1991-11-01

    When a primary coolant pipe of a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) ruptures, helium gas in the reactor core blows out into the container, and the primary cooling system reduces the pressure. After the pressures are balanced between the reactor and the container, air is expected to enter into the reactor core from the breach. It seems to be probable that the graphite structures is oxidized by air. Hence, it is necessary to investigate the air ingress process and the behavior of the generating gases by the oxidation reactions. The previous experimental study is performed on the molecular diffusion and natural convection of the two component gas mixtures using a test model simulating simply the reactor. Objective of the study was to investigate the air ingress process during the early stage of the primary pipe rupture accident. However, since the model did not have any kind of graphite components, the reaction between graphite and oxygen was not simulated. The present model includes the reactor core and the high temperature plenum simulators made of graphite. The major results obtained in the present study are summarized in the followings: (1) The air ingress process with graphite oxidation reaction is similar to that without the reaction qualitatively. (2) When the reactor core simulator is maintained at low temperatures (lower than 450degC), the initiation time of the natural circulation of air is almost equal to that of the natural circulation of nitrogen. On the other hand, when the temperature of the reactor core simulator is high (more than 500degC), the initiation time of the natural circulation of air is earlier than that of nitrogen. (3) When the temperature of the reactor core simulator is higher than 600degC, oxygen is almost dissipated by the graphite structures. When the temperature of the reactor core simulator is below 700degC, carbon dioxide mainly is generated by the oxidation reactions. (author)

  17. Generation of cross section data of heat pipe working fluids for compact nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slewinski, Anderson; Ribeiro, Guilherme B. [Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica (ITA), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Caldeira, Alexandre D., E-mail: anderson_sle@live.com, E-mail: alexdc@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: gbribeiro@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avançados (IEAv), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisão de Energia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    For compact nuclear power plants, such as the nuclear space propulsion proposed by the TERRA project, aspects like mass, size and efficiency are essential drivers that must be managed during the project development. Moreover, for high temperature reactors, the use of liquid metal heat pipes as the heat removal mechanism provides some important advantages as simplicity and reliability. Considering these aforementioned aspects, this paper aims the development of the procedure necessary to calculate the microscopic absorption cross section data of several liquid metal to be used as working fluids with heat pipes; which will be later compared with the given data from JEF Report ⧣14. The information necessary to calculate the cross section data will be obtained from the latest ENDF library version. The NJOY system will be employed with the following modules: RECONR, BROADR, UNRESR and GROUPR, using the same specifications used to calculate the cross section data encountered in the JEF Report ⧣14. This methodology allows a comparison with published values, verifying the procedure developed to calculate the microscopic absorption cross section for selected isotopes using the TERRA reactor spectrum. Liquid metals isotopes of Sodium (Na), Lithium (Li), Thallium (TI) and Mercury (Hg) are part of this study. (author)

  18. Reactor water sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor water sampling device for sampling reactor water in an in-core monitor (neutron measuring tube) housing in a BWR type reactor. The upper end portion of a drain pipe of the reactor water sampling device is attached detachably to an in-core monitor flange. A push-up rod is inserted in the drain pipe vertically movably. A sampling vessel and a vacuum pump are connected to the lower end of the drain pipe. A vacuum pump is operated to depressurize the inside of the device and move the push-up rod upwardly. Reactor water in the in-core monitor housing flows between the drain pipe and the push-up rod and flows into the sampling vessel. With such a constitution, reactor water in the in-core monitor housing can be sampled rapidly with neither opening the lid of the reactor pressure vessel nor being in contact with air. Accordingly, operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.N.)

  19. Effects of phosphate addition on biofilm bacterial communities and water quality in annular reactors equipped with stainless steel and ductile cast iron pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Young-June; Ro, Hee-Myong; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-02-01

    The impact of orthophosphate addition on biofilm formation and water quality was studied in corrosion-resistant stainless steel (STS) pipe and corrosion-susceptible ductile cast iron (DCI) pipe using cultivation and culture-independent approaches. Sample coupons of DCI pipe and STS pipe were installed in annular reactors, which were operated for 9 months under hydraulic conditions similar to a domestic plumbing system. Addition of 5 mg/L of phosphate to the plumbing systems, under low residual chlorine conditions, promoted a more significant growth of biofilm and led to a greater rate reduction of disinfection by-products in DCI pipe than in STS pipe. While the level of THMs (trihalomethanes) increased under conditions of low biofilm concentration, the levels of HAAs (halo acetic acids) and CH (chloral hydrate) decreased in all cases in proportion to the amount of biofilm. It was also observed that chloroform, the main species of THM, was not readily decomposed biologically and decomposition was not proportional to the biofilm concentration; however, it was easily biodegraded after the addition of phosphate. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences of 102 biofilm isolates revealed that Proteobacteria (50%) was the most frequently detected phylum, followed by Firmicutes (10%) and Actinobacteria (2%), with 37% of the bacteria unclassified. Bradyrhizobium was the dominant genus on corroded DCI pipe, while Sphingomonas was predominant on non-corroded STS pipe. Methylobacterium and Afipia were detected only in the reactor without added phosphate. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the diversity of species in biofilm tended to increase when phosphate was added regardless of the pipe material, indicating that phosphate addition upset the biological stability in the plumbing systems.

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Akio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate and accelerate a leakage test of valves of a main steam pipe by adding a leakage test partition valve thereto. Constitution: A leakage testing partition valve is provided between a pressure vessel for a nuclear reactor and the most upstream side valve of a plurality of valves to be tested for leakage, a testing branch pipe is communicated with the downstream side of the partition valve, and the testing water for preventing leakage is introduced thereto through the branch pipe. Since main steam pipe can be simply isolated by closing the partition valve in the leakage test, the leakage test can be conducted without raising or lowering the water level in the pressure vessel, and since interference with other work in the reactor can be eliminated, the leakage test can be readily conducted parallel with other work in the reactor in a short time. Clean water can be used without using reactor water as the test water. (Yoshihara, H.)

  1. Resolution of concerns in auxiliary feedwater piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bain, R.A.; Testa, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    Auxiliary feedwater piping systems at pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants have experienced unanticipated operating conditions during plant operation. These unanticipated conditions have included plant events involving backleakage through check valves, temperatures in portions of the auxiliary feedwater piping system that exceed design conditions, and the occurrence of unanticipated severe fluid transients. The impact of these events has had an adverse effect at some nuclear stations on plant operation, installed plant components and hardware, and design basis calculations. Beaver Valley Unit 2, a three loop pressurized water reactor nuclear plant, has observed anomalies with the auxiliary feedwater system since the unit went operational in 1987. The consequences of these anomalies and plant events have been addressed and resolved for Beaver Valley Unit 2 by performing engineering and construction activities. These activities included pipe stress, pipe support and pipe rupture analysis, the monitoring of auxiliary feedwater system temperature and pressure, and the modification to plant piping, supports, valves, structures and operating procedures

  2. Development of an ISI robot for the fast breeder reactor MONJU primary heat transfer system piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Akihiro; Ueda, Masashi; Yamashita, Takuya; Narisawa, Masataka; Haga, Kouichi

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a new inspection robot for the In-Service Inspection of the heat transfer system of the Fast Breeder Reactor MONJU. The inspection was carried out using a tire-type ultrasonic sensor for volumetric tests at high temperature (atmosphere, 55degC; piping surface, 80degC) and radiation exposure condition (dose rate, 10 mGy/h; piping surface dose rate, 15 mGy/h). An inspection robot using a new tire type for the ultrasonic testing sensor and a new control method was developed. A signal-to-noise ratio S/N over 2 was obtained during the functional test for a calibration defect with a depth of 50%t (from the tube wall thickness). In the automatic inspection test, an EDM slit with a depth of 9% from the pipe thickness was detectable and with an S/N ratio = 4.0 (12.0 dB). (author)

  3. Analysis of gamma ray intensity on the S/C vent pipes area in the unit 2 reactor building of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The robot is equipped with cameras, a dosimeter, and 2 DOF (degree of freedom) manipulation arms. It loads a small vehicle equipped with a camera that can access and inspect narrow areas. TEPCO is using the four-legged walking robot to inspect the suppression chamber (S/C) area of the unit 2 reactor building basement in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The robot carried out 6 missions for about four months, from 11 December, 2012 to 15 March, 2013, where it examined an evidence of a leakage of radioactivity contaminated water in the S/C area of unit 2 reactor building. When a camera's signal processing unit, which is consist of ASIC and FPGA devices manufactured by a CMOS fabrication process, is exposed to a higher dose rate gamma ray, the speckle distribution in the camera image increase more. From the inspection videos, released by TEPCO, of the underground 8 vent pipes in the unit 2 reactor building, we analyzed the speckle distribution from the high dose-rate gamma rays. Based on the distribution of the speckle, we attempted to characterize the vent pipe with much radioactivity contaminated materials among the eight vent pipes connected to the PCV. The numbers of speckles viewed in the image of a CCD (or CMOS) camera are related to an intensity of the gamma ray energy emitted by a nuclear fission reaction from radioactivity materials. The numbers of speckles generated by gamma ray irradiation in the camera image are calculated by an image processing technique. Therefore, calculating the speckles counts, we can determine the vent pipe with relatively most radioactivity-contaminated materials among the other vent pipes. From the comparison of speckles counts calculated in the inspection image of the vent pipe with the speckles counts extracted by gamma ray irradiation experiment of the same small vehicle camera model loaded with the four-legged walking robot, we can qualitatively estimate the gamma ray dose-rate in the S/C vent pipe area of the

  4. Solid-Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-01-01

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP). Like the SAFE 400 space nuclear reactor core, the HPENHS core is comprised of fuel rods and HPs embedded in a solid structure arranged in a hexagonal lattice in a 3:1 ratio. The core is oriented horizontally and has a square rather cylindrical cross section for effective heat transfer. The HPs extend from the two axial reflectors in which the fission gas plena are embedded and transfer heat to an intermediate coolant that flows by natural-circulation. The HP-ENHS is designed to preserve many features of the ENHS including 20-year operation without refueling, very small excess reactivity throughout life, natural circulation cooling, walkaway passive safety, and robust proliferation resistance. The target power level and specific power of the HP-ENHS reactor are those of the reference ENHS reactor. Compared to previous ENHS reactor designs utilizing a lead or lead-bismuth alloy natural circulation cooling system, the HP-ENHS reactor offers a number of advantageous features including: (1) significantly enhanced passive decay heat removal capability; (2) no positive void reactivity coefficients; (3) relatively lower corrosion of the cladding (4) a core that is more robust for transportation; (5) higher temperature potentially offering higher efficiency and hydrogen production capability. This preliminary study focuses on five areas: material compatibility analysis, HP performance analysis, neutronic analysis, thermal-hydraulic analysis and safety analysis. Of the four high-temperature structural materials evaluated, Mo TZM alloy is the preferred choice; its upper estimated feasible operating temperature is 1350 K. HP performance is evaluated as a function of working fluid type, operating temperature, wick design and HP diameter and length. Sodium is the

  5. Preliminary feasibility study of the heat - pipe ENHS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratoni, M.; Kim, L.; Mattafirri, S.; Petroski, R.; Greenspan, E.

    2007-01-01

    This preliminary study assesses the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor [1] to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP). Like the SAFE space nuclear reactor core [2], the HP-ENHS core is comprised of fuel rods and HPs embedded in a solid structure arranged in a hexagonal lattice in a 3:1 ratio. The HPs extend beyond the core length and transfer heat to a secondary coolant that flows by natural circulation. The HP-ENHS reactor is designed to preserve many features of the ENHS reactor including 20-year operation without refueling, very small excess reactivity throughout life, natural circulation cooling, walk-away passive safety, and robust proliferation resistance. The target power level and specific power of the HP-ENHS reactor are those of the reference ENHS reactor [1]. Compared to previous ENHS reactor designs utilizing a lead or lead-bismuth alloy natural circulation cooling system, the HP-ENHS reactor offers a number of possible advantageous features including: (1) significantly enhanced decay heat removal capability; (2) no positive void reactivity coefficients; (3) no direct contact between the fuel clad and coolant, hence, relatively lower wet corrosion of the clad; (4) a core that is more robust for transportation; (5) higher temperature potentially offering higher efficiency and hydrogen production capability. The study focuses on four areas: material compatibility analysis, HP performance analysis, neutronic analysis and thermal-hydraulic analysis. Of four high-temperature structural materials evaluated, Mo TZM alloy is the preferred choice; its upper estimated feasible operating temperature is 1350 K. HP performance is evaluated as a function of working fluid type, operating temperature, wick design and HP diameter and length. Sodium is the preferred working fluid and the HP working temperature is 1300 K. The neutronic analysis found that it is possible to achieve criticality

  6. Probabilistic based design rules for intersystem LOCAS in ABWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Wesley, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for probability-based standards for low-pressure piping systems that are attached to the reactor coolant loops of advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) which could experience reactor coolant loop temperatures and pressures because of multiple isolation valve failures. This accident condition is called an intersystem loss-of-coolant accident (ISLOCA). The methodology was applied to various sizes of carbon and stainless steel piping designed to advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) temperatures and pressures

  7. Hot Leg Piping Materials Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Munne

    2006-01-01

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) the reactor outlet piping was recognized to require a design that utilizes internal insulation (Reference c). The initial pipe design suggested ceramic fiber blanket as the insulation material based on requirements associated with service temperature capability within the expected range, very low thermal conductivity, and low density. Nevertheless, it was not considered to be well suited for internal insulation use because its very high surface area and proclivity for holding adsorbed gases, especially water, would make outgassing a source of contaminant gases in the He-Xe working fluid. Additionally, ceramic fiber blanket insulating materials become very friable after relatively short service periods at working temperatures and small pieces of fiber could be dislodged and contaminate the system. Consequently, alternative insulation materials were sought that would have comparable thermal properties and density but superior structural integrity and greatly reduced outgassing. This letter provides technical information regarding insulation and materials issues for the Hot Leg Piping preconceptual design developed for the Project Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP)

  8. Leak detection in the primary reactor coolant piping of nuclear power plant by applying beam-microphone technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Shimanskiy, Sergey; Naoi, Yosuke; Kanazawa, Junichi

    2004-01-01

    A microphone leak detection method was applied to the inlet piping of the ATR-prototype reactor, Fugen. Statistical analysis results showed that the cross-correlation method provided the effective results for detection of a small leakage. However, such a technique has limited application due to significant distortion of the signals on the reactor site. As one of the alternative methods, the beam-microphone provides necessary spatial selectivity and its performance is less affected by signal distortion. A prototype of the beam-microphone was developed and then tested at the O-arai Engineering Center of the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). On-site testing of the beam-microphone was carried out in the inlet piping room of an RBMK reactor of the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP) in Russia. A leak sound imitator was used to simulate the leakage sound under the leakage flow condition of 1-3 gpm (0.23-0.7 m 3 /h). Analysis showed that signal distortion does not seriously affect the performance of this method, and that sound reflection may result in the appearance of ghost sound sources. The test results showed that the influences of sound reflection and background noise were smaller at the high frequencies where the leakage location could be estimated with an angular accuracy of 5deg which is the range of localization accuracy required for the leak detection system. (author)

  9. Refurbishment of the IEAR1 primary coolant system piping supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainer, Gerson; Faloppa, Altair A.; Oliveira, Carlos A. de; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A partial replacement of the IEA-R1 piping system was concluded in 2014. This paper presents the study and the structural analysis of the IEA-R1 primary circuit piping supports, considering all the changes involved in the replacement. The IEA-R1 is a nuclear reactor for research purposes designed by Babcox-Willcox that is operated by IPEN since 1957. The reactor life management and modernization program is being conducted for the last two decades and already resulted in a series of changes, especially on the reactor coolant system. This set of components, divided in primary and secondary circuit, is responsible for the circulation of water into the core to remove heat. In the ageing management program that includes regular inspection, some degradation was observed in the primary piping system. As result, the renewing of the piping system was conducted in 2014. Moreover the poor condition of some original piping supports gave rise to the refurbishment of all piping supports. The aim of the present work is to review the design of the primary system piping supports taking into account the current conditions after the changes and refurbishment. (author)

  10. Ultrasonic testing with the phased array method at the pipe connection inner edges in pipings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brekow, G.; Wuestenberg, H.; Hesselmann, H.; Rathgeb, W.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing with the phased array method at the pipe connection inner edges in pipings. The pipe connection inner corner tests in feedwater lines to the main coolant pipe were carried out by Preussen-Elektra in cooperation with Siemens KWU and the BAM with the ultrasonic phased array method. The testing plan was developed by means of a computed model. For a trial of the testing plan, numerous ultrasonic measurements with the phased array method were carried out using a pipe test piece with TH-type inner edges, which was a 1:1 model of the reactor component to be tested. The data measured at several test notches in the pipe connection inner edge area covered by a plating of 6 mm were analyzed. (orig./MM) [de

  11. Pressure tube type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Hiroshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To permit safe and reliable replacement of primary pipes by providing a reactor container so as to surround a pressure pipe, with upper portions of the two separably coupled together, and coupling the pressure pipe and primary piping by joint coupling above and below the reactor container, with the lower coupling joint surrounded by drain receptacle. Structure: At the time of replacement of a pressure pipe, a partition valve is opened to exhaust primary cooling water within pressure pipe and upper and lower portions of the primary piping and replace the decelerator within the reactor container with water of the same quality as that of pool water within an upper shield pool. Thereafter, the entire space above the drain receptacle is filled with pool water by closing a partition valve and opening a water supply valve. Then, upper portion seal cover, pool bottom lid, upper joint and upper portion primary piping are removed, then bolts and nuts are loosened, and the pressure pipe is taken out together with the shield block. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. An in-pipe mobile micromachine using fluid power. A mechanism adaptable to pipe diameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Yokota, Shinichi; Takahashi, Ken

    2000-01-01

    To realize micro maintenance robots for small diameter pipes of nuclear reactors and so on, high power in-pipe mobile micromachines have been required. The authors have proposed the bellows microactuator using fluid power and have tried to apply the actuators to in-pipe mobile micromachines. In the previous papers, some inchworm mobile machine prototypes with 25 mm in diameter are fabricated and the traveling performances are experimentally investigated. In this paper, to miniaturize the in-pipe mobile machine and to make it adaptable to pipe diameters, firstly, a simple rubber-tube actuator constrained with a coil-spring is proposed and the static characteristics are investigated. Secondly, a supporting mechanism which utilizes a toggle mechanism and is adaptable to pipe diameters is proposed and the supporting forces are investigated. Finally, an in-pipe mobile micromachine for pipe with 4 - 5 mm in diameter is fabricated and the maximum traveling velocity of 7 mm/s in both ahead and astern movements is experimentally verified. (author)

  13. Study on flow-induced vibration of large-diameter pipings in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. Influence of elbow curvature on velocity fluctuation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Ayako; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Kamide, Hideki; Tobita, Akira

    2010-02-01

    The main cooling system of Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) consists of two loops to reduce the plant construction cost. In the design of JSFR, sodium coolant velocity is beyond 9m/s in the primary hot leg pipe with large-diameter (1.3m). The maximum Reynolds number in the piping reaches 4.2x10 7 . The hot leg pipe having a 90 degree elbow with curvature ratio of r/D=1.0, so-called 'short elbow', which enables a compact reactor vessel. In sodium cooled fast reactors, the system pressure is so low that thickness of pipings in the cooling system is thinner than that in LWRs. Under such a system condition in the cooling system, the flow-induced vibration (FIV) is concerned at the short elbow. The evaluation of the structural integrity of pipings in JSFR should be conducted based on a mechanistic approach of FIV at the elbow. It is significant to obtain the knowledge of the fluctuation intensity and spectra of velocity and pressure fluctuations in order to grasp the mechanism of the FIV. In this study, water experiments were conducted. Two types of 1/8 scaled elbows with different curvature ratio, r/D=1.0, 1.5, were used to investigate the influence of curvature on velocity fluctuation at the elbow. The velocity fields in the elbows were measured using a high speed PIV method. Unsteady behavior of secondary flow at the elbow outlet and separation flow at the inner wall of elbow were observed in the two types of elbows. It was found that the growth of secondary flow correlated with the flow fluctuation near the inside wall of the elbow. (author)

  14. SCC-induced failure of a 304 stainless steel pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, R.L.; Disney, D.J.; Szostak, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    On 1991 January 12, a 304 Stainless Steel (SS) suction line in the AECL-Research NRU reactor failed, shutting down the reactor for approximately 12 months. The pipe, a 32 mm schedule 40 304 stainless steel line exposed to D 2 O at temperatures ≤35 degrees C had been in service for approximately 20 years, although no manufacturing data or composition specifications were available. The failure and resultant leak resulted in a small loss of D 2 O moderator from the reactor vessel. The pipe cracked approximately 180 degrees C around the circumference of a weld. This failure was unexpected and hense a thorough metallographic examination was carried out on the failed section, on the rest of the line (Line 1212), and on representative samples from the rest of the reactor in order to assess the integrity of the remaining piping

  15. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis for leak-before-break evaluation of light water reactor's piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Shinobu; Yagawa, Genki; Akiba, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Terutaka.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (PFM) analyses for quantitative evaluation of the likelihood of Leak-Before-Break (LBB) of Light Water Reactor's (LWR's) piping. The PFM analyses in general assume probabilistic distributions of initial crack size, applied stress cycles, crack growth laws, fracture criteria, leakage detection capability, defect inspection capability and so on. Referring to the deterministic procedure for LBB evaluation, most appropriate PFM models and data for LBB evaluation are discussed. Here the LBB index is newly proposed in order to quantitatively evaluate the likelihood of LBB. Through intensive sensitivity analyses, it is clarified that the LBB is more likely to occur for larger diameter pipe; the performance of leakage detection significantly affects the LBB likelihood; the LBB likelihood increases with plant's aging even conservatively assuming leak detection capability; the R6 method (Category 1, Option 1) for fracture criterion gives very conservative results; and In-Service Inspection (ISI) reduces the increase rate of failure probability than the failure probability itself. (author)

  16. LWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kiyoshi.

    1993-01-01

    A water injection tank in an emergency reactor core cooling system is disposed at a position above a reactor pressure vessel. A liquid phase portion of the water injection tank and an inlet plenum portion in the reactor pressure vessel are connected by a water injection pipe. A gas phase portion of the water injection tank and an upper portion in the reactor pressure vessel are connected by a gas ventilation pipe. Hydraulic operation valves are disposed in the midway of the water injection pipe and the gas ventilation pipe respectively. A pressure conduit is disposed for connecting a discharge port of a main recycling pump and the hydraulic operation valve. In a case where primary coolants are not sent to the main recycling pump by lowering of a liquid level due to loss of coolants or in a case where the main recycling pump is stopped by electric power stoppage or occurrence of troubles, the discharge pressure of the main recycling pump is lowered. Then, the hydraulic operation valve is opened to release the flow channel, then, boric acid water in the water injection tank is sent into the reactor by a falling head, to lead the reactor to a scram state. (I.N.)

  17. Heat-pipe development for the SPAR space-power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranken, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    The SPAR space power system design is based on a high temperature fast spectrum nuclear reactor that furnishes heat to a thermoelectric conversion system to generate an electrical power output of 100 kW/sub (e)/. An important feature of this design is the use of alkali metal heat pipes to provide redundant, reliable, and low-loss heat transfer at high temperature. Three sets of heat pipes are used in the system. These include sodium/molybdenum heat pipes to transfer heat from the reactor core to the conversion system, potassium/niobium heat pipes to couple the conversion system to the radiator in a redundant manner, and potassium/titanium heat pipes to distribute rejected heat throughout the radiator surface. The designs of these units are discussed and fabrication methods and testing results are described. 12 figures

  18. Seismic analysis of liquid metal reactor piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the finite-element numerical algorithm and its applications to LMR piping under seismic excitations. A time-history analysis technique using the implicit temporal integration scheme is addressed. A 3-D pipe element is formulated which has eight degrees of freedom per node (three displacements, three rotations, one membrane displacement, and one bending rotation) to account for the hoop, flexural, rotational, and torsional modes of the piping system. Both geometric and material nonlinearities are considered. This algorithm is unconditionally stable and is particularly suited for the seismic analysis. (orig./GL)

  19. Innovative technology summary report: High-speed clamshell pipe cutter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The Hanford Site C Reactor Technology Demonstration Group demonstrated the High-Speed Clamshell Pipe Cutter technology, developed and marketed by Tri Tool Inc. (Rancho Cordova, California). The models demonstrated are portable, split-frame pipe lathes that require minimal radial and axial clearances for severing and/or beveling in-line pipe with ranges of 25 cm to 41 cm and 46 cm to 61 cm nominal diameter. The radial clearance requirement from the walls, floors, or adjacent pipes is 18 cm. The lathes were supplied with carbide insert conversion kits for the cutting bits for the high-speed technique that was demonstrated. Given site-specific factors, this demonstration showed the cost of the improved technology to be approximately 30% higher than the traditional (baseline) technology (oxyacetylene torch) cost of $14,400 for 10 cuts of contaminated 41-cm and 61-cm-diameter pipe at C Reactor. Actual cutting times were faster than the baseline technology; however, moving/staging the equipment took longer. Unlike the baseline torch, clamshell lathes do not involve applied heat, flames, or smoke and can be operated remotely, thereby helping personal exposures to be as low as reasonably achievable. The baseline technology was demonstrated at the C Reactor north and south water pipe tunnels August 19--22, 1997. The improved technology was demonstrated in the gas pipe tunnel December 15--19

  20. Seismic test of high temperature piping for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobatake, Kiyokazu; Midoriyama, Shigeru; Ooka, Yuzi; Suzuki, Michiaki; Katsuki, Taketsugu

    1983-01-01

    Since the high temperature pipings for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor contain helium gas at 1000 deg C and 40 kgf/cm 2 , the double-walled pipe type consisting of the external pipe serving as the pressure boundary and the internal pipe with heat insulating structure was adopted. Accordingly, their aseismatic design is one of the important subjects. Recently, for the purpose of grasping the vibration characteristics of these high temperature pipings and obtaining the data required for the aseismatic design, two specimens, that is, a double-walled pipe model and a heat-insulating structure, were made, and the vibration test was carried out on them, using a 30 ton vibration table of Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. In the high temperature pipings of the primary cooling system for the multi-purpose, high temperature gas-cooled experimental reactor, the external pipes of 32 B bore as the pressure boundary and the internal pipes of 26 B bore with internal heat insulation consisting of double layers of fiber and laminated metal insulators as the temperature boundary were adopted. The testing method and the results are reported. As the spring constant of spacers is larger and clearance is smaller, the earthquake wave response of double-walled pipes is smaller, and it is more advantageous. The aseismatic property of the heat insulation structure is sufficient. (Kako, I.)

  1. Identification of significant problems related to light water reactor piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    Work on the project was divided into three tasks. In Task 1, past surveys of LWR piping system problems and recent Licensee Event Report summaries are studied to identify the significant problems of LWR piping systems and the primary causes of these problems. Pipe cracking is identified as the most recurring problem and is mainly due to the vibration of pipes due to operating pump-pipe resonance, fluid-flow fluctuations, and vibration of pipe supports. Research relevant to the identified piping system problems is evaluated. Task 2 studies identify typical LWR piping systems and the current loads and load combinations used in the design of these systems. Definitions of loads are reviewed. In Task 3, a comparative study is carried out on the use of nonlinear analysis methods in the design of LWR piping systems. The study concludes that the current linear-elastic methods of analysis may not predict accurately the behavior of piping systems under seismic loads and may, under certain circumstances, result in nonconservative designs. Gaps at piping supports are found to have a significant effect on the response of the piping systems

  2. FFTF report: FFTF piping installation and welding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilles, J.

    1975-01-01

    The main sodium piping with a diameter of 16'' or 28 '' is being installed at the FFTF construction site starting in December 1974. The supplier and authority demarcations are: Combustion Engineering supplies the reactor vessel, guard vessel and adjoining pipes and uses the machine welding equipment ''Dimetrics''; for the piping system of the primary and secondary loops the pipes manufactured by Rollmet at HUICO, Pasco, were delivered and prefabricated there, as far as compatible with the installation. ''Astroarc'' welding machines are used by Bechtel for the piping prefabrication in the weld laboratory as well as on site at the construction site. Technical welding problems occurring during the course of the installation at the construction site and several during this time are described. At present 6 weld seams in the reactor and 14 weld seams in the secondary loop are accepted. The requirement exists to carry out as many welds as possible automatically, in order to produce sodium pipe welds of high technical quality and which are reproducible. The welding equipment is described

  3. BWR type reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, Shin-ichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the internal structure in a reactor by rapidly and efficiently transferring heat generated in a reactor core out of the reactor and eliminating the danger of radiation exposure. Constitution: Steam generated in a pressure vessel is introduced into heat pipe group by inserting the heat pipe group into the steam dome of the pressure vessel. The introduced steam is condensed in the heat pipes to transfer the heat of the steam to the heat pipe group. The transferred heat is transmitted to a heat exchanger provided out of a containment vessel to generate steam to operate a turbine. Thus, it is not necessary to introduce the steam including radioactive substance externally and can remove only the heat so as to carry out the desired purpose. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.P. Jr.; Buden, D.

    1982-01-01

    To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications

  5. Application of ultrasonic testing technique to detect gas accumulation in important pipings for pressurized water reactors safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fushimi, Yasuyuki [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Since 1988, the USNRC has pointed out that gas-binding events might occur at high head safety injection (HHSI) pumps of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). In Japanese PWR plants, corrective actions were taken in response to gas-binding events that occurred on HHSI pumps in the USA, so no gas accumulation event has been reported so far. However, when venting frequency is prolonged with operating cycle extension, the probability of gas accumulation in pipings may increase as in the USA. The purpose of this study was to establish a technique to identify gas accumulation and to measure the gas volume accurately. Taking dominant causes of the gas-binding events in the USA into consideration, we pointed out the following sections in the Japanese PWRs where gas srtipping and/or gas accumulation might occur: residual heat removal system pipings and charging/safety injection pump minimum flow line. Then an ultrasonic testing technique, adopted to identify gas accumulation in the USA, was applied to those sections of the typical Japanese PWR. Consequently, no gas accumulation was found in those pipings. (author)

  6. Reactor control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, Akiyuki.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable three types of controls, that is, level control, scram control and excess reactivity control required for a reactor by a same mechanism by feeding neutron absorber liquid and pressure control gas to several blind pipes provided in the reactor core. Constitution: A plurality of blind pipes are disposed spaced apart in a reactor core and connected by way of injection pipes to a neutron absorber liquid tank. A pressure regulator is connected to the blind pipes, to which pressure control gas is supplied. The neutron absorber liquid used herein consists of sodium, potassium or their alloy, or mercury as a basic substance incorporated with one or more selected from boron, tantalum, rhenium, europium or their compounds. The level control, scram control and excess reactivity control can be attained by moderating the pressure changes in the pressure control gas or by regulating the fluctuation in the liquid level. (Horiughi, T.)

  7. Condensation of steam in horizontal pipes: model development and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szijarto, R.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis submitted to the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich presents the development and validation of a model for the condensation of steam in horizontal pipes. Condensation models were introduced and developed particularly for the application in the emergency cooling system of a Gen-III+ boiling water reactor. Such an emergency cooling system consists of slightly inclined horizontal pipes, which are immersed in a cold water tank. The pipes are connected to the reactor pressure vessel. They are responsible for a fast depressurization of the reactor core in the case of accident. Condensation in horizontal pipes was investigated with both one-dimensional system codes (RELAP5) and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics software (ANSYS FLUENT). The performance of the RELAP5 code was not sufficient for transient condensation processes. Therefore, a mechanistic model was developed and implemented. Four models were tested on the LAOKOON facility, which analysed direct contact condensation in a horizontal duct

  8. Evaluation of clamp effects on LMFBR piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Loop-type liquid metal breeder reactor plants utilize thin-wall piping to mitigate through-wall thermal gradients due to rapid thermal transients. These piping loops require a support system to carry the combined weight of the pipe, coolant and insulation and to provide attachments for seismic restraints. The support system examined here utilizes an insulated pipe clamp designed to minimize the stresses induced in the piping. To determine the effect of these clamps on the pipe wall a non-linear, two-dimensional, finite element model of the clamp, insulation and pipe wall was used to determine the clamp/pipe interface load distributions which were then applied to a three-dimensional, finite element model of the pipe. The two-dimensional interaction model was also utilized to estimate the combined clamp/pipe stiffness

  9. A study on the temperature distribution in the hot leg pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Yoon-Jae; Baik, Se-Jin; Jang, Ho-Cheol; Lee, Byung-Jin; Im, In-Young; Ro, Tae-Sun

    2003-01-01

    In the hot leg pipes of reactor coolant system of the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP), a non-uniform distribution in temperature has been observed across the cross-section, which is attributed to the non-uniformity of power distribution in the reactor core usually having a peak in the center region, and to the colder coolant bypass flow through the reactor vessel outlet nozzle clearances. As a result, the arithmetic mean temperature of four Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) installed in each hot leg - two in the upper region and two in the lower region around the pipe wall may not correctly represent the actual coolant bulk temperature. It is also believed that there is a skewness in the velocity profile in the hot leg pipe due to the sudden changes in the flow direction and area from the core to the hot leg pipe, through the reactor vessel outlet plenum. These temperature non-uniformity and velocity skewness affect the measurement of the plant parameter such as the reactor coolant flow rate which is calculated by using the bulk temperature of hot leg pipes. A computational analysis has been performed to simulate the temperature and velocity distributions and to evaluate the uncertainty of temperature correction offset in the hot leg pipe. A commercial CFD code, FLUENT, is used for this analysis. The analysis results are compared with the operational data of KSNP and the scaled-down model test data for System 80. From the comparisons, an uncertainty of correction offset is obtained to measure the bulk temperature of hot leg more accurately, which can be also applied to the operating plants, leading to the reduction of temperature measurement uncertainty. Since the uncertainty of temperature in the hot leg pipe is one of major parameters to calculate the uncertainty of the reactor coolant flow rate, the analysis results can contribute to the improvement of the plant performance and safety by reducing the uncertainty of temperature measurement

  10. An overview of environmental degradation of materials in nuclear power plant piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.

    1987-08-01

    Piping in light water reactor (LWR) power systems is affected by several types of environmental degradation: intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs) has required research, inspection, and mitigation programs that will ultimately cost several billion dollars; erosion-corrosion of carbon steel piping has been observed frequently in the secondary systems of both BWRs and pressurized water reactors (PWRs); the effect of the BWR environment can greatly diminish the design margin inherent in the ASME Section III fatigue design curves for carbon steel piping; and cast stainless steels are subject to embrittlement after extended thermal aging at reactor operating temperatures. These problems are being addressed by wide-ranging research programs in this country and abroad. The purpose of this review is to highlight some of the accomplishments of these programs and to note some of the remaining unanswered questions

  11. The intermittent contact impact problem in piping systems of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Ricard, A.; Millard, A.

    1981-09-01

    The intermittent contact problem is important in many pipe whip studies, specially as to the safety of nuclear reactors. The impact concept adopted is that of instantaneous impact, so that at the time of impact the two impacting structures instantaneously acquire the same velocity in the impact direction. Energy is dissipated by some mechanism whose spatial and temporal scale is small compared to these scales in the discrete model. This dissipation is associated with local plastic deformation. Different solutions are presented for solving this problem. The first one is a generalization of the modal superposition method, when the nonlinearities of the structure are only due to impact between structural components; the other ones are included in a step by step time history and can take in account geometrical non linearities and of behavior. Some industrial applications in nuclear technology are presented

  12. Two-phase flow structure in large diameter pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.R.; Schlegel, J.P.; Hibiki, T.; Ishii, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Local profiles of various quantities measured in large diameter pipe. ► Database for interfacial area in large pipes extended to churn-turbulent flow. ► Flow regime map confirms previous models for flow regime transitions. ► Data will be useful in developing interfacial area transport models for large pipes. - Abstract: Flow in large pipes is important in a wide variety of applications. In the nuclear industry in particular, understanding of flow in large diameter pipes is essential in predicting the behavior of reactor systems. This is especially true of natural circulation Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) designs, where a large-diameter chimney above the core provides the gravity head to drive circulation of the coolant through the reactor. The behavior of such reactors during transients and during normal operation will be predicted using advanced thermal–hydraulics analysis codes utilizing the two-fluid model. Essential to accurate two-fluid model calculations is reliable and accurate computation of the interfacial transfer terms. These interfacial transfer terms can be expressed as the product of one term describing the potential driving the transfer and a second term describing the available surface area for transfer, or interfacial area concentration. Currently, the interfacial area is predicted using flow regime dependent empirical correlations; however the interfacial area concentration is best computed through the use of the one-dimensional interfacial area transport equation (IATE). To facilitate the development of IATE source and sink term models in large-diameter pipes a fundamental understanding of the structure of the two-phase flow is essential. This understanding is improved through measurement of the local void fraction, interfacial area concentration and gas velocity profiles in pipes with diameters of 0.102 m and 0.152 m under a wide variety of flow conditions. Additionally, flow regime identification has been performed to

  13. Design considerations for CRBRP heat transport system piping operating at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollono, L.P.; Mello, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The heat transport system sodium piping for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) within the reactor containment building must withstand high temperatures for long periods of time. Each phase of the mechanical design process of the piping system is influenced by elevated temperature considerations which include material thermal creep effects, ratchetting caused by rapid temperature transients and stress relaxation, and material degradation effects. The structural design philosophy taken to design the CRBRP piping operating in a high temperature environment is described. The resulting design of the heat transport system piping is presented along with a discussion of special features that resulted from the elevated temperature considerations

  14. Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate-detection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.; Wilkowski, G.

    1995-04-01

    Regulatory Guide 1.45, open-quotes Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary Leakage Detection Systems,close quotes was published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1973, and provides guidance on leak detection methods and system requirements for Light Water Reactors. Additionally, leak detection limits are specified in plant Technical Specifications and are different for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). These leak detection limits are also used in leak-before-break evaluations performed in accordance with Draft Standard Review Plan, Section 3.6.3, open-quotes Leak Before Break Evaluation Proceduresclose quotes where a margin of 10 on the leak detection limit is used in determining the crack size considered in subsequent fracture analyses. This study was requested by the NRC to: (1) evaluate the conditional failure probability for BWR and PWR piping for pipes that were leaking at the allowable leak detection limit, and (2) evaluate the margin of 10 to determine if it was unnecessarily large. A probabilistic approach was undertaken to conduct fracture evaluations of circumferentially cracked pipes for leak-rate-detection applications. Sixteen nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants were analyzed to evaluate conditional failure probability and effects of crack-morphology variability on the current margins used in leak rate detection for leak-before-break

  15. Studies of S-CO{sub 2} Power Plant Pipe Design for Small Modular Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Seok; Ahn, Yoon Han; Lee, Jeong Ik [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    If SFR can be developed into the economical small modular reactor (SMR) for an export from Korea, the expected value can be greater. However, current SFR design may face difficulty in public acceptance due to the potential hazard from sodium-water reaction (SWR) when the current conventional steam Rankine cycle is utilized as a power conversion system for a SFR. In order to eliminate SWR, the Supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) cycle has been proposed. Although there are many researches on S-CO{sub 2} cycle concept and turbomachinery, very few research works considered pipe selection criteria for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle. As one of the most important parts of the plant, this paper will discuss how to select a suitable pipe considering thermal expansion for the S-CO{sub 2} power plant and perform a conceptual design of SFR type SMR. The S-CO{sub 2} cycle can improve the safety of SFR as preventing the SWR by changing the working fluid. Additionally, not only the relatively high efficiency with 450-750 .deg. C turbine inlet temperature, but also the physically compact footprint are advantages of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle. However the pipe design is more complicated than existing power plant because it has high pressure and temperature conditions and needs high mass flow rate. By designing the piping system for a small modular -SFR, the compactness and simplicity of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle are re-confirmed. Moreover, in this paper, realistic and safe pipe design was conducted by considering thermal expansion in the high pressure and temperature conditions. Although total pipe pressure drop is somewhat high, the cycle thermal efficiency is still higher than the existing steam Rankine cycle. Additional study for a larger system such as 300MW class system in MIT report will be conducted in the future study. From the preliminary estimation when the S-CO{sub 2} system becomes large, the pipe diameter may exceed the current ASME standard. This means that more innovative approach

  16. LBB application in the US operating and advanced reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichman, K.; Tsao, J.; Mayfield, M.

    1997-04-01

    The regulatory application of leak before break (LBB) for operating and advanced reactors in the U.S. is described. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved the application of LBB for six piping systems in operating reactors: reactor coolant system primary loop piping, pressurizer surge, safety injection accumulator, residual heat removal, safety injection, and reactor coolant loop bypass. The LBB concept has also been applied in the design of advanced light water reactors. LBB applications, and regulatory considerations, for pressurized water reactors and advanced light water reactors are summarized in this paper. Technology development for LBB performed by the NRC and the International Piping Integrity Research Group is also briefly summarized.

  17. Pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate detection: Probabilistic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.

    1993-01-01

    This is the second in series of three papers generated from studies on nuclear pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate detection. This paper focuses on the development of novel probabilistic models for stochastic performance evaluation of degraded nuclear piping systems. It was accomplished here in three distinct stages. First, a statistical analysis was conducted to characterize various input variables for thermo-hydraulic analysis and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, such as material properties of pipe, crack morphology variables, and location of cracks found in nuclear piping. Second, a new stochastic model was developed to evaluate performance of degraded piping systems. It is based on accurate deterministic models for thermo-hydraulic and fracture mechanics analyses described in the first paper, statistical characterization of various input variables, and state-of-the-art methods of modem structural reliability theory. From this model. the conditional probability of failure as a function of leak-rate detection capability of the piping systems can be predicted. Third, a numerical example was presented to illustrate the proposed model for piping reliability analyses. Results clearly showed that the model provides satisfactory estimates of conditional failure probability with much less computational effort when compared with those obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. The probabilistic model developed in this paper will be applied to various piping in boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor plants for leak-rate detection applications

  18. Pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Osamu; Kumasaka, Katsuyuki.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To remove the heat of reactor core using a great amount of moderators at the periphery of the reactor core as coolants. Constitution: Heat of a reactor core is removed by disposing a spontaneous recycling cooling device for cooling moderators in a moderator tank, without using additional power driven equipments. That is, a spontaneous recycling cooling device for cooling the moderators in the moderator tank is disposed. Further, the gap between the inner wall of a pressure tube guide pipe disposed through the vertical direction of a moderator tank and the outer wall of a pressure tube inserted through the guide pipe is made smaller than the rupture distortion caused by the thermal expansion upon overheating of the pressure tube and greater than the minimum gap required for heat shiels between the pressure tube and the pressure tube guide pipe during usual operation. In this way, even if such an accident as can not using a coolant cooling device comprising power driven equipment should occur in the pressure tube type reactor, the rise in the temperature of the reactor core can be retarded to obtain a margin with time. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Support structure for reactor core constituent element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aida, Yasuhiko.

    1993-01-01

    A connection pipe having an entrance nozzle inserted therein as a reactor core constituent element is protruded above the upper surface of a reactor core support plate. A through hole is disposed to the protruding portion of the connection pipe. The through hole and a through hole disposed to the reactor core support plate are connected by a communication pipe. A shear rod is disposed in a horizontal portion at the inside of the communication pipe and is supported by a spring horizontally movably. Further, a groove is disposed at a position of the entrance nozzle opposing to the shear rod. The shear rod is urged out of the communication pipe by the pressure of the high pressure plenum and the top end portion of the shear rod is inserted to the groove of the entrance nozzle during operation. Accordingly, the shear rod is positioned in a state where it is extended from the through hole of the communication pipe to the groove of the entrance nozzle. This can mechanically constrain the rising of the reactor core constituent elements by the shear rod upon occurrence of earthquakes. (I.N.)

  20. Characterization of pipes, drain lines, and ducts using the pipe explorer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, C.D.; Kendrick, D.T.; Cramer, E.

    1997-01-01

    As DOE dismantles its nuclear processing facilities, site managers must employ the best means of disposing or remediating hundreds of miles of potentially contaminated piping and duct work. Their interiors are difficult to access, and in many cases even the exteriors are inaccessible. Without adequate characterization, it must be assumed that the piping is contaminated, and the disposal cost of buried drain lines can be on the order of $1,200/ft and is often unnecessary as residual contamination levels often are below free release criteria. This paper describes the program to develop a solution to the problem of characterizing radioactive contamination in pipes. The technical approach and results of using the Pipe Explorer trademark system are presented. The heart of the system is SEA's pressurized inverting membrane adapted to transport radiation detectors and other tools into pipes. It offers many benefits over other pipe inspection approaches. It has video and beta/gamma detection capabilities, and the need for alpha detection has been addressed through the development of the Alpha Explorer trademark. These systems have been used during various stages of decontamination and decommissioning of DOE sites, including the ANL CP-5 reactor D ampersand D. Future improvements and extensions of their capabilities are discussed

  1. Application of tearing modulus stability concepts to nuclear piping. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotter, K.H.; Chang, H.Y.; Zahoor, A.

    1982-02-01

    The recently developed tearing modulus stability concept was successfully applied to several boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems. Circumferentially oriented through-the-thickness cracks were postulated at numerous locations in each system. For each location, the simplified tearing stability methods developed in USNRC Report NUREG/CR-0838 were used to determine crack stability. The J-T diagram was used to present the results of the computations. The piping systems considered included Type 304 stainless steel as well as A106 carbon steel materials. These systems were analyzed using the piping analysis computer code MINK

  2. Development of bore tools for pipe welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Ito, Akira; Takiguchi, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    In the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), in-vessel components replacement and maintenance requires that connected cooling pipes be cut and removed beforehand and that new components be installed to which cooling pipes must be rewelded. All welding must be inspected for soundness after completion. These tasks require a new task concept for ensuring shielded areas and access from narrow ports. Thus, it became necessary to develop autonomous locomotion welding and cutting tools for branch and main pipes to weld pipes by in-pipe access; a system was proposed that cut and welded branch and main pipes after passing inside pipe curves, and elemental technologies developed. This paper introduces current development in tools for welding and cutting branch pipes and other tools for welding and cutting the main pipe. (author)

  3. Development of bore tools for pipe welding and cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Ito, Akira; Takiguchi, Yuji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-04-01

    In the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), in-vessel components replacement and maintenance requires that connected cooling pipes be cut and removed beforehand and that new components be installed to which cooling pipes must be rewelded. All welding must be inspected for soundness after completion. These tasks require a new task concept for ensuring shielded areas and access from narrow ports. Thus, it became necessary to develop autonomous locomotion welding and cutting tools for branch and main pipes to weld pipes by in-pipe access; a system was proposed that cut and welded branch and main pipes after passing inside pipe curves, and elemental technologies developed. This paper introduces current development in tools for welding and cutting branch pipes and other tools for welding and cutting the main pipe. (author)

  4. Reactor shutdown back-up system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Seizo; Sakashita, Motoaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent back flow of poison upon injection to a moderator recycling pipeway. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor comprising a moderator recycling system for recycling and cooling moderator through a control rod guide pipe and a rapid poison injection system for rapidly injecting a poison solution at high density into the moderator by way of the same control rod guide pipe as a reactor shutdown back-up system, a mechanism is provided for preventing the back flow of a poison solution at high density into the moderator recycling system upon rapid injection of poison. An orifice provided in the joining pipeway to the control rod guide pipe on the side of the moderator recycling system is utilized as the back flow preventing device for the poison solution and the diameter for the orifice is determined so as to provide a constant ratio between the pressure loss in the control rod guide pipe and the pressure loss in the moderator recycling system pipe line upon usual reactor operation. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. Resolution of thermal striping issue downstream of a horizontal pipe elbow in stratified pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzay, T.M.; Kasza, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    A thermally stratified pipe flow produced by a thermal transient when passing through a horizontal elbow as a result of secondary flow gives rise to large thermal fluctuations on the inner curvature wall of the downstream piping. These fluctuations were measured in a specially instrumented horizontal pipe and elbow system on a test set-up using water in the Mixing Components Technology Facility (MCTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This study is part of a larger program which is studying the influence of thermal buoyancy on general reactor component performance. This paper discusses the influence of pipe flow generated thermal oscillations on the thermal stresses induced in the pipe walls. The instrumentation was concentrated around the exit plane of the 90 0 sweep elbow, since prior tests had indicated that the largest thermal fluctuations would occur within about one hydraulic diameter downstream of the elbow exit. The thermocouples were located along the inner curvature of the piping and measured the near surface fluid temperature. The test matrix involved thermal downramps under turbulent flow conditions

  6. Reactor technology. Progress report, January--March 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J.L.

    1978-07-01

    Progress is reported in eight program areas. The nuclear Space Electric Power Supply Program examined safety questions in the aftermath of the COSMOS 954 incident, examined the use of thermoelectric converters, examined the neutronic effectiveness of various reflecting materials, examined ways of connecting heat pipes to one another, studied the consequences of the failure of one heat pipe in the reactor core, and did conceptual design work on heat radiators for various power supplies. The Heat Pipe Program reported progress in the design of ceramic heat pipes, new application of heat pipes to solar collectors, and final performance tests of two pipes for HEDL applications. Under the Nuclear Process Heat Program, work continues on computer codes to model a pebble bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, adaptation of a set of German reactor calculation codes to use on U.S. computers, and a parametric study of a certain resonance integral required in reactor studies. Under the Nonproliferation Alternative Sources Assessment Program LASL has undertaken an evaluation of a study of gaseous core reactors by Southern Science Applications, Inc. Independently LASL has developed a proposal for a comprehensive study of gaseous uranium-fueled reactor technology. The Plasma Core Reactor Program has concentrated on restacking the beryllium reflector and redesigning the nuclear control system. The status of and experiments on four critical assemblies, SKUA, Godiva IV, Big Ten, and Flattop, are reported. The Nuclear Criticality Safety Program carried out several tasks including conducting a course, doing several annual safety reviews and evaluating the safety of two Nevada test devices. During the quarter one of the groups involved in reactor technology has acquired responsibility for the operation of a Cockroft-Walton accelerator. The present report contains information on the use of machine and improvements being made in its operation

  7. Development of bore tools for pipe inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Nakahira, Masataka; Taguchi, Kou; Ito, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-04-01

    In the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER), replacement and maintenance on in-vessel components requires that all cooling pipes connected be cut and removed, that a new component be installed, and that all cooling pipes be rewelded. After welding is completed, welded area must be inspected for soundness. These tasks require a new work concept for securing shielded area and access from narrow ports. Tools had to be developed for nondestructive inspection and leak testing to evaluate pipe welding soundness by accessing areas from inside pipes using autonomous locomotion welding and cutting tools. A system was proposed for nondestructive inspection of branch pipes and the main pipe after passing through pipe curves, the same as for welding and cutting tool development. Nondestructive inspection and leak testing sensors were developed and the basic parameters were obtained. In addition, the inspection systems which can move inside pipes and conduct the nondestructive inspection and the leak testing were developed. In this paper, an introduction will be given to the current situation concerning the development of nondestructive inspection and leak testing machines for the branch pipes. (author)

  8. Recycling systems for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Akio; Yamamoto, Fumiaki; Fukumoto, Ryuji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To stabilize the coolant flowing characteristics and reactor core reactivity. Constitution: The recycling system in a BWR type reactor comprises a recycling pump disposed to the outside of a reactor pressure vessel, a ring header connected to the recycling pump through main pipe ways, and a plurality of pipes branched from and connected with the ring header and connected to a plurality of jet pumps within the pressure vessel. Then, by making the diameter for the pipeways of each of the branched pipes different from each other, the effective cross-sectional area is varied to thereby average the coolant flow rate supplied to each of the jet pumps. (Seki, T.)

  9. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking: A rationalization of apparent differences among stress corrosion cracking tendencies for sensitized regions in the process water piping and in the tanks of SRS reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The frequency of stress corrosion cracking in the near weld regions of the SRS reactor tank walls is apparently lower than the cracking frequency near the pipe-to-pipe welds in the primary cooling water system. The difference in cracking tendency can be attributed to differences in the welding processes, fabrication schedules, near weld residual stresses, exposure conditions and other system variables. This memorandum discusses the technical issues that may account the differences in cracking tendencies based on a review of the fabrication and operating histories of the reactor systems and the accepted understanding of factors that control stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels

  10. An overview of environmental degradation of materials in nuclear power plant piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Several types of environmental degradation of piping in light water reactor (LWR) power systems have already had significant economic impact on the industry. These include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel piping, erosion-corrosion of carbon steel piping in secondary systems, and a variety of types of fatigue failures. In addition, other problems have been identified that must be addressed in considering extended lifetimes for nuclear plants. These include the embrittlement of cast stainless steels after extended thermal aging at reactor operating temperatures and the effect of reactor environments on the design margin inherent in the ASME Section III fatigue design curves especially for carbon steel piping. These problems are being addressed by wide-ranging research programs in this country and abroad. The purpose of this review is to highlight some of the accomplishments of these programs and to note some of the remaining unanswered questions

  11. Noncondensable gas accumulation phenomena in nuclear power plant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Aoki, Kazuyoshi; Sato, Teruaki; Shida, Akira; Ichikawa, Nagayoshi; Nishikawa, Akira; Inagaki, Tetsuhiko

    2011-01-01

    In the case of the boiling water reactor, hydrogen and oxygen slightly exist in the main steam, because these noncondensable gases are generated by the radiolytic decomposition of the reactor water. BWR plants have taken measures to prevent noncondensable gas accumulation. However, in 2001, the detonation of noncondensable gases occurred at Hamaoka-1 and Brunsbuttel, resulting in ruptured piping. The accumulation phenomena of noncondensable gases in BWR closed piping must be investigated and understood in order to prevent similar events from occurring in the future. Therefore, an experimental study on noncondensable gas accumulation was carried out. The piping geometries for testing were classified and modeled after the piping of actual BWR plants. The test results showed that 1) noncondensable gases accumulate in vertical piping, 2) it is hard for noncondensable gases to accumulate in horizontal piping, and 3) noncondensable gases accumulate under low-pressure conditions. A simple accumulation analysis method was proposed. To evaluate noncondensable gas accumulation phenomena, the three component gases were treated as a mixture. It was assumed that the condensation amount of the vapor is small, because the piping is certainly wrapped with heat insulation material. Moreover, local thermal equilibrium was assumed. This analysis method was verified using the noncondensable gas accumulation test data on branch piping with a closed top. Moreover, an experimental study on drain trap piping was carried out. The test results showed that the noncondensable gases dissolved in the drain water were discharged from the drain trap, and Henry's law could be applied to evaluate the amount of dissolved noncondensable gases in the drain water. (author)

  12. Quality control of stainless steel pipings for nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Minoru; Kitamura, Ichiro; Ito, Hisao; Sasaki, Ryoichi

    1979-01-01

    The proportion of nuclear power in total power generation is increasing recently in order to avoid the concentrated dependence on petroleum resources, consequently the reliability of operation of nuclear power plants has become important. In order to improve the reliability of plants, the reliability of each machine or equipment must be improved, and for the purpose, the quality control at the time of manufacture is the important factor. The piping systems for BWRs are mostly made of carbon steel, and stainless steel pipings are used for the recirculation system cooling reactors and instrumentation system. Recently, grain boundary type stress corrosion cracking has occurred in the heat-affected zones of welded stainless steel pipings in some BWR plants. In this paper, the quality control of stainless steel pipings is described from the standpoint of preventing stress corrosion cracking in BWR plants. The pipings for nuclear power plants must have sufficient toughness so that the sudden rupture never occurs, and also sufficient corrosion resistance so that corrosion products do not raise the radioactivity level in reactors. The stress corrosion cracking occurred in SUS 304 pipings, the factors affecting the quality of stainless steel pipings, the working method which improves the corrosion resistance and welding control are explained. (Kako, I.)

  13. Resolution of thermal striping issue downstream of a horizontal pipe elbow in stratified pipe flow. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzay, T.M.; Kasza, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    A thermally stratified pipe flow produced by a thermal transient when passing through a horizontal elbow as a result of secondary flow gives rise to large thermal fluctuations on the inner curvature wall of the downstream piping. These fluctuations were measured in a specially instrumented horizontal pipe and elbow system on a test set-up using water in the Mixing Components Technology Facility (MCTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This study is part of a larger program which is studying the influence of thermal buoyancy on general reactor component performance. This paper discusses the influence of pipe flow generated thermal oscillations on the thermal stresses induced in the pipe walls. The instrumentation was concentrated around the exit plane of the 90/sup 0/ sweep elbow, since prior tests had indicated that the largest thermal fluctuations would occur within about one hydraulic diameter downstream of the elbow exit. The thermocouples were located along the inner curvature of the piping and measured the near surface fluid temperature. The test matrix involved thermal downramps under turbulent flow conditions.

  14. Mechanical properties of roll extruded nuclear reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steichen, J.M.; Knecht, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    The elevated temperature mechanical properties of large diameter (28 inches) seamless pipe produced by roll extrusion for use as primary piping for sodium coolant in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) have been characterized. The three heats of Type 316H stainless steel piping material used exhibited consistent mechanical properties and chemical compositions. Tensile and creep-rupture properties exceeded values on which the allowable stresses for ASME Code Case 1592 on Nuclear Components in Elevated Temperature Service were based. Tensile strength and ductility were essentially unchanged by aging in static sodium at 1050 0 F for times to 10,000 hours. High strain rate tensile tests showed that tensile properties were insensitive to strain rate at temperatures to 900 0 F and that for temperatures of 1050 0 F and above both strength and ductility significantly increased with increasing strain rate. Fatigue-crack propagation properties were comparable to results obtained on plate material and no differences in crack propagation were found between axial and circumferential orientations. (U.S.)

  15. Pressure releasing device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Mika.

    1994-01-01

    In the present invention, dose rate to public caused by radioactive rare gases can be decreased. That is, a reactor container contains a reactor pressure vessel incorporating a reactor core. There are disposed a pressure releasing system for releasing the pressure in the reactor pressure vessel to the outside, and a burning device for burning gases released from the pressure releasing system. An exhaustion pipe is disposed to the pressure releasing system. A burning device is disposed to the exhaustion pipe. It is effective to dispose a ventilation port at a portion of the exhaustion pipe upstream of the burning device. In addition, the burning device may preferably be disposed in a multi-stage in the axial direction of the exhaustion pipe. With such procedures, hydrogen in gases discharged along with the release of the pressure in the container is burned. Buoyancy is caused to the exhaustion gases by heat energy upon burning. Since the exhaustion gases can reach a higher level by the buoyancy, the dose rate due to the rare gases can be reduced. (I.S.)

  16. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 5. Summary - Piping Review Committee conclusions and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    This document summarizes a comprehensive review of NRC requirements for Nuclear Piping by the US NRC Piping Review Committee. Four topical areas, addressed in greater detail in Volumes 1 through 4 of this report, are included: (1) Stress Corrosion Cracking in Piping of Boiling Water Reactor Plants; (2) Evaluation of Seismic Design; (3) Evaluation of Potential for Pipe Breaks; and (4) Evaluation of Other Dynamic Loads and Load Combinations. This volume summarizes the major issues, reviews the interfaces, and presents the Committee's conclusions and recommendations for updating NRC requirements on these issues. This report also suggests research or other work that may be required to respond to issues not amenable to resolution at this time

  17. Containment vessel for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanari, Sh.; Horiuchi, T.; Sugisaki, T.; Tominaga, K.

    1985-01-01

    A containment vessel for a nuclear reactor having a dry well for mounting therein a pressure vessel for containing the nuclear reactor, a pressure suppressing chamber having a pool of coolant therein, and a vent pipe device for releasing therethrough into the pool of coolant within the pressure suppressing chamber steam which will be produced as a result of the occurrence of an accident and escape into the dry well. The vent pipe device includes a plurality of vent pipe members inserted in the pool of coolant within the pressure suppressing chamber and each having at least one exhaust port opening in the coolant. The vent pipe members are divided into a plurality of groups in such a manner that the vent pipe members of different groups differ from one another in the length of submerged portions of the vent pipe members interposed between the liquid of the coolant within the pressure suppressing chamber and the exhaust ports of the vent pipe members

  18. Impacting effects of seismic loading in feeder pipes of PHWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.

    1996-01-01

    The core of a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) consists of a large number of fuel channels. These fuel channels are connected to the feeder pipes through which the heavy water flows and transports heat from the reactor core to the steam generators. The feeder pipes are several hundreds in number. They run close to each other with small gaps and have several bends. Thus they represent a complex piping system. Under seismic loading, the adjacent feeder pipes may impact each other. In this paper a simplified procedure has been established to assess such impacting effects. The results of the proposed analysis include bending moment and impact force, which provide the stresses due to impacting effects. These results are plotted in nondimensional form so that they could be utilized for any set of feeder pipes. The procedure used for studying the impacting effects includes seismic analysis of individual feeder pipes without impacting effects, selection of pipes for impact analysis, and estimating their maximum impact velocity. Based on the static and dynamic characteristics of the selected feeder pipes, the maximum bending moment, impact force, and stresses are obtained. The results of this study are useful for quick evaluation of the impacting effects in feeder pipes

  19. Simulation experiments of small break LOCA in upper plenum joint pipe for 5 MW heating test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bo Jinhai; Jiang Shengyao; Zhang Youjie; Tong Yunxian; Sun Shusen; Yao Meisheng

    1988-12-01

    A simulation experiment of small break LOCA is introduced, which was caused by the breakdown of a small size or middle size pipe located at upper plenum, or by unexpected opening the safety valve. In the tests, the system pressure, temperature, void fraction and total loss of water were studied. The results showed that the total loss of water was nearly 20% of initial loading water. It means under this condition the 5MW low temperature heating reactor being built in Institute of Nnclear Engergy Technology of Tsinghua University is safe

  20. Space reactor preliminary mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis was performed on the SABRE reactor space power system to determine the effect of the number and size of heat pipes on the design parameters of the nuclear subsystem. Small numbers of thin walled heat pipes were found to give a lower subsystem mass, but excessive fuel swelling resulted. The SP-100 preliminary design uses 120 heat pipes because of acceptable fuel swelling and a minimum nuclear subsystem mass of 1875 kg. Salient features of the reactor preliminary design are: individual fuel modules, ZrO 2 block core mounts, bolted collar fuel module restraints, and a BeO central plug

  1. IEA-R1 primary and secondary coolant piping systems coupled stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainer, Gerson; Faloppa, Altair A.; Oliveira, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to perform the stress analysis of a coupled primary and secondary piping system of the IEA-R1 based on tridimensional model, taking into account the as built conditions. The nuclear research reactor IEA-R1 is a pool type reactor projected by Babcox-Willcox, which is operated by IPEN since 1957. The operation to 5 MW power limit was only possible after the conduction of life management and modernization programs in the last two decades. In these programs the components of the coolant systems, which are responsible for the water circulation into the reactor core to remove the heat generated inside it, were almost totally refurbished. The changes in the primary and secondary systems, mainly the replacement of pump and heat-exchanger, implied in piping layout modifications, and, therefore, the stress condition of the piping systems had to be reanalyzed. In this paper the structural stress assessment of the coupled primary and secondary piping systems is presented and the final results are discussed. (author)

  2. Emergency core cooling system for a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, H.G.; Madsen, R.N.

    1976-01-01

    The main heat transport system for a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor is constructed with elevated piping and guard vessels or pipes around all components of the system below the elevation of the elevated piping so the head developed by the pumps at emergency motor speed will be unsufficient to lift the liquid-metal-coolant over the top of the guard tanks or pipes or out of the elevated piping in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident. In addition, inlet downcomers to the reactor vessel are contained within guard standpipes having a clearance volume as small as practicable. 4 claims, 2 drawing figures

  3. Assessment of LWR piping design loading based on plant operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, P.O.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of this study has been to: (1) identify current Light Water Reactor (LWR) piping design load parameters, (2) identify significant actual LWR piping loads from plant operating experience, (3) perform a comparison of these two sets of data and determine the significance of any differences, and (4) make an evaluation of the load representation in current LWR piping design practice, in view of plant operating experience with respect to piping behavior and response to loading

  4. View of industry on the impact of pipe break criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernsen, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Historically, large pipe breaks in the types of materials used and under operating conditions similar to those in light water reactor service have not occurred. Nevertheless, the non-mechanistic assumption of a double ended pipe break of the early sixties, selected for loss of coolant accident analysis purposes, has become a mechanistic criterion for the design and arrangement of high pressure piping systems and their associated supports and enclosures in today's nuclear plants. While it seems reasonable and appropriate to continue to design the Emergency Core Cooling Systems for a range of loss of coolant accidents up to and including those that approximate the area of the largest pipe connected to the reactor vessel and to use this break in determining the loading and temperature rise rate for containment structures and equipment qualification, it no longer seems reasonable to provide precisely engineered break protection for a limited number of potential pipe break locations. This observation is gaining increasing support, particularly as engineering judgment and historical perspectives are being supplemented by both deterministic and probabilistic studies that indicate the potential for large instantaneous breaks in nuclear grade piping systems is virtually incredible. Fracture mechanics analyses support leak-before-break assumptions with wide margins and probabilistic studies indicate potentials for double-ended pipe breaks in the range of less than one in a billion years

  5. Ductile fracture behaviour of primary heat transport piping material ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Design of primary heat transport (PHT) piping of pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR) has to ensure implementation of leak-before-break con- cepts. In order to be able to do so, the ductile fracture characteristics of PHT piping material have to be quantified. In this paper, the fracture resistance of SA333, Grade.

  6. Application of tearing modulus stability concepts to nuclear piping. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotter, K.H.; Chang, H.Y.; Zahoor, A.

    1982-02-01

    The recently developed tearing modulus stability concept was successfully applied to several boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems. Circumferentially oriented through-the-thickness cracks were postulated at numerous locations in each system. For each location, the simplified tearing stability methods developed in USNRC Report NUREG/CR-0838 were used to determine crack stability. The J-T diagram was used to present the results of the computations. The piping systems considered included Type 304 stainless steel as well as A106 carbon steel materials. These systems were analyzed using the piping analysis computer code MINK.

  7. Selection of power plant elements for future reactor space electric power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Bennett, G.A.; Copper, K.

    1979-09-01

    Various types of reactor designs, electric power conversion equipment, and reject-heat systems to be used in nuclear reactor power plants for future space missions were studied. The designs included gas-cooled, liquid-cooled, and heat-pipe reactors. For the power converters, passive types such as thermoelectric and thermionic converters and dynamic types such as Brayton, potassium Rankine, and Stirling cycles were considered. For the radiators, heat pipes for transfer and radiating surface, pumped fluid for heat transfer with fins as the radiating surface, and pumped fluid for heat transfer with heat pipes as the radiating surface were considered. After careful consideration of weights, sizes, reliabilities, safety, and development cost and time, a heat-pipe reactor design, thermoelectric converters, and a heat-pipe radiator for an experimental program were selected

  8. Test results of a jet impingement from a 4 inch pipe under BWR LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isozaki, Toshikuni; Yano, Toshikazu; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Kato, Rokuro; Kurihara, Ryoichi; Ueda, Shuzo; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1982-09-01

    Hypothetical instantaneous pipe rupture is now considered to be one of the design basis accidents during the operation of the light water reactor. If a pipe rupture accidnet occurs, the pipe will start moving with the sudden discharge of internal fluid. So, the various apparatus such as pipe whip restraints and jet deflectors are being installed near the postulated break location to protect the nuclear power plants against the effect of postulated pipe rupture. Pipe whipping test and jet discharge test are now being conducted at the Division of Reactor Safety of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. This report describes the test results of the jet discharge from a 4 inch pipe under BWR LOCA condition. In front of the pipe exit the target disk of 1000 mm in diameter was installed. The distance between the pipe exit and the target was 500 mm. 13 pressure transducers and 13 thermocouples were mounted on the target disk to measure the pressure and temperature increase due to jet impingement on the target. (author)

  9. Reactor containing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagawa, Katsuhiko.

    1992-01-01

    A cooling space having a predetermined capacity is formed between a reactor container and concrete walls. A circulation loop disposed to the outside of the concrete walls is connected to the top and the bottom of the cooling space. The circulation loop has a circulation pump and a heat exchanger, and a cooling water supply pipe is connected to the upstream of the circulation pump for introducing cooling water from the outside. Upon occurrence of loss of coolant accident, cooling water is introduced from the cooling water supply pipe to the cooling space between the reactor container and the concrete walls after shut-down of the reactor operation. Then, cooling water is circulated while being cooled by the heat exchanger, to cool the reactor container by cooling water flown in the cooling space. This can cool the reactor container in a short period of time upon occurrence of the loss of coolant accident. Accordingly, a repairing operation for a ruptured portion can be conducted rapidly. (I.N.)

  10. Fabrication and evaluation of chemically vapor deposited tungsten heat pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupi, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A network of lithium-filled tungsten heat pipes is being considered as a method of heat extraction from high temperature nuclear reactors. The need for material purity and shape versatility in these applications dictates the use of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. Adaptability of CVD tungsten to complex heat pipe designs is shown. Deposition and welding techniques are described. Operation of two lithium-filled CVD tungsten heat pipes above 1800 K is discussed.

  11. Critical element development of standard pipe connector for remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Kou; Kakudate, Satoshi; Kanamori, Naokazu; Oka, Kiyoshi; Nakahira, Masataka; Obara, Kenjiro; Tada, Eisuke; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Seki, Masahiro

    1994-08-01

    In fusion experimental reactors such as ITER, the in-vessel components such as blanket and divertor are actively cooled and a large number of cooling pipes are located around the core of reactor, where personnel access is prohibited. Mechanical pipe connectors are highly required as standard components for easy and reliable connection/disconnection of cooling pipe by remote handling. For this purpose, a clamping chain type connector has been developed with special mechanisms such as plate springs and guide structures so as to enable concentric and axial movement of clamping chain for easy mounting and dismounting. The basic performance test of a prototypical connector for a 80-A pipe shows sufficient leak tightness and proof pressure capability as well as simple connection/disconnection operation. In addition to the clamp chain type connector, design efforts have been made to develop a quick coupling type connector and a preliminary model of air-actuated quick connector has been fabricated for further investigations. This paper gives the design concept of mechanical pipe connectors such as clamping chain type and quick coupler type, and the basic performance tests results of clamping chain type connector. (author)

  12. Evolution of thermal fatigue management of piping in US LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDewitt, M.; Wolfe, K.; McGill, R.

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue usage caused by cyclic changes of thermally stratified reactor coolant in Light Water Reactor (LWR) pressure boundary piping was not an original consideration in US Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) designs. During the mid 1980's, several events involving cracking and leakage due to thermal cycling occurred in reactor coolant system branch piping at both US and International NPPs. In 1988, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) issued Bulletin 88-08 to alert LWR licensees of the potential for piping failures due to stratified thermal cycling. In response to these events, the US nuclear industry developed initiatives to identify susceptible components and established measures to monitor and prevent future failures. These initiatives have been effective in preventing leakage events, but have also identified fewer defects than expected based on screening model predictions. Improved analytical techniques are being investigated to maintain program effectiveness while minimizing unnecessary non-destructive examinations. This paper discusses the evolution of the US thermal fatigue initiatives, and analytical concepts being evaluated to improve program efficiency. (authors)

  13. Preliminary review of mass transfer and flow visualization studies and techniques relevant to the study of erosion-corrosion of reactor piping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzay, T.M.; Halle, H.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides some background information on the failed piping at the Surry-2 reactor; a summary of pertinent literature on mass transfer in related geometries; and a description of methodologies for visualization and erosion rate measurements in laboratory model studies that can provide greater insight into the role of flow geometry in erosion-corrosion. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Preliminary review of mass transfer and flow visualization studies and techniques relevant to the study of erosion-corrosion of reactor piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzay, T.M.; Halle, H.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides some background information on the failed piping at the Surry-2 reactor; a summary of pertinent literature on mass transfer in related geometries; and a description of methodologies for visualization and erosion rate measurements in laboratory model studies that can provide greater insight into the role of flow geometry in erosion-corrosion. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  15. Self-operation type power control device for nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru.

    1993-07-23

    The device of the present invention operates by sensing the temperature change of a reactor core in all of LMFBR type reactors irrespective of the scale of the reactor core power. That is, a region where liquid poison is filled is disposed at the upper portion and a region where sealed gases are filled is disposed at the lower portion of a pipe having both ends thereof being closed. When the pipe is inserted into the reactor core, the inner diameter of the pipe is determined smaller than a predetermined value so that the boundary between the liquid poison and the sealed gases in the pipe is maintained relative to an assumed maximum acceleration. The sealed gas region is disposed at the reactor core region. If the liquid poison is expanded by the elevation of the reactor core exit temperature, it is moved to the lower gas region, to control the reactor power. Since high reliability can be maintained over a long period of time by this method, it is suitable to FBR reactors disposed in such environments that maintenance can not easily be conducted, such as desserts, isolated islands and undeveloped countries. Further, it is also suitable to ultra small sized nuclear reactors disposed at environments that the direction and the magnitude of gravity are different from those on the ground. (I.S.).

  16. Self-operation type power control device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention operates by sensing the temperature change of a reactor core in all of LMFBR type reactors irrespective of the scale of the reactor core power. That is, a region where liquid poison is filled is disposed at the upper portion and a region where sealed gases are filled is disposed at the lower portion of a pipe having both ends thereof being closed. When the pipe is inserted into the reactor core, the inner diameter of the pipe is determined smaller than a predetermined value so that the boundary between the liquid poison and the sealed gases in the pipe is maintained relative to an assumed maximum acceleration. The sealed gas region is disposed at the reactor core region. If the liquid poison is expanded by the elevation of the reactor core exit temperature, it is moved to the lower gas region, to control the reactor power. Since high reliability can be maintained over a long period of time by this method, it is suitable to FBR reactors disposed in such environments that maintenance can not easily be conducted, such as desserts, isolated islands and undeveloped countries. Further, it is also suitable to ultra small sized nuclear reactors disposed at environments that the direction and the magnitude of gravity are different from those on the ground. (I.S.)

  17. Status of FRJ-2 refurbishment of tank pipes and essential results of aging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.; Thamm, G.; Thome, M.

    1993-01-01

    An aging evaluation program for FRJ-2 (DIDO) of the Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH has been developed and is currently executed in cooperation with the licensing and regulatory and TUV experts in order to determine the overall life expectancy of the facility and to identify critical systems and components that need to be upgraded or refurbished for future safe reactor operation. In Phase A (completed) a so called master list of the FRJ-2 mechanical, electrical and structural components was compiled on a system-by system basis and the operational documentation with respect to regular inspections, maintenance, repair and unusual occurences was carefully examined. Critical components were selected and their ageing respectively life limiting mechanisms identified. In Phase (currently under way) special inspections, examinations and tests for critical systems/components are being elaborated, executed and evaluated. Current work is being concentrated on non replaceable components (e.g. reactor aluminium tank (RAT) and the connecting pipes to the primary cooling circuit, the reactor steel tank and pipe work inside the concrete reactor block). As a consequence of first results of the aging evaluation program and due to leaks in the weir and drain pipes of the RAT a repair/refurbishment program was set up for the Al-RAT pipes (risers, downcomers weir and drain pipes) and the steel guide tubes. Details of the r/r program which is in far progress and first essential results of the aging evaluation will be presented. The results achieved until today are encouraging with respect to safe reactor operation on short and medium term. (author)

  18. Status of FRJ-2 Refurbishment of tank pipes and essential results of aging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.; Thamm, G.; Thome, M.

    1994-01-01

    An aging evaluation program for FRJ-2 (DIDO) of the Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH has been developed and is currently executed in cooperation with the licensing and regulatory and TUEV experts in order to determine the overall life expectancy of the facility and to identify critical systems and components that need to be upgraded or refurbished for future safe reactor operation. In Phase A (completed) a so called master list of the FRJ-2 mechanical, electrical and structural components was compiled on a system-by system basis and the operational documentation with respect to regular inspections, maintenance, repair and unusual occurrences was carefully examined. Critical components were selected and their ageing respectively life limiting mechanisms identified. In Phase B (currently under way) special inspections, examinations and tests for critical systems/components are being elaborated, executed and evaluated. Current work is being concentrated on non replaceable components (e.g. reactor aluminium tank (RAT) and the connecting pipes to the primary cooling circuit, the reactor steel tank and pipe work inside the concrete reactor block). As a consequence of first results of the aging evaluation program and due to leaks in the weir and drain pipes of the RAT a repair/refurbishment program was set up for the Al-RAT pipes (risers, downcomers, weir and drain pipes) and the steel guide tubes. Details of the r/r program which is in far progress and first essential results of the aging evaluation will be presented. The results achieved until today are encouraging with respect to safe reactor operation on short and medium term. (J.P.N.)

  19. A Study on Temperature Distribution in the Hot Leg Pipes considering the Variation of Flow Rate in RCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyuksu; Yi, Kunwoo; Choe, Yoonjae; Jang, Hocheol; Yune, Seokjeong; Park, Seongchan [KEPCO Engineering and Construction, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, a computational analysis is performed to predict the deviation in the temperature distribution in the hot leg pipe according to the flow rate variation in RCS. In the hot leg pipes of Reactor Coolant System (RCS) of APR1400, four Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs), to obtain the average hot leg temperature, are installed at each hot leg pipe (two in the upper region and the other two in the lower region around the wall of the hot leg pipe). There is a deviation in temperature distribution in the hot leg pipe due to the sudden changes in the flow direction and area from the reactor core exit to the hot leg pipe. The non-uniform temperature distribution in the hot leg pipe can affect the measurement of the plant parameters such as the reactor power and the reactor coolant flow rate. The following conclusions are reached 1) The non-uniform temperature distribution in the core exit is sustained to some extent through the entire region of hot leg pipe. 2) The temperature ranges having a uniform pattern are 45 - 120° and 240 - 315°. The sensor positions of RTDs are located in this interval (45 - 120° and 240 - 315°) and this sensor positions of RTDs show the appropriate temperature measurement. Also, the temperature distribution shows the similar pattern without reference to the flow rate variation in RCS.

  20. Computer simulation of LMFBR piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A-Moneim, M.T.; Chang, Y.W.; Fistedis, S.H.

    1977-01-01

    Integrity of piping systems is one of the main concerns of the safety issues of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR). Hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCDA) and water-sodium interaction are two examples of sources of high pressure pulses that endanger the integrity of the heat transport piping systems of LMFBRs. Although plastic wall deformation attenuates pressure peaks so that only pressures slightly higher than the pipe yield pressure propagate along the system, the interaction of these pulses with the different components of the system, such as elbows, valves, heat exchangers, etc.; and with one another produce a complex system of pressure pulses that cause more plastic deformation and perhaps damage to components. A generalized piping component and a tee branching model are described. An optional tube bundle and interior rigid wall simulation model makes such a generalized component model suited for modelling of valves, reducers, expansions, and heat exchangers. The generalized component and the tee branching junction models are combined with the pipe-elbow loop model so that a more general piping system can be analyzed both hydrodynamically and structurally under the effect of simultaneous pressure pulses

  1. Reactor design for nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, D.R.; Ranken, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    Conceptual design studies of a nuclear power plant for electric propulsion of spacecrafts have been on going for several years. An attractive concept which has evolved from these studies and which has been described in previous publications, is a heat-pipe cooled, fast spectrum nuclear reactor that provides 3 MW of thermal energy to out-of-core thermionic converters. The primary motivation for using heat pipes is to provide redundancy in the core cooling system that is not available in gas or liquid-metal cooled reactors. Detailed investigation of the consequences of heat pipe failures has resulted in modifications to the basic reactor design and has led to consideration of an entirely different core design. The new design features an integral laminated core configuration consisting of alternating layers of UO 2 and molybdenum sheets that span the entire diameter of the core. Design characteristics are presented and compared for the two reactors

  2. Main steam system piping response under safety/relief valve opening events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, E.O.; Esswein, G.A.; Hwang, H.L.; Nieh, C.T.

    1980-01-01

    The stresses in the main steam branch pipe of a Boiling Water Reactor due to safety/relief valve blowdown has been measured from an in situ piping system test. The test results were compared with analytical results. The predicted stresses using the current state of art analytical methods used for BWR SRV discharge transient piping response loads were found to be conservative when compared to the measured stress values. 3 refs

  3. A study of inter linkage effects on Candu feeder piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Aggarwal, M.L.; Meysner, A.

    2005-01-01

    A CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium) reactor core consists of a large number of fuel channels where heat is generated. Two feeder pipes are connected to each fuel channel to transport D 2 O coolant into and out of the reactor core. The feeder piping is designed to the requirements of Class 1 piping of Section III NB of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel and CSA Codes. Feeder piping stress analysis is being performed to demonstrate the code compliance check and the fitness for service of feeders. In the past, stress analyses were conducted for each individual feeder without including interaction effects among connected feeders. Interaction effects occur as a result of linkages that exist between feeders to prevent fretting and impacting damage during normal, abnormal and accident conditions. In this paper, a 'combined' approach is adopted to include all feeders connected by inter linkages into one feeder piping model. MSC/NASTRAN finite element software was used in the stress simulation, which contains up to 127 feeder pipes. The ASME Class 1 piping analysis was conducted to investigate the effects of the linkages between feeders. Both seismic time history and broadened response spectra methods were used in the seismic stress calculation. The results show that the effect of linkages is significant in dynamic stresses for all feeder configurations, as well as in static stresses for certain feeder configurations. The single feeder analysis could either underestimate or overestimate feeder stresses depending on the pipe geometry and bend wall thickness. (authors)

  4. Neutron streaming evaluation for the DREAM fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yasushi; Nishio, Satoshi; Ueda, Shuzo; Kurihara, Ryoichi

    2000-01-01

    Aiming at high degree of safety and benign environmental effect, we have proposed a tokamak fusion reactor concept called DREAM, which stands for DRastically EAsy Maintenance Reactor. The blanket structure of the reactor is made from very low activation SiC/SiC composites and cooled by non-reactive helium gas. High net thermal efficiency of about 50% is realized by 900 C helium gas and high plant availability is possible with simple maintenance scheme. In the DREAM Reactor, neutron streaming is a big problem because cooling pipes with diameter larger than 80 cm are used for blanket heat removal. Neutron streaming through the cooling pipes could cause hot spots in the superconducting magnets adjacent to the cooling pipes to shorten the magnet lifetime or increase cryogenic cooling requirement. Neutron streaming could also activate components such as gas turbine further away from the fusion plasma. The effect of neutron streaming through the helium cooling pipes was evaluated for the two types of cooling pipe extraction scheme. The result of a preliminary calculation indicates the gas turbine activation prohibits personnel access in the case of inboard pipe extraction while with additional shielding measures, limited contact maintenance is possible in the case of outboard extraction. (author)

  5. Isolation colling device for reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehara, Morihiko; Arai, Shigeki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent undesired operation of an emergency core cooling system due to excess lowering of water level in a reactor. Constitution: In an emergency facility adapted to drive a turbine, upon reactor isolation, with the excess steams of the reactor to operate a pump and thereby inject cooling water to the reactor, a water level detector is provided and connected to a pump exhaust valve control circuit, a turbine inlet valve control circuit and a by-pass valve control circuit. Valve ON-OFF is automatically controlled depending on the water level to thereby render the level constant. A by-pass pipe is branched from a pump exhaust pipe and connected to a condensate storage tank. When the water level rises due to water injection, the injecting water is returned to circulate by way of the by-pass pipe to the condensate storage tank under the ON-OFF for each of the valves while the turbine being kept to drive. Then, if the water level is lowered, water injection is started again by the ON-OFF for each of the valves. (Ikeda, J.)

  6. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Yuji; Seki, Eiji; Yoshida, Toshifumi; Ito, Toshiaki.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides a self-powered long detector having a sensitivity over the entire length of a reactor core as an entire control rod withdrawal range of a BWR type reactor, and a reactor power measuring device using a gamma ray thermometer which scarcely causes sensitivity degradation. That is, a hollow protection pipe is disposed passing through the reactor core from the outside of a reactor pressure vessel. The self-powered long detectors and the gamma ray thermometers are inserted and installed in the protection pipe. An average reactor power in an axial direction of the reactor relative to a certain position in the horizontal cross section of the reactor core is determined based on the power of the self-powered long detector over the entire length of the reactor core. Since the response of the self-powered detector relative to a local power change is rapid, the output is used as an input signal to a safety protection device of the reactor core. Further, a gamma ray thermometer secured in the reactor and having scarce sensitivity degradation is used instead of an incore travelling neutron monitor used for relative calibration of an existent neutron monitor secured in the reactor. (I.S.)

  7. Status of high-temperature heat-pipe technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranken, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of heat pipes to nuclear reactor space power systems. Characteristics of the device that favor such an application are described and recent results of current technology development programs are presented. Research areas that will need to be addressed in demonstrating that adequate lifetimes can be achieved with evaporation/condensation cycles operating at high temperatures in a reactor environment are also discussed

  8. Boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Kotaro; Ishida, Masayoshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To connect a feedwater pipe to a recycling pipe line, the recycling pipe line being made smaller in diameter, thereby minimizing loss of coolant resulting from rupture of the pipe and improving safety against trouble of coolant loss. Structure: A feedwater pipe is directly connected to a recycling pipe line before a booster pump, and a mixture of recycling water and feedwater is increased in pressure by the booster pump, after which it is introduced into a jet pump in the form of water for driving the jet pump to suck surrounding water causing it to be flown into the core. In accordance with the abovementioned structure, since the flow of feedwater can be used as a part of water for driving the jet pump, the flow within the recycling pipe line may be decreased so that the recycling pipe line can be made smaller in diameter to reduce the flow of coolant in the reactor, which flows out when the pipe is ruptured. (Furukawa, Y.)

  9. Damping considerations in CANDU feeder pipe design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmani, S.A.; Saleem, M.A.; So, G.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in pipe damping indicate a trend towards more realistic and less conservative values, which result in less rigid and safer pipe designs. The CANDU-PHW (Canada deuterium uranium, pressurized heavy water) reactor feeder pipe designs have applied similar approaches which permit seismic qualifications without overly restraining these compact arrays of pipes to cater for the large creep and thermal anchor movement. This paper reviews the feeder design aspects, especially pertaining to the design provisions, experimental verification and analytical modelling for seismic qualification in the light of recent pipe dynamic developments. Using illustrative examples, comparison of seismic analysis results is provided for the ASME Code Case N-411 dampings, and those traditionally used in the feeder seismic qualification. The results confirm acceptability of the traditional approach which permit simplified analysis to demonstrate seismic qualificationqualification of CANDU feeder pipes

  10. Inelastic analysis of SNR-300 piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebel, H.; Di Luna, L.J.; Moy, G.

    1983-01-01

    This paper investigates plasticity, creep, and elastic follow-up effects on a full size hot primary piping system of the German fast breeder reactor prototype, the SNR-300. A large model (327 elements, 419 nodes) of straight pipe, special elbow and hanger elements of the general purpose finite element program, MARC-CDC, is used to predict piping behavior for a heat-up, sodium loading-unloading-reloading cycle and other significant operating conditions. Included in this work are many time-dependent solution increments for a 5,000 hour creep period. Creep strains and relaxed stress results, after 5,000 hours, for the complete model are used with uniaxial and biaxial models and results to extrapolate conclusions for a 100,000 hour operating life. (author)

  11. Inelastic analysis of SNR-300 piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebel, H [INTERATOM, Bergisch Gladbach (Germany); Di Luna, L J; Moy, G [Teledyne Engineering Services, Waltham, MA (United States)

    1983-05-01

    This paper investigates plasticity, creep, and elastic follow-up effects on a full size hot primary piping system of the German fast breeder reactor prototype, the SNR-300. A large model (327 elements, 419 nodes) of straight pipe, special elbow and hanger elements of the general purpose finite element program, MARC-CDC, is used to predict piping behavior for a heat-up, sodium loading-unloading-reloading cycle and other significant operating conditions. Included in this work are many time-dependent solution increments for a 5,000 hour creep period. Creep strains and relaxed stress results, after 5,000 hours, for the complete model are used with uniaxial and biaxial models and results to extrapolate conclusions for a 100,000 hour operating life. (author)

  12. TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durbin, M.E.; Montoya, G.M.

    1991-06-01

    This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m 3 of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m 3 of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Environmentally assisted cracking of light-water reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1996-02-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of lightwater reactor (LWR) materials has affected nuclear reactors from the very introduction of the technology. Corrosion problems have afflicted steam generators from the very introduction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Shippingport, the first commercial PWR operated in the United States, developed leaking cracks in two Type 304 stainless steel (SS) steam generator tubes as early as 1957, after only 150 h of operation. Stress corrosion cracks were observed in the heat-affected zones of welds in austenitic SS piping and associated components in boiling-water reactors (BRWs) as early as 1965. The degradation of steam generator tubing in PWRs and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic SS piping in BWRs have been the most visible and most expensive examples of EAC in LWRs, and the repair and replacement of steam generators and recirculation piping has cost hundreds of millions of dollars. However, other problems associated with the effects of the environment on reactor structures and components am important concerns in operating plants and for extended reactor lifetimes. Cast duplex austenitic-ferritic SSs are used extensively in the nuclear industry to fabricate pump casings and valve bodies for LWRs and primary coolant piping in many PWRs. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase in cast duplex SS may occur after 10 to 20 years at reactor operating temperatures, which could influence the mechanical response and integrity of pressure boundary components during high strain-rate loading (e.g., seismic events). The problem is of most concern in PWRs where slightly higher temperatures are typical and cast SS piping is widely used

  14. Application of LBB to high energy piping systems in operating PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swamy, S.A.; Bhowmick, D.C. [Westinghouse Nuclear Technology Division, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The amendment to General Design Criterion 4 allows exclusion, from the design basis, of dynamic effects associated with high energy pipe rupture by application of leak-before-break (LBB) technology. This new approach has resulted in substantial financial savings to utilities when applied to the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary loop piping and auxiliary piping systems made of stainless steel material. To date majority of applications pertain to piping systems in operating plants. Various steps of evaluation associated with the LBB application to an operating plant are described in this paper.

  15. Study on air ingress during an early stage of a primary-pipe rupture accident of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishida, M.; Takeda, T.

    1991-01-01

    A primary-pipe rupture accident is one of the design-based accidents of the HTTR. As the first step of our final goal of predicting the multicomponent gas flow in a reactor during the early stages of the accident, the present paper aims at studying experimentally and analytically, the basic features of air ingress and gas transportation by transient molecular diffusion and the transient natural convection of a two-component gas mixture. The present paper comprises two main parts. The first part deals with analytical and experimental studies on N 2 ingress (corresponding to air ingress) and gas transportation by molecular diffusion and the one-dimensional natural convection of an He-N 2 two-component gas mixture in a reverse-U-shaped tube. Analytical and experimental results are discussed on the N 2 mole fraction change with time after the simulated pipe rupture and on the initation time of the natural circulation of pure N 2 . The second part deals with a preliminary simulation test of air ingress during the early stages of the accident. The test is performed with a very simple model of the reactor. The experimental results are discussed on the change in mole fraction of air with time and on the initiation time of the natural circulation of pure air. (orig.)

  16. Reactor shutdown device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Toyokazu.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a highly reliable reactor shutdown device capable of checking its function irrespective of the state whether shutdown or operation in a gas-cooled type reactor. Constitution: A hopper is disposed above a guide tube inserted into the reactor core and particulate neutron absorbers are contained in the hopper. An opening for falling particles is disposed to the bottom of the hopper in opposition to the upper end of the guide pipe and the opening is closed by a plug suspended by way of a weld line so as to be capable of dropping. A power source for supplying electrical current to the weld line is disposed. Accordingly, if the current is supplied to the weld line, the line is cut by welding to fall the plug so that the neutron-absorbing particles fall from the opening into the guide pipe to shutdown the reactor, whereby high reliability is obtained for the operation. (Seki, T.)

  17. Condensation driven water hammer studies for feedwater distribution pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savolainen, S.; Katajala, S.; Elsing, B.; Nurkkala, P.; Hoikkanen, J. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Pullinen, J. [IVO Power Engineering Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Logvinov, S.A.; Trunov, N.B.; Sitnik, J.K. [EDO Gidropress (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Imatran Voima Oy, IVO, operates two VVER 440 reactors. Unit 1 has been operating since 1977 and unit 2 since 1981. First damages of the feed water distribution (FWD) pipes were observed in 1989. In closer examinations FWD-pipe T-connection turned out to suffer from severe erosion corrosion damages. Similar damages have been found also in other VVER 440 type NPPs. In 1994 the first new FWD-pipe was replaced and in 1996 extensive water hammer experiments were carried out together with EDO Gidropress in Podolsk. After the first phase of the experiments some fundamental changes were made to the construction of the FWD-pipe. The object of this paper is to give short insight to the design of the new FWD-pipe concentrating on water hammer experiments. (orig.).

  18. Condensation driven water hammer studies for feedwater distribution pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savolainen, S.; Katajala, S.; Elsing, B.; Nurkkala, P.; Hoikkanen, J.; Pullinen, J.; Logvinov, S.A.; Trunov, N.B.; Sitnik, J.K.

    1997-01-01

    Imatran Voima Oy, IVO, operates two VVER 440 reactors. Unit 1 has been operating since 1977 and unit 2 since 1981. First damages of the feed water distribution (FWD) pipes were observed in 1989. In closer examinations FWD-pipe T-connection turned out to suffer from severe erosion corrosion damages. Similar damages have been found also in other VVER 440 type NPPs. In 1994 the first new FWD-pipe was replaced and in 1996 extensive water hammer experiments were carried out together with EDO Gidropress in Podolsk. After the first phase of the experiments some fundamental changes were made to the construction of the FWD-pipe. The object of this paper is to give short insight to the design of the new FWD-pipe concentrating on water hammer experiments. (orig.)

  19. Condensation driven water hammer studies for feedwater distribution pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savolainen, S; Katajala, S; Elsing, B; Nurkkala, P; Hoikkanen, J [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Pullinen, J [IVO Power Engineering Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Logvinov, S A; Trunov, N B; Sitnik, J K [EDO Gidropress (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    Imatran Voima Oy, IVO, operates two VVER 440 reactors. Unit 1 has been operating since 1977 and unit 2 since 1981. First damages of the feed water distribution (FWD) pipes were observed in 1989. In closer examinations FWD-pipe T-connection turned out to suffer from severe erosion corrosion damages. Similar damages have been found also in other VVER 440 type NPPs. In 1994 the first new FWD-pipe was replaced and in 1996 extensive water hammer experiments were carried out together with EDO Gidropress in Podolsk. After the first phase of the experiments some fundamental changes were made to the construction of the FWD-pipe. The object of this paper is to give short insight to the design of the new FWD-pipe concentrating on water hammer experiments. (orig.).

  20. A PC-based high temperature gas reactor simulator for Indonesian conceptual HTR reactor basic training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarip; Po, L. C. C.

    2018-05-01

    In planning for nuclear power plant construction in Indonesia, helium cooled high temperature reactor (HTR) is favorable for not relying upon water supply that might be interrupted by earthquake. In order to train its personnel, BATAN has cooperated with Micro-Simulation Technology of USA to develop a 200 MWt PC-based simulation model PCTRAN/HTR. It operates in Win10 environment with graphic user interface (GUI). Normal operation of startup, power maneuvering, shutdown and accidents including pipe breaks and complete loss of AC power have been conducted. A sample case of safety analysis simulation to demonstrate the inherent safety features of HTR was done for helium pipe break malfunction scenario. The analysis was done for the variation of primary coolant pipe break i.e. from 0,1% - 0,5 % and 1% - 10 % helium gas leakages, while the reactor was operated at the maximum constant power of 10 MWt. The result shows that the highest temperature of HTR fuel centerline and coolant were 1150 °C and 1296 °C respectively. With 10 kg/s of helium flow in the reactor core, the thermal power will back to the startup position after 1287 s of helium pipe break malfunction.

  1. Experimental basis for parameters contributing to energy dissipation in piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibanez, P.; Ware, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews several pipe testing programs to suggest the phenomena causing energy dissipation in piping systems. Such phenomena include material damping, plasticity, collision in gaps and between pipes, water dynamics, insulation straining, coupling slippage, restraints (snubbers, struts, etc.), and pipe/structure interaction. These observations are supported by a large experimental data base. Data are available from in-situ and laboratory tests (pipe diameters up to about 20 inches, response levels from milli-g's to responses causing yielding, and from excitation wave forms including sinusoid, snapback, random, and seismic). A variety of pipe configurations have been tested, including simple, bare, straight sections and complex lines with bends, snubbers, struts, and insulation. Tests have been performed with and without water and at zero to operating pressure. Both light water reactor and LMFBR piping have been tested

  2. Some scoping experiments for a space reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, C.A.; Ogden, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Some scoping experiments were performed to evaluate fuel performance in a lithium heat pipe reactor operating at a nominal 1500K heat pipe temperature. Fuel-coolant and fuel-coolant-clad relationships showed that once a failed heat pipe occurs temperatures can rise high enough so that large concentrations of uranium can be transported by the vapor phase. Upon condensation this uranium would be capable of penetrating heat pipes adjacent to the failed pipe. The potential for propagation of failure exists with UO 2 and a lithium heat pipe. Changing the composition of the metal of the heat pipe would have only a second order effect on the kinetics of the failure mechanism. Uranium carbide and nitride were considered as potential fuels which are nonreactive in a lithium environment. At high temperatures the nitride would be favored because of its better compatibility with potential cladding materials. Compositions of UN with small additions of YN appear to offer very attractive properties for a compact high temperature high power density reactor

  3. Method for operating nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu; Uchida, Shunsuke

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: In order to judge the fuel failures, if any, without opening a reactor container for BWR type reactors, a method has been described for measuring the difference between the temperature dependent iodine spike value and the pressure dependent iodine spike value in the pressure vessel. Method: After the scram of a nuclear reactor, steam generated by decay heat is condensed in a remaining heat exchanger and cooling water is returned through a recycling pipe line to a reactor core. At the same time, a control rod drive system pump is operated, the reactor core is filled with the cooling water. Then, the coolant is taken from the recycling pipe line to cool the reactor core. After applying the temperature fluctuation, the cooling water is sampled at a predetermined time interval at a sampling point to determine the changes with time in the radioactive concentration of iodine. When the radioactivity of iodine in the cooling water is lowered sufficiently by a reactor purifying system, the nuclear reactor vessel is depressurized. After applying pressure fluctuation, iodine spike value is determined. (Kawakami, Y.)

  4. Development of forging technology for PWR primary piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, F.; Badeau, J.P.; Lambs, R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to give information on the changes in the design and manufacture of Primary Piping for electronuclear boilers of the Pressurized Water Reactor type (PWR) which has resulted in the making of one-piece forged lines including stub pipes and arcs. The optimization of these items is aimed at improving the life of the new power stations as well as guaranteeing their safety, while reducing inspection and maintenance requirements in service. The demonstration of the manufacturing feasibility has just been completed. It has taken material form in the installation, on the CIVAUX 1 section, of the first one-piece cold leg in the world. It will shortly be followed by the installation on the CIVAUX 2 section of a complete loop of bent forged pipes. Therefore, this new know-how is going to be incorporated in the French Rules (RCC-M) and can be directly taken into consideration both in the next work to be done and in the design and definition of a future nuclear reactor

  5. Compact reactor/ORC power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.; Kirchner, W.L.; Willcutt, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    A compact power source that combines an organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) electric generator with a nuclear reactor heat source is being designed and fabricated. Incorporating existing ORC technology with proven reactor technology, the compact reactor/ORC power source offers high reliability while minimizing the need for component development. Thermal power at 125 kWt is removed from the coated particle fueled, graphite moderated reactor by heat pipes operating at 500 0 C. Outside the reactor vessel and connected to the heat pipes are vaporizers in which the toluene ORC working fluid is heated to 370 0 C. In the turbine-alternator-pump (TAP) combined-rotating unit, the thermal energy of the toluene is converted to 25 kWe of electric power. Lumped parameter systems analyses combined with a finite element thermal analysis have aided in the power source design. The analyses have provided assurance of reliable multiyear normal operation as well as full power operation with upset conditions, such as failed heat pipes and inoperative ORC vaporizers. Because of inherent high reliability, long life, and insensitivity to upset conditions, this power source is especially suited for use in remote, inaccessible locations where fuel delivery and maintenance costs are high. 10 refs

  6. Performance demonstration of a high-power space-reactor heat-pipe design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrigan, M.A.; Martinez, E.H.; Keddy, E.S.; Runyan, J.; Kemme, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Performance of a 15.9-mm diam, 2-m long, artery heat pipe has been demonstrated at power levels to 22.6 kW and temperatures to 1500 0 K. The heat pipe employed lithium as a working fluid with distribution wicks and arteries fabricated from 400 mesh Mo-41 wt % Re screen. Molybdenum alloy (TZM) was used for the container. Peak axial power density attained in the testing was 19 kW/cm 2 at 1465 0 K. The corresponding radial flux density in the evaporator region of the heat pipe was 150 W/cm 2 . The extrapolated limit for the heat pipe at its 1500 0 K design point is 30 kW, corresponding to an axial flux density of 25 kW/cm 2 . Sonic and capillary limits for the design were investigated in the 1100 to 1500 0 K temperature range. Excellent agreement of measured and predicted temperature and power levels was observed

  7. Experimental investigation on Heat Transfer Performance of Annular Flow Path Heat Pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Guk; Kim, Kyung Mo; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Mochizuki et al. was suggested the passive cooling system to spent nuclear fuel pool. Detail analysis of various heat pipe design cases was studied to determine the heat pipes cooling performance. Wang et al. suggested the concept PRHRS of MSR using sodium heat pipes, and the transient performance of high temperature sodium heat pipe was numerically simulated in the case of MSR accident. The meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants alarmed to the dangers of station blackout (SBO) accident. After the SBO accident, passive decay heat removal systems have been investigated to prevent the severe accidents. Mochizuki et al. suggested the heat pipes cooling system using loop heat pipes for decay heat removal cooling and analysis of heat pipe thermal resistance for boiling water reactor (BWR). The decay heat removal systems for pressurized water reactor (PWR) were suggested using natural convection mechanisms and modification of PWR design. Our group suggested the concept of a hybrid heat pipe with control rod as Passive IN-core Cooling System (PINCs) for decay heat removal for advanced nuclear power plant. Hybrid heat pipe is the combination of the heat pipe and control rod. In the present research, the main objective is to investigate the effect of the inner structure to the heat transfer performance of heat pipe containing neutron absorber material, B 4 C. The main objective is to investigate the effect of the inner structure in heat pipe to the heat transfer performance with annular flow path. ABS pellet was used instead of B 4 C pellet as cylindrical structures. The thermal performances of each heat pipes were measured experimentally. Among them, concentric heat pipe showed the best performance compared with others. 1. Annular evaporation section heat pipe and annular flow path heat pipe showed heat transfer degradation. 2. AHP also had annular vapor space and contact cooling surface per unit volume of vapor was increased. Heat transfer coefficient of

  8. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extend from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

  9. Analysis of residual stresses in girth welded type 304 stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brust, F.W.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in boiling water reactor (BWR) piping is a problem for the nuclear power industry. Tensile residual stresses induced by welding are an important factor in IGSCC of Type 304 stainless steel pipes. Backlay and heat sink welding can retard IGSCC. 17 refs

  10. Program to justify life extension of older nuclear piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, T.K.; Dwight, J.E. Jr.; Morton, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has a history of more than 40 years devoted to the operation of nuclear reactors designed for research and experiments. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one such operating reactor whose mission requires continued operation for an additional 25 years or more. Since the ATR is approaching its design life of twenty years, life extension evaluations have been initiated. Of particular importance are the associated high temperature, high pressure loop piping system supporting in--reactor experiments. Failure of this piping could challenge core safety margins. Since regulatory rules for nuclear power plant life extension are only in the formulation stage, the current technical guidance on this subject provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) or the commercial nuclear industry is incomplete. In the interim, order to assure continued safe operation of this piping beyond its initial design life, a program has been developed to provide the necessary technical justification for life extension. This paper describes a program that establishes Section 11 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code as the governing criteria document, retains B31.1 as the Code of record for Section 11 activities, specifies additional inservice inspection requirements more strict than Section 11, and relies heavily on flaw detection and fracture mechanics evaluations. 18 refs., 2 figs

  11. The Canadian approach to protection against postulated primary heat transport piping failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarman, B.L.

    1985-10-01

    In Canada, the Atomic Energy Control Act and Regulations stipulate in broad terms the requirements to be met by licensees. In addition, AECB staff have prepared licensing guides to amplify those requirements. For nuclear reactors, these include providing suitable protection against the consequences of failure of any pipe in the reactor cooling system. The suggested means of limiting the damage caused by whipping pipes or steam jets is by separation of equipment, installing barriers, or restraining piping. If, however, the designer can demonstrate that restraints are impractical or detrimental to safety, AECB staff may consider alternate arguments based on a demonstration that piping is likely to crack and then leak for a long time prior to rupture. This alternative approach would not be considered for ruptures having a high probability of defeating containment, damaging essential safety systems, or of disrupting flow to the core to the extent that fuel cooling could not be maintained

  12. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications.

  13. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications

  14. Performance Evaluation of the Concept of Hybrid Heat Pipe as Passive In-core Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yeong Shin; Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, In Guk; Bang, In Cheol

    2015-01-01

    As an arising issue for inherent safety of nuclear power plant, the concept of hybrid heat pipe as passive in-core cooling systems was introduced. Hybrid heat pipe has unique features that it is inserted in core directly to remove decay heat from nuclear fuel without any changes of structures of existing facilities of nuclear power plant, substituting conventional control rod. Hybrid heat pipe consists of metal cladding, working fluid, wick structure, and neutron absorber. Same with working principle of the heat pipe, heat is transported by phase change of working fluid inside metal cask. Figure 1 shows the systematic design of the hybrid heat pipe cooling system. In this study, the concept of a hybrid heat pipe was introduced as a Passive IN-core Cooling Systems (PINCs) and demonstrated for internal design features of heat pipe containing neutron absorber. Using a commercial CFD code, single hybrid heat pipe model was analyzed to evaluate thermal performance in designated operating condition. Also, 1-dimensional reactor transient analysis was done by calculating temperature change of the coolant inside reactor pressure vessel using MATLAB. As a passive decay heat removal device, hybrid heat pipe was suggested with a concept of combination of heat pipe and control rod. Hybrid heat pipe has distinct feature that it can be a unique solution to cool the reactor when depressurization process is impossible so that refueling water cannot be injected into RPV by conventional ECCS. It contains neutron absorber material inside heat pipe, so it can stop the reactor and at the same time, remove decay heat in core. For evaluating the concept of hybrid heat pipe, its thermal performance was analyzed using CFD and one-dimensional transient analysis. From single hybrid heat pipe simulation, the hybrid heat pipe can transport heat from the core inside to outside about 18.20 kW, and total thermal resistance of hybrid heat pipe is 0.015 .deg. C/W. Due to unique features of long heat

  15. Survey on application of probabilistic fracture mechanics approach to nuclear piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashima, Koichi

    1987-01-01

    Probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) approach is newly developed as one of the tools to evaluate the structural integrity of nuclear components. This report describes the current status of PFM studies for pressure vessel and piping system in light water reactors and focuses on the investigations of the piping failure probability which have been undertaken by USNRC. USNRC reevaluates the double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of rector coolant piping as a design basis event for nuclear power plant by using the PFM approach. For PWR piping systems designed by Westinghouse, two causes of pipe break are considered: pipe failure due to the crack growth and pipe failure indirectly caused by failure of component supports due to an earthquake. PFM approach shows that the probability of DEGB from either cause is very low and that the effect of earthquake on pipe failure can be neglected. (author)

  16. Pipe Explorer surveying system. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Chicago Operations Office and the DOE's Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. The Pipe Explorer trademark system was developed by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA), Albuquerque, NM as a deployment method for transporting a variety of survey tools into pipes and ducts. Tools available for use with the system include alpha, beta and gamma radiation detectors; video cameras; and pipe locator beacons. Different versions of this technology have been demonstrated at three other sites; results of these demonstrations are provided in an earlier Innovative Technology Summary Report. As part of a D and D project, characterization radiological contamination inside piping systems is necessary before pipes can be recycled, remediated or disposed. This is usually done manually by surveying over the outside of the piping only, with limited effectiveness and risk of worker exposure. The pipe must be accessible to workers, and embedded pipes in concrete or in the ground would have to be excavated at high cost and risk of exposure to workers. The advantage of the Pipe Explorer is its ability to perform in-situ characterization of pipe internals

  17. Flow visualization study of two-phase flow in a single bend outlet feeder pipe of a CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savalaxs, S.-A.; Lister, D.H.; Steward, F.R.

    2005-01-01

    In CANDU reactors, the feeder piping that is used to direct the high-temperature water coolant between the fuel channels and the steam generators is made of carbon steel. Since 1996, several CANDU stations have reported excessive corrosion of their outlet feeders. The first metre is particularity vulnerable because the piping there consists of single or double bends, which have relatively thin walls produced by the bending process. Early studies related the attack to the hydrodynamics of the coolant and verified that it was a type of flow-accelerated corrosion. In order to understand the hydrodynamics of the coolant in the outlet feeders by flow visualization, a full-scale transparent test section simulating the geometry and orientation of an outlet feeder bend with its upstream components was fabricated. The feeder consisted of a 54 mm diameter acrylic pipe with a 73 degree bend. This was connected to the upstream component with an acrylic simulation of a Grayloc flanged fitting. A test loop supplied room temperature water to the test section at flow rates up to 0.019 m3/s. Air could be injected into the water to give a mean volume fraction of up to 0.56. In this preliminary investigation, the size and velocity of air bubbles at different flow conditions and their distribution within the pipe bend were studied. Particular attention was paid to the flow pattern at the inside of the bend, where a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) code - Fluent 6.1-had failed to predict a liquid film in an earlier study. A high-speed digital video camera was used to determine the relation between bubble size and velocity. Such a relation should help to explain the discrepancy in the CFD modelling and provide the basis for accurate predictions of phase distribution in complex geometries at high flow rates. (authors)

  18. Experience with reactor assembly of FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Ravishankar, K.; Babu, A.; Varadarajan, S.; Arumugam, P.; Sekhar, P.

    2006-01-01

    Reactor Assembly, also called Block Pile, is the heart of FBTR and houses the core, top and lateral shields, control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM), sodium inlet pipe and outlet pipes etc. Two major problems which arose during commissioning were reactor vessel tilt due to convection in cover gas space and failure of inflatable seals. The reactor vessel tilt was solved by Helium injection. Reactor was operated without pressurising the inflatable seals till 2005, when the seals were replaced. Other major problems in the course of twenty years of reactor operation were failure of three CRDM lower parts, Core Cover plate which houses the core thermocouples getting stuck in the fuel handling position, water leaks from the Biological Shield Cooling (BSC) coils around the reactor, failure of core wires in the trailing cables during fuel handling etc. This paper addresses the major problems faced and modifications carried out. (author)

  19. Application of leak-before-break criteria to pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roege, P.; Day, B.; Beckjord, E.; Golay, M.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of consequential damage to safety-related systems or components after postulated pipe breaks in Light Water Reactors has led to the installation of pipe restraints capable of withstanding the loads in such an accident. These restraints are a significant part of initial capital cost, and because of their size and location, impede plant maintenance. The Piping Review Committee of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has concluded that, subject to fulfillment of certain criteria, the pipe restraints for pressurized water reactor main coolant piping are not necessary, because the failure mode of this piping is such that it will leak before it will break, and the leakage of reactor coolant is large enough to detect. In this study, we examine the piping systems of a 4-loop 1,150 MWe pressurized water reactor, determining the crack size that would be stable from a fracture mechanics point of view, and the range of leak rates that would ensue. We then consider the sensitivity of conventional leak detection systems, and find that pipe sizes down to 45 cm in diameter would meet the leak-before-break criteria. Improvements in the sensitivity of conventional leak detectors would extend this range down to pipe sizes down to the range of 20 - 45 cm in diameter. The development of local leak detection systems which would respond to leaks in compartments or confined areas would make it possible to apply the criteria to sizes as low as 10 - 20 cm in diameter, which appear to be the limit of the net cost savings of eliminating pipe restraints and adding additional leak detection instrumentation. Extending the leak-before-break concept into this smallest pipe range may require improved precision in crack definition, flow modeling, and leak detection. Better detection of leaks may also require use of new detection methods coupled to novel approaches to piping system design. (J.P.N.)

  20. Stress-assisted, microbial-induced corrosion of stainless steel primary piping and other aging issues at the Omega West Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, A.

    1995-01-01

    After the discovery of cooling system leak of about 284 liters per twenty-four (24) hour period, an investigation determined that the 76.2-cm diameter, 33.5-m long stainless-steel (304) OWR delay line was losing water at the same nominal rate. An excavation effort revealed that a circumferential crack, approximately 0.0025 cm in width, extended around the bottom half of the delay line. In addition, other evidence of what appeared to be microcracking and pitting that originated at random nucleated sites around the pipe were also found. Results of destructive analysis and nondestructive testing allowed Los Alamos staff to conclude that the direct cause for the main crack and other pitting resulted from stress-assisted, microbial-induced corrosion of the stainless steel primary piping. The results also indicated that microbial action from bacteria that are normally present in earth can be extremely harmful to stainless- steel piping under certain conditions. Other potential problems that could have also eventually led to a permanent shutdown of the OWR were discussed. These problems, although never encountered nor associated with the current shutdown, were identified in aging studies and are associated with: (1) the water-cooled, bismuth gamma-ray shield and, (2) the aluminum thermal column head seal that prevents reactor vessel water from entering into the graphite-filled thermal column

  1. Seismic response and damping tests of small bore LMFBR piping and supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barta, D.A.; Anderson, M.J.; Severud, L.K.; Lindquist, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Seismic testing and analysis of a prototypical Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) small bore piping system is described. Measured responses to simulated seismic excitations are compared with analytical predictions based on NRC Regulatory Guide 1.61 and measured system damping values. The test specimen was representative of a typical LMFBR insulated small bore piping system, and it was supported from a rigid test frame by prototypic dead weight supports, mechanical snubbers and pipe clamps

  2. Fuel assemblies for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, Takao.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable effective failed fuel detection by the provision of water rod formed with a connecting section connected to a warmed water feed pipe of a sipping device at the lower portion and with a warmed water jetting port in the lower portion in a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor to thereby carry out rapid sipping. Constitution: Fuel rods and water rods are contained in the channel box of a fuel assembly, and the water rod is provided at its upper portion with a connecting section connected to the warmed water feed pipe of the sipping device and formed at its lower portion with a warmed water jetting port for jetting warmed water fed from the warmed water feed pipe. Upon detection of failed fuels, the reactor operation is shut down and the reactor core is immersed in water. The cover for the reactor container is removed and the cap of the sipping device is inserted to connect the warmed water feed pipe to the connecting section of the water rod. Then, warmed water is fed to the water rod and jetted out from the warmed water jetting port to cause convection and unify the water of the channel box in a short time. Thereafter, specimen is sampled and analyzed for the detection of failed fuels. (Moriyama, K.)

  3. Development of pipe welding, cutting and inspection tools for the ITER blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Ito, Akira; Taguchi, Kou; Takiguchi, Yuji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Tada, Eisuke

    1999-07-01

    In D-T burning reactors such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), an internal access welding/cutting of blanket cooling pipe with bend sections is inevitably required because of spatial constraint due to nuclear shield and available port opening space. For this purpose, internal access pipe welding/cutting/inspection tools for manifolds and branch pipes are being developed according to the agreement of the ITER R and D task (T329). A design concept of welding/cutting processing head with a flexible optical fiber has been developed and the basic feasibility studies on welding, cutting and rewelding are performed using stainless steel plate (SS316L). In the same way, a design concept of inspection head with a non-destructive inspection probe (including a leak-testing probe) has been developed and the basic characteristic tests are performed using welded stainless steel pipes. In this report, the details of welding/cutting/inspection heads for manifolds and branch pipes are described, together with the basic experiment results relating to the welding/cutting and inspection. In addition, details of a composite type optical fiber, which can transmit both the high-power YAG laser and visible rays, is described. (author)

  4. Development and test of a space-reactor-core heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrigan, M.A.; Runyan, J.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Keddy, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pipe designed to meet the heat transfer requirements of a 100-kW/sub e/ space nuclear power system has been developed and tested. General design requirements for the device included an operating temperature of 1500 0 K with an evaporator radial flux density of 100 w/cm 2 . The total heat-pipe length of 2 m comprised an evaporator length of 0.3 m, a 1.2-m adiabatic section, and a condenser length of 0.5 m. A four-artery design employing screen arteries and distribution wicks was used with lithium serving as the working fluid. Molybdenum alloys were used for the screen materials and tube shell. Hafnium and zirconium gettering materials were used in connection with a pre-purified distilled lithium charge to ensure internal chemical compatibility. After initial performance verification, the 14.1-mm i.d. heat pipe was operated at 15 kW throughput at 1500 0 K for 100 hours. No performance degradation was observed during the test

  5. Engineering design aspects of the heat-pipe power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, B. M.; Houts, M. G.; Poston, D. I.; Berte, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Heat-pipe Power System (HPS) is a near-term, low-cost space power system designed at Los Alamos that can provide up to 1,000 kWt for many space nuclear applications. The design of the reactor is simple, modular, and adaptable. The basic design allows for the use of a variety of power conversion systems and reactor materials (including the fuel, clad, and heat pipes). This paper describes a project that was undertaken to develop a database supporting many engineering aspects of the HPS design. The specific tasks discussed in this paper are: the development of an HPS materials database, the creation of finite element models that will allow a wide variety of investigations, and the verification of past calculations.

  6. Engineering design aspects of the heat-pipe power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capell, B.M.; Houts, M.G.; Poston, D.I.; Berte, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Heat-pipe Power System (HPS) is a near-term, low-cost space power system designed at Los Alamos that can provide up to 1,000 kWt for many space nuclear applications. The design of the reactor is simple, modular, and adaptable. The basic design allows for the use of a variety of power conversion systems and reactor materials (including the fuel, clad, and heat pipes). This paper describes a project that was undertaken to develop a database supporting many engineering aspects of the HPS design. The specific tasks discussed in this paper are: the development of an HPS materials database, the creation of finite element models that will allow a wide variety of investigations, and the verification of past calculations

  7. Air conditioning device for reactor buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shiro.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the opening areas of pipe lines for an air conditioning device at the portions passing through the shielding walls of a reactor building for a FBR type reactor, as well as reduce the size of the building. Constitution: Airs in the building for containing reactor are liquefied in an air liquefying mechanism. The liquefied airs are sent by way of pipe lines to each of evaporators, wherein each of the chambers are cooled because of latent heat of evaporation and evaporated airs are released to each of the chambers. The airs released to each of the chambers are collected into an exhaust chamber and sent by way of a duct to the air liquefying mechanism and liquefied again. Since the volume of the liquefied airs may be smaller than the amount conventionally required for usual cooled airs, the pipe lines passing through the shielding walls of the building can be of smaller diameter. This can decrease the opening areas of the pipe lines at the portions passing through the walls of the shieldings and, since the opening areas are smaller, the structure of the radiation shieldings can be simplified in these portions. Further, since the space of the pipe lines in the building is reduced extremely, the size of the building can be reduced. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Stress Distribution in the Dissimilar Metal Butt Weld of Nuclear Reactor Piping due to the Simulation Technique for the Repair Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hweeseung; Huh, Namsu; Kim, Jinsu; Lee, Jinho

    2013-01-01

    During welding, the dissimilar metal butt welds of nuclear piping are typically subjected to repair welding in order to eliminate defects that are found during post-weld inspection. It has been found that the repair weld can significantly increase the tensile residual stress in the weldment, and therefore, accurate estimation of the weld residual stress due to repair weld, especially for dissimilar metal welds using Ni-based alloy 82/182 in nuclear components, is of great importance in order to assess susceptibility to primary water stress corrosion cracking. In the present study, the stress distributions of dissimilar metal butt welds in nuclear reactor piping subjected to repair weld were investigated based on detailed nonlinear finite element analyses. Particular emphasis was placed on the variation of the stress distribution in the dissimilar metal butt weld according to the finite element welding analysis sequence for the repair welding process

  9. Vibration analysis for IHTS piping system of LMR conveying hot liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Lee, Jae Han

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the vibration characteristics of IHTS(Intermediate Heat Transfer System) piping system of LMR(Liquid Metal Reactor) conveying hot liquid sodium are investigated to eliminate the pipe supports for economic reasons. To do this, a 3-dimensional straight pipe element and a curved pipe element conveying fluid are formulated using the dynamic stiffness method of the wave approach and coded to be applied to any complex piping system. Using this method, the dynamic characteristics including the natural frequency, the frequency response functions, and the dynamic instability due to the pipe internal flow velocity are analyzed. As one of the design parameters, the vibration energy flow is also analyzed to investigate the disturbance transmission paths for the resonant excitation and the non-resonant excitations

  10. Space Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    We needed to find a space reactor concept that could be attractive to NASA for flight and proven with a rapid turnaround, low-cost nuclear test. Heat-pipe-cooled reactors coupled to Stirling engines long identified as the easiest path to near-term, low-cost concept.

  11. DETECTION OF COATING FAILURES IN A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, A.H.; Allison, S.K.

    1958-02-11

    This patent relates to water-cooled reactor systems and discloses a means to detect leaks in the jackets of jacketed fuel elements comprising a neutron detector located in the cooling water discharge pipe,the pipe being provided with an enlarged portion for housing the detector so that the latter is completely surrounded by the water in its passage through the pipe, said enlarged portion and detector being shielded from the reactor for the purpose of detecting only those delayed neutrons emitted in the cooling water and due to the latter picking up fission fragments from the defective fuel elements.

  12. A compact reactor/ORC power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.; Kirchner, W.L.; Willcutt, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    A compact power source that combines an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) electric generator with a nuclear reactor heat source is being designed and fabricated. Incorporating existing ORC technology with proven reactor technology, the compact reactor/ORC power source offers high reliability while minimizing the need for componenet development. Thermal power at 125 kWt is removed from the coated particle fueled, graphite moderated reactor by heat pipes operating at 500 0 C. Outside the reactor vessel and connected to the heat pipes are vaporizers in which the toluene ORC working fluid is heated to 370 0 C. In the turbine-alternator-pump (TAP) combined-rotating unit, the thermal energy of the toluene is converted to 25 kWe of electric power. Lumped parameter systems analyses combined with a finite element thermal analyses combined with a finite element thermal analysis have aided in the power source design. The analysis have provided assurance of reliable multiyear normal operation as well as full power operation with upset conditions, such as failed heat pipes and inoperative ORC vaporizers. Because of inherent high reliability, long life, and insensitivity to upset conditions, this power source is especially suited for use in remote, inaccessible locations where fuel delivery and maintenance costs are high

  13. An appraisal of procedures used to give the criterion for instability of a through-wall circumferential crack in a stainless steel piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1989-01-01

    Against the background of the problem of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of 304 stainless steel in Boiling Water Reactor piping systems, this paper presents a critical appraisal of procedures that are currently used to give the criterion for instability of a through-wall circumferential crack in a stainless steel piping system. Particular attention is focussed on a simple procedure developed by Cotter, Chang and Zahoor, which has been applied to specific piping systems, the objective being to underpin its viability. The considerations are applicable to not only Boiling Water Reactor piping systems, but to other piping systems where pipe failure due to circumferential cracking is a potential problem. (author)

  14. Emergency cooling system for a nuclear reactor in a closed gas turbine plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutschi, H.U.

    1974-01-01

    In undisturbed operation of the closed gas turbine plant with compressor stages, reactor, and turbine, a compressor stage driven by a separate motor is following with reduced power. The power input this way is so small that the working medium is just blown through without pressure increase. The compressor stage is connected with the reactor by means of a reactor feedback pipe with an additional cooler and with the other compressor stages by means of a recuperator in the pipe between these and the turbine. In case of emergency cooling, e.g. after the rupture of a pipe with decreasing pressure of the working medium, the feedback pipe is closed short and the additional compressor stage is brought to higher power. It serves as a coolant blower and transfers the necessary amount of working medium to the reactor. The compressor stage is controlled at a constant torque, so that the heat removal from the reactor is adapted to the conditions of the accident. (DG) [de

  15. Design rules for piping: Plastic stability of straight parts under level D loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touboul, F.; Ben Djidia, M.; Acker, D.

    1989-01-01

    Design rules for piping, elaborated for Fast Breeder Reactors, are based on analysis performed for Pressure Water Reactors. Interpretation of largely diversified straight parts tests, enable us to validate and improve existing rules and to propose a more suitable formula. Design rules for piping appear to be non conservative for austenitic thin tubes in bending or torsion. By introducing a B 2 coefficient, geometrically dependent, the gap between thin and thick tubes may be withheld. Conservatism of rules can be ensured by considering the allowable stress defined by ASME, Section III, Appendix F

  16. Hydrogen isotope effect through Pd in hydrogen transport pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    This investigation concerns hydrogen system with hydrogen transport pipes for transportation, purification, isotope separation and storage of hydrogen and its isotopes. A principle of the hydrogen transport pipe (heat pipe having hydrogen transport function) was proposed. It is comprised of the heat pipe and palladium alloy tubes as inlet, outlet, and the separation membrane of hydrogen. The operation was as follows: (1) gas was introduced into the heat pipe through the membrane in the evaporator; (2) the introduced gas was transported toward the condenser by the vapor flow; (3) the transported gas was swept and compressed to the end of the condenser by the vapor pressure; and (4) the compressed gas was exhausted from the heat pipe through the membrane in the condenser. The characteristics of the hydrogen transport pipe were examined for various working conditions. Basic performance concerning transportation, evacuation and compression was experimentally verified. Isotopic dihydrogen gases (H 2 and D 2 ) were used as feed gas for examining the intrinsic performance of the isotope separation by the hydrogen transport pipe. A simulated experiment for hydrogen isotope separation was carried out using a hydrogen-helium gas mixture. The hydrogen transport pipe has a potential for isotope separation and purification of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium in fusion reactor technology. (author)

  17. Nuclear reactor recyclation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigawa, Yukio; Chuma, Kazuto

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the unevenness for the coolant flow rate even when abnormality occurs to one of recycling pumps. Constitution: A plurality of jet pumps disposed at an interval around the reactor core are divided circumferentially into two sets, and a pipeway is disposed to the outside of each pair including recycling pumps corresponding to each of the sets. The pipeway is connected to the recycling inlet of the jet pump by way of a manifold. The discharge portion of the recycling pumps of the loop pipeway are connected with each other by way of communication pipes, and a normally closed valve is disposed to the communication pipe and the normally closed valve of the communication pipe is opened upon detecting abnormality for one of the recycling pumps. Thus, if either one of the pair of recycling pumps shows abnormal state, coolants flows from the other of pipeway to the outside of the loop pipeway and coolants are supplied from all the jet pumps to the reactor core portion and, accordingly, the not-uniform flow rate can be prevented to eliminate undesired effect on the reactor core. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Bayesian analysis of heat pipe life test data for reliability demonstration testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, R.J.; Martz, H.F.

    1985-01-01

    The demonstration testing duration requirements to establish a quantitative measure of assurance of expected lifetime for heat pipes was determined. The heat pipes are candidate devices for transporting heat generated in a nuclear reactor core to thermoelectric converters for use as a space-based electric power plant. A Bayesian analysis technique is employed, utilizing a limited Delphi survey, and a geometric mean accelerated test criterion involving heat pipe power (P) and temperature (T). Resulting calculations indicate considerable test savings can be achieved by employing the method, but development testing to determine heat pipe failure mechanisms should not be circumvented

  19. Replacement of the feedwater pipe system in reactor building outside containment at the nuclear power plant Philippsburg; Austausch der Speisewasserleitung im Reaktorgebaeude ausserhalb SHB im Kernkraftwerk Philippsburg I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, A. [Energie-Versorgung Schwaben AG, Stuttgart (Germany); Labes, M. [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Schwenk, B. [Kernkraftwerk Philippsburg GmbH (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    After full replacement of the feedwater pipe system during the inspection period in 1997, combined with a modern materials, manufacturing and analysis concept, the entire pipe system of the water/steam cycle in the reactor building of KKP 1 now consists of high-toughness materials. The safety level of the entire plant has been increased by leaving aside postulation of F2 breaks in the reactor building and providing for protection against 0.1 leaks. Based on fluid-dynamic calculations for the cases of pump failure and pipe break, as well as pipe system calculations in 5 extensive calculation cycles, about 130 documents were filed for inspection and approval (excluding preliminary test documents on restraints). Points of main interest for safety analysis in this context were the optimised closing performance of the 3rd check valves and the integrity of the nozzle region at the RPV. (oirg./CB) [Deutsch] Durch den Restaustausch der Speisewasserleitungen in der Revision 1997, verbunden mit einem modernen Werkstoff-, Fertigungs- und Nachweiskonzept, sind im Reaktorgebaeude von KKP 1 in den Hauptleitungen des Wasser-Dampf-Kreislaufes nur noch hochzaehe Werkstoffe eingesetzt. Durch den Verzicht auf das Postulat von 2F-Bruechen im Reaktorgebaeude und durch die Auslegung gegen 0,1F-Lecks wird das Sicherheitsniveau der Anlage insgesamt gesteigert. Ausgehend von fluiddynamischen Berechnungen fuer Pumpenausfall und Rohrbruch sowie Rohrsystem-Berechnungen in 5 umfangreichen Berechnungskreisen wurden fuer die Genehmigung und Begutachtung ca. 130 Unterlagen (ohne Halterungs-Vorpruefunterlagen) eingereicht und vom Gutachter geprueft. Schwerpunkte der Nachweisfuehrung waren die Optimierung des Schliessverhaltens der 3. Rueckschlagarmaturen sowie der Integritaetsnachweis des RDB-Anschlusses. (orig./MM)

  20. Analysis of a piping system for requalification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, B.J.; Tang, Yu.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the global stress analysis required for the seismic/structural requalification of a reactor secondary piping system in which minor defects (flaws) were discovered during a detailed inspection. The flaws in question consisted of weld imperfections. Specifically, it was necessary to establish that the stresses at the flawed sections did not exceed the allowables and that the fatigue life remained within acceptable limits. At the same time the piping system had to be qualified for higher earthquake loads than those used in the original design. To accomplish these objectives the nominal stress distributions in the piping system under the various loads (dead load, thermal load, wind load and seismic load) were determined. First a best estimate finite element model was developed and calculations were performed using the piping analysis modules of the ANSYS Computer Code. Parameter studies were then performed to assess the effect of physically reasonable variations in material, structural, and boundary condition characteristics. The nominal stresses and forces so determined, provided input for more detailed analyses of the flawed sections. Based on the reevaluation, the piping flaws were judged to be benign, i.e., the piping safety margins were acceptable inspite of the increased seismic demand. 13 refs

  1. Valve for the mechanical isolation of a pipe to take up a test probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uecker, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    A valve is introduced for application in a pipe in which a test probe is arranged. The valve serves to isolate the pipe in a gas-tight way, thus preventing the escape of radioactive gas or dust during operation in a nuclear reactor. (TK) [de

  2. Vibration analysis of primary inlet pipe line during steady state and transient conditions of Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayazuddin, S.K.; Qureshi, A.A.; Hayat, T.

    1997-11-01

    The Primary Water Inlet Pipeline (PW-IPL) is of stainless steel conveying demineralized water from hold-up tank to the reactor pool of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1). The section of the pipeline from heat exchangers to the valve pit is hanger supported in the pump room and the rest of the section from valve pit to the reactor pool is embedded. The PW-IPL is subjected to steady state and transient vibrations. The reactor pumps, which drive the coolant through various circuits mainly contribute the steady state vibrations, while transient vibrations arise due to instant closure of the check valve (water hammer). The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code provides data about the acceptable limits of stresses related to the primary static stress due to steady state vibrations. However, due to complexity in the pipe structure, stresses related to the transient vibrations are neglected in the code. In this report attempt has been made to analyzed both steady state and transient vibrations of PW-IPL of PARR-1. Since, both the steady state and transient vibrations affect the hanger-supported section of the PW-IPL, therefore, it was selected for vibration test measurements. In the analysis vibration data was compared with the allowable limits and estimations of maximum pressure build-up, eflection, natural frequency, tensile and shear load on hanger support, and the ratio of maximum combine stress to the allowable load were made. (author)

  3. Development of VHTR high temperature piping in KHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Takano, Shiro

    1981-01-01

    The high temperature pipings used for multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors are the internally insulated pipings for transporting high temperature, high pressure helium at 1000 deg C and 40 kgf/cm 2 , and the influences exerted by their performance as well as safety to the plants are very large. Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., has engaged in the development of the high temperature pipings for VHTRs for years. In this report, the progress of the development, the test carried out recently and the problems for future are described. KHI manufactured and is constructing a heater and internally insulated helium pipings for the large, high temperature structure testing loop constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The design concept for the high temperature pipings is to separate the temperature boundary and the pressure boundary, therefore, the double walled construction with internal heat insulation was adopted. The requirements for the high temperature pipings are to prevent natural convection, to prevent bypass flow, to minimize radiation heat transfer and to reduce heat leak through insulator supporters. The heat insulator is composed of two layers, metal laminate insulator and fiber insulator of alumina-silica. The present state of development of the high temperature pipings for VHTRs is reported. (Kako, I.)

  4. Spray pond piping made from fiberglass-reinforced thermosetting resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    A method is presented for implementing requirements pertaining to the design, fabrication, and testing of fiberglass-reinforced thermosetting resin piping for spray pond applications. These requirements are given in 10 CFR Part 50, Section 50.55a and Apppendix A, Criterion 1. This guide applies to both light-water-cooled and gas-cooled reactors. Input has been provided by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards

  5. Remotely controlled repair of piping at Douglas Point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrath, J.J.

    1983-06-01

    The 200 MWe Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station which started operation in 1966 was Canada's first commercial nuclear power plant. In 1977, after 11 years of operation, leakage of heavy water was detected and traced to the Moderator Piping System (pipe sizes 19 mm to 76 mm) located in a vault below the reactor where the radiation fields during shutdown ranged up to 5000 R/Hr. Inspection using remotely operated TV cameras showed that a 'U' bolt clamp support had worn through the wall of one pipe and resulted in the leakage and also that wear was occurring on other pipes. An extensive repair plan was subsequently undertaken in the form of a joint venture of the designer-owner Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and the builder-operator, Ontario Hydro. This paper describes the equipment and procedures used in remotely controlled repairs at Douglas Point

  6. Survey of heat-pipe application under nuclear environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuyuzaki, Noriyoshi; Saito, Takashi; Okamoto, Yoshizo; Hishida, Makoto; Negishi, Kanji.

    1986-11-01

    Heat pipes today are employed in a wide variety of special heat transfer applications including nuclear reactor. In this nuclear technology area in Japan, A headway speed of the heat pipe application technique is not so high because of safety confirmation and investigation under each developing step. Especially, the outline of space craft is a tendency to increase the size. Therefore, the power supply is also tendency to increase the outlet power and keep the long life. Under SP-100 project, the development of nuclear power supply system which power is 1400 - 1600 KW thermal and 100 KW electric power is steadily in progress. Many heat pipes are adopted for thermionic conversion and coolant system in order to construct more safety and light weight system for the project. This paper describes the survey of the heat pipe applications under the present and future condition for nuclear environment. (author)

  7. Review of industry efforts to manage pressurized water reactor feedwater nozzle, piping, and feedring cracking and wall thinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a review of nuclear industry efforts to manage thermal fatigue, flow-accelerated corrosion, and water hammer damage to pressurized water reactor (PWR) feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. The review includes an evaluation of design modifications, operating procedure changes, augmented inspection and monitoring programs, and mitigation, repair and replacement activities. Four actions were taken: (a) review of field experience to identify trends of operating events, (b) review of technical literature, (c) visits to PWR plants and a PWR vendor, and (d) solicitation of information from 8 other countries. Assessment of field experience is that licensees have apparently taken sufficient action to minimize feedwater nozzle cracking caused by thermal fatigue and wall thinning of J-tubes and feedwater piping. Specific industry actions to minimize the wall-thinning in feedrings and thermal sleeves were not found, but visual inspection and necessary repairs are being performed. Assessment of field experience indicates that licensees have taken sufficient action to minimize steam generator water hammer in both top-feed and preheat steam generators. Industry efforts to minimize multiple check valve failures that have allowed backflow of steam from a steam generator and have played a major role in several steam generator water hammer events were not evaluated. A major finding of this review is that analysis, inspection, monitoring, mitigation, and replacement techniques have been developed for managing thermal fatigue and flow-accelerated corrosion damage to feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. Adequate training and appropriate applications of these techniques would ensure effective management of this damage.

  8. Review of industry efforts to manage pressurized water reactor feedwater nozzle, piping, and feedring cracking and wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a review of nuclear industry efforts to manage thermal fatigue, flow-accelerated corrosion, and water hammer damage to pressurized water reactor (PWR) feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. The review includes an evaluation of design modifications, operating procedure changes, augmented inspection and monitoring programs, and mitigation, repair and replacement activities. Four actions were taken: (a) review of field experience to identify trends of operating events, (b) review of technical literature, (c) visits to PWR plants and a PWR vendor, and (d) solicitation of information from 8 other countries. Assessment of field experience is that licensees have apparently taken sufficient action to minimize feedwater nozzle cracking caused by thermal fatigue and wall thinning of J-tubes and feedwater piping. Specific industry actions to minimize the wall-thinning in feedrings and thermal sleeves were not found, but visual inspection and necessary repairs are being performed. Assessment of field experience indicates that licensees have taken sufficient action to minimize steam generator water hammer in both top-feed and preheat steam generators. Industry efforts to minimize multiple check valve failures that have allowed backflow of steam from a steam generator and have played a major role in several steam generator water hammer events were not evaluated. A major finding of this review is that analysis, inspection, monitoring, mitigation, and replacement techniques have been developed for managing thermal fatigue and flow-accelerated corrosion damage to feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. Adequate training and appropriate applications of these techniques would ensure effective management of this damage

  9. Study on seismic design margin based upon inelastic shaking test of the piping and support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Takami; Eto, Kazutoshi; Ikeda, Kazutoyo; Yoshii, Toshiaki; Kondo, Masami; Tai, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    In Japan, according to the revised Regulatory Guide for Aseismic Design of Nuclear Power Reactor Facilities, September 2006, criteria of design basis earthquakes of Nuclear Power Reactor Facilities become more severe. Then, evaluating seismic design margin took on a great importance and it has been profoundly discussed. Since seismic safety is one of the major key issues of nuclear power plant safety, it has been demonstrated that nuclear piping system possesses large safety margins by various durability test reports for piping in ultimate conditions. Though the knowledge of safety margin has been accumulated from these reports, there still remain some technical uncertainties about the phenomenon when both piping and support structures show inelastic behavior in extremely high seismic excitation level. In order to obtain the influences of inelastic behavior of the support structures to the whole piping system response when both piping and support structures show inelastic behavior, we examined seismic proving tests and we conducted simulation analyses for the piping system which focused on the inelastic behavior of the support to the whole piping system response. This paper introduces major results of the seismic shaking tests of the piping and support system and the simulation analyses of these tests. (author)

  10. Analysis of piping response to thermal and operational transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The reactor piping system is an extremely complex three-dimensional structure. Maintaining its structural integrity is essential to the safe operation of the reactor and the steam-supply system. In the safety analysis, various transient loads can be imposed on the piping which may cause plastic deformation and possible damage to the system, including those generated from hydrodynamic wave propagations, thermal and operational transients, as well as the seismic events. At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), a three-dimensional (3-D) piping code, SHAPS, aimed for short-duration transients due to wave propagation, has been developed. Since 1984, the development work has been shifted to the long-duration accidents originating from the thermal and operational transient. As a result, a new version of the code, SHAPS-2, is being established. This paper describes many features related to this later development. To analyze piping response generated from thermal and operational transients, a 3-D implicit finite element algorithm has been developed for calculating the hoop, flexural, axial, and torsional deformations induced by the thermomechanical loads. The analysis appropriately accounts for stresses arising from the temperature dependence of the elastic material properties, the thermal expansion of the materials, and the changes in the temperature-dependent yield surface. Thermal softening, failure, strain rate, creep, and stress ratching can also be considered

  11. Critical element development of standard components for pipe welding/cutting by CO{sub 2} laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Kakudate, Satoshi; Nakahira, Masataka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment] [and others

    1994-11-01

    In D-T burning reactors such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor(ITER), an internal access is inevitable for welding/cutting of cooling pipes of in-vessel components, because of spatial constraint due to a narrow port opening space. An internal-access pipe welding/cutting equipment is being developed in JAERI. Internal access is to approach through inside a pipe to a welding/cutting position, to use 10kW CO{sub 2} laser beam, and to be applicable to both welding and cutting with using a same processing head. A welding/cutting processing head with 10kW CO{sub 2} laser beam has been fabricated and the basic feasibility has been successfully demonstrated for studies of the internal-access pipe welding/cutting concept using 100-A stainless steel pipe with a thickness of 6.3mm. In this study, the optimum focal point of laser beam, laser power and traveling speed of the head have been investigated together with an adjusting mechanism of a relative distance between the head and the pipe wall. In addition, the radiation resistance of critical elements such as optical lens has been investigated. (author).

  12. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the improved TOPAZ-II power system using a heat pipe radiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenwen; Zhang, Dalin, E-mail: dlzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Tian, Wenxi; Qiu, Suizheng; Su, G.H.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The system thermal-hydraulic model of the improved space thermionic reactor is developed. • The temperature reactivity feedback effects of the moderator, UO2 fuel, electrodes and reflector are considered. • The alkali metal heat pipe radiator is modeled with the two dimensional heat pipe model. • The steady state and the start-up procedure of the system are analyzed. - Abstract: A system analysis code coupled with the heat pipe model is developed to analyze the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the improved TOPAZ-II reactor power system with a heat pipe radiator. The core thermal-hydraulic model, neutron physics model, and the coolant loop component models (including pump, volume accumulator, pipes and plenums) are established. The designed heat pipe radiator, which replaces the original pumped loop radiator, is also modeled, including two-dimensional heat pipe analysis model, fin model and coolant transport duct model. The system analysis code and the heat pipe model is coupled in the transport duct model. Steady state condition and start-up procedure of the improved TOPAZ-II system are calculated. The results show that the designed radiator can satisfy the waste heat rejection requirement of the improved power system. Meanwhile, the code can be used to obtained the thermal characteristics of the system transients such as the start-up process.

  13. Experimental observations of thermal mixing characteristics in T-junction piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mei-Shiue, E-mail: chenms@mx.nthu.edu.tw; Hsieh, Huai-En; Ferng, Yuh-Ming; Pei, Bau-Shi

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The effects of flow velocity ratio on thermal mixing phenomenon are the major parameters. • The flow velocity ratio (V{sub b}/V{sub m}) is greater than 13.6, reverse flow occurs. • The flow velocity ratio is greater than 13.7, a “good” mixing quality is achieved. - Abstract: The T-junction piping is frequently used in many industrial applications, including the nuclear plants. For a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) inject cold water into the primary loops if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) happens. Inappropriate mixing of the two streams with significant temperature different at a junction may cause strong thermal stresses to the downstream structures in the reactor vessel. The downstream structures may be damaged. This study is an experimental investigation into the thermal mixing effect occurring at a T-junction. A small-scale test facility was established to observe the mixing effect of flows with different temperature. Thermal mixing effect with different flow rates in the main and branch pipes are investigated by measuring the temperature distribution along the main pipe. In test condition I, we found that lower main pipe flow rate leads to better mixing effect with constant branch pipe flow rate. And in conditions II and III, higher injection flow velocity would enhance the turbulence effect which results in better thermal mixing. The results will be useful for applications with mixing fluids with different temperature.

  14. Evaluation on the thermal-hydraulic behavior of condensation pool and piping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Soon Bum; Lee, B. E.; Baek, S. C.; Joo, S. Y.; Lee, D. E.; Woo, S. W. [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    The In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST) has the function of heat sink, when steam is released from the pressurizer. The hydrodynamic behaviors occurring at the piping system and sparger are very complex because of the wide variety of operating conditions and the complex geometry. Hydrodynamic behavior when air is discharged through a sparger in a condensation pool is investigated using CFD techniques in the present study. The effect of pressure acting on the sparger header during both water and air discharge through the sparger is studied. In addition, pressure oscillation occurring in the IRWST during air discharge through the sparger is studied for a better understanding of mechanisms of air discharge md an advanced evaluation technology of reactor safety. Understanding of flow behaviors occurring m the various types of pipes when POSRV is opened are also very important because those are very complex and may damage the structures of reactor coolant system. The principle of shock tube has been applied to analyze flow behaviors occurring in the piping system and several important phenomena which can be used for the evaluation of nuclear reactor safety has been obtained.

  15. Piping benchmark problems for the ABB/CE System 80+ Standardized Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J.; Wang, Y.K.

    1994-07-01

    To satisfy the need for verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for the ABB/Combustion Engineering System 80+ Standardized Plant, three benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the System 80+ standard design. It will be required that the combined license licensees demonstrate that their solution to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set. The first System 80+ piping benchmark is a uniform support motion response spectrum solution for one section of the feedwater piping subjected to safe shutdown seismic loads. The second System 80+ piping benchmark is a time history solution for the feedwater piping subjected to the transient loading induced by a water hammer. The third System 80+ piping benchmark is a time history solution of the pressurizer surge line subjected to the accelerations induced by a main steam line pipe break. The System 80+ reactor is an advanced PWR type

  16. Technical report on the Piping Reliability Proving Tests at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) conducts Piping Reliability Proving Tests from 1975 to 1992 based upon the contracts between JAERI and Science and Technology Agency of Japan (STA) under the auspices of the special account law for electric power development promotion. The purpose of these tests are to prove the structural reliability of the primary cooling piping constituting a part of the pressure boundary in the light water reactor power plants. The tests with large experimental facilities had ended already in 1990. Presently piping reliability analysis by the probabilistic fracture mechanics method is being done. Until now annual reports concerning the proving tests were produced and submitted to STA, whereas this report summarizes the test results done during these 16 years. Objectives of the piping reliability proving tests are to prove that the primary piping of the light water reactor (1) be reliable throughout the service period, (2) have no possibility of rupture, (3) bring no detrimental influence on the surrounding instrumentations or equipments near the break location even if it ruptured suddenly. To attain these objectives (i) pipe fatigue tests, (ii) unstable pipe fracture tests, (iii) pipe rupture tests and also the analyses by computer codes were done. After carrying out these tests, it is verified that the piping is reliable throughout the service period. The authors of this report are T. Isozaki, K. Shibata, S. Ueda, R. Kurihara, K. Onizawa and A. Kohsaka. The parts they wrote are shown in contents. (author)

  17. In-situ rehabilitation cleans, lines, and renews pipe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munden, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses how, in the past five years, developments in coating and lining material technology have found their way into pipe line application and have yielded successful results. The thick film, high solids material often used to repair tanks, vessels and offshore structures has now been adapted for existing pipe lines. One of the most promising of these systems in successful service is an epoxy, high solids (95%) material originally developed for nuclear service as a lining for reactor containment vessels

  18. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 3: nonseismic stress analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, A.L.; Curtis, D.J.; Rybicki, E.F.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-08-01

    This volume describes the analyses used to evaluate stresses due to loads other than seismic excitations in the primary coolant loop piping of a selected four-loop pressurized water reactor nuclear power station. The results of the analyses are used as input to a simulation procedure for predicting the probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant system. Sources of stresses considered in the analyses are pressure, dead weight, thermal expansion, thermal gradients through the pipe wall, residual welding, and mechanical vibrations. Pressure and thermal transients arising from plant operations are best estimates and are based on actual plant operation records supplemented by specified plant design conditions. Stresses due to dead weight and thermal expansion are computed from a three-dimensional finite element model that uses a combination of pipe, truss, and beam elements to represent the reactor coolant loop piping, reactor pressure vessel, reactor coolant pumps, steam generators, and the pressurizer. Stresses due to pressure and thermal gradients are obtained by closed-form solutions. Calculations of residual stresses account for the actual heat impact, welding speed, weld preparation geometry, and pre- and post-heat treatments. Vibrational stresses due to pump operation are estimated by a dynamic analysis using existing measurements of pump vibrations

  19. Method of driving control rod in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osa, Hirotaka.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve security and safety of the reactor by reducing reactor output automatically and quickly when circulation of cooling water is stopped. Constitution: When the circulating pump is under operation, fluid pressure in the discharge pipe is transferred to the fluid room of fluid pressure cylinder via the control rod drive pipe and lift up the piston, and then the control rod is drawn out of the reactor core. When the circulating pump is lowered in its functions, discharge pipe fluid pressure decreases, fluid pressure in the fluid room decreases, and with less force of piston movement, the control rod gets lowered by its own weight. At this time, the blocked state of the opening by the piston is released, fluid flows into the room. Lowering of pressure and the control rod is promoted by transferring out fluid below the piston in the fluid room to the upper part of the piston via a small gap when the control rod falls by gravity. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. Device for measuring the flow rate of a fluid moving through a pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barge, Gilles; Bouchard, Patrick; Chaix, J.E.; Rigaud, J.L.; Vivaldi, Andre.

    1981-01-01

    A device is described for measuring the flow rate, in particular through large section pipes, such as those found in water type nuclear reactors, thermal power stations and gas loops. This device includes a plate drilled with holes crossed by a fluid and held in the pipe by deformable components on which are secured strain gauges forming the detecting element of an electronic device for processing the signal emitted by the gauges. This device can be employed, for instance, for measuring the flow rate of a coolant in the primary system of a nuclear reactor [fr

  1. CFD analysis of a Sphere-Packed Pipe for potential application in the molten salt blanket system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazififard, Mohammad [Kashan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Energy Systems; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and PHILOSOPHIA

    2016-08-15

    This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis aims to evaluate the flow structures and heat transfer characteristics in Sphere Packed Pipe (SPP) for potential application in fusion reactors. The SPP consists of metal spheres which are packed in a pipe and disturb the flow inside of the pipe to boost the heat transfer. One of the potential applications of SPP is using it at the first wall of Force Free Helical Reactors (FFHR). The numerical model has improved on the numerical model, gaps between pebbles and channel wall, and turbulent model compared to previous numerical studies. The standard κε- model, Omega Reynolds stress model, the Shear Stress Transport (SST) model and κε EARSM/BSL have been applied as turbulence model to examine the effect of turbulence model on validation of numerical results. The present numerical model can be used in the design of the blanket of fusion reactor.

  2. Refueling system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koschkin, J.N.; Ordynskij, G.V.; Schchijan, C.G.; Schapkin, A.F.; Fadeev, A.I.; Laptev, F.V.; Batjukov, V.I.; Korolkov, K.I.; Borodin, I.V.; Tschernomordik, E.N.

    1979-01-01

    With the refueling system fuel elements are transferred from the intermediate distributing chamber within the fast breeder reactor vessel to the storage tanks for new and irradiated fuel elements outside of the reactor vessel and vice versa. It consists of a hermetic chamber, filled with inert gas, within which the refueling machine, having got a vertical swing pipe, is placed. On the swing pipe there is mounted by means of a bracket a hanging support tube for a tube manipulator that can be moved over the openings to the fuel elements. At the end of the tube manipulator there is a gripping device whose drive mechanism is arranged within the support tube. The swing pipe is moved by means of a drive mechanism outside of the chamber. (DG) [de

  3. Calculation of dynamic hydraulic forces in nuclear plant piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, D.K.

    1982-01-01

    A computer code was developed as one of the tools needed for analysis of piping dynamic loading on nuclear power plant high energy piping systems, including reactor safety and relief value upstream and discharge piping systems. The code calculates the transient hydraulic data and dynamic forces within the one-dimensional system, caused by a pipe rupture or sudden value motion, using a fixed space and varying time grid-method of characteristics. Subcooled, superheated, homogeneous two-phase and transition flow regimes are considered. A non-equilibrium effect is also considered in computing the fluid specific volume and fluid local sonic velocity in the two-phase mixture. Various hydraulic components such as a spring loaded or power operated value, enlarger, orifice, pressurized tank, multiple pipe junction (tee), etc. are considered as boundary conditions. Comparisons of calculated results with available experimental data shows a good agreement. (Author)

  4. Leak detector for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Mikio.

    1991-01-01

    A branched pipe is disposed to a leak off pipeline led from a flange surface which connects the main body and the upper lid of a reactor pressure vessel. An exhaust pump is disposed to the branched pipe and a moisture gage is disposed on the side of the exhaustion and a dry air supplier is connected to the branched pipe. Upon conducting a pressure-proof leak test for the reactor pressure vessel, the exhaust pump is operated and an electromagnet valve disposed at the upstream of the dry air supplier is opened and closed repeatedly. The humidity of air sucked by the exhaust pump is detected by the moisture gage. If leaks should be caused in the joining surface of the flange, leaked water is diffused as steams. Accordingly, occurrence of leak can be detected instantly based on the comparison with the moisture level of the dry air as a standard. In this way, a leak test can be conducted reliably in a short period of time with no change of for the reactor pressure container itself. (I.N.)

  5. FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tsugio.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure the thermal integrity of a reactor vessel in FBR type reactors by preventing sodium vapors or the likes from intruding into a shielding chamber and avoiding spontaneous convection thereof. Constitution: There are provided a shielding plug for shielding the upper opening of a reactor container, an annular thermal member disposed to the circumferential side in the container, a shielding member for shielding upper end of the shielding chamber and a plurality of convection preventive plates suspended from the thermal member into the shielding chamber, and the shielding chamber is communicated by way of the relatively low temperature portion of the container with a gas communication pipe. That is, by closing the upper end of the shielding chamber with the shielding member, coolant vapors, etc. can be prevented from intruding into the shielding chamber. Further, the convection preventive plates prevent the occurrence of spontaneous convection in the shielding chamber. Further, the gas communication pipe absorbs the expansion and contraction of gases in the shielding chamber to effectively prevent the deformation or the like for each of the structural materials. In this way, the thermal integrity of the reactor container can surely be maintained. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. Pipe Explorer{trademark} surveying system. Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Chicago Operations Office and the DOE`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. The Pipe Explorer{trademark} system was developed by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA), Albuquerque, NM as a deployment method for transporting a variety of survey tools into pipes and ducts. Tools available for use with the system include alpha, beta and gamma radiation detectors; video cameras; and pipe locator beacons. Different versions of this technology have been demonstrated at three other sites; results of these demonstrations are provided in an earlier Innovative Technology Summary Report. As part of a D and D project, characterization radiological contamination inside piping systems is necessary before pipes can be recycled, remediated or disposed. This is usually done manually by surveying over the outside of the piping only, with limited effectiveness and risk of worker exposure. The pipe must be accessible to workers, and embedded pipes in concrete or in the ground would have to be excavated at high cost and risk of exposure to workers. The advantage of the Pipe Explorer is its ability to perform in-situ characterization of pipe internals.

  7. Qualification of PHT piping of Indian 500 MW PHWR for LBB, using R-6 method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, Rohit; Bhasin, V.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    1997-01-01

    This document discusses the qualification of straight pipe portion of the primary heat transport (PHT) piping of Indian 500 MWe pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) for leak before break (LBB). The evaluation is done using R-6 [1] method. The results presented here are: the safety margins which exist on straight pipe components of main PHT piping of 500 MWe, under leakage size crack (LSC) and design basis accident loads; the sensitivity of safety margins with respect to different analysis parameters and the qualification of PHT piping for LBB based on criterion given by NUREG-1061 [2] and TECDOC-774 [3]. (author)

  8. Impact of inservice inspection on the reliability of nuclear piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, H.H.

    1983-12-01

    The reliability of nuclear piping is a function of piping quality as fabricated, service loadings and environments, plus programs of continuing inspection during operation. This report presents the results of a study of the impact of inservice inspection (ISI) programs on the reliability of specific nuclear piping systems that have actually failed in service. Two major factors are considered in the ISI programs: one is the capability of detecting flaws; the other is the frequency of performing ISI. A probabilistic fracture mechanics model issued to estimate the reliability of two nuclear piping lines over the plant life as functions of the ISI programs. Examples chosen for the study are the PWR feedwater steam generator nozzle cracking incident and the BWR recirculation reactor vessel nozzle safe-end cracking incident

  9. Primary pipe rupture accident analysis for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, D.C.; Bari, R.A.

    1976-04-01

    In this report, the thermal transient response of the CRBR to a severe primary coolant flow perturbation, initiated by a rupture of the primary heat transport system piping, is analyzed. This hypothetical accident is studied under the further assumption that the plant protection system does function according to current design descriptions for the CRBR. Although a brief discussion of an unprotected (no scram) pipe rupture accident is presented, the major emphasis of the present report is on the protected accident.

  10. Primary pipe rupture accident analysis for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, D.C.; Bari, R.A.

    1976-04-01

    In this report, the thermal transient response of the CRBR to a severe primary coolant flow perturbation, initiated by a rupture of the primary heat transport system piping, is analyzed. This hypothetical accident is studied under the further assumption that the plant protection system does function according to current design descriptions for the CRBR. Although a brief discussion of an unprotected (no scram) pipe rupture accident is presented, the major emphasis of the present report is on the protected accident

  11. Solar chemical heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, M.; Levitan, R.; Rosin, H.; Rubin, R.

    1991-08-01

    The performance of a solar chemical heat pipe was studied using CO 2 reforming of methane as a vehicle for storage and transport of solar energy. The endothermic reforming reaction was carried out in an Inconel reactor, packed with a Rh catalyst. The reactor was suspended in an insulated box receiver which was placed in the focal plane of the Schaeffer Solar Furnace of the Weizman Institute of Science. The exothermic methanation reaction was run in a 6-stage adiabatic reactor filled with the same Rh catalyst. Conversions of over 80% were achieved for both reactions. In the closed loop mode the products from the reformer and from the metanator were compressed into separate storage tanks. The two reactions were run either separately or 'on-line'. The complete process was repeated for over 60 cycles. The overall performance of the closed loop was quite satisfactory and scale-up work is in progress in the Solar Tower. (authors). 35 refs., 2 figs

  12. Generic safety evaluation report regarding integrity of BWR scram system piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    Safety concerns associated with postulated pipe breaks in the boiling water reactor (BWR) scram system were identified during the staff's continuing investigation of the Browns Ferry Unit 3 control rod partial insertion failure on June 28, 1980. This report includes an evaluation of the licensing basis for the BWR scram discharge volume (SDV) piping and an assessment of the potential for the SDV piping to fail while in service. A discussion of the means available for mitigation an unlikely SDV system failure is provided. Generic recommendations are made to improve mitigation capability and ensure that system integrity is maintained in service

  13. Evaluation of piping heat transfer, piping flow regimes, and steam generator heat transfer for the Semiscale Mod-1 isothermal tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, R.T.

    1975-08-01

    Selected experimental data pertinent to piping heat transfer, transient fluid flow regimes, and steam generator heat transfer obtained during the Semiscale Mod-1 isothermal blowdown test series (Test Series 1) are analyzed. The tests in this first test series were designed to provide counterparts to the LOFT nonnuclear experiments. The data from the Semiscale Mod-1 intact and broken loop piping are evaluated to determine the surface heat flux and average heat transfer coefficients effective during the blowdown transient and compared with well known heat transfer correlations used in the RELAP4 computer program. Flow regimes in horizontal pipe sections are calculated and compared with data obtained from horizontal and vertical densitometers and with an existing steady state flow map. Effects of steam generator heat transfer are evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. The Semiscale Mod-1 data and the analysis presented in this report are valuable for evaluating the adequacy and improving the predictive capability of analytical models developed to predict system response to piping heat transfer, piping flow regimes, and steam generator heat transfer during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). 16 references. (auth)

  14. A simplified dynamic analysis for reactor piping systems under blowdown conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    In the design of pipelines in a nuclear power plant for blowdown conditions, is it customary to conduct dynamic analysis of the piping system to obtain the responses and the resulting stresses. Calculations are repeated for each design modification in piping geometry or supporting system until the design codes are met. The numerical calculations are, in general, very costly and time consuming. Until now, there have been no simple means for calculating the dynamic responses for the design. The proposed method reduces the dynamic calculation to a quasi-static one, and can be beneficially used for the preliminary design. The method is followed by a complete dynamical analysis to improve the final results. The new formulations greatly simplify the numerical computation and provide design guides. When used to design a given piping system, the method saved approximately one order of magnitude of computer time. The approach can also be used for other types of structures

  15. Effect of heat treatment on carbon steel pipe welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Harun.

    1987-01-01

    The heat treatment to improve the altered properties of carbon steel pipe welds is described. Pipe critical components in oil, gasification and nuclear reactor plants require adequate room temperature toughness and high strength at both room and moderately elevated temperatures. Microstructure and microhardness across the welds were changed markedly by the welding process and heat treatment. The presentation of hardness fluctuation in the welds can produce premature failure. A number of heat treatments are suggested to improve the properties of the welds. (author) 8 figs., 5 refs

  16. Structural Health Monitoring of Piping in Nuclear Power Plants - A Review of Efficiency of Existing Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2011-05-01

    In the first part of the report, we review various efforts that have been recently performed in the USA in the field of reactor health monitoring. They were carried out by different organizations and they addressed different issues related to the safety of nuclear reactors. Among other aspects, we present technical issues related to the design of a self-diagnostic monitoring system for the next generation of nuclear reactors. We also give a brief review of the international experience of such systems in today's reactors. In the second part of the report we focus on long range ultrasonic techniques that can be used for monitoring piping in nuclear reactors. Common strategy used in the Swedish nuclear plants is leak before break (LBB), which relies on monitoring leaks from the pipelines as indications of possible pipe break. Significant parts of piping systems are partly or entirely inaccessible for the NDE inspectors, which complicates the use of proactive strategies. One solution to the problem could be implementing monitoring systems capable of monitoring pipelines over a long range. The method, which has shown much promise in such applications is the UT based on guided waves (GW) referred to as long range ultrasound testing (LRUT). In the report we give a brief review of the GW theory followed by the presentation the commercial GW instruments and transducers designed for the LRUT of piping. We also present examples of the baseline based systems using permanently installed transducers. In the final part we report capacity tests of the LRUT instruments performed in collaboration with two different manufactures

  17. A numerical analysis on thermal stratification phenomenon in the SCS piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Chu; Park, Man Heung; Youm, Hag Ki; Lee, Sun Ki; Kim, Tae Ryong

    2003-01-01

    A numerical study is performed to estimate on an unsteady thermal stratification phenomenon in the Shutdown Cooling System(SCS) piping branched off the Reactor Coolant System(RCS) piping of Nuclear Power Plant. In the results, turbulent penetration reaches to the 1 st isolation valve. At 500sec, the maximum temperature difference between top and bottom inner wall in piping is observed at the starting point of horizontal piping passing elbow. The temperature of coolant in the rear side of the 1 st isolation valve disk is very slowly increased and the inflection point in temperature difference curve for time is observed at 2700sec. At the beginning of turbulent penetration from RCS piping, the fast inflow generates the higher temperature for the inner wall than the outer wall in the SCS piping. In the case the hot-leg injection piping and the drain piping are connected to the SCS piping, the effect of thermal stratification in the SCS piping is decreased due to an increase of heat loss compared with no connection case. The hot-leg injection piping affected by turbulent penetration from the SCS piping has a severe temperature difference that exceeds criterion temperature stated in reference. But the drain piping located in the rear compared with the hot-leg injection piping shows a tiny temperature difference. In a viewpoint of designer, for the purpose of decreasing the thermal stratification effect, it is necessary to increase the length of vertical piping in the SCS piping, and to move the position of the hot-leg injection piping backward

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the nuclear reactor availability by enabling to continuously exchange fuels in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region during operation. Constitution: A control rod is withdrawn to the midway of a highly enriched uranium region by means of control rod drives and the highly enriched uranium region is burnt to maintain the nuclear reactor always at a critical state. At the same time, fresh uranium-slightly enriched uranium is continuously supplied gravitationally from a fresh fuel reservoir through fuel reservoir to each of fuel pipes in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region. Then, spent fuels reduced with the reactivity by the burn up are successively taken out from the bottom of each of the fuel pipes through an exit duct and a solenoid valve to the inside of a spent fuel reservoir and the burn up in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region is conducted continuously. (Kawakami, Y.)

  19. Probabilistic assessment of critically flawed LMFBR PHTS piping elbows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balkey, K.R.; Wallace, I.T.; Vaurio, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    One of the important functions of the Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) of a large Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) plant is to contain the circulating radioactive sodium in components and piping routed through inerted areas within the containment building. A significant possible failure mode of this vital system is the development of cracks in the piping components. This paper presents results from the probabilistic assessment of postulated flaws in the most-critical piping elbow of each piping leg. The criticality of calculated maximum sized flaws is assessed against an estimated material fracture toughness to determine safety factors and failure probability estimates using stress-strength interference theory. Subsequently, a different approach is also employed in which the randomness of the initial flaw size and loading are more-rigorously taken into account. This latter approach yields much smaller probability of failure values when compared to the stress-strength interference analysis results

  20. Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in light water reactors (LWRs) are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or SCC cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Similar cracking has also occurred in upper shell-to-transition cone girth welds in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator vessels. Another concern is failure of reactor-core internal components after accumulation of relatively high fluence, which has occurred in both BWRs and PWRs. Research during the past year focused on (1) fatigue and SCC of ferritic steels used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated BWR water in SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS, and (3) irradiation-assisted SCC in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs. Failure after accumulation of relatively high fluence has been attributed to radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of elements such as Si, P, Ni, and Cr. This document provides a summary of research progress in these areas

  1. Performance correlations for high temperature potassium heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Potassium heat pipes designed for operation at a nominal temperature of 775K have been developed for use in a heat pipe cooled reactor design. The heat pipes operate in a gravity assist mode with a maximum required power throughput of approximately 16 kW per heat pipe. Based on a series of sub-scale experiments with 2.12 and 3.2 cm diameter heat pipes the prototypic heat pipe diameter was set at 5.7 cm with a simple knurled wall wick used in the interests of mechanical simplicity. The performance levels required for this design had been demonstrated in prior work with gutter assisted wicks and emphasis in the present work was on the attainment of similar performance with a simplified wick structure. The wick structure used in the experiment consisted of a pattern of knurled grooves in the internal wall of the heat pipe. The knurl depth required for the planned heat pipe performance was determined by scaling of wick characteristic data from the sub-scale tests. These tests indicated that the maximum performance limits of the test heat pipes did not follow normal entrainment limit predictions for textured wall gravity assist heat pipes. Test data was therefore scaled to the prototype design based on the assumption that the performance was controlled by an entrainment parameter based on the liquid flow depth in the groove structure. This correlation provided a reasonable fit to the sub-scale test data and was used in scale up of the design from the 8.0 cm 2 cross section of the largest sub-scale heat pipe to the 25.5 cm 2 cross section prototype. Correlation of the model predictions with test data from the prototype is discussed

  2. The determination of neutron energy spectrum in reactor core C1 of reactor VR-1 Sparrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vins, M. [Department of Nuclear Reactors, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: vinsmiro@seznam.cz

    2008-07-15

    This contribution overviews neutron spectrum measurement, which was done on training reactor VR-1 Sparrow with a new nuclear fuel. Former nuclear fuel IRT-3M was changed for current nuclear fuel IRT-4M with lower enrichment of 235U (enrichment was reduced from former 36% to 20%) in terms of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program. Neutron spectrum measurement was obtained by irradiation of activation foils at the end of pipe of rabit system and consecutive deconvolution of obtained saturated activities. Deconvolution was performed by computer iterative code SAND-II with 620 groups' structure. All gamma measurements were performed on Canberra HPGe. Activation foils were chosen according physical and nuclear parameters from the set of certificated foils. The Resulting differential flux at the end of pipe of rabit system agreed well with typical spectrum of light water reactor. Measurement of neutron spectrum has brought better knowledge about new reactor core C1 and improved methodology of activation measurement. (author)

  3. Piping inspection activities at the EPRI NDE Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammirato, F.V.

    1988-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the primary system of boiling water reactors (BWRs) has been a major reliability issue in recent years. BWR pipe cracking was first reported in 1974 with a low percentage of only small-diameter lines affected. However, with increased plant operating time, the number of reported cracking incidents has risen significantly and in 1982 and 1983 included the large-diameter recirculation lines. With the advent of cracking in large-diameter piping, innovative repair remedies were developed, such as weld overlay for repair (WOR). Although these remedies are effective in extending the service life of piping, they also present challenging NDE problems. The EPRI program for improving piping examination has aimed at systematically resolving the difficulties by optimizing techniques and procedures as well as by developing field-qualified automated examination equipment. The EPRI NDE Center's role has been the evaluation and transfer of the technology necessary to address the current piping examination problems of the nuclear utility industry. These activities normally include the following: technology assessment and improvement; validation through demonstrations and field trials; technology transfer reports, workshops, training, and qualification testing; and acquisition of relevant samples. The activities of the NDE Center are discussed

  4. Arrangement to reduce the failure frequency of heat condensate pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liskow, E.; Apelt, W.; Krause, W.; Meisel, L.

    1988-01-01

    The arrangement of throttling devices in heat condensate pipes of NPP with WWER-440 type reactors aims at reducing their failure frequency, ensuring an energetically favourable operation, and enhancing the availability and safety of NPP units

  5. Evaluation of residual stresses for the multipass welds of 316L stainless steel pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Joo, Y. S.; Lee, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    It is necessary to evaluate the influence of the residual stress and distortion in the design and fabrication of welded structure and the sound welded structure can be maintained by this consideration. Multipass welds of the 316L stainless steel have been widely employed in the pipes of Liquid Metal Reactor. In this study, the residual stresses in the 316L stainless steel pipe welds were calculated by the finite element method using ANSYS code. Also, the residual stresses both on the surface and in the interior of the thickness were measured by HRPD(High Resolution Powder Diffractometer) instrumented in HANARO Reactor. The residual stresses were measured for each 18 points in small(t/d=0.075) and large pipe specimens (t/d=0.034). The experimental and calculated results were compared and the characteristics of the distribution of the residual stress discussed

  6. Assessment of value-impact associated with the elimination of postulated pipe ruptures from the design basis for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1985-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is proposing to amend the regulations that currently require that the design basis for nuclear power plants include the postulation of dynamic effects from loss of coolant accidents up to and including the double-ended rupture of the largest pipe in the reactor coolant system. Proposed modifications would allow analyses to serve as a sufficient basis for excluding dynamic effects, including but not necessarily limited to pipe whip and jet impingement, associated with specific pipe ruptures. Only dynamic effects would be impacted; current design requirements for containment sizing and discharge capacity of emergency core cooling systems would remain unchanged. This report presents a detailed analysis of value-impact associated with the proposed amendment for PWR reactor coolant loop piping and for BWR recirculation loop piping. The effect of extending application of the proposed rule change to other piping systems is also assessed in a less quantitative manner

  7. State-of-practice review of ultrasonic in-service inspection of Class I system piping in commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, C.J.; Becker, F.L.

    1982-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a survey to determine the state of practice of ultrasonic in-service inspection of primary system piping in light water reactors. Personnel at four utilities, five inspection organizations, and three domestic reactor manufacturers were interviewed. The intention of the study was to provide a better understanding of the actual practices employed in in-service inspection of primary system piping and of the difficulties encountered

  8. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Hirohide; Otonari, Jun-ichiro; Tozaki, Yuka.

    1993-01-01

    Partition walls are disposed between a reactor pressure vessel and a suppression chamber to separate a dry well to an upper portion and a lower portion. A communication pipe is disposed to the partition walls. One end of the communication pipe is opened in an upper portion of the dry well at a position higher than a hole disposed to a bent tube of the suppression chamber. When coolants overflow from a depressurization valve by an erroneous operation of an emergency reactor core cooling device, the coolants accumulate in the upper portion of the dry well. When the pipeline is ruptured at the upper portion of the pressure vessel, only the inside of the pressure vessel and the upper portion of the dry well are submerged in water. In this case, the water level of the coolants does not elevate to the opening of the commuication pipe but they flow into the suppression chamber from the hole disposed to the bent tube. Since the coolants do not flow out to the lower portion of the dry well, important equipments such as control rod drives disposed at the lower portion of the dry wall can be prevented from submerging in water. (I.N.)

  9. Savannah River Site reactor hardware design modification study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, J.E.

    1990-03-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the merits of proposed design modifications to the SRS reactors. The evaluation was based on the responses calculated by the RELAP5 systems code to double-ended guillotine break loss-of-coolant-accidents (DEGB LOCAs). The three concepts evaluated were (a) elevated plenum inlet piping with a guard vessel and clamshell enclosures, (b) closure of both rotovalves in the affected loop, and (c) closure of the pump suction valve in the affected loop. Each concept included a fast reactor shutdown (to 65% power in 100 ms) and a 2-s ac pump trip. For the elevated piping design, system recovery was predicted for breaks in the plenum inlet or pump suction piping; response to the pump discharge break location did not show improvement compared to the present system configuration. The rotovalve closure design improved system response to plenum inlet or pump discharge breaks; recovery was not predicted for pump suction breaks. The pump suction valve closure design demonstrated system recovery for all break locations downstream of the valve. A combination of features is recommended to ensure liquid inventory recovery for all break locations. The elevated piping design performance during pump discharge breaks would be improved with addition of a dc pump trip in the affected loop. Valve closure design performance for a break location in the short section of piping between the reactor concrete shield and the pump suction valve would benefit from the clamshell enclosing that section of piping. 12 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  10. The brief introduction to decommissioning of nuclear reactor projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shixin

    1991-01-01

    The basic concept and procedure of the decommissioning of nuclear reactor project and the three stages of decommissioning defined by IAEA are introduced. The main work of decommissioning of nuclear reactor are as following: (1) the documentary and technological preparation; (2) the site preparation of decommissioning project; (3) the dismantling of equipment piping system and components; (4) the decontamination of the piping system before and after decomminssioning; (5) the storage and disposal of the operational and decommissioning waste

  11. The brief introduction to decommissioning of nuclear reactor projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shixin, Zhao [Beijing Inst. of Nuclear Engineering (China)

    1991-08-01

    The basic concept and procedure of the decommissioning of nuclear reactor project and the three stages of decommissioning defined by IAEA are introduced. The main work of decommissioning of nuclear reactor are as following: (1) the documentary and technological preparation; (2) the site preparation of decommissioning project; (3) the dismantling of equipment piping system and components; (4) the decontamination of the piping system before and after decomminssioning; (5) the storage and disposal of the operational and decommissioning waste.

  12. Users manual on database of the Piping Reliability Proving Tests at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute(JAERI) conducted Piping Reliability Proving Tests from 1975 to 1992 based upon the contracts between JAERI and Science and Technology Agency of Japan under the auspices of the special account law for electric power development promotion. The purposes of those tests are to prove the structural reliability of the primary cooling piping constituting a part of the pressure boundary in the water reactor power plants. The tests with large experimental facilities had ended already in 1990. After that piping reliability analysis by the probabilistic method followed until 1992. This report describes the users manual on databases about the test results using the large experimental facilities. Objectives of the piping reliability proving tests are to prove that the primary piping of the water reactor (1) be reliable throughout the service period, (2) have no possibility of rupture, (3) bring no detrimental influence on the surrounding instrumentations or equipments near the break location. The research activities using large scale piping test facilities are described. The present report does the database about the test results pairing the former report. With these two reports, all the feature of Piping Reliability Proving Tests is made clear. Briefings of the tests are described also written in Japanese or English. (author)

  13. Bulk temperature measurement in thermally striped pipe flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemure, N.; Olvera, J.R.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1995-12-01

    The hot leg flows in some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designs have a temperature distribution across the pipe cross-section. This condition is often referred to as a thermally striped flow. Here, the bulk temperature measurement of pipe flows with thermal striping is explored. An experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the external surface of the pipe to estimate the bulk temperature of the flow. Simple mixing models are used to characterize the development of the temperature profile in the flow. Simple averaging techniques and Backward Propagating Neural Net are used to predict bulk temperature from the external temperature measurements. Accurate bulk temperatures can be predicted. However, some temperature distributions in the flow effectively mask the bulk temperature from the wall and cause significant error in the bulk temperature predicted using this technique

  14. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of nuclear reactor primary coolant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffell, B.F. Jr.; Macek, R.W.; Thompson, T.R.; Lippert, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    The ADINA computer code is utilized to perform mechanical response analysis of pressurized reactor primary coolant systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) loadings. Specifically, three plant analyses are performed utilizing the geometric and material nonlinear analysis capabilities of ADINA. Each reactor system finite element model represents the reactor vessel and internals, piping, major components, and component supports in a single coupled model. Material and geometric nonlinear capabilities of the beam and truss elements are employed in the formulation of each finite element model. Loadings applied to each plant for LOCA dynamic analysis include steady-state pressure, dead weight, strain energy release, transient piping hydraulic forces, and reactor vessel cavity pressurization. Representative results are presented with some suggestions for consideration in future ADINA code development

  15. The development and manufacture of size for size feeder pipe for feeder replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legate, G.; Schreiter, D.; Townley, N.

    2008-01-01

    The recently recognised problem of feeder pipe thinning created a unique sourcing problem. Operators require relatively small quantities of nuclear class 1 seamless feeder pipe for such replacement which prior to the introduction of this product in 2006 was not available. It was desired that the pipe be produced at the exact size of the pipe currently in use at the specific reactor site (feeder pipe size varies from site to site). Secondly the pipe had to be made in conformance to the original code year of issue and to conform to the intent of the original material specifications. Finally a supply strategy had to be implemented allowing for timely manufacture of replacement piping. This presentation will report upon how replacement size for size feeder tube was developed and is currently manufactured at Nu-Tech Precision Metals. The paper will also detail the current supply strategy to ensure timely manufacture of the product.

  16. Evaluation of KALIMER IHTS piping using French RCC-MR code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Kim, J. B.; Lee, J. H.

    2001-12-01

    In the present report, the evaluation of design integrity for the liquid metal reactor(LMR) of KALIMER IHTS(intermediate heat transport system) piping according to the French design guideline of RCC-MR RC3600 developed for secondary piping of LMR and the evaluation procedure was presented. The evaluation results showed that the results by the simple RC-3600 procedure of design by formula were more conservative than those of ASME section III subsection NH of the design by analysis for the class I structural components

  17. Radioactive recontamination on mechanically polished piping at Shimane-1 Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, K.; Komoto, I.; Imamura, K.; Kataoka, I.; Uchida, S.

    1998-01-01

    In a series of preventive maintenance tasks for an aging plant, recirculation pipes of Shimane-1 NPP have been replaced by newly fabricated type 316 NG stainless steel pipes. Suppression of shutdown dose rate caused by 60 Co recontamination on the newly replaced piping was one of the major concerns in the recirculation pipe replacement. In order to suppress the shutdown dose rate, control of the 60 Co deposition rate coefficient as well as 60 Co radioactivity in the reactor water are essential. The deposition rate coefficient depends on surface roughness. The coefficient is suppressed by reduction of the effective surface area of pipes through mechanical polishing. Then the inner surface of the pipes was polished mechanically to reduce roughness prior to application in the plant. After measuring and evaluating radioactive recontamination, it was estimated that deposited amounts of radioactive corrosion products on the pipe inner surface would reach the saturated value in a few years, and would not exceed the level before replacement unless water chemistry is degraded. (author)

  18. Failure behaviour of a piping system with a circumferentially orientated flaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkola, T.P.J.; Diem, H.; Blind, D.; Hunger, H.

    1987-01-01

    The experiments were conducted on the recently installed feedwater line of the HDR reactor in Kahl. The investigations were focused on analysing both the crack propagation of a circumferentially flowed pipe under the influence of corrosion and cyclic load, together with the pipeline's subsequent failure behaviour. The experimental conditions were selected in a manner representing those which can, for example, prevait during start-up or shut-down of reactor. To this aim, the pipes were internally stressed with high pressure and temperature oxygenic water in conjunction with an externally applied bending moment. The investigations are supplemented by elastic-plastic triaxial finite element (FE) calculations for various assumed crack configurations, both prior to and following the experiments, thus granting a fracture-mechanical assessment of the structural behaviour. (orig./DG) [de

  19. Wall thinning trend analyses for secondary side piping of Korean NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, K.M.; Jin, T.E.; Lee, S.H.; Jeon, S.C.

    2003-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, nuclear power plants in Korea have experienced wall thinning, leaks, and ruptures of secondary side piping caused by flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC). The pipe failures have increased as operating time progresses. In order to prevent the FAC-induced pipe failures and to develop an effective FAC management strategy, KEPRI and KOPEC have conducted a study for developing systematic FAC management technology for secondary side piping of all Korean nuclear power plants. As a part of the study, FAC analyses were performed using the CHECWORKS code. The analysis results were used to select components for inspection and to determine inspection intervals on each nuclear power plant. This paper describes the introduction of the FAC analysis method and the wall thinning trend analysis results by reactor type, system, and water treatment amine. This paper also represents the site application feasibility for secondary side piping management. The site application feasibility of the analysis results was proven by comparisons of predicted and measured wear rates. (author)

  20. Phase 2 of the International Piping Integrity Research Group programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlaston, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    The results of phase 1 of the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-1) programme have been widely reported. The significance of the results is reviewed briefly, in order to put the phase 2 programme into perspective. The success of phase 1 led the participants to consider further development and validation of pipe and pipe component fracture analysis technology as part of another international group programme (IPIRG-2). The benefits of combined funding and of the technical exchanges and interactions are considered to be of significant advantage and value. The phase 2 programme has been designed with the overall objective of developing and experimentally validating methods of predicting the fracture behaviour of nuclear reactor safety-related piping, to both normal operating and accident loads. The programme will add to the engineering estimation analysis methods that have been developed for straight pipes. The pipe system tests will expand the database to include seismic loadings and flaws in fittings, such as bends, elbows and tees, as well as ''short'' cracks. The results will be used to validate further the analytical methods, expand the capability to make fittings and extend the quasi-static results for the USNRC's new programme on short cracks in piping and piping welds. The IPIRG-2 programme is described to provide a clear understanding of the content, strategy, potential benefits and likely significance of the work. ((orig.))

  1. Single-earthquake design for piping systems in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, D.

    1993-01-01

    Appendix A to Part 100 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 100) requires, in part, that all structures, systems, and components of the nuclear power plant necessary for continued operation without undue risk to the health and safety of the public shall be designed to remain functional and within applicable stress and deformation limits when subject to an operating basis earthquake (OBE). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is proposing changes to Appendix A to Part 100 to redefine the OBE at a level such that its purpose can be satisfied without the need to perform explicit response analyses. Consequently, only the safe-shutdown earthquake (SSE) would be required for the seismic design of safety-related structures, systems and components. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the proposed changes to existing seismic design criteria that the NRC staff has found acceptable for implementing the proposed rule change in the design of safety-related piping systems in the advanced light water reactor (ALWR) lead plant. These criteria apply only to the ALWR lead plant design and are not intended to replace the seismic design criteria approved by the Commission in the licensing bases of currently operating facilities. Although the guidelines described herein have been proposed for use as a pilot program for implementing the proposed rule change specifically for the ALWR lead plant, the NRC staff expects that these guidelines will also be applied to other ALWRs

  2. Application of risk-informed approaches for optimization of control of WWER 1000 pipe metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolykhanov, Viktork; Komarov, Yuriy; Skalozubov, Volodymyr; Kovryzhkin, Yuriy

    2007-01-01

    According to Ukrainian regulations, the periodic control of pipes by non-destructive methods has to be performed on a precise basis depending on the degree of influence of a system on the nuclear power plant safety. In order to improve control programs of pipes metal, risk-informed approaches have been introduced. The characteristics of a pipe (or part of a pipe) has been assessed according 4 aspects: the influence on reactor safety, the influence on the reliability of power generation, the influence on residual resource (the resource is worked-out or not), and the absence/presence of defects in the pipe. The above assessment for a pipe or part of a pipe leads to one of the 4 levels of operational metal controls. Level 0: metal control is not carried out (the pipe is fixed when a failure appears), level 1: partial metal controls are performed, level 2: operational metal controls are performed, and level 3: extended metal controls are performed. This new approach has been applied to the pipes involved in the high pressure emergency core cooling system of the VVER-1000

  3. Savannah River Site reactor hardware design modification study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the merits of proposed design modifications to the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. The evaluation was based on the responses calculated by the RELAP5 systems code to double-ended guillotine break loss-of-coolant-accidents (DEGB LOCAs). The three concepts evaluated were (a) elevated plenum inlet piping with a guard vessel and clamshell enclosures, (b) closure of both rotovalves in the affected loop, and (c) closure of the pump suction valve in the affected loop. Each concept included a fast reactor shutdown (to 65% power in 100 ms) and a 2-s ac pump trip. System recovery potential was evaluated for break locations at the pump suction, the pump discharge, and the plenum inlet. The code version used was RELAP5/MOD2.5 version 3d3, a preliminary version of RELAP5/MOD3. The model was a three-dimensional representation of the K-Reactor water plenum and moderator tank. It included explicit representations of all six loops, which were based on the configuration of L-Reactor. A combination of features is recommended to ensure liquid inventory recovery for all break locations. Valve closure design performance for a break location in the short section of piping between the reactor concrete shield and the pump suction valve would benefit from the clamshell enclosing that section of piping. 7 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Environmental Assisted Fatigue Evaluation of Direct Vessel Injection Piping Considering Thermal Stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taesoon; Lee, Dohwan

    2016-01-01

    As the environmentally assisted fatigue (EAF) due to the primary water conditions is to be a critical issue, the fatigue evaluation for the components and pipes exposed to light water reactor coolant conditions has become increasingly important. Therefore, many studies to evaluate the fatigue life of the components and pipes in LWR coolant environments on fatigue life of materials have been conducted. Among many components and pipes of nuclear power plants, the direct vessel injection piping is known to one of the most vulnerable pipe systems because of thermal stratification occurred in that systems. Thermal stratification occurs because the density of water changes significantly with temperature. In this study, fatigue analysis for DVI piping using finite element analysis has been conducted and those results showed that the results met design conditions related with the environmental fatigue evaluation of safety class 1 pipes in nuclear power plants. Structural and fatigue integrity for the DVI piping system that thermal stratification occurred during the plant operation has conducted. First of all, thermal distribution of the piping system is calculated by computational fluid dynamic analysis to analyze the structural integrity of that piping system. And the fatigue life evaluation considering environmental effects was carried out. Our results showed that the DVI piping system had enough structural integrity and fatigue life during the design lifetime of 60 years

  5. Specifying and manufacturing piping for the fast flux test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moen, R.A.; O'Keefe, D.P.; Irvin, J.E.; Tobin, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    Specification of materials for liquid metal reactor coolant piping, at service temperatures up to 1200 0 F, involves a number of considerations unique to these systems. The mechanical property/design allowable stress considerations which led to the selection and specification of specific materials for the Fast Flux Test Facility piping are discussed. Additional considerations are described indicating allowances made for material changes anticipated in service. These measures primarily involved raising the minimum carbon content to a value that would insure the strength of the material always remains above that assumed in the initial design, although other considerations are discussed. The processes by which this piping was manufactured, its resulting characteristics and methods of subsequent handling/assembly are briefly discussed. (U.S.)

  6. Studies on the characteristics of the separated type heat pipe system with non-condensible gas for the use of the passive decay heat removal in reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takao; Iigaki, Kazuhiko; Ohashi, Kazutaka; Hayakawa, Hitoshi; Yamada, Masao.

    1995-01-01

    This study is the fundamental research by experiments to aim at the development of the complete passive decay heat removal system on the modular reactor systems by the form of the separated type of heat pipe system utilizing the features of both the big latent heat for vaporization from water to steam and easy transportation characteristics. Special intention in our study on the fundamental experiments is to look for the effects in such a separated type of heat pipe system to introduce non-condensible gas such as nitrogen gas together with the working fluid of water. Many interesting findings have been obtained so far on the experiments for the variable conductance heat pipe characteristics from viewpoint of the actual application on the aim said above. This study has been carried out by the joint study between Tokai University and Fuji Electric Co., Ltd. and this paper is made up from the several papers presented so far at both the national and international symposiums under the name of joint study of the both bodies. (author)

  7. Fast ultrasonic imaging in a liquid filled pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolbe, W.F.; Turko, B.T.; Leskovar, B.

    1986-01-01

    A new method is described for the imaging of the interior of a liquid filled metallic pipe using acoustical techniques. The experimental system incorporates an array of 20 acoustical transducers and is capable of capturing the images of moving bubbles at a frame rate in excess of 300/s. The transducers are mounted circumferentially around the pipe. Each transducer is pulsed in sequence, and the echoes reflected from vapor bubbles in the interior are detected, digitized and processed by a computer to generate an image. The high rate of speed was achieved by the use of newly developed software and electronic circuitry. This approach has eliminated most of the spurious echo signals which degraded the performance of previous imaging systems. The capability of the method is illustrated by imaging actual vapor bubbles in rapid sequence in the pipe. The described imaging system is used to examine reactor cooling systems

  8. Modeling of hot tensile and short-term creep strength for LWR piping materials under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Y.; Maruyama, Y.; Chino, E.; Shibazaki, H.; Kudo, T.; Hidaka, A.; Hashimoto, K.; Sugimoto, J.

    2000-01-01

    The analytical study on severe accident shows the possibility of the reactor coolant system (RCS) piping failure before reactor pressure vessel failure under the high primary pressure sequence at pressurized water reactors. The establishment of the high-temperature strength model of the realistic RCS piping materials is important in order to predict precisely the accident progression and to evaluate the piping behavior with small uncertainties. Based on material testing, the 0.2% proof stress and the ultimate tensile strength above 800degC were given by the equations of second degree as a function of the reciprocal absolute temperature considering the strength increase due to fine precipitates for the piping materials. The piping materials include type 316 stainless steel, type 316 stainless steel of nuclear grade, CF8M cast duplex stainless steel and STS410 carbon steel. Also the short-term creep rupture time and the minimum creep rate at high-temperature were given by the modified Norton's Law as a function of stress and temperature considering the effect of the precipitation formation and resolution on the creep strength. The present modified Norton's Law gives better results than the conventional Larson-Miller method. Correlating the creep data (the applied stress versus the minimum creep rate) with the tensile data (the 0.2% proof stress or the ultimate tensile strength versus the strain rate), it was found that the dynamic recrystallization significantly occurred at high-temperature. (author)

  9. Device for preventing cooling water from flowing out of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinen, Masanori; Kotani, Koichi; Murase, Michio.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide emergency cooling system, which can prevent cooling water bearing radioactivity from flowing to the outside of the reactor at the time of breakage of feedwater pipe, thus eliminating the possibility of exposure of the fuel rod to provide high reliability and also reducing the possibility of causing radioactive pollution. Structure: The device for preventing cooling water from flowing out from the reactor features a jet nozzle inserted in a feedwater pipe adjacent to the inlet or outlet thereof immediately before the reactor container. The nozzle outlet is provided in the vicinity of the reactor wall and in a direction opposite to the direction of out-flow, and water supplied from a high pressure pump is jetted from it. (Nakamura, S.)

  10. Applications of a fracture mechanics model of structural reliability to the effects of seismic events on reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.O.; Lim, E.Y.

    1982-01-01

    A fracture mechanics model of structural reliability is described. The model assumes that failure occurs due to the subcritical and catastrophic growth of as-fabricated defects. The material properties, stress history, number and dimensions of the initial cracks are treated as random variables. Crack growth is calculated using fracture mechanics principles. The model has been used to estimate the influence of earthquakes on the integrity of circumferential girth butt welds in the large (diameter greater than 30 in.) primary coolant system pipes of a commercial pressurized water reactor. In the absence of earthquakes, the probability of leaks and catastrophic double-ended guillotine breaks is estimated to be 10 -6 and 10 -12 per plant lifetime, respectively. These probabilities were only slightly increased by the occurrence of earthquakes. (author)

  11. Theory and application of a three-dimensional code SHAPS to complex piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Y.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the theory and application of a three-dimensional computer code SHAPS to the complex piping systems. The code utilizes a two-dimensional implicit Eulerian method for the hydrodynamic analysis together with a three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite-element program for the structural calculation. A three-dimensional pipe element with eight degrees of freedom is employed to account for the hoop, flexural, axial, and the torsional mode of the piping system. In the SHAPS analysis the hydrodynamic equations are modified to include the global piping motion. Coupling between fluid and structure is achieved by enforcing the free-slip boundary conditions. Also, the response of the piping network generated by the seismic excitation can be included. A thermal transient capability is also provided in SHAPS. To illustrate the methodology, many sample problems dealing with the hydrodynamic, structural, and thermal analyses of reactor-piping systems are given. Validation of the SHAPS code with experimental data is also presented

  12. Reactor building for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidlen, F.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the improvement of the design of a liner, supported by a latticed steel girder structure and destined for guaranteeing a gastight closure for the plant compartments in the reactor building of a pressurized water reactor. It is intended to provide the steel girder structure on their top side with grates, being suited for walking upon, and to hang on their lower side diaphragms in modular construction as a liner. At the edges they may be sealed with bellows in order to avoid thermal stresses. The steel girder structure may at the same time serve as supports for parts of the steam pipe. (RW) [de

  13. Calculation and analysis of hydrogen volume concentrations in the vent pipe rigid proposed for NPP-L V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez T, A. M.; Xolocostli M, V.; Lopez M, R.; Filio L, C.; Royl, P.

    2014-10-01

    In 2012 was modeled of primary and secondary container of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) for the CFD Gas-Flow code. These models were used to calculate hydrogen volume concentrations run release the reactor building in case of a severe accident. The results showed that the venting would produce detonation conditions in the venting level (level 33) and flammability at ground level of reload. One of the solutions to avoid reaching critical concentrations (flammable or detonable) inside the reactor building and thus safeguard the contentions is to make a rigid venting. The rigid vent is a pipe connected to the primary container could go to the level 33 of the secondary container and style fireplace climb to the top of the reactor building. The analysis of hydrogen transport inside the vent pipe can be influenced by various environmental criteria and factors vent, so a logical consequence of the 2012 analysis is the analysis of the gases transport within said pipe to define vent ideal conditions. For these evaluations the vent pipe was modeled with a fine mesh of 32 radial interior nodes and a coarse mesh of 4 radial interior nodes. With three-dimensional models were realized calculations that allow observing the influence of heat transfer in the long term, i.e. a complete analysis of exhaust (approx. 700 seconds). However, the most interesting results focus on the first milliseconds, when the H 2 coming from the atmosphere of the primary container faces the air in the vent pipe. These first milliseconds besides allowing evaluating the detonation criteria in great detail in the different tubular sections similarly allow evaluating the pressure wave that occurs in the pipe and that at some point slows to the fluid on the last tubular section and could produce a detonation inside the pipe. Results are presented for venting fixed conditions, showing possible detonations into the pipe. (Author)

  14. Fission reactors and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, B.R.T.

    1981-12-01

    The American-designed boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor dominate the designs currently in use and under construction worldwide. As in all energy systems, materials problems have appeared during service; these include stress-corrosion of stainless steel pipes and heat exchangers and questions regarding crack behavior in pressure vessels. To obtain the maximum potential energy from our limited uranium supplies is is essential to develop the fast breeder reactor. The materials in these reactors are subjected to higher temperatures and neutron fluxes but lower pressures than in the water reactors. The performance required of the fuel elements is more arduous in the breeder than in water reactors. Extensive materials programs are in progress in test reactors and in large test rigs to ensure that materials will be available to meet these conditions

  15. Cooling device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji.

    1996-01-01

    Upon assembling a static container cooling system to an emergency reactor core cooling system using dynamic pumps in a power plant, the present invention provides a cooling device of lowered center of gravity and having a good cooling effect by lowering the position of a cooling water pool of the static container cooling system. Namely, the emergency reactor core cooling system injects water to the inside of a pressure vessel using emergency cooling water stored in a suppression pool as at least one water source upon loss of reactor coolant accident. In addition, a cooling water pool incorporating a heat exchanger is disposed at the circumference of the suppression pool at the outside of the container. A dry well and the heat exchanger are connected by way of steam supply pipes, and the heat exchanger is connected with the suppression pool by way of a gas exhaustion pipe and a condensate returning pipeline. With such a constitution, the position of the heat exchanger is made higher than an ordinary water level of the suppression pool. As a result, the emergency cooling water of the suppression pool water is injected to the pressure vessel by the operation of the reactor cooling pumps upon loss of coolant accident to cool the reactor core. (I.S.)

  16. Flooding characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow in a horizontal U bend pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, T.; Hosokawa, S.; Fujii, Y.

    1995-01-01

    For next-generation nuclear reactors, hybrid safety systems which consist of active and passive safety systems have been planned. Steam generators with horizontal U bend pipelines will be used as one of the passive safety systems. It is required to clarify flow characteristics, especially the onset of flooding, in the horizontal U bend pipelines in order to examine their safety. Flooding in vertical pipes has been studied extensively. However, there is little study on flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines. It is supposed that the onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines is different from that in vertical pipes. On the other hand, liquid is generated due to condensation of steam in pipes of the horizontal steam generators at the loss of coolant accident because the steam generators will be used as a condenser of a cooling system of steam from the reactor. It is necessary to simulate this situation by the supply of water at the middle of horizontal pipe. In the present paper, experiments were carried out using a horizontal U bend pipeline with a liquid supply section in the midway of pipeline. The onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipeline was measured. Effects of the length of horizontal pipe and the radius of U bend on the onset of flooding were discussed

  17. Flooding characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow in a horizontal U bend pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaguchi, T.; Hosokawa, S.; Fujii, Y. [Kobe Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For next-generation nuclear reactors, hybrid safety systems which consist of active and passive safety systems have been planned. Steam generators with horizontal U bend pipelines will be used as one of the passive safety systems. It is required to clarify flow characteristics, especially the onset of flooding, in the horizontal U bend pipelines in order to examine their safety. Flooding in vertical pipes has been studied extensively. However, there is little study on flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines. It is supposed that the onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines is different from that in vertical pipes. On the other hand, liquid is generated due to condensation of steam in pipes of the horizontal steam generators at the loss of coolant accident because the steam generators will be used as a condenser of a cooling system of steam from the reactor. It is necessary to simulate this situation by the supply of water at the middle of horizontal pipe. In the present paper, experiments were carried out using a horizontal U bend pipeline with a liquid supply section in the midway of pipeline. The onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipeline was measured. Effects of the length of horizontal pipe and the radius of U bend on the onset of flooding were discussed.

  18. AGING MANAGMENT OF REACTOR COOLANT SYSTEM MECHANICAL COMPONENTS FOR LICENSE RENEWAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SUBUDHI, M.; MORANTE, R.; LEE, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    The reactor coolant system (RCS) mechanical components that require an aging management review for license renewal include the primary loop piping and associated connections to other support systems, reactor vessel, reactor vessel internals, pressurizer. steam generators, reactor coolant pumps, and all other inter-connected piping, pipe fittings, valves, and bolting. All major RCS components are located inside the reactor building. Based on the evaluation findings of recently submitted license renewal applications for pressurized water reactors, this paper presents the plant programs and/or activities proposed by the applicants to manage the effects of aging. These programs and/or activities provide reasonable assurance that the intended function(s) of these mechanical components will be maintained for the period of extended operation. The license renewal application includes identification of RCS subcomponents that are within the scope of license renewal and are vulnerable to age-related degradation when exposed to environmental and operational conditions. determination of the effects of aging on their intended safety functions. and implementation of the aging management programs and/or activities including both current and new programs. Industry-wide operating experience, including generic communication by the NRC, is part of the aging management review for the RCS components. In addition, this paper discusses time-limited aging analyses associated with neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline region and thermal fatigue

  19. Large butterfly valve design copes with out-of-round pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saar, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    Two 96 inch circulating water lines at the Trojan reactor were joined to butterfly valves which had to be distorted to conform to the badly out-of-round pipes. Bubble tight seating was achieved by positioning a flexible seat ring after the valve was installed

  20. Structural integrity of a reinforced concrete structure and a pipe outlet under hydrogen detonation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarenheimo, A.; Silde, A.; Calonius, K.

    2002-05-01

    Structural integrity of a reinforced concrete wall and a pipe penetration under detonation conditions in a selected reactor building room of Olkiluoto BWR were studied. Hydrogen leakage from the pressurised containment to the sur rounding reactor building is possible during a severe accident. Leaked hydrogen tends to accumulate in the reactor building rooms where the leak is located leading to a stable stratification and locally very high hydrogen concentration. If ignited, a possibility to flame acceleration and detonation cannot be ruled out. The structure may survive the peak detonation transient because the eigenperiod of the structure is considerably longer than the duration of the peak detonation. However, the relatively slowly decreasing static type pressure after a peak detonation damages the wall more severely. Elastic deformations in reinforcement are recoverable and cracks in these areas will close after the pressure decrease. But there will be remarkable compression crushing and the static type slowly decreasing over pressure clearly exceeds the loading capacity of the wall. Structural integrity of a pipe outlet was considered also under detonation conditions. The effect of drag forces was taken into account. Damping and strain rate dependence of yield strength were not taken into consideration. The boundary condition at the end of the pipe line model was varied in order to find out the effect of the stiffness of the pipeline outside the calculation model. The calculation model where the lower pipe end is free to move axially, is conservative from the pipe penetration integrity point of view. Even in this conservative study, the highest peak value for the maximum plastic deformation is 3.5%. This is well below the success criteria found in literature. (au)

  1. Feed water distribution pipe replacement at Loviisa NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savolainen, S.; Elsing, B. [Imatran Voima Loviisa NPP (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    Imatran Voima Oy operates two WWER-440 reactors. Unit 1 has been operating since 1977 and unit 2 since 1981. First damages of feed water distribution (FWD) pipe were observed in 1989. The FWD-pipe T-connection had suffered from severe erosion corrosion damages. Similar damages have been been found also in other WWER-440 type NPPs. In 1989 the nozzles of the steam generator YB11 were inspected. No signs of the damages or signs of erosion were detected. The first damaged nozzles were found in 1992 in steam generators of both units. In 1992 it was started studying different possibilities to either repair or replace the damaged FWD-pipes. Due to the difficult conditions for repairing the damaged nozzles it was decided to study different FWD-pipe constructions. In 1991 two new feedwater distributors had been implemented at Dukovany NPP designed by Vitckovice company. Additionally OKB Gidropress had presented their design for new collector. In spring 1994 all the six steam generators of Rovno NPP unit 1 were replaced with FWD-pipes designed by OKB Gidropress. After the implementation an experimental program with the new systems was carried out. Due to the successful experiments at Rovno NPP Unit 1 it was decided to implement `Gidropress solution` during 1994 refueling outage into the steam generator YB52 at Loviisa 2. The object of this paper is to discuss the new FWD-pipe and its effects on the plant safety during normal and accident conditions. (orig.).

  2. Feed water distribution pipe replacement at Loviisa NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savolainen, S; Elsing, B [Imatran Voima Loviisa NPP (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Imatran Voima Oy operates two WWER-440 reactors. Unit 1 has been operating since 1977 and unit 2 since 1981. First damages of feed water distribution (FWD) pipe were observed in 1989. The FWD-pipe T-connection had suffered from severe erosion corrosion damages. Similar damages have been been found also in other WWER-440 type NPPs. In 1989 the nozzles of the steam generator YB11 were inspected. No signs of the damages or signs of erosion were detected. The first damaged nozzles were found in 1992 in steam generators of both units. In 1992 it was started studying different possibilities to either repair or replace the damaged FWD-pipes. Due to the difficult conditions for repairing the damaged nozzles it was decided to study different FWD-pipe constructions. In 1991 two new feedwater distributors had been implemented at Dukovany NPP designed by Vitckovice company. Additionally OKB Gidropress had presented their design for new collector. In spring 1994 all the six steam generators of Rovno NPP unit 1 were replaced with FWD-pipes designed by OKB Gidropress. After the implementation an experimental program with the new systems was carried out. Due to the successful experiments at Rovno NPP Unit 1 it was decided to implement `Gidropress solution` during 1994 refueling outage into the steam generator YB52 at Loviisa 2. The object of this paper is to discuss the new FWD-pipe and its effects on the plant safety during normal and accident conditions. (orig.).

  3. Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in lifting pipe of pebble-bed HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke; Su, Jiageng [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Zhou, Hongbo [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Chinergy Co., LTD., Beijing 100193 (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Yu, Suyun, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative determination of abrasion rate of graphite pebbles in different lifting velocities. • Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in helium, air and nitrogen. • In helium, intensive collisions caused by oscillatory motion result in more graphite dust production. - Abstract: A pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (pebble-bed HTR) uses a helium coolant, graphite core structure, and spherical fuel elements. The pebble-bed design enables on-line refueling, avoiding refueling shutdowns. During circulation process, the pebbles are lifted pneumatically via a stainless steel lifting pipe and reinserted into the reactor. Inevitably, the movement of the fuel elements as they recirculate in the reactor produces graphite dust. Mechanical wear is the primary source of graphite dust production. Specifically, the sources are mechanisms of pebble–pebble contact, pebble–wall (structural graphite) contact, and fuel handling (pebble–metal abrasion). The key contribution to graphite dust production is from the fuel handling system, particularly from the lifting pipe. During pneumatic lift, graphite pebbles undergo multiple collisions with the stainless steel lifting pipe, thereby causing abrasion of the graphite pebbles and producing graphite dust. The present work explored the abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in the lifting pipe by measuring the abrasion rate at different lifting velocities. The abrasion rate of the graphite pebble in helium was found much higher than those in air and nitrogen. This gas environment effect could be explained by either tribology behavior or dynamic behavior. Friction testing excluded the possibility of tribology reason. The dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble was captured by analysis of the audio waveforms during pneumatic lift. The analysis results revealed unique dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble in helium. Oscillation and consequently intensive collisions occur during pneumatic lift, causing

  4. Reactor System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, S. K.; Kim, G. K.; Yeo, J. W.

    2006-08-01

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  5. Modeling of residual stress mitigation in austenitic stainless steel pipe girth weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Atteridge, D.G.; Anderson, W.E.; West, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    This study provides numerical procedures to model 40-cm-diameter, schedule 40, Type 304L stainless steel pipe girth welding and a newly proposed post-weld treatment. The treatment can be used to accomplish the goal of imparting compressive residual stresses at the inner surface of a pipe girth weldment to prevent/retard the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of the piping system in nuclear reactors. This new post-weld treatment for mitigating residual stresses is cooling stress improvement (CSI). The concept of CSI is to establish and maintain a certain temperature gradient across the pipe wall thickness to change the final stress state. Thus, this process involves sub-zero low temperature cooling of the inner pipe surface of a completed girth weldment, while simultaneously keeping the outer pipe surface at a slightly elevated temperature with the help of a certain heating method. Analyses to obtain quantitative results on pipe girth welding and CSI by using a thermo-elastic-plastic finite element model are described in this paper. Results demonstrate the potential effectiveness of CSI for introducing compressive residual stresses to prevent/retard IGSCC. Because of the symmetric nature of CSI, it shows great potential for industrial application

  6. Removal of Shippingport Station primary system components and piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaGuardia, T.S.; Lipsett, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    The dismantling workscope for the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project was divided into subtasks to permit the work to be subcontracted to the maximum extent practicable. Major subtasks were identified and described by Activity specifications which could then be grouped into logical work packages to be put out for bid. Two of the largest dismantling work packages, removal of piping and components, were grouped together and designated as Activity Specifications 4 and 5. TLG Services, Inc. and Cleveland Wrecking Company formed a Joint Venture to perform this work during a two-year period at a cost of approximately $7 million. The major portions of this dismantling workscope are described. The primary system components within this workscope consist of the stainless steel reactor coolant piping, check valves, reactor coolant pumps, steam generators, and reactor purification demineralizers and coolers. The work performed, the heavy rigging preparations and procedures, the cutting tools used, component draining/capping techniques to prevent spills, contamination containment, airborne control techniques, and lessons learned during the removal of these primary system components are described. Summaries of crew size and composition, labor hours, duration hours and radiation exposure to workers are provided and discussed briefly. The successful completion of this work is evidence of the engineering, planning, equipment, materials and labor pool available to remove large, radioactively contaminated components safely. This experience will help decommissioning planners to prepare for the removal of reactor components in future decommissioning

  7. Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station recirc pipe dose rates with zinc injection and condenser replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiCello, D.C.; Odell, A.D.; Jackson, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station (PBAPS) is located near the town of Delta, Pennsylvania, on the west bank of the Susquehanna River. It is situated approximately 20 miles south of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The site contains two boiling water reactors of General Electric design and each rated at 3,293 megawatts thermal. The units are BWR 4s and went commercial in 1977. There is also a decommissioned high temperature gas-cooled reactor on site, Unit 1. PBAPS Unit 2 recirc pipe was replaced in 1985 and Unit 3 recirc pipes replaced in 1988 with 326 NGSS. The Unit 2 replacement pipe was electropolished, and the Unit 3 pipe was electropolished and passivated. The Unit 2 brass condenser was replaced with a Titanium condenser in the first quarter of 1991, and the Unit 3 condenser was replaced in the fourth quarter of 1991. The admiralty brass condensers were the source of natural zinc in both units. Zinc injection was initiated in Unit 2 in May 1991, and in Unit 3 in May 1992. Contact dose rate measurements were made in standard locations on the 28-inch recirc suction and discharge lines to determine the effectiveness of zinc injection and to monitor radiation build-up in the pipe. Additionally, HPGe gamma scans were performed to determine the isotopic composition of the oxide layer inside the pipe. In particular, the specific (μCi/cm 2 ) of Co-60 and Zn-65 were analyzed

  8. Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station recirc pipe dose rates with zinc injection and condenser replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiCello, D.C.; Odell, A.D.; Jackson, T.J. [PECO Energy Co., Delta, PA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station (PBAPS) is located near the town of Delta, Pennsylvania, on the west bank of the Susquehanna River. It is situated approximately 20 miles south of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The site contains two boiling water reactors of General Electric design and each rated at 3,293 megawatts thermal. The units are BWR 4s and went commercial in 1977. There is also a decommissioned high temperature gas-cooled reactor on site, Unit 1. PBAPS Unit 2 recirc pipe was replaced in 1985 and Unit 3 recirc pipes replaced in 1988 with 326 NGSS. The Unit 2 replacement pipe was electropolished, and the Unit 3 pipe was electropolished and passivated. The Unit 2 brass condenser was replaced with a Titanium condenser in the first quarter of 1991, and the Unit 3 condenser was replaced in the fourth quarter of 1991. The admiralty brass condensers were the source of natural zinc in both units. Zinc injection was initiated in Unit 2 in May 1991, and in Unit 3 in May 1992. Contact dose rate measurements were made in standard locations on the 28-inch recirc suction and discharge lines to determine the effectiveness of zinc injection and to monitor radiation build-up in the pipe. Additionally, HPGe gamma scans were performed to determine the isotopic composition of the oxide layer inside the pipe. In particular, the specific ({mu}Ci/cm{sup 2}) of Co-60 and Zn-65 were analyzed.

  9. Space reactors. Progress report, October 1981-March 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranken, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in design studies and technology for the SP-100 Project - successor to the Space Power Advanced Reactor (SPAR) Project - is reported for the period October 1, 1981 to March 31, 1982. The basis for selecting a high-temperature, UO 2 -fueled, heat-pipe-cooled reactor with a thermoelectric conversion system as the 100-kW/sub e/ reference design has been reviewed. Although no change has been made in the general concept, design studies have been done to investigate various reactor/conversion system coupling methods and core design modifications. Thermal and mechanical finite element modeling and three-dimensional Monte Carlo analysis of a core with individual finned fuel elements are reported. Studies of unrestrained fuel irradiation data are discussed that are relevant both to the core modeling work and to the design and fabrication of the first in-pile irradiation test, which is also reported. Work on lithium-filled core heat pipe development is described, including the attainment of 15.6 kW/sub t/ operation at 1525 K for a 2-m-long heat pipe with a 15.7-mm outside diameter. The successful operation of a 5.5-m-long, lightweight potassium/titanium heat pipe at 760 K is described, and test results of a thermoelectric module with GaP-modified SiGe thermoelectric elements are presented

  10. Improvement of C*-integral and Crack Opening Displacement Estimation Equations for Thin-walled Pipes with Circumferential Through-wall Cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Soon; Jhung, Myung Jo

    2012-01-01

    Since the LBB(Leak-Before-Break) concept has been widely applied to high energy piping systems in the pressurized water reactors, a number of engineering estimation methods had been developed for J-integral and COD values. However, those estimation methods were mostly reliable for relatively thick-walled pipes about R m /t=5 or 10. As the LBB concept might be considered in the design stage of the SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor) which has relatively thin-walled pipes due to its low design pressure, the applicability of current estimation methods should be investigated for thin-walled pipes. Along with the J-integral and COD, the estimation method for creep fracture mechanics parameters, C*- integral and COD rate, is required because operating temperature of SFR is high enough to induce creep in the structural materials. In this study, the applicability of the current C*- integral and COD estimation methods to thin-walled pipes is studied for a circumferential through-wall crack using the finite element (FE) method. Based on the FE results, enhancement of the current estimation methods is made

  11. Reactor technology. Progress report, July-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breslow, M.

    1980-12-01

    Progress in the Space Power Advanced Reactor (SPAR) Program includes indications that revision of the BeO reflector configuration can reduce system weight. Observed boiling limit restrictions on the performance of the annular-wick core heat pipe have accelerated transition to the development of the target-design arterial heat pipe. Successful bends of core heat pipes have been made with sodium as the mandrel material. With the phasing out of the GCFR Program, work on the Low Power Safety Experiments Program is now concentrated on completion of the third 37-rod Full Length Subgroup test. In the Reactor Safety/Structural Analysis area, effort on the Category I Structures Program is toward developing an experimental test plan focusing on a specific structural design. Buckling experiments on thin-walled cylindrical shells with circular cutouts are reported. Results of a three-dimensional analysis of thermal stresses in the Fort St. Vrain core support block are presented. Materials investigations and operation of a molybdenum-core SiC heat pipe are reported. Entrainment limits for gravity-assisted heat pipes and heat pipe configurations for application to energy conservation are being investigated. The new solution critical assembly, SHEBA, was completed. Godiva IV was temporarily relocated at TA-15. Influence of scattered radiations in the test vault on InRad measurements was determined from detector scans of the vault produced by 252 Cf neutron and 137 Cs gamma sources

  12. Removal of metal from acid mine drainage using a hybrid system including a pipes inserted microalgae reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Tae; Lee, Hongkyun; Yun, Hyun-Shik; Song, Kyung-Guen; Yeom, Sung-Ho; Choi, Jaeyoung

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the microalgae culture system to combined active treatment system and pipe inserted microalgae reactor (PIMR) was investigated. After pretreated AMD in active treatment system, the effluent load to PIMR in order to Nephroselmis sp. KGE 8 culture. In experiment, effect of iron on growth and lipid accumulation in microalgae were inspected. The 2nd pretreatment effluent was economic feasibility of microalgae culture and lipid accumulation. The growth kinetics of the microalgae are modeled using logistic growth model and the model is primarily parameterized from data obtained through an experimental study where PIMR were dosed with BBM, BBM added 10 mg L(-1) iron and 2nd pretreatment effluent. Moreover, the continuous of microalgae culture in PIMR can be available. Overall, this study indicated that the use of pretreated AMD is a viable method for culture microalgae and lipid accumulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Manufacturing and material properties of forgings for reactor pressure vessel of high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, I.; Suzuki, K.

    1994-01-01

    For the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) which has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel is used first in the world. Material confirmation test has been carried out to demonstrate good applicability of forged low Si 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel to the RPV of HTTR. Recently, JSW has succeeded in the manufacturing of large size ring forgings and large size forged cover dome integrated with nozzles for stand pipe for the RPV. This paper describes the results of the material confirmation test as well as the manufacturing and material properties of the large forged cover dome integrated with nozzles for stand pipe. (orig.)

  14. A CFD Study on Inlet Plenum Flow Field of Pebble Bed Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Won Jae; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-01-01

    High temperature gas cooled reactor, largely divided into two types of PBR (Pebble Bed Reactor) and PMR (Prismatic Modular Reactor), has becomes great interest of researchers in connection with the hydrogen production. KAERI has started a project to develop the gas cooled reactor for the hydrogen production and has been doing in-depth study for selecting the reactor type between PBR and PMR. As a part of the study, PBMR (Pebble Bed Modular Reactor) was selected as a reference PBR reactor for the CFD analysis and the flow field of its inlet plenum was simulated with computational fluid dynamics program CFX5. Due to asymmetrical arrangement of pipes to the inlet plenum, non-uniform flow distribution has been expected to occur, giving rise to non-uniform power distribution at the core. Flow fields of different arrangement of inlet pipes were also investigated, as one of measures to reduce the non-uniformity

  15. Nuclear reactor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Masaya; Makihara, Yoshiaki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the heat transfer performance, as well as reducing and simplifying the structure while preventing the intrusion of primary coolants to utilization systems. Constitution: Heat transfer from the primary coolant circuit to the utilization circuits is conducted by means of heat pipe type heat exchangers. The heat exchanger comprises a tightly closed vessel divided by a partition wall, through which a plurality of heat pipes are passed. The primary coolants receiving the heat from the nuclear reactor enter the first chamber of the heat exchanger to heat the evaporating portion of the heat pipes. The heated flow of steams in the heat pipes transfer to the condensating portion in the second chamber to conduct heat exchange with the utilization system. In this way, since secondary coolant circuits are saved, the heat transfer performance can be improved significantly and the risk of failure can be reduced. (Kamimura, M,)

  16. Construction within cooling system of a sodium cooler reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is described for the manufacture and the construction of a bundle of a large number of pipes, at least near their outer ends lying practically evenly spaced which pipes lie with one of their outermost ends in a pipe plate and with their other outer ends in a second pipe plate, where the procedure involves placing at or near the derived place a means for holding the bundle of pipes, as well as eventually holding a pipe plate with stub pipes near the outer ends of the bundle of pipes, the successive attachment by means of welding of the pipes in the plate of the above mentioned assembly with the stub pipes, characterized in that to each of the pipes in the bundle is welded to an outer end directly a corresponding short pipe which is also welded to a pipe end of a stub pipe, so that a connection is made by the short pipe which lies between the outer end of the pipe in the bundle and the stub pipe. Such a construction is used in the heat exchanger of sodium cooled reactors. (G.C.)

  17. Heat and fluid dynamic in the primary circuit of a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebrin, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Aiming at the analysis of some thermohydraulic transients that may affect the safety of a reactor core, a FORTRAN program was developed which evaluates the heat and fluid dynamics in the primary circuit of a research reactor. The selection of the pump, the determination of the length and diameter of the pipes, as well as the appropriate arrangement of the pipes and heat exchanger, are determined from the stationary regime. (Author) [pt

  18. Overview of cooperative international piping benchmark analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAfee, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an effort initiated in 1976 by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to evaluate detailed and simplified inelastic analysis methods for piping systems with particular emphasis on piping bends. The procedure was to collect from participating member IAEA countries descriptions of tests and test results for piping systems or bends (with emphasis on high temperature inelastic tests), to compile, evaluate, and issue a selected number of these problems for analysis, and to compile and make a preliminary evaluation of the analyses results. Of the problem descriptions submitted three were selected to be used: a 90 0 -elbow at 600 0 C with an in-plane transverse force; a 90 0 -elbow with an in-plane moment; and a 180 0 -elbow at room temperature with a reversed, cyclic, in-plane transverse force. A variety of both detailed and simplified analysis solutions were obtained. A brief comparative assessment of the analyses is contained in this paper. 15 figures

  19. Flow visualization study of two phase flow in a single bend outlet feeder pipe and horizontal annulus of outlet end-fitting of a CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supa-Amornkul, S.; Lister, D.H.; Steward, F.R.

    2005-01-01

    'Full text:' In CANDU-6 reactors, the pressurized high-temperature coolant flows through 380 fuel channels passing horizontally through the core. Each end of a fuel channel has a stainless steel annular end-fitting connected to a carbon steel feeder pipe. The outlet coolant, which is at 310 o C with up to 0.30 steam voidage, turns through 90 o as it passes from flow in the annular end-fitting to pipe flow in the feeder via a Grayloc connector. Since 1996, several CANDU stations have reported excessive corrosion of their outlet feeder pipes; especially between the first metre, which consisted of single or double bends. Early studies related the attack to the hydrodynamics of the coolant and verified that it was a type of flow accelerated corrosion. In order to understand the hydrodynamics of the coolant in the outlet feeders by flow-visualization, a full-scale transparent test section simulating the geometry and orientation of an outlet feeder bend with its upstream annular end-fitting were fabricated. The feeder consisted of a 54 mm inside diameter acrylic pipe with a 73 o bend, connecting to an acrylic simulation of a Grayloc flanged fitting and annular end-fitting. The annular end-fitting consisted of an inner pipe, 110 mm outer diameter, and an outer pipe, 150 mm inner diameter, both 190.7 cm long in length. The tests were performed with water and air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The maximum water volumetric flow rate was 19 L/s and the volume fraction of air varied from 0.05 to 0.56. The phase distributions within the feeder pipe and along the length of the annulus were investigated with a digital video recorder. Size, concentration and velocity of the air bubbles at particular locations were studied with a high-speed digital still camera and a high-speed digital video camera. Phase distributions and variations in bubble size with velocity were determined. Particular attention was paid to the flow pattern at the inside of the bend, where a CFD

  20. Flow visualization study of two phase flow in a single bend outlet feeder pipe and horizontal annulus of outlet end-fitting of a CANDU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supa-Amornkul, S.; Lister, D.H.; Steward, F.R. [Univ. of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick (Canada)]. E-mail: h796e@unb.ca; dlister@unb.ca; fsteward@unb.ca

    2005-07-01

    'Full text:' In CANDU-6 reactors, the pressurized high-temperature coolant flows through 380 fuel channels passing horizontally through the core. Each end of a fuel channel has a stainless steel annular end-fitting connected to a carbon steel feeder pipe. The outlet coolant, which is at 310{sup o}C with up to 0.30 steam voidage, turns through 90{sup o} as it passes from flow in the annular end-fitting to pipe flow in the feeder via a Grayloc connector. Since 1996, several CANDU stations have reported excessive corrosion of their outlet feeder pipes; especially between the first metre, which consisted of single or double bends. Early studies related the attack to the hydrodynamics of the coolant and verified that it was a type of flow accelerated corrosion. In order to understand the hydrodynamics of the coolant in the outlet feeders by flow-visualization, a full-scale transparent test section simulating the geometry and orientation of an outlet feeder bend with its upstream annular end-fitting were fabricated. The feeder consisted of a 54 mm inside diameter acrylic pipe with a 73{sup o} bend, connecting to an acrylic simulation of a Grayloc flanged fitting and annular end-fitting. The annular end-fitting consisted of an inner pipe, 110 mm outer diameter, and an outer pipe, 150 mm inner diameter, both 190.7 cm long in length. The tests were performed with water and air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The maximum water volumetric flow rate was 19 L/s and the volume fraction of air varied from 0.05 to 0.56. The phase distributions within the feeder pipe and along the length of the annulus were investigated with a digital video recorder. Size, concentration and velocity of the air bubbles at particular locations were studied with a high-speed digital still camera and a high-speed digital video camera. Phase distributions and variations in bubble size with velocity were determined. Particular attention was paid to the flow pattern at the inside

  1. Experimental study on fluid mixing phenomena in T-pipe junction with upstream elbow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi Ogawa; Minoru Igarashi; Nobuyuki Kimura; Hideki Kamide

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Temperature fluctuation in fluid causes high cycle thermal fatigue in shroud structure according to its amplitude and frequency. There are still some incidents of thermal fatigue and leakage in light water reactors (Japanese PWR Tomari-2 in 2003, French PWR CIVAUX in 1998), and also in sodium cooled reactors (French FBR Phenix in 1992). Mixing tee is a typical component where temperature fluctuation occurs. Water experiment has been carried out to investigate temperature fluctuation characteristics and flow velocity field in a simple T-pipe junction with straight inlet pipings for main and branch lines; test facility is named as WATLON (Water Experiment on Fluid Mixing in T-pipe with Long Cycle Fluctuation). Here, influence of upstream elbow in the main pipe was studied in the WATLON facility. Elbow can be set near the mixing tee in a real plant. Outlet of the elbow has biased velocity distribution and also the secondary flow, which decays unsteadily. Temperature distribution in the mixing tee was measured by a movable tree with 17 thermocouples and velocity field was measured by Dynamic PIV (high speed particle image velocimetry) with sampling frequency of 200 Hz. Measured temperature showed that fluctuation intensity near the wall was larger in the elbow geometry than in the straight inlet pipes in a case of wall jet (branch flow velocity is smaller than main pipe flow velocity); high intensity region in the elbow case was enlarged around the jet exiting from the branch pipe. The result of flow velocity measurement showed that secondary flow and biased flow velocity distributions due to the elbow influenced bending of the jet exiting from the branch pipe and the temperature fluctuation intensity around the jet. The detailed flow velocity distributions and the secondary flow of upstream elbow can be measured by Dynamic PIV. Influence of such elbow was discussed based on detailed temperature data together with fluctuated velocity

  2. Divertor plate for thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Sato, Keisuke; Nishio, Satoshi.

    1993-01-01

    In a divertor plate for a thermonuclear reactor, adjacent cooling pipes are electrically insulated from each other and pipes made of a gradient functional material prepared by compositing ceramics having an insulation property and metals are metallurgically joined to at least one portion of each of the cooling pipes. Electric current caused upon occurrence of plasma disruption is interrupted by the insulation portion, so that a large circuit is not formed and electromagnetic force is decreased to such a extent that the divertor plate is not ruptured. Since a header of the cooling pipes can be installed at any optional position, the installation space can be reduced. Further, since inlet and exit collection headers can be disposed on both ends of the cooling pipes, it is possible to shorten the length of the cooling pipe of the divertor plate corresponded to high heat fluxes and reduce the pressure loss on the side of coolants to about 1/2. Further, turn back portions of small radius of curvature of the cooling pipes are eliminated to reduce the cost and extend the lifetime and, in addition, protection tiles can be attached easily. (N.H.)

  3. Estimation of piping temperature fluctuations based on external strain measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morilhat, P.; Maye, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the difficulty to carry out measurements at the inner sides of nuclear reactor piping subjected to thermal transients, temperature and stress variations in the pipe walls are estimated by means of external thermocouples and strain-gauges. This inverse problem is solved by spectral analysis. Since the wall harmonic transfer function (response to a harmonic load) is known, the inner side signal will be obtained by convolution of the inverse transfer function of the system and of the strain measurement enables detection of internal temperature fluctuations in a frequency range beyond the scope of the thermocouples. (authors). 5 figs., 3 refs

  4. Background noise of acoustic emission signals in sodium piping loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Y.; Aoki, K.; Kuribayashi, K.; Kishi, T.; Sakakibara, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Background noise measurement in the frequency range of acoustic emission (AE) signals was made on the sodium piping loops of a 50 MW steam generator test facility in the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC). During the dynamic characteristics test of the steam generator over a wide range of operating conditions, the background noise generated on the pipe surface was measured using wideband AE sensor externally mounted with waveguide. Data were obtained for the effect of power loads of steam generator on both amplitude and frequency spectra of background noise signals. Source and nature of background noise were established

  5. Cooling facility for reactor container

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Kiyoshi; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1996-05-31

    A suction port of a condensator to a condensate pipe is connected to a main steam pipe, a discharge port of a incondensible gas exhaustion pipe is connected from an inlet header of the condensator to a main steam pipe by way of a valve, and an exhaustion port of the incondensible gas exhaustion pipe is connected from an exit header of the condensator to a pressure suppression pool by way of a valve. In addition, a condensate return pipe is connected from the exit header of the condensator to the pressure vessel by way of a value. When the reactor is isolated, steams are flown from the pressure vessel to a condensator by way of a main steam pipe. In this case, since incondensible gas is not present, the flow rate of inflown steams is great, the condensate heat conductivity is great and temperature difference between the inside and the outside of the pipes is great, the amount of heat released out of the container is increased. The value of the condensate return pipe is opened, condensates are injected to the pressure vessel. Upon occurrence of an accident, steams and incondensible gases are mixed and flown from the suction pipe of the condensator into the condensator, and noncondensed steams are discharged to a pressure suppression pool by the pressure difference between the inside of the condensate pipe and the inside of the pressure suppression chamber. (N.H.)

  6. Cooling facility for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kiyoshi; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Kinoshita, Shoichiro.

    1996-01-01

    A suction port of a condensator to a condensate pipe is connected to a main steam pipe, a discharge port of a incondensible gas exhaustion pipe is connected from an inlet header of the condensator to a main steam pipe by way of a valve, and an exhaustion port of the incondensible gas exhaustion pipe is connected from an exit header of the condensator to a pressure suppression pool by way of a valve. In addition, a condensate return pipe is connected from the exit header of the condensator to the pressure vessel by way of a value. When the reactor is isolated, steams are flown from the pressure vessel to a condensator by way of a main steam pipe. In this case, since incondensible gas is not present, the flow rate of inflown steams is great, the condensate heat conductivity is great and temperature difference between the inside and the outside of the pipes is great, the amount of heat released out of the container is increased. The value of the condensate return pipe is opened, condensates are injected to the pressure vessel. Upon occurrence of an accident, steams and incondensible gases are mixed and flown from the suction pipe of the condensator into the condensator, and noncondensed steams are discharged to a pressure suppression pool by the pressure difference between the inside of the condensate pipe and the inside of the pressure suppression chamber. (N.H.)

  7. Pipe-to-pipe impact program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer, J.M.; Bampton, M.C.C.; Friley, J.R.; Simonen, F.A.

    1984-06-01

    This report documents the tests and analyses performed as part of the Pipe-to-Pipe Impact (PTPI) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This work was performed to assist the NRC in making licensing decisions regarding pipe-to-pipe impact events following postulated breaks in high energy fluid system piping. The report scope encompasses work conducted from the program's start through the completion of the initial hot oil tests. The test equipment, procedures, and results are described, as are analytic studies of failure potential and data correlation. Because the PTPI Program is only partially completed, the total significance of the current test results cannot yet be accurately assessed. Therefore, although trends in the data are discussed, final conclusions and recommendations will be possible only after the completion of the program, which is scheduled to end in FY 1984

  8. Reactor Materials Program process water piping indirect failure frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    Following completion of the probabilistic analyses, the LOCA Definition Project has been subject to various external reviews, and as a result the need for several revisions has arisen. This report updates and summarizes the indirect failure frequency analysis for the process water piping. In this report, a conservatism of the earlier analysis is removed, supporting lower failure frequency estimates. The analysis results are also reinterpreted in light of subsequent review comments

  9. Space nuclear reactor concepts for avoidance of a single point failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents three space nuclear reactor concepts for future exploration missions requiring electrical power of 10's to 100's kW, for 7-10 years. These concepts avoid a single point failure in reactor cooling; and they could be used with a host of energy conversion technologies. The first is lithium or sodium heat pipes cooled reactor. The heat pipes operate at a fraction of their prevailing capillary or sonic limit. Thus, when a number of heat pipes fail, those in the adjacent modules remove their heat load, maintaining reactor core adequately cooled. The second is a reactor with a circulating liquid metal coolant. The reactor core is divided into six identical sectors, each with a separate energy conversion loop. The sectors in the reactor core are neurotically coupled, but hydraulically decoupled. Thus, when a sector experiences a loss of coolant, the fission power generated in it will be removed by the circulating coolant in the adjacent sectors. In this case, however, the reactor fission power would have to decrease to avoid exceeding the design temperature limits in the sector with a failed loop. These two reactor concepts are used with energy conversion technologies, such as advanced Thermoelectric (TE), Free Piston Stirling Engines (FPSE), and Alkali Metal Thermal-to- Electric Conversion (AMTEC). Gas cooled reactors are a better choice to use with Closed Brayton Cycle engines, such as the third reactor concept to be presented in the paper. It has a sectored core that is cooled with a binary mixture of He-Xe (40 gm/mole). Each of the three sectors in the reactor has its own CBC and neutronically, but not hydraulically, coupled to the other sectors

  10. Heat Transfer Characteristics of SiC-coated Heat Pipe for Passive Decay Heat Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, In Guk; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol

    2014-01-01

    The main concern with the Fukushima accident was the failure of active and passive core cooling systems. The main function of existing passive decay heat removal systems is feeding additional coolant to the reactor core. Thus, an established emergency core cooling system (ECCS) cannot operate properly because of impossible depressurization under the station blackout (SBO) condition. Therefore, a new concept for passive decay heat removal system is required. In this study, an innovative hybrid control rod concept is considered for passive in-core decay heat removal that differs from the existing direct vessel injection core cooling system and passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS). The heat transfer between the evaporator and condenser sections occurs by phase change of the working fluid and capillary action induced by wick structures installed on the inner wall of the heat pipe. In this study, a hybrid control rod is developed to take the roles of both neutron absorption and heat removal by combining the functions of a heat pipe and control rod. Previous studies on enhancing the heat removal capacity of heat pipes used nanofluids, self-rewetting fluids, various wick structures and condensers. Many studies have examined the thermal performances of heat pipes using various nanofluids. They concluded that the enhanced thermal performance of the heat pipe using nanofluids is due to nanoparticle deposition on the wick structures. Thus, the wick structure of heat pipes has been modified by nanoparticle deposition to enhance the heat removal capacity. However, previous studies used relatively small heat pipes and narrow ranges of heat loads. The environment of a nuclear reactor is very specific, and the decay heat produced by fission products after shutdown is relatively large. Thus, this study tested a large-scale heat pipe over a wide range of power. The concept of a hybrid heat pipe for an advanced in-core decay heat removal system was introduced for complete

  11. Heat Transfer Characteristics of SiC-coated Heat Pipe for Passive Decay Heat Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, In Guk; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The main concern with the Fukushima accident was the failure of active and passive core cooling systems. The main function of existing passive decay heat removal systems is feeding additional coolant to the reactor core. Thus, an established emergency core cooling system (ECCS) cannot operate properly because of impossible depressurization under the station blackout (SBO) condition. Therefore, a new concept for passive decay heat removal system is required. In this study, an innovative hybrid control rod concept is considered for passive in-core decay heat removal that differs from the existing direct vessel injection core cooling system and passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS). The heat transfer between the evaporator and condenser sections occurs by phase change of the working fluid and capillary action induced by wick structures installed on the inner wall of the heat pipe. In this study, a hybrid control rod is developed to take the roles of both neutron absorption and heat removal by combining the functions of a heat pipe and control rod. Previous studies on enhancing the heat removal capacity of heat pipes used nanofluids, self-rewetting fluids, various wick structures and condensers. Many studies have examined the thermal performances of heat pipes using various nanofluids. They concluded that the enhanced thermal performance of the heat pipe using nanofluids is due to nanoparticle deposition on the wick structures. Thus, the wick structure of heat pipes has been modified by nanoparticle deposition to enhance the heat removal capacity. However, previous studies used relatively small heat pipes and narrow ranges of heat loads. The environment of a nuclear reactor is very specific, and the decay heat produced by fission products after shutdown is relatively large. Thus, this study tested a large-scale heat pipe over a wide range of power. The concept of a hybrid heat pipe for an advanced in-core decay heat removal system was introduced for complete

  12. Development of remote bore tools for pipe welding/cutting by YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Nakahira, Masataka; Kakudate, Satoshi; Tada, Eisuke; Obara, Kenjiro; Taguchi, Kou; Nakamori, Naokazu

    1996-07-01

    In D-T burning reactors such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), an internal access welding/cutting of blanket cooling pipe with bend sections is inevitably required because of spatial constraint due to nuclear shield and available port opening space. For this purpose, an internal access pipe welding/cutting using YAG laser beam is being developed according to the agreement of the ITER R and D task (T44). A design concept of welding/cutting processing head with a flexible optical fiber has been developed and the basic feasibility studies on welding, cutting and rewelding are performed using stainless steel plate (SS316L). In this report, the details of a welding/cutting head with a flexible optical fiber for YAG laser are described, together with the basic experiment results relating to the welding/cutting and rewelding. (author)

  13. Reactor materials program process water component failure probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, W. L.

    1988-01-01

    The maximum rate loss of coolant accident for the Savannah River Production Reactors is presently specified as the abrupt double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of a large process water pipe. This accident is not considered credible in light of the low applied stresses and the inherent ductility of the piping materials. The Reactor Materials Program was initiated to provide the technical basis for an alternate, credible maximum rate LOCA. The major thrust of this program is to develop an alternate worst case accident scenario by deterministic means. In addition, the probability of a DEGB is also being determined; to show that in addition to being mechanistically incredible, it is also highly improbable. The probability of a DEGB of the process water piping is evaluated in two parts: failure by direct means, and indirectly-induced failure. These two areas have been discussed in other reports. In addition, the frequency of a large bread (equivalent to a DEGB) in other process water system components is assessed. This report reviews the large break frequency for each component as well as the overall large break frequency for the reactor system

  14. Characteristics of DC electrical braking method of the gas circulator to limit the temperature rise at the heat transfer pipes in the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, K.; Saito, K.; Iyoku, T.

    2001-01-01

    In the safety evaluation of a High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), it must be confirmed that the core has no chance to be damaged and the barrier against the FP release is designed properly not to be affecting the influence of radiation around the reactor site. Especially the maximum temperature of the reactor pressure boundary such as the heat transfer pipes of pressurized water cooler (PWC) must not exceed the permissible values under an anticipated accident such as pipe of rupture in PWC. A requirement for the gas circulator which circulates helium gas in the primary cooling line and the secondary cooling line, is to be braked within 10 seconds by an electrical braking method after the HTTR reactor has scrammed under the accident in PWC. The reason is that the temperature rise of the heat transfer pipe at PWC has to be suppressed when the gas circulator has stopped, the revolution of the gas circulator decreases like the free coast down so that it takes about 90 seconds to be zero and the temperature rise of the pipe in the PWC exceeds the permissible value. By braking within 10 secs., the temperature of the pipe in the PWC reaches about 368 deg. C, less than the permissible value. Using a simplified equivalent circuit of an induction motor, braking time analysis was performed with obtained electrical resistance and inductance. The obtained braking time is about 10 secs., showing close agreement with analysis values. (author)

  15. A regulatory perspective on appropriate seismic loading stress criteria for advanced light water reactor piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the foregoing sections, the author has discussed the NRC staff's perspective on the evolving seismic design criteria for piping systems. He also addressed the need for developing seismic loading stress criteria and provided several recommendations and considerations for ensuring piping functional capability, pressure integrity, and structural integrity. Overall, the general consensus in the NRC staff is that in the past several years, many initiatives have been developed and implemented by the industry and the NRC staff to reduce the excessive conservatisms that might have existed in nuclear piping system design criteria. The regulations, regulatory guides, and Standard Review Plan have been (or are currently in the process of being) revised to reflect these initiatives in an effort to produce requirements and guidelines that will continue to result in a safe and practical design of piping systems. However, further proposals to reduce margins are continually being submitted to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and the NRC for review and approval. Improvements to the piping seismic design criteria are always encouraged, but there is a point at which the benefits might be outweighed by drawbacks. Because of this rapidly evolving situation the need exists for the industry and the NRC staff to develop a course of action to ensure that piping seismic design criteria for future ALWR plants will result in piping system designs that provide adequate safety margins and practical designs at a reasonable cost

  16. Aging of metal components in US nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayfield, M.E.; Strosnider, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the aging of metal components in U.S. Light Water Reactors. The types of degradation being experienced in components such as the pressure vessel, piping, reactor internals, and steam generators, and the programs being implemented to manage the degradation are discussed. (author)

  17. Fission reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagawa, Katsuhiko.

    1991-01-01

    Cooling water is sent without using dynamic equipments upon loss of coolants accident in a pressure vessel by improving an arrangement of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. That is, a containing space is formed at the center of a suppression chamber for storing cooling water while being partitioned with each other, in which the pressure vessel is placed. Further, a water reservoir is formed above the pressure vessel. Then a water discharge pipe is connected to the reservoir for submerging the stored water over the pressure vessel upon occurrence of loss of coolants accident. Further, a water injection pipe is disposed between the pressure suppression chamber and the pressure vessel for injecting the cooling water in the pressure suppression chamber to the reactor core of the pressure vessel by the difference of a water head upon loss of coolants accident. With such a constitution, the pressure vessel has high earthquake proofness. Further, upon loss of coolants accident of the pressure vessel, the cooling water in the reservoir is discharged to submerge and cool the pressure vessel efficiently. Further, the reactor core of the pressure vessel can certainly be cooled by the cooling water of the pressure suppression chamber without relying on dynamic equipments. (I.S.)

  18. Unsteady hydraulic characteristics in pipe with elbow under high Reynolds condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, A.; Kimura, N.; Kamide, H.; Tobita, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, O-arai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    In the design of Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR), coolant velocity is beyond 9 m/s in the primary hot leg pipe of 1.27 m diameter. The Reynolds number in the piping reaches 4.2x10{sup 7}. Moreover, a short-elbow (r/D=1.0, r: curvature radius, D: pipe diameter) is adopted in the hot leg pipe in order to achieve compact plant layout and reduce plant construction cost. Therefore, the flow-induced vibration (FIV) arising from the piping geometry may occur in the short-elbow pipe. The FIV is due to the excitation force which is caused by the pressure fluctuation on the wall. The pressure fluctuation on the pipe wall is closely related with the flow fluctuation. In this study, water experiments using two types of 1/8 scaled elbows with different curvature ratio, r/D=1.0 and 1.5 (short-elbow and long-elbow), were conducted in order to investigate the mechanism of velocity and pressure fluctuation in the elbow and its downstream. The experiments were carried out at Re=5.4x10{sup 5} conditions. Measurement of velocity fluctuation and pressure fluctuation in two types of elbows with different curvature revealed that behavior of separation region and the circumferential secondary flow affected the pressure fluctuation on the wall of the elbow greatly. (author)

  19. Adaptation of eddy current methods to the multiple problems of reactor testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumm, W.

    1975-01-01

    In reactor testing, the eddy current method is mainly used for the testing of surface regions inside the pressure vessel, on welds and joints, and for the testing of thin-walled pipes, e.g. the heat exchanger pipes. (RW/AK) [de

  20. Failure probability estimate of type 304 stainless steel piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, W.L.; Awadalla, N.G.; Sindelar, R.L.; Mehta, H.S.; Ranganath, S.

    1989-01-01

    The primary source of in-service degradation of the SRS production reactor process water piping is intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). IGSCC has occurred in a limited number of weld heat affected zones, areas known to be susceptible to IGSCC. A model has been developed to combine crack growth rates, crack size distributions, in-service examination reliability estimates and other considerations to estimate the pipe large-break frequency. This frequency estimates the probability that an IGSCC crack will initiate, escape detection by ultrasonic (UT) examination, and grow to instability prior to extending through-wall and being detected by the sensitive leak detection system. These events are combined as the product of four factors: (1) the probability that a given weld heat affected zone contains IGSCC; (2) the conditional probability, given the presence of IGSCC, that the cracking will escape detection during UT examination; (3) the conditional probability, given a crack escapes detection by UT, that it will not grow through-wall and be detected by leakage; (4) the conditional probability, given a crack is not detected by leakage, that it grows to instability prior to the next UT exam. These four factors estimate the occurrence of several conditions that must coexist in order for a crack to lead to a large break of the process water piping. When evaluated for the SRS production reactors, they produce an extremely low break frequency. The objective of this paper is to present the assumptions, methodology, results and conclusions of a probabilistic evaluation for the direct failure of the primary coolant piping resulting from normal operation and seismic loads. This evaluation was performed to support the ongoing PRA effort and to complement deterministic analyses addressing the credibility of a double-ended guillotine break

  1. A leak-before-break strategy for CANDU primary piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, M.L.; Kozluk, M.J.; Lin, T.C.; Manning, B.W.; Vijay, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics have made it possible to assess the stability of cracks in ductile piping systems. These technological developments have been used by Ontario Hydro as the nucleus of an approach for demonstrating that CANDU primary heat transport piping systems will not break catastrophically; at worst they would leak at a detectable rate. This leak-before-break approach has been taken on the Darlington nuclear generating station as a design stage alternative to the provision of pipe whip restraints on large diameter, primary heat transport system piping. Positive conclusions reached via this approach are considered sufficient to exclude the requirement to provide protective devices, such as pipe whip restraints. In arriving at the proposed leak-before-break approach a review of current and proposed leak-before-break licensing positions of other jurisdictions (particularly those in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany) was carried out. The approach presented makes use of recent American developments in the area of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. It also gives consideration to aspects which are unique to the pressurized heavy water (CANDU) reactors used by Ontario Hydro. The proposed leak-before-break approach is described and its use is illustrated by applying it to the Darlington generating station primary heat transport system pump suction piping. (author)

  2. EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor-II] system surveillance using pattern recognition software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mott, J.E.; Radtke, W.H.; King, R.W.

    1986-02-01

    The problem of most accurately determining the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) reactor outlet temperature from currently available plant signals is investigated. Historically, the reactor outlet pipe was originally instrumented with 8 temperature sensors but, during 22 years of operation, all these instruments have failed except for one remaining thermocouple, and its output had recently become suspect. Using pattern recognition methods to compare values of 129 plant signals for similarities over a 7 month period spanning reconfiguration of the core and recalibration of many plant signals, it was determined that the remaining reactor outlet pipe thermocouple is still useful as an indicator of true mixed mean reactor outlet temperature. Application of this methodology to investigate one specific signal has automatically validated the vast majority of the 129 signals used for pattern recognition and also highlighted a few inconsistent signals for further investigation

  3. Preliminary Assessment of Two Alternative Core Design Concepts for the Special Purpose Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Werner, James E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hummel, Andrew J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kennedy, John C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O' Brien, Robert C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dion, Axel M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wright, Richard N. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ananth, Krishnan P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The Special Purpose Reactor (SPR) is a small 5 MWt, heat pipe-cooled, fast reactor based on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Mega-Power concept. The LANL concept features a stainless steel monolithic core structure with drilled channels for UO2 pellet stacks and evaporator sections of the heat pipes. Two alternative active core designs are presented here that replace the monolithic core structure with simpler and easier to manufacture fuel elements. The two new core designs are simply referred to as Design A and Design B. In addition to ease of manufacturability, the fuel elements for both Design A and Design B can be individually fabricated, assembled, inspected, tested, and qualified prior to their installation into the reactor core leading to greater reactor system reliability and safety. Design A fuel elements will require the development of a new hexagonally-shaped UO2 fuel pellet. The Design A configuration will consist of an array of hexagonally-shaped fuel elements with each fuel element having a central heat pipe. This hexagonal fuel element configuration results in four radial gaps or thermal resistances per element. Neither the fuel element development, nor the radial gap issue are deemed to be serious and should not impact an aggressive reactor deployment schedule. Design B uses embedded arrays of heat pipes and fuel pins in a double-wall tank filled with liquid metal sodium. Sodium is used to thermally bond the heat pipes to the fuel pins, but its usage may create reactor transportation and regulatory challenges. An independent panel of U.S. manufacturing experts has preliminarily assessed the three SPR core designs and views Design A as simplest to manufacture. Herein are the results of a preliminary neutronic, thermal, mechanical, material, and manufacturing assessment of both Design A and Design B along with comparisons to the LANL concept (monolithic core structure). Despite the active core differences, all three reactor concepts behave

  4. WWER type reactor primary loop imitation on large test loop facility in MARIA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldysh, A.; Strupchevski, A.; Kmetek, Eh.; Spasskov, V.P.; Shumskij, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    At present in Poland in cooperation with USSR a nuclear water loop test facility (WL) in 'MARIA' reactor in Sverke is under construction. The program objective is to investigate processes occuring in WWER reactor under emergency conditions, first of all after the break of the mainprimary loop circulation pipe-line. WL with the power of about 600 kW consists of three major parts: 1) an active loop, imitating the undamaged loops of the WWER reactor; 2) a passive loop assignedfor modelling the broken loop of the WWER reactor; 3) the emergency core cooling system imitating the corresponding full-scale system. The fuel rod bundle consists of 18 1 m long rods. They were fabricated according to the standard WWER fuel technology. In the report some general principles of WWERbehaviour imitation under emergency conditions are given. They are based on the operation experience obtained from 'SEMISCALE' and 'LOFT' test facilities in the USA. A description of separate modelling factors and criteria effects on the development of 'LOCA'-type accident is presented (the break cross-section to the primary loop volume ratio, the pressure differential between inlet and outlet reactor chambers, the pressure drop rate in the loop, the coolant flow rate throuh the core etc.). As an example a comparison of calculated flow rate variations for the WWER-1000 reactor and the model during the loss-of-coolant accident with the main pipe-line break at the core inlet is given. Calculations have been carried out with the use of TECH'-M code [ru

  5. Ultrasonic measurements on residual stress in autofrettged thick walled petroleum pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woias, G.; Mizera, J.

    2008-01-01

    optimal specimen length as 60 mm required beam time is for three slices measurements in depth of wall. This work is to compare the neutron stresses on ultrasound technique and FEM. Results of FEM modeling shows the axial compression zone in the inner side of the pipe. The residual stresses are growing while the pipe is in exploitation. Non-destructive method of measurements - ultrasonic - will be the best way of life time assessment and degradation monitoring. That's why the results obtained with other residual stresses measuring methods are significant. The measurements using neutron gauge are planned to be done on the inner surface of the pipe. According to the FEM model the dimensions of the sample to rule out any risk of residual stresses relaxation are described in inferences by FEM analysis. To assess residual stresses with 5% accuracy it is required to measure slice cut samples not less that two pipe's thickness length - 60 cm. Three samples were prepared to be measured: 1) New pipe after autofrettaging [Np]; 2) Pipe after exploitation from the upper part of the reactor - heating zone [11/1]; 3) Pipe from lower part - cooling zone [75]. In the first part of the experiment, the pipe no [11/1] has been measured for axial and hoop stresses. The pipe [Np] was measured for axial stresses. The aim of these measurements will be measuring hoop residual stress on a non-used pipe after autofrettaging [Np] as well as hoop and axial stresses in a pipe taken from the lower part of the reactor - the cooling zone. (author)

  6. [Leak on underground pipings. Corrosion in containment spray systems at Bugey NPP (Preliminary Information)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    During last refuelling shutdown at BUGEY 3, this year on the fourteenth of February, the plant operator discovered a wide corrosion on the reactor vessel head and its equipments. The reactor head vessel had recently been replaced by a new one since last reactor shutdown in order to treat the vessel head adaptor safety problem. The cause of this corrosion is a small primary leak on this pipe flange. The leak had been found fortuitously during a field inspection of valves while there was not reactor charge, seven months before the reactor was shutdown for refuelling. At this time the primary leak had been leaktighted by closure of a manual valve and the reactor was restarted up

  7. Seminar on countermeasures for pipe cracking in BWRs. Volume 4 of 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-05-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of welded type 304 stainless steel in the recirculation piping of boiling water reactors has had an impact on plant availability and reliability since the fall of 1974. Investigations of this problem have resulted in significant progress in understanding the phenomenon and providing an engineering resolution by developing and qualifying countermeasures. A number of these countermeasures including solution heat treatment, corrosion resistant clad, alternate pipe materials, induction heating stress improvement and heat sink welding have been implemented. Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented.

  8. Seminar on countermeasures for pipe cracking in BWRs. Volume 2 of 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-05-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of welded type 304 stainless steel in the recirculation piping of boiling water reactors has had an impact on plant availability and reliability since the fall of 1974. Investigtions of this problem have resulted in significant progress in understanding the phenomenon and providing an engineering resolution by developing and qualifying countermeasures. A number of these countermeasures including solution heat treatment, corrosion resistant clad, alternate pipe materials, induction heating stress improvement and heat sink welding have been implemented. Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented.

  9. Plastic fracture instability analysis of wall breakthrough in a circumferentially cracked pipe subjected to bending loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    A method of analyzing internal surface circumferential cracks in ductile reactor piping is presented. The method utilizes an alternate but equivalent definition of the J-integral based on nonlinear structural compliance. The analysis is valid for situations where the cross section containing the crack is fully yielded. Results are obtained for radial and circumferential crack growth for pipes subjected to bending. The stability of radial crack growth (wall breakthrough) is assessed using the J-integral-based tearing modulus approach. The analysis is shown to be in agreement with experimental results on the stability of surface crack growth in Type 304 stainless stee pipes. Example quantitative results for fracture instability assessments for nuclear piping are presented. 23 refs

  10. Plastic fracture instability analysis of wall breakthrough in a circumferentially cracked pipe subjected to bending loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-07-01

    A method of analyzing internal surface circumferential cracks in ductile reactor piping is presented. The method utilizes an alternate but equivalent definition of the J-integral based on nonlinear structural compliance. The analysis is valid for situations where the cross section containing the crack is fully yielded. Results are obtained for radial and circumferential crack growth for pipes subjected to bending. The stability of radial crack growth (wall breakthrough) is assessed using the J-integral-based tearing modulus approach. The analysis is shown to be in agreement with experimental results on the stability of surface crack growth in Type 304 stainless stee pipes. Example quantitative results for fracture instability assessments for nuclear piping are presented. 23 refs.

  11. Characterisation of girth pipe weld for primary heat transport system of pressurised heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P.K.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2002-01-01

    The weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) associated with the girth weld are most vulnerable regions of the piping system. The different regions of the weld joint such as the weld metal, HAZ and base metal lead to heterogeneous mechanical and metallurgical properties of the joints. Due to their different metallurgical and mechanical properties, the amounts of damage produced in these regions are different when the component is subjected to service condition. Thus, it is imperative to know the characteristics of these regions of a pipe weld in order to identify the weakest zone for safe designing of high energy piping components. In view of this necessity the present study has been planned to carry out complete characterisation of the weld joint of SA 333 Gr.6 steel pipe, in terms of its metallurgical, mechanical and fracture properties. The mechanical and fracture mechanics properties of the base metal, weld deposit and HAZ have been compared and correlated with reference to their microstructures. Weld joints of SA 333 Gr.6 steel pipe have been prepared by using GTAW root pass and SMAW filling of V-grove as per recommended welding procedure specifications (WPS) conforming to ASME Sec IX commonly used to fabricate nuclear piping system components. The emphasis of the study is to characterise base, weld and HAZ of the pipe weld in terms of chemical, metallurgical, mechanical and fracture mechanics properties. The fracture toughness behaviour of the welds and HAZ has been characterised by J-integral parameters. The fatigue crack growth rate has been characterised by Paris Law. Stretched zone width (SZW) has been measured under SEM to evaluate initiation fracture toughness. The estimated initiation fracture toughness based on SZW and blunting line given by EGF recommendation have been compared. The fracture mechanics properties of base, weld and HAZ has been determined and compared. The fracture mechanics properties of the weld and HAZ have been correlated to their

  12. Pipe whip: a summary of the damage observed in BNL pipe-on-pipe impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes examples of the damage resulting from the impact of a whipping pipe on a nearby pressurised pipe. The work is a by-product of a study of the motion of a whipping pipe. The tests were conducted with small-diameter pipes mounted in rigid supports and hence the results are not directly applicable to large-scale plant applications where flexible support mountings are employed. The results illustrate the influence of whipping pipe energy, impact position and support type on the damage sustained by the target pipe. (author)

  13. Power control device for heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Hidesuke; Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To improve self controllability of a nuclear power plant, as well as enable continuous power level control by a controlled flow of moderators in void pipes provided in a reactor core. Constitution: Hollow void pipes are provided in a reactor core to which a heavy water recycle loop for power control, a heavy water recycle pump for power control, a heavy water temperature regulator and a heavy water flow rate control valve for power control are connected in series to constitute a heavy water recycle loop for flowing heavy water moderators. The void ratio in each of the void pipes are calculated by a process computer to determine the flow rate and the temperature for the recycled heavy water. Based on the above calculation result, the heavy water temperature regulator is actuated by way of a temperature setter at the heavy water inlet and the heavy water flow rate is controlled by the actuation of the heavy water flow rate control valve. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Temperature control with high performance gravity-assist heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemme, J.E.; Deverall, J.E.; Keddy, E.S.; Phillips, J.R.; Ranken, W.A.

    1975-01-01

    The development of high performance heat pipes for controlling the temperature of irradiation experiments in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) is described. Because this application involves vertical operation in a gravity-assist mode with the evaporator down, several tests were made with sodium and potassium heat pipes in this position to establish their performance limits as a function of operating temperature. Best performance was achieved with a new wick structure consisting of a fine porous liner next to the heat-pipe wall and four helical channels next to the vapor passage. Also, a new modification of heat-pipe theory was discovered for determining performance limits for this type of wick. In its most rudimentary form, this modification says that the dynamic pressure gradient in the vapor stream cannot exceed the gravity gradient causing return of liquid. Once this modification was expressed in the form of a limiting equation, and a term was added to account for the slight capillary force developed in the channels, good agreement was obtained between calculated limits and those measured in several tests with both sodium and potassium. These tests showed rather conclusively that only half of the liquid head in the evaporator section was causing return of condensate, whereas existing theory predicts that the full head of liquid in the heat pipe is available for condensate return. (U.S.)

  15. Control and metallurgical examination on safety injection piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thebault, Y.; Grandjean, Y.; Gauthier, V.; Lambert, B.; Debustcher, B.

    1998-01-01

    From 1992 until 1997, cracking phenomena by thermal fatigue regarding safety injection piping were evidenced on several PWR 900 MW reactors. These events led EDF to the implementation of a first maintenance programme. In December 1996, a new leak occurred on an EDF 900 MW PWR in operation and was located on a safety injection pipe. In site inspections and metallurgical examinations carried out in the EDF hot Laboratory evidenced defects inside the pipe, out of the welding areas. These degradations are the consequence of a fatigue cracking phenomenon with thermal cycling linked to permanent tensile stresses. Following this incident, a programme of non destructive testing was implemented on all the EDF 900 MW plants. These inspections exhibited the same defects on other PWR 900 MW units. The results of the metallurgical examinations and also in site inspection results allowed EDF to understand the phenomenon and to validate an inspection programme on the one hand and a modification of the design of the circuits on the other hand. (authors)

  16. Pipe support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollono, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    A pipe support for high temperature, thin-walled piping runs such as those used in nuclear systems is described. A section of the pipe to be suppported is encircled by a tubular inner member comprised of two walls with an annular space therebetween. Compacted load-bearing thermal insulation is encapsulated within the annular space, and the inner member is clamped to the pipe by a constant clamping force split-ring clamp. The clamp may be connected to pipe hangers which provide desired support for the pipe

  17. Check valve slam waterhammer in piping systems equipped with multiple parallel pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sponsel, J.; Bird, E.; Zarechnak, A.

    1993-01-01

    The low pressure safety injection system at the calvert cliff's plant is designed to provide cooling water to the reactor in the event of a postulated accident and for reactor cool-down and decay heat removal during normal maintenance and refueling. This system experienced repeated damage to the axial piping supports on the pump section and the discharge headers due to the check valve phenomenon. To determine the cause, testing was performed in both the LPSI and CCW systems

  18. Estimation of reactor pool water temperature after shutdown in JRR-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Masahiro; Sato, Mitsugu; Kakefuda, Kazuhiro

    1999-01-01

    The reactor pool water temperature increasing by the decay heat was estimated by calculation. The reactor pool water temperature was calculated by increased enthalpy that was estimated by the reactor decay heat, the heat released from the reactor biological shielding concrete, reactor pool water surface, the heat conduction from the canal and the core inlet piping. These results of calculation were compared with the past measured data. As the results of estimation, after the JRR-3M shutdown, the calculated reactor pool temperature first increased sharply. This is because the decay heat was the major contribution. And then, rate of increased reactor pool temperature decreased. This is because the ratio of heat released from reactor biological shielding concrete and core inlet piping to the decay heat increased. Besides, the calculated reactor pool water temperature agreed with the past measured data in consequence of correcting the decay heat and the released heat. The corrected coefficient k 1 of decay heat was 0.74 - 0.80. And the corrected coefficient k 2 of heat released from the reactor biological shielding concrete was 3.5 - 4.5. (author)

  19. Single failure effects of reactor coolant system large bore hydraulic snubbers for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, T.S.; Park, S.H.; Sung, K.K.; Kim, T.W.; Jheon, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    A potential snubber single failure is one of the safety significances identified in General Safety Issue 113 for Large Bore Hydraulic Snubber (LBHS) dynamic qualification. This paper investigates dynamic structural effects of single failures of the steam generator and reactor coolant pump snubbers in Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant by performing the time history dynamic analyses for the reactor coolant system under seismic and postulated pipe break events. The seismic input motions considered are the synthesized ground time histories conforming to SRP 3.7.1, and he postulated pipe break input loadings result from steam generator main seam line and feedwater line pipe breaks which govern pipe breaks remaining after applying LBB to the main coolant line and primary side ranch lines equal to and greater than 12 inch nominal pipe size

  20. Reactor pressure boundary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Chi, S. H.; Lee, B. S.

    2002-04-01

    With a long-term operation of nuclear power plants, the component materials are degraded under severe reactor conditions such as neutron irradiation, high temperature, high pressure and corrosive environment. It is necessary to establish the reliable and practical technologies for improving and developing the component materials and for evaluating the mechanical properties. Especially, it is very important to investigate the technologies for reactor pressure boundary materials such as reactor vessel and pipings in accordance with their critical roles. Therefore, this study was focused on developing and advancing the microstructural/micro-mechanical evaluation technologies, and on evaluating the neutron irradiation characteristics and radiation effects analysis technology of the reactor pressure boundary materials, and also on establishing a basis of nuclear material property database

  1. Reactor feedwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagaya, Hiroyuki; Tominaga, Kenji.

    1993-01-01

    In a simplified water type reactor using a gravitationally dropping emergency core cooling system (ECCS), the present invention effectively prevents remaining high temperature water in feedwater pipelines from flowing into the reactor upon occurrence of abnormal events. That is, (1) upon LOCA, if a feedwater pipeline injection valve is closed, boiling under reduced pressure of the remaining high temperature water occurs in the feedwater pipelines, generated steams prevent the remaining high temperature water from flowing into the reactor. Accordingly, the reactor is depressurized rapidly. (2) The feedwater pipeline injection valve is closed and a bypassing valve is opened. Steams generated by boiling under reduced pressure of the remaining high temperature water in the feedwater pipelines are released to a condensator or a suppression pool passing through bypass pipelines. As a result, the remaining high temperature water is prevented from flowing into the reactor. Accordingly, the reactor is rapidly depressurized and cooled. It is possible to accelerate the depressurization of the reactor by the method described above. Further, load on the depressurization valve disposed to a main steam pipe can be reduced. (I.S.)

  2. Effects of Inner Surface Roughness and Asymmetric Pipe Flow on Accuracy of Profile Factor for Ultrasonic Flow Meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michitsugu Mori; Kenichi Tezuka; Yasushi Takeda

    2006-01-01

    Flow profile factors (PFs), which adjust measurements to real flow rates, also strongly depend on flow profiles. To determine profile factors for actual power plants, manufactures of flowmeters usually conduct factory calibration tests under ambient flow conditions. Indeed, flow measurements with high accuracy for reactor feedwater require them to conduct calibration tests under real conditions, such as liquid conditions and piping layouts. On the contrary, as nuclear power plants are highly aging, readings of flowmeters for reactor feedwater systems drift due to the changes of flow profiles. The causes of those deviations are affected by the change of wall roughness of inner surface of pipings. We have conducted experiments to quantify the effects of flow patterns on the PFs due to pipe roughness and asymmetric flow, and the results of our experiments have shown the effects of elbows and pipe inner roughness, which strongly affect to the creation of the flow patterns. Those changes of flow patterns lead to large errors in measurements with transit time (time-of-flight: TOF) ultrasonic flow meters. In those experiments, changes of pipe roughness result in the changes of PFs with certain errors. Therefore, we must take into account those effects in order to measure the flow rates of feedwater with better accuracy in actual power plants. (authors)

  3. Emergency cooling device for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hisamichi; Naito, Masanori; Sato, Chikara; Chino, Koichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To pour high pressure cooling water into a core, when coolant is lost in a boiling water reactor, thereby restraining the rise of fuel cladding. Structure: A control rod guiding pipe, which is moved up and down by a control rod, is mounted on the bottom of a pressure vessel, the control rod guiding pipe being communicated with a high pressure cooling water tank positioned externally of the pressure vessel, and a differential in pressure between the pressure vessel and the aforesaid tank is detected when trouble of coolant loss occurs, and the high pressure cooling water within the tank is poured into the core through the control rod guiding pipe to restrain the rise of fuel cladding. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Store for burnt-up fuel elements of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpf, H.

    1981-01-01

    Burnt-up fuel elements of nuclear reactors have to be cooled during storage. For this reason the boxes which surround the fuel elements can have cooling air flowing round them in natural flow. This air is taken through the walls of a storage building through zones of parallel pipes, whose diameter and spacing are in the ratio of 1 : 0.5 to 1 : 2. The pipes have dust filters. Prefilters with fan drive are situated in parallel with the inlet pipe zones. (orig.) [de

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Weber, R.; Bauer, A.

    1975-01-01

    The refuelling of a PWR power reactor of about 1,200 MWe is performed by a transport pipe in the containment leading from an external to an internal fuel pit. A wagon to transport the fuel elements can go from a vertical loading position to an also vertical deloading position in the inner fuel pit via guide rollers. The necessary horizontal movement is effected by means of a cable line through the transport pipe which is inclined at least 10 0 . Gravity thus helps in the movement to the deloading position. The cable line with winch is fastened outside the containment. Swivelling devices tip the wagon from the horizontal to the vertical position or vice versa. Loading and deloading are done laterally. (TK/LH) [de

  6. The stability of growth of a through-wall circumferential crack in a cylindrical pipe subjected to bending deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1987-01-01

    Tada, Paris and Gamble have used the tearing modulus approach to examine the stability of growth of a through-wall circumferential crack in a 304 stainless steel circular cylindrical pipe subject to bending deformation. They showed that crack growth is stable, in the sense that growth requires the rotation imposed at the pipe-ends to be increased, provided the pipe length is less than a critical length Lsub(c), which is given by their analysis. The Tada-Paris-Gamble analysis focuses on the question of the stability, or otherwise, of crack growth at the onset of crack extension. The analysis does not consider the possibilities that (a) instability might occur after some stable crack growth, and (b) arrest might occur after some unstable growth. A study of these aspects of the circumferential crack growth problem using the tearing modulus approach is precluded by the geometry dependence of the J-crack growth resistance curve. Consequently the present paper uses a crack tip opening angle criterion to describe crack growth, and thereby demonstrates that possibilities (a) and (b) should both occur, depending on the initial crack length and pipe length. In terms of relevance to the technologically important problem of cracking in Boiling Water Reactor piping, the important conclusion stemming from the paper's analysis is that stability of crack growth after the onset of crack extension is assured if the pipe length is less than a critical length L'sub(c). L'sub(c) is less than Lsub(c), the critical length relevant to the onset of crack extension, but it is still appreciably greater than the pipe run lengths in actual reactor piping systems, and safety against guillotine failure of a pipe is therefore generally assured. (author)

  7. The flow measurement methods for the primary system of integral reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Seo, J. K.; Lee, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    It is the common features of the integral reactors that the main components of the primary system are installed within the reactor vessel, and so there are no any flow pipes connecting the reactor coolant pumps or steam generators. Due to no any flow pipes, it is impossible to measure the differential pressure at the primary system of the integral reactors, and it also makes impossible measure the primary coolant flow rate. The objective of the study is to draw up the flow measurement methods for the primary system of integral reactors. As a result of the review, we have made a selection of the flow measurement method by pump speed, bt HBM, and by pump motor power as the flow measurement methods for the primary system of integral reactors. Peculiarly, we did not found out a precedent which the direct pump motor power-flow rate curve is used as the flow measurement method in the existing commercial nuclear power reactors. Therefore, to use this method for integral reactors, it is needed to bear the follow-up measures in mind. The follow-up measures is included in this report

  8. Pipe clamp effects on thin-walled pipe design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindquist, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    Clamp induced stresses in FFTF piping are sufficiently large to require structural assessment. The basic principles and procedures used in analyzing FFTF piping at clamp support locations for compliance with ASME Code rules are given. Typical results from a three-dimensional shell finite element pipe model with clamp loads applied over the clamp/pipe contact area are shown. Analyses performed to categorize clamp induced piping loads as primary or secondary in nature are described. The ELCLAMP Computer Code, which performs analyses at clamp locations combining clamp induced stresses with stresses from overall piping system loads, is discussed. Grouping and enveloping methods to reduce the number of individual clamp locations requiring analysis are described

  9. Ultrasound propagation in steel piping at electric power plant using clamp-on ultrasonic pulse doppler velocity-profile flowmeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, Kenichi; Mori, Michitsugu; Wada, Sanehiro; Aritomi, Masanori; Kikura, Hiroshige

    2008-01-01

    Venturi nozzles are widely used to measure the flow rates of reactor feedwater. This flow rate of nuclear reactor feedwater is an important factor in the operation of nuclear power reactors. Some other types of flowmeters have been proposed to improve measurement accuracy. The ultrasonic pulse Doppler velocity-profile flowmeter is expected to be a candidate method because it can measure the flow profiles across the pipe cross sections. For the accurate estimation of the flow velocity, the incidence angle of ultrasonic entering the fluid should be carefully estimated by the theoretical approach. However, the evaluation of the ultrasound propagation is not straightforward for the several reasons such as temperature gradient in the wedge or mode conversion at the interface between the wedge and pipe. In recent years, the simulation code for ultrasound propagation has come into use in the nuclear field for nondestructive testing. This article analyzes and discusses ultrasound propagation in steel piping and water, using the 3D-FEM simulation code and the Kirchhoff method, as it relates to the flow profile measurements in power plants with the ultrasonic pulse Doppler velocity-profile flowmeter. (author)

  10. Progress on the degraded piping program - Phase II. Battelle Columbus Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkowski, Gery; Ahmad, J.; Barnes, C.; Brust, F.; Guerrieri, D.; Kramer, G.; Landow, M.; Marschall, C.; Nakagaki, M.; Papaspyropoulos; Scott, P.

    1988-01-01

    The overall objective of the Degraded Piping Program is to verify and improve simple estimation schemes to predict the fracture behavior of circumferentially cracked pipe. The program is limited to quasi-static fracture and cracks in straight pipe. There are a variety of materials, flaw geometries, pipe sizes, and loading conditions evaluated. The Degraded Piping Program,which has been extended for one more year, will supply results that provide a basis for regulatory decisions regard applications for leak-before-break (LBB) and In-service flaw assessment. The significance of our results are summarized relative to how they may affect regulatory technical needs. The scope of the work in The Degraded Piping Program includes both analytical and experimental efforts. The experimental efforts have concentrated on testing circumferentially cracked pipe at 550 F (288 C) under si-static loading. Many of the tasks within this program were undertaken with the objective of determining if any detailed efforts were needed. This is true for both the analytical and experimental efforts. i e of the tasks have been slightly expanded during the course of the gram, while others were found to be of lesser concern and further efforts in those areas were not pursued. The results of this summary include the efforts of the third year. These efforts have contributed considerably to the understanding of the application of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to nuclear piping systems. Rather than listing the significant technical contributions, these contributions are summarized below in relation to their application to LBB analyses, in-service flaw assessment criteria, and (3) material characterization and unusual behavior of nuclear piping materials at light water reactor (LWR) temperatures

  11. Technical basis for the extension of ASME Code Case N-494 for assessment of austenitic piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    In 1990, the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for Nuclear Components approved Code Case N-494 as an alternative procedure for evaluating laws in Light Water Reactor alterative procedure for evaluating flaws in Light Water Reactor (LWR) ferritic piping. The approach is an alternative to Appendix H of the ASME Code and alloys the user to remove some unnecessary conservatism in the existing procedure by allowing the use of pipe specific material properties. The Code Case is an implementation of the methodology of the Deformation Plasticity Failure Assessment diagram (DPFAD). The key ingredient in the application of DPFAD is that the material stress-strain curve must be in the format of a simple power law hardening stress-strain curve such as the Ramberg-Osgood (R-O) model. Ferritic materials can be accurately fit by the R-O model and, therefore, it was natural to use the DPFAD methodology for the assessment of LWR ferritic piping. An extension of Code Case N-494 to austenitic piping required a modification of the existing DPFAD methodology. The Code Case N-494 approach was revised using the PWFAD procedure in the same manner as in the development of the original N-494 approach for ferritic materials. A lower bound stress-strain curve was used to generate a PWFAD curve for the geometry of a part-through wall circumferential flaw in a cylinder under tension. Earlier work demonstrated that a cylinder under axial tension with a 50% flaw depth, 90 degrees in circumference, and radius to thickness of 10, produced a lower bound FAD curve. Validation of the new proposed Code Case procedure for austenitic piping was performed using actual pipe test data. Using the lower bound PWFAD curve, pipe test results were conservatively predicted. The resultant development of ht PWFAD curve for austenitic piping led to a revision of Code Case N-494 to include a procedure for assessment of flaws in austenitic piping

  12. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Park, J.Y.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1992 to March 1993. Fatigue and EAC of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (1) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels. (2) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs), (3) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence, and (4) EAC of low-alloy steels. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions and chromium-nickel-plated A533-Gr B steel in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289 degrees C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for ferritic steels in oxygenated water and correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

  13. Nuclear reactor system study for NASA/JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R. G.; Lundberg, L. B.; Keddy, E. S.; Koenig, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor shielding, safety studies, and heat pipe development work are described. Monte Carlo calculations of gamma and neutron shield configurations show that substantial weight penalties are incurred if exposure at 25 m to neutrons and gammas must be limited to 10 to the 12th power nvt and 10 to the 6th power rad, instead of the 10 to the 13th power nvt and 10 to the 7th power rad values used earlier. For a 1.6 MW sub t reactor, the required shield weight increases from 400 to 815 kg. Water immersion critically calculations were extended to study the effect of water in fuel void spaces as well as in the core heat pipes. These show that the insertion into the core of eight blades of B4C with a mass totaling 2.5 kg will guarantee subcriticality. The design, fabrication procedure, and testing of a 4m long molybdenum/lithium heat pipe are described. It appears that an excess of oxygen in the wick prevented the attainment of expected performance capability.

  14. Improved reactor cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, L.R.; Demarchais, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A reactor pressure vessel disposed in a cavity has coolant inlet or outlet pipes extending through passages in the cavity walls and welded to pressure nozzles. The cavity wall has means for directing fluid away from a break at a weld away from the pressure vessel, and means for inhibiting flow of fluid toward the vessel. (author)

  15. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baddley, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    A method of constructing a radiation shielding plug for use in the roof of the coolant containment vault of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described. The construction allows relative movement of that part of service cables and pipes which are carried by the fixed roof and that part which is carried by the rotatable plug. (U.K.)

  16. Development of piping evaluation diagram for LBB application to KNGR surge line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, K. S.; Park, W. B.; Kim, J. M.; Choi, T. S.; Yang, J. S.; Park, C. Y.

    1998-01-01

    Plant specific data, such as pipe geometry, material properties and pipe loads, are required in order to evaluate Leak-Before-Break (LBB) applicability to piping systems in nuclear power plant under the construction. However, the existing method of LBB evaluation for KSNP's can not be used for newly developed nuclear plants such as Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) which material properties is not available and LBB evaluation is required during design process. In order to solve this problem during developing process for KNGR surge line LBB Piping Evaluation Diagram (PED), which is independent of piping geometry and has a function of the loads applied in piping system, is developed in this paper. Also, in order to evaluate LBB applicability during construction process with only the comparative evaluation of material properties between actually used and expected, the expected changes of material properties are considered in the PED. The PED, therefore, can be used for quick LBB evaluation of KNGR surge line in the process of both design and construction. The benefit obtained by using the PED is : 1) to be able to very quickly confirm LBB applicability without calculating any leakage crack length for all concerned piping locations in the process of both iterative design for optimal routing and construction and 2) to save significantly a lot of computing times required for the corresponding LBB analyses

  17. A lead-before-break strategy for primary heat transport piping of 500 MWe Indian PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) is being used to design the primary heat transport piping system of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR). The work is categorized in three directions to demonstrate three levels of safety against sudden catastrophic break. Level 1 is inherent in the design procedure of piping system as per ASME Sec.III with a well defined factor of safety. Level 2 consists of fatigue crack growth study of a postulated part-through flaw at the inside surface of pipes. Level 3 is stability analysis of a postulated leakage size flaw under the maximum credible loading condition. Developmental work related to demonstration of level 2 and level 3 confidence is described in this paper. In a case study on fatigue crack growth on PHT straight pipes for level 2, negligible crack growth is predicted for the life of the reactor. For level 3 analysis, the R6 method has been adopted. A database to evaluate SIF of elbows with throughwall flaws under combined internal pressure and bending moment has been generated to provide one of the inputs for R6 method. The methodology of safety assessment of elbow using R6 method has been demonstrated for a typical pump discharge elbow. In this analysis, limit load of the cracked elbow has been determined by carrying out elasto-plastic finite element analysis. The limit load results compared well with those given by Miller. However, it requires further study to give a general form of limit load solution. On the experimental front, a set of small diameter pipe fracture experiments have been carried out at room temperature and 300{degrees}C. Two important observations of the experiments are - appreciable drop in maximum load at 300{degrees}C in case of SS pipes and out-of-plane crack growth in case of CS pipes. Experimental load deflection curves are finally compared with five J-estimation schemes predictions. A material database of PHT piping materials is also being generated for use in LBB analysis.

  18. A lead-before-break strategy for primary heat transport piping of 500 MWe Indian PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    1997-01-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) is being used to design the primary heat transport piping system of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR). The work is categorized in three directions to demonstrate three levels of safety against sudden catastrophic break. Level 1 is inherent in the design procedure of piping system as per ASME Sec.III with a well defined factor of safety. Level 2 consists of fatigue crack growth study of a postulated part-through flaw at the inside surface of pipes. Level 3 is stability analysis of a postulated leakage size flaw under the maximum credible loading condition. Developmental work related to demonstration of level 2 and level 3 confidence is described in this paper. In a case study on fatigue crack growth on PHT straight pipes for level 2, negligible crack growth is predicted for the life of the reactor. For level 3 analysis, the R6 method has been adopted. A database to evaluate SIF of elbows with throughwall flaws under combined internal pressure and bending moment has been generated to provide one of the inputs for R6 method. The methodology of safety assessment of elbow using R6 method has been demonstrated for a typical pump discharge elbow. In this analysis, limit load of the cracked elbow has been determined by carrying out elasto-plastic finite element analysis. The limit load results compared well with those given by Miller. However, it requires further study to give a general form of limit load solution. On the experimental front, a set of small diameter pipe fracture experiments have been carried out at room temperature and 300 degrees C. Two important observations of the experiments are - appreciable drop in maximum load at 300 degrees C in case of SS pipes and out-of-plane crack growth in case of CS pipes. Experimental load deflection curves are finally compared with five J-estimation schemes predictions. A material database of PHT piping materials is also being generated for use in LBB analysis

  19. Using Low-Frequency Phased Arrays to Detect Cracks in Cast Austenitic Piping Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a multi-year program funded by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) to address NDE reliability of inservice inspection (ISI) programs, recent studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing novel NDE approaches for the inspection of coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the US NRC on the utility, effectiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) inspection techniques as related to the ISI of primary piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This paper describes progress, recent developments and early results from an assessment of a portion of this work relating to the ultrasonic low frequency phased array inspection technique. Westinghouse Owner's Group (WOG) cast stainless steel pipe segments with thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks, PNNL samples containing thermal fatigue cracks and several blank vintage specimens having very coarse grains that are representative of early centrifugally cast piping installed in PWRs, are being used for assessing the inspection method. The phased array approach was implemented using an R/D Tech Tomoscan III system operating at 1.0 MHz and 500 kHz, providing composite volumetric images of the samples. Several dual, transmit-receive, custom designed low-frequency arrays are employed in laboratory trials. Results from laboratory studies for assessing detection of thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks in cast stainless steel piping welds are discussed

  20. Structural dynamics in fast reactor accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fistedis, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    Analyses and codes are under development combining the hydrodynamics and solid mechanics (and more recently the bubble dynamics) phenomena to gage the stresses, strains, and deformations of important primary components, as well as the overall adequacy of primary and secondary containments. An arbitrary partition of the structural components treated evolves into (1) a core mechanics effort; and (2) a primary system and containment program. The primary system and containment program treats the structural response of components beyond the core, starting with the core barrel. Combined hydrodynamics-solid mechanics codes provide transient stresses and strains and final deformations for components such as the reactor vessel, reactor cover, cover holddown bolts, as well as the pulses for which the primary piping system is to be analyzed. Both, Lagrangian and Eulerian two-dimensional codes are under development, which provide greater accuracy and longer durations for the treatment of HCDA. The codes are being augmented with bubble migration capability pertaining to the latter stages of the HCDA, after slug impact. Recent developments involve the adaptation of the 2-D Eulerian primary system code to the 2-D elastic-plastic treatment of primary piping. Pulses are provided at the vessel-primary piping interfaces of the inlet and outlet nozzles, calculation includes the elbows and pressure drops along the components of the primary piping system. Recent improvements to the primary containment codes include introduction of bending strength in materials, Langrangian mesh regularization techniques, and treatment of energy absorbing materials for the slug impact. Another development involves the combination of a 2-D finite element code for the reactor cover with the hydrodynamic containment code

  1. Stress-corrosion cracking in BWR and PWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, R.W.

    1983-07-01

    Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of weld-sensitized wrought stainless steel piping has been an increasingly ubiquitous and expensive problem in boiling-water reactors over the last decade. In recent months, numerous cracks have been found, even in large-diameter lines. A number of potential remedies have been developed. These are directed at providing more resistant materials, reducing weld-induced stresses, or improving the water chemistry. The potential remedies are discussed, along with the capabilities of ultrasonic testing to find and size the cracks and related safety issues. The problem has been much less severe to date in pressurized-water reactors, reflecting the use of different materials and much lower coolant oxygen levels

  2. Proceedings of the specialists meeting on experience with thermal fatigue in LWR piping caused by mixing and stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This specialists meeting on experience with thermal fatigue in LWR piping caused by mixing and stratification, was held in June 1998 in Paris. It included five sessions. Session 1: operating experience (7 papers): Historical perspective; EDF experience with local thermohydraulic phenomena in PWRs: impacts and strategies; Thermal fatigue in safety injection lines of French PWRs: technical problems, regulatory requirements, concerns about other areas; US NRC Regulatory perspective on unanticipated thermal fatigue in LWR piping; Failure to the Residual Heat Removal system suction line pipe in Genkai unit 1 caused by thermal stratification cycling; Emergency Core Cooling System pipe crack incident at Tihange unit 1; Two leakages induced by thermal stratification at the Loviisa power plant). Session 2: thermal hydraulic phenomena (5 papers): Thermal stratification in small pipes with respect to fatigue effects and so called 'Banana effect'; Thermal stratification in the surge line of the Korean next generation reactor; Thermal stratification in horizontal pipes investigated in UPTF-TRAM and HDR facilities; Research on thermal stratification in un-isolable piping of reactor pressure boundary; Thermal mixing phenomena in piping systems: 3D numerical simulation and design considerations. Session 3: response of material and structure (5 papers): Fatigue induced by thermal stratification, Results of tests and calculations of the COUFAST model; Laboratory simulation of thermal fatigue cracking as a basis for verifying life models; Thermo-mechanical analysis methods for the conception and the follow up of components submitted to thermal stratification transients; Piping analysis methods of a PWR surge line for stratified flow; The thermal stratification effect on surge lines, The VVER estimation. Session 4: monitoring aspects (4 papers): Determination of the thermal loadings affecting the auxiliary lines of the reactor coolant system in French PWR plants; Expected and

  3. Thermal Performance and Operation Limit of Heat Pipe Containing Neutron Absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Kim, In Guk; Bang, In Choel [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Recently, passive safety systems are under development to ensure the core cooling in accidents involving impossible depressurization such as station blackout (SBO). Hydraulic control rod drive mechanisms, passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS), Passive autocatalystic recombiner (PAR), and so on are types of passive safety systems to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants. Heat pipe is used in various engineering fields due to its advantages in terms of easy fabrication, high heat transfer rate, and passive heat transfer. Also, the various concepts associated with safety system and heat transfer using the heat pipe were developed in nuclear engineering field.. Thus, our group suggested the hybrid control rod which combines the functions of existing control rod and heat pipe. If there is significant temperature difference between active core and condenser, the hybrid control rod can shutdown the nuclear fission reaction and remove the decay heat from the core to ultimate heat sink. The unique characteristic of the hybrid control rod is the presence of neutron absorber inside the heat pipe. Many previous researchers studied the effect of parameters on the thermal performance of heat pipe. However, the effect of neutron absorber on the thermal performance of heat pipe has not been investigated. Thus, the annular heat pipe which contains B{sub 4}C pellet in the normal heat pipe was prepared and the thermal performance of the annular heat pipe was studied in this study. Hybrid control rod concept was developed as a passive safety system of nuclear power plant to ensure the safety of the reactor at accident condition. The hybrid control rod must contain the neutron absorber for the function as a control rod. So, the effect of neutron absorber on the thermal performance of heat pipe was experimentally investigated in this study. Temperature distributions at evaporator section of annular heat pipe were lower than normal heat pipe due to the larger volume occupied by

  4. Sodium--NaK engineering handbook. Volume IV. Sodium pumps, valves, piping, and auxiliary equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foust, O.J.

    1978-01-01

    The handbook is useful for designers in the Liquid Metals Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program and by the engineering and scientific community performing investigation and experimentation requiring high-temperature Na and NaK technology. Data are presented for pumps, bearings and seals, valves, vessels and piping, and auxiliary equipment including vapor traps, freeze plugs, fuel-channel flow regulators, antivortexing devices, and miscellaneous mechanical elements. Reactor materials are also discussed

  5. Development and testing of passive autocatalytic recombiners cooled by heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granzow, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    A severe accident in a nuclear power plant (NPP) can lead to core damage in conjunction with the release of large amounts of hydrogen. As hydrogen mitigation measure, passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs) are used in today's pressurized water reactors. PARs recombine hydrogen and oxygen contained in the air to steam. The heat from this exothermic reaction causes the catalyst and its surroundings to heat up. If parts of the PAR heat up above the ignition temperature of the gas mixture, a spontaneous deflagration or detonation can occur. The aim of this work is the prevention of such high temperatures by means of passive cooling of the catalyst with heat pipes. Heat pipes are completely passive heat exchanger with a very high effective thermal conductivity. For a deeper understanding of the reaction kinetics at lower temperatures, single catalytic coated heat pipes are studied in a flow reactor. The development of a modular small-scale PAR model is then based on a test series with cooled catalyst sheets. Finally, the PAR model is tested inside a pressure vessel under boundary conditions similar to a real NPP. The experiments show, that the temperatures of the cooled catalytic sheets stay significantly below the temperature of the uncooled sheets and below the ignition temperature of the gas mixture under any set boundary conditions, although no significant reduction of the conversion efficiency can be observed. As a last point, a mathematical model of the reaction kinetics of the recombination process as well as a model of the fluid dynamic and thermohydraulic processes in a heat pipe are developed with the data obtained from the experiments.

  6. FEM Analysis and Measurement of Residual Stress by Neutron Diffraction on the Dissimilar Overlay Weld Pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kang Soo; Lee, Ho Jin; Woo, Wan Chuck; Seong, Baek Seok; Byeon, Jin Gwi; Park, Kwang Soo; Jung, In Chul

    2010-01-01

    Much research has been done to estimate the residual stress on a dissimilar metal weld. There are many methods to estimate the weld residual stress and FEM (Finite Element Method) is generally used due to the advantage of the parametric study. And the X-ray method and a Hole Drilling technique for an experimental method are also usually used. The aim of this paper is to develop the appropriate FEM model to estimate the residual stresses of the dissimilar overlay weld pipe. For this, firstly, the specimen of the dissimilar overlay weld pipe was manufactured. The SA 508 Gr3 nozzle, the SA 182 safe end and SA376 pipe were welded by the Alloy 182. And the overlay weld by the Alloy 52M was performed. The residual stress of this specimen was measured by using the Neutron Diffraction device in the HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr) research reactor, KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Secondly, FEM Model on the dissimilar overlay weld pipe was made and analyzed by the ABAQUS Code (ABAQUS, 2004). Thermal analysis and stress analysis were performed, and the residual stress was calculated. Thirdly, the results of the FEM analysis were compared with those of the experimental methods

  7. Reliability of piping system components. Framework for estimating failure parameters from service data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, R.; Hegedus, D.; Tomic, B.; Lydell, B.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes results and insights from the final phase of a R and D project on piping reliability sponsored by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). The technical scope includes the development of an analysis framework for estimating piping reliability parameters from service data. The R and D has produced a large database on the operating experience with piping systems in commercial nuclear power plants worldwide. It covers the period 1970 to the present. The scope of the work emphasized pipe failures (i.e., flaws/cracks, leaks and ruptures) in light water reactors (LWRs). Pipe failures are rare events. A data reduction format was developed to ensure that homogenous data sets are prepared from scarce service data. This data reduction format distinguishes between reliability attributes and reliability influence factors. The quantitative results of the analysis of service data are in the form of conditional probabilities of pipe rupture given failures (flaws/cracks, leaks or ruptures) and frequencies of pipe failures. Finally, the R and D by SKI produced an analysis framework in support of practical applications of service data in PSA. This, multi-purpose framework, termed 'PFCA'-Pipe Failure Cause and Attribute- defines minimum requirements on piping reliability analysis. The application of service data should reflect the requirements of an application. Together with raw data summaries, this analysis framework enables the development of a prior and a posterior pipe rupture probability distribution. The framework supports LOCA frequency estimation, steam line break frequency estimation, as well as the development of strategies for optimized in-service inspection strategies

  8. Reliability of piping system components. Framework for estimating failure parameters from service data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, R [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Hegedus, D; Tomic, B [ENCONET Consulting GesmbH, Vienna (Austria); Lydell, B [RSA Technologies, Vista, CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes results and insights from the final phase of a R and D project on piping reliability sponsored by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). The technical scope includes the development of an analysis framework for estimating piping reliability parameters from service data. The R and D has produced a large database on the operating experience with piping systems in commercial nuclear power plants worldwide. It covers the period 1970 to the present. The scope of the work emphasized pipe failures (i.e., flaws/cracks, leaks and ruptures) in light water reactors (LWRs). Pipe failures are rare events. A data reduction format was developed to ensure that homogenous data sets are prepared from scarce service data. This data reduction format distinguishes between reliability attributes and reliability influence factors. The quantitative results of the analysis of service data are in the form of conditional probabilities of pipe rupture given failures (flaws/cracks, leaks or ruptures) and frequencies of pipe failures. Finally, the R and D by SKI produced an analysis framework in support of practical applications of service data in PSA. This, multi-purpose framework, termed `PFCA`-Pipe Failure Cause and Attribute- defines minimum requirements on piping reliability analysis. The application of service data should reflect the requirements of an application. Together with raw data summaries, this analysis framework enables the development of a prior and a posterior pipe rupture probability distribution. The framework supports LOCA frequency estimation, steam line break frequency estimation, as well as the development of strategies for optimized in-service inspection strategies. 63 refs, 30 tabs, 22 figs.

  9. Contributions of Modranska potrubni a.s. to the safety improvement of piping systems and valves of NPS type VVER 440 and VVER 1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slach, J.

    2004-01-01

    The following activities are described: (i) Installation of pipe whip restraints on piping for high pressure and temperature steam and feed piping; (ii) Installation of air receivers for quick-acting valves with air actuator on VVER 440 units at the Jaslovske Bohunice V2 NPP; (iii) Replacement of the technical water distribution system material in the reactor hall of the Temelin VVER 1000 units; Installation of measuring nozzles on main steam piping DN 600 at the Temelin VVER 1000 units. (P.A.)

  10. Investigation on field removed pipe sections in the PISC hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambini, M.; Crutzen, S.; Jehenson, P.; Bergh, R. Van den; Violin, F.

    1990-01-01

    Action No. 1 of PISC II: Real Contaminated Structures (RCS), seeks to collect results from specific investigations and limited round robin tests on real service induced defects in materials and structures of the primary circuit of Light Water Reactors. The hot cell facilities at JRC-Ispra are fully equipped for non destructive and destructive work on a collaborative basis. Cracked austenitic steel primary circuit pipes coming from the primary circuit of the Muhleberg reactor (Switzerland) have been inspected in order to demonstrate the validity of the facilities to examine these contaminated pieces. (author)

  11. Fluidized bed reactor for working up carbon coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschollek, M.; Simon, W.; Walter, C.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor is described for working up carbon coated particles, particularly nuclear fuel particles or fertile material particles consisting essentially of a cylindrical portion connected to a conical portion. Gas supply pipes, gas distribution space and gas distribution heads are provided within the conical reactor lower portion, the gas distribution members being arranged in at least two superimposed planes and distributed symmetrically over the cross-section of the reactor

  12. Method of measuring reactor water level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Kaoru.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a water level measuring system so that a reactor water level detecting signal can be corrected in correspondence to a recirculation flow, thereby to carry out a correct water level detection in a wide range of the reactor. Method: According to the operation record of a precursor reactor, the ratio Δh of the lowering of the water level due to the recirculation flow is lowered in proportion to the ratiowith respect to the rated differential pressure of the recirculation flow. Accordingly, the flow of recirculation pump is measured by an elbow differential pressure generator utilizing an elbow of a pipe, and the measured value is multiplied by a gain by a ratio setter, and therefter, an addition computation is carried out by an adder for correcting the signal from a water level detector. When the signal from the water level detector is corrected in this manner, the influence of the lowering of the water level due to the recirculation flow can be removed, and an interlocker predetermined in the defined water level can be actuated, thus the influence of the dynamic pressure due to the recirculation flow acting on the instrumental pipe line detecting the reactor water level can be removed effectively. (Yoshino, Y.)

  13. Heat Pipe Powered Stirling Conversion for the Demonstration Using Flattop Fission (DUFF) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Marc A.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Sanzi, James L.; Brace, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Design concepts for small Fission Power Systems (FPS) have shown that heat pipe cooled reactors provide a passive, redundant, and lower mass option to transfer heat from the fuel to the power conversion system, as opposed to pumped loop designs typically associated with larger FPS. Although many systems have been conceptually designed and a few making it to electrically heated testing, none have been coupled to a real nuclear reactor. A demonstration test named DUFF Demonstration Using Flattop Fission, was planned by the Los Alamos National Lab (LANL) to use an existing criticality experiment named Flattop to provide the nuclear heat source. A team from the NASA Glenn Research Center designed, built, and tested a heat pipe and power conversion system to couple to Flattop with the end goal of making electrical power. This paper will focus on the design and testing performed in preparation for the DUFF test.

  14. Simulation of a pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Andre Felipe da Silva de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic is used to simulate natural circulation condition after a research reactor shutdown. A benchmark problem was used to test the viability of usage such code to simulate the reactor model. A model which contains the core, the pool, the reflector tank, the circulation pipes and chimney was simulated. The reactor core contained in the full scale model was represented by a porous media. The parameters of porous media were obtained from a separate CFD analysis of the full core model. Results demonstrate that such studies can be carried out for research and test of reactors design. (author)

  15. Structural evaluation report of piping and support structure for design-changed hot-water layer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jeong Soo

    1998-05-01

    After hot-water layer system had been installed, the verification tests to reduce the radiation level at the top of reactor pool were performed many times. The major goal of this report is to assess the structural integrity on the piping and the support structures of design-changed hot-water layer system. The piping stress analysis was performed by using ADLPIPE program for the pump suction line and the pump discharge line subjected to dead weight, pressure, thermal expansion and seismic loadings. The stress analysis of the support structure was carried out using the reaction forces obtained from the piping stress analysis. The results of structural evaluation for the pipings and the support structures showed that the structural acceptance criteria were satisfied, in compliance with ASME, subsection ND for the piping and subsection NF for the support structures. Therefore based on the results of the analysis and the design, the structural integrity on the piping and the support structures of design-changed hot-water system was proved. (author). 9 refs., 9 tabs., 14 figs

  16. Evaluation of thermal displacement behavior of high temperature piping system in power-up test of HTTR. No. 1 results up to 20 MW operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawa, Satoshi; Kojima, Takao; Sumita, Junya; Tachibana, Yukio

    2002-03-01

    Temperature of the primary cooling system of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, HTTR, becomes very high because the coolant temperature at the reactor outlet reaches 950degC, and 400degC at inlet of the reactor. Therefore, it is important to confirm the thermal displacement behavior of the high temperature piping system in the primary cooling system from the viewpoint of the structural integrity. Moreover, newly designed 3-dimensional floating support system is adopted to the cooling system, it is meaningful to verify the thermal displacement behavior of the piping system applied the 3-dimensional floating support system. In the power-up test (up to 20 MW operation), thermal displacement behavior of the high temperature piping system was measured. This paper describes the experimental and analytical results of thermal displacement characteristics of the high temperature piping system. The results showed that the resistance force induced from the supporting system effects to the thermal displacement behavior of cooling system, and the analytical results have a good agreement with the experimental results by optimizing the resistant force of the floating support system. Additionally, structural integrity at the 30 MW operation was confirmed by the analysis. (author)

  17. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Urabe, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  18. Corrosion problems in boiling water reactors and their remedies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, B.

    1989-01-01

    This article briefly presents current corrosion problems in boiling water reactors and their remedies. The problems are different forms of environmentally assisted cracking, and the remedies are divided into material-, environment-, and stress-related remedies. The list of problems comprises: intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in weld-sensitized stainless steel piping; IGSCC in cold-bent stainless steel piping; irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in stainless alloys; IGSCC in high-strength stainless alloys. A prospective corrosion problem, as judged from literature references, and one which relates to plant life, is corrosion fatigue in pressure vessel steel, since the reactor pressure vessel is the most critical component in the BWR pressure boundary as regards plant safety. (author)

  19. A Hydrogen Ignition Mechanism for Explosions in Nuclear Facility Piping Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, Robert A.

    2013-09-18

    Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein. Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions may occur. Pipe ruptures in nuclear reactor cooling systems were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents, an ignition source for hydrogen was not clearly demonstrated, but these accidents demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. A new theory to identify an ignition source and explosion cause is presented here, and further research is recommended to fully understand this explosion mechanism.

  20. PRE design of a molten salt thorium reactor loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caire, Jean-Pierre; Roure, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    This study is a contribution to the 2004 PCR-RSF program of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) devoted to research on high temperature thorium molten salt reactors. A major issue of high temperature molten salt reactors is the very large heat duty to be transferred from primary to secondary loop of the reactor with minimal thermal losses. A possible inner loop made of a series of conventional graphite filter plate exchangers, pipes and pumps was investigated. The loop was assumed to use two counter current flows of the same LiF, BeF 2 , ZrF 4 , UF 4 molten salt flowing through the reactor. The 3D model used the coupling of k-ε turbulent Navier-Stokes equations and thermal applications of the Heat Transfer module of COMSOL Multiphysics. For a reactor delivering 2700 MWth, the model required a set of 114 identical exchangers. Each one was optimized to limit the heat losses to 2882 W. The pipes made of a succession of graphite, ceramics, Hastelloy-N alloy and insulating Microtherm layers led to a thermal loss limited to 550 W per linear meter. In such conditions, the global thermal losses represent only 0.013% of the reactor thermal power for elements covered with an insulator only 3 cm thick. (author)

  1. Nuclear piping and pipe support design and operability relating to loadings and small bore piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, D.H.; Tubbs, J.M.; Callaway, W.O.; Tang, H.T.; Van Duyne, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The present nuclear piping system design practices for loadings, multiple support design and small bore piping evaluation are overly conservative. The paper discusses the results developed for realistic definitions of loadings and loading combinations with methodology for combining loads under various conditions for supports and multiple support design. The paper also discusses a simplified method developed for performing deadweight and thermal evaluations of small bore piping systems. Although the simplified method is oriented towards the qualification of piping in older plants, this approach is applicable to plants designed to any edition of the ASME Section III or B31.1 piping codes

  2. Plant accident dynamics of high-temperature reactors with direct gas turbine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waloch, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    In the paper submitted, a one-dimensional accident simulation model for high-temperature reactors with direct-cycle gas turbine (single-cycle facilities) is described. The paper assesses the sudden failure of a gas duct caused by the double-ended break of one out of several parallel pipes before and behind the reactor for a non-integrated plant, leading to major loads in the reactor region, as well as the complete loss of vanes of the compressor for an integrated plant. The results of the calculations show especially high loads for the break of a hot-gas pipe immediately behind the flow restrictors of the reactor outlet, because of prolonged effects of pressure gradients in the reactor region and the maximum core differential pressure. A plant accident dynamics calculation therefore allows to find a compromise between the requirements of stable compressor operation, on the one hand, and small loads in the reactor in the course of an accident, on the other, by establishing in a co-ordinated manner the narrowing ratio of the flow restrictors. (GL) [de

  3. Consequence evaluation of hypothetical reactor pressure vessel support failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.; Holman, G.S.; Lambert, H.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a consequence evaluation to address safety concerns raised by the radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports for the Trojan nuclear power plant. The study comprises a structural evaluation and an effects evaluation and assumes that all four reactor vessel supports have completely lost the load carrying capability. The structural evaluation concludes that the Trojan reactor coolant loop (RCL) piping is capable of transferring loads to the steam generator (SG) supports and the reactor coolant pump (RCP) supports and that the SG supports and the RCP supports have sufficient design margins to accommodate additional loads transferred to them through the RCL piping. The effects evaluation, employing a systems analysis approach, investigates initiating events and the reliability of the engineered safeguard systems as the RPV is subject to movements caused by the RPV support failure. The evaluation identifies a number of areas for further investigation and concludes that a hypothetical failure of the Trojan RPV supports due to radiation embrittlement will not result in consequences of significant safety concerns. (author)

  4. Design features of BREST reactors. Experimental work to advance the concept of BREST reactors. Results and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filin, A.I.; Orlov, V.V.; Leonov, V.N.; Sila-Novitskij, A.G.; Smirnov, V.S.; Tsikunov, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    Principle designs of 300 MW(th) and 1200 MW(th) lead-cooled fast reactors are presented. Reactors of various output are shown to be built using the same principles. In conjunction with increased output and to implement inherent safety concept in BREST-1200 reactor design a number of new solutions, which may be used in BREST-300 concept too, has been taken including: pool-type reactor design not requiring metal vessel, hence, not limiting reactor power; new handling system allowing to reduce central hall and building dimensions as a whole; emergency cooling system using Field pipes, immersed directly in lead, which may be used to cool down reactor under normal conditions; by-pass line incorporated in coolant loop allowing to refuse the actively actuating valve initiated in pumps shut down. (author)

  5. Leak-before-break behaviour of nuclear piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholome, G.; Wellein, R.

    1992-01-01

    The general concept for break preclusion of nuclear piping systems in the FRG consists of two main prerequisites: Basic safety; independent redundancies. The leak-before-break behaviour is open of these redundancies and will be verified by fracture mechanics. The following items have to be evaluated: The growth of detected and postulated defects must be negligible in one life time of the plant; the growth behaviour beyond design (i.e. multiple load collectives are taken into account) leads to a stable leak; This leakage of the piping must be detected by an adequate leak detection system long before the critical defect size is reached. The fracture mechanics calculations concerning growth and instability of the relevant defects and corresponding leakage areas are described in more detail. The leak-before-break behaviour is shown for two examples of nuclear piping systems in pressurized water reactors: main coolant line of SIEMENS-PWR 1300 MW (ferritic material, diameter 800 mm); surge line of Russian WWER 440 (austenitic material, diameter 250 mm). The main results are given taking into account the relevant leak detection possibilities. (author). 9 refs, 9 figs

  6. Pressurizer /Auxiliary Spray Piping Stress Analysis For Determination Of Lead Shielding Maximum Allow Able Load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setjo, Renaningsih

    2000-01-01

    Piping stress analysis for PZR/Auxiliary Spray Lines Nuclear Power Plant AV Unit I(PWR Type) has been carried out. The purpose of this analysis is to establish a maximum allowable load that is permitted at the time of need by placing lead shielding on the piping system on class 1 pipe, Pressurizer/Auxiliary Spray Lines (PZR/Aux.) Reactor Coolant Loop 1 and 4 for NPP AV Unit one in the mode 5 and 6 during outage. This analysis is intended to reduce the maximum amount of radiation dose for the operator during ISI ( In service Inspection) period.The result shown that the maximum allowable loads for 4 inches lines for PZR/Auxiliary Spray Lines is 123 lbs/feet

  7. Elastic-plastic response of a piping system due to simulated double-ended guillotine break events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Diem, H.; Hunger, H.; Katzenmeier, G.

    1987-01-01

    From the blowdown experiments performed on the HDR feedwater line with feedwater check valve the conclusion can be drawn that high transient loads of up to plastic strains of 3%, acting on an initially integer piping system, can be sustained without loss of integrity for a low number of load cycles due to the plasticizing capacity of the pipework materials nowadays used in reactor technology. In the experiments carried out with ferritic piping of ND 400 pressure peaks up to about 31,5 MPa were achieved which resulted in excessive strains of up to 3%. By nonlinear finite element computations (ABAQUS) it was possible to describe the elastic-plastic behaviour of the piping in a good approximation. (orig./GL)

  8. Leak-before-break due to fatigue cracks in the cold leg piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayfield, M.E.; Collier, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    This review paper presents the results of a deterministic assessment of the margin of safety against a large break in the cold leg piping system of pressurized water reactors. The paper focuses on the computation of leak rates resulting from fatigue cracks that penetrate the full wall thickness. Results are presented that illustrate the sensitivity of the leak rate to stress level, crack shape and crack orientation. Further, the leak rates for specific conditions are contrasted to detection levels, shutdown criteria, make-up capacity and the leak rate associated with final failure of the piping system. The results of these computations indicate that, in general, leaks far in excess of the present detection sensitivities would result at crack sizes well below the critical crack sizes for the upset loadings on the cold leg piping system

  9. Studies of S-CO{sub 2} Power Plant Pipe Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minseok; Ahn, Yoonhan; Lee, Jeong Ik [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Further development of nuclear energy is required to address the global warming issue while overcoming the difficulty of meeting the constantly growing demand of energy. As the nuclear energy does not only reduce the carbon dioxide emission but also attain sufficient and stable electricity supply, this is considered as one of the most clean and sustainable energy sources. The Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) is a strong candidate among the next generation nuclear reactors. However, current SFR design may face difficulty in public acceptance due to the potential hazard from sodium-water reaction (SWR) when the current conventional steam Rankine cycle is utilized as a power conversion system for SFR. In order to eliminate SWR, the Supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) cycle has been proposed. Although many S-CO{sub 2} cycle concepts are being suggested by many research organizations, pipe selection criteria for S-CO{sub 2} cycle are one of the areas that are not clearly established. As one of the most important parts of the plant design is economical fluid transfer, this paper will discuss how to select a suitable pipe for the S-CO{sub 2} power plant compared to steam Rankine cycle. The main advantages of S-CO{sub 2} cycle are: prevention of no SWR by changing the working fluid, relatively high efficiency with 450∼750 .deg. C turbine inlet temperature, physically compact size. Additional study for larger system such as 300MW class system in MIT report will be conducted. From the preliminary estimation when the S-CO{sub 2} system becomes large than the pipe diameter may exceed the current ASME standard. This means that more innovative approach will be needed for the S-CO{sub 2} pipe design. To economically design the pipe of S-CO{sub 2} recompressing cycle, optimal flow velocity for S-CO{sub 2} that can be obtained through the process engineering should exist. Although the Ronald W. Capps equation offers an optimal flow velocity while considering safety, capital

  10. Seismic damping factors of small-bore piping as influenced by insulation and support elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severud, L.K.; Anderson, M.J.; Barta, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic damping tests of a prototypical Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) small-bore piping system is described, and measured transient responses to pulse excitations are reported. The test specimen was representative of a typical LMFBR insulated small-bore piping system, and it was supported from a rigid test fame by prototypic dead-weight supports, mechanical snubbers, and pipe clamps. Various support configurations were tested to assess the reponse sensitivity to insulation and use of mechanical snubbers. Factors much higher than the magnitudes currently allowed in design, by the USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.61, were found. This verified the design values but also pointed out the possibility of undue conservatism and costly overdesign resulting from use of the present design values

  11. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 14, Safety protection measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Nuclear reactor accidents can be caused by three type of errors: failure of reactor components including (1) control and measuring instrumentation, (2) errors in operation procedure, (3) natural disasters. Safety during reactor operation are secured during its design and construction and later during operation. Both construction and administrative procedures are applied to attain safe operation. Technical safety features include fission product barriers, fuel elements cladding, primary reactor components (reactor vessel, primary cooling pipes, heat exchanger in the pump), reactor building. Safety system is the system for safe reactor shutdown and auxiliary safety system. RA reactor operating regulations and instructions are administrative acts applied to avoid possible human error caused accidents [sr

  12. Sensitization development in austenitic stainless steel piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Page, R.E.; Atteridge, D.G.

    1984-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the Division of Engineering Technology of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission are conducting a program to determine a method for evaluating welded and rapair-welded stainless steel piping for light-water reactor service. Validated models, based on experimental data, are being developed to predict the degree of sensitization (DOS) and the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the SS weldments. The cumulative effects of material composition, past fabrication procedures, past service exposure, weldment thermomechanical (TM) history, and projected post-repair component life are being considered. This program will measure and model the development of HAZ TM history and resultant sensitized microstructure in welded and repair-welded piping. An empirical correlation between a material's DOS and its susceptibility to SCC will be determined using slow strain rate tensile tests. Mill heat chemistries and processing/fabrication records already required in the nuclear industry will be used as input for initial DOS predictions

  13. An Evaluation Report on the High Temperature Design of the KALIMER-600 Reactor Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Gyu; Lee, Jae Han

    2007-03-15

    This report is on the validity evaluation of high temperature structural design for the reactor structures and piping of the pool-type Liquid Metal Reactor, KALIMER-600 subjected to the high temperature thermal load condition. The structural concept of the Upper Internal Structure located above the core is analyzed and the adequate UIS conceptual design for KALIMER-600 is proposed. Also, the high temperature structural integrity of the thermal liner which is to protect the UIS bottom plate from the high frequency thermal fatigue damage was evaluated by the thermal stripping analysis. The high temperature structural design of the reactor internal structure by considering the reactor startup-shutdown cycle was carried out and the structural integrity of it for a normal operating condition as well as the transient condition of the primary pump trip accident was confirmed. Additionally the structure design of the reactor internal structural was changed to prevent the non-uniform deformation of the primary pump which is induced by the thermal expansion difference between the reactor head and the baffle plate. The arrangement of the IHTS piping system which is a part of the reactor system is carried out and the structural integrity and the accumulated deformation by considering the reactor startup-shutdown cycle of a normal operating condition were evaluated. The structural integrity and the accumulated deformation of the PDRC hot leg piping by considering the PDRC operating condition were evaluated. The validity of KALIMER-600 high temperature structural design is confirmed through this study, and it is clearly found that the methodology research to evaluate the structural integrity considering the reactor life time of 60 years ensured is necessary.

  14. LMFBR flexible pipe joint development program. Annual technical progress report, government fiscal year 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Currently, the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code does not allow the use of flexible pipe joints (bellows) in Section III, Class 1 reactor primary piping systems. Studies have shown that the primary piping loops of LMFBR's could be simplified by using these joints. This simplification translates directly into shorter primary piping runs and reduced costs for the primary piping system. Further cost savings result through reduced vault sizes and reduced containment building diameter. In addition, the use of flexible joints localizes the motions from thermally-induced piping growth into components which are specifically designed to accommodate this motion. This reduces the stress levels in the piping system and its components. It is thus economically and structurally important that flexible piping joints be available to the LMFBR designer. The overall objective of the Flexible Joint Program is to provide this availability. This will be accomplished through the development of ASME rules which allow the appropriate use of such joints in Section III, Class 1 piping systems and through the development and demonstration of construction methods which satisfy these rules. The rule development includes analytic and testing methodology formulations which will be supported by subscale bellows testing. The construction development and demonstration encompass the design, fabrication, and in-sodium testing of prototypical LMFBR plant-size flexible pipe joints which meet all ASME rule requirements. The satisfactory completion of these developmental goals will result in an approved flexible pipe joint design for the LMFBR. Progress is summarized in the following efforts undertaken during 1977 to accomplish these goals: (1) code case support, (2) engineering and design, (3) material development, (4) testing, and (5) manufacturing development

  15. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 8, Auxiliary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This volume describes RA reactor auxiliary systems, as follows: special ventilation system, special drainage system, hot cells, systems for internal transport. Ventilation system is considered as part of the reactor safety and protection system. Its role is eliminate possible radioactive particles dispersion in the environment. Special drainage system includes pipes and reservoirs with the safety role, meaning absorption or storage of possible radioactive waste water from the reactor building. Hot cells existing in the RA reactor building are designed for production of sealed radioactive sources, including packaging and transport [sr

  16. Investigation on field removed pipe sections in the PISC hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambini, M.; Crutzen, S.; Jehenson, P.

    1990-01-01

    Action no. 1 of PISC III (Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components): Real Contaminated Structures (RCS), seeks to collect results from specific investigations and limited round robin tests on real service induced defects in materials and structures of the primary circuit of Light Water Reactors. The hot cell facilities at JRC-Ispra are fully equipped for non destructive and destructive work on a collaborative basis. Cracked austenitic steel pipes coming from the primary circuit of the Muehleberg reactor (Switzerland) have been inspected in order to demonstrate the validity of the facilities for the examination of these contaminated pieces

  17. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems using the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIPR) or underwater laser beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rick, Grendys; Marc, Piccolino; Cunthia, Pezze; Badlani, Manu

    2009-01-01

    A current issue facing pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of bi metallic welds. PWSCC in a PWR requires the presence of a susceptible material, an aggressive environment and a tensile stress of significant magnitude. Reducing the potential for SCC can be accomplished by eliminating any of these three elements. In the U.S., mitigation of susceptible material in the pressurizer nozzle locations has largely been completed via the structural weld overlay (SWOL) process or NuVision Engineering's Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP R) , depending on inspectability. The next most susceptible locations in Westinghouse designed power plants are the Reactor Vessel (RV) hot leg nozzle welds. However, a full SWOL Process for RV nozzles is time consuming and has a high likelihood of in process weld repairs. Therefore, Westinghouse provides two distinctive methods to mitigate susceptible material for the RV nozzle locations depending on nozzle access and utility preference. These methods are the MSIP and the Underwater Laser Beam Welding (ULBW) process. MSIP applies a load to the outside diameter of the pipe adjacent to the weld, imposing plastic strains during compression that are not reversed after unloading, thus eliminating the tensile stress component of SCC. Recently, Westinghouse and NuVision successfully applied MSIP on all eight RV nozzles at the Salem Unit 1 power plant. Another option to mitigate SCC in RV nozzles is to place a barrier between the susceptible material and the aggressive environment. The ULBW process applies a weld inlay onto the inside pipe diameter. The deposited weld metal (Alloy 52M) is resistant to PWSCC and acts as a barrier to prevent primary water from contacting the susceptible material. This paper provides information on the approval and acceptance bases for MSIP, its recent application on RV nozzles and an update on ULBW development

  18. HPFRCC - Extruded Pipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik; Pedersen, Carsten

    1996-01-01

    The present paper gives an overview of the research onHigh Performance Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composite -- HPFRCC --pipes recently carried out at Department of Structural Engineering, Technical University of Denmark. The project combines material development, processing technique development......-w$ relationship is presented. Structural development involved definition of a new type of semi-flexiblecement based pipe, i.e. a cement based pipe characterized by the fact that the soil-pipe interaction related to pipe deformation is an importantcontribution to the in-situ load carrying capacity of the pipe...

  19. Development on methods for evaluating structure reliability of piping components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimpfke, T.; Grebner, H.; Peschke, J.; Sievers, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the frame of the German reactor safety research program of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour, GRS has started to develop an analysis code named PROST (PRObabilistic STructure analysis) for estimating the leak and break probabilities of piping systems in nuclear power plants. The development is based on the experience achieved with applications of the public available US code PRAISE 3.10 (Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events), which was supplemented by additional features regarding the statistical evaluation and the crack orientation. PROST is designed to be more flexible to changes and supplementations. Up to now it can be used for calculating fatigue problems. The paper mentions the main capabilities and theoretical background of the present PROST development and presents a parametric study on the influence by changing the method of stress intensity factor and limit load calculation and the statistical evaluation options on the leak probability of an exemplary pipe with postulated axial crack distribution. Furthermore the resulting leak probability of an exemplary pipe with postulated circumferential crack distribution is compared with the results of the modified PRAISE computer program. The intention of this investigation is to show trends. Therefore the resulting absolute values for probabilities should not be considered as realistic evaluations. (author)

  20. Pipe damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    Studies are being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to determine whether an increase in the damping values used in seismic structural analyses of nuclear piping systems is justified. Increasing the allowable damping would allow fewer piping supports which could lead to safer, more reliable, and less costly piping systems. Test data from availble literature were examined to determine the important parameters contributing to piping system damping, and each was investigated in separate-effects tests. From the combined results a world pipe damping data bank was established and multiple regression analyses performed to assess the relative contributions of the various parameters. The program is being extended to determine damping applicable to higher frequency (33 to 100 Hz) fluid-induced loadings. The goals of the program are to establish a methodology for predicting piping system damping and to recommend revised guidelines for the damping values to be included in analyses

  1. Simplified inelastic (plastic and creep) analysis of pipe elbows subjected to inplane and out-of-plane bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, R.M.; Scheller, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The inelastic analysis of elbows typical of use in Liquid Metal Fast Reactor piping systems is described. Detailed information on stresses, plastic and creep strains, and deformations throughout the elbow bodies resulting from elastic/plastic, elastic/plastic/creep, and elastic/plastic-creep/relaxation material behavior was obtained for the cases of applied inplane and out-of-plane moment loading on the elbows. Some conclusions are made concerning the nature of the resulting stresses in the elbows. The simplified pipe-bend element in the MARC nonlinear finite element program is used as the analytical tool. This element permits nonlinear analysis of piping elbows and pipeline systems at realistic cost. 16 refs

  2. Coolant inlet device for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroshi; Abe, Yasuhiro; Iwabuchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji.

    1969-01-01

    Herein disclosed is a coolant inlet device for liquid-metal cooled reactors which employs a coolant distributor serving also as a supporting means for the reactor core. The distributor is mounted within the reactor vessel so as to slide horizontally on supporting lugs, and is further slidably connected via a junction pipe to a coolant inlet conduit protruding through the floor of the vessel. The distributor is adapted to uniformly disperse the highly pressured coolant over the reactor core so as to reduce the stresses sustained by the reactor vessel as well as the supporting lugs. Moreover, the slidable nature of the distributor allows thermal shock and excessive coolant pressures to be prevented or alleviated, factors which posed major difficulties in conventional coolant inlet devices. (Owens, K. J.)

  3. IAEA issues recommendations regarding temporary restart of Dutch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: An IAEA-led international team of nuclear reactor safety experts completed a safety review mission on 18 February at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten, in the Netherlands. The mission was conducted at the request of the Government of the Netherlands to review a set of previous evaluations made by the Dutch regulatory authority regarding the reactor's safety. The IAEA mission made a series of recommendations to enhance the safety of the year-long temporary restart. The recommendations included: - Performance of the monitoring system for leaks should be rigorously checked during the interim year of operation; - Temporary operation of the HFR cannot be extended beyond 1 March 2010; and - In case of any detected leakage from the coolant pipes, the reactor should be shut down immediately and repaired before restarting. The international team was composed of one IAEA staff member and five external experts from Argentina, Canada, France, India and South Africa. The IAEA's main conclusions and recommendations were presented in The Hague to the Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment and several other ministries. The team also provided a summary of its findings to the Netherlands Regulatory Authority. The team's final report will be submitted within two weeks. The HFR at Petten is one of five research reactors in the world that produces radioactive medical isotopes, used an estimated 40 million times annually for cancer treatment and the diagnosis of heart attacks. Prolonged outages at any of these five reactors have a far-reaching impact on medical treatments and diagnoses for patients around the globe. Since August 2008, the HFR reactor has been in shut-down status due to corrosion of pipes in its primary cooling circuit. The Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), the operating organization for Petten, proposed a one-year restart of the HFR reactor, which was approved by the Dutch regulatory body. The reactor then resumed operation

  4. Vacuum Bellows, Vacuum Piping, Cryogenic Break, and Copper Joint Failure Rate Estimates for ITER Design Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2010-06-01

    The ITER international project design teams are working to produce an engineering design in preparation for construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak. During the course of this work, questions have arisen in regard to safety barriers and equipment reliability as important facets of system design. The vacuum system designers have asked several questions about the reliability of vacuum bellows and vacuum piping. The vessel design team has asked about the reliability of electrical breaks and copper-copper joints used in cryogenic piping. Research into operating experiences of similar equipment has been performed to determine representative failure rates for these components. The following chapters give the research results and the findings for vacuum system bellows, power plant stainless steel piping (amended to represent vacuum system piping), cryogenic system electrical insulating breaks, and copper joints.

  5. Pipe inspection using the pipe crawler. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective remediation technologies for use in the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. In several of the buildings at the Fernald Site, there is piping that was used to transport process materials. As the demolition of these buildings occur, disposal of this piping has become a costly issue. Currently, all process piping is cut into ten-foot or less sections, the ends of the piping are wrapped and taped to prevent the release of any potential contaminants into the air, and the piping is placed in roll off boxes for eventual repackaging and shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal. Alternatives that allow for the onsite disposal of process piping are greatly desired due to the potential for dramatic savings in current offsite disposal costs. No means is currently employed to allow for the adequate inspection of the interior of piping, and consequently, process piping has been assumed to be internally contaminated and thus routinely disposed of at NTS. The BTX-II system incorporates a high-resolution micro color camera with lightheads, cabling, a monitor, and a video recorder. The complete probe is capable of inspecting pipes with an internal diameter (ID) as small as 1.4 inches. By using readily interchangeable lightheads, the same system is capable of inspecting piping up to 24 inches in ID. The original development of the BTX system was for inspection of boiler tubes and small diameter pipes for build-up, pitting, and corrosion. However, the system is well suited for inspecting the interior of most types of piping and other small, confined areas. The report describes the technology, its performance, uses, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned

  6. Pipe inspection using the pipe crawler. Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective remediation technologies for use in the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. In several of the buildings at the Fernald Site, there is piping that was used to transport process materials. As the demolition of these buildings occur, disposal of this piping has become a costly issue. Currently, all process piping is cut into ten-foot or less sections, the ends of the piping are wrapped and taped to prevent the release of any potential contaminants into the air, and the piping is placed in roll off boxes for eventual repackaging and shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal. Alternatives that allow for the onsite disposal of process piping are greatly desired due to the potential for dramatic savings in current offsite disposal costs. No means is currently employed to allow for the adequate inspection of the interior of piping, and consequently, process piping has been assumed to be internally contaminated and thus routinely disposed of at NTS. The BTX-II system incorporates a high-resolution micro color camera with lightheads, cabling, a monitor, and a video recorder. The complete probe is capable of inspecting pipes with an internal diameter (ID) as small as 1.4 inches. By using readily interchangeable lightheads, the same system is capable of inspecting piping up to 24 inches in ID. The original development of the BTX system was for inspection of boiler tubes and small diameter pipes for build-up, pitting, and corrosion. However, the system is well suited for inspecting the interior of most types of piping and other small, confined areas. The report describes the technology, its performance, uses, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  7. Reactor Coolant Temperature Measurement using Ultrasonic Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, JaeCheon [KEPCO International Nuclear graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, YongSun; Bechue, Nicholas [Krohne Messtechnik GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    In NPP, the primary piping temperature is detected by four redundant RTDs (Resistance Temperature Detectors) installed 90 degrees apart on the RCS (Reactor Coolant System) piping circumferentially. Such outputs however, if applied to I and C systems would not give balanced results. The discrepancy can be explained by either thermal stratification or improper arrangement of thermo-wells and RTDs. This phenomenon has become more pronounced in the hot-leg piping than in the cold-leg. Normally, the temperature difference among channels is in the range of 1°F in Korean nuclear power Plants. Consequently, a more accurate pipe average temperate measurement technique is required. Ultrasonic methods can be used to measure average temperatures with relatively higher accuracy than RTDs because the sound wave propagation in the RCS pipe is proportional to the average temperature around pipe area. The inaccuracy of RCS temperature measurement worsens the safety margin for both DNBR and LPD. The possibility of this discrepancy has been reported with thermal stratification effect. Proposed RCS temperature measurement system based on ultrasonic technology offers a countermeasure to cope with thermal stratification effect on hot-leg piping that has been an unresolved issue in NPPs. By introducing ultrasonic technology, the average internal piping temperature can be measured with high accuracy. The inaccuracy can be decreased less than ±1℉ by this method.

  8. Influence of pipe material and surfaces on sulfide related odor and corrosion in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Wium-Andersen, Tove; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2008-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation on sewer pipe surfaces was investigated in a pilot scale experimental setup. The experiments were aimed at replicating conditions in a gravity sewer located immediately downstream of a force main where sulfide related concrete corrosion and odor is often observed. During the experiments, hydrogen sulfide gas was injected intermittently into the headspace of partially filled concrete and plastic (PVC and HDPE) sewer pipes in concentrations of approximately 1,000 ppm(v). Between each injection, the hydrogen sulfide concentration was monitored while it decreased because of adsorption and subsequent oxidation on the pipe surfaces. The experiments showed that the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation was approximately two orders of magnitude faster on the concrete pipe surfaces than on the plastic pipe surfaces. Removal of the layer of reaction (corrosion) products from the concrete pipes was found to reduce the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation significantly. However, the rate of sulfide oxidation was restored to its background level within 10-20 days. A similar treatment had no observable effect on hydrogen sulfide removal in the plastic pipe reactors. The experimental results were used to model hydrogen sulfide oxidation under field conditions. This showed that the gas-phase hydrogen sulfide concentration in concrete sewers would typically amount to a few percent of the equilibrium concentration calculated from Henry's law. In the plastic pipe sewers, significantly higher concentrations were predicted because of the slower adsorption and oxidation kinetics on such surfaces.

  9. Nuclear reactor with several cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swars, H.

    1977-01-01

    Several sodium-cooled cores in separate vessels with removable closures are placed in a common reactor tank. Each individual vessel is protected against the consequences of an accident in the relevant core. Maintenance devices and inlet and outlet pipes for the coolant are also arranged within the reactor tank. The individual vessels are all enclosed by coolant in a way that in case of emergency cooling or refuelling each core can be continued to be cooled by means of the coolant loops of the other cores. (HP) [de

  10. Nuclear reactor monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihashi, Ishi; Honma, Hitoshi.

    1993-01-01

    The monitoring device of the present invention comprises a reactor core/reactor system data measuring and controlling device, a radioactivity concentration calculation device for activated coolants for calculating a radioactivity concentration of activated coolants in a main steam and reactor water by using an appropriate physical model, a radioactivity concentration correlation and comparison device for activated coolants for comparing correlationship with a radiation dose and an abnormality alarm device. Since radioactivity of activated primary coolants is monitored at each of positions in the reactor system and occurrence of leakage and the amount thereof from a primary circuit to a secondary circuit is monitored if the reactor has secondary circuit, integrity of the reactor system can be ensured and an abnormality can be detected rapidly. Further, radioactivity concentration of activated primary circuit coolants, represented by 16 N or 15 C, is always monitored at each of positions of PWR primary circuits. When a heat transfer pipe is ruptured in a steam generator, leakage of primary circuit coolants is detected rapidly, as well as the amount of the leakage can be informed. (N.H.)

  11. An improved water cooled nuclear reactor and pressuriser assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, F.J.; Strong, R.

    1991-01-01

    A water cooled nuclear reactor is described which comprises a reactor core, a primary water coolant circuit and a pressuriser arranged as an integral unit in a pressure vessel. The pressure vessel is divided into an upper and a lower chamber by a casing. The reactor core and primary water coolant circuit are arranged in the lower chamber and the pressuriser is arranged in the upper chamber. A plurality of spray pipes interconnect a steam space of the pressuriser with the downcomer of the primary water coolant circuit below a heat exchanger. A plurality of surge ports interconnect a water space of the pressuriser with the primary water coolant circuit. The surge ports have hydraulic diodes so that there is a low flow resistance for water from the water space of the pressuriser to the primary water coolant circuit and high flow resistance in the opposite direction. The spray pipes provide a desuperheating spray of cooled water into the pressuriser during positive volume surges of the primary water coolant. The pressuriser arrangement may also be applied to integral water cooled reactors with separate pressurisers and to dispersed pressurised water reactors. The surge ports also allow water to flow by gravity to the core in an emergency. (author)

  12. Methods and means of the radioisotope flaw detection of the nuclear power reactors components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekopov, A.S.; Majorov, A.N.; Firsov, V.G.

    1979-01-01

    Methods and means are considered for the radioisotopic flaw detection of the nuclear reactors pressure vessels and structural components of the reactor circuit. Methods of control are described as in the technological process of fabrication of the power reactors assemblies as during the systematic-preventive repair of the nuclear power station equipment during exploitation. Methodological base is given of the technology of radiation control of welded joints of the pressure vessel branch piper of the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors in the process of assembling and exploitation and joining pipes with the pipe-plate of the steamgenerator in the process of fabrication. Methods of the radioisotope flaw detection in the process of exploitation take into consideration the influence of the radioisotope background, and ensure obtaining of the demanded by the rules of control, sensitivity. Methods of control of welded joints of the steamgenerator of nuclear power plants are based on the simultaneous examination of all joints with application of the shaped radiographic plate-holders. Special gamma-flaw-detection equipment is developed for control of the welded joints of the main branch-pipes. Design peculiarities are given of the installation for flaw detection. These installations are equipped with the system for emergency return of the radiation source into the storage position from the position for exposure. They have automatic exposure-meters for determination of the exposure time. Successfull exploitation of such installations in the Finland during assembling equipment for the nuclear reactor of the nuclear power plant ''Loviisa-1'' and in the USSR on the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant has shown possibility for detection of flaws having dimensions about 1% of the equipment used. For control of welded joints of pipes with pipe-plates at the steam generators, portable flaw-detectors are used. Sensitivity of these flaw-detectors towards detection of the wire standards has

  13. Failure probability of PWR reactor coolant loop piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, T.; Woo, H.H.; Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1984-02-01

    This paper describes the results of assessments performed on the PWR coolant loop piping of Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering plants. For direct double-ended guillotine break (DEGB), consideration was given to crack existence probability, initial crack size distribution, hydrostatic proof test, preservice inspection, leak detection probability, crack growth characteristics, and failure criteria based on the net section stress failure and tearing modulus stability concept. For indirect DEGB, fragilities of major component supports were estimated. The system level fragility was then calculated based on the Boolean expression involving these fragilities. Indirect DEGB due to seismic effects was calculated by convolving the system level fragility and the seismic hazard curve. The results indicate that the probability of occurrence of both direct and indirect DEGB is extremely small, thus, postulation of DEGB in design should be eliminated and replaced by more realistic criteria

  14. Seismic damping factors of small bore piping as influenced by insulation and support elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severud, L.K.; Anderson, M.J.; Barta, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Seismic damping tests of a prototypical Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) small bore piping system is described, and measured transient responses to pulse excitations are reported. The test specimen was representative of a typical LMFBR insulated small bore piping system, and it was supported from a rigid test frame by prototypic dead weight supports, mechanical snubbers, and pipe clamps. Various support configurations were tested to assess the response sensitivity to insulation and other nonlinear support characteristics. Damping factors increased significantly due to the insulation and use of mechanical snubbers. Factors much higher than the magnitudes currently allowed in design by the USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.61, were found. This verified the design values, and it also pointed out the possibility of undue conservatism and costly overdesign resulting from use of the present design values

  15. Seismic damping factors of small bore piping as influenced by insulation and support elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severud, L.K.; Barta, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic damping tests of a prototypical Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) small bore piping system is described, and measured transient responses to pulse excitations are reported. The test specimen was representative of a typical LMFBR insulated small bore piping system, and it was supported from a rigid test frame by prototypic dead weight supports, mechanical snubbers, and pipe clamps. Various support configurations were tested to assess the response sensitivity to insulation and other nonlinear support characteristics. Damping factors increased significantly due to the insulation and use of mechanical snubbers. Factors much higher than the magnitudes currently allowed in design, by the USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.61, were found. This verified the design values but also pointed out the possibility of undue conservatism and costly overdesign resulting from use of the present design values

  16. Results and recommendations from the reactor chemistry and corrosion tasks of the reactor materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, E.W.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1990-11-01

    Within the general context of extended service life, the Reactor Materials Program was initiated in 1984. This comprehensive program addressed material performance in SRS reactor tanks and the primary coolant or Process Water System (PWS) piping. Three of the eleven tasks concerned moderator quality and corrosion mitigation. Definition and control of the stainless steel aqueous environment is a key factor in corrosion mitigation. The Reactor Materials Program systematically investigated the SRS environment and its effect on crack initiation and propagation in stainless steel, with the objective of improving this environment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the contributions of Tasks 6, 7 and 10 of the Reactor Materials Program to the understanding and control of moderator quality and its relationship to mitigation of stress corrosion cracking

  17. Reactor container facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Takashi; Nagasaka, Hideo.

    1990-01-01

    A dry-well pool for spontaneously circulating stored pool water and a suppression pool for flooding a pressure vessel by feeding water, when required, to a flooding gap by means of spontaneous falling upto the flooding position, thereby flooding the pressure vessel are contained at the inside of a reactor container. Thus, when loss of coolant accidents such as caused by main pipe rupture accidents should happen, pool water in the suppression pool is supplied to the flooding gap by spontaneously falling. Further, if the flooding water uprises exceeding a predetermined level, the flooding gap is in communication with the dry-well pool at the upper and the lower portions respectively. Accordingly, flooding water at high temperature heated by the after-heat of the reactor core is returned again into the flooding gap to cool the reactor core repeatedly. (T.M.)

  18. Development of modified piping evaluation diagram for LBB application to Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Nam Su; Kim, Young Jin; Pyo, Chang ryul; Yu, Young Jun; Yang, Jun Seog

    1999-01-01

    Recently, the Piping Evaluation Diagram (PED) is accepted in nuclear industry for simple application of Leak-Before-Break (LBB) concept to piping system. By utilizing the PED, the LBB concept is applied before the piping layout is finalized. However, the developed PED may have to be modified to account for the difference between the material properties of the PED development stage and those of the assembly stage. The objective of this paper is to develop the modified PED which can account for the variation of material properties. For this purpose, a parametric study was performed to investigate the effect of stress-strain curve on the detectable crack length and the effect of fracture resistance curve on the LBB allowable load. Finite element analyses were also performed to investigate the effect of stress-strain curve on the LBB allowable load. Finally a modified PED is developed as a function of crack length (DLC and 2xDLC) and the allowable Safe shutdown Earthquake (SSE) load. By adopting the modified PED, the variation of material properties can be considered in the LBB analysis and the computer runs required for the LBB analysis can be considerably reduced

  19. Feedwater recycling system in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Yoshiharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reactor safety by preventing thermal stresses and cracks generated in structural materials due to the fluctuations in the temperature for high temperature water - low temperature water mixture near the feedwater nozzle. Method: Feedwater pipes are connected to a pressure vessel not directly but by way of a flow control valve. While the recycled water is circulated from an inlet nozzle to an outlet nozzle through a recycle pump, flow control valve and recycling pipeways, feedwater is fed from the feedwater pipes to the recycling pipeways by way of the flow control valve. More specifically, since the high temperature recycle water and the low temperature recycle water are mixed within the pipeways, the temperature fluctuations resulted from the temperature difference between the recycle water and the feedwater is reduced to prevent thermal fatigue and generation of cracks thereby securing the reactor safety. (Furukawa, Y.)

  20. Development and optimization of water treatment reactors using TiO2-modified polymer beads with a refractive index identical to that of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myoga, Arata; Iwashita, Ryutaro; Unno, Noriyuki; Satake, Shin-ichi; Taniguchi, Jun; Yuki, Kazuhisa; Seki, Yohji

    2018-06-01

    Various water purification reactors were constructed using beads of TiO2-coated MEXFLON, which is a fluoropolymer exhibiting a refractive index identical to that of water. The performance of these reactors was evaluated in a recirculation experiment utilizing an aqueous solution of methylene blue. Reactor pipes (length = 150 mm, internal diameter = 10 mm) were made of a fluorinated ethylene polymer with a refractive index of 1.338 and contained 206-bead clusters. A UV lamp was used to irradiate eight reactor pipes surrounding it. The above-mentioned eight bead-packed pipes were connected both in series and in parallel, and the performances of these two reactor types were compared. A pseudo-first-order rate constant of 0.70 h- 1 was obtained for the series connection, whereas the corresponding value for the parallel connection was 1.5 times smaller, confirming the effectiveness of increasing the reaction surface by employing a larger number of beads.

  1. Development and optimization of water treatment reactors using TiO2-modified polymer beads with a refractive index identical to that of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myoga, Arata; Iwashita, Ryutaro; Unno, Noriyuki; Satake, Shin-ichi; Taniguchi, Jun; Yuki, Kazuhisa; Seki, Yohji

    2018-03-01

    Various water purification reactors were constructed using beads of TiO2-coated MEXFLON, which is a fluoropolymer exhibiting a refractive index identical to that of water. The performance of these reactors was evaluated in a recirculation experiment utilizing an aqueous solution of methylene blue. Reactor pipes (length = 150 mm, internal diameter = 10 mm) were made of a fluorinated ethylene polymer with a refractive index of 1.338 and contained 206-bead clusters. A UV lamp was used to irradiate eight reactor pipes surrounding it. The above-mentioned eight bead-packed pipes were connected both in series and in parallel, and the performances of these two reactor types were compared. A pseudo-first-order rate constant of 0.70 h- 1 was obtained for the series connection, whereas the corresponding value for the parallel connection was 1.5 times smaller, confirming the effectiveness of increasing the reaction surface by employing a larger number of beads.

  2. Modifications and modernization of the Portuguese research reactor (RPI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardeira, F.M.; Menezes, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    The Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) reached its criticality in April 1961 and has successfully operated for more than 30 years without important incidents. Several replacements of equipment and improvements were introduced during this period, the most important occurring in the modernisation period (1987-1991), with the purpose of improving safety and reliability of the reactor exploitation. The reactor has been shut-down during more than two years for important works of replacement and refurbishment of the primary piping and pool lining. The objective of this paper is to describe the main works performed on RPI reactor during its life time concerning replacements, upgrading and modernisation of reactor equipment and installations. (orig.)

  3. Investigation of temperature fluctuation phenomena in a stratified steam-water two-phase flow in a simulating pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Koji, E-mail: miyoshi.koj@inss.co.jp; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Taisuke; Sugimoto, Katsumi

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Thermal hydraulics phenomena were discussed in a spray pipe of pressurizer. • Temperature fluctuation was investigated in a stratified steam-water two-phase. • Remarkable liquid temperature fluctuations were observed in the liquid layer. • The observed temperature fluctuations were caused by the internal gravity wave. • The temperature fluctuations decreased with increasing dissolved oxygen. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuation phenomena in a stratified steam-water two-phase flow in a horizontal rectangular duct, which simulate a pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor, were studied experimentally. Vertical distributions of the temperature and the liquid velocity were measured with water of various dissolved oxygen concentrations. Large liquid temperature fluctuations were observed when the water was deaerated well and dissolved oxygen concentration was around 10 ppb. The large temperature fluctuations were not observed when the oxygen concentration was higher. It was shown that the observed temperature fluctuations were caused by the internal gravity wave since the Richardson numbers were larger than 0.25 and the temperature fluctuation frequencies were around the Brunt-Väisälä frequencies in the present experimental conditions. The temperature fluctuations decreased by the non-condensable gas since the non-condensable gas suppressed the condensation and the temperature difference in the liquid layer was small.

  4. Future view of total energy system and reactor engineering and reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, T.

    1974-01-01

    This paper outlines the present status of fission reactors and fusion reactors. The conversion ratio of light water reactors is 0.5, and the efficiency is 32% because of relatively low temperature. Both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors are technically well developed, their performances are well known, and the fuel cycle is well developed, so that both reactors have monopolized power reactor market. But the reprocessing of spent fuel and the treatment of their hazards are inevitable, and the construction and enlargement of reprocessing facilities are indispensable. In LMFBR's tight sealing is easy because they are non-pressurized, and the efficiency is 41%. But liquid sodium is strongly activated and recirculated, so that chemical obstruction due to the breakage of recirculating pumps, pipings, and heat exchangers may occur, and the hazard of plutonium is large. Regarding controlled thermo-nuclear fusion reactors, because Lawson criterion must be satisfied, two methods of plasma confinement are now experimented. One is the plasma confinement by strong magnetic field of 50 KG to 100 KG, and the other is the confinement by the implosion method with high-power laser beam. The latter has much more uncertainties than the former, but recently both methods have made much progress. (Tai, I)

  5. Prevention of biofouling and biocorrosion in reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, A.K.; Shivananda, S.R.

    1995-01-01

    Formaldehyde even at 500 μl/l concentration can prevent the growth of bacteria, algae and fungi in thermal reactors there by stopping the chances of biocorrosion and plugging of the pipe lines. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig

  6. Estimative of core damage frequency in IPEN's IEA-R1 research reactor (PSA level 1) due to the initiating event of loss of coolant caused by large rupture in the pipe of the primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Daniel Massami

    2009-01-01

    This work applies the methodology of probabilistic safety assessment level 1 to the research reactor IEA-R1 IPEN-CNEN/SP. Two categories of identified initiating events of accidents in the reactor are studied: loss of flow and loss of primary coolant. Among the initiating events, blockage of flow channel and loss of cooling fluid by major pipe rupture in the primary circuit are chosen for a detailed analysis. The event tree technique is used to analyze the evolution of the accident, including the actuation or the fail of actuation of the safety systems and the reactor damages. Using the fault tree the reliability of the following reactor safety systems is evaluated: reactor shutdown system, isolation of the reactor pool, emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and the electric system. Estimative for the frequency of damage to the reactor core and the probability of failure of the analyzed systems are calculated. The estimated values for the frequencies of core damage are within the expected margins and are of the same order of magnitude as those found for similar reactors. The reliability of the reactor shutdown system, isolation of the reactor pool and ECCS are satisfactory for the conditions these systems are required. However, for the electric system it is suggested an upgrade to increase its reliability. (author)

  7. Method for pre-heating lmfbr type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokozawa, Atsushi; Kataoka, Hajime.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To enable pre-heating for the inside of the reactor container and the inside of the coolant recycling system with no additional facilities. Method: The coolant recycling system is composed of a heat exchanger, a mechanical pump, a check valve, a flow meter or the like and it is connected in series by way of a pipe line to a reactor container. The mechanical pump is used as a gas recycling device upon pre-heating and it is designed so that a blower such as a fan can be replaced for the impeller of the pump. The inside of the reactor container and the inside of the coolant recycling system is at first filled with an inert gas such as for use with cover gas. Then, nuclear fuels are loaded to attain criticality. Simultaneously, the blower is started and the control rods are operated while cooling the nuclear fuel with the inert gas thus to obtain heat required for pre-heating the pipe line or the like from the nuclear fuels. After the completion of the pre-heating, the liquid metal is charged. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. Commissioning of the Winfrith Aerosol Deposition and Pipe Flow Facility (ADPFF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, M.H.E.; Mitchell, J.P.; Brighton, F.R.

    1991-02-01

    A facility has been constructed to investigate the turbulent deposition behaviour of micron-sized particles in large pipes. These studies are designed to generate suitable data to test and develop the ATLAS code, being developed by the AEA Safety and Reliability Business, to model aerosol transport through reactor components in certain severe accident sequences. The design specification of the Aerosol Deposition and Pipe Flow Facility (ADPFF) is described, together with the basic control instrumentation and commissioning trials. A preliminary assessment of the air velocity profiles measured at a Reynolds number of 10 5 is also included. The ADPFF meets the design specification and is available for the start of the first series of experiments to study aerosol deposition behaviour. (author)

  9. An analysis of a pipe bend subjected to in-plane loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellen, T.K.

    1979-01-01

    This report describes a set of finite element analyses conducted on a pipe bend subjected to in-plane loads. The pipe is thin-walled, and two types of finite element, shells and solid bricks, are compared elastically. An alternative semi-analytical technique has also been used and experimental results are available, all of which show good correlative agreement. The use of suitable mesh refinement and order of numerical integration is examined. Finally, the solid elements are used to follow a loading sequence incorporating elasto-plastic behaviour as conducted by experiment. This work is an updated version of that used for the CEC benchmark calculations for the Fast Reactor Codes and Standards Working Group, Activity No 2, on Structural Analysis. (author)

  10. The application of leak before break concepts piping of KWU-plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholome, G.; Bieselt, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The fracture of pipes with longitudinal and circumferential cracks was investigated by experiments and theoretical approaches (flow stress criteria and limit load analyses). The experiments show that the critical crack dimensions can conservatively be determined by fracture mechanics. The tests and calculations are applied to KWU primary coolant piping with hypothetical longitudinal and circumferential defects. Reactor systems, design, fabrication, stress analysis, material, non-destructive testing, quality control and inservice inspection are considered referring to the leak-before-break behaviour. On the basis of the extreme toughness of the materials, the known loads, the high level of non-destructive examinations, the leakage monitoring system and the high quality of manufacture and processing it is shown that a spontaneous failure need not be postulated. (orig.)

  11. Applying Ultrasonic Phased Array Technology to Examine Austenitic Coarse-Grained Structures for Light Water Reactor Piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is evaluating the capabilities and limitations of phased array (PA) technology to detect service-type flaws in coarse-grained austenitic piping structures. The work is being sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Research. This paper presents initial work involving the use of PA technology to determine the effectiveness of detecting and accurately characterizing flaws on the far-side of austenitic piping welds

  12. Stabilization of magnet assemblies of permanent magnet sodium flowmeters used in fast breeder reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, K.K., E-mail: kkrajan@igcar.gov.in; Vijayakumar, G.

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Stabilization procedure for ALNICO-5 permanent magnet material is evolved. • Effect of time and temperature on ALNICO-5 assembly is determined. • Suitability of ALNICO-5 flowmeters at high temperatures is established. • Temperature coefficient of flux density is determined. - Abstract: Permanent magnet flow meters (PMFMs) are used to measure the sodium flow in sodium cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Circuits. Prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) which is under construction at Kalpakkam is a 500 MWe, sodium cooled, pool type reactor. Sodium flow measurement in various loops of the reactor is of prime importance from operational and safety point of view. To measure the flow of electrically conducting liquid sodium, in primary and secondary circuit pipe lines of PFBR, permanent magnet flow meters are used. PMFM is a non-invasive device, which works on the principle of generation of motional EMF by magnetic forces exerted on the charges in a moving conductor. Flowmeters of different pipe sizes ranging from 10 mm to 200 mm pipe diameter are required for PFBR. Long term performance of the flowmeters mainly depends on stability of permanent magnets used in flowmeters to generate constant magnetic field in stainless steel (SS) pipes. This paper describes the effects of time and temperature on permanent magnet assemblies made of ALNICO-V used in PFBR flowmeters. The stabilization methodology for ALNICO-V permanent magnet assemblies is evolved and established. Loss of magnetic field strength with respect to time and temperatures is determined by experiments and found negligible.

  13. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioiri, Akio.

    1992-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor container, a vent tube communication port is disposed to a pressure suppression pool at a position higher than the pool water therein for communication with an upper dry well, and the upper end opening of a dry well communication pipe is disposed at a position higher than the communication port. When condensate return pipeline is ruptured in the upper dry well, water in a water source pool is injected to the pressure vessel and partially discharged out of the ruptured port and a depressurization valve connected to the pressure vessel to the inside of the upper dry well. The discharged water stays in the upper dry well and, when the water level reaches the height of the vent tube communication port, it flows into the pressure suppression pool. Even in a state that the entire amount of water in the water source pool is supplied, since water does not reach the upper opening port of the dry well communication pipe, water does not flow into a lower dry well. Accordingly, the motor of a control rod drives disposed in the lower dry well can be prevented from submerging. The reactor core can be cooled more reliably, to improve the reliability of the pressure suppression function. (N.H.)

  14. Pipe damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Arendts, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    A program has been developed to assess the available piping damping data, to generate additional data and conduct seperate effects tests, and to establish a plan for reporting and storing future test results into a data bank. This effort is providing some of the basis for developing higher allowable damping values for piping seismic analyses, which will potentially permit removal of a considerable number of piping supports, particularly snubbers. This in turn will lead to more flexible piping systems which will be less susceptible to thermal cracking, will be easier to maintain and inspect, as well as less costly

  15. Reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, Ryuhei; Yamaki, Rika.

    1990-01-01

    A water vessel is disposed and the gas phase portion of the water vessel is connected to a reactor container by a pipeline having a valve disposed at the midway thereof. A pipe in communication with external air is extended upwardly from the liquid phase portion to a considerable height so as to resist against the back pressure by a waterhead in the pipeline. Accordingly, when the pressure in the container is reduced to a negative level, air passes through the pipeline and uprises through the liquid phase portion in the water vessel in the form of bubbles and then flows into the reactor container. When the pressure inside of the reactor goes higher, since the liquid surface in the water vessel is forced down, water is pushed up into the pipeline. Since the waterhead pressure of a column of water in the pipeline and the pressure of the reactor container are well-balanced, gases in the reactor container are not leaked to the outside. Further, in a case if a great positive pressure is formed in the reactor container, the inner pressure overcomes the waterhead of the column of water, so that the gases containing radioactive aerosol uprise in the pipeline. Since water and the gases flow being in contact with each other, this can provide the effect of removing aerosol. (T.M.)

  16. Study of the HTGR fission product migration at the Osiris experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS