WorldWideScience

Sample records for pioneering observations compared

  1. Hans Strahl's pioneering studies in comparative placentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Anthony Michael; Mess, A

    2010-01-01

    and relationship to maternal tissues. This greatly influenced the work of Otto Grosser, who became better known in part because his work was more accessible to other scientists and clinicians. Strahl described the development of the fetal membranes across a broad range of mammalian orders extending his...... observations beyond parturition to the post partum involution of the uterus. He paid close attention to structures designed for histotrophic nutrition including the areolae of moles, haemophagous organs of carnivores and tenrecs and chorionic vesicles of lemurs and lorises. We here provide a summary of some...... of the most important findings made by Strahl including work on placentation in carnivores and higher primates that remains unsurpassed....

  2. Theodore H. Bullock: pioneer of integrative and comparative neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanc, G K H; Zupanc, M M

    2008-02-01

    Theodore H. Bullock (1905-2005) was a pioneer of integrative and comparative neurobiology and one of the founders of neuroethology. His work--distinguished by the tremendous number of different research themes and animal taxa studied--provided the basis for a comprehensive analysis of brain evolution. Among his major achievements are: one of the first physiological analyses of rhythmic central pattern generators; the first simultaneous recording from both the presynaptic and postsynaptic region of a chemical synapse; the demonstration of intercellular communication through graded potentials; and the discovery of two novel sensory organs formed by infrared receptors in pit vipers and electroreceptors in electric fish. He was also one of the first who applied computational tools to the analysis of complex neural signals and to perform a comparative analysis of cognitive events. His two-volume treatise "Structure and function in the nervous system of invertebrates" (with G. Adrian Horridge) remains the most comprehensive, authoritative review of this topic ever written. In addition to his research merits, his legacy is particularly based on his cosmopolitan way of thinking and acting, his large, worldwide school of students, and his committed advocacy for comparative and systems-oriented neurobiology.

  3. Solar wind stream structure at large heliocentric distances Pioneer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Time profiles and histograms of plasma data from Pioneers 10 and 11 are examined for the period between 1975 and 1983. During this time, Pioneer 10 traveled between a heliocentric distance of 8.7 and 30.4 AU. The velocity structure of the solar wind at these heliocentric distances is found to have one of two distinct forms: approximately 70 percent of the time the solar wind has a nearly flat velocity profile. Occasionally, this flat velocity profile is accompanied by quasi-periodic variations in density and in thermal speed consistent with the concept that the 'corotating interaction regions' which are produced by the interaction of high- and low-speed streams at intermediate heliocentric distances are replaced by 'pressure regions' in the outer heliosphere. The remaining 30 percent of the time the solar wind is marked by large (50-200 km/s) long-term (30-120 days) shifts in the average solar wind velocity.

  4. Pioneer and Voyager observations of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances and latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.; Mihalov, J. D.; Barnes, A.; Lazarus, A. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    Data obtained from the electrostatic analyzers aboard the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft and from the Faraday cup aboard Voyager 2 were used to study spatial gradients in the distant solar wind. Prior to mid-1985, both spacecraft observed nearly identical solar wind structures. After day 150 of 1985, the velocity structure at Voyager 2 became flatter, and the Voyager 2 velocities were smaller than those observed by Pioneer 11. It is suggested that these changes in the solar wind at low latitudes may be related to a change which occurred in the coronal hole structure in early 1985.

  5. Ultrastructural observations on five pioneer soil algae from ice denuded areas (King George Island, West Antarctica)

    OpenAIRE

    MASSALSKI, ANDRZEJ; Mrozinska ,Teresa; Olech, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Morphological observations were made using transmission electron microscopy on five species of green soil algae, including Chlorosarcinopsis cf. gelatinosa Chantanachat & Bold, Muriella decolor visher, Tetracystis aeria Brown & Bold, Tetracystis pampae Brown & bold, and Stichococcus bacillaris Nageli. With an exception of the latter species, they are all new records in Antarctica. These species were the important pioneers in the colonization process of the areas recently denuded of ice. Colle...

  6. CO2 impact ionization-driven plasma instability observed by Pioneer Venus Orbiter at Periapsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S. A.; Brace, L. H.; Niemann, H. B.; Scarf, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of enhanced ac electric field noise about Pioneer Venus periapsis are shown to be related to spacecraft-generated impact ionization of the ambient CO2. The frequency of the electric field noise is found to peak in the vicinity of the CO2(+) ion plasma frequency and to closely follow the form of the neutral CO2 density profile. When the electric field noise in all channels is normalized by the square root of the CO2 number density, the ratio is constant. Since the impact electron density measured by the Pioneer Venus Langmuir probe, is observed to scale directly with the neutral CO2, the growth of the electric field amplitude is found to be linear in time with a growth rate proportional to the CO2(+) ion plasma frequency. On the basis of these results the impact ionization-driven instability is shown to be the ion acoustic instability. Implications for the lack of observations by Pioneer Venus of reflected-O(+)-driven instabilities, as have been proposed for the space shuttle, are discussed.

  7. Pioneer 10 observations of zodiacal light brightness near the ecliptic - Changes with heliocentric distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanner, M. S.; Weinberg, J. L.; Beeson, D. E.; Sparrow, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    Sky maps made by the Pioneer 10 Imaging Photopolarimeter (IPP) at sun-spacecraft distances from 1 to 3 AU have been analyzed to derive the brightness of the zodiacal light near the ecliptic at elongations greater than 90 degrees. The change in zodiacal light brightness with heliocentric distance is compared with models of the spatial distribution of the dust. Use of background starlight brightnesses derived from IPP measurements beyond the asteroid belt, where the zodiacal light is not detected, and, especially, use of a corrected calibration lead to considerably lower values for zodiacal light than those reported by us previously.

  8. Solar wind and coronal structure near sunspot minimum - Pioneer and SMM observations from 1985-1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Barnes, A.; Hundhausen, A. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in solar wind speed and magnetic polarity observed at the Pioneer spacecraft are discussed here in terms of the changing magnetic geometry implied by SMM coronagraph observations over the period 1985-1987. The pattern of recurrent solar wind streams, the long-term average speed, and the sector polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field all changed in a manner suggesting both a temporal variation, and a changing dependence on heliographic latitude. Coronal observations during this epoch show a systematic variation in coronal structure and the magnetic structure imposed on the expanding solar wind. These observations suggest interpretation of the solar wind speed variations in terms of the familiar model where the speed increases with distance from a nearly flat interplanetary current sheet, and where this current sheet becomes aligned with the solar equatorial plane as sunspot minimum approaches, but deviates rapidly from that orientation after minimum.

  9. Solar wind structure at large heliocentric distances - An interpretation of Pioneer 10 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhausen, A. J.; Gosling, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Examination of hourly values of the solar wind speed observed by the Pioneer 10 spacecraft beyond a heliocentric distance of 4 AU reveals (1) a prevalent 'sawtoothlike' speed-time profile, most speed fluctuations displaying a rapid rise and a much slower decline, and (2) the nearly universal appearance of abrupt (on the 1-hour time resolution of these data) changes in the speed on the rising portions of the speed fluctuations. These previously unreported characteristics, as well as the rate of decay of stream amplitudes derived earlier by Collard and Wolfe, are in general agreement with the predictions of stream propagation models that neglect any conversion of kinetic energy to thermal energy outside of shock fronts. Thus the Pioneer 10 observations give the first confirmation of the general concept of solar wind stream evolution employed in these models, i.e., that solar wind speed inhomogeneities appear to steepen to form shock waves and that the 'wave amplitudes' decay slowly as the shock waves propagate outward from the sun.

  10. COMPARISON OF PIONEER 10, VOYAGER 1, AND VOYAGER 2 ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS WITH ANTI-SOLAR LYMAN-ALPHA BACKSCATTER SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayock, B.; Zank, G. P.; Heerikhuisen, J., E-mail: brian.fayock@gmail.com, E-mail: garyp.zank@gmail.com, E-mail: jacob.heerikhuisen@uah.edu [Department of Physics and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    Observations made by ultraviolet (UV) detectors on board Pioneer 10, Voyager 1, and Voyager 2 can be used to analyze the distribution of neutral hydrogen throughout the heliosphere, including the interaction regions of the solar wind and local interstellar medium. Previous studies of the long-term trend of decreasing intensity with increasing heliocentric distance established the need for more sophisticated heliospheric models. Here we use state-of-the-art three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) neutral models to simulate Lyman-alpha backscatter as would be seen by the three spacecrafts, exploiting a new 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code under solar minimum conditions. Both observations and simulations of the UV backscatter intensity are normalized for each spacecraft flight path at {approx}15 AU, and we focus on the slope of decreasing intensity over an increasing heliocentric distance. Comparisons of simulations with Voyager 1 Lyman-alpha data results in a very close match, while the Pioneer 10 comparison is similar due to normalization, but not considered to be in agreement. The deviations may be influenced by a low resolution of photoionization in the 3D MHD-neutral model, a lack of solar cycle activity in our simulations, and possibly issues with instrumental sensitivity. Comparing the slope of Voyager 2 and the simulated intensities yields an almost identical match. Our results predict a large increase in the Lyman-alpha intensity as the hydrogen wall is approached, which would signal an imminent crossing of the heliopause.

  11. Pioneer 10 observation of the solar wind proton temperature heliocentric gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Solar wind isotropic proton temperatures as measured out to 12.2 AU heliocentric distance by the Ames plasma analyzer aboard Pioneer 10 are presented as consecutive averages over three Carrington solar rotations and discussed. The weighted least-squares fit of average temperature to heliocentric radial distance, R, yields the power law R sup -.52. These average proton temperatures are not correlated as well with Pioneer 10's heliocentric radial distance (-.85) as are the corresponding average Zurich sunspot numbers R sub z (-.95). Consequently, it is difficult to isolate the spatial gradient in the Pioneer 10 solar wind proton temperatures using that data alone.

  12. ATOC/Pioneer Seamount cable after 8 years on the seafloor: Observations, environmental impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Irina; Paull, Charles K.; Kuhnz, Linda A.; Burton, Erica J.; von Thun, Susan; Gary Greene, H.; Barry, James P.

    2006-04-01

    A study was conducted on the impacts of the presence of the Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC)/Pioneer Seamount cable on the benthos from nearshore waters adjacent to its origin at Pillar Point Air Force Station in Half Moon Bay, California to its terminus 95 km along its length on Pioneer Seamount. The coaxial Type SD cable was installed, unburied on the seafloor in 1995. Thirteen sites along the cable route were surveyed using the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) ROVs Ventana and Tiburon equipped with cable-tracking tools. Quantitative comparisons of biological communities and seafloor features between cable and control sites were performed at nine stations. Forty-two hours of video footage and 138 push cores were collected over 15.1 km of seafloor. Approximately 12.1 km of the cable was observed (13% of the cable route). This study documents the appearance and condition of the cable and the underlying seafloor, and the effects of the cable on biological communities along its route. Limited self-burial of the cable has occurred during the 8-year deployment, particularly over the continental shelf and upper slope. Cable strumming by nearshore wave action has incised rocky siltstone outcrops. Several observations of kinks and snags in the cable on the upper slope (˜240 m depth) suggest contact with trawling gear. Few changes in the abundance or distribution of benthic fauna were detectable from video observations (epifaunal) and sediment core samples (infauna). Of 17 megafaunal groups and 19 infaunal taxa, no tests evaluating the overall effect of the cable were statistically significant. While these results indicate that the biological impacts of the cable are minor at most, three megafaunal groups exhibited cable-related changes at one or more stations. Actiniarians (sea anemones) colonized the cable when it was exposed on the seafloor, and were therefore generally more abundant on the cable than in surrounding, sediment

  13. Pioneer 10 ultraviolet photometer observations of the interplanetary glow at heliocentric distances from 2 to 14 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F. M.; Judge, D. L.; Suzuki, K.; Carlson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the observed Pioneer 10 interplanetary data from 1972 to 1977, taking into account the interplanetary glow intensity observed by the Pioneer 10 UV photometer at sun-spacecraft distances of 2-14 AU. On the basis of the obtained data, it was determined that the background intensity for the 200-1400 A band pass of the photometer channel is about 40 + or - 10 R, and that the nearby interstellar density is 0.04 + or - 0.91 per ccm for hydrogen and about 0.01 + or - 0.002 per ccm for helium. Accordingly, the He/H number density is about 0.25 at large distances from the sun. The Pioneer 10 spacecraft is leaving the solar system in the downwind direction, while both Pioneer 11 and Voyager will leave in the upwind direction. The combined UV observations of the interplanetary glow will provide accurate results on the physical status of the inflowing interstellar gas and the variability of background radiation as well.

  14. A Comparative Study of Pioneer Entry Decisions in the United States and China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y. Lisa; Song, Michael; Parry, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    According to the resource-based view of the firm, competitive advantages arise from control and deployment of productive resources that are rare and difficult to imitate. Through early entry, pioneers can gain preferential access to key resources. However, the value of that access depends on the pre

  15. Pioneer and Voyager observations of Forbush decreases between 6 and 24 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, F. B.; Trainor, J. H.; Webber, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed phenomenological description of deep space Forbush decreases is given, using Voyager and Pioneer data. The transient reduction in cosmic ray intensity can be produced by (1) reflection at the shock front; (2) increased modulation associated with the disturbed region behind the shock; (3) a barrier mechanism involving large-scale tangential discontinuities; or (4) particle drifts in the enhanced magnetic field by the post-shock region. The presence of a well-defined precursor peak clearly indicates that particle reflection is important. Forbush decreases appear to be an important component in the long-term modulation.

  16. Seed retention by pioneer trees enhances plant diversity resilience on gravel bars: Observations from the river Allier, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corenblit, Dov; Vidal, Vincent; Cabanis, Manon; Steiger, Johannes; Garófano-Gómez, Virginia; Garreau, Alexandre; Hortobágyi, Borbála; Otto, Thierry; Roussel, Erwan; Voldoire, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Pioneer riparian trees which establish in river active tracts on gravel bars enhance fine sediment retention during high flows within their stands and in their lee side, forming obstacle marks. Fine sediment retention can be accompanied by deposition of seeds transported by water dispersal, i.e. by hydrochory. We tested the hypothesis that pioneer riparian trees significantly control seed deposition on gravel bars by forming sediment obstacle marks. We described the seed bank structure and compared samples collected from obstacle marks and bare coarse-grained bar surfaces. At the surface (at 2 cm depth), seed abundance (N) and richness (S) (expressed as mean ± sd) were significantly higher in areas directly affected by riparian trees, i.e. obstacle marks, (N: 693 ± 391; S: 17 ± 3) than in bare surfaces (N: 334 ± 371; S: 13 ± 5). Surface and sub-surface (at 20 cm depth) samples were also significantly different, with the sub-surface samples almost devoid of seeds (respectively N: 514 ± 413; S: 15 ± 5 and N: 3 ± 6; S: 1 ± 2). These results suggest a biogeomorphic feedback between sediment and associated seed retention mediated by hydrochory, vegetation growth and local seed dispersal mediated by barochory. Such feedback may improve plant diversity resilience on gravel alluvial bars of high-energy rivers.

  17. The Pioneer Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    de Diego, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the radio-metric data from Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts has indicated the presence of an unmodeled acceleration starting at 20 AU, which has become known as the Pioneer anomaly. The nature of this acceleration is uncertain. In this paper we give a description of the effect and review some relevant mechanisms proposed to explain the observed anomaly. We also discuss on some future projects to investigate this phenomenon.

  18. The High Andean Cordillera of central Argentina and Chile along the Piuquenes Pass-Cordon del Portillo transect: Darwin's pioneering observations compared with modern geology La Alta Cordillera de los Andes del centro de Argentina y Chile a lo largo de la transecta del Paso Piuquenes-Cordón del Portillo: Las observaciones pioneras de Darwin comparadas con la geología moderna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Giambiagi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The geological observations made by Darwin in 1835 during his crossing of the Andes from Santiago to Mendoza via the Piuquenes Pass and Cordón del Portillo are compared with the present geological knowledge of the Cordillera Principal and Cordillera Frontal at 33°-34°S. The analysis of the complex stratigraphy of the Cordillera Principal, the imbricated structure of the Aconcagua fold and thrust belt, as well as the stratigraphy and structure of the inter mountain foreland Tunuyán Basin, allows to assess the pioneer observations of Darwin. He recognized the old metamorphic basement and the granitoids and volcanic sequences of late Paleozoic to Triassic age of the Cordillera Frontal, established the Cretaceous age of the marine successions cropping out along the eastern Cordillera Principal and studied the conglomeratic deposits associated with the uplift of the Cordillera in the Alto Tunuyán Basin. Based on the study of clast provenance of the synorogenic deposits of the Alto Tunuyán Basin, Darwin recognized that the Cordillera Frontal was uplifted later than the Cordillera Principal. The present knowledge of this sector of the Andean Cordillera confirms his pioneer observations and show that Darwin was one of the first scientists ever in realizing that in an orogenic system the sequence of uplift and deformation proceeds from hinterland towards foreland, according to a process that is exceptionally well-illustrated along the Piuquenes-Cordón del Portillo transect.Las observaciones geológicas efectuadas por Darwin en 1935 durante su cruce de la Cordillera de Los Andes entre Santiago y Mendoza realizado en 1835 a través de los pasos del Portillo y Piuquenes son examinadas y comparadas con el conocimiento actual existente de las Cordilleras Principal y Frontal entre los 33°-34°S. El análisis de la compleja estratigrafía de la Cordillera Principal, la estructura de las diferentes láminas imbricadas de la faja plegada y corrida del

  19. Printing Pioneer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Wang Xuan,inventor of a laser typesetting system for Chinese characters,ushers in a new age in the printing industry Anyone who reads a book or newspaper in Chinese is indebted to Wang Xuan, a pioneer in modem Chinese-language printing, just as one can thank Thomas Edison for inventing the electric light bulb. Wang invented a computerized laser photocomposition system for Chinese char-

  20. Gamma-ray burst arrival-time localizations: Simultaneous observations by Ulysses, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, SIGMA, WATCH, and PHEBUS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, K.; Laros, J.; Brandt, Søren Kristian

    2000-01-01

    Between the launch of the Ulysses spacecraft in 1990 October and the entry of Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) into the atmosphere of Venus in 1992 October, concurrent coverage by Ulysses, PVO, the WATCH experiments aboard the Granat and Eureca spacecraft, and the SIGMA and PHEBUS experiments aboard...

  1. Spatial gradients in the heliospheric magnetic field - Pioneer 11 observations between 1 AU and 24 AU, and over solar cycle 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, Daniel; Smith, Edward J.; Slavin, James A.; Wolfe, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The large-scale temporal behavior and spatial gradients in the heliospheric magnetic field were investigated using magnetic field observations by Pioneer 11 and ISEE 3/ICE satellites, including observations out to a radial distance of 24 AU and over a time interval that includes the recent solar minimum. It was found that, to first order, the gradients in the magnetic field magnitude and in the azimutal component agree well with the Parker (1958) model. The analysis of the Pioneer data confirms previous reports of a magnetic field flux deficit of about 1 percent/AU, so that at 20 AU the relative deficit is of the order of 20 percent. It is argued that most of the magnetic field deficit is in the radial gradient.

  2. Comparisons of ground-based monitor data with Pioneers 8, 9, 10 and 11 observations in 1968-1974. [Forbush decreases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, J. A.; Webber, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    The paper examines ground-based neutron monitor data and the counting rates in different energy channels on the Pioneer 8, 9, 10 and 11 spacecraft to determine the scale size of the transient cosmic-ray variations (Forbush decreases) and the relationship of these variations to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field. Since the Pioneer spacecraft sampled the inner modulating region extensively, the spatial extent of Forbush decreases (Fd's) can be determined. In some cases the Fd modulating region was co-rotating and in others radially expanding. The azimuthal extent of the Fd region was variable but was typically about 45 deg in extent. These observations will be interpreted in terms of models proposed for Fds.

  3. Pioneering unquenched desire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Hoffmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The book Twórczość Leśmiana w kręgu filozoficznej myśli symbolizmu rosyjskiego written by Sobieska is a pioneering attempt at combining a discussion on the literary output of the author of Dziejba leśna with the reflection stemming from the tradition of the Eastern Orthodox Church. The book, notwithstanding its shortcomings and self-imposed limitations, comprehensively discusses views and opinions hitherto unknown to the Polish reader, introduces and explains the context of the findings of such thinkers as Soloviov or Biely, compares texts written by Russian symbolists with Leśmian’s poems. Sobieska categorizes the problem issues into subsequent thematic ranges (epiphany insight into the nature of being, musicality and the notion of poetical metre, creative imagination, mystical femininity in order to point at potential sources of the recontextualization of Leśmian’s poetical sensitivity. The findings, being an example of classic comparatistic studies, have been enhanced by iconological and musicological observations as well as by some additional guiding elements facilitating the understanding of Orthodox theology. The present sketch discusses the book and is complemented with a polemics with some of its methodological solutions.

  4. Comparative efficacy on dogs of a single topical treatment with the pioneer fipronil/(S-methoprene and an oral treatment with spinosad against Ctenocephalides felis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beugnet F.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the study reported here, the pioneer fipronil/(S-methoprene topical product (FRONTLINE® PLUS, Merial Limited, Duluth, GA was compared to the oral spinosad product (COMFORTIS® Elanco, Greenfield, IN for efficacy against adult fleas and preventing egg production. The product presentations, doses and labelling were the one applicable in the USA. Using a standard protocol, 200 cat fleas of mixed sex were applied to dogs on Days 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42. Dogs were combed to remove fleas 24 hours post-infestation, the fleas were counted, collected, and then reapplied to each dog following completion of their respective count. At 48 hours post-infestation, comb counts were performed and fleas were removed. No fleas were collected from any dog in the fipronil/(S-methoprene group at any 24 or 48 hours post-infestation assessment throughout the six weeks study, yielding a preventive efficacy of 100%. For the spinosad treatment, efficacy was 100% at 24 hours and 48 hours through Day 16, and thereafter declined. The results observed in the spinosad-treated dogs were highly variable between animals. At the 24 and 48 hours counts following the Day 21 infestation, only five of eight spinosad-treated dogs (62.5% were flea-free. Following the Day 28 infestation, spinosad efficacy fell to 85% and 89%, for the 24 hours and 48 hours counts, and only two dogs (25% were flea free, compared to 100% flea-free dogs in the fipronil/(S-methoprene group. No fleas were collected from the fipronil/(S- methoprene treated dogs throughout the entire study, therefore, no eggs were collected at any time from any dog in the group. However, in the spinosad group adult fleas were found on dogs starting on Day 21 and by Day 30, 42 eggs were collected from one dog that had 107 adult fleas counted at 48 hours. At Day 37 and Day 49, more than 100 eggs were collected from each dog in the spinosad-treated and control groups.

  5. Pioneer ACO PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Pioneer ACO PUF - To address the increasing number of requests for Pioneer ACO data, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has created a standard...

  6. Three pioneers of comparative psychology in America, 1843-1890: Lewis H. Morgan, John Bascom, and Joseph LeConte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Timothy D

    2003-02-01

    Scientific comparative psychology in America dates from the mid-1890s, but there is a body of earlier literature on the topic, written during a period of theistic debates over Darwinian evolution. The anthropologist Lewis H. Morgan rejected instinct as an explanation of animal behavior in 1843 and defended the mental similarities between animals and humans, although he was not an evolutionist. John Bascom's textbook Comparative Psychology (1878) is the earliest American work to use that title, and its theistic approach anticipates some arguments found in much later evolutionary works. Beginning in 1860, the geologist Joseph LeConte, who is well known for defending the compatibility of evolution and religion, wrote several articles in which he outlined a comparative evolutionary approach to psychological problems. However, these writers did not establish a coherent research tradition and were ignored by the "New Psychologists" of the 1880s.

  7. Discovering Ourselves by Unfolding Our Panorama: Interviewing Pioneers in Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, P. Paul; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines significant events that have influenced the personal and professional development of pioneers in the counseling field who have been interviewed in the "Journal of Counseling and Development." Presents some of the pioneers' observations and reflections about counselor training. (ABL)

  8. Comparing crowding in human and ideal observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Ronald; Johnson, Addie; Martinez Anton, Angela; Schepers, Anne L; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2012-06-12

    A visual target is more difficult to recognize when it is surrounded by other, similar objects. This breakdown in object recognition is known as crowding. Despite a long history of experimental work, computational models of crowding are still sparse. Specifically, few studies have examined crowding using an ideal-observer approach. Here, we compare crowding in ideal observers with crowding in humans. We derived an ideal-observer model for target identification under conditions of position and identity uncertainty. Simulations showed that this model reproduces the hallmark of crowding, namely a critical spacing that scales with viewing eccentricity. To examine how well the model fits quantitatively to human data, we performed three experiments. In Experiments 1 and 2, we measured observers' perceptual uncertainty about stimulus positions and identities, respectively, for a target in isolation. In Experiment 3, observers identified a target that was flanked by two distractors. We found that about half of the errors in Experiment 3 could be accounted for by the perceptual uncertainty measured in Experiments 1 and 2. The remainder of the errors could be accounted for by assuming that uncertainty (i.e., the width of internal noise distribution) about stimulus positions and identities depends on flanker proximity. Our results provide a mathematical restatement of the crowding problem and support the hypothesis that crowding behavior is a sign of optimality rather than a perceptual defect.

  9. Hemispheric Coupling: Comparing Dynamo Simulations and Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, Aimee A; Passos, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations that reproduce solar-like magnetic cycles can be used to generate long-term statistics. The variations in N-S hemispheric cycle synchronicity and amplitude produced in simulations has not been widely compared to observations. The observed limits on asymmetry show that hemispheric sunspot area production is no more than 20% asymmetric for cycles 12-23 and phase lags do not exceed 20% (2 yrs) of the total cycle period. Independent studies have found a long-term trend in phase values as one hemisphere leads the other for ~four cycles. Such persistence in phase is not indicative of a stochastic phenomenon. We compare the findings to results from a numerical simulation of solar convection recently produced with the EULAG-MHD model. This simulation spans 1600 yrs and generated 40 regular, sunspot-like cycles. While the simulated cycle length is too long and the toroidal bands remain at too high of latitudes, some solar-like aspects of hemispheric asymmetry are reproduced. The model reproduces ...

  10. Pioneer 12 (PN-12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, D.; Fimmel, R.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for Pioneer 12 are summarized. The Pioneer 12 spacecraft is in a 24-hour elliptical orbit around Venus. Atmospheric and altimetry data are obtained mainly around periapsis, and planetary imaging is normally performed around apoapsis. The Pioneer 12 mission objectives are outlined and the DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, command and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  11. Pioneer ACO Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Pioneer ACO Model is designed for health care organizations and providers that are already experienced in coordinating care for patients across care settings. It...

  12. Pioneering in geese

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is about pioneering in geese-- the report gives a history of the goose and its evolution from the Pleistocene to currents species of geese. The report...

  13. Does PIONEER measure local spacetime expansion?

    CERN Document Server

    Fahr, H J; Fahr, Hans-Joerg; Siewert, Mark

    2006-01-01

    There is a longstanding mystery connected with the radiotracking of distant interplanetary spaceprobes like ULYSSES, Galileo and especially the two NASA probes PIONEER 10 and 11. Comparing radiosignals outgoing from the earth to the probe and ingoing again from the probes do show anomalous frequency shifts which up to now have been explained as caused by anomalous non-Newtonian decelerations of these probes recognizable at solar distances beyond 5 AU. In this paper we study cosmological conditions for the transfer of radiosignals between the Earth and these distant probes. Applying general relativity, we derive both the geodetic deceleration as well as the cosmological redshift and compare the resulting frequency shift with the observed effect. We find that anomalous decelerations do act on these probes which are of cosmological nature, but these are, as expected from standard cosmology, much too low to explain the observed effect. In contrast, the cosmological redshift of radiophotons suffered during the iti...

  14. Comparing MMS Observations with Theory and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas Earle; Burch, James L.; Torbert, Roy B.

    2016-04-01

    MMS completes its first year in orbit on 13 March 2016, and its science data set will by then be open to use by the entire research community, including theorists and simulators. We will briefly summarize observational highlights from the first year of MMS operations to illustrate the unprecedented accuracy and resolution of phenomena that have until now been inaccessible to observation, especially at electron scales. The goal of such observations has always been to test and refine our understanding of reconnection, as embodied in our theoretical and simulation models, with the goal of better predicting the morphology and dynamic evolution of reconnection as a driver of space weather. Toward that end, we summarize the MMS data products and suggest ways for the theory and modeling community to make contact with MMS observations and use them to test their models.

  15. Data base to compare calculations and observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tichler, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Meteorological and climatological data bases were compared with known tritium release points and diffusion calculations to determine if calculated concentrations could replace measure concentrations at the monitoring stations. Daily tritium concentrations were monitored at 8 stations and 16 possible receptors. Automated data retrieval strategies are listed. (PSB)

  16. The Pioneer Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor T. Toth

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Radio-metric Doppler tracking data received from the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft from heliocentric distances of 20-70 AU has consistently indicated the presence of a small, anomalous, blue-shifted frequency drift uniformly changing with a rate of ~6 × 10–9 Hz/s. Ultimately, the drift was interpreted as a constant sunward deceleration of each particular spacecraft at the level of aP = (8.74 ± 1.33 × 10–10 m/s2. This apparent violation of the Newton's gravitational inverse square law has become known as the Pioneer anomaly; the nature of this anomaly remains unexplained. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the physical properties of the anomaly and the conditions that led to its detection and characterization. We review various mechanisms proposed to explain the anomaly and discuss the current state of efforts to determine its nature. A comprehensive new investigation of the anomalous behavior of the two Pioneers has begun recently. The new efforts rely on the much-extended set of radio-metric Doppler data for both spacecraft in conjunction with the newly available complete record of their telemetry files and a large archive of original project documentation. As the new study is yet to report its findings, this review provides the necessary background for the new results to appear in the near future. In particular, we provide a significant amount of information on the design, operations and behavior of the two Pioneers during their entire missions, including descriptions of various data formats and techniques used for their navigation and radio-science data analysis. As most of this information was recovered relatively recently, it was not used in the previous studies of the Pioneer anomaly, but it is critical for the new investigation.

  17. Alasti pioneer / Jelena Skulskaja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Skulskaja, Jelena, 1950-

    2005-01-01

    Teatri- ja filmiuudiseid Venemaalt : Kira Muratova mängufilm "Häälestaja" ("Nastroishtshik"), Aleksandr Sokurovi töös olev mängufilm Thomas Manni ja Johann Wolfgang Goethe ainetel "Faust" ning Kirill Serebrjannikovi lavastus Sovremennikus Mihhail Kononovi romaani "Alasti pioneer" järgi, peaosas Tshulpan Hamatova. Ajalehe tiitellehel kuupäevaks "märtsi lõpp (4/05)"

  18. Jupiter after Pioneer - A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonough, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    In December 1973, Pioneer 10 became the first spacecraft to reach the vicinity of Jupiter. The spacecraft passed through the Jovian magnetosphere in two weeks and sent back more than 300 pictures of the big planet. Measurements were conducted of EM fields, energetic particles, and micrometeoroids. Radio occultations observed are discussed along with observations in the infrared and ultraviolet range, magnetic measurements, questions of trajectory analysis, and data obtained with the aid of a plasma analyzer. Pioneer 10 has confirmed as inescapable the fact that Jupiter radiates more energy than it receives from the sun.

  19. Neurological examination: pioneering authors and their books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péricles Maranhão-Filho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to highlight some of the most important pioneering books specifically focused on the neurological examination and their authors. During the XIX Century, Alexander Hammond, William Gowers and Charles Mills pioneered the neurological literature, followed in the XX Century by Aloysio de Castro, Monrad-Krohn, Derek Denny-Brown, Robert Wartenberg, Gordon Holmes, and Russel DeJong. With determination and a marked sense of observation and research, they competently developed and spread the technique and art of the neurological exam.

  20. Contrasting the morphology, anatomy and fungal colonization of new pioneer and fibrous roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadworny, Marcin; Eissenstat, David M

    2011-04-01

    Not all roots born as first-order branches are the same and this has important consequences for overall function. We hypothesized that, compared with fibrous roots, pioneer roots are built to live longer at the expense of absorptive capacity. We tested this hypothesis by investigating pioneer and fibrous roots in their first 14 d of life in the arbuscular mycorrhizal tree species: Acer negundo, Acer saccharum, Juglans nigra, Liriodendron tulipifera and Populus tremuloides. Root observations were made with root-access boxes that allowed roots to be sampled at known ages in field-grown trees. Compared to fibrous roots, pioneer roots had larger diameter, lower specific root length, greater average length and a lack of mycorrhizal or nonmycorrhizal fungal colonization. Pioneer roots < 14 d old had more layers of hypodermis with a lower percentage of putative passage cells and more protoxylem groups than similar age fibrous roots. Our results suggest that pioneer roots are constructed for defense against biotic and abiotic challenges, exploration of soil distal to the stem, high fibrous root branching and secondary development with high axial hydraulic conductivity at the expense of mycorrhizal colonization and high absorptive capacity for water and nutrients.

  1. Pioneers of representation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Charles W

    1999-01-01

    The year 1897 was marked by two important mathematical events: the publication of the first paper on representations of finite groups by Ferdinand Georg Frobenius (1849-1917) and the appearance of the first treatise in English on the theory of finite groups by William Burnside (1852-1927). Burnside soon developed his own approach to representations of finite groups. In the next few years, working independently, Frobenius and Burnside explored the new subject and its applications to finite group theory. They were soon joined in this enterprise by Issai Schur (1875-1941) and some years later, by Richard Brauer (1901-1977). These mathematicians' pioneering research is the subject of this book. It presents an account of the early history of representation theory through an analysis of the published work of the principals and others with whom the principals' work was interwoven. Also included are biographical sketches and enough mathematics to enable readers to follow the development of the subject. An introductor...

  2. Pioneering a Biobased UAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Eli; Byemerwa, Jovita; Dispenza, Ross; Doughty, Benjamin; Gillyard, KaNesha; Godbole, Poorwa; Gonzales-Wright, Jeanette; Hull, Ian; Kannappan, Jotthe; Levine, Alexander; Nelakanti, Raman; Ruffner, Lydia; Shumate, Alaina; Sorayya, Aryo; Ugwu, Kyla; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2015-01-01

    With the exponential growth of interest in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and their vast array of applications in both space exploration and terrestrial uses such as the delivery of medicine and monitoring the environment, the 2014 Stanford-Brown-Spelman iGEM team is pioneering the development of a fully biological UAV for scientific and humanitarian missions. The prospect of a biologically-produced UAV presents numerous advantages over the current manufacturing paradigm. First, a foundational architecture built by cells allows for construction or repair in locations where it would be difficult to bring traditional tools of production. Second, a major limitation of current research with UAVs is the size and high power consumption of analytical instruments, which require bulky electrical components and large fuselages to support their weight. By moving these functions into cells with biosensing capabilities – for example, a series of cells engineered to report GFP, green fluorescent protein, when conditions exceed a certain threshold concentration of a compound of interest, enabling their detection post-flight – these problems of scale can be avoided. To this end, we are working to engineer cells to synthesize cellulose acetate as a novel bioplastic, characterize biological methods of waterproofing the material, and program this material’s systemic biodegradation. In addition, we aim to use an “amberless” system to prevent horizontal gene transfer from live cells on the material to microorganisms in the flight environment. So far, we have: successfully transformed Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a cellulose-producing bacterium, with a series of promoters to test transformation efficiency before adding the acetylation genes; isolated protein bands present in the wasp nest material; transformed the cellulose-degrading genes into Escherichia coli; and we have confirmed that the amberless construct prevents protein expression in wild-type cells. In addition, as

  3. Pioneering Heat Pump Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschliman, Dave [Indiana Inst. of Technology, Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Lubbehusen, Mike [Indiana Inst. of Technology, Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States)

    2015-06-30

    This project was initiated at a time when ground coupled heat pump systems in this region were limited in size and quantity. There were economic pressures with costs for natural gas and electric utilities that had many organizations considering ground coupled heat pumps; The research has added to the understanding of how ground temperatures fluctuate seasonally and how this affects the performance and operation of the heat pumps. This was done by using a series of temperature sensors buried within the middle of one of the vertical bore fields with sensors located at various depths below grade. Trending of the data showed that there is a lag in ground temperature with respect to air temperatures in the shoulder months, however as full cooling and heating season arrives, the heat rejection and heat extraction from the ground has a significant effect on the ground temps; Additionally it is better understood that while a large community geothermal bore field serving multiple buildings does provide a convenient central plant to use, it introduces complexity of not being able to easily model and predict how each building will contribute to the loads in real time. Additional controllers and programming were added to provide more insight into this real time load profile and allow for intelligent shedding of load via a dry cooler during cool nights in lieu of rejecting to the ground loop. This serves as a means to ‘condition’ the ground loop and mitigate thermal creep of the field, as is typically observed; and It has been observed when compared to traditional heating and cooling equipment, there is still a cost premium to use ground source heat pumps that is driven mostly by the cost for vertical bore holes. Horizontal loop systems are less costly to install, but do not perform as well in this climate zone for heating mode

  4. Daniel Mollière (1848-1890): the French anatomist-surgeon who introduced Robin's pioneering osteoclast for the genu valgum observed in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Sgantzos, Markos; Androutsos, George

    2015-08-01

    Inside the pages of the French medical treatises of the 19th century a forgotten osteoclast apparatus for the genu valgum observed in adolescents remained hidden waiting to be unearthed. It was Victor Robin's osteoclast, which has been used by the supreme French anatomist and surgeon Daniel Mollière. With the purpose to share a significant heritage on orthopaedics, a thorough research of the literature of the era was conducted. Our study resulted in the illumination of both Mollière's prolific figure and osteoclast's impact on orthopaedic surgery at that time. Having in mind Mollière's perseverance towards surgical apparatuses, his antiseptic measures inside his operating theatre, his published treatises, his surgical skills, we may effortlessly conclude that he stands among Lyon's best surgeons with an important contribution to orthopaedics.

  5. Less Mundane Explanation of Pioneer Anomaly from Q-Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarandache F.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been various explanations of Pioneer blueshift anomaly in the past few years; nonetheless no explanation has been offered from the viewpoint of Q-relativity physics. In the present paper it is argued that Pioneer anomalous blueshift may be caused by Pioneer spacecraft experiencing angular shift induced by similar Q- relativity effect which may also affect Jupiter satellites. By taking into consideration “aether drift” effect, the proposed method as described herein could explain Pioneer blueshift anomaly within 0.26% error range, which speaks for itself. Another new proposition of redshift quantization is also proposed from gravitational Bohr-radius which is consistent with Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization. Further observation is of course recommended in order to refute or verify this proposition.

  6. Comparing models of star formation simulating observed interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, L. F.; Muñoz-Cuartas, J. C.; Rodrigues, I.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we make a comparison between different models of star formation to reproduce observed interacting galaxies. We use observational data to model the evolution of a pair of galaxies undergoing a minor merger. Minor mergers represent situations weakly deviated from the equilibrium configuration but significant changes in star fomation (SF) efficiency can take place, then, minor mergers provide an unique scene to study SF in galaxies in a realistic but yet simple way. Reproducing observed systems also give us the opportunity to compare the results of the simulations with observations, which at the end can be used as probes to characterize the models of SF implemented in the comparison. In this work we compare two different star formation recipes implemented in Gadget3 and GIZMO codes. Both codes share the same numerical background, and differences arise mainly in the star formation recipe they use. We use observations from Pico dos Días and GEMINI telescopes and show how we use observational data of the interacting pair in AM2229-735 to characterize the interacting pair. Later we use this information to simulate the evolution of the system to finally reproduce the observations: Mass distribution, morphology and main features of the merger-induced star formation burst. We show that both methods manage to reproduce roughly the star formation activity. We show, through a careful study, that resolution plays a major role in the reproducibility of the system. In that sense, star formation recipe implemented in GIZMO code has shown a more robust performance. Acknowledgements: This work is supported by Colciencias, Doctorado Nacional - 617 program.

  7. Pioneer Women in Chaos Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Frank Y

    2009-01-01

    The general public has been made aware of the research field of "chaos" by the book of that title by James Gleick. This paper will focus on the achievements of Sonya Kovalevskaya, Mary Cartwright, and Mary Tsingou, whose pioneer works were not mentioned in Gleick's book.

  8. MHD models compared with Artemis observations at -60 Re

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencturk Akay, Iklim; Sibeck, David; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2016-07-01

    The distant magnetotail has been one of the least studied magnetic regions of the Earth's magnetosphere compared to the other near Earth both dayside and nightside magnetospheric regions owing to the limited number of spacecraft observations. Since 2011, ARTEMIS spacecraft give an excellent opportunity to study the magnetotail at lunar distances in terms of data quality and parameter space. This also gives opportunities to improve the magnetotail models at -60 Re and encourages the modelling studies of the distant magnetotail. Using ARTEMIS data in distant magnetotail, we create magnetic field and plasma flow vector maps in different planes and separated with IMF orientation to understand the magnetotail dynamics at this distance. For this study, we use CCMC's Run-on-Request resources of the MHD models; specifically SWMF-BATS-R-US, OpenGGCM, and LFM and perform the similar analysis with the models. Our main purpose in this study is to measure the performance of the MHD models at -60 Re distant magnetotail by comparing the model results with Artemis observations. In the literature, such a comprehensive comparative study is lacking in the distant tail. Preliminary results show that in general all three models underestimate the magnetic field structure while overestimating the flow speed. In the cross-sectional view, LFM seems to produce the better agreement with the observations. A clear dipolar magnetic field structure is seen with dawn-dusk asymmetry in all models owing to slight positive IMF By but the effect was found to be exaggerated. All models show tailward flows at this distance of the magnetotail, most possibly owing to the magnetic reconnection at the near Earth tail distances. A detailed comparison of several tail characteristics from the models will be presented and discussions will be given with respect to the observations from Artemis at this distance.

  9. Satellite microwave observations of a storm complex: A comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The hypothesis that cold events correspond to a particular stage in a class of thunderstorms was tested. That class is a storms class which updrafts are: (1) strong, broad and moist, and (2) extend well above the freezing level. Condition (1) implies strong mesoscale forcing. Condition (2) implies a tall updraft or a relatively low freezing level. Such storms should have big, intense radar echoes and cold, fast-growing anvils. The thunderstorm events were analyzed by radar, rain gauge and GOES infrared observations. Radar was the starting point for detection and definition of the hypothesized thunderstorms. The radar signature is compared to the signature of the storm in rain gauge observations, satellite infrared images and satellite microwave images.

  10. Comparing theoretical models of our galaxy with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston K.V.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of large scale observational surveys to map out the stars in our galaxy, there is a need for an efficient tool to compare theoretical models of our galaxy with observations. To this end, we describe here the code Galaxia, which uses efficient and fast algorithms for creating a synthetic survey of the Milky Way, and discuss its uses. Given one or more observational constraints like the color-magnitude bounds, a survey size and geometry, Galaxia returns a catalog of stars in accordance with a given theoretical model of the Milky Way. Both analytic and N-body models can be sampled by Galaxia. For N-body models, we present a scheme that disperses the stars spawned by an N-body particle, in such a way that the phase space density of the spawned stars is consistent with that of the N-body particles. The code is ideally suited to generating synthetic data sets that mimic near future wide area surveys such as GAIA, LSST and HERMES. In future, we plan to release the code publicly at http://galaxia.sourceforge.net. As an application of the code, we study the prospect of identifying structures in the stellar halo with future surveys that will have velocity information about the stars.

  11. Pioneer Mothers' Memorial Forest revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.C. Schlesinger; D.T. Funk; P.L. Roth; C.C. Myers

    1991-01-01

    The area now known as Pioneer Mothers' Memorial Forest was acquired by Joseph Cox in 1816 from the public domain. In 1944, a portion of that property, including the area referred to as Cox Woods, was established as a National Forest Research Natural Area. This beech-maple forest, located in the Knobs area of southern Indiana, is considered to be one of the few...

  12. Propagation of a large Forbush decrease in cosmic-ray intensity past the earth, Pioneer 11 at 34 AU and Pioneer 10 at 53 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allen, James A.; Fillius, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of a large Forbush decrease in cosmic-ray intensity at the earth, Pioneer II and Pioneer 10 are reported. The Pioneer 10 data show a large impulsive decrease in cosmic-ray intensity at the greatest distance from the sun observed to date. The apparent radial speed of propagation of the Forbush decrease was about 820 km/s, independent of the radial distance. The observations reported here and similar previous observations provide the basis for a new quantitative model of the propagation of Forbush decreases in the outer heliosphere.

  13. Willa Cather and Her Pioneering Themes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张菁华

    2013-01-01

      This thesis aims at the elaboration of Willa Cather’s pioneering themes based on her major works spanning over the pro⁃logue and epilogue of American pioneering age. Among which, O Pioneers! and My Antonia applause for the transcendent glory of innovative and enterprising pioneer ladies, declined in A Lost Lady and My Mortal Enemy and substituted with hedonism, affinity reliance and mammonism. In her late years, Cather resurrected her pioneering themes through the recollection of the best bygone time spent in waste west land.

  14. Flight performance of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter solar array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhammer, L. J.; Powe, J. S.; Smith, Marcie

    1987-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) solar panel power output capability has degraded much more severely than has the power output capability of solar panels that have operated in earth-orbiting spacecraft for comparable periods of time. The incidence of solar proton events recorded by the spacecraft's scientific instruments accounts for this phenomenon only in part. It cannot explain two specific forms of anomalous behavior observed: 1) a variation of output per spin with roll angle, and 2) a gradual degradation of the maximum output. Analysis indicates that the most probable cause of the first anomaly is that the solar cells underneath the spacecraft's magnetometer boom have been damaged by a reverse biasing of the cells that occurs during pulsed shadowing of the cells by the boom as the spacecraft rotates. The second anomaly might be caused by the effects on the solar array of substances from the upper atmosphere of Venus.

  15. Flight performance of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter solar array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhammer, L. J.; Powe, J. S.; Smith, Marcie

    1987-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) solar panel power output capability has degraded much more severely than has the power output capability of solar panels that have operated in earth-orbiting spacecraft for comparable periods of time. The incidence of solar proton events recorded by the spacecraft's scientific instruments accounts for this phenomenon only in part. It cannot explain two specific forms of anomalous behavior observed: 1) a variation of output per spin with roll angle, and 2) a gradual degradation of the maximum output. Analysis indicates that the most probable cause of the first anomaly is that the solar cells underneath the spacecraft's magnetometer boom have been damaged by a reverse biasing of the cells that occurs during pulsed shadowing of the cells by the boom as the spacecraft rotates. The second anomaly might be caused by the effects on the solar array of substances from the upper atmosphere of Venus.

  16. Comparing the incomparable: hemodialysis versus peritoneal dialysis in observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Robert N

    2004-01-01

    A randomized trial comparing survival in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis remains a utopian aspiration. Dialysis is still relatively rare on a population basis, and a natural tension exists between desirability and feasibility in terms of quality of evidence. In practice, it is very difficult to perform prospective comparisons with large groups of contemporary representative subjects, and much of the literature comes from retrospective national registries. This article considers several questions to address when trying to compare the outcomes of peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis. Prognostic similarity at baseline is a fundamental issue. Traditionally, adjustment for known prognostic factors has been used in an attempt to minimize the bias caused by nonrandom treatment assignment. Propensity scores have been suggested to be superior, and matched-case analysis may also be a useful method for comparison. Other questions include, when, in relation to starting dialysis, to start the observation clock; the definition and handling of switches of dialysis therapy; and the decision to censor at transplantation. Finally, comparisons are complicated by hazards ratios that vary over time, and time-segmented analysis is obligatory. Many types of analytical approaches are needed to begin to appreciate outcome disparities between dialysis therapies.

  17. Pioneers! O Pioneers!’ and Whitman’s Early German Translators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Steinroetter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This response to Kirsten Harris's essay on British socialist reactions to Walt Whitman's poem "Pioneers! O Pioneers!" traces some of the political and cultural issues raised by Harris in the context of Whitman's early German translators, inviting a comparative discussion of key aspects of the poem's transatlantic reception in these two important European cultural contexts. While Whitman's poetry often represented an ideal vehicle for progressive and even revolutionary messages in the eyes of his early German translators, its political complexity and ambiguity allowed it to appeal to translators and readers of different, sometimes even opposed political leanings, both left and right. Given the interest that 'Pioneers!' held for British socialists, as Harris describes, the poem's translation history in Germany provides an intriguing counterpoint in some notable aspects. It seems to have been largely ignored by early German socialists, while for the nationalist Wilhelm Schölermann, one of the first German translators of Whitman's poetry to include the poem in his selection (1904 and single it out for its significance, the poem was of special interest as a vision of what his country could aspire to after a cultural rebirth.

  18. Support for Temporally Varying Behavior of the Pioneer Anomaly from the Extended Pioneer 10 and 11 Doppler Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Toth, Viktor T.; Ellis, Jordan; Markwardt, Craig B.

    2011-08-01

    The Pioneer anomaly is a small sunward anomalous acceleration found in the trajectory analysis of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft. As part of the investigation of the effect, the analysis of recently recovered Doppler data for both spacecraft has been completed. The presence of a small anomalous acceleration is confirmed by using data spans more than twice as long as those that were previously analyzed. We examine the constancy and direction of the Pioneer anomaly and conclude that (i) the data favor a temporally decaying anomalous acceleration (˜2×10-11m/s2/yr) with an over 10% improvement in the residuals compared to a constant acceleration model, (ii) although the direction of the acceleration remains imprecisely determined, we find no support in favor of a Sun-pointing direction over the Earth-pointing or along the spin-axis directions, and (iii) support for an early “onset” of the acceleration remains weak in the pre-Saturn Pioneer 11 tracking data. We present these new findings and discuss their implications for the nature of the Pioneer anomaly.

  19. Restoration potential of pioneer plants growing on lead-zinc mine tailings in Lanping, southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Dongmei; DUAN Changqun

    2008-01-01

    This study focused on the restoration potential of ten pioneer plants (Artemisia roxburghiana, Artemisia tangutica, Carex inanis,Cyperaceae hebecarpus, Plantago depresa, Cynoglossum lanceolatum, Potentilla saundesiana, Coriaria sinica, Oxyria sinensis, andMiscanthus nepalensis) during the early phase of Pb-Zn mine tailings phytostabilization, in Lanping, China. The concentrations ofheavy metals (Pb, Zn, and Cu) and soil fertility (the available N, P, K, and organic matter) in the rhizosphere of these species have been compared. The results showed a general improvement in the rhizosphere soil properties of pioneer plants. Of the ten species, theconcentrations of Pb, Zn, and Cu in the rhizosphere of A. Roxburghiana have the greatest reduction of 56.23%, 83.00%, and 84.36%,respectively, compared to the bulk soil. The best improvement in soil fertility was found in the rhizosphere of P. Saundesiana, with anincrease of 241.83%, 170.76%, 49.09%, and 81.60%, respectively, in the available N, E K, and organic matter. Metals accumulated bythe plants have been mainly distributed in the root tissues, and only small amounts transferred m the aboveground tissues. The highestcontents of Pb and Zn have been recorded in C. Hebecarpus with 57.84 and 87.92 mg/kg dry weight (dw), respectively. The maximumCu content was observed in C. Inanis with 1.19 mg/kg dw. Overall, pioneer plants will be ideal species for the phytostabilization of minetailings, but the potential use varies in different pioneer plant species. Among these ten species, A. Roxburghiana has been identified tobe the most suitable for phytostabilization programs, due to its greatest improvement on physicai-chemical properties in the rhizospheresoil.

  20. Reminiscence of the Glory of Pioneering Spirits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张菁华

    2013-01-01

      At the end of pioneering age, the women pioneers were substituted by lost ladies from whom the innovation, self-reli⁃ance, tolerance and endurance yielded to nihilism, reliant affinity, mammonism and hedonism. To reminisce the glory of pioneering splendors in the integration with the waste west land spiritually and alienation to the materialized modern society, Cather regressed to the memorable bygones in“The Best Years”, The Professor's House and elegized the spiritual pioneering by means of infusing Christianity into the uncultivated indigenous inhabitants in Death Comes for the Archbishop.

  1. Fish plasma lipoproteins--comparative observations in serranides and sparides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santulli, A; Cusenza, L; Modica, A; Curatolo, A; D'Amelio, V

    1991-01-01

    1. Diet, time from last feeding, temperature, season and sexual stage are some of the factors influencing the lipoprotein pattern. 2. Keeping these factors constant species-specific differences observed among lipoprotein patterns of Sparus aurata, Puntazzo puntazzo, Diplodus sargus, Diplodus vulgaris and Dicentrarchus labrax are discussed. 3. Feeding habits and therefore lipid absorption and the rate of lipoprotein maturation process are the factors determining the observed differences.

  2. Comparing Simulations and Observations of Reionization-Epoch Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian

    2006-05-01

    We propose to test and constrain models of early galaxy formation through comparisons with observations of reionization-epoch (z>6) galaxies observed using Spitzer. The goals are to (1) Make predictions for z>6 objects using state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation tailored to study the reionization epoch; (2) Develop a publicly-available tool called SPOC designed to obtain detailed constraints on physical properties of observed galaxies through comparisons with simulated galaxy catalogs; and (3) Use SPOC to test and constrain models of galaxy formation through comparisons with rapidly- advancing observations in the new frontier of early universe studies. The results of this study will yield deeper insights into the galaxy formation process at these mostly unexplored epochs, with implications for understanding the formation of massive galaxies, studying the topology and evolution of IGM reionization, and designing future surveys to detect first objects. The SPOC tool will facilitate a closer connection between observations and theory by enabling the community to interpret data within the framework of current hierarchical structure formation models, in turn providing detailed tests of these models that is essential for driving the field forward.

  3. Oral history in radiography: Listening to pioneers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferris, Christine [International Development Facilitator, Robert Winston Building, Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S10 2BP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: c.m.ferris@shu.ac.uk; Winslow, Michelle [University of Sheffield, Oral History Society, Academic Unit of Supportive Care, Sykes House, Little Common Lane, Sheffield S11 9NE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.winslow@sheffield.ac.uk

    2009-12-15

    We explore the professional value of the collection and analysis of oral histories in the history of radiography. Drawing on oral histories collected from radiographers, we analyse accounts of experiences to identify common themes, some of which are of current significance, whilst others have faded from existence. 15 oral histories were collected from radiographers whose combined practice spans the years 1930-1973. The sample consists of 6 male and 9 female radiographers. Themes identified in the oral histories include radiographers as invisible pioneers who worked in professionally unclaimed territory and their dangerous working environment. The oral histories reveal the working world of the radiographer as having encompassed a practice ethos where challenges became an accepted part of work. We gain insight into less observable aspects of the radiographer's role, the difficulties they faced, how they invented techniques and equipment, and how they managed their practice including protecting the public from ionising radiation sources.

  4. Passive output feedback and observer based autopilots: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Paulsen

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Two methods for course-keeping of a ship are studied where no measurements of the yaw rate are available. The two methods are a passive output feedback controller and a controller-observer structure. A comparison with special attention to stability and wave filtering properties, is provided. Finally, a case study of a ship autopilot is included.

  5. Salute to some nursing pioneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.H. Harrison

    1979-09-01

    Full Text Available This is indeed a very wide meaning for the word, ‘Pioneer’, and it was with some trepidation that I approached this subject. After all, it could end up by being a sort of Biographical Directory of Nurses in South Africa and this is certainly not what our readers would like in this particular journal. In any case, Searle’s History of the Development of Nursing in South Africa covers this field very fully and adequately. So just what sort of people do we regard as pioneers of nursing in our country? Where do we begin? Can one be totally objective about it or would my choice be different from that of readers because of a more subjective attitude.

  6. Sir David Brewster: polarization pioneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Kinsell L.

    1992-12-01

    Sir David Brewster, Scottish physicist of the Nineteenth Century, was one of the pioneers in the investigation of the polarization of light. Every physics student is familiar with the Brewster angle of reflection, and the Brewster neutral point of skylight polarization is a well- known feature in atmospheric optics. He was at one time the most honored natural philosopher in Britain, having received numerous medals plus a knighthood for his work in the polarization of light. This paper, having arisen from my new biography of Brewster, traces his polarization work throughout his most productive period in the first half of the last century. It is of interest to science historians, as well as to those working in the field of polarization phenomena.

  7. Case B binary evolution compared to observed Algols

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensbergen, Walter

    We follow the path in the HR-diagram of binaries with a B-type primary at birth which form an Algol system during case B mass transfer. Our calculations were done with and without the assumption of conservative mass transfer, giving very different results for the distributions of mass ratios and orbital periods for the obtained Algols. The conservative model fits the observations poorly by producing far too many Algols with low mass ratios and large orbital periods. Liberal models yield better agreement between theory and obervations. The best agreement is obtained when ≍50% of the mass lost by the primary is trapped into a ring with radius ≍2.5 × the semi major axis of the binary orbit.

  8. Comparing Two Observational Systems in the Assessment of Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Fuchs-Lacelle

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Research has demonstrated the utility of the Pain Behavior Measurement (PBM system as a pain index. PBM involves the recording of sighing, rubbing, grimacing, guarding and bracing. A modification of this system has been proposed, focusing on the occurrence of joint flexing, rubbing, unloading the joint, guarding and rigidity, specifically for patients with knee pain. The aim of the present study was to compare the original PBM to the modified version in a sample of knee replacement patients to assess the utility of the more specialized approach. It was expected that the more discomforting physiotherapy activities (knee bending and quadriceps exercises would result in more pain behaviours than intermediate activities (walking and standing, which, in turn, would result in more pain behaviours than reclining. The extent to which each system reflected this expected pattern was examined.

  9. Pioneer Venus polarimetry and haze optical thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbe, W. J. J.; Wauben, W. M. F.; Travis, L. D.; Hovenier, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus mission provided us with high-resolution measurements at four wavelengths of the linear polarization of sunlight reflected by the Venus atmosphere. These measurements span the complete phase angle range and cover a period of more than a decade. A first analysis of these data by Kawabata et al. confirmed earlier suggestions of a haze layer above and partially mixed with the cloud layer. They found that the haze exhibits large spatial and temporal variations. The haze optical thickness at a wavelength of 365 nm was about 0.06 at low latitudes, but approximately 0.8 at latitudes from 55 deg poleward. Differences between morning and evening terminator have also been reported by the same authors. Using an existing cloud/haze model of Venus, we study the relationship between the haze optical thickness and the degree of linear polarization. Variations over the visible disk and phase angle dependence are investigated. For that purpose, exact multiple scattering computations are compared with Pioneer Venus measurements. To get an impression of the variations over the visible disk, we have first studied scans of the polarization parallel to the intensity equator. After investigating a small subset of the available data we have the following results. Adopting the haze particle characteristics given by Kawabata et al., we find a thickening of the haze at increasing latitudes. Further, we see a difference in haze optical thickness between the northern and southern hemispheres that is of the same order of magnitude as the longitudinal variation of haze thickness along a scan line. These effects are most pronounced at a wavelength of 935 nm. We must emphasize the tentative nature of the results, because there is still an enormous amount of data to be analyzed. We intend to combine further polarimetric research of Venus with constraints on the haze parameters imposed by physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere.

  10. Redox pioneer: professor Barry Halliwell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervaiz, Shazib

    2011-05-01

    Professor Barry Halliwell is recognized as a Redox Pioneer because he has published eight articles on redox biology that have been each cited more than 1000 times, and 158 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. His contributions go back as far as 1976, when he was involved in elucidation of the Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle, an efficient mechanism for preventing oxidative damage to chloroplasts. His subsequent work established the important role of iron and zinc in free radical reactions and their relevance to human pathologies. Professor Halliwell is also a leader in developing novel methodology for detecting free radical intermediates in vivo, and his contributions to our knowledge of reactive nitrogen species are highly significant. His sustained excellence won him the top-cited scientist award in the United Kingdom in biomedical sciences in 1999, and in 2003 he was recognized as a highly cited scientist by Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) for work on plant antioxidants, and the same year ranked 28 out of 5494 biochemists/biologists for scientific impact. Two pieces of his scholarly work have been listed as Citation Classics by ISI, and in 2007 his laboratory was ranked number 1 worldwide based on highest citation score in research on free radicals.

  11. Support for temporally varying behavior of the Pioneer anomaly from the extended Pioneer 10 and 11 Doppler data sets

    CERN Document Server

    Turyshev, Slava G; Ellis, Jordan; Markwardt, Craig B

    2011-01-01

    The Pioneer anomaly is a small sunward anomalous acceleration found in the trajectory analysis of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft. As part of the investigation of the effect, analysis of recently recovered Doppler data for both spacecraft has been completed. The presence of a small anomalous acceleration is confirmed using data spans more than twice as long as those that were previously analyzed. We examine the constancy and direction of the Pioneer anomaly, and conclude that: i) the data favor a temporally decaying anomalous acceleration (~2\\times 10^{-11} m/s^2/yr) with an over 10% improvement in the residuals compared to a constant acceleration model; ii) although the direction of the acceleration remains imprecisely determined, we find no support in favor of a Sun-pointing direction over the Earth-pointing or along the spin-axis directions, and iii) support for an early "onset" of the acceleration remains weak in the pre-Saturn Pioneer 11 tracking data. We present these new findings and discuss their imp...

  12. Grote Reber, Radio Astronomy Pioneer, Dies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    Grote Reber, one of the earliest pioneers of radio astronomy, died in Tasmania on December 20, just two days shy of his 91st birthday. Reber was the first person to build a radio telescope dedicated to astronomy, opening up a whole new "window" on the Universe that eventually produced such landmark discoveries as quasars, pulsars and the remnant "afterglow" of the Big Bang. His self- financed experiments laid the foundation for today's advanced radio-astronomy facilities. Grote Reber Grote Reber NRAO/AUI photo "Radio astronomy has changed profoundly our understanding of the Universe and has earned the Nobel Prize for several major contributions. All radio astronomers who have followed him owe Grote Reber a deep debt for his pioneering work," said Dr. Fred Lo, director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "Reber was the first to systematically study the sky by observing something other than visible light. This gave astronomy a whole new view of the Universe. The continuing importance of new ways of looking at the Universe is emphasized by this year's Nobel Prizes in physics, which recognized scientists who pioneered X-ray and neutrino observations," Lo added. Reber was a radio engineer and avid amateur "ham" radio operator in Wheaton, Illinois, in the 1930s when he read about Karl Jansky's 1932 discovery of natural radio emissions coming from outer space. As an amateur operator, Reber had won awards and communicated with other amateurs around the world, and later wrote that he had concluded "there were no more worlds to conquer" in radio. Learning of Jansky's discovery gave Reber a whole new challenge that he attacked with vigor. Analyzing the problem as an engineer, Reber concluded that what he needed was a parabolic-dish antenna, something quite uncommon in the 1930s. In 1937, using his own funds, he constructed a 31.4-foot-diameter dish antenna in his back yard. The strange contraption attracted curious attention from his neighbors and became

  13. The Anomalous Acceleration of the Pioneer Spacecrafts

    CERN Document Server

    de Diego, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    Radiometric data from the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts have revealed an unexplained constant acceleration of a_A = (8.74 +/- 1.33) x 10^(-10) m s^(-2) towards the Sun, also known as the Pioneer anomaly. Different groups have analyzed the Pioneer data and have got the same results, which rules out computer programming and handling errors. Attempts to explain this phenomenon arguing intrinsic causes on-board the spacecrafts failed or have lead to inconclusive results. Therefore, the Pioneer anomalous acceleration has motivated the interest of researchers to find out explanations that could bring insight upon the forces acting in the outer Solar Systems or a hint to discover new natural laws.

  14. Innovation in education, ICT and pioneer teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bocconi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflections on the role of "pioneer teachers" as a potential key figure in the innovation process of the school, with particular reference to the European Framework Programme project Ulearn eLearning.

  15. WEST PIONEER WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, MONTANA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Byron R.; Benham, John R.

    1984-01-01

    The West Pioneer Wilderness Study Area is in the Pioneer Mountains, Beaverhead County, Montana. A mineral-resource study of the area identified eight areas with molybdenum potential, four areas with gold-silver potential, one area with tungsten potential, and one area with barite potential. Several small mines were encountered, but none were accessible for the purposes of resource evaluation. No energy resources were identified in the study.

  16. A salute to the pioneers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2001-02-01

    An historical account is given of the pioneers who were instrumental in opening up the electrical frontier and paved the way for its phenomenal growth over the past century. The work of Franklin, Volta and Faraday, experimenters of the 18. and 19. century, is mentioned, along with the musings of Roger Bacon, a 13. century philosopher and scientist who postulated theories about magnetism, and that of William Gilbert of some three centuries later who formulated the definition of 'frictional electricity', noting the properties of attraction created by rubbing together amber and other substances. Mention is also made of the discoveries in the 18. and 19. centuries of Andre Marie Ampere of France, Luigi Galvani of Italy, Georg Simon Ohm and Heinrich Rudolph Hertz of Germany, Hans Christian Oersted of Denmark, Joseph Henry of the United States, William Grove and James Clerk Maxwell of Britain, and Aubrey Fessenden of Canada. An account is given of the discoveries of the Yugoslavian-born Nikola Tesla, whose work bridged the 19. and 20. centuries and who made singularly important contributions to the theory of electrical distribution systems, transformers, arc lights, dynamos, electric motors, steam turbines, thermomagnetics and radio systems. His invention of the polyphase alternating current system in 1888 was the turning point for the age of electricity that pushed the geographical distribution boundaries of electricity beyond the restrictive limitations of direct current used for Thomas Edison's electric light system. His work, with the timely support of George Westinghouse, opened the floodgates to electrical progress to bring new levels of productivity to business and industry and a higher standard of living for everyone. Many of the artifacts and memorabilia associated with the development of electrical technology are preserved in special exhibits and museums throughout the country. Brief accounts of some of the publicly accessible exhibits are

  17. Comparing distance education and conventional education: observations from a comparative study of post-registration nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Duffy

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study presents a comparison of assessment results achieved by distancelearning students and classroom-based students undertaking the same module in a degree course. The purpose of the comparison is to provide some objective measurement of the quality of distance education in relation to conventional classroom-based education. The authors have selected three groups of students, who have all undertaken the same module in the B. Sc Health Studies degree programme offered by the University of Paisley. One group (in Paisley undertook their studies by means of conventional classroom-based education, the second (in Hong Kong by supported distance learning with face-to-face contact in the form of tutorials, and the third (in a geographically dispersed group in the United Kingdom and other countries by supported distance learning with no face-to-face contact. The results obtained by these three groups of students were analysed. Because of the differences in the size of the groups, the Kruskal- Wallis 1- Way Anova test was applied to validate the face value findings. The authors include findings from the literature comparing distance education with conventional education and from cross-cultural studies to present their data in context. Analysis of the assessment results showed that students from all three groups were successful in their studies, but the students studying by distance learning obtained significantly higher end-of-module results than their classroom-based colleagues. This latter finding reflects the conclusion that other investigators have reached In their discussion the authors identify educational, cultural and personal factors that may help to explain their findings. A limitation in the study is that it concerns only one module in the degree programme. The research now moves on to comparing students who have undertaken the whole degree programme by the means described

  18. Pioneer neurons of the antennal nervous system project to protocerebral pioneers in the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyan, George; Ehrhardt, Erica

    2015-11-01

    The twin nerve tracts of the antenna of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria are established early in embryogenesis by sibling pairs of pioneers which delaminate from the epithelium into the lumen at the antennal tip. These cells can be uniquely identified via their co-expression of the neuronal labels horseradish peroxidase and the lipocalin Lazarillo. The apical pioneers direct axons toward the antennal base where they encounter guidepost-like cells called base pioneers which transiently express the same molecular labels as the apical pioneers. To what extent the pioneer growth cones then progress into the brain neuropil proper, and what their targets there might be, has remained unclear. In this study, we show that the apical antennal pioneers project centrally beyond the antennal base first into the deutocerebral, and then into the protocerebral brain neuropils. In the protocerebrum, we identify their target circuitry as being identified Lazarillo-positive cells which themselves pioneer the primary axon scaffold of the brain. The apical and base antennal pioneers therefore form part of a molecularly contiguous pathway from the periphery to an identified central circuit of the embryonic grasshopper brain.

  19. A Pioneer in Social Studies in Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In May 1942, Li Youyi published his book on Han-Bo trade and the economic and educational organizations in Tibetan lamaseries. With 60 years devoted to Tibetan studies, Li is indeed a pioneer in the field. Now, aged 90, he is widely regarded as a sociologist who pioneered social studies in Tibet.Li entered Tibet in 1944 together with Shen Zonglian, Liu Shengqi and Li Maoyi. They belonged to the Office in Charge of Tibetan Affairs, stationed in Lhasa by the Nationalist government. The decision was made following the

  20. Pioneer fauna of nepheline-containing tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkova, I. V.; Kalmykova, V. V.; Liskovaya, A. A.

    2009-08-01

    The zoological analysis of nepheline-containing sands deposited in tailings 10-40 years ago showed that the pioneer colonists of this technogenic substrate are collembolan and mites, whose proportions depend on the succession of the bacterial and fungal components of the microbiota. The pioneer groups of mesofauna on 10- to 30-year-old tailings include carnivorous herpetobiontic arthropods and phytophagous insects. An impoverished version of the fauna of northern-taiga podzols is developed in the sands rehabilitated more than 40 years ago.

  1. Interspecific variation in vitamin E levels and the extent of lipid peroxidation in pioneer and non-pioneer species used in tropical forest restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, Daniele R; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2016-09-01

    Reforestation projects have gained interest over recent years due to the loss of biodiversity in tropical regions as a result of large deforestation by anthropogenic actions. However, better knowledge on the tolerance of plant species to environmental stresses is needed for reforestation success. Here, we evaluated the photoprotective and antioxidant capacity, in terms of vitamin E accumulation, of five pioneer (Platypodium elegans Vogel, Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi, Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil, Cecropia pachystachya Trécul. and Aegiphila sellowiana Cham.) and five non-pioneer (Myracrodruon urundeuva Allemão, Cedrela fissilis Vell., Genipa americana L., Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. and Hymenaea courbaril L.) species, in relation to the extent of lipid peroxidation in leaves. Furthermore, we examined differences between sun and shade leaves on vitamin E accumulation and the extent of lipid peroxidation. Pioneer plants showed on average 33% higher malondialdehyde levels, an indicator of lipid peroxidation, than non-pioneer species, but no significant differences in vitamin E contents. In contrast, a marked interspecific variation was observed in the levels of α-tocopherol and its precursor, γ-tocopherol. Natural variation revealed interesting relationships between vitamin E levels and the extent of lipid peroxidation in leaves. The pioneer species, P. elegans, did not accumulate α-tocopherol and displayed the highest levels of malondialdehyde. Sun and shade leaves accumulated vitamin E levels to a similar extent, except for the pioneer L. pacari and the non-pioneer C. langsdorffii, the former accumulating more α-tocopherol in sun leaves and the latter in shade leaves. We conclude that interspecific variation is higher than both leaf type and successional-group variation in terms of vitamin E accumulation and the extent of lipid peroxidation, and that vitamin E levels, particularly those of α-tocopherol, negatively correlate with the extent of lipid

  2. Biases and systematics in the observational derivation of galaxy properties: comparing different techniques on synthetic observations of simulated galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Guidi, Giovanni; Walcher, C Jakob

    2015-01-01

    We study the sources of biases and systematics in the derivation of galaxy properties of observational studies, focusing on stellar masses, star formation rates, gas/stellar metallicities, stellar ages and magnitudes/colors. We use hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of galaxy formation, for which the real quantities are known, and apply observational techniques to derive the observables. We also make an analysis of biases that are relevant for a proper comparison between simulations and observations. For our study, we post-process the simulation outputs to calculate the galaxies' spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using Stellar Population Synthesis models and also generating the fully-consistent far UV-submillimeter wavelength SEDs with the radiative transfer code SUNRISE. We compared the direct results of simulations with the observationally-derived quantities obtained in various ways, and found that systematic differences in all studied galaxy properties appear, which are caused by: (1) purely observ...

  3. THE ANOMALOUS ACCELERATION OF THE PIONEER SPACECRAFTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. de Diego

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Los datos radiométricos de las naves Pioneer 10 y 11 han revelado una aceleración constante no explicada de aA = (8:74+-1:33 X 10-10ms-2 dirigida hacia el Sol, también conocida como la anomalía del Pioneer. Distintos grupos han analizado los datos de los Pioneer y han obtenido los mismos resultados, lo que descarta errores en los códigos de computadora y en el manejo de los datos. Los intentos por explicar este fenómeno argumentando causas intrínsecas a bordo de las naves fracasaron o han conducido a resultados no concluyentes. Debido a esto, la aceleración anómala del Pioneer ha motivado el interés de los investigadores por encontrar explicaciones que puedan echar luz sobre las fuerzas que actúan en el Sistema Solar exterior o que den una pista para descubrir nuevas leyes naturales.

  4. Elwood Murray: Pioneering Methodologist in Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Judi

    2014-01-01

    Elwood Murray (1897-1988) was a pioneer in communication education. Beginning in the 1930s, he applied nontraditional methods in the speech classroom to encourage students to internalize and apply what they learned, and to view knowledge holistically. Drawing on the work of Kunkel, Moreno, Lewin, and Korzybski, Murray focused on developing skills…

  5. Elwood Murray: Pioneering Methodologist in Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Judi

    2014-01-01

    Elwood Murray (1897-1988) was a pioneer in communication education. Beginning in the 1930s, he applied nontraditional methods in the speech classroom to encourage students to internalize and apply what they learned, and to view knowledge holistically. Drawing on the work of Kunkel, Moreno, Lewin, and Korzybski, Murray focused on developing skills…

  6. Competing Environmental Ethics in Cooper's "The Pioneers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnassar, Sabri

    2015-01-01

    This essay examines the environmental worthiness of James Fenimore Cooper's "The Pioneers" and analyzes the various and competing environmental ethics that Cooper introduces in this novel through his descriptions of the different relationships between humans and the natural world. Among these different environmental ethics are the…

  7. Pioneers for the Study on Yangshi Lei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张威; 李晓丹

    2003-01-01

    The architectural graphics and archives of Yangshi Lei collected in the National Library of China and other institutions are of great importance for the research on the architectural history of China. This paper introduces the pioneers for the study on Yangshi Lei and their innovative checkup and research work.

  8. A Pioneer of Collegiate Women's Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Lydia

    2008-01-01

    This article features North Carolina State University's Kay Yow, a pioneer of collegiate women's sports. An Olympic gold medal champion whose entire coaching career has been spent in her home state of North Carolina, Yow has amassed a remarkable lifetime win-loss record of 729-337. She is one of only six coaches to have won at least 700 career…

  9. Biases and systematics in the observational derivation of galaxy properties: comparing different techniques on synthetic observations of simulated galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Giovanni; Scannapieco, Cecilia; Walcher, C. Jakob

    2015-12-01

    We study the sources of biases and systematics in the derivation of galaxy properties from observational studies, focusing on stellar masses, star formation rates, gas and stellar metallicities, stellar ages, magnitudes and colours. We use hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of galaxy formation, for which the real quantities are known, and apply observational techniques to derive the observables. We also analyse biases that are relevant for a proper comparison between simulations and observations. For our study, we post-process the simulation outputs to calculate the galaxies' spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using stellar population synthesis models and also generate the fully consistent far-UV-submillimetre wavelength SEDs with the radiative transfer code SUNRISE. We compared the direct results of simulations with the observationally derived quantities obtained in various ways, and found that systematic differences in all studied galaxy properties appear, which are caused by: (1) purely observational biases, (2) the use of mass-weighted and luminosity-weighted quantities, with preferential sampling of more massive and luminous regions, (3) the different ways of constructing the template of models when a fit to the spectra is performed, and (4) variations due to different calibrations, most notably for gas metallicities and star formation rates. Our results show that large differences can appear depending on the technique used to derive galaxy properties. Understanding these differences is of primary importance both for simulators, to allow a better judgement of similarities and differences with observations, and for observers, to allow a proper interpretation of the data.

  10. Live versus Video Observations: Comparing the Reliability and Validity of Two Methods of Assessing Classroom Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curby, Timothy W.; Johnson, Price; Mashburn, Andrew J.; Carlis, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    When conducting classroom observations, researchers are often confronted with the decision of whether to conduct observations live or by using pre-recorded video. The present study focuses on comparing and contrasting observations of live and video administrations of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-PreK (CLASS-PreK). Associations between…

  11. Hepatic deficiency of the pioneer transcription factor FoxA restricts hepatitis B virus biosynthesis by the developmental regulation of viral DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa C McFadden

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The FoxA family of pioneer transcription factors regulates hepatitis B virus (HBV transcription, and hence viral replication. Hepatocyte-specific FoxA-deficiency in the HBV transgenic mouse model of chronic infection prevents the transcription of the viral DNA genome as a result of the failure of the developmentally controlled conversion of 5-methylcytosine residues to cytosine during postnatal hepatic maturation. These observations suggest that pioneer transcription factors such as FoxA, which mark genes for expression at subsequent developmental steps in the cellular differentiation program, mediate their effects by reversing the DNA methylation status of their target genes to permit their ensuing expression when the appropriate tissue-specific transcription factor combinations arise during development. Furthermore, as the FoxA-deficient HBV transgenic mice are viable, the specific developmental timing, abundance and isoform type of pioneer factor expression must permit all essential liver gene expression to occur at a level sufficient to support adequate liver function. This implies that pioneer transcription factors can recognize and mark their target genes in distinct developmental manners dependent upon, at least in part, the concentration and affinity of FoxA for its binding sites within enhancer and promoter regulatory sequence elements. This selective marking of cellular genes for expression by the FoxA pioneer factor compared to HBV may offer the opportunity for the specific silencing of HBV gene expression and hence the resolution of chronic HBV infections which are responsible for approximately one million deaths worldwide annually due to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  12. A note on the ring current in Saturn’s magnetosphere: Comparison of magnetic data obtained during the Pioneer-11 and Voyager-1 and -2 fly-bys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Bunce

    Full Text Available We examine the residual (measured minus internal magnetic field vectors observed in Saturn’s magnetosphere during the Pioneer-11 fly-by in 1979, and compare them with those observed during the Voyager-1 and -2 fly-bys in 1980 and 1981. We show for the first time that a ring current system was present within the magnetosphere during the Pioneer-11 encounter, which was qualitatively similar to those present during the Voyager fly-bys. The analysis also shows, however, that the ring current was located closer to the planet during the Pioneer-11 encounter than during the comparable Voyager-1 fly-by, reflecting the more com-pressed nature of the magnetosphere at the time. The residual field vectors have been fit using an adaptation of the current system proposed for Jupiter by Connerney et al. (1981a. A model that provides a reasonably good fit to the Pioneer-11 Saturn data extends radially between 6.5 and 12.5 RS (compared with a noon-sector magnetopause distance of 17 RS, has a north-south extent of 4 RS, and carries a total current of 9.6 MA. A corresponding model that provides a qualitatively similar fit to the Voyager data, determined previously by Connerney et al. (1983, extends radially between 8 and 15.5 RS (compared with a noon-sector magnetopause distance for Voyager-1 of 23–24 RS, has a north-south extent of 6 RS, and carries a total current of 11.5 MA.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems, magnetospheric configuration and dynamics, planetary magnetospheres

  13. Short biography of Louis Daniel Beauperthuy (1807-71): pioneer of microbiology and medical science in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Gerardo A; Tarradath, Ewart

    2010-02-01

    Louis Daniel Beauperthuy was a pioneer of microbiology in Venezuela where he developed microscopic and clinical research together with academic and scientific observation related to leprosy and the role of insects in the transmission of febrile illnesses.

  14. Lessons Learned from the Pioneers 10/11 for a Mission to Test the Pioneer Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Turyshev, S G; Anderson, J D; Turyshev, Slava G.; Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, John D.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of the radio-metric tracking data from the Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft at distances between 20--70 astronomical units (AU) from the Sun has consistently indicated the presence of an anomalous, small, constant Doppler frequency drift. The drift is a blue-shift, uniformly changing with rate a_t = (2.92 +/- 0.44) x 10^(-18) s/s^2. It can also be interpreted as a constant acceleration of a_P = (8.74 +/- 1.33) x 10^(-8) cm/s^2 directed towards the Sun. Although it is suspected that there is a systematic origin to the effect, none has been found. As a result, the nature of this anomaly has become of growing interest. Here we discuss the details of our recent investigation focusing on the effects both external to and internal to the spacecraft, as well as those due to modeling and computational techniques. We review some of the mechanisms proposed to explain the anomaly and show their inability to account for the observed behavior of the anomaly. We also present lessons learned from this investigation for a po...

  15. Chameleon effect and the Pioneer anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, John D

    2012-01-01

    The possibility that the apparent anomalous acceleration of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft may be due, at least in part, to a chameleon field effect is examined. A small spacecraft, with no thin shell, can have a more pronounced anomalous acceleration than a large compact body, such as a planet, having a thin shell. The chameleon effect seems to present a natural way to explain the differences seen in deviations from pure Newtonian gravity for a spacecraft and for a planet, and appears to be compatible with the basic features of the Pioneer anomaly, including the appearance of a jerk term. However, estimates of the size of the chameleon effect indicate that its contribution to the anomalous acceleration is negligible. We conclude that any inverse-square component in the anomalous acceleration is more likely caused by an unmodelled reaction force from solar-radiation pressure, rather than a chameleon field effect.

  16. Pioneers in Astronomy and Space Exploration

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The pioneers of astronomy and space exploration have advanced humankind's understanding of the universe. These individuals include earthbound theorists such as Aristotle, Ptolemy, and Galileo, as well as those who put their lives on the line travelling into the great unknown. Readers chronicle the lives of individuals positioned at the vanguard of astronomical discovery, laying the groundwork for space exploration past, present, and yet to come.

  17. Jupiter's Radiation Belts: Can Pioneer 10 Survive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, W N; Birmingham, T J; Mead, G D

    1973-12-07

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  18. VISTA: Pioneering New Survey Telescope Starts Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    A new telescope - VISTA (the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy) - has just started work at ESO's Paranal Observatory and has made its first release of pictures. VISTA is a survey telescope working at infrared wavelengths and is the world's largest telescope dedicated to mapping the sky. Its large mirror, wide field of view and very sensitive detectors will reveal a completely new view of the southern sky. Spectacular new images of the Flame Nebula, the centre of our Milky Way galaxy and the Fornax Galaxy Cluster show that it is working extremely well. VISTA is the latest telescope to be added to ESO's Paranal Observatory in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. It is housed on the peak adjacent to the one hosting the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) and shares the same exceptional observing conditions. VISTA's main mirror is 4.1 metres across and is the most highly curved mirror of this size and quality ever made - its deviations from a perfect surface are less than a few thousandths of the thickness of a human hair - and its construction and polishing presented formidable challenges. VISTA was conceived and developed by a consortium of 18 universities in the United Kingdom [1] led by Queen Mary, University of London and became an in-kind contribution to ESO as part of the UK's accession agreement. The telescope design and construction were project-managed by the Science and Technology Facilities Council's UK Astronomy Technology Centre (STFC, UK ATC). Provisional acceptance of VISTA was formally granted by ESO at a ceremony at ESO's Headquarters in Garching, Germany, attended by representatives of Queen Mary, University of London and STFC, on 10 December 2009 and the telescope will now be operated by ESO. "VISTA is a unique addition to ESO's observatory on Cerro Paranal. It will play a pioneering role in surveying the southern sky at infrared wavelengths and will find many interesting targets for further study by the Very Large Telescope, ALMA and

  19. Are pioneer mangroves more vulnerable to oil pollution than later successional species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Gonasageran; Naidoo, Krishnaveni

    2017-08-15

    Propagules of Avicennia marina, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and Rhizophora mucronata were cultivated in rhizotrons (root observation chambers) and subjected to sediment oiling treatments for 409days to determine the effects of oil on root growth. Oiling reduced root length, specific root length, relative root growth rate and root diameter, while specific root volume increased. Oiling reduced root length by 96% in A. marina, 99% in B. gymnorrhiza and 80% in R. mucronata, while specific root volume increased by 34%, 29% and 23% respectively. Relative root growth rate decreased in the oiled treatments by 84%, 80% and 73% respectively. Avicennia exhibits typical root traits of a pioneer species compared to slower-growing later successional species like B. gymnorrhiza and R. mucronata. These traits of A. marina not only allow more rapid establishment of seedlings, but also expose a larger root surface area and therefore greater susceptibility to oil contamination than the other species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Doomed pioneers: Event deposition and bioturbation in anaerobic marine environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, K.A. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (USA)); Follmi, K.B. (Geologisches Institut, Zurich (Switzerland))

    1990-05-01

    Isolated horizons of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes burrows, in exclusive association with gravity flow deposits within otherwise unbioturbated sediments, indicate that event deposition in oxygen-depleted sedimentary environments may be accompanied by the appearance of allochthonous infauna. In the Miocene Monterey Formation of Alta California and in the Oligocene-Miocene San Gregorio Formation of Baja California Sur, the authors observe compelling evidence that some turbulent sedimentation events entrain living decapod crustaceans. Upon deposition in anaerobic environments, these imported burrowers rework substantial quantities of laminated, commonly organic-rich sediment, in an environment from which they were previously excluded. The persistence of oxygen-depleted environmental conditions limits the survival time of these transported infaunal dwellers and renders them doomed pioneers. The occurrence of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes, ichnogenera that are generally observed in normal-marine, neritic environments, in anoxic hemipelagic host sediments have been problematic for paleoenvironmental interpretation; in some cases, these features have been incorrectly interpreted to indicate bottom water ventilation and reoxygenation on a basin-wide scale. Accurate recognition of doomed pioneer trace fossil assemblages will permit more precise understanding of paleo-oxygen levels and basin history.

  1. A Comparative Study of Observed Score Approaches and Purification Procedures for Detecting Differential Item Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Nohoon; Davenport, Ernest C., Jr.; Davison, Mark L.

    The purposes of this study were to introduce the iterative purification procedure and to compare this with the two-step purification procedure, to compare false positive error rates and the power of five observed score approaches and to identify factors affecting power and false positive rates in each method. This study used 2,400 data sets that…

  2. On the possible onset of the Pioneer anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility that the observed onset of the Pioneer anomaly after Saturn encounter by Pioneer 11 is not necessarily due to mismodeling of solar radiation pressure but instead reflects a physically relevant characteristic of the anomaly itself. We employ the principles of a recently proposed cosmological model termed "the theory of inertial centers" along with an understanding of the fundamental assumptions taken by the Deep Space Network (DSN) to attempt to model this sudden onset. Due to an ambiguity that arises from the difference in the DSN definition of expected light-time with light-time according to the theory of inertial centers, we are forced to adopt a seemingly arbitrary convention to relate DSN-assumed clock-rates to physical clock-rates for this model. We offer a possible reason for adopting the convention employed in our analysis; however, we remain skeptical. Nevertheless, with this convention, one finds that this theory is able to replicate the previously reported Hubble-like beha...

  3. A NEO-NEWTONIAN EXPLANATION OF THE PIONEER ANOMALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Greaves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For over 20 years NASA has struggled to nd an explanation for the Pioneer anomaly, an unmodelled weak acceleration towards the sun (= 8:5 x 10-10 m s-2, observed in deep space probes Pioneer 10, 11, Galileo and Ulysses (Anderson et al. 1998, 1999; Katz 1999. No consensus explanation has been given since the anomaly was rst announced, suggesting that new physics is involved. The riddle may be solved if we assume that c, the speed of light, is not a universal constant. Newtonian mechanics, together with the hypothesis by C spedes-Cur (2002 that the index of refraction is a function of the gravitational energy density of space, leads to values of c slightly higher for interstellar space dominated by the primordial energy density p* due to galaxies and far away stars, far from the gravitational in uence of Earth, Moon, and Sun. The value derived for the index of refraction of space (n0 < 1, implies a Doppler shift of the radio signal received from the probes which results in a decrease of the frequency received at Earth and interpreted as a weak acceleration towards the Sun.

  4. Unique pioneer microbial communities exposed to volcanic sulfur dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Reiko; Kim, Seok-Won; Sato, Yoshinori; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kamijo, Takashi; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Newly exposed volcanic substrates contain negligible amounts of organic materials. Heterotrophic organisms in newly formed ecosystems require bioavailable carbon and nitrogen that are provided from CO2 and N2 fixation by pioneer microbes. However, the knowledge of initial ecosystem developmental mechanisms, especially the association between microbial succession and environmental change, is still limited. This study reports the unique process of microbial succession in fresh basaltic ash, which was affected by long-term exposure to volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2). Here we compared the microbial ecosystems among deposits affected by SO2 exposure at different levels. The results of metagenomic analysis suggested the importance of autotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria, particularly those involved in CO2 and N2 fixation, in the heavily SO2 affected site. Changes in the chemical properties of the deposits after the decline of the SO2 impact led to an apparent decrease in the iron-oxidizer abundance and a possible shift in the microbial community structure. Furthermore, the community structure of the deposits that had experienced lower SO2 gas levels showed higher similarity with that of the control forest soil. Our results implied that the effect of SO2 exposure exerted a selective pressure on the pioneer community structure by changing the surrounding environment of the microbes.

  5. High precision thermal modeling of complex systems with application to the flyby and Pioneer anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Rievers, Benny

    2011-01-01

    Thermal modeling of complex systems faces the problems of an effective digitalization of the detailed geometry and properties of the system, calculation of the thermal flows and temperature maps, treatment of the thermal radiation including possible multiple reflections, inclusion of additional external influences, extraction of the radiation pressure from calculated surface data, and computational effectiveness. In previous publications the solution to these problems have been outlined and a first application to the Pioneer spacecraft have been shown. Here we like to present the application of our thermal modeling to the Rosetta flyby anomaly as well as to the Pioneer anomaly. The analysis outlines that thermal recoil pressure is not the cause of the Rosetta flyby anomaly but likely resolves the anomalous acceleration observed for Pioneer 10.

  6. Tripler pioneers telemedicine across the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaplain, C B; Lindborg, C E; Norton, S A; Hastings, J E

    1993-12-01

    Between January and August 1993, 59 medical teleconsultations were conducted successfully between the video teleconference center at Tripler Army Medical Center on Oahu and the video teleconference center on Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. This pioneer effort in the Pacific connected 2 archipeligoes separated by more than 2,200 nautical miles. Diagnostic and therapeutic decisions were made in the specialties of orthopedics, dermatology, radiology, urology, pediatrics, ophthalmology and physical therapy. Geographic isolation no longer means limited medical specialty care.

  7. Sigmund Freud: pioneer in energy healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Stephen D; Edwards, David J

    2010-02-01

    Energy healing is a popular contemporary term for forms of healing that facilitate a natural healing process through harmonizing, rebalancing, and releasing energy flow disturbed or blocked by disease and illness. Biographical evidence indicates that Freud used physical, suggestive, and radiant forms of energy healing, and that his personal life, metapsychology, and psychoanalysis were founded on dynamic, energetic experiences and conceptualizations. Analysis of Freud's life and work leads to the conclusion that in experience, theory, and practice, Freud typified the traditional role of therapist and was a pioneer in modern forms of energy healing.

  8. Can conventional forces really explain the anomalous acceleration of Pioneer 10/11 ?

    CERN Document Server

    Mbelek, J P

    2003-01-01

    A conventional explanation of the correlation between the Pioneer 10/11 anomalous acceleration and spin-rate change is given. First, the rotational Doppler shift analysis is improved. Finally, a relation between the radio beam reaction force and the spin-rate change is established. Computations are found in good agreement with observational data. The relevance of our result to the main Pioneer 10/11 anomalous acceleration is emphasized. Our analysis leads us to conclude that the latter may not be merely artificial.

  9. Roots of pioneer trees in the lower sub-tropical area of Dinghushan, Guangdong, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Yan-ru; PENG Shao-lin; MO Jiang-ming; LIU Xin-wei; CHEN Zhuo-quan; ZHOU Kai; WU Jin-rong

    2006-01-01

    Representative pioneer tree root systems in the subtropical area of South China were examined with regard to their structure, underground stratification and biomass distribution. Excavation of skeleton roots and observation of fine roots of seven species including the Euphorbiaceae, Theaceae, Melastomataceae, Lauraceae and Fagaceae families was carried out. The results showed that: (1) Pioneer tree roots in the first stage of natural succession were of two types, one characterized by taproot system with bulky plagiotropic branches; the other characterized by flat root system with several tabular roots. The late mesophilous tree roots were characterized by one obvious taproot and tactic braches roots up and down. Shrub species roots were characterized by heart fibrous root type featured both by horizontally and transversally growing branches. Root shapes varied in different dominant species at different stages of succession. (2) Roots of the different species varied in the external features-color, periderm and structure of freshly cut slash. (3) In a set of successional stages the biomass of tree roots increased linearly with the age of growth. During monsoon, the total root biomass amounted to 115.70 t/ha in the evergreen broad-leaved forest; 50.61t/ha in needle and broad-leaved mixed forest dominated by coniferous forest; and 64.20 t/ha in broad-and needle-leaved mixed forest dominated by broad-leaved heliophytes, and are comparable to the underground biomass observed in similar tropical forests. Thisis the first report about roots characteristics of forest in the lower sub-tropical area of Dinghushan, Guangdong, China.

  10. a Study of the Pioneer Anomaly:. New Data and Objectives for New Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Toth, Viktor T.; Kellogg, Larry R.; Lau, Eunice L.; Lee, Kyong J.

    The Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft yielded the most precise navigation in deep space to date. However, their radiometric tracking data has consistently indicated the presence of a small, anomalous, Doppler frequency drift. The drift is a blue shift, uniformly changing with a rate of ~6 × 10-9 Hz/s and can be interpreted as a constant sunward acceleration of each particular spacecraft of aP = (8.74±1.33) × 10-10 m/s2 (or, alternatively, a time acceleration of at = (2.92±0.44) × 10-18 s/s2). This signal has become known as the Pioneer anomaly; the nature of this anomaly remains unexplained. We discuss the current state of the efforts to retrieve the entire data sets of the Pioneer 10 and 11 radiometric Doppler data. We also report on the availability of recently recovered telemetry files that may be used to reconstruct the engineering history of both spacecraft using original project documentation and newly developed software tools. We discuss possible ways to further investigate the discovered effect using these telemetry files in conjunction with the analysis of the much extended Pioneer Doppler data. In preparation for this new upcoming investigation, we summarize the current knowledge of the Pioneer anomaly and review some of the mechanisms proposed for its explanation. We emphasize the main objectives of this new study, namely (i) analysis of the early data that could yield the true direction of the anomaly and thus, its origin, (ii) analysis of planetary encounters, which should say more about the onset of the anomaly (e.g. Pioneer 11's Saturn flyby), (iii) analysis of the entire dataset, which should lead to a better determination of the temporal behavior of the anomaly, (iv) comparative analysis of individual anomalous accelerations for the two Pioneers with the data taken from similar heliocentric distances, (v) the detailed study of on-board systematics, and (vi) development of a thermal-electric-dynamical model using on-board telemetry. The outlined

  11. Discovery of directional and nondirectional pioneer transcription factors by modeling DNase profile magnitude and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Richard I; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; O'Donnell, Charles W; Lewis, Sophia; Barkal, Amira A; van Hoff, John Peter; Karun, Vivek; Jaakkola, Tommi; Gifford, David K

    2014-02-01

    We describe protein interaction quantitation (PIQ), a computational method for modeling the magnitude and shape of genome-wide DNase I hypersensitivity profiles to identify transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Through the use of machine-learning techniques, PIQ identified binding sites for >700 TFs from one DNase I hypersensitivity analysis followed by sequencing (DNase-seq) experiment with accuracy comparable to that of chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq). We applied PIQ to analyze DNase-seq data from mouse embryonic stem cells differentiating into prepancreatic and intestinal endoderm. We identified 120 and experimentally validated eight 'pioneer' TF families that dynamically open chromatin. Four pioneer TF families only opened chromatin in one direction from their motifs. Furthermore, we identified 'settler' TFs whose genomic binding is principally governed by proximity to open chromatin. Our results support a model of hierarchical TF binding in which directional and nondirectional pioneer activity shapes the chromatin landscape for population by settler TFs.

  12. Comparing the WFC3 IR Grism Stare and Spatial-Scan Observations for Exoplanet Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Swain, Mark R; Wagstaff, Kiri L

    2013-01-01

    We report on a detailed study of the measurement stability for WFC3 IR grism stare and spatial scan observations. The excess measurement noise for both modes is established by comparing the observed and theoretical measurement uncertainties. We find that the stare-mode observations produce differential measurements that are consistent and achieve $\\sim\\,1.3$ times photon-limited measurement precision. In contrast, the spatial-scan mode observations produce measurements which are inconsistent, non-Gaussian, and have higher excess noise corresponding to $\\sim\\,2$ times the photon-limited precision. The inferior quality of the spatial scan observations is due to spatial-temporal variability in the detector performance which we measure and map. The non-Gaussian nature of spatial scan measurements makes the use of $\\chi^2$ and the determination of formal confidence intervals problematic and thus renders the comparison of spatial scan data with theoretical models or other measurements difficult. With better measure...

  13. The energy budget of stellar magnetic fields: comparing non-potential simulations and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmann, L T; Vidotto, A A; Mackay, D H; See, V; Donati, J -F; Folsom, C P; Jeffers, S V; Marsden, S C; Morin, J; Petit, P

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic geometry of the surface magnetic fields of more than 55 cool stars have now been mapped using spectropolarimetry. In order to better understand these observations, we compare the magnetic field topology at different surface scale sizes of observed and simulated cool stars. For ease of comparison between the high-resolution non-potential magnetofrictional simulations and the relatively low-resolution observations, we filter out the small-scale field in the simulations using a spherical harmonics decomposition. We show that the large-scale field topologies of the solar-based simulations produce values of poloidal/toroidal fields and fractions of energy in axisymmetric modes that are similar to the observations. These global non-potential evolution model simulations capture key magnetic features of the observed solar-like stars through the processes of surface flux transport and magnetic flux emergence. They do not, however, reproduce the magnetic field of M-dwarfs or stars with dominantly toroidal ...

  14. Healthcare outcomes assessed with observational study designs compared with those assessed in randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglemyer, Andrew; Horvath, Hacsi T; Bero, Lisa

    2014-04-29

    Researchers and organizations often use evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the efficacy of a treatment or intervention under ideal conditions. Studies of observational designs are often used to measure the effectiveness of an intervention in 'real world' scenarios. Numerous study designs and modifications of existing designs, including both randomized and observational, are used for comparative effectiveness research in an attempt to give an unbiased estimate of whether one treatment is more effective or safer than another for a particular population.A systematic analysis of study design features, risk of bias, parameter interpretation, and effect size for all types of randomized and non-experimental observational studies is needed to identify specific differences in design types and potential biases. This review summarizes the results of methodological reviews that compare the outcomes of observational studies with randomized trials addressing the same question, as well as methodological reviews that compare the outcomes of different types of observational studies. To assess the impact of study design (including RCTs versus observational study designs) on the effect measures estimated.To explore methodological variables that might explain any differences identified.To identify gaps in the existing research comparing study designs. We searched seven electronic databases, from January 1990 to December 2013.Along with MeSH terms and relevant keywords, we used the sensitivity-specificity balanced version of a validated strategy to identify reviews in PubMed, augmented with one term ("review" in article titles) so that it better targeted narrative reviews. No language restrictions were applied. We examined systematic reviews that were designed as methodological reviews to compare quantitative effect size estimates measuring efficacy or effectiveness of interventions tested in trials with those tested in observational studies

  15. Comparing two observational measures to evaluate compliance with tobacco-free campus policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickes, Melinda; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Rayens, Mary Kay; Hahn, Ellen J

    2015-03-01

    Despite potential benefits of tobacco-free campus policies, compliance remains a challenge. Observational measures hold the most promise in determining compliance with these policies. There is need for further study to determine validity of observational measures of compliance with tobacco-free campus policies. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of two observational measures of compliance with a tobacco-free campus policy: direct observation of violators and cigarette butts. Data collection took place over a 1-year time period. Direct observation was operationally defined as the number of observed violators in hot spots. A cigarette butt protocol previously found to be reliable was used to count the number of butts in campus hot spots. Results indicated a positive relationship between number of violators observed per visit and number of cigarette butts collected. Although most of the hot spots exhibited two or fewer violators per visit and 100 butts or fewer per collection, the data points outside this range supported a positive association between observed violators per visit and cigarette butts. The findings support that direct observation of violators is a valid measure of compliance compared to cigarette butts. Given available resources, using one or the other as evaluation measures is warranted.

  16. John Dique: dialysis pioneer and political advocate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Charles R P

    2016-02-01

    John Dique (1915-1995) epitomized the internationalism of medicine, the intellectual and manual dexterity of many pioneers of dialysis, and the social concern evinced by many nephrologists. Born in Burma of French, German, British and Indian ancestry; educated in India; an Anglo-Indian who described himself as British without ever having visited Britain; he moved to Australia in 1948 to escape the murderous inter-ethnic conflict that befell multicultural India as it and Pakistan became independent. Settling in Brisbane, he pioneered several novel medical techniques. After inventing some simple equipment to facilitate intravenous therapy, he established a neonatal exchange blood transfusion programme. Then, between 1954 and 1963, he personally constructed and operated two haemodialysis machines with which to treat patients suffering from acute renal failure, the first such treatment performed in Australasia. His patients survival results were, for the era, remarkable. He subsequently helped found the Royal Australasian College of Pathologists and went on to establish a successful private pathology practice. The latter years of his life, however, saw him become a social and political advocate. He fiercely opposed the emerging ideologies of multiculturalism and social liberalism that, he predicted, would seriously damage the national fabric of Western society. Public vilification ensued, his medical achievements disregarded. It does seem likely, however, that in none of the areas that he touched - whether medical, social, or political - has the last word yet been said.

  17. Helping Teenagers Stop Smoking: Comparative Observations across Youth Settings in Cardiff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Hannah; Maher, Alison; Sage, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This paper presents comparative observations between schools/colleges, youth centres, and specialist youth provision, in relation to delivery of the 2tuff2puff six-week smoking cessation and awareness programme to young people in Cardiff. Design: A six-week smoking cessation programme was delivered to 12-23 year olds in various youth…

  18. Comparing tide gauge observations to regional patterns of sea-level change (1961–2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A.B.A.; Van de Wal, R.S.W.; Wada, Y.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Although the global mean sea-level budget for the 20th century can now be closed, the understanding of sea-level change on a regional scale is still limited. In this study we compare observations from tide gauges to regional patterns from various contributions to sea-level change to see how much of

  19. Comparing tide gauge observations to regional patterns of sea-level change (1961–2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A.B.A.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Wada, Y.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Although the global mean sea-level budget for the20th century can now be closed, the understanding of sealevelchange on a regional scale is still limited. In this studywe compare observations from tide gauges to regional patternsfrom various contributions to sea-level change to seehow much of the re

  20. Comparing tide gauge observations to regional patterns of sea-level change (1961-2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A. B. A.; van de Wal, R. S. W.; Wada, Y.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.

    2014-01-01

    Although the global mean sea-level budget for the 20th century can now be closed, the understanding of sea-level change on a regional scale is still limited. In this study we compare observations from tide gauges to regional patterns from various contributions to sea-level change to see how much of

  1. Adapted Bland-Altman method was used to compare measurement methods with unequal observations per case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, C.S.; Melis, R.J.F.; Donders, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe an adjustment of the Bland-Altman approach to evaluate possible patterns of discord between two measurement methods with an unequal number of observations per case. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Two methods of adaptation were compared using self-assessed general well-being scores

  2. Diagnostics comparing sea surface temperature feedbacks from operational hurricane forecasts to observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D. Lloyd

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the ability of recent versions of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Operational Hurricane Forecast Model (GHM to reproduce the observed relationship between hurricane intensity and hurricane-induced Sea Surface Temperature (SST cooling. The analysis was performed by taking a Lagrangian composite of all hurricanes in the North Atlantic from 1998–2009 in observations and 2005–2009 for the GHM. A marked improvement in the intensity-SST relationship for the GHM compared to observations was found between the years 2005 and 2006–2009 due to the introduction of warm-core eddies, a representation of the loop current, and changes to the drag coefficient parameterization for bulk turbulent flux computation. A Conceptual Hurricane Intensity Model illustrates the essential steady-state characteristics of the intensity-SST relationship and is explained by two coupled equations for the atmosphere and ocean. The conceptual model qualitatively matches observations and the 2006–2009 period in the GHM, and presents supporting evidence for the conclusion that weaker upper oceanic thermal stratification in the Gulf of Mexico, caused by the introduction of the loop current and warm core eddies, is crucial to explaining the observed SST-intensity pattern. The diagnostics proposed by the conceptual model offer an independent set of metrics for comparing operational hurricane forecast models to observations.

  3. Sir Victor Horsley: pioneer craniopharyngioma surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, José M; Prieto, Ruth; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    Sir Victor Horsley (1857-1916) is considered to be the pioneer of pituitary surgery. He is known to have performed the first surgical operation on the pituitary gland in 1889, and in 1906 he stated that he had operated on 10 patients with pituitary tumors. He did not publish the details of these procedures nor did he provide evidence of the pathology of the pituitary lesions operated on. Four of the patients underwent surgery at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery (Queen Square, London), and the records of those cases were recently retrieved and analyzed by members of the hospital staff. The remaining cases corresponded to private operations whose records were presumably kept in Horsley's personal notebooks, most of which have been lost. In this paper, the authors have investigated the only scientific monograph providing a complete account of the pituitary surgeries that Horsley performed in his private practice, La Patologia Chirurgica dell'Ipofisi (Surgical Pathology of the Hypophysis), written in 1911 by Giovanni Verga, Italian assistant professor of anatomy at the University of Pavia. They have traced the life and work of this little-known physician who contributed to the preservation of Horsley's legacy in pituitary surgery. Within Verga's pituitary treatise, a full transcription of Horsley's notes is provided for 10 pituitary cases, including the patients' clinical symptoms, surgical techniques employed, intraoperative findings, and the outcome of surgery. The descriptions of the topographical and macroscopic features of two of the lesions correspond unmistakably to the features of craniopharyngiomas, one of the squamous-papillary type and one of the adamantinomatous type. The former lesion was found on necropsy after the patient's sudden death following a temporal osteoplastic craniectomy. Surgical removal of the lesion in the latter case, with the assumed nature of an adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma, was successful. According to the

  4. Reinterpreting the Pioneer anomaly and its annual residual

    CERN Document Server

    Boom, P G

    2005-01-01

    In addition to its long-term constancy, the Pioneer spacecraft anomaly appears to only exist for bodies whose mass is less than that of: planets, moons, comets, and heavy asteroids of known mass. Assuming the observational evidence is reliable, and not the result of an unknown systematic effect, a violation of the Weak Principle of Equivalence is implied. To propose an additional force fails to satisfy this constraint. This paper presents a new hypothesis involving additional field energy in the form of: a finite number of lunar sourced constant amplitude (Lorentz invariant) wave-like undulations upon the gravitational field. Although apparently a futile suggestion, the author's model overcomes concerns regarding wave dissipation, wave generation, and the apparent constancy of the anomaly. A shortfall in motion arises because a tiny proportion of spacecraft kinetic energy is directed into a superposition of non-translational longitudinal oscillatory components. The restriction of this effect to low mass bodie...

  5. New Horizons and the onset of the Pioneer anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Michael Martin

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the radio tracking data from the Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft at distances between about 20 70 AU from the Sun has indicated the presence of an unmodeled, small, constant, Doppler blue shift which can be interpreted as a constant acceleration of a=(8.74±1.33)×10 cm/s directed approximately towards the Sun. In addition, there is early (roughly modeled) data from as close in as 5 AU which indicates there may have been an onset of the anomaly near Saturn. We observe that the data now arriving from the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt could allow a relatively easy, direct experimental test of whether this onset is associated with distance from the Sun (being, for example, an effect of drag on dark matter). We strongly urge that this test be done.

  6. New Horizons and the Onset of the Pioneer Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Nieto, Michael Martin

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the radio tracking data from the Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft at distances between about 20 - 70 AU from the Sun has indicated the presence of an unmodeled, small, constant, Doppler blue shift which can be interpreted as a constant acceleration of a_P= (8.74 \\pm 1.33) \\times 10^{-8} cm/s^2 directed approximately {\\it towards} the Sun. In addition, there is early (roughly modeled) data from as close in as 5 AU which indicates there may have been an onset of the anomaly near Saturn. We observe that the data now arriving from the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt could allow a relatively easy, direct experimental test of whether this onset is associated with distance from the Sun (being, for example, an effect of drag on dark matter). We strongly urge that this test be done.

  7. Public health nursing pioneer: Jane Elizabeth Hitchcock 1863-1939.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Joellen W; Watson, John Charles

    2003-01-01

    Jane Elizabeth Hitchcock was one of many distinguished nursing leaders of the 19th and early 20th centuries who attended a women's college before enrolling in a nurse training school. Like many of her contemporaries with equally impeccable family credentials, Hitchcock was something of an enigma to her family for choosing nursing over teaching, the most common acceptable career for women of her social class. Hitchcock's endowment of character, according to contemporary Lavinia Dock, exemplified the best of her Puritan roots. Her contributions to the evolution of public health nursing and the integration of public health nursing content into curriculums of training schools rivalled the achievements in higher education of her famous father, grandfather, and brother but garnered no comparable recognition. Her life presents an interesting case for analysis of an independent woman, a characteristic shared by many pioneers in the early years of public health nursing: 1893 to 1920.

  8. The "Pioneer effect" a cosmological Foucault's experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Rosales, J L

    2002-01-01

    The reported anomalous acceleration acting on the Pioneers spacecrafts could be seen as a consequence of the existence of some local curvature in light geodesics when using the coordinate speed of light in an expanding space-time. The effect is related with the non synchronous character of the underlying metric and therefore, planets closed orbits can not reveal it. It is shown that the cosmic expansion rate -the Hubble parameter H- has been indeed detected. Additionally, a relation for an existing annual term is obtained which depends on the cosine of the ecliptic latitude of the spacecraft, suggestingan heuristic analogy between the effect and Foucault's experiment - light rays playing a similar role in the expanding space than Foucault's Pendulum does while determining Earth's rotation. This statement could be seen as a benchmark for future experiments.

  9. Thomas K. Jeffers: pioneer of coccidiosis research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, H D

    2012-01-01

    Thomas K. Jeffers has made many significant contributions to our understanding of the biology of the parasite Eimeria, the cause of coccidiosis in poultry. His work has had direct practical application for the control of this widespread disease. Topics discussed include Jeffers' pioneering work concerned with genetics of the host response to infection, the nature of biological and immunological intraspecific variation, drug resistance and discovery, field surveys of resistance, and his most recognized achievement-the demonstration that the lifecycle of coccidia may be altered by artificial selection. Parasites so modified are attenuated but retain their immunogenicity, a discovery that has led to the development of live vaccines that are inherently non-pathogenic. This article provides a brief biography and describes the contributions that Jeffers has made to our knowledge of coccidiosis.

  10. A Pioneer of Global Change Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ One summer's day in 1984, a meteorologist came all the way from the United States to Prof. Ye Duzheng, a CAS atmospheric scientist in Beijing, in the hope of establishing cooperative research into global climate change, a field unfamiliar to most scientists in the world at that time. His proposal immediately caught the interest of Ye, who was then president of the Chinese Meteorological Society and vice-president of CAS. Prof. Ye believed it to be an extremely important issue requiring sustained and collaborative attention. Already in his seventies, he found some young researchers to work with him in the field. Two decades later, global change is now recognized as a major science branch. As a pioneer of this branch, Prof. Ye was awarded the prestigious Prize of the World Meteorological Organization in 2003, and honored with China's National Supreme S&T Award in 2005.

  11. An Automated Comparative Observation System for Sun-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence of Vegetation Canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xijia Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Detecting sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF offers a new approach for remote sensing photosynthesis. However, to analyse the response characteristics of SIF under different stress states, a long-term time-series comparative observation of vegetation under different stress states must be carried out at the canopy scale, such that the similarities and differences in SIF change law can be summarized under different time scales. A continuous comparative observation system for vegetation canopy SIF is designed in this study. The system, which is based on a high-resolution spectrometer and an optical multiplexer, can achieve comparative observation of multiple targets. To simultaneously measure the commonly used vegetation index and SIF in the O2-A and O2-B atmospheric absorption bands, the following parameters are used: a spectral range of 475.9 to 862.2 nm, a spectral resolution of approximately 0.9 nm, a spectral sampling interval of approximately 0.4 nm, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR can be as high as 1000:1. To obtain data for both the upward radiance of the vegetation canopy and downward irradiance data with a high SNR in relatively short time intervals, the single-step integration time optimization algorithm is proposed. To optimize the extraction accuracy of SIF, the FluorMOD model is used to simulate sets of data according to the spectral resolution, spectral sampling interval and SNR of the spectrometer in this continuous observation system. These data sets are used to determine the best parameters of Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD, Three FLD (3FLD and the spectral fitting method (SFM, and 3FLD and SFM are confirmed to be suitable for extracting SIF from the spectral measurements. This system has been used to observe the SIF values in O2-A and O2-B absorption bands and some commonly used vegetation index from sweet potato and bare land, the result of which shows: (1 the daily variation trend of SIF value of sweet potato leaves is

  12. An Automated Comparative Observation System for Sun-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence of Vegetation Canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xijia; Liu, Zhigang; Xu, Shan; Zhang, Weiwei; Wu, Jun

    2016-05-27

    Detecting sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) offers a new approach for remote sensing photosynthesis. However, to analyse the response characteristics of SIF under different stress states, a long-term time-series comparative observation of vegetation under different stress states must be carried out at the canopy scale, such that the similarities and differences in SIF change law can be summarized under different time scales. A continuous comparative observation system for vegetation canopy SIF is designed in this study. The system, which is based on a high-resolution spectrometer and an optical multiplexer, can achieve comparative observation of multiple targets. To simultaneously measure the commonly used vegetation index and SIF in the O₂-A and O₂-B atmospheric absorption bands, the following parameters are used: a spectral range of 475.9 to 862.2 nm, a spectral resolution of approximately 0.9 nm, a spectral sampling interval of approximately 0.4 nm, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be as high as 1000:1. To obtain data for both the upward radiance of the vegetation canopy and downward irradiance data with a high SNR in relatively short time intervals, the single-step integration time optimization algorithm is proposed. To optimize the extraction accuracy of SIF, the FluorMOD model is used to simulate sets of data according to the spectral resolution, spectral sampling interval and SNR of the spectrometer in this continuous observation system. These data sets are used to determine the best parameters of Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD), Three FLD (3FLD) and the spectral fitting method (SFM), and 3FLD and SFM are confirmed to be suitable for extracting SIF from the spectral measurements. This system has been used to observe the SIF values in O₂-A and O₂-B absorption bands and some commonly used vegetation index from sweet potato and bare land, the result of which shows: (1) the daily variation trend of SIF value of sweet potato leaves is

  13. Demystifying the Enigma of Smoking – An Observational Comparative Study on Tobacco Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallakunta, Rajesh; Reddy, Sudhakara Reddy; Chennoju, Sai Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Smoking is a hazardous habit which causes definite changes in the oral cavity, consequently there exist changes in the mucosa when subjected to smoking. Palatal mucosa is first to be affected. The present study determines the palatal status in reverse smokers and conventional smokers. Aim To study and compare the clinical, cytological and histopathological changes in palatal mucosa among reverse and conventional smokers. Materials and Methods Study sample was categorized into two groups. Group 1 comprised of 20 subjects with the habit of reverse smoking and Group 2 comprised of 20 subjects with the habit of conventional smoking. Initially, clinical appearance of the palatal mucosa was recorded, followed by a cytological smear and biopsy of the involved area among all the subjects. The findings were studied clinically, the specimens were analysed cytologically and histopathologically, and compared among the two groups. Results The severity of clinical changes of the palatal mucosa among reverse smokers was statistically significant when compared to those of conventional smokers. There was no statistically significant difference observed in cytological staging between the groups with a p-value of 0.35. The histopathological changes in both the groups showed a significant difference with a p-value of 0.02. A significant positive correlation was observed between the clinical appearance, and cytological, histopathological changes. Conclusion Profound clinically aggressive changes were observed in group I compared to group II. Severity of dysplastic changes have been detected in few subjects through histopathological examination irrespective of no prominent clinical and cytological changes observed among the two groups. PMID:27190962

  14. 75 FR 17798 - Pioneer Bond Fund, et al.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... subsidiary of Pioneer Global Asset Management S.p.A. and its parent UniCredit S.p.A. The Adviser is..., Pioneer Short Term Income Fund, Pioneer Strategic Income Fund, Pioneer Variable Contracts Trust (together, the ``Trusts'') and Pioneer Investment Management, Inc. (the ``Adviser''). Filing Dates: The...

  15. Some parameterization formulae for mixing height compared with joint sodar and lidar observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielak, A.; Burzynski, J.; Kaszowski, W.; Walczewski, J. [Inst. for Meteorology and Water Management, Cracow (Poland)

    1997-10-01

    The mixing height (MH) is most frequently defined in terms of the mixing mechanism: atmospheric turbulence and its variability versus height. From the practical point of view it is more important to know the height of mixing of real polluting substances, than the absolute ceiling of turbulent processes. This approach is followed by many authors, especially those using lidars for observations of aerosol or gas mixing. In this paper effort is made to bring some contribution to these studies. The paper presents the results of selected observations of aerosol mixing height, compared with sodar observations of BL structure and with the MH calculated with use of different formulae taken from literature. All measurements were made in Cracow, Poland. (LN) 20 refs.

  16. Comparing USGS national seismic hazard maps with internet-based macroseismic intensity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Sum; Schorlemmer, Danijel

    2016-04-01

    Verifying a nationwide seismic hazard assessment using data collected after the assessment has been made (i.e., prospective data) is a direct consistency check of the assessment. We directly compared the predicted rate of ground motion exceedance by the four available versions of the USGS national seismic hazard map (NSHMP, 1996, 2002, 2008, 2014) with the actual observed rate during 2000-2013. The data were prospective to the two earlier versions of NSHMP. We used two sets of somewhat independent data, namely 1) the USGS "Did You Feel It?" (DYFI) intensity reports, 2) instrumental ground motion records extracted from ShakeMap stations. Although both are observed data, they come in different degrees of accuracy. Our results indicated that for California, the predicted and observed hazards were very comparable. The two sets of data gave consistent results, implying robustness. The consistency also encourages the use of DYFI data for hazard verification in the Central and Eastern US (CEUS), where instrumental records are lacking. The result showed that the observed ground-motion exceedance was also consistent with the predicted in CEUS. The primary value of this study is to demonstrate the usefulness of DYFI data, originally designed for community communication instead of scientific analysis, for the purpose of hazard verification.

  17. [Comparative observation on acupuncture-moxibustion and western medication for treatment of sudden deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xin-hua; Ding, Ya-nan; Chang, Xiang-hui; Ouyang, Yu-lu; Xie, Qiang

    2010-08-01

    To compare the therapeutic effect on sudden deafness between acupuncture and moxibustion therapy of excitation-focus transfer and routine medication. Eighty cases of sudden deafness were randomly divided into two groups, 40 cases in each one. Acupuncture and moxibustion therapy of excitation-focus transfer was adopted in observation group on Yongquan (KI 1) (with reducing and slightly heavy manipulation), Tinggong (SI 19), Tinghui (GB 2) and Ermen (TE 21), and associated with suspending moxibustion for thermal sensitization on Yongquan (KI 1). In control group, the routine medications were given. The therapeutic effects of two groups were compared with each other. After three sessions of treatment, dB value of hearing loss in two groups decreased (Psudden deafness as compared with the routine western therapy.

  18. Identifying tools for comparing simulations and observations of spectral-line data cubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Eric W.; Ward, Caleb G.; Offner, Stella; Loeppky, Jason L.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2017-10-01

    We present a statistical framework to compare spectral-line data cubes of molecular clouds and use the framework to perform an analysis of various statistical tools developed from methods proposed in the literature. We test whether our methods are sensitive to changes in the underlying physical properties of the clouds or whether their behaviour is governed by random fluctuations. We perform a set of 32 self-gravitating magnetohydrodynamic simulations that test all combinations of five physical parameters - Mach number, plasma parameter, virial parameter, driving scales and solenoidal driving fraction - each of which can be set to a low or high value. We create mock observational data sets of 13CO(1-0) emission from each simulation. We compare these mock data to those generated from a set of baseline simulations using pseudo-distance metrics based on 18 different statistical techniques that have previously been used to study molecular clouds. We analyse these results using methods from the statistical field of experimental design and find that several of the statistics can reliably track changes in the underlying physics. Our analysis shows that the interactions between parameters are often among the most significant effects. A small fraction of statistics are also sensitive to changes in magnetic field properties. We use this framework to compare the set of simulations to observations of three nearby star-forming regions: NGC 1333, Oph A and IC 348. We find that no one simulation agrees significantly better with the observations, although there is evidence that the high Mach number simulations are more consistent with the observations.

  19. Comparing different Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation observations using modeling of water vapor jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Hansen, Candice; Aye, Klaus-Michael

    2016-10-01

    Motivation: On March 11, 2016 the Cassini UVIS observed its 6th star occultation by Enceladus' plume. This observation was aimed to determine variability in the total gas flux from the Enceladus' southern polar region. The analysis of the received data suggests that the total gas flux is moderately increased comparing to the average gas flux observed by UVIS from 2005 to 2011 [1]. However, UVIS detected variability in individual jets. In particular, Baghdad 1 is more collimated in 2016 than in 2005, meaning its gas escapes at higher velocity.Model and fits: We use 3D DSMC model for water vapor jets to compare different UVIS occultation observations from 2005 to 2016. The model traces test articles from jets' sources [2] into space and results in coordinates and velocities for a set of test particles. We convert particle positions into the particle number density and integrate along UVIS line of sight (LoS) for each time step of the UVIS observation using precise observational geometry derived from SPICE [3]. We integrate all jets that are crossed by the LoS and perform constrained least-squares fit of resulting modeled opacities to the observed data to solved for relative strengths of jets. The geometry of each occultation is specific, for example, during solar occultation in 2010 UVIS LoS was almost parallel to tiger stripes, which made it possible to distinguish jets venting from different tiger stripes. In 2011 Eps Orionis occultation LoS was perpendicular to tiger stripes and thus many of the jets were geometrically overlapping. Solar occultation provided us with the largest inventory of active jets - our model fit detects at least 43 non-zero jet contributions. Stellar occultations generally have lower temporal resolution and observe only a sub-set of these jets: 2011 Eps Orionis needs minimum 25 non-zero jets to fit UVIS data. We will discuss different occultations and models fits, including the most recent Epsilon Orionis occultation of 2016.[1] Hansen et al

  20. Biases and systematics in the observational derivation of galaxy properties: comparing different techniques on synthetic observations of simulated galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Guidi, Giovanni; Scannapieco, Cecilia; Walcher, C. Jakob

    2015-01-01

    We study the sources of biases and systematics in the derivation of galaxy properties of observational studies, focusing on stellar masses, star formation rates, gas/stellar metallicities, stellar ages and magnitudes/colors. We use hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of galaxy formation, for which the real quantities are known, and apply observational techniques to derive the observables. We also make an analysis of biases that are relevant for a proper comparison between simulations and ...

  1. Bayesian Techniques for Comparing Time-dependent GRMHD Simulations to Variable Event Horizon Telescope Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhan; Marrone, Daniel P.; Chan, Chi-Kwan; Medeiros, Lia; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a millimeter-wavelength, very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment that is capable of observing black holes with horizon-scale resolution. Early observations have revealed variable horizon-scale emission in the Galactic Center black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). Comparing such observations to time-dependent general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations requires statistical tools that explicitly consider the variability in both the data and the models. We develop here a Bayesian method to compare time-resolved simulation images to variable VLBI data, in order to infer model parameters and perform model comparisons. We use mock EHT data based on GRMHD simulations to explore the robustness of this Bayesian method and contrast it to approaches that do not consider the effects of variability. We find that time-independent models lead to offset values of the inferred parameters with artificially reduced uncertainties. Moreover, neglecting the variability in the data and the models often leads to erroneous model selections. We finally apply our method to the early EHT data on Sgr A*.

  2. Coronal Mass Ejections and Dimmings: A Comparative Study using MHD Simulations and SDO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meng; Cheung, Mark; DeRosa, Marc L.; Nitta, Nariaki; Schrijver, Karel

    2017-08-01

    Solar coronal dimmings have been observed extensively in the past two decades. Due to their close association with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), there is a critical need to improve our understanding of the physical processes that cause dimmings and determine their relationship with CMEs. In this study, we investigate coronal dimmings by combining simulation and observational efforts. By utilizing a data-driven global magnetohydrodynamics model (AWSoM: Alfven-wave Solar Model), we simulate coronal dimmings resulting from different CME energetics and flux rope configurations. We synthesize the emissions of different EUV spectral bands/lines and compare with SDO/AIA and EVE observations. A detailed analysis of simulation and observation data suggests that the “core” dimming is mainly caused by the mass loss from the CME, while the “remote” dimming could have a different origin (e.g., plasma heating). Moreover, the interaction between the erupting flux rope with different orientations and the global solar corona could significantly influence the coronal dimming patterns. Using metrics such as dimming depth, dimming slope, and recovery time, we investigate the relationship between dimmings and CME properties (e.g., CME mass, CME speed) in the simulation. Our result suggests that coronal dimmings encode important information about CMEs. We also discuss how our knowledge about solar coronal dimmings could be extended to the study of stellar CMEs.

  3. Quality standards for real-world research. Focus on observational database studies of comparative effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Nicolas; Reddel, Helen; Martin, Richard; Brusselle, Guy; Papi, Alberto; Thomas, Mike; Postma, Dirjke; Thomas, Vicky; Rand, Cynthia; Chisholm, Alison; Price, David

    2014-02-01

    Real-world research can use observational or clinical trial designs, in both cases putting emphasis on high external validity, to complement the classical efficacy randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high internal validity. Real-world research is made necessary by the variety of factors that can play an important a role in modulating effectiveness in real life but are often tightly controlled in RCTs, such as comorbidities and concomitant treatments, adherence, inhalation technique, access to care, strength of doctor-caregiver communication, and socio-economic and other organizational factors. Real-world studies belong to two main categories: pragmatic trials and observational studies, which can be prospective or retrospective. Focusing on comparative database observational studies, the process aimed at ensuring high-quality research can be divided into three parts: preparation of research, analyses and reporting, and discussion of results. Key points include a priori planning of data collection and analyses, identification of appropriate database(s), proper outcomes definition, study registration with commitment to publish, bias minimization through matching and adjustment processes accounting for potential confounders, and sensitivity analyses testing the robustness of results. When these conditions are met, observational database studies can reach a sufficient level of evidence to help create guidelines (i.e., clinical and regulatory decision-making).

  4. Polar-Region Distributions of Poynting Flux: Global Models Compared With Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, P. D.; Lotko, W.; Murr, D.; Gagne, J. R.; Wiltberger, M.; Lyon, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    Low-altitude distributions of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon- Fedder-Mobarry global simulation model of the magnetosphere are compared with distributions derived from SuperDARN, the Iridium satellite constellation, and the Weimer 2005 empirical model for a one-hour interval (1400-1500 UT) on 23 November 1999 during which the interplanetary magnetic field was steady and southward. Synthetic measurements along a pseudo-satellite track are also obtained from each distribution and compared with measurements from the DMSP F13 satellite. Previous studies of the event are supplemented here with updated simulation results for the electric potential and field-aligned currents, new simulation diagnostics for the Poynting flux incident on the ionosphere, and comparisons of observational and simulation results with the Weimer empirical model. The location and extent of the simulated Poynting fluxes that occur in the afternoon sector, between the Region-1 and 2 currents, are consistent with the observed and empirically modeled locations, but the magnitudes exhibit significant differences (locally up to ~100% both higher and lower). Elsewhere, the distribution of simulated fluxes more closely resembles the empirically modeled values than the observed ones and in general is greater in magnitude by about 100%. Additionally, the fraction of simulated Poynting flux that flow into the polar cap region (above 75 deg) is about one third of the total flowing into the ionosphere above 60 deg; a similar value is found for both the observed and the empirically modeled fluxes. The effect of including the parallel potential drop in the self-consistent mapping of electric potential between the ionosphere and inner boundary of the simulation domain is also examined. Globally the effect is small (< 5%); however, in regions where the field-aligned potential drop is appreciable, local changes of 100% or more are found in the magnitude of the

  5. Distribution of [sup 32]Si in the world ocean: Model compared to observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, T.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Maier-Reimer, E. (Max-Planck Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)); Broecker, W.S. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States))

    1993-06-01

    The most difficult measurement of the GEOSECS survey was that of silicon 32. This paper compares the observed distribution from the survey with the distributions predicted from two global ocean models. Existing measurements show little surface to bottom or ocean to ocean variations where as the models predict three to five fold greater ratios in the deep Atlantic Ocean than in the deep Pacific and Indian oceans. A flaw in the measurements is one possibility for the discrepancy. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. ULF foreshock under radial IMF: THEMIS observations and global kinetic simulation Vlasiator results compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmroth, Minna; Rami, Vainio; Archer, Martin; Hietala, Heli; Afanasiev, Alexandr; Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    For decades, a certain type of ultra low frequency waves with a period of about 30 seconds have been observed in the Earth's quasi-parallel foreshock. These waves, with a wavelength of about an Earth radius, are compressive and propagate with an average angle of 20 degrees with respect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The latter property has caused trouble to scientists as the growth rate for the instability causing the waves is maximized along the magnetic field. So far, these waves have been characterized by single or multi-spacecraft methods and 2-dimensional hybrid-PIC simulations, which have not fully reproduced the wave properties. Vlasiator is a newly developed, global hybrid-Vlasov simulation, which solves the six-dimensional phase space utilising the Vlasov equation for protons, while electrons are a charge-neutralising fluid. The outcome of the simulation is a global reproduction of ion-scale physics in a holistic manner where the generation of physical features can be followed in time and their consequences can be quantitatively characterised. Vlasiator produces the ion distribution functions and the related kinetic physics in unprecedented detail, in the global scale magnetospheric scale with a resolution of a couple of hundred kilometres in the ordinary space and 20 km/s in the velocity space. We run Vlasiator under a radial IMF in five dimensions consisting of the three-dimensional velocity space embedded in the ecliptic plane. We observe the generation of the 30-second ULF waves, and characterize their evolution and physical properties in time. We compare the results both to THEMIS observations and to the quasi-linear theory. We find that Vlasiator reproduces the foreshock ULF waves in all reported observational aspects, i.e., they are of the observed size in wavelength and period, they are compressive and propagate obliquely to the IMF. In particular, we discuss the issues related to the long-standing question of oblique propagation.

  7. The association of DNA Repair with breast cancer risk in women. A comparative observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matta Jaime

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have found a link between a low DNA repair capacity (DRC level and increased cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the statistical association of DRC level and breast cancer (BC using a case–control epidemiological study in a Hispanic community. Methods We conducted a comparative observational study to assess the validity of DRC in detecting BC in 824 women throughout Puerto Rico. Over a 6-year period, we compared 285 women newly diagnosed with BC to 539 without BC. DRC levels were measured in lymphocytes by means of a host-cell reactivation assay. We assessed the sensitivity, specificity, and association using the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Multiple logistic regression-adjusted odds ratios were estimated with 95% confidence level to measure the strength of the association of DRC and BC after adjusting for all confounders simultaneously. Results Compared to women without cancer, women with BC showed an average decrease of 60% in their DRC levels (p p Conclusions Our results support the usefulness of DRC level as a measure of BC risk. Additional studies in other populations are needed to further verify its usefulness.

  8. Monitoring greenhouse gas emissions in Australian landscapes: Comparing ground based mobile surveying data to GOSAT observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, S.; Iverach, C.; Kelly, B. F. J.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is threatening the health and stability of the natural world and human society. Such concerns were emphasized at COP21 conference in Paris 2015 which highlighted the global need to improve our knowledge of sources of greenhouse gas and to develop methods to mitigate the effects of their emissions. Ongoing spatial and temporal measurements of greenhouse gases at both point and regional scales is important for clarification of climate change mechanisms and accounting. The Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is designed to monitor the global distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from orbit. As existing ground monitoring stations are limited and still unevenly distributed, satellite observations provide important frequent, spatially extensive, but low resolution observations. Recent developments in portable laser based greenhouse gas measurement systems have enabled the rapid measurement of greenhouse gases in ppb at the ground surface. This study was conducted to map major sources of CO2 and CH4 in the eastern states of Australia at the landscape scale and to compare the results to GOSAT observations. During April 2016 we conducted a regional CH4 and CO2 mobile survey, using an LGR greenhouse gas analyzer. Measurements were made along a 4000 KM circuit through major cities, country towns, dry sclerophyll forests, coastal wetlands, coal mining regions, coal seam gas developments, dryland farming and irrigated agricultural landscapes. The ground-based survey data were then compared with the data (L2) from GOSAT. Ground-based mobile surveys showed that there are clear statistical differences in the ground level atmospheric concentration of CH4 and CO2 associated with all major changes in land use. These changes extend for kilometers, and cover one or more GOSAT pixels. In the coal mining districts the ground-level atmospheric concentration of CH4 exceeded 2 ppm for over 40 km, yet this was not discernable in the retrieved data (L2

  9. COMPARING THE OBSERVABLE PROPERTIES OF DWARF GALAXIES ON AND OFF THE ANDROMEDA PLANE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rich, R. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Ibata, Rodrigo A. [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11, Rue de l' Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Chapman, Scott C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Coburg Road, Halifax B3H1A6 (Canada); McConnachie, Alan W. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, British Columbia, Victoria V9E 2E7 (Canada); Ferguson, Annette M. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Irwin, Michael J. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Rise, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Lewis, Geraint F., E-mail: michelle.collins@yale.edu [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-01-20

    The thin, extended planes of satellite galaxies detected around both the Milky Way and Andromeda are not a natural prediction of the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm. Galaxies in these distinct planes may have formed and evolved in a different way (e.g., tidally) from their off-plane neighbors. If this were the case, one would expect the on- and off-plane dwarf galaxies in Andromeda to have experienced different evolutionary histories, which should be reflected by the chemistries, dynamics, and star formation histories of the two populations. In this work, we present new, robust kinematic observations for two on-plane M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies (And XVI and XVII) and compile and compare all available observational metrics for the on- and off-plane dwarfs to search for a signal that would corroborate such a hypothesis. We find that, barring their spatial alignment, the on- and off-plane Andromeda dwarf galaxies are indistinguishable from one another, arguing against vastly different formative and evolutionary histories for these two populations.

  10. Evaluation concepts to compare observed and simulated deposition areas of mass movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Micha; Scheidl, Christian; Kaitna, Roland

    2017-04-01

    A delineation of potentially endangered areas by geophysical mass flows, like debris flows, rock and snow avalanches, is an important for regional and urban planning. For this numerical simulation programs have become an important tool in engineering hazard assessment. However, when being confronted with the evaluation of model performance and sensitivity there are no standard, objective approaches. In this contribution we present a new approach to quantitatively compare 2D simulations of observed and simulated deposition patterns - a concept derived from a literature review of 75 peer reviewed articles which inverse modelled real events of different types of mass flows. It seems that existing evaluation concepts with respect to the deposition distribution does only account for one or a combination of two possible evaluation errors based on overestimation, underestimation and/or overlap of the simulation outcome with the observed reference. The proposed evaluation concept integrates all three possible errors and yields a single metric between -1 (no fit) and 1 (perfect fit). Combined with a ternary plot we further show that the proposed evaluation concept might act as a simple decision support tool to i) identify weaknesses and strengths of the simulation model, ii) to find the best simulation setup and iii) to test whether higher complexity of simulation models are balanced by higher accuracies. This method shall help developers and end-users of simulation models to better understand model behavior and provide a possibility for comparison of model results, independent of simulation platform and type of mass flow.

  11. Comparing the model-simulated global warming signal to observations using empirical estimates of unforced noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick T; Li, Wenhong; Cordero, Eugene C; Mauget, Steven A

    2015-04-21

    The comparison of observed global mean surface air temperature (GMT) change to the mean change simulated by climate models has received much public and scientific attention. For a given global warming signal produced by a climate model ensemble, there exists an envelope of GMT values representing the range of possible unforced states of the climate system (the Envelope of Unforced Noise; EUN). Typically, the EUN is derived from climate models themselves, but climate models might not accurately simulate the correct characteristics of unforced GMT variability. Here, we simulate a new, empirical, EUN that is based on instrumental and reconstructed surface temperature records. We compare the forced GMT signal produced by climate models to observations while noting the range of GMT values provided by the empirical EUN. We find that the empirical EUN is wide enough so that the interdecadal variability in the rate of global warming over the 20(th) century does not necessarily require corresponding variability in the rate-of-increase of the forced signal. The empirical EUN also indicates that the reduced GMT warming over the past decade or so is still consistent with a middle emission scenario's forced signal, but is likely inconsistent with the steepest emission scenario's forced signal.

  12. Homoeopathic management of Schizophrenia: A prospective, non-comparative, open-label observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Oberai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the usefulness of homoeopathic intervention in Schizophrenia, in untreated cases and antipsychotic treatment resistant cases, to verify indications of medicines, and to assess relapse, if any. Materials and Methods: A prospective, non-comparative, open-label observational study was carried out from October 2005-September 2010 by CCRH at Central Research Institute (H, Kottayam, Kerala, India. Patients between 20 and 60 years of age, presenting with symptoms of Schizophrenia were screened for inclusion and exclusion criteria. The patients who were on antipsychotic drugs were allowed to continue the same along with homoeopathic medicine, the dose of antipsychotics was monitored by the Psychiatrist. The symptoms of each patient were repertorized, and medicine was initially prescribed in 30C potency after consulting Materia Medica. Patients were followed up for 12 months. Outcome of treatment was assessed with Brief Psychiatric Rating Scales (BPRS. Analysis was done using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences  SPSS Version 20.0. Results: Out of 188 enrolled patients, 17 cases did not complete the baseline information. Total 171 patients were analysed as per modified Intention to Treat Principle. Significant difference (P = 0.0001, P < 0.05 in the mean scores of BPRS, using paired t test was observed at end of the study. Sulphur, Lycopodium, Natrum muriaticum, Pulsatilla and Phosphorus were found to be the most useful medicines in treating schizophrenic patients. Conclusion: The study reflects the positive role of homoeopathic medicines in the management of patients suffering from schizophrenia as measured by BPRS.

  13. Comparing Vesta's Surface Roughness to the Moon Using Bistatic Radar Observations by the Dawn Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, E. M.; Heggy, E.; Kofman, W. W.; Moghaddam, M.

    2015-12-01

    The first orbital bistatic radar (BSR) observations of a small body have been conducted opportunistically by NASA's Dawn spacecraft at Asteroid Vesta using the telecommunications antenna aboard Dawn to transmit and the Deep Space Network 70-meter antennas on Earth to receive. Dawn's high-gain communications antenna continuously transmitted right-hand circularly polarized radio waves (4-cm wavelength), and due to the opportunistic nature of the experiment, remained in a fixed orientation pointed toward Earth throughout each BSR observation. As a consequence, Dawn's transmitted radio waves scattered from Vesta's surface just before and after each occultation of the Dawn spacecraft behind Vesta, resulting in surface echoes at highly oblique incidence angles of greater than 85 degrees, and a small Doppler shift of ~2 Hz between the carrier signal and surface echoes from Vesta. We analyze the power and Doppler spreading of Vesta's surface echoes to assess surface roughness, and find that Vesta's area-normalized radar cross section ranges from -8 to -17 dB, which is notably much stronger than backscatter radar cross section values reported for the Moon's limbs (-20 to -35 dB). However, our measurements correspond to the forward scattering regime--such that at high incidence, radar waves are expected to scatter more weakly from a rough surface in the backscatter direction than that which is scattered forward. Using scattering models of rough surfaces observed at high incidence, we report on the relative roughness of Vesta's surface as compared to the Moon and icy Galilean satellites. Through this, we assess the dominant processes that have influenced Vesta's surface roughness at centimeter and decimeter scales, which are in turn applicable to assisting future landing, sampling and orbital missions of other small bodies.

  14. Observations of the intraseasonal oscillations over two Brazilian low latitude stations: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guharay, A.; Batista, P. P.; Clemesha, B. R.; Buriti, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    A comparative study of intraseasonal oscillations (ISO) in the period range 20-110 days is carried out in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) zonal wind at two low latitude stations, Cariri (7.4°S, 36.5°W) and Cachoeira Paulista (22.7°S, 45°W) located far from the convective anomaly region. Considerable seasonal and interannual variability is observed. The ISO in the MLT and lower atmosphere are found to be well correlated during winter and spring indicating a coupling of the atmospheric regions through the ISO. On the other hand, relatively less correlation during summer and fall may suggest a dominance of the in situ excitation of the ISO in the MLT relative to the lower atmospheric contribution. The correlation between the MLT and lower atmosphere is found to be a little higher at Cachoeira Paulista than Cariri. The ISO in the MLT shows good correlation between the two stations, but correlation is insignificant in the case of lower atmosphere. The ISO is most prominent in the upper troposphere, upper stratosphere and MLT. The waves responsible for communicating the ISO signature from the troposphere to the middle atmosphere in the tropics are believed to refract through mid-latitudes in course of their propagation. An evident height variation of the high amplitude ISO in the upper troposphere is observed with a clear annual oscillation at Cariri. The observed behaviors of the ISO at the present sites are discussed in the light of plausible physical mechanisms.

  15. Does Increased Spending on Pharmaceutical Marketing Inhibit Pioneering Innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Denis G; Troyer, Jennifer L

    2016-04-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has been criticized for developing and aggressively marketing drugs that do not provide significant health benefits relative to existing drugs but retain the benefits of patent protection. Critics argue that drug marketing increases health care expenditures and provides a disincentive for pioneering drug innovation. However, evidence that marketing expenditures have any relationship to new drug approvals has been anecdotal. We hypothesized that, at publicly traded pharmaceutical firms, increased marketing expenditures will result in a reduced volume of pioneering new drugs in comparison to less innovative new drugs. We also hypothesized that additional research and development spending will result in an increased volume of pioneering new drugs in comparison to less innovative drugs. Results confirm our hypotheses. Specific policy recommendations for altering firms' incentives for the development of pioneering drugs are provided.

  16. Comparative Interactions of Dihydroquinazolin Derivatives with Human Serum Albumin Observed via Multiple Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of dihydroquinazolines with human serum albumin (HSA were studied in pH 7.4 aqueous solution via fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic techniques. In this work, 6-chloro-1-(3,3-dimethyl-butanoyl-2(unsubstitutedphenyl-2,3-dihydroquinazolin-4(1H-one (PDQL derivatives were designed and synthesized to study the impact of five similar substituents (methyl, methoxy, cyano, trifluoromethyl and isopropyl on the interactions between PDQL and HSA using a comparative methodology. The results revealed that PDQL quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA through a static quenching process. Displacement experiments with site-specific markers revealed that PDQL binds to HSA at site II (subdomain IIIA and that there may be only one binding site for PDQL on HSA. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that hydrophobic interactions mainly drove the interactions between PDQL and HSA. The substitution using five similar groups in the benzene ring could increase the interactions between PDQL and HSA to some extent through the van der Waals force or hydrogen bond effects in the proper temperature range. Isopropyl substitution could particularly enhance the binding affinity, as observed via comparative studies

  17. Pioneer fly-by of Saturn and its rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, T.; Esposito, L.

    1981-01-01

    Results acquired by the imaging photopolarimeter on board Pioneer 11 during the spacecraft fly-by of Saturn and its rings on September 1, 1979 are reviewed. Analysis of the broadband photometry and polarimetry obtained of the Saturn atmosphere has been used to determine a cloud top height of 300 mb and a scale height of the aerosol distribution about 1/4 that of the ambient gas, and to point out differences between the forward scattering and belt and zone characteristics of the Saturn and Jupiter atmospheres. Images of Saturn's rings have been used to derive a profile of ring optical depth between 1.22 and 2.35 Saturn radii, and reveal new divisions and thin rings and azimuthal variations in the brightness of the A ring not observable from earth. Linear polarization observations of Titan in red and blue light reveal that the aerosols near the top of the atmosphere have radii less than about 0.09 micron and that the optical thickness of the small aerosol layer is about 0.6 above an effectively depolarizing surface, and indicate radii of 2845 + or - 25 km and 2880 + or - 22 km in red and blue light, respectively. Earth-based and spacecraft data are consistent with the formation of rings structures as a result of Poynting-Robertson drag and gravitational satellite resonances with the original ice and rock particles.

  18. Comparative observation with MRI and pathology of brain edema at the early stage of severe burn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between MRI features and pathology in brain edema at the early stage of severe burn (50% TBSA Ⅲ degree) in dogs.Methods: Fifty-two dogs were randomized into control, simple burn (SB), burn plus sodium lactate (BSL), and burn plus glucose solution groups (BGS). The manifestation of the brain of control group was compared with that of burn groups at 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours postburn with MRI and pathological examination (gross appearance, electron microscopy and light microscopy).Results: The earliest findings of brain edema were seen at 12 hours after burn in BGS group, in which brain swelling was the main feature of MRI. The decrease of SIR on T1WI was not observed until it was exceeded 10%.Signal of T2WI increased by 8.29% at 24 hours after burn.It was difficult to distinguish the gray matter from the white matter at the boundary line, which became blurred later. Histological changes of brain edema were observed as early as 6 hours after burn, being accompanied by swelling of endothelial cells and peri-vescular astrocytes, and vacuolation took place in neurons at 12 hours after burn, with different degrees of necrosis of capillary endothelimn,neurons, and axons. These changes became more marked with elapse of time. The BGS group showed the most obvious changes mentioned above at 24 hours after burn.Conclusions: The model of the brain edema after severe burn has the feature of both vasogenic edema and cytotoxic edema on the MRI and pathology. Positive MRI findings lagged behind that of the pathomorphological changes.ed

  19. Comparing and contrasting observed adaptations in three deltas: the Ganges-Meghna-Brahmaputra, Mahanadi and Volta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, R. J.; Suckall, N.; Mensah, A.; Mondal, S.; Dey, S.; Hazra, S.

    2015-12-01

    In low and middle-income countries, many deltaic communities directly depend on the natural environment for income and well-being. Current environmental concerns that threaten deltaic communities, such as increasing salinity, sedimentation, erosion and subsidence are likely to be exacerbated by climate change and variability, for example sea-level rise, increased storminess and rising temperatures. Such changes, along with other social and environmental stressors, mean that communities must adapt. This paper outlines findings of a systematic review of the peer-reviewed and grey literature that examines observed adaptations in three deltas of differing sizes in various geographical contexts: the Ganges-Meghna-Brahmaputra in India and Bangladesh, the Mahanadi in India, and the Volta in Ghana. It compares and contrasts various elements of observed adaptations, including who is driving the adaptation, the beneficiaries, barriers to participation and evidence for maladaptation. The predominant drivers of adaptation vary from government (at state level in India and national level in Bangladesh) and NGOs (in Ghana). Autonomous adaptations are not widely reported in the literature from any of the deltas. In all three deltas there is a focus on supporting adaptation in farming rather than fishing; despite the fact that fisheries contribute to local food security as well as national economies. Lack of access to financial, natural, physical and human capital are common barriers to adaptation in all three deltas. Additionally the Indian literature in particular highlights the lack of coordination between different government departments, coupled with an excessively top-down (state-driven) approach to adaptation. Maladaptation is most commonly reported in the literature from Bangladesh, for example, loss of employment of inland fishermen in embanked areas. The paper concludes by highlighting some of the implications of these findings for adaptation policy in deltas.

  20. Coagulation Profile Dynamics in Pediatric Patients with Cushing Syndrome: A Prospective, Observational Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, Leah; Lodish, Maya; Tirosh, Amit; Chittiboina, Prashant; Keil, Meg; Lyssikatos, Charlampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Feelders, Richard A; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the association between Cushing syndrome and hypercoagulability in children. A prospective, observational study was performed of 54 patients with Cushing syndrome, 15.1 ± 3.9 years, treated at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Coagulation profiles were taken before and 6-12 months after surgery and compared with18 normocortisolemic children, 13.7 ± 3.6 years. At baseline, patients with Cushing syndrome had greater levels of the procoagulant factor VIII (FVIII) vs controls (145 IU/dL ± 84 vs 99 ± 47, P = .04); 6-12 months after surgery, FVIII levels decreased to 111 ± 47, P = .05. Patients with Cushing syndrome had greater levels of the antifibrinolytic α2-antiplasmin, 96 ± 17% vs 82 ± 26%, P = .015. After surgery, antifibrinolytic α2-antiplasmin levels decreased to 82 ± 24%, P Cushing syndrome vs controls at baseline, including protein C (138 ± 41% vs 84 ± 25%, P Cushing syndrome had elevated procoagulants, antifibrinolytics, and anticoagulants at baseline compared with controls; normalization of coagulation measures was seen after surgical cure. Despite the increase in anticoagulants, hypercortisolemia is associated with a hypercoagulable state in children, as is the case in adults. This finding has potential implications for prevention of venous thromboembolism in children with Cushing syndrome. ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT00001595. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Sir Charles Ballance: pioneer British neurological surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J L

    1999-03-01

    nerve regeneration and nerve grafting, and after many years of devoted research, he devised successful operations for facial nerve paralysis. For this and early vascular work, he is often credited as the first English surgeon to reintroduce classical Hunterian methods of experiment into surgery. He was honored as the founder and President of The Society of British Neurological Surgeons in 1926. Perhaps best known as a general and aural surgeon, Ballance was second only to Horsley in reputation as a pioneer British neurological surgeon. Described as a painstakingly slow but delicate and meticulous operator, Ballance made a contribution to neurosurgery and temporal bone surgery that was immense.

  2. Pioneering new approaches. Educating girls in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namuddu, K

    1993-01-01

    education. Women's groups are also questioning policies that bar girls from reentering school after a childhood pregnancy. Uganda has a program to help girls resume their studies after pregnancy, but not within the main educational system. Pioneering new approaches is occurring and the Rockefeller Foundation is taking the lead in an 18-member international donor group in supporting the promotion of female education.

  3. 76 FR 83 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Availability of Petition and Environmental Assessment for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Availability of Petition... has received a petition from Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., seeking a determination of...) from Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. (Pioneer) of Johnston, IA, seeking a determination...

  4. Comparative incidence of pregnancy outcomes in treated obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome: the NOH-APS observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier, Sylvie; Cochery-Nouvellon, Eva; Lavigne-Lissalde, Géraldine; Mercier, Erick; Marchetti, Tess; Balducchi, Jean-Pierre; Marès, Pierre; Gris, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-16

    The incidence of pregnancy outcomes for women with the purely obstetric form of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) treated with prophylactic low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) plus low-dose aspirin (LDA) has not been documented. We observed women without a history of thrombosis who had experienced 3 consecutive spontaneous abortions before the 10th week of gestation or 1 fetal loss at or beyond the 10th week. We compared the frequencies of complications during new pregnancies between treated women with APS (n = 513; LMWH + LDA) and women negative for antiphospholipid antibodies as controls (n = 791; no treatment). Among APS women, prior fetal loss was a risk factor for fetal loss, preeclampsia (PE), premature birth, and the occurrence of any placenta-mediated complication. Being positive for anticardiolipin immunoglobulin M antibodies was a risk factor for any placenta-mediated complication. Among women with a history of recurrent abortion, APS women were at a higher risk than other women of PE, placenta-mediated complications, and neonatal mortality. Among women with prior fetal loss, LMWH + LDA-treated APS women had lower pregnancy loss rates but higher PE rates than other women. Improved therapies, in particular better prophylaxis of late pregnancy complications, are urgently needed for obstetric APS and should be evaluated according to the type of pregnancy loss.

  5. A highly efficacious pediculicide based on dimeticone: Randomized observer blinded comparative trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Fabíola A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infestation with the human head louse (Pediculus humanus capitis occurs worldwide. Existing treatment options are limited, and reports of resistance to commonly used pediculicides have been increasing. In this trial we assessed the efficacy of a product containing a high (92% concentration of the silicone oil dimeticone (identical in composition to NYDA®, as compared to a 1% permethrin lotion. Methods Randomized, controlled, observer blinded clinical trial. Participants were recruited from a poor urban neighbourhood in Brazil where pediculosis capitis was highly prevalent. To minimize reinfestation during the trial, participants (145 children aged 5–15 years with head lice infestations were transferred to a holiday resort outside the endemic area for a period of 9 days. Two applications of dimeticone or 1% permethrin were done, seven days apart. Outcome measures were defined as cure (absence of vital head lice after first application and before and after second applications, degree of itching, cosmetic acceptability, and clinical pathology. Results Overall cure rates were: day 2 – dimeticone 94.5% (95% CI: 86.6% – 98.5% and permethrin 66.7% (95% CI: 54.6% – 77.3%; p Conclusion The dimeticone product is a safe and highly efficacious pediculicide. Due to its physical mode of action (interruption of the lice's oxygen supply of the central nervous system, development of resistance is unlikely. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN15117709.

  6. The main layers of the ionosphere of Venus as seen by Pioneer Venus Orbiter radio occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Jacob; Withers, Paul; Vogt, Marissa F.

    2016-10-01

    Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) performed numerous atmospheric experiments from 1978 to 1992. Radio occultation measurements were used to create vertical ionospheric electron density profiles extending as low as 100 km altitude; yielding data coverage across the V1 and V2 layers of the Venusian ionosphere, 125 and 140 km respectively. The PVO data give us a unique look at the ionosphere during solar maximum compared to later Venus missions. However, none of these ionospheric profiles were archived at the PDS nor have been available for comparison to Venus Express observations. We have extracted 120 PVO radio occultation profiles from published papers using a program to digitally read data from graphical images. Additionally, the NSSDC had 94 profiles, 63 of which were added to our dataset. The data from both sources were used in conjunction to analyze trends between solar activity and the characteristics of the V1 and V2 layers. The V1 layer, created by soft x-rays, should react more to changes in solar activity than the EUV created V2 layer. We intend to archive this data at the PDS so that the community can easily access digital measurements of the Venusian ionosphere at solar maximum.

  7. Sophus Peter Tromholt: an outstanding pioneer in auroral research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Moss

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Danish school teacher Sophus Peter Tromholt (1851–1896 was self-taught in physics, astronomy, and auroral sciences. Still, he was one of the brightest auroral researchers of the 19th century. He was the first scientist ever to organize and analyse correlated auroral observations over a wide area (entire Scandinavia moving away from incomplete localized observations. Tromholt documented the relation between auroras and sunspots and demonstrated the daily, seasonal and solar cycle-related variations in high-latitude auroral occurrence frequencies. Thus, Tromholt was the first ever to deduce from auroral observations the variations associated with what is now known as the auroral oval termed so by Khorosheva (1962 and Feldstein (1963 more than 80 yr later. He made reliable and accurate estimates of the heights of auroras several decades before this important issue was finally settled through Størmer's brilliant photographic technique. In addition to his three major scientific works (Tromholt, 1880a, 1882a, and 1885a, he wrote numerous short science notes and made huge efforts to collect historical auroral observations (Tromholt, 1898. Furthermore, Tromholt wrote a large number of popular science articles in newspapers and journals and made lecture tours all over Scandinavia and Germany, contributing to enhance the public educational level and awareness. He devoted most of his life to auroral research but as a self-taught scientist, he received little acclaim within the contemporary academic scientific society. With his non-academic background, trained at a college of education – not a university – he was never offered a position at a university or a research institution. However, Sophus Tromholt was an outstanding pioneer in auroral research.

  8. Hermann Karsten, pioneer of geologic mapping in northwestern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, K. R.

    2015-06-01

    In the late 19th century, a regional map of Nueva Granada (present-day Colombia, Panama and parts of Venezuela and Ecuador) was published by German botanist and geologist Hermann Karsten (1817-1908). Karsten's work was incorporated by Agustín Codazzi (1793-1859), an Italian who emigrated to Venezuela and Colombia to serve as a government cartographer and geographer, in his popular Atlas geográfico e histórico de la Republica de Colombia (1889). Geologic mapping and most observations provided in this 1889 atlas were taken from Karsten's Géologie de l'ancienne Colombie bolivarienne: Vénézuela, Nouvelle-Grenade et Ecuador (1886), as cited by Manual Paz and/or Felipe Pérez, who edited this edition of the atlas. Karsten defined four epochs in Earth history: Primera - without life - primary crystalline rocks, Segunda - with only marine life - chiefly sedimentary rocks, Tercera - with terrestrial quadrupeds and fresh water life forms life - chiefly sedimentary rocks, and Cuarta - mankind appears, includes diluvial (glacigenic) and post-diluvial terranes. He noted that Colombia is composed of chiefly of Quaternary, Tertiary and Cretaceous plutonic, volcanic and sedimentary rocks, and that Earth's internal heat (calor central) accounted, by escape of inner gases, for volcanism, seismicity and uplift of mountains. Karsten's regional mapping and interpretation thus constitutes the primary source and ultimate pioneering geologic research.

  9. Darwin and Mendel: who was the pioneer of genetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongsheng

    2005-01-01

    Although Mendel is now widely recognized as the founder of genetics, historical studies have shown that he did not in fact propose the modern concept of paired characters linked to genes, nor did he formulate the two "Mendelian laws" in the form now given. Furthermore, Mendel was accused of falsifying his data, and Mendelism has been met with scepticism because of its failure to provide scientific explanation for evolution, to furnish a basis for the process of genetic assimilation and to explain the inheritance of acquired characters, graft hybridization and many other facts. Darwin was the first to clearly describe almost all genetical phenomena of fundamental importance, and was the first to present a developmental theory of heredity--Pangenesis, which not only greatly influenced many subsequent theories of inheritance, particularly those of de Vries, Galton, Brooks and Weismann, but also tied all aspects of variation, heredity and development together, provided a mechanism for most of the observable facts, and is supported by increasing evidence. It has also been indicated that Darwin's influence on Mendel, primarily from The Origin, is evident. The word "gene" was derived from "pangen", itself a derivative of "Pangenesis" which Darwin had coined. It seems that Darwin should have been regarded as the pioneer, if not of transmissional genetics, of developmental genetics and molecular genetics.

  10. Three-dimensional simulations of gravitationally confined detonations compared to observations of SN 1991T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Kromer, Markus; Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, Franco; Marquardt, Kai; Fink, Michael; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Sim, Stuart A.; Taubenberger, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model has been proposed as a possible explosion mechanism for Type Ia supernovae in the single-degenerate evolution channel. It starts with ignition of a deflagration in a single off-centre bubble in a near-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf. Driven by buoyancy, the deflagration flame rises in a narrow cone towards the surface. For the most part, the main component of the flow of the expanding ashes remains radial, but upon reaching the outer, low-pressure layers of the white dwarf, an additional lateral component develops. This causes the deflagration ashes to converge again at the opposite side, where the compression heats fuel and a detonation may be launched. We first performed five three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the deflagration phase in 1.4 M⊙ carbon/oxygen white dwarfs at intermediate-resolution (2563 computational zones). We confirm that the closer the initial deflagration is ignited to the centre, the slower the buoyant rise and the longer the deflagration ashes takes to break out and close in on the opposite pole to collide. To test the GCD explosion model, we then performed a high-resolution (5123 computational zones) simulation for a model with an ignition spot offset near the upper limit of what is still justifiable, 200 km. This high-resolution simulation met our deliberately optimistic detonation criteria, and we initiated a detonation. The detonation burned through the white dwarf and led to its complete disruption. For this model, we determined detailed nucleosynthetic yields by post-processing 106 tracer particles with a 384 nuclide reaction network, and we present multi-band light curves and time-dependent optical spectra. We find that our synthetic observables show a prominent viewing-angle sensitivity in ultraviolet and blue wavelength bands, which contradicts observed SNe Ia. The strong dependence on the viewing angle is caused by the asymmetric distribution of the deflagration ashes

  11. Driving an electric vehicle. A sociological analysis on pioneer users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre, M. [EDF R and D, Electricite de France, Research and Development, 1 avenue du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Jemelin, C. [6T research bureau, 11 rue Duhesme, 75018 Paris (France); Louvet, N. [EPFL, Lausanne Federal Polytechnic School, 11 rue Duhesme, 75018 Paris (France)

    2011-11-15

    In most of the western countries, car is the prevalent means of transport for local mobility. At the same time, sensitivity to environmental issues is increasing, correlated to the consciousness that carbon dioxide emissions have to be reduced. In regard to these two trends (individual mobility and public opinions favourable to a reduction of carbon emissions), energy-efficient vehicles will probably develop in the future-car manufacturers actually prepare new offers for the mass market. Comparable cases have occurred during the last decades-probably more modest but full of learning: some local authorities have promoted innovations based on electric vehicles in the 1990s, and some people have chosen this kind of cars for their daily travels. This article deals with these pioneers (This article comes from a communication at the ECEEE Summer Study, June 2009, Panel 6: Energy efficiency in transport and mobility.). Reporting studies carried out in 2006 and 2008, we intend to identify the reasons of this innovative modal choice, to show the difficulties that electric vehicle drivers then encountered and to analyse the patterns of use that governed their mobility and their use of electric vehicles.

  12. Variation of Jupiter's aurora observed by Hisaki/EXCEED: 1. Observed characteristics of the auroral electron energies compared with observations performed using HST/STIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Badman, Sarah V.; Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; André, Nicolas; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Shiota, Daikou; Tadokoro, Hiroyasu; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Temporal variation of Jupiter's northern aurora is detected using the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics (EXCEED) on board JAXA's Earth-orbiting planetary space telescope Hisaki. The wavelength coverage of EXCEED includes the H2 Lyman and Werner bands at 80-148 nm from the entire northern polar region. The prominent periodic modulation of the observed emission corresponds to the rotation of Jupiter's main auroral oval through the aperture, with additional superposed -50%-100% temporal variations. The hydrocarbon color ratio (CR) adopted for the wavelength range of EXCEED is defined as the ratio of the emission intensity in the long wavelength range of 138.5-144.8 nm to that in the short wavelength range of 126.3-130 nm. This CR varies with the planetary rotation phase. Short- (within one planetary rotation) and long-term (> one planetary rotation) enhancements of the auroral power are observed in both wavelength ranges and result in a small CR variation. The occurrence timing of the auroral power enhancement does not clearly depend on the central meridian longitude. Despite the limitations of the wavelength coverage and the large field of view of the observation, the auroral spectra and CR-brightness distribution measured using EXCEED are consistent with other observations.

  13. William and Caroline Herschel pioneers in late 18th-century astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hoskin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This beautifully structured book presents the essentials of William and Caroline Herschel's pioneering achievements in late 18th-century astronomy. Michael Hoskin shows that William Herschel was the first observational cosmologist and one of the first observers to attack the sidereal universe beyond the solar system:Herschel built instruments far better than any being used at the royal observatory. Aided by his sister Caroline, he commenced a great systematic survey that led to his discovery of Uranus in 1781.Unlike observers before him, whose telescopes did not reveal them as astronomical obj

  14. Axogenesis in the antennal nervous system of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria revisited: the base pioneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Erica; Liu, Yu; Boyan, George

    2015-01-01

    The antennal nervous system of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria comprises two parallel pathways projecting to the brain, each pioneered early in embryogenesis by a pair of sibling cells located at the antennal tip. En route, the growth cones of pioneers from one pathway have been shown to contact a guidepost-like cell called the base pioneer. Its role in axon guidance remains unclear as do the cellular guidance cues regulating axogenesis in the other pathway supposedly without a base pioneer. Further, while the tip pioneers are known to delaminate from the antennal epithelium into the lumen, the origin of this base pioneer is unknown. Here, we use immunolabeling and immunoblocking methods to clarify these issues. Co-labeling against the neuron-specific marker horseradish peroxidase and the pioneer-specific cell surface glycoprotein Lazarillo identifies not only the tip pioneers but also a base pioneer associated with each of the developing antennal pathways. Both base pioneers co-express the mesodermal label Mes3, consistent with a lumenal origin, whereas the tip pioneers proved Mes3-negative confirming their affiliation with the ectodermal epithelium. Lazarillo antigen expression in the antennal pioneers followed a different temporal dynamic: continuous in the tip pioneers, but in the base pioneers, only at the time their filopodia and those of the tip pioneers first recognize one another. Immunoblocking of Lazarillo expression in cultured embryos disrupts this recognition resulting in misguided axogenesis in both antennal pathways.

  15. Development of density plumes of dissolved CO2: Comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Karen; Vosper, Hayley; Rochelle, Chris; Noy, Dave; Chadwick, Andy

    2014-05-01

    The long-term trapping of CO2 within deep geological storage reservoirs will be dependent upon CO2-water-rock geochemical reactions. The first, and most important, steps in this process will be dissolution of CO2 into the reservoir porewater and the transport of this dissolved CO2 through the reservoir. As part of the CO2CARE project we have investigated these via laboratory tests using a water-filled porous medium. Key experimental parameters were measured to determine system permeability, so that a high-resolution numerical model could be built in an attempt to reproduce the observed system behaviour. The Hele-Shaw cell comprised two glass sheets 65 cm wide and 36 cm high, separated by a spacing of 1.1 mm, and filled with closely-packed glass beads 0.4-0.6 mm in diameter. The surface of the glass was treated to prevent the formation of a higher permeability zone along this interface. A pH-sensitive dye was added to the pore-filling water to show where it had been acidified due to the presence of CO2. CO2 gas was introduced to a space at the top of the cell, which created a thin, diffusion-controlled boundary layer of CO2-rich water below the CO2-water interface. CO2 dissolution increased water density, resulting in gravitational instabilities and the formation of many small, downward-migrating plumes. Time-lapse photography was used to track the formation and progress of these plumes. As the plumes grew they increased in length relative to their width, and decreased in number over time. They also became more complex with time, splitting and forming several lobes, whose outer edges became more diffuse as they mixed with the CO2-poor water. The onset time of plume development and the horizontal wavelength (spacing) of the descending plumes are diagnostic measures of the system properties, notably permeability. They were analysed from the time-lapse images and expressed as probability density functions based on histograms of the observations. The derived

  16. Hydraulic architecture of two species differing in wood density: opposing strategies in co-occurring tropical pioneer trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine A. McCulloh; Daniel M. Johnson; Frederick C. Meinzer; Steven L. Voelker; Barbara Lachenbruch; Jean-Christophe. Domec

    2012-01-01

    Co-occurring species often have different strategies for tolerating daily cycles of water stress. One underlying parameter that can link together the suite of traits that enables a given strategy is wood density. Here we compare hydraulic traits of two pioneer species from a tropical forest in Panama that differ in wood density: Miconia argentea...

  17. Comparative analysis of decametre "drift pair" bursts observed in 2002 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volvach, Ya. S.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Koval, A. A.; Dorovskyy, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    We report about new observations of solar "drift pair" (DP) bursts by means of the UTR-2 radio telescope at frequencies 10-30 MHz. Our experimental data include both "forward" and "reverse" bursts with high frequency and time resolution. The records of 301 bursts, observed in 10-12 July of 2015, are investigated. The main properties of these bursts (frequency bandwidth, central frequency and others) have been analysed. In this report our main attention is paid to the comparison of our observations with the similar observations of decametre DPs performed earlier during 13-15 July of 2002 in the same frequency range. Common features of DPs in the two different pieces of data samples have been found. This may indicate the possible presence of stability in the frequency-time properties of decametre DPs from one cycle of solar activity to another.

  18. Interprofessional primary care team meetings: a qualitative approach comparing observations with personal opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Jerôme Jean Jacques; van Bokhoven, Marloes Amantia; Daniëls, Ramon; Lenzen, Stephanie Anna; van der Weijden, Trudy; Beurskens, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Background. The number of people with multiple chronic conditions requiring primary care services increases. Professionals from different disciplines collaborate and coordinate care to deal with the complex health care needs. There is lack of information on current practices regarding interprofessional team (IPT) meetings. Objectives. This study aimed to improve our understanding of the process of interprofessional collaboration in primary care team meetings in the Netherlands by observing the current practice and exploring personal opinions. Methods. Qualitative study involving observations of team meetings and interviews with participants. Eight different IPT meetings (n = 8) in different primary care practices were observed by means of video recordings. Experiences were explored by conducting individual semi-structured interviews (n = 60) with participants (i.e. health care professionals from different disciplines) of the observed team meetings. The data were analysed by means of content analysis. Results. Most participants expressed favourable opinions about their team meetings. However, observations showed that team meetings were more or less hectic, and lacked a clear structure and team coordinator or leader. There appears to be a discrepancy between findings from observations and interviews. From the interviews, four main themes were extracted: (1) Team structure and composition, (2) Patient-centredness, (3) Interaction and (4) Attitude and motivation. Conclusion. IPT meetings could benefit from improvements in structure, patient-centredness and leadership by the chairpersons. Given the discrepancy between observations and interviews, it would appear useful to improve team members’ awareness of aspects that could be improved before training them in dealing with specific challenges. PMID:28122925

  19. Using data assimilation to compare models of Mars and Venus atmospheres with observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Thomas; Forget, Francois; Millour, Ehouarn

    2016-10-01

    Data assimilation is a technique that optimally reconstructs a best estimate of the atmospheric state by combining observations and an a priori provided by a numerical model. The aim of data assimilation is to extrapolate in space and time observations of the atmosphere with the means of a model in order to recover the state of the atmosphere as completely and as accurately as possible.In this work, we employ a state-of-the-art Martian Global Climate Model to assimilate vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, airborne dust, and water ice clouds retrieved from observations of the Mars Climate Sounder onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The assimilation is carried out using an Ensemble Kalman Filter technique, that maps covariances between model variables. Therefore, observations of one variable (e.g. temperature) can be used to estimate other unobserved variables (e.g. winds), using covariances constructed from an ensemble of model simulations for which initial states slightly differ. Using this method, one can estimate dust from temperature observations only, confirming the presence of detached layers of dust in the atmosphere from their thermal signature. Then, the joint assimilation of temperature, dust, and water ice clouds shows that the performance of the assimilation is limited due to model biases, such as an incorrect phasing of the thermal tide and observed dust diurnal variations unexplained by a model. However, dust estimation makes possible the predictability of the atmosphere, up to around ten days in the most favorable cases, a great improvement over previous studies.Future developments for an improved assimilation strongly suggest to assimilate model parameters, such as the ones for the representation of parameterized atmospheric gravity waves.Also, in the light of the recent global observations of the Venusian atmosphere from the Akastuki spacecraft, the case for the first-ever assimilation of Venus will be made.

  20. A comparative study on 3-D solar wind structure observed by Ulysses and MHD simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xueshang; XIANG Changqing; ZHONG Dingkun; FAN Quanlin

    2005-01-01

    During Ulysses' first rapid pole-to-pole transit from September 1994 to June 1995, its observations showed that middle- or high-speed solar winds covered all latitudes except those between -20° and +20° near the ecliptic plane,where the velocity was 300-450 km/s. At poleward 40°,however, only fast solar winds at the speed of 700-870 km/s were observed. In addition, the transitions from low-speed wind to high-speed wind or vice versa were abrupt. In this paper, the large-scale structure of solar wind observed by Ulysses near solar minimum is simulated by using the three-dimensional numerical MHD model. The model combines TVD Lax-Friedrich scheme and MacCormack Ⅱ scheme and decomposes the calculation region into two regions: one from 1 to 22 Rs and the other from 18 Rs to 1 AU.Based on the observations of the solar photospheric magnetic field and an addition of the volumetric heating to MHD equations, the large-scale solar wind structure mentioned above is reproduced by using the three-dimensional MHD model and the numerical results are roughly consistent with Ulysses' observations. Our simulation shows that the initial magnetic field topology and the addition of volume heating may govern the bimodal structure of solar wind observed by Ulysses and also demonstrates that the three-dimensional MHD numerical model used here is efficient in modeling the large-scale solar wind structure.

  1. Comparing regional modeling (CHIMERE) and satellite observations of aerosols (PARASOL): Methodology and case study over Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromatas, Stavros

    2010-05-01

    S. Stromatas (1), S. Turquety (1), H. Chepfer (1), L. Menut (1), B. Bessagnet (2), JC Pere (2), D. Tanré (3) . (1) Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, CNRS/IPSL, École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, France, (2) INERIS, Institut National de l'Environnement Industriel et des Risques, Parc technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte, FRANCE, (3) Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique/CNRS Univ. des Sciences et Tech. de Lille, 59650 - Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. Atmospheric suspended particles (aerosols) have significant radiative and environmental impacts, affecting human health, visibility and climate. Therefore, they are regulated by air quality standards worldwide, and monitored by regional observation networks. Satellite observations vastly improve the horizontal and temporal coverage, providing daily distributions. Aerosols are currently estimated using aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals, a quantitative measure of the extinction of solar radiation by aerosol scattering and absorption between the point of observation and the top of the atmosphere. Even though remarkable progresses in aerosol modeling by chemistry-transport models (CTM) and measurement experiments have been made in recent years, there is still a significant divergence between the modeled and observed results. However, AOD retrievals from satellites remains a highly challenging task mostly because it depends on a variety of different parameters such as cloud contamination, surface reflectance contributions and a priori assumptions on aerosol types, each one of them incorporating its own difficulties. Therefore, comparisons between CTM and observations are often difficult to interpret. In this presentation, we will discuss comparisons between regional modeling (CHIMERE CTM) over Mexico and satellite observations obtained by the POLDER instrument embarked on PARASOL micro-satellite. After a comparison of the model AOD with the retrieved L2 AOD, we will present an alternative

  2. Solar Surface Emerging Flux Regions: A Comparative Study of Radiative MHD Modeling and Hinode SOT Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M.; Schüssler, M.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    We present results from three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations of the rise of buoyant magnetic flux tubes through the convection zone and into the photosphere. Due to the strong stratification of the convection zone, the rise results in a lateral expansion of the tube into a magnetic sheet, which acts as a reservoir for small-scale flux emergence events at the scale of granulation. The interaction of the convective downflows and the rising magnetic flux tube undulates it to form serpentine field lines that emerge into the photosphere. Observational characteristics of the simulated emerging flux regions are discussed in the context of new observations from Hinode SOT.

  3. Coagulation Profile Dynamics in Pediatric Patients with Cushing Syndrome: A Prospective, Observational Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birdwell, L. (Leah); M.B. Lodish (Maya Beth); Tirosh, A. (Amit); P. Chittiboina (Prashant); M. Keil (Mark); Lyssikatos, C. (Charlampos); Belyavskaya, E. (Elena); R.A. Feelders (Richard); C.A. Stratakis (Constantine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective To evaluate the association between Cushing syndrome and hypercoagulability in children. Study design A prospective, observational study was performed of 54 patients with Cushing syndrome, 15.1 ± 3.9 years, treated at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center.

  4. Comparing the model-simulated global warming signal to observations using empirical estimates of unforced noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    The comparison of observed global mean surface air temperature (GMT) change to the mean change simulated by climate models has received much attention. For a given global warming signal produced by a climate model ensemble, there exists an envelope of GMT values representing the range of possible un...

  5. Comparing Vignette Instruction and Assessment Tasks to Classroom Observations and Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Carolyn; Maeder, Dale W.

    2011-01-01

    The growing body of research on the use of vignettes in teacher education courses suggests that vignette-based instruction and assessment tasks may represent a viable alternative to traditional forms of scaffolded instruction and reflective essays following classroom observations, thereby creating a bridge between college and K-12 classrooms for…

  6. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  7. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  8. Comparing Global Atmospheric CO2 Flux and Transport Models with Remote Sensing (and Other) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. R.; Collatz, G. J.; Pawson, S.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wofsy, S. C.; Andrews, A. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report recent progress derived from comparison of global CO2 flux and transport models with new remote sensing and other sources of CO2 data including those from satellite. The overall objective of this activity is to improve the process models that represent our understanding of the workings of the atmospheric carbon cycle. Model estimates of CO2 surface flux and atmospheric transport processes are required for initial constraints on inverse analyses, to connect atmospheric observations to the location of surface sources and sinks, to provide the basic framework for carbon data assimilation, and ultimately for future projections of carbon-climate interactions. Models can also be used to test consistency within and between CO2 data sets under varying geophysical states. Here we focus on simulated CO2 fluxes from terrestrial vegetation and atmospheric transport mutually constrained by analyzed meteorological fields from the Goddard Modeling and Assimilation Office for the period 2000 through 2009. Use of assimilated meteorological data enables direct model comparison to observations across a wide range of scales of variability. The biospheric fluxes are produced by the CASA model at 1x1 degrees on a monthly mean basis, modulated hourly with analyzed temperature and sunlight. Both physiological and biomass burning fluxes are derived using satellite observations of vegetation, burned area (as in GFED-3), and analyzed meteorology. For the purposes of comparison to CO2 data, fossil fuel and ocean fluxes are also included in the transport simulations. In this presentation we evaluate the model's ability to simulate CO2 flux and mixing ratio variability in comparison to remote sensing observations from TCCON, GOSAT, and AIRS as well as relevant in situ observations. Examples of the influence of key process representations are shown from both forward and inverse model comparisons. We find that the model can resolve much of the synoptic, seasonal, and interannual

  9. Duchenne De Boulogne: a pioneer in neurology and medical photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, André

    2005-08-01

    Guillaume-Benjamin-Amand Duchenne was born 200 years ago in Boulogne-sur-Mer (Pas-de-Calais, France). He studied medicine in Paris and became a physician in 1831. He practiced general medicine in his native town for about 11 years and then returned to Paris to initiate pioneering studies on electrical stimulation of muscles. Duchenne used electricity not only as a therapeutic agent, as it was commonly the case earlier in the 19th century, but chiefly as a physiological investigation tool to study the anatomy of the living body. Without formal appointment he visited hospital wards across Paris searching for rare cases of neuromuscular disorders. He built a portable electrical device that he used to functionally map all bodily muscles and to study their coordinating action in health and disease. He gave accurate descriptions of many neuromuscular disorders, including pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy to which his name is still attached (Duchenne muscular dystrophy). He also invented a needle system (Duchenne's histological harpoon) for percutaneous sampling of muscular tissue without anesthesia, a forerunner of today's biopsy. Duchenne summarized his work in two major treatises entitled De l'électrisation localisée (1855) and Physiologie des mouvements (1867). Duchenne's iconographic work stands at the crossroads of three major discoveries of the 19th century: electricity, physiology and photography. This is best exemplified by his investigation of the mechanisms of human physiognomy in which he used localized faradic stimulation to reproduce various forms of human facial expression. The album that complements his book on this issue is considered a true incunabulum of photography. Duchenne de Boulogne, a shy but hard-working, acute and ingenious observer, became one of most original clinicians of the 19th century. He died in Paris in 1875.

  10. Mental imagery of positive and neutral memories: A fMRI study comparing field perspective imagery to observer perspective imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grol, Maud; Vingerhoets, Guy; De Raedt, Rudi

    2017-02-01

    Imagery perspective can influence what information is recalled, processing style, and emotionality; however, the understanding of possible mechanisms mediating these observed differences is still limited. We aimed to examine differences between memory recall from a field perspective and observer perspective at the neurobiological level, in order to improve our understanding of what is underlying the observed differences at the behavioral level. We conducted a fMRI study in healthy individuals, comparing imagery perspectives during recall of neutral and positive autobiographical memories. Behavioral results revealed field perspective imagery of positive memories, as compared to observer perspective, to be associated with more positive feelings afterwards. At the neurobiological level, contrasting observer perspective to field perspective imagery was associated with greater activity, or less decrease relative to the control visual search task, in the right precuneus and in the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ). Greater activity in the right TPJ during an observer perspective as compared to field perspective could reflect performing a greater shift of perspective and mental state during observer perspective imagery than field perspective imagery. Differential activity in the precuneus may reflect that during observer perspective imagery individuals are more likely to engage in (self-) evaluative processing and visuospatial processing. Our findings contribute to a growing understanding of how imagery perspective can influence the type of information that is recalled and the intensity of the emotional response. Observer perspective imagery may not automatically reduce emotional intensity but this could depend on how the imagined situation is evaluated in relation to the self-concept.

  11. A comparative analysis of simulated and observed photosynthetic CO2 uptake in two coniferous forest canopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrom, A.; Jarvis, P.G.; Clement, R.

    2006-01-01

    Gross canopy photosynthesis (Pg) can be simulated with canopy models or retrieved from turbulent carbon dioxide (CO2) flux measurements above the forest canopy. We compare the two estimates and illustrate our findings with two case studies. We used the three-dimensional canopy model MAESTRA to si...

  12. Solar surface emerging flux regions: a comparative study of radiative MHD modeling and Hinode SOT observations

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, M C M; Tarbell, T D; Title, A M

    2008-01-01

    We present results from numerical modeling of emerging flux regions on the solar surface. The modeling was carried out by means of 3D radiative MHD simulations of the rise of buoyant magnetic flux tubes through the convection zone and into the photosphere. Due to the strong stratification of the convection zone, the rise results in a lateral expansion of the tube into a magnetic sheet, which acts as a reservoir for small-scale flux emergence events at the scale of granulation. The interaction of the convective downflows and the rising magnetic flux undulates it to form serpentine field lines emerging into the photosphere. Observational characteristics including the pattern of emerging flux regions, the cancellation of surface flux and associated high speed downflows, the convective collapse of photospheric flux tubes, the appearance of anomalous darkenings, the formation of bright points and the possible existence of transient kilogauss horizontal fields are discussed in the context of new observations from t...

  13. June 13, 2013 U.S. East Coast Meteotsunami: Comparing a Numerical Model With Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Becker, N. C.; Weinstein, S.; Whitmore, P.; Knight, W.; Kim, Y.; Bouchard, R. H.; Grissom, K.

    2013-12-01

    On June 13, 2013, a tsunami struck the U.S. East Coast and caused several reported injuries. This tsunami occurred after a derecho moved offshore from North America into the Atlantic Ocean. The presence of this storm, the lack of a seismic source, and the fact that tsunami arrival times at tide stations and deep ocean-bottom pressure sensors cannot be attributed to a 'point-source' suggest this tsunami was caused by atmospheric forces, i.e., a meteotsunami. In this study we attempt to reproduce the observed phenomenon using a numerical model with idealized atmospheric pressure forcing resembling the propagation of the observed barometric anomaly. The numerical model was able to capture some observed features of the tsunami at some tide stations, including the time-lag between the time of pressure jump and the time of tsunami arrival. The model also captures the response at a deep ocean-bottom pressure gauge (DART 44402), including the primary wave and the reflected wave. There are two components of the oceanic response to the propagating pressure anomaly, inverted barometer response and dynamic response. We find that the dynamic response over the deep ocean to be much smaller than the inverted barometer response. The time lag between the pressure jump and tsunami arrival at tide stations is due to the dynamic response: waves generated and/or reflected at the shelf-break propagate shoreward and amplify due to the shoaling effect. The evolution of the derecho over the deep ocean (propagation direction and intensity) is not well defined, however, because of the lack of data so the forcing used for this study is somewhat speculative. Better definition of the pressure anomaly through increased observation or high resolution atmospheric models would improve meteotsunami forecast capabilities.

  14. A Multi-Scale Analysis of Namibian Rainfall: Comparing TRMM Satellite Data and Ground Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X.; Wang, L.; Pan, M.; Kaseke, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Rainfall is critically important in dryland regions, as it is the major source of water for natural vegetation as well as agriculture and livestock production. However, the lack of ground observations has long been a major obstacle to the study of rainfall patterning in drylands. In this study, a continuous 6-year record of ground observations collected at Weltevrede Guest Farm Namibia was used to evaluate the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 0.25-degree (~25 km) 3-hourly satellite rainfall estimates for the period of 2008-2013 for two locations. The agreement between ground and satellite rainfall data was generally good at annual scales but a large variation was observed at the hourly scale. A trend analysis was carried out using bias-corrected annual satellite data (1998-2013) to examine the long-term patterns in rainfall amount, intensity, frequency and seasonal variations. Our results suggest that satellite rainfall estimates offer reasonable performance at annual scale. The preliminary trend analyses showed significant changes in frequency, but not in intensity or total amount in one of the two locations during the rainy season (November - March), but not in the other, emphasizing the spatial variability of the dryland rainfall.

  15. Low-frequency waves at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Observations compared to numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenders, C.; Perschke, C.; Goetz, C.; Richter, I.; Motschmann, U.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2016-10-01

    Context. A new type of low-frequency wave was detected by the magnetometer of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium at the comet during the initial months after the arrival of the Rosetta spacecraft at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This large-amplitude, nearly continuous wave activity is observed in the frequency range from 30 mHz to 80 mHz where 40 mHz to 50 mHz is the dominant frequency. This type of low frequency is not closely related to the gyrofrequency of newborn cometary ions, which differs from previous wave activity observed in the interaction region of comets with the solar wind. Aims: This work aims to reveal a global view on the wave activity region using simulations of the comet-solar wind interaction region. Parameters, such as wavelength, propagation direction, and propagation patterns, are within the focus of this study. While the Rosetta observations only provide local information, numerical simulations provide further information on the global wave properties. Methods: Standard hybrid simulations were applied to the comet-solar wind interaction scenario. In the model, the ions were described as particles, which allows us to describe kinetic processes of the ions. The electrons were described as a fluid. Results: The simulations exhibit a threefold wave structure of the interaction region. A Mach cone and a Whistler wing are observed downstream of the comet. The third kind of wave activity found are low-frequency waves at 97 mHz, which corresponds to the waves observed by Richter et al. (2015, Ann. Geophys., 33, 1031). These waves are caused by the initial pick-up of the cometary ions that are perpendicular to the solar wind flow and in the interplanetary magnetic field direction. The associated electric current becomes unstable. The simulations show that wave activity is only detectable in the + E hemisphere and that the Mach cone and whistler wings need to be distinguished from the newly found instability driven wave activity. The movie associated to

  16. "Mid-Week Pictorial": Pioneer American Photojournalism Magazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Keith

    In 1914 (22 years before the inception of "Life" magazine), the "New York Times" began publishing "Mid-Week Pictorial" to absorb a flood of war pictures pouring in from Europe. Several sociological and technological forces shaped "Mid-Week Pictorial" as a pioneer of American photojournalism magazines,…

  17. Greenness: Pioneering a New Path of Ecological Civilization Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    liang Yong; Gong Jianfei

    2015-01-01

    In May 2015,The Opinion on Accelerating Ecological Civilization Construction by the CPC Central Committee and the State Council for the first time conceives the concept of greenness,and requests the coordinate promotion of new-type industrialization,urbanization,informationization,cultural modernization and greenness.Greenness is a profound innovation from theory to practice,pioneers a new path of

  18. Comparing simulated PSC optical properties with CALIPSO observations during the 2010 Antarctic winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunqian; Toon, Owen B.; Pitts, Michael C.; Lambert, Alyn; Bardeen, Charles; Kinnison, Douglas E.

    2017-01-01

    We simulate polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) during the Antarctic winter of 2010 using the Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model/Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (SD-WACCM/CARMA) model. The current PSC model contains microphysical schemes for supercooled ternary solutions (STS) and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles, as well as a prognostic treatment for PSC ice particles and dehydration. Our simulations and CALIPSO satellite data suggest two major NAT particle formation mechanisms. The first mechanism is the nucleation of NAT from STS. Our model, with homogeneous nucleation rates of NAT from STS constrained by observations from the Arctic winter of 2010-2011, reproduces optical properties observed by CALIPSO over Antarctica in May and the timing of denitrification observed by the Microwave Limb Sounder within their uncertainties. On the other hand, the CALIPSO data indicate that our simulations are missing clouds containing small NAT particles with large number densities. We suggest these particles are most likely to form from ice clouds or STS in gravity waves, as found by previous investigations. The simulated cloud coverage agrees with the CALIPSO cloud coverage within a few percent on average with a correlation coefficient of 0.83. However, using the CALIPSO classification algorithm, simulated ice clouds often fall into Mix categories under the denitrified and dehydrated conditions. The model needs an improved ice microphysical representation, not only to allow ice particles to be a source of NAT but also to provide information on ice cloud particle number and size so that ice cloud optical properties can be more precisely calculated for comparison with CALIPSO data.

  19. A comparative analysis of the observed white dwarf cooling sequence from globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Campos, Fabíola; Romero, A D; Kepler, S O; Ourique, G; Costa, J E S; Bonatto, C J; Winget, D E; Montgomery, M H; Pacheco, T A; Bedin, L R

    2015-01-01

    We report our study of features at the observed red end of the white dwarf cooling sequences for three Galactic globular clusters: NGC\\,6397, 47\\,Tucanae and M\\,4. We use deep colour-magnitude diagrams constructed from archival Hubble Space Telescope (ACS) to systematically investigate the blue turn at faint magnitudes and the age determinations for each cluster. We find that the age difference between NGC\\,6397 and 47\\,Tuc is 1.98$^{+0.44}_{-0.26}$\\,Gyr, consistent with the picture that metal-rich halo clusters were formed later than metal-poor halo clusters. We self-consistently include the effect of metallicity on the progenitor age and the initial-to-final mass relation. In contrast with previous investigations that invoked a single white dwarf mass for each cluster, the data shows a spread of white dwarf masses that better reproduce the shape and location of the blue turn. This effect alone, however, does not completely reproduce the observational data - the blue turn retains some mystery. In this contex...

  20. Intraguild predation in pioneer predator communities of alpine glacier forelands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raso, Lorna; Sint, Daniela; Mayer, Rebecca; Plangg, Simon; Recheis, Thomas; Brunner, Silvia; Kaufmann, Rüdiger; Traugott, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Pioneer communities establishing themselves in the barren terrain in front of glacier forelands consist principally of predator species such as carabid beetles and lycosid spiders. The fact that so many different predators can co-inhabit an area with no apparent primary production was initially explained by allochthonous material deposited in these forelands. However, whether these populations can be sustained on allochthonous material alone is questionable and recent studies point towards this assumption to be flawed. Intraguild predation (IGP) might play an important role in these pioneer predator assemblages, especially in the very early successional stages where other prey is scarce. Here, we investigated IGP between the main predator species and their consumption of Collembola, an important autochthonous alternative prey, within a glacier foreland in the Ötztal (Austrian Alps). Multiplex PCR and stable isotope analysis were used to characterize the trophic niches in an early and late pioneer stage over 2 years. Results showed that intraguild prey was consumed by all invertebrate predators, particularly the larger carabid species. Contrary to our initial hypothesis, the DNA detection frequency of IGP prey was not significantly higher in early than in late pioneer stage, which was corroborated by the stable isotope analysis. Collembola were the most frequently detected prey in all of the predators, and the overall prey DNA detection patterns were consistent between years. Our findings show that IGP appears as a constant in these pioneer predator communities and that it remains unaffected by successional changes. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Quantifying the Hawthorne Effect in Hand Hygiene Compliance Through Comparing Direct Observation With Automated Hand Hygiene Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagel, Stefan; Reischke, Jana; Kesselmeier, Miriam; Winning, Johannes; Gastmeier, Petra; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Scherag, André; Pletz, Mathias W

    2015-08-01

    To quantify the Hawthorne effect of hand hygiene performance among healthcare workers using direct observation. Prospective observational study. Intensive care unit, university hospital. Direct observation of hand hygiene compliance over 48 audits of 2 hours each. Simultaneously, hand hygiene events (HHEs) were recorded using electronic alcohol-based handrub dispensers. Directly observed and electronically recorded HHEs during the 2 hours of direct observation were compared using Spearman correlations and Bland-Altman plots. To quantify the Hawthorne effect, we compared the number of electronically recorded HHEs during the direct observation periods with the re-scaled electronically recorded HHEs in the 6 remaining hours of the 8-hour working shift. A total of 3,978 opportunities for hand hygiene were observed during the 96 hours of direct observation. Hand hygiene compliance was 51% (95% CI, 49%-53%). There was a strong positive correlation between directly observed compliance and electronically recorded HHEs (ρ=0.68 [95% CI, 0.49-0.81], Phand hygiene performance.

  2. Comment to "Recent Climate Observations Compared to Projections" by Rahmstorf et al

    CERN Document Server

    Kramm, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    It is shown in this comment that considering the Mauna Loa observation of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and the mean near surface temperature anomalies for the period from the beginning of the seventies to recent years only is, clearly, a source of misinterpretation. If we consider the whole period of available data (1958 - 2004), we obtain results which differ from those presented by Rahmstorf et al. It is also shown that in 1988 when the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change (IPCC) of the United Nations and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) was established there was certainly no correlation between the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and the mean near surface temperature anomalies, neither on the annual time scale nor on the monthly time scale.

  3. Comparative study of social skills observation of twin with and without visual impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Severino Lopes da Costa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The general aim was to describe and characterize the social performances of two identical twins aged ten years old: one blind and one sighted. The data were obtained by filming the children during free situations. According to a protocol for observing the free situations, the films were assessed so that the children’s performances enabled to infer the categories of social skills. The results showed that the sighted child presented a wider and more refined repertoire of social skills in relation to her sister. From the data, it is possible to conclude, in this case, that blind and sighted children have distinct social skills repertories, and the existing differences can be related to the blind variable as well as to the differences in the way the environment stimulates the children.

  4. Using Islands to Systematically Compare Satellite Observations to Models and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, S. C.; Robinson, F.; Gerstle, D.; Liu, C.; Kirshbaum, D. J.; Hernandez-Deckers, D.; Li, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite observations are our most voluminous, and perhaps most important source of information on atmospheric convective behavior. However testing models is quite difficult, especially with satellites in low Earth orbits, due to several problems including infrequent sampling, the chaotic nature of convection (which means actual storms will always differ from modeled ones even with perfect models), model initialization, and uncertain boundary conditions. This talk presents work using forcing by islands of different sizes as a strategy for overcoming these problems. We examine the systematic dependence of different characteristics of convection with island size, as a target for simple theories of convection and the sea breeze, and for CRMs (cloud resolving models). We find some nonintuitive trends of behavior with size -- some of which we can reproduce with the WRF CRM, and some which we cannot.

  5. Photospheric Magnetic Flux Emergence: A comparative study between Hinode/SOT Observations and MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Tarbell, T. D.

    2007-12-01

    With high angular resolution, high temporal cadence and a stable point spread function, the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode satellite is the ideal instrument for the study of magnetic flux emergence and its manifestations on the solar surface. In this presentation, we focus on the development of ephemeral regions and small active regions. In many instances, SOT has been able to capture the entire emergence process from beginning to end: i.e. from the initial stages of flux appearance in granule interiors, through the intermediate stages of G-band bright point formation, and finally to the coalescence of small vertical flux elements to form pores. To investigate the physics of the flux emergence process, we performed 3D numerical MHD simulations with the MURaM code. The models are able to reproduce, and help us explain, various observational signatures of magnetic flux emergence.

  6. 76 FR 33306 - Medicare Program; Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model, Request for Applications; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... Care Organization Model: Request for Applications.'' FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Maria Alexander... http://innovations.cms.gov/areas-of-focus/seamless-and-coordinated-care-models/pioneer-aco... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Pioneer Accountable...

  7. A Comparative Study of Dark Energy Constraints from Current Observational Data

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yun; Mukherjee, Pia

    2012-01-01

    We examine how dark energy constraints from current observational data depend on the analysis methods used: the analysis of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), and that of galaxy clustering data. We generalize the flux-averaging analysis method of SNe Ia to allow correlated errors of SNe Ia, in order to reduce the systematic bias due to weak lensing of SNe Ia. We find that flux-averaging leads to larger errors on dark energy and cosmological parameters if only SN Ia data are used. When SN Ia data (the latest compilation by the SNLS team) are combined with WMAP 7 year results (in terms of our Gaussian fits to the probability distributions of the CMB shift parameters), the latest Hubble constant (H_0) measurement using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and gamma ray burst (GRB) data, flux-averaging of SNe Ia increases the concordance with other data, and leads to significantly tighter constraints on the dark energy density at z=1, and the cosmic curvature \\Omega_k. The galaxy clustering measurements of H(z=0.35)r_s(z_...

  8. Definition of Saturn's magnetospheric model parameters for the Pioneer 11 flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a description of a method for selection parameters for a global paraboloid model of Saturn's magnetosphere. The model is based on the preexisting paraboloid terrestrial and Jovian models of the magnetospheric field. Interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere, i.e. the magnetotail current system, and the magnetopause currents screening all magnetospheric field sources, is taken into account. The input model parameters are determined from observations of the Pioneer 11 inbound flyby.

  9. Charles Wilberforce Daniels, FRCP (1862-1927): underrated pioneer of tropical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G C

    2002-03-01

    Charles Wilberforce Daniels was a major pioneer in the early days of the newly-formed medical specialism--tropical medicine. At the London School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) of which he was a leading stalwart, he took an active part in research, teaching and administration. But like others in the new discipline he spent a great deal of time at various tropical locations: Fiji, British Guiana--where he made important observations on various forms of filariasis-- east Africa, and Malaya. However, his most important research contribution was arguably confirmation of Ronald Ross' 1898 discovery of the complete life-cycle of avian malaria, in Calcutta.

  10. Frugivory and the effects of ingestion by bats on the seed germination of three pioneering plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho-Ricardo, Maria C.; Uieda, Wilson; Fonseca, Renata Cristina B.; Rossi, Marcelo N.

    2014-02-01

    The dispersion and seedling establishment of pioneering plants can be favoured by the presence of frugivorous bats because the bats usually improve seed germination after ingestion. Although seed germinability is known to vary greatly after ingestion by different bats, the relative contribution of each bat species to seed germination within plant communities is poorly understood. In this study, we first determined the fauna of frugivorous bats in a semideciduous seasonal forest remnant in southern Brazil and subsequently identified the plant species of the seeds passed through their guts. Second, the germination performance (i.e., germination percentage and speed) of the seeds of three pioneering plants (Piper aduncum, Piper hispidinervum and Solanum granuloso-leprosum) ingested by the most abundant bats was compared with that of the non-ingested seeds (seeds collected from fruits). Additionally, the effects on seed germination of different bat species were compared. During one year, five species of frugivorous bats were caught, and the seeds of eleven identifiable plant species (not counting those of undetermined species) were found in their faeces. We found that the germination performance of the seeds of Piper species was significantly enhanced after ingestion by bats, whereas S. granuloso-leprosum seeds had neutral or reduced germinability when seeds in faeces were compared with pulp-removed seeds. Our results revealed that the bat species that were captured exerted different effects upon seed germination; such a disparity is expected to result in different rates of early establishment of these pioneer plants in tropical forests, most likely affecting forest composition and structure, particularly during the initial stages of succession.

  11. Comparing Foreshock Characteristics and Foreshock Forecasting in Observed and Simulated Earthquake Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In our previous papers (Ogata et al., 1995, 1996, 2012; GJI), we characterized foreshock activity in Japan, and then presented a model that forecasts the probability that one or more earthquakes form a foreshock sequence; then we tested prospectively foreshock probabilities in the JMA catalog. In this talk, I compare the empirical results with results for synthetic catalogs in order to clarify whether or not these results are consistent with the description of the seismicity by a superposition of background activity and epidemic-type aftershock sequences (ETAS models). This question is important, because it is still controversially discussed whether the nucleation process of large earthquakes is driven by seismically cascading (ETAS-type) or by aseismic accelerating processes. To explore the foreshock characteristics, I firstly applied the same clustering algorithms to real and synthetic catalogs and analyzed the temporal, spatial and magnitude distributions of the selected foreshocks, to find significant differences particularly in the temporal acceleration and magnitude dependence. Finally, I calculated forecast scores based on a single-link cluster algorithm which could be appropriate for real-time applications. I find that the JMA catalog yields higher scores than all synthetic catalogs and that the ETAS models having the same magnitude sequence as the original catalog performs significantly better (more close to the reality) than ETAS-models with randomly picked magnitudes.

  12. Patient satisfaction and side effects in primary care: An observational study comparing homeopathy and conventional medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurneysen André

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study is part of a nationwide evaluation of complementary medicine in Switzerland (Programme Evaluation of Complementary Medicine PEK and was funded by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health. The main objective of this study is to investigate patient satisfaction and perception of side effects in homeopathy compared with conventional care in a primary care setting. Methods We examined data from two cross-sectional studies conducted in 2002–2003. The first study was a physician questionnaire assessing structural characteristics of practices. The second study was conducted on four given days during a 12-month period in 2002/2003 using a physician and patient questionnaire at consultation and a patient questionnaire mailed to the patient one month later (including Europep questionnaire. The participating physicians were all trained and licensed in conventional medicine. An additional qualification was required for medical doctors providing homeopathy (membership in the Swiss association of homeopathic physicians SVHA. Results A total of 6778 adult patients received the questionnaire and 3126 responded (46.1%. Statistically significant differences were found with respect to health status (higher percentage of chronic and severe conditions in the homeopathic group, perception of side effects (higher percentage of reported side effects in the conventional group and patient satisfaction (higher percentage of satisfied patients in the homeopathic group. Conclusion Overall patient satisfaction was significantly higher in homeopathic than in conventional care. Homeopathic treatments were perceived as a low-risk therapy with two to three times fewer side effects than conventional care

  13. The (Political Pursuit of Victim Voice:(Comparative Observations on the Dutch Draft on the Adviesrecht

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée Kool

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Since contemporary victims’ policy features the pursuit of procedural justice, the criminal justice authorities have introduced procedural arrangements to serve victims’ voice. Western states use (some form of Victim Impact Statements, providing crime victims with room to inform the courts about the consequences of the crime. Nevertheless, victim voice is contested since it creates an imagery of bias and might cause repeated victimisaton. Indeed, victimologists point at the heterogeneity of victims’ needs, stating that the topical focus on victim voice executed during trial proceedings is one-sighted. Notwithstanding this critique, the Dutch legislator has recently lodged a proposal to introduce a so-called adviesrecht, encompassing the full scheme of the court’s decision-making (guilt and truth finding. Since the Dutch use non-bifurcated trial proceedings, the adviesrecht might have serious repercussions for the standard of a fair trial. A comparative (legal perspective on the (use of the Victim Impact Statement and the Victim Statement of Opinion as used in the United Stated of America appears helpful to expose the potential repercussions of extended victim voice in terms of procedural justice.

  14. Effect of anti-biofouling potential of multi-walled carbon nanotubes-filled polydimethylsiloxane composites on pioneer microbial colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Lang, Yanhe; Sun, Qian; Liang, Shuang; Liu, Yongkang; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, two carbon nanotube (CNT) nanofillers, namely the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and the carboxyl-modified MWCNTs (cMWCNTs), were introduced into the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix respectively, in order to produce the PDMS composites with reinforced anti-biofouling properties. The anti-biofouling capacity of the silicone-based coatings, including the unfilled PDMS (P0), the MWCNTs-filled PDMS (PM) and the cMWCNTs-filled PDMS (PC), was examined via the field assays conducted in Weihai, China. The effect of different silicone-based coatings on the dynamic variations of the pioneer microbial-community diversity was analyzed using the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique. The PM and PC surfaces have exhibited excellent anti-biofouling properties in contrast to that of the PDMS surface, with extremely low attachment of the early colonizers, such as juvenile invertebrates, seaweeds and algae sporelings. The PM and PC surfaces can effectively prevent biofouling for more than 12 weeks. These combined results suggest that the incorporation of MWCNTs or cMWCNTs into the PDMS matrix can dramatically reinforce its anti-biofouling properties. The SSCP analysis reveals that compared with the PDMS surfaces, the PM and PC surfaces have strong modulating effect on the pioneer prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities, particularly on the colonization of pioneer eukaryotic microbes. The significantly reduced pioneer eukaryotic-community diversity may contribute to the weakening of the subsequent colonization of macrofoulers.

  15. Comparative approaches on the shops metallurgists for the modern viniculture. The pioneer Antonio Baldé, Gil Miret and Carlos Berri in Mendoza Aproximaciones comparativas sobre los talleres metalúrgicos para la vitivinicultura moderna. Los pioneros Antonio Baldé, Gil Miret y Carlos Berri en Mendoza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pérez Romagnoli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a comparison among the main characteristics of the two shops pioneer metallurgists in the production of instruments and equipment for wineries and industrial stills, in the beginnings of the modern viniculture in Mendoza . The Catalan partners Antonio Baldé and Gil Miret began in 1885 and the Italian Carlos Berri in 1888. A general panorama is presented on the equipment of the shops and the objects produced, the characteristics of the labor, the formation in metallurgy of the proprietors, the insert of the two firms in the region, a reference to other economic activities developed by the managers and some complementary questions.Este trabajo propone una comparación entre las características principales de los dos talleres metalúrgicos pioneros en la producción de instrumentos y equipamiento para bodegas y destilerías industriales, en los comienzos de la vitivinicultura moderna en Mendoza. Los socios catalanes Antonio Baldé y Gil Miret comenzaron en 1885 y el italiano Carlos Berri en 1888. Se presenta un panorama general sobre el equipamiento de los talleres y los objetos que producían, las características de la mano de obra, la formación metalúrgica de los propietarios, la inserción de las dos firmas en la región, una referencia a otras actividades económicas desarrolladas por los empresarios y algunas cuestiones complementarias.

  16. Ventricular synchronicity: observations comparing pulse flow and tissue Doppler assessment in a Chinese healthy adult cohort

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUAN Xin; ZHU Tian-gang; GUO Shi; MA Jian-xin; WANG Xin; GUO Ji-hong

    2012-01-01

    Background Mechanical asynchrony is an important parameter in predicting the response to cardiac resynchronization therapy,but detailed knowledge about cardiac timing in healthy persons is scarce.Therefore,in the current study,we sought to investigate the physiological status of interventricular synchronicity using pulse wave flow and tissue Doppler imaging in a healthy Chinese population.Methods Eighty-eight healthy volunteers underwent standard flow and tissue Doppler echocardiographic examinations.Ventricular inflow and outflow pulse wave flow Doppler patterns were recorded together with annulus pulse tissue Doppler imaging.Time intervals from the beginning of the QRS complex to the onset,peak and end of each wave were measured.Results The onsets of systole between left and right ventricles were highly synchronized by both imaging modalities.However,the left ventricle reached the peak flow ejection and peak mechanical contraction earlier than the right ventricle,(165.61±26.23) ms vs.(204.3±34.55) ms (P <0.01) and (133.62±26.19) ms vs.(191.25±38.47) ms (P <0.01).Time to peak early diastolic relaxation was earlier in the left ventricle than in the right heart,(500.23±56.52) me vs.(524.94±47.42) ms (P <0.01).Conclusions Left and right ventricles were well synchronized at the onsets of systole and diastole even though interventricular peak systolic and peak early diastolic dyssynchrony was observed in healthy people by pulse wave Doppler imaging.In addition,diastolic timing events were slightly affected by age and gender.

  17. Dame Sheila Sherlock: pioneer in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-04-01

    Within living memory of some of us, liver disease was a Cinderella subject. If you look up the first edition of the standard medical textbook of the time, Sir William Osler's 'Principles and Practice of Medicine', published in 1892, you will find a mere 24 of its 1079 pages devoted to the liver, compared with 38 pages on typhoid fever alone; and matters hardly changed throughout the first half of the 20th century. Although 'cirrhosis' and 'hepatitis' were well recognised conditions when I was a house surgeon in 1948, their classification, aetiologies, detailed pathology and management were little understood, while laboratory investigations of the liver diseases were few and non-specific.

  18. Comparing the invasibility of experimental "reefs" with field observations of natural reefs and artificial structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Dafforn

    Full Text Available Natural systems are increasingly being modified by the addition of artificial habitats which may facilitate invasion. Where invaders are able to disperse from artificial habitats, their impact may spread to surrounding natural communities and therefore it is important to investigate potential factors that reduce or enhance invasibility. We surveyed the distribution of non-indigenous and native invertebrates and algae between artificial habitats and natural reefs in a marine subtidal system. We also deployed sandstone plates as experimental 'reefs' and manipulated the orientation, starting assemblage and degree of shading. Invertebrates (non-indigenous and native appeared to be responding to similar environmental factors (e.g. orientation and occupied most space on artificial structures and to a lesser extent reef walls. Non-indigenous invertebrates are less successful than native invertebrates on horizontal reefs despite functional similarities. Manipulative experiments revealed that even when non-indigenous invertebrates invade vertical "reefs", they are unlikely to gain a foothold and never exceed covers of native invertebrates (regardless of space availability. Community ecology suggests that invertebrates will dominate reef walls and algae horizontal reefs due to functional differences, however our surveys revealed that native algae dominate both vertical and horizontal reefs in shallow estuarine systems. Few non-indigenous algae were sampled in the study, however where invasive algal species are present in a system, they may present a threat to reef communities. Our findings suggest that non-indigenous species are less successful at occupying space on reef compared to artificial structures, and manipulations of biotic and abiotic conditions (primarily orientation and to a lesser extent biotic resistance on experimental "reefs" explained a large portion of this variation, however they could not fully explain the magnitude of differences.

  19. Polarization data from SCIAMACHY limb backscatter observations compared to vector radiative transfer model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Liebing

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available SCIAMACHY is a passive imaging spectrometer onboard ENVISAT, designed to obtain trace gas abundances from measured radiances and irradiances in the UV to SWIR range in nadir, limb and occultation viewing modes. Its grating spectrometer introduces a substantial sensitivity to the polarization of the incoming light with nonnegligible effects on the radiometric calibration. To be able to correct for the polarization sensitivity, SCIAMACHY utilizes broadband Polarization Measurement Devices (PMDs. While for the nadir viewing mode the measured atmospheric polarization has been validated against POLDER data (Tilstra and Stammes, 2007, 2010, a similar validation study regarding the limb viewing mode has not yet been performed. This paper aims at an assessment of the quality of the SCIAMACHY limb polarization data. Since limb polarization measurements by other air- or spaceborne instruments in the spectral range of SCIAMACHY are not available, a comparison with radiative transfer simulations by SCIATRAN V3.1(Rozanov et al., 2012 using a wide range of atmospheric parameters is performed. SCIATRAN is a vector radiative transfer model (VRTM capable of performing calculations of the multiply scattered radiance in a~spherically symmetric atmosphere.

    The study shows that the limb polarization data exhibit a large systematic bias which is decreasing with wavelength. The most likely reason for this bias is an instrumental phase shift which changes the relative contributions of different Stokes vector components to the PMD signal as compared to on-ground calibration measurements. It is also shown that it is in principle feasible to recalibrate the polarization sensitivity using the in-flight data and the VRTM simulations, enabling also the monitoring of its degradation. Together with an optimization of the algorithm used to calculate the in-flight polarization data an improved polarization correction can increase the radiometric accuracy of SCIAMACHY

  20. Interannual sedimentary effluxes of alkalinity in the southern North Sea: Model results compared with summer observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetsch, Johannes; Kuehn, Wilfried; Six, Katharina

    2016-04-01

    Alkalinity generation in the sediment of the southern North Sea is the focus of several recent studies. One motivation for these efforts is the potentially enhanced buffering capacity of anthropogenic CO2 invasion into the corresponding pelagic system. An adaptation of a global multilayer sediment model (Heinze et al., 1999) in combination with a pelagic ecosystem model for shelf sea dynamics was used to study the benthic reactions on very different annual cycles (2001 - 2009) including the River Elbe summer flooding in 2002. The focus of this study is the efflux of alkalinity, their different contributors (aerobic respiration, denitrification, net sulfate reduction, calcite dissolution, nitrification) and their seasonal and interannual cycles. Similar to the observations covering the southern North Sea (Brenner et al., 2015) the model results show large horizontal gradients from the near-shore high productive areas with benthic remineralization up to Rmin = 10.6 mol C m-2 yr-1 and TA generation RTA = 2 mol C m-2 yr-1 to off-shore moderate productive areas with mean Rmin = 2.5 mol C m-2 yr-1 and mean TA generation RTA = 0.4 mol C m-2 yr-1. Beside calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration (producing ammonium) and denitrification are the largest contributors to alkalinity generation. Nitrification is reducing alkalinity in the sediment. Due to low regenerated primary production in summer, the year 2001 exhibits the lowest input of particulate organic matter into the sediment (POCexp=2.3 mol C m-2 yr-1), while the year 2003 exhibits the highest export production (POCexp=2.6 mol C m-2 yr-1). The biogeochemical reactions and the effluxes from the sediment follow these pelagic amplitudes with a time lag of about one year with damped amplitudes. References Brenner, H., Braeckman, U., Le Guitton, M., Meysman, F.J.R., 2015. The impact of sedimentary alkalinity release on the water column CO2 system in the North Sea. Biogeosiences Discussion, 12(15): 12395-12453. Heinze, C

  1. Comparing nutritional requirements, provision and intakes among patients prescribed therapeutic diets in hospital: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, Megan; Desbrow, Ben; Roberts, Shelley

    Nutrition is an important part of recovery for hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional adequacy of meals provided to and consumed by patients prescribed a therapeutic diet. Patients (N = 110) prescribed a therapeutic diet (texture-modified, low-fiber, oral fluid, or food allergy or intolerance diets) for medical or nutritional reasons were recruited from six wards of a tertiary hospital. Complete (24-h) dietary provisions and intakes were directly observed and analyzed for energy (kJ) and protein (g) content. A chart audit gathered demographic, clinical, and nutrition-related information to calculate each patient's disease-specific estimated energy and protein requirements. Provisions and intake were considered adequate if they met ≥75% of the patient's estimated requirements. Mean energy and protein provided to patients (5844 ± 2319 kJ, 53 ± 30 g) were significantly lower than their mean estimated requirements (8786 ± 1641 kJ, 86 ± 18 g). Consequently, mean nutrition intake (4088 ± 2423 kJ, 37 ± 28 g) were significantly lower than estimated requirements. Only 37% (41) of patients were provided with and 18% (20) consumed adequate nutrition to meet their estimated requirements. No therapeutic diet provided adequate food to meet the energy and protein requirements of all recipients. Patients on oral fluid diets had the highest estimated requirements (9497 ± 1455 kJ, 93 ± 16 g) and the lowest nutrient provision (3497 ± 1388 kJ, 25 ± 19 g) and intake (2156 ± 1394 kJ, 14 ± 14 g). Hospitalized patients prescribed therapeutic diets (particularly fluid-only diets) are at risk for malnutrition. Further research is required to determine the most effective strategies to improve nutritional provision and intake among patients prescribed therapeutic diets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparing Stable Water Isotope Variation in Atmospheric Moisture Observed over Coastal Water and Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, C. T.; Rambo, J. P.; Welp, L. R.; Bible, K.; Hollinger, D. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Stable oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopologues of atmospheric moisture are strongly influenced by large-scale synoptic weather cycles, surface evapotranspiration and boundary layer mixing. Atmospheric water isotope variation has been shown to empirically relate to relative humidity (Rh) of near surface moisture, and to a less degree, air temperature. Continuous δ18O and δD measurements are becoming more available, providing new opportunities to investigate processes that control isotope variability. This study shows the comparison of δ18O and δD measured at a continental location and over coastal waters for 3 seasons (spring to fall, 2014). The surface moisture isotope measurements were made using two LGR spectroscopy water vapor isotope analyzers (Los Gatos Research Inc.), one operated in an old-growth coniferous forest at Wind River field station, WA (45.8205°N, 121.9519°W), and another sampling marine air over seawater at the Scripps Pier in San Diego, CA (32.8654°N, 117.2536°W), USA. Isotope variations were measured at 1Hz and data were reported as hourly averages with an overall accuracy of ±0.1‰ for δ18O, ±0.5‰ for δ2H. Day-to-day variations in δ18O and δD are shown strongly influenced by synoptic weather events at both locations. Boundary layer mixing between surface moisture and the dry air entrained from the free troposphere exerts a midday maximum and a consistent diel pattern in deuterium excess (dx). At the forest site, surface moisture also interacts with leaf water through transpiration during the day and re-equilibration at night. The latter occurs by retro-diffusion of atmospheric H2O molecules into leaf intercellular space, which becomes intensified as Rh increaes after nightfall, and continues until sunrise, to counter-balance the evaporative isotopic enrichment in leaf water on a daily basis. These vegetation effects lead to negative dx values consistently observed at nighttime in this continental location that were not

  3. 75 FR 32356 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of... line developed by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, designated as transformation event 305423, which has... evaluation of data submitted by Pioneer Hi-Bred International in its petition for a determination...

  4. 78 FR 32231 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Availability of Plant Pest Risk Assessment, Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Availability of Plant... regarding a request from Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., seeking a determination of nonregulated status... regulated under 7 CFR part 340. APHIS received a petition (APHIS Petition Number 11-063-01p) from Pioneer...

  5. 76 FR 37767 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of... determination that a corn line developed by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., designated as event DP-32138-1... on our evaluation of data submitted by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., in its petition for...

  6. 78 FR 37201 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Maize Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of... determination that a maize line developed by Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., designated as maize event DP... on our evaluation of data submitted by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., in its petition for...

  7. 76 FR 34712 - Medicare Program; Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model; Extension of the Submission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ...: This notice extends the deadlines for the submission of the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model...-coordinated-care-models/pioneer-aco . Application Submission Deadline: Applications must be postmarked on or before August 19, 2011. The Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model ] Application is available...

  8. 75 FR 2592 - Pioneer Industrial Railway Co.-Trackage Rights Exemption-Central Illinois Railroad Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Surface Transportation Board Pioneer Industrial Railway Co.--Trackage Rights Exemption-- Central Illinois...) has agreed to grant non-exclusive local trackage rights to Pioneer Industrial Railway Co. (PIRY) over... Kellar Branch. See STB Docket No. AB-1056X, Pioneer Industrial Railway Co.--Discontinuance of Service...

  9. Comparing face processing strategies between typically-developed observers and observers with autism using sub-sampled-pixels presentation in response classification technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Masayoshi; Bennett, Patrick J; Rutherford, M D; Gaspar, Carl M; Kumada, Takatsune; Sekuler, Allison B

    2013-03-07

    In the present study we modified the standard classification image method by subsampling visual stimuli to provide us with a technique capable of examining an individual's face-processing strategy in detail with fewer trials. Experiment 1 confirmed that one testing session (1450 trials) was sufficient to produce classification images that were qualitatively similar to those obtained previously with 10,000 trials (Sekuler et al., 2004). Experiment 2 used this method to compare classification images obtained from observers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and typically-developing (TD) observers. As was found in Experiment 1, classification images obtained from TD observers suggested that they all discriminated faces based on information conveyed by pixels in the eyes/brow region. In contrast, classification images obtained from ASD observers suggested that they used different perceptual strategies: three out of five ASD observers used a typical strategy of making use of information in the eye/brow region, but two used an atypical strategy that relied on information in the forehead region. The advantage of using the response classification technique is that there is no restriction to specific theoretical perspectives or a priori hypotheses, which enabled us to see unexpected strategies, like ASD's forehead strategy, and thus showed this technique is particularly useful in the examination of special populations.

  10. Angiogenesis in breast cancer: a comparative study of the observer variability of methods for determining microvessel density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Rose, C;

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of different methods for estimating neovascularization in breast cancer and to compare them in terms of observer variability. The microvessel endothelium was stained immunohistochemically by antibodies against CD34. The investigated method...

  11. Protostellar accretion traced with chemistry: Comparing synthetic C18O maps of embedded protostars to real observations

    CERN Document Server

    Frimann, Søren; Padoan, Paolo; Haugbølle, Troels

    2015-01-01

    Context: Understanding how protostars accrete their mass is a central question of star formation. One aspect of this is to try and understand if the time evolution of accretion rates in deeply embedded objects is best characterised by a smooth decline from early to late stages, or by intermittent bursts of high accretion. Aims: We create synthetic observations of deeply embedded protostars in a large numerical simulation of a molecular cloud, which are compared directly to real observations. The goal is to compare episodic accretion events in the simulation to observations, and to test the methodology used for analysing the observations. Methods: Simple freeze-out and sublimation chemistry is added to the simulation, and synthetic C18O line cubes are created for a large number of simulated protostars. The spatial extent of C18O is measured for the simulated protostars, and compared directly to a sample of 16 deeply embedded protostars observed with the Submillimeter Array. If CO is distributed over a larger a...

  12. Kristian Birkeland's pioneering investigations of geomagnetic disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, A.; Burke, W. J.

    2010-04-01

    More than 100 years ago Kristian Birkeland (1967-1917) addressed questions that had vexed scientists for centuries. Why do auroras appear overhead while the Earth's magnetic field is disturbed? Are magnetic storms on Earth related to disturbances on the Sun? To answer these questions Birkeland devised terrella simulations, led coordinated campaigns in the Arctic wilderness, and then interpreted his results in the light of Maxwell's synthesis of laws governing electricity and magnetism. After analyzing thousands of magnetograms, he divided disturbances into 3 categories: 1. Polar elementary storms are auroral-latitude disturbances now called substorms. 2. Equatorial perturbations correspond to initial and main phases of magnetic storms. 3. Cyclo-median perturbations reflect enhanced solar-quiet currents on the dayside. He published the first two-cell pattern of electric currents in Earth's upper atmosphere, nearly 30 years before the ionosphere was identified as a separate entity. Birkeland's most enduring contribution toward understanding geomagnetic disturbances flowed from his recognition that field-aligned currents must connect the upper atmosphere with generators in distant space. The existence of field-aligned currents was vigorously debated among scientists for more than 50 years. Birkeland's conjecture profoundly affects present-day understanding of auroral phenomena and global electrodynamics. In 1896, four years after Lord Kelvin rejected suggestions that matter passes between the Sun and Earth, and two years before the electron was discovered, Birkeland proposed current carriers are "electric corpuscles from the Sun" and "the auroras are formed by corpuscular rays drawn in from space, and coming from the Sun". It can be reasonably argued that the year 1896 marks the founding of space plasma physics. Many of Birkeland's insights were rooted in observations made during his terrella experiments, the first attempts to simulate cosmic phenomena within a

  13. Pioneers of paediatrics: Professor Salah Abdelrahman Ali Taha

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights the contributions of Professor Salah Abdelrahman Ali Taha (1927–1988), one of the pioneers in paediatrics in Sudan and Saudi Arabia. He graduated from Kitchener School of Medicine (renamed, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum[U of K]) in 1952 and was awarded an MD from the U of K in 1973, having accomplished a survey on the prevalence and underlying causes of childhood malnutrition in 14 villages. His impact was remarkable in establishing child health services in Sudan and Saudi Arabia, and in laying the foundation of the Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, King Saud University. He was also an active researcher in various fields in child health, and was pioneering in those related to nutrition. Following his return to Sudan, Dr Salah A Taha was elected Member of Parliament from his rural district in Gezira State and was the Speaker of the House of Parliament in 1986. PMID:27493360

  14. A Quick and Dirty Approach to Verify the Pioneer Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Unzicker, A; Schmidle, Daniel; Unzicker, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    We present source code for the computer algebra system Mathematica that analyzes the motion of the Pioneer spacecraft using the public available ephemeris data from JPL's website. Within 15 minutes, the reader can verify that the Pioneer anomalous acceleration a_p (1) exists in the order of magnitude of c H_0, (2) is not due to mismodeling of gravitational attraction, solar pressure or spacecraft attitude maneuvers. The simple code of about 100 lines may easily be extended by the reader to include further tests. Due to the limitations of our approach, we do not know (1) whether the unknown raw data were correctly processed to generate the trajectory files (2) how the apparent mismatch of ephemerides before 1990 had occurred.

  15. Kristian Birkeland's pioneering investigations of geomagnetic disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Burke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available More than 100 years ago Kristian Birkeland (1967–1917 addressed questions that had vexed scientists for centuries. Why do auroras appear overhead while the Earth's magnetic field is disturbed? Are magnetic storms on Earth related to disturbances on the Sun? To answer these questions Birkeland devised terrella simulations, led coordinated campaigns in the Arctic wilderness, and then interpreted his results in the light of Maxwell's synthesis of laws governing electricity and magnetism. After analyzing thousands of magnetograms, he divided disturbances into 3 categories:

    1. Polar elementary storms are auroral-latitude disturbances now called substorms.
    2. Equatorial perturbations correspond to initial and main phases of magnetic storms.
    3. Cyclo-median perturbations reflect enhanced solar-quiet currents on the dayside.

    He published the first two-cell pattern of electric currents in Earth's upper atmosphere, nearly 30 years before the ionosphere was identified as a separate entity. Birkeland's most enduring contribution toward understanding geomagnetic disturbances flowed from his recognition that field-aligned currents must connect the upper atmosphere with generators in distant space. The existence of field-aligned currents was vigorously debated among scientists for more than 50 years. Birkeland's conjecture profoundly affects present-day understanding of auroral phenomena and global electrodynamics. In 1896, four years after Lord Kelvin rejected suggestions that matter passes between the Sun and Earth, and two years before the electron was discovered, Birkeland proposed current carriers are "electric corpuscles from the Sun" and "the auroras are formed by corpuscular rays drawn in from space, and coming from the Sun". It can be reasonably argued that the year 1896 marks the founding of space plasma physics. Many of Birkeland's insights were rooted in observations made during his terrella

  16. Before Franz Boas: Pioneering Women in American Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Tarducci

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One consequence of the impact of the feminist movement in anthropological theory and practice was the recovery of the life and work of women who, despite occupying a peripheral site, made significant contributions to the field. In this paper I focus on the trajectories of these pioneers who, in a time of fast socioeconomic changes (last decades or xix Century and the early xx Century and despite they were self taught, were fundamental to the professionalization of anthropology.

  17. Pioneer 10 studies of interplanetary shocks at large heliocentric distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Pioneer 10 Ames plasma analyzer data collected in the 6.1 to 12.6 AU range of heliocentric distances (November 1974 to April 1977) have been examined for interplanetary shock waves. Eighteen shock signatures have been identified, with four of these being of the reverse type and the remainder the forward type. Sonic Mach numbers in the range from 3 to 10 are estimated for these events.

  18. Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology: Integrating Nutrition and Child Development Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology series, this article provides a brief personal account of Maureen Black's career as a pediatric psychologist. It traces the transition of the Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) from a section of the Division of Clinical Psychology of the American Psychological Association (APA) to an independent division of APA, which occurred during my presidency of SPP. The article addresses three aspects of pediatric psychology that have been central to my...

  19. A revised automated proximity and conformity analysis method to compare predicted and observed spatial boundaries of geologic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingkui; Napieralski, Jacob; Harbor, Jon

    2008-12-01

    Quantitative assessment of the level of agreement between model-predicted and field-observed geologic data is crucial to calibrate and validate numerical landscape models. Application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provides an opportunity to integrate model and field data and quantify their levels of correspondence. Napieralski et al. [Comparing predicted and observed spatial boundaries of geologic phenomena: Automated Proximity and Conformity Analysis (APCA) applied to ice sheet reconstructions. Computers and Geosciences 32, 124-134] introduced an Automated Proximity and Conformity Analysis (APCA) method to compare model-predicted and field-observed spatial boundaries and used it to quantify the level of correspondence between predicted ice margins from ice sheet models and field observations from end moraines. However, as originally formulated, APCA involves a relatively large amount of user intervention during the analysis and results in an index to quantify the level of correspondence that lacks direct statistical meaning. Here, we propose a revised APCA approach and a more automated and statistically robust way to quantify the level of correspondence between model predictions and field observations. Specifically, the mean and standard deviation of distances between model and field boundaries are used to quantify proximity and conformity, respectively. An illustration of the revised method comparing modeled ice margins of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet with observed end moraines of the Last Glacial Maximum shows that this approach provides a more automated and statistically robust means to quantify correspondence than the original APCA. The revised approach can be adopted for a wide range of geoscience issues where comparisons of model-predicted and field-observed spatial boundaries are useful, including mass movement and flood extents.

  20. Comparing Observed with Predicted Weekly Influenza-Like Illness Rates during the Winter Holiday Break, United States, 2004-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongjiang; Wong, Karen K.; Zheteyeva, Yenlik; Shi, Jianrong; Uzicanin, Amra; Rainey, Jeanette J.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, influenza season typically begins in October or November, peaks in February, and tapers off in April. During the winter holiday break, from the end of December to the beginning of January, changes in social mixing patterns, healthcare-seeking behaviors, and surveillance reporting could affect influenza-like illness (ILI) rates. We compared predicted with observed weekly ILI to examine trends around the winter break period. We examined weekly rates of ILI by region in the United States from influenza season 2003–2004 to 2012–2013. We compared observed and predicted ILI rates from week 44 to week 8 of each influenza season using the auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) method. Of 1,530 region, week, and year combinations, 64 observed ILI rates were significantly higher than predicted by the model. Of these, 21 occurred during the typical winter holiday break period (weeks 51–52); 12 occurred during influenza season 2012–2013. There were 46 observed ILI rates that were significantly lower than predicted. Of these, 16 occurred after the typical holiday break during week 1, eight of which occurred during season 2012–2013. Of 90 (10 HHS regions x 9 seasons) predictions during the peak week, 78 predicted ILI rates were lower than observed. Out of 73 predictions for the post-peak week, 62 ILI rates were higher than observed. There were 53 out of 73 models that had lower peak and higher post-peak predicted ILI rates than were actually observed. While most regions had ILI rates higher than predicted during winter holiday break and lower than predicted after the break during the 2012–2013 season, overall there was not a consistent relationship between observed and predicted ILI around the winter holiday break during the other influenza seasons. PMID:26649568

  1. How Physicians, Patients, and Observers Compare on the Use of Qualitative and Quantitative Measures of Physician-Patient Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Howard S; Street, Richard L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare several different measures of physician-patient communication. We compared data derived from different measures of three communication behaviors, patient participation, physician information giving, and physician participatory decision-making (PDM) style, from 83 outpatient visits to oncology or thoracic surgery clinics for pulmonary nodules or lung cancer. Communication was measured with rating scales completed by patients and physicians after the consultation and by two different groups of external observers who used rating scales or coded the frequency of communication behaviors, respectively, after listening to an audio recording of the consultation. Measures were compared using Pearson's correlations. Correlations of patients' and physicians' ratings of patient participation (r = .04) and physician PDM style (r = .03) were low and not significant (p > .0083, Bonferroni-adjusted). Correlations of observers' ratings with patients' or physicians' ratings for patient participation and physician PDM style were moderate or low (r = .15, .27, .07, and .01, respectively) but were not statistically significant (p > .0083, Bonferroni-adjusted). Correlations between observers' ratings and frequency measures were .31, .52, and .63 and were statistically significant with p values .005, observers' ratings as an alternate measure of communication to more labor intensive frequency measures.

  2. LipidPioneer : A Comprehensive User-Generated Exact Mass Template for Lipidomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Candice Z.; Koelmel, Jeremy P.; Ragland, Jared M.; Garrett, Timothy J.; Bowden, John A.

    2017-03-01

    Lipidomics, the comprehensive measurement of lipid species in a biological system, has promising potential in biomarker discovery and disease etiology elucidation. Advances in chromatographic separation, mass spectrometric techniques, and novel substrate applications continue to expand the number of lipid species observed. The total number and type of lipid species detected in a given sample are generally indicative of the sample matrix examined (e.g., serum, plasma, cells, bacteria, tissue, etc.). Current exact mass lipid libraries are static and represent the most commonly analyzed matrices. It is common practice for users to manually curate their own lists of lipid species and adduct masses; however, this process is time-consuming. LipidPioneer, an interactive template, can be used to generate exact masses and molecular formulas of lipid species that may be encountered in the mass spectrometric analysis of lipid profiles. Over 60 lipid classes are present in the LipidPioneer template and include several unique lipid species, such as ether-linked lipids and lipid oxidation products. In the template, users can add any fatty acyl constituents without limitation in the number of carbons or degrees of unsaturation. LipidPioneer accepts naming using the lipid class level (sum composition) and the LIPID MAPS notation for fatty acyl structure level. In addition to lipid identification, user-generated lipid m/z values can be used to develop inclusion lists for targeted fragmentation experiments. Resulting lipid names and m/z values can be imported into software such as MZmine or Compound Discoverer to automate exact mass searching and isotopic pattern matching across experimental data.

  3. LipidPioneer : A Comprehensive User-Generated Exact Mass Template for Lipidomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Candice Z.; Koelmel, Jeremy P.; Ragland, Jared M.; Garrett, Timothy J.; Bowden, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Lipidomics, the comprehensive measurement of lipid species in a biological system, has promising potential in biomarker discovery and disease etiology elucidation. Advances in chromatographic separation, mass spectrometric techniques, and novel substrate applications continue to expand the number of lipid species observed. The total number and type of lipid species detected in a given sample are generally indicative of the sample matrix examined (e.g., serum, plasma, cells, bacteria, tissue, etc.). Current exact mass lipid libraries are static and represent the most commonly analyzed matrices. It is common practice for users to manually curate their own lists of lipid species and adduct masses; however, this process is time-consuming. LipidPioneer, an interactive template, can be used to generate exact masses and molecular formulas of lipid species that may be encountered in the mass spectrometric analysis of lipid profiles. Over 60 lipid classes are present in the LipidPioneer template and include several unique lipid species, such as ether-linked lipids and lipid oxidation products. In the template, users can add any fatty acyl constituents without limitation in the number of carbons or degrees of unsaturation. LipidPioneer accepts naming using the lipid class level (sum composition) and the LIPID MAPS notation for fatty acyl structure level. In addition to lipid identification, user-generated lipid m/z values can be used to develop inclusion lists for targeted fragmentation experiments. Resulting lipid names and m/z values can be imported into software such as MZmine or Compound Discoverer to automate exact mass searching and isotopic pattern matching across experimental data.

  4. On the Origin of the Dark Matter/Energy in the Universe and the Pioneer Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham A. Ungar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Einstein's special relativity is a theory rich of paradoxes, one of which is the recently discovered Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox. According to this Paradox, the relativistic invariant mass of a galaxy of moving stars exceeds the sum of the relativistic invariant masses of the constituent stars owing to their motion relative to each other. This excess of mass is the mass of virtual matter that has no physical properties other than positive relativistic invariant mass and, hence, that reveals its presence by no means other than gravity. As such, this virtual matter is the dark matter that cosmologists believe is necessary in order to supply the missing gravity that keeps galaxies stable. Based on the Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox we offer in this article a model which quantifies the anomalous acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts and other deep space missions, and explains the presence of dark matter and dark energy in the universe. It turns out that the origin of dark matter and dark energy in the Universe lies in the Paradox, and that the origin of the Pioneer anomaly results from neglecting the Paradox. In order to appreciate the physical significance of the Paradox within the frame of Einstein's special theory of relativity, following the presentation of the Paradox we demonstrate that the Paradox is responsible for the extension of the kinetic energy theorem and of the additivity of energy and momentum from classical to relativistic mechanics. Clearly, the claim that the acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts is anomalous is incomplete, within the frame of Einstein's special relativity, since those who made the claim did not take into account the presence of the Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox (which is understandable since the Paradox, published in the author's 2008 book, was discovered by the author only recently. It remains to test how well the Paradox accords with observations.

  5. On the Origin of the Dark Matter/Energy in the Universe and the Pioneer Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungar A. A.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Einstein’s special relativity is a theory rich of paradoxes, one of which is the recently discovered Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox . According to this Paradox, the rela- tivistic invariant mass of a galaxy of moving stars exceeds the sum of the relativistic invariant masses of the constituent stars owing to their motion relative to each other. This excess of mass is the mass of virtual matter that has no physical properties other than positive relativistic invariant mass and, hence, that reveals its presence by no means other than gravity. As such, this virtual matter is the dark matter that cosmologists be- lieve is necessary in order to supply the missing gravity that keeps galaxies stable. Based on the Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox we offer in this article a model which quan- tifies the anomalous acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts and other deep space missions, and explains the presence of dark matter and dark energy in the universe. It turns out that the origin of dark matter and dark energy in the Universe lies in the Para- dox, and that the origin of the Pioneer anomaly results from neglecting the Paradox. In order to appreciate the physical significance of the Paradox within the frame of Ein- stein’s special theory of relativity, following the presentation of the Paradox we demon- strate that the Paradox is responsible for the extension of the kinetic energy theorem and of the additivity of energy and momentum from classical to relativistic mechanics. Clearly, the claim that the acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts is anomalous is incomplete, within the frame of Einstein’s special relativity, since those who made the claim did not take into account the presence of the Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox (which is understandable since the Paradox, published in the author’s 2008 book, was discovered by the author only recently. It remains to test how well the Paradox accords with observations.

  6. The Pioneer riddle, the quantum vacuum and the acceleration of light

    CERN Document Server

    Ranada, A F

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that the same phenomenological Newtonian model recently proposed by the author to explain the cosmological evolution of the fine structure constant suggests furthermore an explanation of the unmodelled acceleration $a_P\\simeq 8.5\\times 10^{-10}m/s^2$ of the Pioneer 10/11 spaceships reported by Anderson {\\em et al} in 1998. In the view presented here, it is argued that the permittivity and permeability of empty space are decreasing adiabatically, and the light is accelerating therefore, as a consequence of the progressive thinning down of the quantum vacuum due to the combined effect of its gravitational interaction with all the expanding universe and the fourth Heisenberg relation. It is suggested that the spaceships do not have any extra acceleration (but follow the unchanged Newton laws), the observed effect being due to an adiabatic acceleration of the light equal to $a_P$, which has the same observational radio signature as the anomalous acceleration of the Pioneers.

  7. A beacon of new physics: The Pioneer anomaly modelled as a path based speed loss driven by the externalisation of aggregate non-inertial QM energy

    CERN Document Server

    Boom, Paul G ten

    2012-01-01

    This treatise outlines how a real non-systematic based Pioneer anomaly, with its implied violation (re: 'low' mass bodies only) of both general relativity's weak equivalence principle and the Newtonian inverse-square law, can be successfully modelled. These theoretical hurdles and various awkward observational constraints, such as the low value of Pioneer 11's anomaly pre-Saturn encounter, have not been convincingly modelled to date. Notwithstanding the recent trend to embrace a non-constant Sun/Earth-directed heat based explanation of this anomalous deceleration, the actual: nature, direction, and temporal and spatial variation of the Pioneer anomaly remain an open arena of research. Working backwards from the observational evidence, and rethinking: time, mass, quantum entanglement and non-locality, we hypothesise a mechanism involving a quantum mechanical energy source and a new type of 'gravitational' field; neither of which lie within general relativity's domain of formulation/application. By way of a sys...

  8. Comparing nadir and limb observations of polar mesospheric clouds: The effect of the assumed particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Scott M.; Thomas, Gary E.; Hervig, Mark E.; Lumpe, Jerry D.; Randall, Cora E.; Carstens, Justin N.; Thurairajah, Brentha; Rusch, David W.; Russell, James M.; Gordley, Larry L.

    2015-05-01

    Nadir viewing observations of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) from the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) spacecraft are compared to Common Volume (CV), limb-viewing observations by the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE) also on AIM. CIPS makes multiple observations of PMC-scattered UV sunlight from a given location at a variety of geometries and uses the variation of the radiance with scattering angle to determine a cloud albedo, particle size distribution, and Ice Water Content (IWC). SOFIE uses IR solar occultation in 16 channels (0.3-5 μm) to obtain altitude profiles of ice properties including the particle size distribution and IWC in addition to temperature, water vapor abundance, and other environmental parameters. CIPS and SOFIE made CV observations from 2007 to 2009. In order to compare the CV observations from the two instruments, SOFIE observations are used to predict the mean PMC properties observed by CIPS. Initial agreement is poor with SOFIE predicting particle size distributions with systematically smaller mean radii and a factor of two more albedo and IWC than observed by CIPS. We show that significantly improved agreement is obtained if the PMC ice is assumed to contain 0.5% meteoric smoke by mass, in agreement with previous studies. We show that the comparison is further improved if an adjustment is made in the CIPS data processing regarding the removal of Rayleigh scattered sunlight below the clouds. This change has an effect on the CV PMC, but is negligible for most of the observed clouds outside the CV. Finally, we examine the role of the assumed shape of the ice particle size distribution. Both experiments nominally assume the shape is Gaussian with a width parameter roughly half of the mean radius. We analyze modeled ice particle distributions and show that, for the column integrated ice distribution, Log-normal and Exponential distributions better represent the range

  9. Comparative Observation on Therapeutic Effects of Treating Menopausal Syndrome with Auricular Points Sticking-pressure and Acupuncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙冬梅; 单秋华; 吴富东; 韩丑萍

    2006-01-01

    目的:对比观察耳穴贴压与针刺治疗女性更年期综合征的疗效.方法:86例患者随机分为耳穴贴压组和针刺组.根据改良的Kupperman指数进行疗效对比观察.结果:两组疗效对比差异经统计学处理无显著性.结论:耳穴贴压与针刺疗法均能有效治疗女性更年期综合征,且耳穴贴压更具有操作简便,易于推广的优势.%Objective: To make a comparative observation on treating menopausal syndrome with auricular points sticking-pressure and acupuncture. Methods:The 86 cases were randomized into the group of auricular points sticking-pressure and acupuncture group, and then the comparative observation was made according to the modified Kupperman index. Results: The statistical analysis on the comparative observation showed there is no significant difference between the therapeutic effects of the two groups. Conclusion: Auricular points sticking-pressure and acupuncture are both effective for menopausal syndrome, and the auricular points sticking-pressure is worthy to spread with its easy operation.

  10. Effects of pointing compared with naming and observing during encoding on item and source memory in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwehand, Kim; van Gog, Tamara; Paas, Fred

    2016-10-01

    Research showed that source memory functioning declines with ageing. Evidence suggests that encoding visual stimuli with manual pointing in addition to visual observation can have a positive effect on spatial memory compared with visual observation only. The present study investigated whether pointing at picture locations during encoding would lead to better spatial source memory than naming (Experiment 1) and visual observation only (Experiment 2) in young and older adults. Experiment 3 investigated whether response modality during the test phase would influence spatial source memory performance. Experiments 1 and 2 supported the hypothesis that pointing during encoding led to better source memory for picture locations than naming or observation only. Young adults outperformed older adults on the source memory but not the item memory task in both Experiments 1 and 2. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants manually responded in the test phase. Experiment 3 showed that if participants had to verbally respond in the test phase, the positive effect of pointing compared with naming during encoding disappeared. The results suggest that pointing at picture locations during encoding can enhance spatial source memory in both young and older adults, but only if the response modality is congruent in the test phase.

  11. AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY COMPARING SITAGLIPTIN TO METFORMIN AS A INITIAL MONOTHERAPY IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: An Observational study Comparing sitagliptin to metformin as an initial monotherapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients . METHOD : In this observational study we have selected 100 patients which divided into two groups; first group was on sitagliptin and second group was on metformin. The criterion for inclusion in the study was 1 Age group of 18 – 78 years 2 HbA1c of 6.5 – 9.0%. G roup A was started on sitagliptin 50 to 100 mg. Group B patients were started on Metformin , dosage of 500 mg once a day and the dose was increased to a of maximum of 2000 mg; and this study was done for 12 weeks. RESULTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS : Group A c omprises 50 patients whose baseline FBS , PPBS , HbA1C was determined , Group B comprises 50 patients whose baseline FBS , PPBS , HbA1C was determined. The results of HbA1c obtained before and after the sitagliptin and metformin therapy was analyzed using SPSS V 20 software using paired t test and chi square analysis. It was observed that the mean baseline hba1c in the group A patients was 7.8 % and in group B was 7.95% whereas the mean HbA1c after 12 weeks of therapy was 7.44% and 7.73% respectively in the Grou p A and B. There was a significant decrease in Hba1c in both groups with t ( 49 value Group A (7.89 , p <0.001 Group B (3.48 , p 0.001. There was a significantly positive correlation (p<0.001 in two groups , A (r = 0.903 having higher positive correlation than group B (r= 0.748 , whereas the mean difference in Hba1c was higher for group A (0.36 compared to group B (0 , 21 suggesting a greater decrease in Hba1c with sitagliptin compared to metformin , as the mean difference was significant the effect size ( d was calculated it was observed that the effect size for group A was (d= 1.16 larger than group B (d= 0.49. Occurrence of Various symptoms such as nausea , headache and diarrhoea were seen in two groups and it was observed that nausea was greater in gro up A (16% compared to B (8% , the

  12. 77 FR 35959 - Atlas Pipeline Mid-Continent WestTex, LLC; Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc.; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Atlas Pipeline Mid-Continent WestTex, LLC; Pioneer Natural Resources...Tex, LLC (Atlas) and Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc. (Pioneer), filed in the above referenced..., Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc., 5205 North O'Connor Blvd., Suite 200, Irving, TX 75039, by...

  13. Cytogenetics and characterization of microsatellite loci for a South American pioneer tree species, Croton floribundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrini, Milene; Pinto-Maglio, Cecília A F; Zucchi, Maria I; dos Santos, Flavio A M

    2013-12-01

    Despite the recent advances in plant population genetic studies, the lack of information regarding pedigree, ploidy level, or mode of inheritance for many polyploids can compromise the analysis of the molecular data produced. The aim of this study was to examine both microsatellite and cytogenetic characteristics of the pioneer tree Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae) to test for the occurrence of polyploidy in the species and to evaluate its implications for the appropriate use of SSR markers. Seven microsatellite markers were developed and screened for 62 individuals from a semi-deciduous tropical forest in Brazil. Chromosome number, meiotic behavior, and pollen viability were evaluated from male flower buds. All SSR loci were highly polymorphic. The number of bivalents observed in meiosis n = 56 (2n = 8× = 112) and the maximum number of alleles per individual (Ni = 8) demonstrated the occurrence of polyploidy in C. floribundus. The normal meiotic pairing and the high pollen viability suggested that C. floribundus is a regular and stable polyploid, most likely an allopolyploid. The combined SSR and cytogenetic data provided new evidence on the origin and evolution of the species as well as assured the accurate use of SSR loci for population genetic studies of the polyploid pioneer species.

  14. On the compatibility of a proposed explanation of the Pioneer anomaly with the cartography of the solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Ranada, Antonio F

    2009-01-01

    We analyze here the reasons why an explanation of the Pioneer anomaly proposed by the authors is fully compatible with the cartography of the solar system. First, this proposal posits that the phenomenon is an apparent acceleration, not a real one, caused by a progressive desynchronization of the astronomical and the atomic clock-times, after they had been synchronized at a previous instant. The desynchronization could be caused by a coupling between the background gravitation and the quantum vacuum. Therefore, the standard argument for the incompatibility of the Pioneer acceleration and the values of the planets' orbits radii cannot be applied. Second, this proposal gives exactly the same results for radar ranging observations as standard physics. Hence, it cannot be in conflict with the very precise cartography of the solar system determined by NASA's Viking mission. Otherwise stated, while this proposal predicts apparent changes in the velocities of the spaceships and in the frequencies of Doppler observat...

  15. A comparative and observational assessment of gingival condition and il-1β level in vitiligo and nonvitiligo patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharidhi Laxman Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vitiligo is an autoimmune skin disorder that causes loss of skin pigment. Loss of skin pigment in oral mucosa may also become prominent and tend to be more noticeable in people with darker skin. There is much less information concerning this condition in gingiva. Therefore, an initial attempt has been made to compare clinical gingival status and biochemical assessment in vitiligo and nonvitiligo patients. Materials and Methods: This observational pilot study includes 45 patients of age group 20–40 years were divided as nonvitiligo pigmented gingivitis as observational 1 group, nonvitiligo nonpigmented gingivitis as control group, and vitiligo with gingivitis as observational 2 group. The clinical parameters assessed were plaque index, gingival index (GI, gingival bleeding index (GBI, dummett oral pigmentation index, and biochemical parameter such as gingival crevicular fluid (GCF interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β levels. Results: On intergroup examination using unpaired t -test and statistical analysis, vitiligo group showed highly significant results in GI (P < 0.001 and GBI (P < 0.001 than nonvitiligo group. Furthermore, the GCF IL-1β levels were found to be lesser (34.16 ng/ml in vitiligo group as compared to nonvitiligo groups. Conclusion: At similar plaque level, higher gingival inflammation and bleeding were found in vitiligo patients. The loss of pigmentation of gingiva was evident in vitiligo patients. The possible defensive role of melanin is evident clinically.

  16. Nutrient capital sequestration in pioneer plant communities on surface-mine spoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Four pioneer plant communities on a surface-mine spoil were compared in terms of biomass production and nutrient capital sequestration. A chenopodium album-dominated community (Treatment 4) produced the greatest amount of biomass. Next were a community derived from a forest topsoil seed bank spread over mine spoil (Treatment 2), a seed bank community with common reclamation species seeded into it (Treatment 3), and a mix of grasses and Lespedeza commonly used in reclamation (Treatment 1). Amounts of nutrients sequestered in vegetation were not strictly proportional to biomass. Community nutrient contents were largely influenced by community biomass and the nutrient uptake characteristics of the species with most biomass. Significant changes in soil chemistry were found after one growing season. Addition of the reclamation mix of grasses and Lespedeza to the seed bank resulted in significantly fewer established native species. Native species lost their normal dominance and exhibited stunted growth and phenological delay in Treatment 3. Nutrient content niche, nutrient content niche share, and niche breadth (Levins; B) were calculated for important species in each community. Native species generally had reduced niche breadths and niche shares when reclamation species were added to the community. Community content niche, the sums of species content niches, varied between different types of pioneer communities.

  17. Bacterial Rhizosphere Biodiversity from Several Pioneer Desert Sand Plants Near Jizan, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Osman, Jorge R.

    2016-04-08

    Life in arid regions and, in particular, hot deserts is often limited due to their harsh environmental conditions, such as large temperature fluctuations and low amounts of water. These extreme environments can influence the microbial community present on the surface sands and any rhizosphere members surrounding desert plant roots. The Jizan desert area, located in Saudi Arabia, supports particular vegetation that grows in the large sandy flat terrain. We examined five different samples, four from the rhizosphere of pioneer plants plus a surface sand sample, and used pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified V1-V3 regions of 16S rDNA genes from total extracted DNA to reveal and compare the bacterial population diversity of the samples. The results showed a total of 3,530 OTUs in the five samples, calculated using ≥ 97% sequence similarity levels. The Chao1 estimation of the bacterial diversity fluctuated from 637 to 2,026 OTUs for a given sample. The most abundant members found in the samples belong to the Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria phyla. This work shows that the Jizan desert area of Saudi Arabia can contain a diverse bacterial community on the sand and surrounding the roots of pioneer desert plants. It also shows that desert sand microbiomes can vary depending on conditions, with broad implications for sandstone monument bacterial communities

  18. Optimized tracking of RF carriers with phase noise, including Pioneer 10 results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Hurd, W. J.; Brown, D. H.

    1987-01-01

    The ability to track very weak signals from distant spacecraft is limited by the phase instabilities of the received signal and of the local oscillator employed by the receiver. These instabilities ultimately limit the minimum loop bandwidth that can be used in a phase-coherent receiver, and hence limit the ratio of received carrier power to noise spectral density which can be tracked phase coherently. A method is presented for near real time estimation of the received carrier phase and additive noise spectrum, and optimization of the phase locked loop bandwidth. The method was used with the breadboard Deep Space Network (DSN) Advanced Receiver to optimize tracking of very weak signals from the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, which is now more distant that the edge of the solar system. Tracking with bandwidths of 0.1 Hz to 1.0 Hz reduces tracking signal threshold and increases carrier loop signal to noise ratio (SNR) by 5 dB to 15 dB compared to the 3 Hz bandwidth of the receivers now used operationally in the DSN. This will enable the DSN to track Pioneer 10 until its power sources fails near the end of the century.

  19. Darwinian hydrology: can the methodology Charles Darwin pioneered help hydrologic science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, C.; Troch, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    There have been repeated calls for a Darwinian approach to hydrologic science or for a synthesis of Darwinian and Newtonian approaches, to deepen understanding the hydrologic system in the larger landscape context, and so develop a better basis for predictions now and in an uncertain future. But what exactly makes a Darwinian approach to hydrology "Darwinian"? While there have now been a number of discussions of Darwinian approaches, many referencing Harte (2002), the term is potentially a source of confusion while its connections to Darwin remain allusive rather than explicit. Here we discuss the methods that Charles Darwin pioneered to understand a variety of complex systems in terms of their historical processes of change. We suggest that the Darwinian approach to hydrology follows his lead by focusing attention on the patterns of variation in populations, seeking hypotheses that explain these patterns in terms of the mechanisms and conditions that determine their historical development, using deduction and modeling to derive consequent hypotheses that follow from a proposed explanation, and critically testing these hypotheses against new observations. It is not sufficient to catalogue the patterns or predict them statistically. Nor is it sufficient for the explanations to amount to a "just-so" story not subject to critical analysis. Darwin's theories linked present-day variation to mechanisms that operated over history, and could be independently test and falsified by comparing new observations to the predictions of corollary hypotheses they generated. With a Darwinian framework in mind it is easy to see that a great deal of hydrologic research has already been done that contributes to a Darwinian hydrology - whether deliberately or not. The various heuristic methods that Darwin used to develop explanatory theories - extrapolating mechanisms, space for time substitution, and looking for signatures of history - have direct application in hydrologic science. Some

  20. The Pioneer's Anomalous Doppler Drift as a Berry Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Rosales, J L

    2004-01-01

    The detected anomalous frequency drift acceleration in Pioneer's radar data finds its explanation in a Berry phase that obtains the quantum state of a photon that propagates within an expanding space-time. The clock acceleration is just the adiabatic expansion rate and an analogy between the effect and Foucault's experiment is fully suggested. In this sense, light rays play a similar role in the expanding space than Foucault's Pendulum does while determining Earth's rotation. On the other hand, one could speculate about a suitable future experiment at "laboratory" scales able to measure the local cosmological expansion rate using the procedure of outlined in this paper.

  1. On the gravitational origin of the Pioneer Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Siutsou, I A

    2009-01-01

    From Doppler tracking data and data on circular motion of astronomical objects we obtain a metric of the Pioneer Anomaly. The metric resolves the issue of manifest absence of anomaly acceleration in orbits of the outer planets and extra-Pluto objects of the Solar system. However, it turns out that the energy-momentum tensor of matter, which generates such a gravitational field in GR, violates energy dominance conditions. At the same time the equation of state derived from the energy-momentum tensor is that of dark energy with $w=-1/3$. So the model proposed must be carefully studied by "Grand-Fit" investigations.

  2. Geometrical rectification of spin-scan images from Pioneer 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, R. N.; Burke, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Images of Saturn received from Pioneer 11 suffer from geometrical distortions due to the curvilinear scan lines and the unequal sampling intervals in orthogonal directions, which are inherent in spin-scan imaging. In this paper geometrical image rectification by polynomial transformation based on control points is discussed. Factors that affect the accuracy of reconstruction are shown to include the spatial distribution and spatial density of control points, and the order of the polynomial distortion model. A computer implementation of the technique is described.

  3. HTRF(®): pioneering technology for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degorce, François

    2006-12-01

    Cisbio international pioneered the field of homogeneous fluorescence methodologies and time-resolved fluorescence resonance in particular, through its proprietary technology, HTRF(®). The development was based on Prof. Jean-Marie Lehn's research on rare earth fluorescence properties (awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1987) and on Cisbio's expertise in homogenous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF). The technology is used in assay development and drug screening, most notably in high-throughput screening applications. This highly powerful technology is particularly applied to the areas of G-protein-coupled receptor and kinase screening, as well as a series of targets related to inflammation, metabolic diseases and CNS disorders.

  4. A century of influence: Part 1. Orthodontic pioneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The story of orthodontics during the first 100 years of Journal publication can be told through the people who lived it. As part of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics' Centennial Celebration, we present 100 people who most influenced the specialty during the last 100 years. Part 1 describes the orthodontic pioneers who were born in the 1800 s. They were broadly educated in the sciences, and most studied orthodontics with Angle, Dewey, or Lischer. They were innovators and inventors, and they laid the foundation of the specialty during the early years of the 20th century.

  5. FATHI YAKAN THE PIONEER OF ISLAMIC ACTIVISM IN LEBANON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Rabil

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the ideology of Fathi Yakan, the pioneer of Sunni Islamism in Lebanon and a principal founder of the Islamist party al-­‐Jama'a al-­‐Islamiya.  It also traces the establishment of  al_Jama'a as the first organized Islamist party in Lebanon.  As Secretary General of al-­‐Jama'a, Fathi Yakan blazed the ideological trail for Islamism's participation in Lebanon's political realm.  Significantly, Yakan's political activism, in much the same vein as that of Druze "Socialist" Kamal Jumblat, was also more about removing Maronite hegemony over the state.

  6. SNAP 19 Pioneer F and G. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-06-01

    The generator developed for the Pioneer mission evolved from the SNAP 19 RTG`s launched aboard the NIMBUS III spacecraft. In order to satisfy the power requirements and environment of earth escape trajectory, significant modifications were made to the thermoelectric converter, heat source, and structural configuration. Specifically, a TAGS 2N thermoelectric couple was designed to provide higher efficiency and improved long term power performance, and the electrical circuitry was modified to yield very low magnetic field from current flow in the RTG. A new heat source was employed to satisfy operational requirements and its integration with the generator required alteration to the method of providing support to the fuel capsule.

  7. Women in science 50 fearless pioneers who changed the world

    CERN Document Server

    Ignotofsky, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    A charmingly illustrated and educational book, New York Times best seller Women in Science highlights the contributions of fifty notable women to the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) from the ancient to the modern world. Full of striking, singular art, this fascinating collection also contains infographics about relevant topics such as lab equipment, rates of women currently working in STEM fields, and an illustrated scientific glossary. The trailblazing women profiled include well-known figures like primatologist Jane Goodall, as well as lesser-known pioneers such as Katherine Johnson, the African-American physicist and mathematician who calculated the trajectory of the 1969 Apollo 11 mission to the moon.

  8. A comparative analysis of simulated and observed landslide locations triggered by Hurricane Camille in Nelson County, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, M.M.; Wieczorek, G.F.; Morgan, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    In 1969, Nelson County, Virginia received up to 71 cm of rain within 12 h starting at 7 p.m. on August 19. The total rainfall from the storm exceeded the 1000-year return period in the region. Several thousands of landslides were induced by rainfall associated with Hurricane Camille causing fatalities and destroying infrastructure. We apply a distributed transient response model for regional slope stability analysis to shallow landslides. Initiation points of over 3000 debris flows and effects of flooding from this storm are applied to the model. Geotechnical data used in the calculations are published data from samples of colluvium. Results from these calculations are compared with field observations such as landslide trigger location and timing of debris flows to assess how well the model predicts the spatial and temporal distribution. of landslide initiation locations. The model predicts many of the initiation locations in areas where debris flows are observed. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. [Water use of re-vegetation pioneer tree species Schima superba and Acacia mangium in hilly land of South China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Zhao, Ping; Ni, Guang-Yan; Zhu, Li-Wei; Zhao, Xiu-Hua; Zhao, Pei-Qiang; Niu, Jun-Feng

    2014-04-01

    The xylem sap flows of two pioneer tree species, i.e., Acacia mangium and Schima superba, in degraded hill lands of South China, were continually monitored with Granier' s thermal dissipation probes during 2004-2007 and 2008-2012, respectively, and their seasonal transpiration changes at different tree age levels were compared. The results showed that the annual transpiration of both species increased with tree ages, and S. superba demonstrated a higher value than A. mangium. The average annual whole-tree transpiration of S. superba (7014.76 kg) was higher than that of A. mangium (3704.97 kg). A. mangium (511.46-1802.17 kg) had greater seasonal variation than S. superba (1346.48-2349.35 kg). The standard regression coefficients (beta) of transpiration (Eh), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) for both species increased with soil moisture, suggesting the increase of soil moisture generated a greater sensitivity of plants to environmental factors. Partial correlation analysis revealed that soil moisture played an important role in the seasonal variation of transpiration of both species. The optimum soil moistures of S. superba and A. mangium were 0.22-0.40 and 0.29-0.30 (V/V), respectively, indicating the native pioneer species S. superba better adapted to water deficit compared with exotic pioneer species A. mangium.

  10. Saturnian trapped radiation and its absorption by satellites and rings: the first results from pioneer 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J A; Bastian, T S; Chenette, D L; Lentz, G A; McKibben, R B; Pyle, K R; Tuzzolino, A J

    1980-01-25

    Electrons and protons accelerated and trapped in a Saturnian magnetic field have been found by the University of Chicago experiments on Pioneer 11 within 20 Saturn radii (Rs) of the planet. In the innermost regions, strong absorption effects due to satellites and ring material were observed, and from approximately 4 Rs inwards to the outer edge of the A ring at 2.30 Rs (where the radiation is absorbed), the intensity distributions of protons (>/= 0.5 million electron volts) and electrons (2 to 20 million electron volts) were axially symmetric, consistent with a centered dipole aligned with the planetary rotation axis. The maximum fluxes observed for protons (> 35 million electron volts and for electrons flux increases observed between absorption features raise new questions concerning the physics of charged particle transport and acceleration. An absorption feature near 2.5 Rs has led to the discovery of a previously unknown satellite with a diameter of approximately 200 kilometers, semimajor axis of 2.51 Rs, and eccentricity of 0.013. Radiation absorption features that suggest a nonuniform distribution of matter around Saturn have also been found from 2.34 to 2.36 Rs, near the position of the F ring discovered by the Pioneer imaging experiment. Beneath the A, B, and C rings we continued to observe a low flux of high-energy electrons. We conclude that the inner Saturn magnetosphere, because of its near-axial symmetry and the many discrete radiation absorption regions, offers a unique opportunity to study the acceleration and transport of charged particles in a planetary magnetic field.

  11. Implications of the Pioneer Anomaly for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna

    OpenAIRE

    Defrere, Denis

    2005-01-01

    The Doppler tracking data from two deep-space spacecraft, Pioneer 10 and 11, show an anomalous blueshift, which has been dubbed the “Pioneer anomaly”. The effect is most commonly interpreted as a real deceleration of the spacecraft - an interpretation that faces serious challenges from planetary ephemerides. The Pioneer anomaly could as well indicate an unknown effect on the radio signal itself. Several authors have made suggestions how such a blueshift could be related to cosmology. We consi...

  12. Using Virtual Globes and a Java web Application to Visualize and Compare Ocean Observations and Model Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, A. L.; Blower, J.; Haines, K.; Smith, G.

    2007-12-01

    In order to better predict how the Earth's changing climate will affect ocean circulation, and more generally the behaviour of the ocean-atmosphere system, ocean modellers need to have the ability to accurately assimilate historical and near-real time data into their models. This process has traditionally included the use of fairly static plots of model and observed data in order to attempt to visualize where discrepancies between the two are greatest. Here we present OceanDIVA - Ocean Data Intercomparison and Visualization Application. OceanDIVA can read in ocean data from both local sources, and from any publicly accessible data holdings worldwide via OPeNDAP, and output the data into either Google Earth or a freely-available online virtual globe. One of its key capabilities is to read in model data from one source and observed data from another unrelated source, and to compare the two - giving data on the misfit. This is done in the form of colour-coded observation locations, or statistical difference plots averaged over regions which can be displayed on the virtual globe. If a particular profile is of interest then users may click on that icon and OceanDIVA will proceed to generate a plot of data with depth on the fly. Data may also be plotted on temperature levels which removes errors associated with estimating the depth at which water masses are found. By harvesting the power and ease of use of virtual globes, we see this as a useful tool to visualize and compare data from different sources, generating new datasets which have more value than the sum of their constituent parts. OceanDIVA could be readily expanded to incorporate, for example, satellite data, biological marine data, or data over land.

  13. High resolution observations of SiO masers: comparing the spatial distribution at 43 and 86 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Soria-Ruiz, R; Colomer, F; Bujarrabal, V; Desmurs, J F; Marvel, K B; Diamond, P J

    2004-01-01

    We present sub-milliarcsecond observations of SiO masers in the late-type stars IRC +10011 and Chi Cyg. We have used the NRAO Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to map the 43 GHz (v=1, 2 J=1-0) and the 86 GHz (v=1, 2 J=2-1) SiO masers. All the transitions have been imaged except the v=2 J=2-1 in IRC +10011. We report the first VLBI map of the v=1 J=2-1 28SiO maser in IRC +10011 as well as the first VLBA images of SiO masers in an S-type Mira variable, Chi Cyg. In this paper we have focused on the study of the relative spatial distribution of the different observed lines. We have found that in some cases the observational results are not reproduced by the current theoretical pumping models, either radiative or collisional. In particular, for IRC +10011, the v=1 J=1-0 and J=2-1 28SiO lines have different spatial distributions and emitting region sizes, the J=2-1 emission being located in an outer region of the envelope. For Chi Cyg, the distributions also differ, but the sizes of the masing regions are comparable....

  14. Comparing predicted and observed spatial boundaries of geologic phenomena: Automated Proximity and Conformity Analysis applied to ice sheet reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napieralski, Jacob; Li, Yingkui; Harbor, Jon

    2006-02-01

    Comparing predicted with observed geologic data is a central element of many aspects of research in the geosciences, e.g., comparing numerical ice sheet models with geomorphic data to test ice sheet model parameters and accuracy. However, the ability to verify predictions using empirical data has been limited by the lack of objective techniques that provide systematic comparison and statistical assessment of the goodness of correspondence between predictions of spatial and temporal patterns of geologic phenomena and the field evidence. Much of this problem arises from the inability to quantify the level of agreement between straight or curvilinear features, such as between the modeled extent of some geologic phenomenon and the field evidence for the extent of the phenomenon. Automated Proximity and Conformity Analysis (APCA) addresses this challenge using a system of Geographic Information System-based buffering that determines the general proximity and parallel conformity between linear features. APCA results indicate which modeled output fits empirical data, based on the distance and angle between features. As a result, various model outputs can be sorted according to overall level of agreement by comparison with one or multiple features from field evidence, based on proximity and conformity values. In an example application drawn from glacial geomorphology, APCA is integrated into an overall model verification process that includes matching modeled ice sheets to known marginal positions and ice flow directions, among other parameters. APCA is not limited to ice sheet or glacier models, but can be applied to many geoscience areas where the extent or geometry of modeled results need to be compared against field observations, such as debris flows, tsunami run-out, lava flows, or flood extents.

  15. Acrostichum, a Pioneering Fern of Floodplain Areas from the Late Oligocene Sariñena Formation of the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Javier; Diez, José B.

    2016-01-01

    Acrostichum is considered today an opportunistic fern in disturbed areas, which indicates the first stages of colonisation of such zones. However, in the fossil record, Acrostichum appears related to fluvio-lacustrine environments, freshwater marshes and mangrove deposits. We report here for first time fossil evidence of Acrostichum that reveals a pioneering behaviour of this fern in the colonisation of perturbed communities in Europe, which corroborates previous assumptions about the paleobiology of Acrostichum. Plant remains were collected from the Chattian (late Oligocene) La Val fossil site (Estadilla, Huesca, northeastern Spain) belonging to the Sariñena Formation, which mainly embraces crevasse splays, levees and floodplain deposits. Evidence shows that Acrostichum grew within the levee’s vegetal community or close to/on the river banks as well as on floodplain areas and closer to/on the shores of ephemeral ponds. But most importantly, the observed co-existence of Equisetum and Acrostichum remains in the same beds indicates that such strata represent short-lived inundated terrains, e.g., floodplains where the water table was temporarily stagnant. Evidence shows wetland environments dominated by pioneering taxa, implying a pioneering role for Acrostichum during the late Oligocene in the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:27631099

  16. Evolutionary variations in the expression of dorso-ventral patterning genes and the conservation of pioneer neurons in Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffar, Lucia; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2015-04-01

    Insects are ideally suited for gaining insight into the evolutionary developmental mechanisms that have led to adaptive changes of the nervous system since the specific structure of the nervous system can be directly linked to the neural stem cell (neuroblast) lineages, which in turn can be traced back to the last common ancestor of insects. The recent comparative analysis of the Drosophila melanogaster and Tribolium castaneum neuroblast maps revealed substantial differences in the expression profiles of neuroblasts. Here we show that despite the overall conservation of the dorso-ventral expression domains of muscle segment homeobox, intermediate neuroblasts defective and ventral nervous system defective, the expression of these genes relative to the neuroblasts in the respective domains has changed considerably during insect evolution. Furthermore, functional studies show evolutionary changes in the requirement of ventral nervous system defective in the formation of neuroblast 1-1 and the correct differentiation of its presumptive progeny, the pioneer neurons aCC and pCC. The inclusion of the expression data of the dorso-ventral genes into the recently established T. castaneum neuroblast map further increases the differences in the neuroblast expression profiles between D. melanogaster and T. castaneum. Despite these molecular variations, the Even-skipped positive pioneer neurons show an invariant arrangement, except for an additional Even-skipped positive cluster that we discovered in T. castaneum. Given the importance of these pioneer neurons in establishing the intersegmental nerves and the longitudinal tracts, which are part of the conserved axonal scaffold of arthropods, we discuss internal buffering mechanisms that might ensure that neuroblast lineages invariantly generate pioneer neurons over a wide range of molecular variations.

  17. Tonsillectomy efficacy in children with PFAPA syndrome is comparable to the standard medical treatment: a long-term observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigo, Giulia; Martini, Giorgia; Zoppi, Silvia; Vittadello, Fabio; Zulian, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Tonsillectomy has recently been suggested as an effective treatment for PFAPA syndrome but little is known about its long-term efficacy. We compared the clinical features and the long-term outcome of a large cohort of patients with PFAPA syndrome treated with tonsillectomy or with standard medical treatment. We conducted a retrospective study on patients with PFAPA syndrome followed at a tertiary care centre from January 1993 to August 2010. Clinical characteristics and laboratory parameters were evaluated at onset and during the follow-up. Disease outcomes of patients who underwent tonsillectomy and of those treated with medical therapy (NSAIDs, prednisone) were compared. Clinical remission on medication (CRM) was considered the persistence of fever attacks which were well controlled by medical therapy, clinical remission (CR) was defined as the absence of fever attacks, without any treatment, for more than 12 months. 275 patients with PFAPA syndrome, 59.6% males, aged 27.9 months at onset and followed for mean 54.5 months, entered the study. CR was reported in 59.6% of the patients and was significantly less frequent in those with positive family history for PFAPA (46.4% vs. 66.1%, p=0.003). 27/41 patients (65.9%), responded to tonsillectomy and this result was comparable with that observed in those treated with medical therapy (59.1%, p=0.51). Disease duration, age at remission or presence of associated symptoms were not significantly different in both groups. No predictors of tonsillectomy failure were found. In a large cohort of patients with PFAPA syndrome, tonsillectomy efficacy was comparable to the standard medical treatment.

  18. The distribution of snow black carbon observed in the Arctic and compared to the GISS-PUCCINI model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluate the ability of the latest NASA GISS composition-climate model, GISS-E2-PUCCINI, to simulate the spatial distribution of snow BC (sBC in the Arctic relative to present-day observations. Radiative forcing due to BC deposition onto Arctic snow and sea ice is also estimated. Two sets of model simulations are analyzed, where meteorology is linearly relaxed towards National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP and towards NASA Modern Era Reanalysis for Research and Applications (MERRA reanalyses. Results indicate that the modeled concentrations of sBC are comparable with present-day observations in and around the Arctic Ocean, except for apparent underestimation at a few sites in the Russian Arctic. That said, the model has some biases in its simulated spatial distribution of BC deposition to the Arctic. The simulations from the two model runs are roughly equal, indicating that discrepancies between model and observations come from other sources. Underestimation of biomass burning emissions in Northern Eurasia may be the main cause of the low biases in the Russian Arctic. Comparisons of modeled aerosol BC (aBC with long-term surface observations at Barrow, Alert, Zeppelin and Nord stations show significant underestimation in winter and spring concentrations in the Arctic (most significant in Alaska, although the simulated seasonality of aBC has been greatly improved relative to earlier model versions. This is consistent with simulated biases in vertical profiles of aBC, with underestimation in the lower and middle troposphere but overestimation in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, suggesting that the wet removal processes in the current model may be too weak or that vertical transport is too rapid, although the simulated BC lifetime seems reasonable. The combination of observations and modeling provides a comprehensive distribution of sBC over the Arctic. On the basis of this distribution, we estimate the

  19. The Distribution of Snow Black Carbon observed in the Arctic and Compared to the GISS-PUCCINI Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, T.; Xiao, C.; Shindell, D. T.; Liu, J.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Ming, J.; Qin, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the ability of the latest NASA GISS composition-climate model, GISS-E2- PUCCINI, to simulate the spatial distribution of snow BC (sBC) in the Arctic relative to present-day observations. Radiative forcing due to BC deposition onto Arctic snow and sea ice is also estimated. Two sets of model simulations are analyzed, where meteorology is linearly relaxed towards National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and towards NASA Modern Era Reanalysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalyses. Results indicate that the modeled concentrations of sBC are comparable with presentday observations in and around the Arctic Ocean, except for apparent underestimation at a few sites in the Russian Arctic. That said, the model has some biases in its simulated spatial distribution of BC deposition to the Arctic. The simulations from the two model runs are roughly equal, indicating that discrepancies between model and observations come from other sources. Underestimation of biomass burning emissions in Northern Eurasia may be the main cause of the low biases in the Russian Arctic. Comparisons of modeled aerosol BC (aBC) with long-term surface observations at Barrow, Alert, Zeppelin and Nord stations show significant underestimation in winter and spring concentrations in the Arctic (most significant in Alaska), although the simulated seasonality of aBC has been greatly improved relative to earlier model versions. This is consistent with simulated biases in vertical profiles of aBC, with underestimation in the lower and middle troposphere but overestimation in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, suggesting that the wet removal processes in the current model may be too weak or that vertical transport is too rapid, although the simulated BC lifetime seems reasonable. The combination of observations and modeling provides a comprehensive distribution of sBC over the Arctic. On the basis of this distribution, we estimate the decrease in snow

  20. Detectability index of differential phase contrast CT compared with conventional CT: a preliminary channelized Hotelling observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Yang, Yi; Tang, Shaojie

    2013-03-01

    Under the framework of model observer with signal and background exactly known (SKE/BKE), we investigate the detectability of differential phase contrast CT compared with that of the conventional attenuation-based CT. Using the channelized Hotelling observer and the radially symmetric difference-of-Gaussians channel template , we investigate the detectability index and its variation over the dimension of object and detector cells. The preliminary data show that the differential phase contrast CT outperforms the conventional attenuation-based CT significantly in the detectability index while both the object to be detected and the cell of detector used for data acquisition are relatively small. However, the differential phase contrast CT's dominance in the detectability index diminishes with increasing dimension of either object or detector cell, and virtually disappears while the dimension of object or detector cell approaches a threshold, respectively. It is hoped that the preliminary data reported in this paper may provide insightful understanding of the differential phase contrast CT's characteristic in the detectability index and its comparison with that of the conventional attenuation-based CT.

  1. Comparative analysis of clastogen-induced chromosome aberrations observed with light microscopy and by means of atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, Vanya Petrova; Dragoeva, Asya Pencheva; Andreeva, Andreana Ivanova; Burova, Marina Todorova; Georgiev, Sevdalin; Enchev, Dobromir Dimitrov

    2013-04-30

    Different types of chromosome aberration were observed in mouse bone-marrow cells after treatment with 4-bromo-N,N-diethyl-5,5-dimethyl-2,5-dihydro-1,2-oxaphosphol-2-amine 2-oxide (Br-oxaphosphole, Br-oxph) in a previous study. The aim of the present study is to perform a comparative analysis of these chromosomal damages observed with light microscopy (LM) and by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The kinds of aberrations scored by LM were substantially corrected by images at the ultrastructural level. The AFM analysis excluded 29.0% of gaps and 33.3% of fusion-type aberrations. On the other hand, AFM revealed the presence of aberrations that were not visible under the LM. This indicates that only AFM images would provide precise information about the real nature of chromosomal damages. The results of our study revealed that the 'real gaps' represented about 50% of all the gaps visible under LM. Excluded 'false gaps' were detected via AFM as breaks or decondensed chromosome regions. These results would support the statement that gaps must be included when testing genotoxicity. The ultrastructural analysis also confirmed the validity of using LM in the mouse bone-marrow chromosome aberration test, as a tool for detecting genotoxicity of chemicals in routine studies. When there is a need for precise evaluation of chromosome damage, only AFM images can provide information on specific genotoxic effects.

  2. Comparing Herschel dust emission structures, magnetic fields observed by Planck, and dynamics: high-latitude star forming cloud L1642

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    The nearby high-latitude cloud L1642 is one of only two known very high latitude (|b| > 30 deg) clouds actively forming stars. This cloud is a rare example of star formation in isolated conditions, and can reveal important details of star formation in general, e.g., of the effect of magnetic fields. We compare Herschel dust emission structures and magnetic field orientation revealed by Planck polarization maps in L1642, and also combine these with dynamic information from molecular line observations. The high-resolution Herschel data reveal a complex structure including a dense, compressed central blob with elongated extensions, low density striations, "fishbone" like structures with a spine and perpendicular striations, and a spiraling "tail". The Planck polarization data reveal an ordered magnetic field that pervades the cloud and is aligned with the surrounding low density striations. We show that there is a complex interplay between the cloud structure and large scale magnetic fields revealed by Planck polarization data at 10' resolution. This suggests that the magnetic field is closely linked to the formation and evolution of the cloud. We see a clear transition from aligned to perpendicular structures approximately at a column density of NH = 2x10^21 cm-2. We conclude that Planck polarization data revealing the large scale magnetic field orientation can be very useful even when comparing to the finest structures in higher resolution data, e.g. Herschel at ~18" resolution.

  3. COUNTERING RADICALISATION ACROSS EUROPE – THE PIONEERING ISDEP PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozila Kana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The changing landscape of the global terrorism threat coupled with increasing concern about home grown extremism means that the need to tackle the root causes of radicalisation across the European Union has never been greater. The pathway to violent extremism and terrorism is, however, undeniably complex. Frontline practitioners working with those vulnerable to radicalisation need to have the right tools to allow them to recognise, respond to and challenge ideologies and narratives associated with any form of terrorism. A pioneering EU Commission funded project is the first of its kind designed to offer consistency around, and increase awareness of, counter radicalisation specifically for frontline practitioners. Improving Security by Democratic Participation (ISDEP is a two year programme based on the EU Commission’s Prevent strand of the Counter Terrorism Strategy. Training themes focus on helping practitioners to identify the influences and vulnerabilities that shape an individual’s thought processes towards violent extremism.

  4. A tribute to Oscar Buneman -- Pioneer of plasma simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buneman, R.; Barker, R.J. (Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Washington, DC (United States)); Peratt, A.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Brecht, S.H. (Berkeley Research Associates, Inc., CA (United States)); Langdon, A.B. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). X-Division); Lewis, H.R. (Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1994-02-01

    Highlights are presented from among the many contributions made by Oscar Buneman to the science, engineering, and mathematics communities. Emphasis is placed not only on ''what'' this pioneer of computational plasma physics contributed but, of equal importance, on ''how'' he made his contributions. Therein lies the difference between technical competence and scientific greatness. The picture which emerges illustrates the open-mindedness, enthusiasm, intellectual/physical stamina, imagination, intellectual integrity, interdisciplinary curiosity, and deep humanity that made this individual unique. As a gentleman and a scholar, he had mastered the art of making cold technical facts ''come to life.'' Oscar Buneman died peacefully at his home near Stanford University on Sunday, January 24th, 1993. The profound influence he has had on many of his colleagues guarantees his immortality.

  5. Florence Nightingale: creator of modern nursing and public health pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Harold

    2008-09-01

    In starting this series of articles on distinguished women in nursing, medicine and the related healthcare professions, the choice of the first name is obvious. Florence Nightingale is, I suggest, the most famous female in the long history of medicine and is a name that is known and revered throughout the world. Most people--even those in 'the trade'--think of her as 'the lady with the lamp', the heroine who went out to the Crimean War and nursed the sick and wounded at Scutari. Important though this was, her main contribution was her continued work, long after the war, in nursing organisation and training, hospital planning, public and military health and her pioneering work in the efficient gathering of medical statistics.

  6. Pioneers in trauma care at Harborview Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Eileen; Hecker, Cynthia J; Butler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Harborview Medical Center in Seattle has been home to the pioneering work of University of Washington (UW) Medicine physicians and staff who have led innovations to improve trauma care for more than 40 years. As the only level I adult and pediatric trauma center and regional burn center for Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho, Harborview provides cares for more than 6500 critically injured trauma and burn patients per year. Our physicians, researchers and staff are recognized as national experts and as collaborative partners with nursing in the delivery of outstanding clinical care, research, and education. Beginning with the establishment of Seattle Medic One in the late 1960s, a groundbreaking program to train firefighters as paramedics, Harborview and the work of UW Medicine has been recognized locally and globally as a leader in every component of the ideal trauma system, as defined by the American College of Surgeons: prevention, access, acute hospital care, rehabilitation, education, and research activities.

  7. Constraining an Expanding Locally Anisotropic metric from the Pioneer anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, P Castelo

    2012-01-01

    It is discussed the possibility of a fine-tuneable contribution to the two way Doppler acceleration either towards, either outwards the Sun for heliocentric distances above 20 AU by considering a background described by an Expanding Locally Anisotropic (ELA) metric. This metric encodes both the standard local Schwarzschild gravitational effects and the cosmological Universe expansion effects allowing simultaneously to fine-tune other gravitational effects at intermediate scales, which may be tentatively interpreted as a covariant parameterization of either cold dark matter either gravitational interaction corrections. Are derived bounds for the ELA metric functional parameter by considering the bounds on the deviation from standard General Relativity imposed by the current updated limits for the Pioneer anomaly, taking in consideration both the natural outgassing and on-board radiation pressure, resulting in an average Doppler acceleration outwards the Sun of a_p = +0.4^{+2.1}_{-2.0} x 10^{-10} (m/s^2). It is...

  8. Pioneering of Schools with International Standard to Respond the Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ipnugraha Ipnugraha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet respond the challenges of globalization Indonesia Government held a Pioneering of Schools with International Standard (RSBI. As an international standard schools pilot, these schools prepared gradually through the guidance by government and stakeholders. Within a certain period of four years it is expected that the schools is able to fulfill and meet the criteria of Schools with International Standard (SBI. Actually, in it’s implementation, RSBI faces many challenges, among others, were expensive anda require modern infrastructure, require a qualified teacher, SBI criteria and English implementation in education not yet possessed constitutional base. With RSBI it will form a national school with national education standards that have international quality and its graduates are able to compete internationally

  9. Boleslas Matuszewski: Pioneer of medical film-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matanović Dragana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Boleslas Matuszewski, born in 1856, was a pioneer in medical film-making. He worked simultaneously on improving his movie camera, film-making, collecting film documentation, and the idea of establishing an archive of medical films. Although his first attempts at filming and showing surgical operations didn't gain widespread approval, he was not discouraged, and succeeded in garnering support from a number of French doctors, who realized the importance of his ideas, not only in filming and forming medical film documentation, but also in the use of film for educative purposes. His visionary ideas gained acceptance when Dr. Doyen, on the occasion of the 66th Convention of the British Medical Society, in 1898, used film material as part of his lecture. Shortly afterwards, the Medical Academy took steps to show certain operative techniques, which represented both the confirmation and fruition of Matuszewski's ideas about filmmaking and the establishment of an archive of medical films.

  10. Redox pioneer: Professor Wulf Dröge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinscherf, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    Dr. Wulf Dröge is recognized here as a redox pioneer because he has published as first author an article on antioxidant/redox biology that has been cited more than 2000 times and over 10 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. One of the key discoveries (1987) was the stimulatory effect of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide on lymphocyte functions, which triggered a series of studies on the role of reactive oxygen species, glutathione, and its precursor cysteine in physiological and pathological processes. He discovered abnormally low cysteine and glutathione levels in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients and the age-related decline in the postabsorptive plasma cysteine concentration, which is believed to cause age-related oxidative stress. He developed a theoretical concept of the mechanism of aging and death, which is outlined in his books Avoiding the First Cause of Death and Challenging the Limits of the Human Lifespan.

  11. Grete Kellenberger-Gujer: Molecular biology research pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citi, Sandra; Berg, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    Grete Kellenberger-Gujer was a Swiss molecular biologist who pioneered fundamental studies of bacteriophage in the mid-20(th) century at the University of Geneva. Her life and career stories are reviewed here, focusing on her fundamental contributions to our early understanding of phage biology via her insightful analyses of phenomena such as the lysogenic state of a temperate phage (λ), genetic recombination, radiation's in vivo consequences, and DNA restriction-modification; on her creative personality and interactions with peers; and how her academic advancement was affected by gender, societal conditions and cultural attitudes of the time. Her story is important scientifically, putting into perspective features of the scientific community from just before the molecular biology era started through its early years, and also sociologically, in illustrating the numerous "glass ceilings" that, especially then, often hampered the advancement of creative women.

  12. Pioneers in pediatric psychology: integrating nutrition and child development interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Maureen M

    2015-05-01

    As part of the Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology series, this article provides a brief personal account of Maureen Black's career as a pediatric psychologist. It traces the transition of the Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) from a section of the Division of Clinical Psychology of the American Psychological Association (APA) to an independent division of APA, which occurred during my presidency of SPP. The article addresses three aspects of pediatric psychology that have been central to my career: pediatric nutritional problems, global child development, and the advancement of children's health and development through policy-related strategies. The article concludes with Lessons Learned and Recommendations for the future of pediatric psychology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Propulsion by light: visions of the German pioneer Eugen Saenger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Willy L.

    2005-03-01

    Although the laser was not yet invented Eugen Sanger, one of the most prominent German personalities in the early development of hypersonic flight and rocket technology suggested to use photons for the propulsion of spacecrafts in the fifties. In contrast to current schemes which are mostly aimed at laser induced ablation processes, Eugen Sanger started with the idea of using the radiation pressure itself for propulsion purposes. A review of his pioneering work in that area will be supported by numerous historical documents and personal remembrance showing his effort to promote unconventional ideas. The paper also emphasizes how some of the original concepts are being revisited and partly implemented by using today's laser technology.

  14. Pioneers of laser propulsion: Saenger, Marx, Moeckel, and Kantrowitz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Max M.; Hey, John D.

    2002-09-01

    The strength of empires and civilizations has often depended on novel forms of transportation: the Viking long boat, the Roman road, Iberian galleons, French and British steam ships, Indian trains, the car of the early twentieth century, the plane of the middle and the rocket of late. But Space has now come up against a barrier: the enormous and barely affordable expense of putting things into orbit and the unaffordable energy required to travel to the stars. The recent advent of very energetic lasers may reduce the cost. The pioneering ideas of the mid sixties appear less fanciful. Laser space propulsion is about to become such an important topic that its scientific origin and engineering roots need to be investigated. This is by no means an exhaustive survey. We review here the laser propulsion work of four eminent experts: Eugen Saenger, George Marx, Wolfgang Moeckel and Arthur Kantrowitz.

  15. Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology: Smashing Silos and Breaking Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertlieb, Donald

    2016-11-01

    As part of the Pioneers in Pediatric Psychology series, this article provides a brief personal account of my career as a pediatric psychologist. Educational and professional experiences often involved confrontations with silos and boundaries set by traditions limiting understanding and impact on children's healthy development. A pedigree in developmental psychology clashed with identity, guild, and loyalty dimensions of clinical psychology. A research emphasis challenged the emergent harmony of the scientist-practitioner models. The medical center and its silos collided with those of arts and sciences academia. Evolving as an applied developmental scientist specializing in pediatric psychology allowed for a gratifying and meaningful career with a range of scientific, pedagogical, and policy contributions. An abiding orientation toward human rights and social justice sustained progress and generativity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The GRACE checklist for rating the quality of observational studies of comparative effectiveness: a tale of hope and caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Nancy A; Velentgas, Priscilla; Westrich, Kimberly; Dubois, Robert

    2014-03-01

    While there is growing demand for information about comparative effectiveness (CE), there is substantial debate about whether and when observational studies have sufficient quality to support decision making. To develop and test an item checklist that can be used to qualify those observational CE studies sufficiently rigorous in design and execution to contribute meaningfully to the evidence base for decision support. An 11-item checklist about data and methods (the GRACE checklist) was developed through literature review and consultation with experts from professional societies, payer groups, the private sector, and academia. Since no single gold standard exists for validation, checklist item responses were compared with 3 different types of external quality ratings (N=88 articles). The articles compared treatment effectiveness and/or safety of drugs, medical devices, and medical procedures. We validated checklist item responses 3 ways against external quality ratings, using published articles of observational CE or safety studies: (a) Systematic Review-quality assessment from a published systematic review; (b) Single Expert Review-quality assessment made according to the solicited "expert opinion" of a senior researcher; and (c) Concordant Expert Review-quality assessments from 2 experts for which there was concordance. Volunteers (N=113) from 5 continents completed 280 article assessments using the checklist. Positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV, respectively) of individual items were estimated to compare testers' assessments with those of experts. Taken as a whole, the scale had better NPV than PPV, for both data and methods. The most consistent predictor of quality relates to the validity of the primary outcomes measurement for the study purpose. Other consistent markers of quality relate to using concurrent comparators, minimizing the effects of bias by prudent choice of covariates, and using sensitivity analysis to test robustness of results

  17. 76 FR 29249 - Medicare Program; Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model: Request for Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... participate in the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model for a period beginning in 2011 and ending...://innovations.cms.gov/areas-of-focus/seamless-and-coordinated-care-models/pioneer-aco . Application Submission... Accountable Care Organization Model or the application process. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background...

  18. Willem J Kolff (1911-2009): physician, inventor and pioneer: father of artificial organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Megan

    2012-08-01

    Medical pioneer Willem Johan Kolff was an inspirational father, son, physician and inventor. He founded the development of the first kidney dialysis machine, pioneered advances in the heart and lung machine, laid down the foundations for the first mainland blood bank in Europe and successfully implanted the first artificial heart into humans.

  19. Utilizing Free and Open Source Software to access, view and compare in situ observations, EO products and model output data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Aleksander; Hamre, Torill; Lygre, Kjetil

    2014-05-01

    The GreenSeas project (Development of global plankton data base and model system for eco-climate early warning) aims to advance the knowledge and predictive capacities of how marine ecosystems will respond to global change. A main task has been to set up a data delivery and monitoring core service following the open and free data access policy implemented in the Global Monitoring for the Environment and Security (GMES) programme. The aim is to ensure open and free access to historical plankton data, new data (EO products and in situ measurements), model data (including estimates of simulation error) and biological, environmental and climatic indicators to a range of stakeholders, such as scientists, policy makers and environmental managers. To this end, we have developed a geo-spatial database of both historical and new in situ physical, biological and chemical parameters for the Southern Ocean, Atlantic, Nordic Seas and the Arctic, and organized related satellite-derived quantities and model forecasts in a joint geo-spatial repository. For easy access to these data, we have implemented a web-based GIS (Geographical Information Systems) where observed, derived and forcasted parameters can be searched, displayed, compared and exported. Model forecasts can also be uploaded dynamically to the system, to allow modelers to quickly compare their results with available in situ and satellite observations. We have implemented the web-based GIS(Geographical Information Systems) system based on free and open source technologies: Thredds Data Server, ncWMS, GeoServer, OpenLayers, PostGIS, Liferay, Apache Tomcat, PRTree, NetCDF-Java, json-simple, Geotoolkit, Highcharts, GeoExt, MapFish, FileSaver, jQuery, jstree and qUnit. We also wanted to used open standards to communicate between the different services and we use WMS, WFS, netCDF, GML, OPeNDAP, JSON, and SLD. The main advantage we got from using FOSS was that we did not have to invent the wheel all over again, but could use

  20. Comparative effect of olmesartan and candesartan on lipid metabolism and renal function in patients with hypertension: a retrospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), including olmesartan and candesartan, are widely used antihypertensive agents. Many clinical studies have demonstrated that ARBs have organ-protecting effects, e.g., cardioprotection, vasculoprotection and renoprotection. However, the effect of prolonged olmesartan monotherapy on lipid metabolism in patients with hypertension is less well studied. We performed a retrospective observational study to compare the effects of olmesartan with those of candesartan, focusing on lipid metabolism and renal function. Methods We used data from the Clinical Data Warehouse of Nihon University School of Medicine obtained between Nov 1, 2004 and Feb 28, 2011, to identify cohorts of new olmesartan users (n = 168) and candesartan users (n = 266). We used propensity-score weighting to adjust for differences in all covariates (age, sex, comorbid diseases, previous drugs) between olmesartan and candesartan users, and compared serum chemical data including serum triglyceride (TG), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), potassium, creatinine and urea nitrogen. The mean exposure of olmesartan and candesartan users was 126.1 and 122.8 days, respectively. Results After adjustment, there were no statistically significant differences in all covariates between olmesartan and candesartan users. The mean age was 60.7 and 61.0 years, and 33.4% and 33.7% of olmesartan and candesartan users were women, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in mean values for all laboratory tests between baseline and during the exposure period in both olmesartan and candesartan users. In olmesartan users, the reduction of serum TG level was significant in comparison with that in candesartan users. Other parameters of lipid profile and renal function showed no statistically significant difference in the change from baseline to during the exposure period between olmesartan and candesartan users. Conclusions In this study, we

  1. Comparative effect of olmesartan and candesartan on lipid metabolism and renal function in patients with hypertension: a retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Tomohiro

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs, including olmesartan and candesartan, are widely used antihypertensive agents. Many clinical studies have demonstrated that ARBs have organ-protecting effects, e.g., cardioprotection, vasculoprotection and renoprotection. However, the effect of prolonged olmesartan monotherapy on lipid metabolism in patients with hypertension is less well studied. We performed a retrospective observational study to compare the effects of olmesartan with those of candesartan, focusing on lipid metabolism and renal function. Methods We used data from the Clinical Data Warehouse of Nihon University School of Medicine obtained between Nov 1, 2004 and Feb 28, 2011, to identify cohorts of new olmesartan users (n = 168 and candesartan users (n = 266. We used propensity-score weighting to adjust for differences in all covariates (age, sex, comorbid diseases, previous drugs between olmesartan and candesartan users, and compared serum chemical data including serum triglyceride (TG, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C, total cholesterol (TC, potassium, creatinine and urea nitrogen. The mean exposure of olmesartan and candesartan users was 126.1 and 122.8 days, respectively. Results After adjustment, there were no statistically significant differences in all covariates between olmesartan and candesartan users. The mean age was 60.7 and 61.0 years, and 33.4% and 33.7% of olmesartan and candesartan users were women, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in mean values for all laboratory tests between baseline and during the exposure period in both olmesartan and candesartan users. In olmesartan users, the reduction of serum TG level was significant in comparison with that in candesartan users. Other parameters of lipid profile and renal function showed no statistically significant difference in the change from baseline to during the exposure period between olmesartan and candesartan users. Conclusions

  2. Modelled and observed sea surface fCO{sub 2} in the southern ocean: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louanchi, Ferial; Poisson, Alain; Schauer, Bernard; Ruiz-Pino, D.P. [UPMC-CNRS, Paris (France). Lab. de Physique et Chemie Marines; Hoppema, Mario [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Tracer Oceanography; Bakker, D.C.E. [CNRS/ORSTOM/UPMC, Paris (France). Lab. d`Oceanographie Dynamique et de Climatologie; Stoll, M.H.C.; De Baar, H.J.W. [Netherlands Inst. for Sea Research, Texel (Netherlands); Wolf-Gladrow, D. [Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The results of an existing one-dimensional diagnostic model that calculates the fugacity of CO{sub 2} (fCO{sub 2}) in the surface layer of the southern ocean were compared with in situ observations from different ocean sectors and seasons. Our model is based on the translation of monthly variations of constraints fields into surface water fCO{sub 2} variations, and was used to assess the CO{sub 2} uptake of the southern ocean. In situ observations are useful to verify the model results and were here applied to improve the estimation of the CO{sub 2} uptake of the southern ocean south of 50 deg S. The model reproduces the fCO{sub 2} distribution in both Pacific and Indian sectors of the southern ocean satisfactorily, the mean deviation being only 5 {mu}atm. This discrepancy requires only a minor modification of the CO{sub 2} uptake calculated by the model for that area. By contrast, the model strongly underestimates the fCO{sub 2} levels in early spring and early winter in the Weddell gyre. This indicates that the CO{sub 2} uptake by the Atlantic sector of the southern ocean as calculated by the model, amounting to 0.47 GtC yr{sup -1}, should be reduced, possibly by about half of this value. The reason for this mismatch lies in the use of climatological physical constraints by the model, that do not sufficiently well describe reality. Partly, the mismatch is also caused by a difference of seasonal stage between the model which reflects climatological conditions and the real ocean which is affected by interannual variability. Based on this study it is concluded that the CO{sub 2} uptake of the southern ocean south of 50 deg S is likely to lie somewhere between 0.6 and 0.7 GtC yr{sup -1} for the 1990s, which is a high value compared to estimates from other investigations 48 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Comparative observation of protective effects of earplug and barrel on auditory organs of guinea pigs exposed to experimental blast underpressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao-jun; ZHU Pei-fang; LIU Zhao-hua; WANG Zheng-guo; YANG Cheng; CHEN Hai-bin; NING Xin; ZHOU Ji-hong; Chen Jian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the protective effects of earplug and barrel on auditory organs of guinea pigs exposed to experimental blast underpressure (BUP).Methods: The hearing thresholds of the guinea pigs were assessed with auditory brainstem responses (ABR).The traumatic levels of tympanic membrane and ossicular chain were observed under stereo-microscope. The rate of outer hair cells (OHCs) loss was analyzed using a light microscope. The changes of guinea pigs protected with barrel and earplug were compared with those of the control group without any protection.Results: An important ABR threshold shift of the guinea pigs without any protection was detected from 8h to 14d after being exposed to BUP with a peak ranging from -64.5kPa to -69.3kPa (P<0.01). The rate of perforation of tympanic membrane reached 87.5 % and that of total OHCs loss was 19.46% + 5.38% at 14d after exposure. The guinea pigs protected with barrel and earplug had lower ABR threshold and total OHCs loss rate compared with the animals without any protection (P < 0.01 ). All of the tympanic membrane and ossicular chain of the protected animals maintained their integrities.Meanwhile, the guinea pigs protected with the barrel had lower ABR threshold and total OHCs loss rate than those with earplug (P<0.01).Conclusions: The earplug and barrel have protective effects against BUP-induced trauma on auditory organs of the guinea pigs and the protective effects of barrel are better than those of earplug.

  4. Evaluating Frontal Precipitation with a Spectral Microphysics Mesoscale Model and a Satellite Simulator as Compared to Radar and Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Braun, S. A.; Matsui, T.; Iguchi, T.; Williams, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) onboard NASA Aqua satellite and a ground-based precipitation profiling radar sampled a frontal precipitation event in the US west coast on 30 to 31 December 2005. Simulations with bulk microphysics schemes in the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model have been evaluated with those remote sensing data. In the current study, we continue similar work to evaluate a spectral bin microphysics (SBM) scheme, HUCM, in the WRF model. The Goddard-Satellite Data Simulation Unit (G-SDSU) is used to simulate quantities observed by the radar and radiometer. With advanced representation of cloud and precipitation microphysics processes, the HUCM scheme predicts distributions of 7 hydrometeor species as storms evolve. In this study, the simulation with HUCM well captured the structure of the precipitation and its microphysics characteristics. In addition, it improved total precipitation ice mass simulation and corrected, to a certain extent, the large low bias of ice scattering signature in the bulk scheme simulations. However, the radar reflectivity simulations with the HUCM scheme were not improved as compared to the bulk schemes. We conducted investigations to understand how microphysical processes and properties, such as snow break up parameter and particle fall velocities would influence precipitation size distribution and spectrum of water paths, and further modify radar and/or radiometer simulations. Influence by ice nuclei is going to be examined as well.

  5. The Dynamic Atmospheres of Mira Stars: Comparing the CODEX Models to PTI Time Series Observations of TU Andromedae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillen, M.; Verhoelst, T.; Degroote, P.; Acke, B.; Van Winckel, H.

    2015-08-01

    We present our already-published evaluation of the effectiveness of the CODEX models, released in 2011, in representing the atmospheres of M-type Mira variables. We present a high-precision interferometric K-band time series of TU And, consisting of 50 nights that cover eight consecutive pulsation cycles. At each phase, the flux at 2.2μm was obtained, along with the spectral shape and visibility points in five channels across the K band. We show a comparison between these data and the dynamical self-excited CODEX model which gives the closest match in stellar parameters yet available. Both the spectrum and the visibilities are consistently reproduced around visual minimum phases. Near the maximum phases, however, the current models predict a photosphere that is too hot and compact, surrounded by an extended atmosphere that lacks H2O opacity, compared to the observations. A better coverage in the model parameter space is needed to make firm conclusions as to the cause of the discrepancies. In the case of TU And, the discrepancy might be lifted by adopting a lower value of the mixing length parameter combined with an increased stellar mass and/or a decreased metallicity.

  6. Comparative ultrastructural observations on the pineal organ of the pipefish, Syngnatus acus, and the seahorse, Hippocampus hudsonius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, H J

    1980-01-01

    A comparative ultrastructural study was made of the pineal organ of two related species of the Syngnathidae, the pipefish, Syngnathus acus, and the seahorse, Hippocampus hudsonius. Both species have a relatively small pineal organ, which ultrastructurally shows several similarities with the pineal of other teleosts. In the pineal organ of Syngnathus acus, the photoreceptor cells have well-developed outer segments consisting of about 15 to 60 saccules. The pineal supporting cells are characterized by the presence of numerous myeloid bodies. In Hippocampus hudsonius the pineal outer segments are scarce and poorly developed; generally, they show not more than 20 saccules. The apical parts of the supporting cells contain dense-core vesicles with a diameter varying from 100 to 180 nm. Corresponding vesicles were not observed in the pineal organ of Syngnathus acus. Arguments are presented for the suggestion that the pineal organ of the Syngnathidae, in spite of its relatively small size, still has a functional significance. In Syngnathus acus, light reaching the pineal organ directly might have a regulating effect on pineal activity. In Hippocampus hudsonius, however, light acting directly on the pineal organ appears to have minor effect on pineal function.

  7. Comparative observations of learning engagement by students with developmental disabilities using an Ipad and computer: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthanat, Sajay; Curtin, Christine; Knotak, David

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the use of the Apple iPad for learning by children with developmental disabilities (DD), including those on the autism spectrum. A single case design was used to record the participation of four students with DD when taught with their standard computer at baseline, followed by the introduction of the iPad. A six-component participation scale was developed to quantify observations of these students during the learning sessions. Visual analysis of data indicated no differences in participation with the iPad as compared to the computer for three of the four subjects. One subject appeared to have notably higher participation with the iPad. Individual variations were identified in each student along with some common concerns with attention, task persistence, and goal directed behavior with use of the iPad. Student academic scores improved during the course of iPad use. Nevertheless, the findings drawn from this pilot study do not justify the use of the iPad over the computer (and vice versa) for achieving academic goals in students with DD. The need to document best practices and barriers in use of emerging touch-tablet devices to support individualized education was clearly evident.

  8. Observed & Modeled Changes in the Onset of Spring: A Preliminary Comparative Analysis by Geographic Regions of the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enquist, C.

    2012-12-01

    Phenology, the study of seasonal life cycle events in plants and animals, is a well-recognized indicator of climate change impacts on people and nature. Models, experiments, and observational studies show changes in plant and animal phenology as a function of environmental change. Current research aims to improve our understanding of changes by enhancing existing models, analyzing observations, synthesizing previous research, and comparing outputs. Local to regional climatology is a critical driver of phenological variation of organisms across scales. Because plants respond to the cumulative effects of daily weather over an extended period, timing of life cycle events are effective integrators of climate data. One specific measure, leaf emergence, is particularly important because it often shows a strong response to temperature change, and is crucial for assessment of processes related to start and duration of the growing season. Schwartz et al. (2006) developed a suite of models (the "Spring Indices") linking plant development from historical data from leafing and flowering of cloned lilac and honeysuckle with basic climatic drivers to monitor changes related to the start of the spring growing season. These models can be generated at any location that has daily max-min temperature time series. The new version of these models is called the "Extended Spring Indices," or SI-x (Schwartz et al. in press). The SI-x model output (first leaf date and first bloom date) are produced similarly to the original models (SI-o), but do not incorporate accumulated chilling hours; rather energy accumulation starts for all stations on January 1. This change extends the locations SI model output can be generated into the sub-tropics, allowing full coverage of the conterminous USA. Both SI model versions are highly correlated, with mean bias and mean absolute differences around two days or less, and a similar bias and absolute errors when compared to cloned lilac data. To

  9. Annie Marion MacLean: “the mother of contemporary etnography” and pioneer in sociology distance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia García Dauder

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The article introduces Anne Marion MacLean into the United States' scientific sociology at its very origins (1892, when the Department of Sociology of the Chicago University was created. It also puts MacLean in a network called "Women's School of Chicago", and the forgotten contributions of these social sciences' pioneers, submitted to the American Journal of Sociology, are analyzed. Two MacLean's key contributions are highlighted: the correspondence courses in teaching sociology and her research by means of participant observation in workplaces focusing on women's work.

  10. Overload and neovascularization of Achilles tendons in young artistic and rhythmic gymnasts compared with controls: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarnicola, A; Maccagnano, G; Di Leo, M; Tafuri, S; Moretti, B

    2014-08-01

    The incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is very high in young female gymnasts (17.5 %). According to literature, ecography screenings show the tendons thickening, but at the same time it does not reveal a direct link to the clinical picture. The neovessels are involved in the pathophysiological process of Achilles tendinopathy. For this reason, we wanted to verify there between perfusion tendon values and the type of sport activity. We performed a clinical observational study monitoring the oximetry of the Achilles tendon and the epidemiological data of 52 elite female (artistic and rhythmic) gymnasts versus 21 age-matched controls. Analyzing the main limb, we revealed statistically higher oximetry values in the artistic gymnasts group (69.5 %) compared to the rhythmic gymnasts group (67.1 %) (t = 2.13; p = 0.01) and the sedentary group (66.2 %) (t = 2.70; p = 0.004), but we did not find any differences between rhythmic gymnasts group and the sedentary group (t = 0.68; p = 0.24). The multiple logistic regression model highlighted that the oximetry value of the main limb is not influenced by age, knowledge of the main limb, years of general and gymnastic sports activity (p > 0.05). We discovered an increase of Achilles tendon perfusion in the main limb in the artistic gymnast group. We hypothesize that specific figures of artistic sports activity are responsible for muscle overload and gastrocnemius-soleus group and, at the same time, these figures cause hyperperfusion of the tendon. Prospective longitudinal studies could explain if this could become a predictive sign of the next Achilles tendinopathy onset.

  11. 78 FR 13312 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Availability of Petition, Plant Pest Risk Assessment, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Availability of Petition... Plant Health Inspection Service has received a petition from Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc... has received a petition (APHIS Petition Number 11-244-01p) from Pioneer Hi-Bred International,...

  12. 77 FR 39696 - Atlas Pipeline Mid-Continent WestTex, LLC; Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc.; Notice of Intent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ...-000] Atlas Pipeline Mid-Continent WestTex, LLC; Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc.; Notice of Intent...-Continent WestTex, LLC and Pioneer Natural Resources USA, Inc. (Atlas and Pioneer), as joint applicants, in...: Geology and soils; Land use; Water resources, fisheries, and wetlands; Cultural resources; Vegetation and...

  13. Subpallial origin of a population of projecting pioneer neurons during corticogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morante-Oria, Javier; Carleton, Alan; Ortino, Barbara; Kremer, Eric J; Fairén, Alfonso; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2003-10-14

    Pyramidal neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex are generated in the ventricular zone of the pallium whereas the subpallium provides the cortex with inhibitory interneurons. The marginal zone contains a subpial stream of migratory interneurons and two different classes of transient neurons, the pioneer neurons provided with corticofugal axons, and the reelin-expressing Cajal-Retzius cells. We found in cultured slices that the medial ganglionic eminence provides the reelin-negative pioneer neurons of the marginal zone. Pioneer neurons sent long projection axons that went through the cortical plate and reached the subplate and the lateral border of the lateral ganglionic eminence. In the cultured slices, pioneer neurons were functionally mature: they displayed a voltage-gated sodium current, expressed functional alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, and showed gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) postsynaptic events that were modulated by presynaptic AMPA receptors. Pioneer neurons expressed the adhesion molecules L1 and TAG-1; the latter has been reported to control tangential migrations to the neocortex [Denaxa, M., Chan, C.-H., Schachner, M., Parnavelas, J. & Karagogeos, D. (2001) Development (Cambridge, U.K.) 128, 4635-4644], and we show here that the pioneer neurons of the marginal zone are the cellular substrate of such a function. Finally, we show that, in early corticogenesis, reelin controls both the tangential migration of cortical interneurons toward the cortical plate and the tangential migration of pioneer neurons toward the marginal zone.

  14. Pioneer vegetation on ash dumps in Oswiecim (southern Poland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojarczuk, T.; Kuczynski, B.

    1972-01-01

    The authors found fifty-three plant species growing on the ash dumps in Oswiecim, while in 1963 twenty-two species only were encountered there. Most of the self-sown plants belong to calciphilous, ruderal and xerophilous species. The pH of the ashes amounts to 9.5. Some of them, e.g. Matricaria chamomilla are index plants for acid habitats; others were hitherto encountered in wet habitats, e.g. Rumex obtusifolias, Myricaria germanica, Epilobium roseum, and others. Their occurrence on ash dumps is possible thanks to the considerable amount of precipitation (465 mm) during the vegetative period. The mosses are the pioneers of these dumps, e.g. Funaria hygromertrica and Bryum argenteum, which usually appear on the site of fire. The authors are of the opinion that a better knowledge of the plants appearing spontaneously on dumps and waste heaps may provide many useful conclusions which will help to obtain positive results at the recultivation of spoil heaps and industrial wastes. 9 references, 3 tables.

  15. Vivien Thomas (1910-1985): the backstage pioneer and educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chin Ting Justin

    2014-06-01

    Vivien Thomas (1910-1985) was an African-American scientist, pioneer, and renowned educator. Thomas's contributions to cardiovascular surgery were unequivocal, and yet it was only after his death that he gained more widespread recognition. Thomas's more notable work involves aiding in the discovery of the cause of traumatic shock, designing and guiding the first operation to treat Tetralogy of Fallot, carrying out the first atrial septectomy, and helping develop the electrical defibrillator. Thomas struggled amidst the adversities of racism and the Great Depression (1929-1941), armed merely with a high school degree. Nevertheless, his genius and determination eventually led him to receive an honorary doctorate from John Hopkins University. His story inspired the creation of the award winning PBS documentary in 2003 Partners of the Heart and also the 2004 Emmy Award-winning HBO film Something the Lord Made. This article will aim to provide an overview to the more notable events in Thomas's amazing tale, with a particular focus on his work on the Tetralogy of Fallot.

  16. The Experimental V4X Stirling Engine - A Pioneering Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundholm, Gunnar

    2003-11-01

    A Swedish double-acting 35 kW V4 Stirling engine was developed in a pioneering effort with a number of simplified and novel design features. The overall design was made with the intention to fit a passenger car. The engine used standard automotive journal bearing technology, a new robust crosshead design, and sliding seals. A balancing shaft was used to remove first-order imbalances. Cooler, regenerator and heater geometry were first inherited from the Philips 4-65 swash-plate engine. Later a sequence of experimental heaters were designed and tested. Very little has until now been published on this engine, since its development was discontinued in favour of the double-crankshaft U4 engines 4-95 (P40), 4-275 (P75 Mk II and III) and 4-123 (MOD1). These designs were in turn later abandoned (with exception of the solar P40 engine) because of problems with for instance rattling gears. The V4 design concept was then revived in the automotive 60 kW MOD2 engine and the successful Kockums submarine 75 kW V4-275 engine. This paper describes the innovative design features, heater performance results and applications used for the development of fast power control.

  17. The teacher training process through distance education: a pioneer experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Massaru Fujita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents briefly the actions conducted in the formation process and established partnerships to achieve the pioneering educational process of Distance Education (DE courses of the State University of Londrina (UEL-PR. The methodological design was developed according to the Qualitative Approach of Action-Research type that prioritizes the development and analysis of the process along with the "meaning" that people give to things and your life than actually the product itself. The data collected through questionnaires at the end of the course signal impressions (positive and constructive criticism we received and the meanings experienced teacher students (testimonials, chats, discussion forums, projects in the courses offered. The experience lived in these three courses: Virtual Learning Environment (60 hours; Tutoring in distance education (60 hours and Teaching Materials in Distance Education (60 hours, from its conception to its actual conclusion, make us think that we are on the right way and by TDIC, new horizons may open up to the institution in short- and medium-term.

  18. Bing Zhi: pioneer of modern biology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Li; Le Kang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Located in the lobby of the Institute of Zoology at Chinese Academy of Sciences,is a bronze statue of Dr.Bing Zhi.Many passers-by,especially the young ones,would ask who this person is and what he has accomplished.The short answer is,according to the plate of the statue,that he is a pioneer zoologist and educator and the founder of modern biology in China.The more detailed answer involves the word"first"for quite a few significances:As a biologist,Bing Zhi is the co-founder of the first non-governmental scientific society of China,the co-founder of the first Chinese scientific journal,the founder of the first biology department in China,the founder of the first biological research institute in China,and the founder of China Zoological Society; as an educator,he trained many young men who later became renowned specialists in their own areas.

  19. [The pioneer otolaryngologists in Eretz-Israel: 1911-1948].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golz, Avishay

    2013-07-01

    Until 1911 there was no ear nose and throat (ENT) specialist in Eretz-Israel. Dr. Moshe Sherman, an ENT specialist, disembarked at the port of Jaffa on August 4, 1911. He had trained in Moscow, and was the first otolaryngologist in the country. Between 1911 and 1948, over 100 otolaryngologists arrived in Eretz-Israel and were dispersed throughout the country from Safed and Tiberias in the North to Rehovot in the South. These physicians brought modern and advanced European medicine to Israel. Many left their imprint on the development of ENT medicine in the country, laying the foundations of today's otolaryngologic services both in clinical and academic spheres. ENT medicine, like other fields of medicine, evolved following the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. Many departments were opened and equipped with the best modern instruments and technology. Department heads are the pupils of our pioneer physicians. The memory of these talented and dedicated physicians should be remembered and cherished by their successors and all physicians in Israel.

  20. In-Space Manufacturing: Pioneering a Sustainable Path to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkheiser, Niki

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide meaningful impacts to exploration technology needs, the In-Space Manufacturing (ISM) Initiative must influence exploration systems design now. In-space manufacturing offers: dramatic paradigm shift in the development and creation of space architectures; efficiency gain and risk reduction for low Earth orbit and deep space exploration; and "pioneering" approach to maintenance, repair, and logistics leading to sustainable, affordable supply chain model. In order to develop application-based capabilities in time to support NASA budget and schedule, ISM must be able to leverage the significant commercial developments, which requires innovative, agile collaborative mechanisms (contracts, challenges, SBIR's, etc.); and NASA-unique investments to focus primarily on adapting the technologies and processes to the microgravity environment. We must do the foundational work - it is the critical path for taking these technologies from lab curiosities to institutionalized capabilities: characterize, certify, institutionalize, design for Additive Manufacturing (AM). Ideally, International Space Station (ISS) U.S. lab rack or partial rack space should be identified for in-space manufacturing utilization in order to continue technology development of a suite of capabilities required for exploration missions, as well as commercialization on ISS.

  1. Osseointegrated prostheses for rehabilitation following amputation : The pioneering Swedish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Brånemark, Rickard

    2017-04-01

    The direct attachment of osseointegrated (OI) prostheses to the skeleton avoids the inherent problems of socket suspension. It also provides physiological weight bearing, improved range of motion in the proximal joint, as well as osseoperceptive sensory feedback, enabling better control of the artificial limbs by amputees. The present article briefly reviews the pioneering efforts on extremity osseointegration surgeries in Sweden and the development of the OPRA (Osseointegrated Prostheses for the Rehabilitation of Amputees) program. The standard implant design of the OPRA system and surgical techniques are described as well as the special rehabilitation protocols based on surgical sites. The results of long-term follow-up for transradial, transhumeral, and thumb amputee operations are briefly reported including the prospective study of transfemoral amputees according to OPRA protocol. The importance of refinement on implant designs and surgical techniques based on the biomechanical analysis and early clinical trials is emphasized. Future aspects on osseointegration surgery are briefly described, including novel treatment options using implanted electrodes.

  2. Historiography of psychology in Brazil: pioneer works, recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Regina Helena de Freitas; Jacó-Vilela, Ana Maria; Massimi, Marina

    2010-08-01

    The evolution of the historiography of psychology in Brazil is surveyed, to describe how the field has evolved from the seminal works of the pioneer, mostly self-taught, psychologists, to the now professional historians working from a variety of theoretical models and methods of inquiry. The first accounts of the history of psychology written by Brazilians and by foreigners are surveyed, as well as the recent works made by researchers linked to the Work Group on the History of Psychology of the Brazilian Association of Research and Graduate Education in Psychology and published in periodicals such as Memorandum and Mnemosine. The present historiography focuses mainly the relationship of psychological knowledge to specific social and cultural conditions, emphasizing themes such as women's participation in the construction of the field, the development of psychology as a science and as a profession in education and health, and the development of psychology as an expression of Brazilian culture and of the experience of resistance of local communities to domination. To reveal this process of identity construction, a cultural historiography is an important tool, coupled with methodological pluralism.

  3. Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772): pioneer of neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Riech, Sheryl; Verma, Ketan; Loukas, Marios; Mortazavi, Martin; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron

    2011-08-01

    Emanuel Swedenborg is widely accredited for his religious fervor and devout dedication to his spirituality. He spearheaded the creation of what is known today as the New Jerusalem Church. However, Swedenborg also served as a prominent figure in the European Enlightenment, making noteworthy strides in the fields of mathematics and science. His acumen for science instilled in the medical world groundbreaking ideas that would forever innovate the practice of medicine. Not only did Swedenborg describe intricacies of the cerebral cortex but he also discovered the perivascular spaces, the foramen of Magendie, and the cerebrospinal fluid. He noted the importance of the pituitary gland or "arch gland" in maintaining normal neurological function. Lastly, in a period where the cortex was given no significant function, Swedenborg developed the idea of somatotopic organization, and this was almost 100 years prior to Fritsch and Hitzig. It is on the shoulders of such great pioneers as Emanuel Swedenborg that we base our current understanding of the nervous system.

  4. Heavy metals in emergent trees and pioneers from tropical forest with special reference to forest fires and local pollution sources in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breulman, G; Markert, B; Weckert, V; Herpin, U; Yoneda, R; Ogino, K

    2002-02-21

    Leaf samples of tropical trees, i.e. Dryobalanops lanceolata (Kapur paji), Dipterocarpaceae and Macaranga spp. (Mahang), Euphorbiaceae were analyzed for 21 chemical elements. The pioneer Macaranga spp. exhibited higher concentrations for the majority of elements compared to the emergent species of Dryobalanops lanceolata, which was attributed to the higher physiological activity of the fast growing pioneer species compared to emergent trees. Lead showed rather high concentrations in several samples from the Bakam re-forestation site. This is suggested to be caused by emissions through brick manufacturing and related activities in the vicinity. A comparison of Dryobalanops lanceolata samples collected in 1993, 1995 and 1997 in the Lambir Hills National Park revealed that certain heavy metals, i.e. Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Ti showed higher values in 1997 compared to the previous years, which could indicate an atmospheric input from the haze caused by the extensive forest fires raging in Borneo and other parts of Southeast Asia.

  5. Can the Pioneer anomaly be induced by velocity-dependent forces? Tests in the outer regions of solar system with planetary dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the impact on the orbital motions of the outer planets of the solar system from Jupiter to Pluto of some velocity-dependent forces recently proposed to phenomenologically explain the Pioneer anomaly, and compare their predictions (secular variations of the longitude of perihelion \\varpi or of the semimajor axis a and the eccentricity e) with the latest observational determinations by E.V. Pitjeva with the EPM2006 ephemerides. It turns out that while the predicted centennial shifts of a are so huge that they would have been easily detected for all planets with the exception of Neptune, the predicted anomalous precessions of \\varpi are too small, with the exception of Jupiter, so that they are still compatible with the estimated corrections to the standard Newton-Einstein perihelion precessions. As a consequence, we incline to discard those extra-forces predicting secular variations of a and e, also for some other reasons, and to give a chance, at least observationally, to those models ...

  6. Recognizing the fingerprints of the Galactic bar: a quantitative approach to comparing model (l,v) distributions to observation

    CERN Document Server

    Sormani, Mattia C

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method for fitting simple hydrodynamical models to the (l,v) distribution of atomic and molecular gas observed in the Milky Way. The method works by matching features found in models and observations. It is based on the assumption that the large-scale features seen in (l,v) plots, such as ridgelines and the terminal velocity curve, are influenced primarily by the underlying large-scale Galactic potential and are only weakly dependent on local ISM heating and cooling processes. In our scheme one first identifies by hand the features in the observations: this only has to be done once. We describe a procedure for automatically extracting similar features from simple hydrodynamical models and quantifying the "distance" between each model's features and the observations. Application to models of the Galactic Bar region (|l|<30deg) shows that our feature-fitting method performs better than \\chi^2 or envelope distances at identifying the correct underlying galaxy model.

  7. Pioneers of Study on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions; Achievements by Dr. Yoshioki Ishikawa and Dr. Yoshio Ohta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Kazuhiko; Nambu, Akira

    Dr. Yoshioki Ishikawa is a pioneer who carried out systematic electron stimulated desorption (ESD) investigations for hydrogen adsorbed on a clean platinum plate (H2/Pt) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions in 1942. (His name is spelled as Yosioki Isikawa in the original papers.) Although his papers are referred in several papers on desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET), these seem to be not as well-known as famous ones by Menzel, Gomer, and Redhead in 1964. We describe his pioneering work in this article. He developed an UHV apparatus made of glass with a Pt plate and an oxide cathode pumped by a small mercury pump via a liquid air trap. Clear ESD signals were observed for H2/Pt at excitation energies of 8, 12, 14, 33-46, and 46-51 eV. He assigned the desorbate to atomic hydrogen (H), because it was pumped by a glass wall baked above 350°C. Based on these results and the potential curves of H2 in the gas phase, he proposed a model for the ESD of H from H2/Pt that is, the first step is an electronic transition of adsorbed H2, and the second is the desorption of H along the repulsive potential surface of the excited state. This was the first introduction of the notion of DIET. He also carried out an ESD study of H2O/Pt in 1943. We also introduce achievements by Dr. Yoshio Ohta, who was another pioneer in the field of DIET. He measured electron-stimulated ion desorption from an oxidized Ni plate. He found that the threshold excitation energy for ion desorption is 22 eV, and that the kinetic energy of the desorbed ion is 1˜2 eV. To explain these results, he also proposed the concept of DIET.

  8. [Auguste Lumière, pioneer of the modern cicatrization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazard, B; Casanova, D; Zuleta, J; Desouches, C; Magalon, G

    2003-06-01

    At the "Grand Café" in Paris, on december 28, 1895 Louis and Auguste Lumiere displayed the cinematograph, a technical innovation that revolutionized the nascent motion picture. It was the first public projection of a film. While Louis continues his work on pictures and invents autochrome plates for colour photography, Auguste focused his interests on biology and medicine. Since Ambroise Paré, few doctors have been interested in the healing process. Although Carrel and Lecomte Du Nouy published the first studies in the early twentieth century, Auguste Lumière was a pioneer in the modern research and treatment of wounds. He applied the principles of experimental medicine. In his research he used 44 dogs to study the healing speed and the scar quality in certain areas and under general conditions. In the winter of 1914-1915 he studied in Lyon several hundred wounds of war casualties. In 1922 he established and published in a marvellous book the principles of normal healing. In the department of Pr Leon Bérard he was shocked by the fetidness of the wards where the dried bandages were changed once a week. In 1915 he perfected a revolutionary sterilized "treatment-bandage" consisting of 2 mm stitched gauze saturated with Vaseline and Perou's balsam: the "Tulle Gras. In order to disinfect wounds, he used an iodized solution, sprayed in little droplets. The lives of Auguste and Louis Lumière were full of projects and inventions. When Auguste died in 1954 he had registered more than one hundred patents.

  9. [Otto Ulmgren--a distinguished pioneer in oral surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordenram, Ake

    2006-01-01

    Otto Ulmgren (1844-1932) was graduated in 1874 as medical doctor. During sex months in 1875-76 he studied the diseases of teeth, mouth and neck at "Erste Wiener Zahntechnische Schule" in Wien. Then he auscultated at some prominent dental practitionars in Berlin. After that he practised further as dental surgeon in Stockholm. He was strongly engaged to improve dental education and contributed actively for starting the School of Dentistry in Stockholm in 1898. He appointed director of the school and chief of the Department of oral surgery. Otto Ulmgren's doctor's thesis was "Ofversigt af tandläkarekonstens historia" (Survey of the History of Dentistry) in 1877. He also published about 60 scientific articles especially dealing with dental education and oral surgery. Otto Ulmgren was one of the founders of Odontologiska Sällskapet i Stockholm (Dental Society in Stockholm) in 1901 and was its president during the period 1901-21. He was also one of the founders of Sveriges Tandläkareförbund (Dental Association of Sweden) in 1908. He was honorary member of many dental associations. Otto Ulmgren was regarded as a man of principle, an eminent teacher, a skilful clinician and scientist and a strong pioneer of dentistry, particularly in oral surgery. In leisure hours Otto Ulmgren devoted himself to singing and he was a member of the famous men's choir "Orphei drängar". He was also very interested in hunting and had a kennel with hunting dogs. He was appointed honorary member of the Swedish Kennel Club.

  10. Remedial measures for the PCB spill at federal Pioneer Limited in Regina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1980-01-01

    In August, 1976, a rupture occurred in a buried pipeline carrying transformer oil containing PCBs, from an outdoor buld storage area to the indoor manufacturing facilities of the federal Pioneer Limited (FPL...

  11. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Pioneer Bank, Hawaii, USA (NetCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Pioneer Bank, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths between 20 and 1000 meters. The netCDF...

  12. San Francisco's Pioneer Mother Monument: maternalism, racial order, and the politics of memorialization, 1907–1915.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, Brenda D

    2012-01-01

    The 1907–1915 campaign to create San Francisco's Pioneer Mother Monument provides both a case study of conservative uses of maternalism and a window into the political mutability of maternalist rhetoric. Ella Sterling Mighels, a pioneer descendant, utilized the monument campaign to promote white women's moral influence over middle-class men, to argue against Asian immigration and labor unrest, and to inculcate old-fashioned moral values among urban children. Although some of Mighels's contemporaries cited pioneer mothers as proof of women's fitness for suffrage, Mighels herself used the pioneer mother to argue against suffrage. The final statue, created by the sculptor Charles Grafly, failed to encapsulate Mighels's multivalent political message and to express her ideals about gender, race, class, and morality.

  13. Salivary Interleukin-6 - A pioneering marker for correlating diabetes and chronic periodontitis: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease which is multifactorial. Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the major systemic factors to influence the severity of chronic periodontitis. Numerous inflammatory markers are produced in the course of the disease which is secreted in saliva too. This study evaluates the salivary concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6 in periodontitis patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: Whole saliva samples were collected from eighty patients who were further divided into four groups; healthy (control group; n = 20, untreated periodontitis (UPD; n = 20, DM (DM; n = 20, and UPD + DM (n = 20 groups. Salivary IL-6 concentrations were determined by standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Results show that the UPD patients with and without DM exhibited higher concentrations of salivary IL-6 than the control group and diabetes groups. Further, the salivary IL-6 was correlated with glycosylated hemoglobin A levels in patients with diabetes. Conclusion: Concentration of salivary IL-6 was elevated in patients with periodontitis with and without diabetes. Thus, salivary IL–6 levels can be considered as an important biomarker in the diagnosis of periodontitis and diabetes.

  14. A multi-scale analysis of Namibian rainfall over the recent decade – comparing TMPA satellite estimates and ground observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Lu

    2016-12-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: The agreement between ground and satellite rainfall data was generally good at annual/monthly scales but large variations were observed at the daily scale. Results showed a spatial variability of rainfall trends across the rainfall gradient. We observed significant changes in frequency along with insignificant changes in intensity and no changes in total amount for the driest location, but no changes in any of the rainfall parameters were observed for the three wetter locations. The results also showed increased rainfall variability for the driest location. This study provided a useful approach of using TMPA data associated with trend analysis to extend the data record for ecohydrological studies for similar data scarce conditions. The results of this study will also help constrain IPCC predictions in this region.

  15. Subpallial origin of a population of projecting pioneer neurons during corticogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Morante-Oria, Javier; Carleton, Alan; Ortino, Barbara; Eric J. Kremer; Fairén, Alfonso; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2003-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex are generated in the ventricular zone of the pallium whereas the subpallium provides the cortex with inhibitory interneurons. The marginal zone contains a subpial stream of migratory interneurons and two different classes of transient neurons, the pioneer neurons provided with corticofugal axons, and the reelin-expressing Cajal–Retzius cells. We found in cultured slices that the medial ganglionic eminence provides the reelin-negative pioneer ...

  16. Birds and bats diverge in the qualitative and quantitative components of seed dispersal of a pioneer tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacomassa, Fábio André F.; Pizo, Marco Aurélio

    2010-09-01

    Although the overlap in fruit diet between birds and bats is low, they sometimes consume and compete for fruits of the same plant species. What is poorly known is how birds and bats compare with each other in relation to the effectiveness of seed dispersal. In this paper we contrasted birds and bats in relation to quantitative (the amount of fruits removed from plants) and qualitative (germination performance of seeds) components of the seed dispersal of Solanum granuloso- leprosum, a pioneer, small-seeded tree of open areas and forest edges in south Brazil. We tagged fruits on the plants and monitored their removal by day and night. We compared the final percent of germination and speed of germination of seeds ingested by birds and bats with non-ingested, control seeds. While bats removed more fruits than birds, performing better in the quantitative component, birds improved the germination performance of seeds, an aspect of the qualitative component of seed dispersal effectiveness. Although bats are more likely to deposit seeds in highly disturbed sites that favor the recruitment of pioneer plant species, birds frequent forest edges, which is also suitable habitat for S. granuloso- leprosum, We concluded that birds and bats are not 'redundant' seed dispersers for S. granuloso- leprosum because in conjunction they may enhance its recruitment by diversifying the microsites where seeds are deposited, performing in addition different ecological functions in terms of quantity and quality of dispersal.

  17. Comparing large-scale hydrological model predictions with observed streamflow in the Pacific Northwest: effects of climate and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Safeeq; Guillaume S. Mauger; Gordon E. Grant; Ivan Arismendi; Alan F. Hamlet; Se-Yeun Lee

    2014-01-01

    Assessing uncertainties in hydrologic models can improve accuracy in predicting future streamflow. Here, simulated streamflows using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model at coarse (1/16°) and fine (1/120°) spatial resolutions were evaluated against observed streamflows from 217 watersheds. In...

  18. The distribution of snow black carbon observed in the Arctic and compared to the GISS-PUCCINI model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dou

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus on the latest NASA GISS composition-climate model to evaluate its performance in simulating the spatial distribution of snow BC (sBC in the Arctic relative to present observations. The radiative forcing due to BC deposition to the Arctic snow and sea ice is also estimated. Two sets of model simulations have been done in the analysis, where meteorology is linearly relaxed towards National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP and towards NASA Modern Era Reanalysis for Research and Applications (MERRA reanalyses. Results indicate that both of the modeled sBC are in good agreement with present-day observations in and around the Arctic Ocean, except for underestimation at a few sites in the Russian Arctic. The overall ratio of observed to modeled sBC is 1.1. The result from the NCEP run is slightly better than that from the MERRA run. This suggests that the latest GISS-E2-PUCCINI model does not have significant biases in its simulated spatial distribution of BC deposition to the Arctic, and underestimation of biomass burning emissions in Northern Eurasia is preliminarily considered to be the main cause of the simulation biases in the Russian Arctic. The combination of observations and modeling provides a comprehensive distribution of sBC over the Arctic. On the basis of this distribution, we estimate the decrease in snow and sea ice albedo and the resulting radiative forcing. It is concluded that the averaged decrease in snow and sea ice albedo in and around the Arctic Ocean (66–90° N due to BC deposition is 0.4–0.6% from spring 2007–2009, leading to regional surface radiative forcings of 0.7 W m−2, 1.1 W m−2 and 1.0 W m−2, respectively in spring 2007, 2008 and 2009.

  19. Mergers and Mass Accretion Rates in Galaxy Assembly: The Millennium Simulation Compared to Observations of z~2 Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Genel, S; Bouché, N; Sternberg, A; Naab, T; Förster-Schreiber, N M; Shapiro, K L; Tacconi, L J; Lutz, D; Cresci, G; Buschkamp, P; Davies, R I; Hicks, E K S

    2008-01-01

    Recent observations of UV-/optically selected, massive star forming galaxies at z~2 indicate that the baryonic mass assembly and star formation history is dominated by continuous rapid accretion of gas and internal secular evolution, rather than by major mergers. We use the Millennium Simulation to build new halo merger trees, and extract halo merger fractions and mass accretion rates. We find that even for halos not undergoing major mergers the mass accretion rates are plausibly sufficient to account for the high star formation rates observed in z~2 disks. On the other hand, the fraction of major mergers in the Millennium Simulation is sufficient to account for the number counts of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), in support of observational evidence that these are major mergers. When following the fate of these two populations in the Millennium Simulation to z=0, we find that subsequent mergers are not frequent enough to convert all z~2 turbulent disks into elliptical galaxies at z=0. Similarly, mergers canno...

  20. Comparative Observation on the Effects of Radix Tripterygium Hypoglaucum Tablet and Tripterygium Glycosides Tablet in Treating Erosive Oral Lichen Planus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Li-mei; QI Xiang-min

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the therapeutic effects of Radix Tripterygium hypoglaucum tablet (THT) and Tripterygium glycosides tablet (TGT) in treating erosive oral lichen planus( EOLP). Methods: The patients were randomized into two groups, and they were treated with THT ( n = 47) or TGT ( n = 47), respectively. The therapeutic effects were evaluated after 3 months treatment. Results: For the patients of grade 1, the total efficacy in TGT group was 85.71%, compared with 52.38% in THT group, the efficacy was statistically greater in the group receiving TGT (P = 0. 043). However, for the patients of grade 2, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0. 173). Conclusion: TGT is more effective in treating EOLP than THT for grade 1 patients. However, TGT is. not suitable for patients of child bearing age.

  1. Comparative Risk Assessment to Inform Adaptation Priorities for the Natural Environment: Observations from the First UK Climate Change Risk Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Iain Brown

    2015-01-01

    Risk assessment can potentially provide an objective framework to synthesise and prioritise climate change risks to inform adaptation policy. However, there are significant challenges in the application of comparative risk assessment procedures to climate change, particularly for the natural environment. These challenges are evaluated with particular reference to the first statutory Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA) and evidence review procedures used to guide policy for the UK government...

  2. Description of algorithms for co-locating and comparing gridded model data with remote-sensing observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Langerock

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available MACC-II,III, Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate, is the current pre-operational Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS. It provides data records on atmospheric composition for recent years, present conditions and forecasts for a few days ahead. To support the quality assessment of the CAMS products, the EU FP7 project NORS created a server to validate the gridded MACC-II,III/CAMS model data against remote-sensing observations from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, for a selected set of target species and pilot stations. This paper describes in detail the algorithms used in this validation server.

  3. Usability Engineering of Games: A Comparative Analysis of Measuring Excitement Using Sensors, Direct Observations and Self-Reported Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa Alamoudi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Usability engineering and usability testing are concepts that continue to evolve. Interesting research studies and new ideas come up every now and then. This paper tests the hypothesis of using an EDA-based physiological measurements as a usability testing tool by considering three measures; which are observers‟ opinions, self-reported data and EDA-based physiological sensor data. These data were analyzed comparatively and statistically. It concludes by discussing the findings that has been obtained from those subjective and objective measures, which partially supports the hypothesis.

  4. Performance evaluation of the hydrogen-powered prototype locomotive 'Hydrogen Pioneer'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffrichter, Andreas; Fisher, Peter; Tutcher, Jonathan; Hillmansen, Stuart; Roberts, Clive

    2014-03-01

    The narrow-gauge locomotive 'Hydrogen Pioneer', which was developed and constructed at the University of Birmingham, was employed to establish the performance of a hydrogen-hybrid railway traction vehicle. To achieve this several empirical tests were conducted. The locomotive utilises hydrogen gas in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell power-plant to supply electricity to the traction motors or charge the on-board lead-acid batteries. First, the resistance to motion of the vehicle was determined, then operating tests were conducted for the speeds 2 km h-1, 6 km h-1, 7 km h-1, and 10 km h-1 on a 30 m straight, level alignment resembling light running. The power-plant and vehicle efficiency as well as the performance of the hybrid system were recorded. The observed overall duty cycle efficiency of the power-plant was from 28% to 40% and peak-power demand, such as during acceleration, was provided by the battery-pack, while average power during the duty cycle was met by the fuel cell stack, as designed. The tests establish the proof-of-concept for a hydrogen-hybrid railway traction vehicle and the results indicate that the traction system can be applied to full-scale locomotives.

  5. Dynamics of microbial communities during decomposition of litter from pioneering plants in initial soil ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esperschütz, J.; Zimmermann, C.; Dümig, A.; Welzl, G.; Buegger, F.; Elmer, M.; Munch, J. C.; Schloter, M.

    2013-07-01

    In initial ecosystems, concentrations of all macro- and micronutrients can be considered as extremely low. Plant litter therefore strongly influences the development of a degrader's food web and is an important source for C and N input into soil in such ecosystems. In the present study, a 13C litter decomposition field experiment was performed for 30 weeks in initial soils from a post-mining area near the city of Cottbus (Germany). Two of this region's dominant but contrasting pioneering plant species (Lotus corniculatus L. and Calamagrostis epigejos L.) were chosen to investigate the effects of litter quality on the litter decomposing microbial food web in initially nutrient-poor substrates. The results clearly indicate the importance of litter quality, as indicated by its N content, its bioavailability for the degradation process and the development of microbial communities in the detritusphere and soil. The degradation of the L. corniculatus litter, which had a low C / N ratio, was fast and showed pronounced changes in the microbial community structure 1-4 weeks after litter addition. The degradation of the C. epigejos litter material was slow and microbial community changes mainly occurred between 4 and 30 weeks after litter addition to the soil. However, for both litter materials a clear indication of the importance of fungi for the degradation process was observed both in terms of fungal abundance and activity (13C incorporation activity)

  6. Orbital Effects of a Time-Dependent Pioneer-Like Anomalous Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2012-05-01

    We work out the impact that the recently determined time-dependent component of the Pioneer Anomaly (PA), if interpreted as an additional exotic acceleration of gravitational origin with respect to the well-known PA-like constant one, may have on the orbital motions of some planets of the solar system. By assuming that it points towards the Sun, it turns out that both the semi-major axis a and the eccentricity e of the orbit of a test particle would experience secular variations. For Saturn and Uranus, for which modern data records cover at least one full orbital revolution, such predicted anomalies are up to 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than the present-day accuracies in empirical determinations of their orbital parameters from the usual orbit determination procedures in which the PA was not modeled. Given the predicted huge sizes of such hypothetical signatures, it is unlikely that their absence from the presently available processed data can be attributable to an "absorption" for them in the estimated parameters caused by the fact that they were not explicitly modeled. The magnitude of a constant PA-type acceleration at 9.5 au cannot be larger than 9×10-15 m s-2 according to the latest observational results for the perihelion precession of Saturn.

  7. Dynamics of microbial communities during decomposition of litter from pioneering plants in initial soil ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Esperschütz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In initial ecosystems, concentrations of all macro- and micronutrients can be considered as extremely low. Plant litter therefore strongly influences the development of a degrader's food web and is an important source for C and N input into soil in such ecosystems. In the present study, a 13C litter decomposition field experiment was performed for 30 weeks in initial soils from a post-mining area near the city of Cottbus (Germany. Two of this region's dominant but contrasting pioneering plant species (Lotus corniculatus L. and Calamagrostis epigejos L. were chosen to investigate the effects of litter quality on the litter decomposing microbial food web in initially nutrient-poor substrates. The results clearly indicate the importance of litter quality, as indicated by its N content, its bioavailability for the degradation process and the development of microbial communities in the detritusphere and soil. The degradation of the L. corniculatus litter, which had a low C / N ratio, was fast and showed pronounced changes in the microbial community structure 1–4 weeks after litter addition. The degradation of the C. epigejos litter material was slow and microbial community changes mainly occurred between 4 and 30 weeks after litter addition to the soil. However, for both litter materials a clear indication of the importance of fungi for the degradation process was observed both in terms of fungal abundance and activity (13C incorporation activity

  8. Comparative Risk Assessment to Inform Adaptation Priorities for the Natural Environment: Observations from the First UK Climate Change Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Brown

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Risk assessment can potentially provide an objective framework to synthesise and prioritise climate change risks to inform adaptation policy. However, there are significant challenges in the application of comparative risk assessment procedures to climate change, particularly for the natural environment. These challenges are evaluated with particular reference to the first statutory Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA and evidence review procedures used to guide policy for the UK government. More progress was achieved on risk identification, screening and prioritisation compared to risk quantification. This was due to the inherent complexity and interdependence of ecological risks and their interaction with socio-economic drivers as well as a climate change. Robust strategies to manage risk were identified as those that coordinate organisational resources to enhance ecosystem resilience, and to accommodate inevitable change, rather than to meet specific species or habitats targets. The assessment also highlighted subjective and contextual components of risk appraisal including ethical issues regarding the level of human intervention in the natural environment and the proposed outcomes of any intervention. This suggests that goals for risk assessment need to be more clearly explicated and assumptions on tolerable risk declared as a primer for further dialogue on expectations for managed outcomes. Ecosystem-based adaptation may mean that traditional habitats and species conservation goals and existing regulatory frameworks no longer provide the best guide for long-term risk management thereby challenging the viability of some existing practices.

  9. Comparative study of efficacy of excimer light therapy vs intralesional triamcinolone vs topical 5% minoxidil: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonunsanga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alopecia Areota is a chronic inflammatory disease that involves hair follicles, and sometimes nails, caused by T-cell mediated autoimmune mechanism. Current treatment modalities includes corticosteroids (oral, topical or intralesional, Minoxidil, Contact sensitizers like DNCB, DPCP and SADBE, Immunosuppressants like Methotrexate or Azathioprine, DMARDs like Sulfasalazine, and Phototherapy. Materials and methods: After taking consent, 40 patients treated with excimer light, 46 patients treated with triamcinolone injection intralesionally and 14 patients treated with topical minoxidil 5% were compared by their photographs taken prior to treatments, at 2 months and 6 months follow up. Results: Among the excimer group, 21/32 (61.76% with single patch and 1/6 (16.67% with multiple patches achieved >50% hair regrowth. Among Triamcinolone group, 23/30 (76.67% with single patch and 10/16 (62.5% with multiple patches achieved >50% hair regrowth. Among the Minoxidil group, 4/12 (33.33% with single patch and none .i.e 0/2 with multiple patches achieved >50% regrowth. Conclusion: After comparing the efficacy of Excimer light therapy, intralesional triamcinolone and 5% Minoxidil, it was concluded that intralesional triamcinolone seems to be the most efficacious. Multiple patches were more resistant than single patch. Scalp response much better than beard.

  10. Drivers' phone use at red traffic lights: a roadside observation study comparing calls and visual-manual interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Véronique; Sanchez, Yann; Brusque, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Phone use while driving has become one of the priority issues in road safety, given that it may lead to decreased situation awareness and deteriorated driving performance. It has been suggested that drivers can regulate their exposure to secondary tasks and seek for compatibility of phone use and driving. Phone use strategies include the choice of driving situations with low demands and interruptions of the interaction when the context changes. Traffic light situations at urban intersections imply both a temptation to use the phone while waiting at the red traffic light and a potential threat due to the incompatibility of phone use and driving when the traffic light turns green. These two situations were targeted in a roadside observation study, with the aim to investigate the existence of a phone use strategy at the red traffic light and to test its effectiveness. N=124 phone users and a corresponding control group of non-users were observed. Strategic phone use behaviour was detected for visual-manual interactions, which are more likely to be initiated at the red traffic light and tend to be stopped before the vehicle moves off, while calls are less likely to be limited to the red traffic light situation. As an indicator of impaired situation awareness, delayed start was associated to phone use and in particular to visual-manual interactions, whether phone use was interrupted before moving off or not. Traffic light situations do not seem to allow effective application of phone use strategies, although drivers attempt to do so for the most demanding phone use mode. The underlying factors of phone use need to be studied so as to reduce the temptation of phone use and facilitate exposure regulation strategies.

  11. Scaling relations between black holes and their host galaxies: comparing theoretical and observational measurements, and the impact of selection effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraf, C.; Di Matteo, T.; Treu, T.; Feng, Y.; Woo, J.-H.; Park, D.

    2015-11-01

    We use the high-resolution simulation MassiveBlackII to examine scaling relations between black hole (BH) mass and host galaxy properties (σ, total M* and LV), finding good agreement with recent observational data, especially at the high-mass end. We find Gaussian intrinsic scatter (˜half the observed scatter) about all three relations, except among the most massive objects. Below z ˜ 2 the slope of the relations remain roughly z-independent, and only steepen by 50 per cent by z ˜ 4. The normalization of the σ, LV relations evolve by 0.3, 0.43 dex, while the M* correlation does not evolve out to at least z ˜ 2. Testing for selection biases, we find MBH- or M*-selected samples have steeper slopes than random samples, suggesting a constant-mass selection function can exhibit faster evolution than a random sample. We find a potential bias among high-LBH subsamples due to their more massive hosts, but that bright (active) active galactic nuclei exhibit no intrinsic bias relative to fainter (inactive) BHs in equivalent-mass hosts. Finally, we show that BHs below the local relation tend to grow faster than their host (72 per cent of BHs >0.3 dex below the mean relation have an MBH-M* trajectory steeper than the local relation), while those above have shallower trajectories (only 14 per cent are steeper than local). Thus BHs tend to grow faster than their hosts until surpassing the local relation, when their growth is suppressed, bringing them back towards the mean relation.

  12. Pioneering water quality data on the Lake Victoria watershed: effects on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanelly, Tamie J; Johnson-Pynn, Julie; Okot-Okumu, James; Nyenje, Richard; Namaganda, Emily

    2015-09-01

    Four forest reserves within 50 km of Kampala in Uganda act as a critical buffer to the Lake Victoria watershed and habitat for local populations. Over a 9-month period we capture a pioneering water quality data set that illustrates ecosystem health through the implementation of a water quality index (WQI). The WQI was calculated using field and laboratory data that reflect measured physical and chemical parameters (pH, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen on demand, nitrates, phosphates, fecal coliform, and temperature turbidity). Overall, the WQI for the four forest reserves reflect poor to medium water quality. Results compared with US Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization drinking water standards indicate varying levels of contamination at most sites and all designated drinking water sources, with signatures of elevated nitrates, phosphates, and/or fecal coliforms. As critical health problems are known to arise with elevated exposure to contaminants in drinking water, this data set can be used to communicate necessary improvements within the watershed.

  13. Behaviour based Mobile Robot Navigation Technique using AI System: Experimental Investigation on Active Media Pioneer Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Parasuraman, V.Ganapathy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A key issue in the research of an autonomous robot is the design and development of the navigation technique that enables the robot to navigate in a real world environment. In this research, the issues investigated and methodologies established include (a Designing of the individual behavior and behavior rule selection using Alpha level fuzzy logic system  (b Designing of the controller, which maps the sensors input to the motor output through model based Fuzzy Logic Inference System and (c Formulation of the decision-making process by using Alpha-level fuzzy logic system. The proposed method is applied to Active Media Pioneer Robot and the results are discussed and compared with most accepted methods. This approach provides a formal methodology for representing and implementing the human expert heuristic knowledge and perception-based action in mobile robot navigation. In this approach, the operational strategies of the human expert driver are transferred via fuzzy logic to the robot navigation in the form of a set of simple conditional statements composed of linguistic variables.Keywards: Mobile robot, behavior based control, fuzzy logic, alpha level fuzzy logic, obstacle avoidance behavior and goal seek behavior

  14. Observation and comparative analysis of proton beam extraction or collimation by different planar channels of a bent crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Afonin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the experiment the efficiency of the 50 GeV proton beam extraction from accelerator by means of a bent crystal as a function of crystal orientation was measured. This allowed one to make a comparative analysis of efficiencies of high-energy protons deflection by different crystal atomic planes with different values of the electrostatic field. The results of simulation of high-energy protons deflection by means of crystal atomic planes and crystal atomic strings are also presented in the article. In the case of planar channeling the simulation shows a good agreement with experimental data. In the case of proton motion in the regime of stochastic scattering by bent atomic strings the simulation shows that angles of particle deflection are much greater than the critical channeling angle.

  15. Sorption of alkylphenols on Ebro River sediments: Comparing isotherms with field observations in river water and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Alicia [Center of Applied Geoscience, University of Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: anoqam@iiqab.csic.es; Endo, Satoshi; Gocht, Tilman [Center of Applied Geoscience, University of Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Barth, Johannes A.C. [Center of Applied Geoscience, University of Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Lehrstuhl fuer Angewandte Geologie, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Schlossgarten 5, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Lacorte, Silvia [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Barcelo, Damia [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Institut Catala de Recerca de l' Aigua (ICRA), Parc Cientific i Tecnologic de la Universitat de Girona, Pic de Peguera, 15, 17003 Girona (Spain); Grathwohl, Peter [Center of Applied Geoscience, University of Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    This study reports sorption isotherms of the endocrine disruptors nonylphenol (NP) and octylphenol (OP) in three sediment samples from the Ebro River basin (NE Spain), with organic carbon fractions (f{sub OC}) ranging from 0.0035 to 0.082 g{sub OC} g{sup -1}. All isotherms were fitted to the Freundlich model with slightly nonlinear exponents ranging from 0.80 to 0.94. The solubility of the compounds as well as the organic carbon (OC) content had the strongest influences on the sorption behavior of these compounds. Comparison of the laboratory-spiked samples with the native contamination of NP of 45 water and concurrent sediment samples resulted in reasonable matches between both data sets, even though the lowest concentrations in the field were not completely reached in laboratory tests. This good agreement indicates that sorption laboratory data can be extrapolated to environmental levels and therefore the distribution of nonylphenol between sediments and water can be predicted with a precision of one order of magnitude. Furthermore, laboratory experiments with simultaneous loading of NP and OP revealed negligible competition for sorption sites at low concentrations. - Laboratory sorption of nonylphenol compared to field concentrations showed good agreements.

  16. The (Political Pursuit of Victim Voice:
    (Comparative Observations on the Dutch Draft on the Adviesrecht

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée Kool

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Since contemporary victims’ policy features the pursuit of procedural justice, the criminal justice authorities have introduced procedural arrangements to serve victims’ voice. Western states use (some form of Victim Impact Statements, providing crime victims with room to inform the courts about the consequences of the crime. Nevertheless, victim voice is contested since it creates an imagery of bias and might cause repeated victimisaton. Indeed, victimologists point at the heterogeneity of victims’ needs, stating that the topical focus on victim voice executed during trial proceedings is one-sighted. Notwithstanding this critique, the Dutch legislator has recently lodged a proposal to introduce a so-called adviesrecht, encompassing the full scheme of the court’s decision-making (guilt and truth finding. Since the Dutch use non-bifurcated trial proceedings, the adviesrecht might have serious repercussions for the standard of a fair trial. A comparative (legal perspective on the (use of the Victim Impact Statement and the Victim Statement of Opinion as used in the United Stated of America appears helpful to expose the potential repercussions of extended victim voice in terms of procedural justice.

  17. Effects of low oxygen dead space ventilation and breath-holding test in evaluating cerebrovascular reactivity: A comparative observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Ke-Ju; Zhong, Ling-Ling; Ni, Xiao-Yu; Xia, Lei; Xue, Liu-Jun; Cheng, Guan-Liang

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the application prospect of low oxygen dead space ventilation (LODSV) in evaluating vasomotor reactivity (VMR) by comparison between LODSV and breath-holding test (BHT). Outpatient or inpatient patients who underwent transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) were enrolled into this study. These patients successively underwent BHT and LODSV. The cooperation degree, tolerance conditions and adverse reactions in patients were recorded, and VMR was calculated, compared and analyzed. Patients had poor cooperation during BHT. Except for compensatory tachypnea after BHT, patients basically had no adverse reaction. The main manifestations of patients undergoing LODSV were deepened breathing and accelerated frequency in the end of the ventilation, and increased heart rate and a slight decline in pulse oxygen that rapidly recovered after ventilation. The increase rate of blood flow velocity in patients undergoing LODSV was significantly higher than in BHT (PBHT (PBHT revealed a monophasic curve that slightly descends and rapidly increases, and LODSV revealed a curve that descends for a short time and slowly increases with a platform. LODSV can effectively eliminate the affect of poor cooperation in patients, and avoid intolerance caused by hypoxia. Hence, VMR value is more accurate than that determined by BHT; and this can reflect the maximum reaction ability of the blood vessels. Therefore, this method has higher clinical application value.

  18. Observational study comparing the performance of first-trimester screening protocols for detecting trisomy 21 in a North Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anita; Singh, Chanchal; Gupta, Rachna; Arora, Nidhi; Gupta, Abha

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate first-trimester screening protocols for detecting trisomy 21 in an Indian population. The present prospective study collected data from women with singleton pregnancies and a crown-to-rump length of 45-84 mm who presented at the fetal medicine unit of a tertiary care center in North India between June 1, 2006, and December 31, 2015, for combined first-trimester screening. Maternal age, nuchal translucency, nasal bone, and maternal serum levels of free beta human chorionic gonadotropin and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A were assessed for calculating the risk of trisomy 21. Tricuspid regurgitation and qualitative analysis of ductus venosus data were available from June 2010, and were included where available. Trisomy-21 detection rates were calculated for various screening protocols and were compared. There were 4523 women screened and 24 records of trisomy 21. Combined screening with maternal age, nuchal translucency, nasal bone, tricuspid regurgitation, and ductus venosus demonstrated optimal detection and false-positive rates of 93.8% and 1.9%, respectively. Screening using only maternal age yielded a detection rate of 37.5%; using fixed nuchal translucency cut-off values of 2.5 and 3 mm resulted in detection rates of 66.7% and 37.5%, respectively. Combined first-trimester screening performed well in an Indian population; combining maternal age, nuchal translucency, nasal bone, ductus venosus, and tricuspid regurgitation yielded the most accurate screening. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  19. A comparative, retrospective, observational study of the clinical and microbiological profiles of post-penetrating keratoplasty keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I.-Huang; Chang, Yi-Sheng; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Huang, Yi-Hsun

    2016-09-01

    Infectious keratitis after penetrating keratoplasty (PK) is a devastating condition that may result in graft failure and poor visual outcome. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent PK between 2009 and 2014, and recorded those who developed infectious keratitis. We compared the predisposing factors and organisms isolated to those identified in our previous study, conducted between 1989 and 1994. The incidence of post-PK infectious keratitis decreased from 11.6% (41 out of 354 cases, 1989-1994) to 6.5% (9 out of 138 cases, 2009-2014). Graft epithelial defect and suture-related problems remained the leading two risk factors of infectious keratitis after PK. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial infection decreased from 58.5% and 46.3% to 11.1% and 22.2%, respectively (P = 0.023 and P = 0.271). In contrast, fungus infection increased from 9.8% to 66.7% (P = 0.001) fungi have become the major pathogen for post-PK infectious keratitis. In conclusion, while the incidence of post-PK infectious keratitis has decreased over time, the number and frequency of fungal infections have significantly increased in the recent study period. Clinicians should be aware of the shifting trend in pathogens involved in post-PK infectious keratitis.

  20. Franz Ulinski, an Almost Forgotten Early Pioneer of Rocketry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, B. P.

    2002-01-01

    During the early period of rocket development several pioneers originating from the former Austro-Hungarian empire contributed their ideas to the new field of rocketry. The most well known - regarded as the "father of rocketry" in Western Europe - is Hermann Oberth. The others were Max Valier, Franz von Hoefft, Guido von Pirquet, Hermann Potocnik, Friedrich Schmiedl, Franz Ulinski, Eugen Saenger and others. Franz Ulinski (1890-1974) was born 1890 in Blosdorf, Moravia (now Mljadejow, Czech Republic). After attending schools in Wels, Upper Austria, he started a career in the Austro-Hungarian Army in 1910. During his service he worked beginning 1917 at an airplane engine plant in Fischamend and in 1919/20 at the "Fliegerarsenal" (aircraft arsenal) in Vienna. End of 1920 the army of the remaining republic of Austria had to severely reduce its forces and Ulinski was superannuated without further payment. Since 1917 he was also inscribed at the College for Advanced Technology in Vienna ("Technische Hochschule Wien"), but he never graduated, instead he autodidactically attained the VDI-Engineering-Diploma (VDI = "Verein Deutscher Ingenieure"- Association of German Engineers). During 1921-1924 he worked as a development engineer and later as a design engineer for a car factory. In 1925 he set up and ran his own company (radio sale enterprise) and in 1929 an engineering workshop. From 1938 to 1945 he first served as technical staff and later as a design engineer at the Siebel- Flugzeugwerke (Airplane-Factory) in Halle/Saale, Germany. After the Second World War he was employed as a design engineer at different engineering companies in Austria and he died 1974 in Wels. Ulinski's first contact with the topic of space flight occurred during the time period when he was a member of the Austro- Hungarian Army. Ulinski was one of the first in the german speaking part of Europe to publish an article with his ideas about space flight in 1920 (three years before Herman Oberth

  1. Distribution of mesorectal lymph nodes in rectal cancer: in vivo MR imaging compared with histopathological examination. Initial observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, D.M.; Brown, G.; Temple, L.; Blake, H.; Raja, A.; Toomey, P.; Bett, N.; Farhat, S.; Norman, A.R.; Daniels, I.; Husband, J.E. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Academic Department of Radiology, Cancer Research UK Magnetic Resonance Group, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the distribution of mesorectal lymph nodes using T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging compared with histopathological findings in patients with rectal carcinoma. Sixteen patients with rectal carcinoma undergoing primary surgery without pre-operative neoadjuvant treatment were evaluated using 3-mm axial T{sub 2}-weighted MR imaging. The position of each visible mesorectal node on imaging was localised by measuring its minimum distance from the mesorectal fascia (d{sub m}), its minimum distance from the rectal wall (d{sub r}) and its distance from the distal tumour margin (d{sub v}). Independent assessment of d{sub m}, d{sub r} and d{sub v} was made at histopathological examination. Eighty-five mesorectal nodes on in vivo MR imaging were matched to histopathological findings. On imaging, 67/85 mesorectal nodes were found at the level of the tumour and 84/85 were identified at or within 5 cm proximal to the tumour. Only one out of 85 nodes was seen below the inferior tumour margin. The mean difference of d{sub m} and d{sub r} obtained on in vivo MR imaging and histopathological examination was 0.7 mm (95% confidence interval, CI, -0.12 to 1.42 mm) and -1.1 mm (95% CI -2.29 to 0.14 mm), respectively. Almost all mesorectal nodes visible on MR imaging were found at the level of tumour or within 5 cm proximal to the tumour. This has implications for the planning of MR imaging and the level of mesorectal transection at surgery. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of homoeopathic medicines as add-on to institutional management protocol in Acute Encephalitis Syndrome: An exploratory observational comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K Manchanda

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This exploratory observational study suggests reduction of mortality and morbidity with add-on homoeopathic medicine. Further randomized controlled trial study with comparable groups is desirable. If findings are confirmed by subsequent research, add-on Homoeopathy might have relevant implication for its management.

  3. Pollen flow in fragmented landscapes maintains genetic diversity following stand-replacing disturbance in a neotropical pioneer tree, Vochysia ferruginea Mart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, S J; Cavers, S; Finegan, B; White, A; Breed, M F; Lowe, A J

    2015-08-01

    In forests with gap disturbance regimes, pioneer tree regeneration is typically abundant following stand-replacing disturbances, whether natural or anthropogenic. Differences in pioneer tree density linked to disturbance regime can influence pollinator behaviour and impact on mating patterns and genetic diversity of pioneer populations. Such mating pattern shifts can manifest as higher selfing rates and lower pollen diversity in old growth forest populations. In secondary forest, where more closely related pollen donors occur, an increase in biparental inbreeding is a potential problem. Here, we investigate the consequences of secondary forest colonisation on the mating patterns and genetic diversity of open-pollinated progeny arrays for the long-lived, self-compatible pioneer tree, Vochysia ferruginea, at two Costa Rican sites. Five microsatellite loci were screened across adult and seed cohorts from old growth forest with lower density, secondary forest with higher density, and isolated individual trees in pasture. Progeny from both old growth and secondary forest contexts were predominantly outcrossed (tm=1.00) and experienced low levels of biparental inbreeding (tm-ts=0.00-0.04). In contrast to predictions, our results indicated that the mating patterns of V. ferruginea are relatively robust to density differences between old growth and secondary forest stands. In addition, we observed that pollen-mediated gene flow possibly maintained the genetic diversity of open-pollinated progeny arrays in stands of secondary forest adults. As part of a natural resource management strategy, we suggest that primary forest remnants should be prioritised for conservation to promote restoration of genetic diversity during forest regeneration.

  4. Dynamics of microbial communities during decomposition of litter from pioneering plants in initial soil ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Esperschütz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In initial ecosystems concentrations of all macro- and micronutrients can be considered as extremely low. Plant litter therefore strongly influences the development of a degraders' food web and is an important source for C and N input into soil in such ecosystems. In the present study, a 13C litter decomposition field experiment was performed for 30 weeks in initial soils from a post-mining area near the city of Cottbus (Germany. Two of this regions' dominant but contrasting pioneering plant species (Lotus corniculatus L. and Calamagrostis epigejos L. were chosen to investigate the effects of litter quality on the litter decomposing microbial food web in initially nutrient-poor substrates. The results clearly indicate the importance of litter quality, mainly the amount of N stored in the litter material and its bioavailability for the degradation process and the development of microbial communities in the detritusphere and bulk soil. Whereas the degradation process of the L. corniculatus litter which had a low C/N ratio was fast and most pronounced changes in the microbial community structure were observed 1–4 weeks after litter addition, the degradation of the C. epigejos litter material was slow and microbial community changes mainly occurred at between 4 and 30 weeks after litter addition to the soil. However for both litter materials a clear indication for the importance of fungi for the degradation process was observed both on the abundance level as well as on the level of 13C incorporation (activity.

  5. Tracking and data system support for the Pioneer project. Volume 3: Pioneer 10 from 1 April 1972 through the Jupiter encounter period, January 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Systems support of the Pioneer 10 mission from April 1, 1972 through the Jupiter encounter period which ended January 5, 1974 is described. The period covered involves operations in the interplanetary environment from the time of completion of the second trajectory correction to the start of Jupiter encounter; the implementation, planning, and testing that lead to the Jupiter encounter; and the operations during the 60 day encounter period.

  6. Sliding-mode adaptive control of Pioneer 3-DX wheeled mobile robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian FILIPESCU

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Parameter identification scheme and discrete-time adaptive sliding-mode controller applied to Pioneer 3-DX wheeled mobile robot (WMR are presented in this paper. The dynamical model for mobile robot with one pair of active wheels, time–varying mass and moment of inertia have been used in sliding-mode control. Two closed-loop, on-line parameter estimators have been used in order to achieve robustness against parameter uncertainties (robot mass and moment of inertia. Two sliding-mode adaptive controllers corresponding to angular and position motion have been designed. Closed-loop circular trajectory tracking Pioneer 3-DX real-time control is presented.

  7. A question of strategy: To be a pioneer or a follower?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaličanin Đorđe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important questions faced by business leaders in the strategic management process is a choice of timing to launch new product/technologies and enter new markets. There are two options: to be a pioneer or to be a follower. Both have advantages and risks. Pioneers often have higher profitability, greater market share, and a longer business life, but the relative success of each strategy depends on several factors, both internal and external (pace of evolution of technology and markets.

  8. The pioneer cohort of curriculum reform: Guinea pigs or trail-blazers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLean Michelle

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With curriculum reform, whether we admit it or not, the first cohort of students will be 'test-driving' the new programme. Not only are they the pioneers of a new curriculum, but as they progress through their studies, they experience each year of the innovation for the first time. As curriculum designers, we learn from their experiences and their feedback to improve the programme content and delivery, invariably for subsequent cohorts. A considerable onus therefore rests with this pioneer group, and their contribution to curriculum design, evaluation and programme revision should be valued.

  9. Applications of propensity score methods in observational comparative effectiveness and safety research: where have we come and where should we go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Bijan J; Moriarty, James P; Crown, William H; Doshi, Jalpa A

    2014-01-01

    Propensity score (PS) methods have proliferated in recent years in observational studies in general and in observational comparative effectiveness research (CER) in particular. PS methods are an important set of tools for estimating treatment effects in observational studies, enabling adjustment for measured confounders in an easy-to-understand and transparent way. This article demonstrates how PS methods have been used to address specific CER questions from 2001 through to 2012 by identifying six impactful studies from this period. This article also discusses areas for improvement, including data infrastructure, and a unified set of guidelines in terms of PS implementation and reporting, which will boost confidence in evidence generated through observational CER using PS methods.

  10. Large-scale numerical simulations of star formation put to the test: Comparing synthetic images and actual observations for statistical samples of protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Frimann, Søren; Haugbølle, Troels

    2015-01-01

    (abridged) Context: Both observations and simulations of embedded protostars have progressed rapidly in recent years. Bringing them together is an important step in advancing our knowledge about the earliest phases of star formation. Aims: To compare synthetic continuum images and SEDs, created from large-scale numerical simulations, to observational studies - thereby aiding both in the interpretation of observations and test the fidelity of the simulations. Methods: The radiative transfer code RADMC-3D is used to create synthetic continuum images and SEDs of protostellar systems in a large numerical simulation of a molecular cloud. More than 13000 unique radiative transfer models are produced of a variety of different protostellar systems. Results: Over the course of 0.76 Myr more than 500 protostars are formed in the simulation - primarily within two sub-clusters. Synthetic SEDs are used to calculate evolutionary tracers Tbol and Lsmm/Lbol. It is shown that, while the observed distributions of tracers are w...

  11. A prospective, observational study comparing the PK/PD relationships of generic Meropenem (Mercide®) to the innovator brand in critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mer, Mervyn; Snyman, Jacques Rene; van Rensburg, Constance Elizabeth Jansen; van Tonder, Jacob John; Laurens, Ilze

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinicians’ skepticism, fueled by evidence of inferiority of some multisource generic antimicrobial products, results in the underutilization of more cost-effective generics, especially in critically ill patients. The aim of this observational study was to demonstrate equivalence between the generic or comparator brand of meropenem (Mercide®) and the leading innovator brand (Meronem®) by means of an ex vivo technique whereby antimicrobial activity is used to estimate plasma concentration of the active moiety. Methods Patients from different high care and intensive care units were recruited for observation when prescribed either of the meropenem brands under investigation. Blood samples were collected over 6 hours after a 30 minute infusion of the different brands. Meropenem concentration curves were established against United States Pharmacopeia standard meropenem (Sigma-Aldrich) by using standard laboratory techniques for culture of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Patients’ plasma samples were tested ex vivo, using a disc diffusion assay, to confirm antimicrobial activity and estimate plasma concentrations of the two brands. Results Both brands of meropenem demonstrated similar curves in donor plasma when concentrations in vials were confirmed. Patient-specific serum concentrations were determined from zones of inhibition against a standard laboratory Klebsiella strain ex vivo, confirming at least similar in vivo concentrations as the concentration curves (90% confidence interval) overlapped; however, the upper limit of the area under the curve for the ratio comparator/innovator exceeded the 1.25-point estimate, i.e., 4% higher for comparator meropenem. Conclusion This observational, in-practice study demonstrates similar ex vivo activity and in vivo plasma concentration time curves for the products under observation. Assay sensitivity is also confirmed. Current registration status of generic small molecules is in place. The products are therefore

  12. Observer agreement in the reporting of knee and lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations: Selectively trained MR radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brealey, S., E-mail: stephen.brealey@york.ac.uk [Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Piper, K., E-mail: keith.piper@canterbury.ac.uk [Department of Allied Health Professions, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1QU (United Kingdom); King, D., E-mail: david.g.king@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Bland, M., E-mail: martin.bland@york.ac.uk [Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Caddick, J., E-mail: Julie.Caddick@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Campbell, P., E-mail: peter.campbell@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Gibbon, A., E-mail: anthony.j.gibbon@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Highland, A., E-mail: Adrian.Highland@sth.nhs.uk [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Herries Road, Sheffield S5 7AU (United Kingdom); Jenkins, N., E-mail: neil.jenkins@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Petty, D., E-mail: daniel.petty@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Warren, D., E-mail: david.warren@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To assess agreement between trained radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist when reporting on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the knee and lumbar spine and to examine the subsequent effect of discordant reports on patient management and outcome. Methods: At York Hospital two MR radiographers, two consultant radiologists and an index radiologist reported on a prospective, random sample of 326 MRI examinations. The radiographers reported in clinical practice conditions and the radiologists during clinical practice. An independent consultant radiologist compared these reports with the index radiologist report for agreement. Orthopaedic surgeons then assessed whether the discordance between reports was clinically important. Results: Overall observer agreement with the index radiologist was comparable between observers and ranged from 54% to 58%; for the knee it was 46–57% and for the lumbar spine was 56–66%. There was a very small observed difference of 0.6% (95% CI −11.9 to 13.0) in mean agreement between the radiographers and radiologists (P = 0.860). For the knee, lumbar spine and overall, radiographers’ discordant reports, when compared with the index radiologist, were less likely to have a clinically important effect on patient outcome than the radiologists’ discordant reports. Less than 10% of observer's reports were sufficiently discordant with the index radiologist's reports to be clinically important. Conclusion: Carefully selected MR radiographers with postgraduate education and training reported in clinical practice conditions on specific MRI examinations of the knee and lumbar spine to a level of agreement comparable with non-musculoskeletal consultant radiologists.

  13. Evaluation of Web-based Dietary Assessment Software for Children: comparing reported fruit, juice and vegetable intakes with plasma carotenoid concentration and school lunch observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia; Bysted, Anette; Trolle, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    by comparing intake with plasma carotenoid concentration, and by comparing the reported FJV intake to actually eaten FJV, as observed by a photographic method. A total of eighty-one children, assisted by parents, reported their diet for seven consecutive days. For the same five schooldays as they reported...... their diet, the children's school lunch was photographed and weighed before and after eating. In the week after the diet reporting, fasting blood samples were taken. Self-reported intake of FJV and estimated intake of carotenoids were compared with plasma carotenoid concentration. Accuracy of self......-reported food and FJV consumption at school lunch was measured in terms of matches, intrusion, omission and faults, when compared with images and weights of lunch intake. Self-reported intake of FJV was significantly correlated with the total carotenoid concentration (0·58) (P

  14. A comparative study of field-oriented control and direct-torque control of induction motors using an adaptive flux observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikhi Abdesselam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative study of field-oriented control (IFOC and direct-torque control (DTC of induction motors using an adaptive flux observer. The main characteristics of field-oriented control and direct torque control schemes are studied by simulation, emphasizing their advantages and disadvantages. The performances of the two control schemes are evaluated in terms of torque, current ripples and transient responses to load toque variations. We can nevertheless observe a slight advance of DTC scheme compared to FOC scheme regarding the dynamic flux control performance and the implementation complexity. Consequently, the choice of one or the other scheme will depend mainly on specific requirements of the application.

  15. Research on the weed control degree and glyphosate soil biodegradation in apple plantations (Pioneer variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersilia ALEXA

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we follow control degree of glyphosate herbicide on weeds in apple plantations (Pioneer variety of the Research Station Timisoara. It was also followed glyphosate biodegradation capacity in the soil by determining the amount of CO2 released by the action of microorganisms on C14 glyphosate marked isotope. Laboratory analysis of glyphosate residues in soil was made using a Liquid Scintillation TRIATHLER. Glyphosate biodegradation ability in the presence of soil microorganisms is high, so glyphosate residues remaining in soil, in terms of its use in weed combating, are minimal. Study of glyphosate biodegradation capacity in the experimental field indicates that the CO2 fraction accumulated after 50 days is 28.02% for samples exposed in the experimental field. Weather conditions, especially temperature variations between day and night, influences the activity of soilmicroorganisms and affect biodegraded glyphosate percentage.Chemical method of weed control consisted in: herbicide used was Roundup 3 l/ha (glyphosate isopropyl amine salt 360 g/l and are based on chemical application on weeds, on the rows of trees, on their uptake and translocation in their organs having as principal scope the total destruction of weeds. The experimental results obtained reveal a weed combat degree of 82.98% , in the case of chemical variant, compared with control variant. The species combated mainly due to glyphosate herbicide, which is no longer found in the final mapping are: Capsella bursa-pastoris, Chenopodium album, Echinochloa crus-galli, Plantago major, Polygonum aviculare. Total combated weeds /m2 with glyphosate is 126.67.

  16. Ancient DNA analysis of 8000 B.C. near eastern farmers supports an early neolithic pioneer maritime colonization of Mainland Europe through Cyprus and the Aegean Islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Fernández

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The genetic impact associated to the Neolithic spread in Europe has been widely debated over the last 20 years. Within this context, ancient DNA studies have provided a more reliable picture by directly analyzing the protagonist populations at different regions in Europe. However, the lack of available data from the original Near Eastern farmers has limited the achieved conclusions, preventing the formulation of continental models of Neolithic expansion. Here we address this issue by presenting mitochondrial DNA data of the original Near-Eastern Neolithic communities with the aim of providing the adequate background for the interpretation of Neolithic genetic data from European samples. Sixty-three skeletons from the Pre Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB sites of Tell Halula, Tell Ramad and Dja'de El Mughara dating between 8,700-6,600 cal. B.C. were analyzed, and 15 validated mitochondrial DNA profiles were recovered. In order to estimate the demographic contribution of the first farmers to both Central European and Western Mediterranean Neolithic cultures, haplotype and haplogroup diversities in the PPNB sample were compared using phylogeographic and population genetic analyses to available ancient DNA data from human remains belonging to the Linearbandkeramik-Alföldi Vonaldiszes Kerámia and Cardial/Epicardial cultures. We also searched for possible signatures of the original Neolithic expansion over the modern Near Eastern and South European genetic pools, and tried to infer possible routes of expansion by comparing the obtained results to a database of 60 modern populations from both regions. Comparisons performed among the 3 ancient datasets allowed us to identify K and N-derived mitochondrial DNA haplogroups as potential markers of the Neolithic expansion, whose genetic signature would have reached both the Iberian coasts and the Central European plain. Moreover, the observed genetic affinities between the PPNB samples and the modern populations

  17. Ancient DNA Analysis of 8000 B.C. Near Eastern Farmers Supports an Early Neolithic Pioneer Maritime Colonization of Mainland Europe through Cyprus and the Aegean Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Eva; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Gamba, Cristina; Prats, Eva; Cuesta, Pedro; Anfruns, Josep; Molist, Miquel; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Turbón, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The genetic impact associated to the Neolithic spread in Europe has been widely debated over the last 20 years. Within this context, ancient DNA studies have provided a more reliable picture by directly analyzing the protagonist populations at different regions in Europe. However, the lack of available data from the original Near Eastern farmers has limited the achieved conclusions, preventing the formulation of continental models of Neolithic expansion. Here we address this issue by presenting mitochondrial DNA data of the original Near-Eastern Neolithic communities with the aim of providing the adequate background for the interpretation of Neolithic genetic data from European samples. Sixty-three skeletons from the Pre Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB) sites of Tell Halula, Tell Ramad and Dja'de El Mughara dating between 8,700–6,600 cal. B.C. were analyzed, and 15 validated mitochondrial DNA profiles were recovered. In order to estimate the demographic contribution of the first farmers to both Central European and Western Mediterranean Neolithic cultures, haplotype and haplogroup diversities in the PPNB sample were compared using phylogeographic and population genetic analyses to available ancient DNA data from human remains belonging to the Linearbandkeramik-Alföldi Vonaldiszes Kerámia and Cardial/Epicardial cultures. We also searched for possible signatures of the original Neolithic expansion over the modern Near Eastern and South European genetic pools, and tried to infer possible routes of expansion by comparing the obtained results to a database of 60 modern populations from both regions. Comparisons performed among the 3 ancient datasets allowed us to identify K and N-derived mitochondrial DNA haplogroups as potential markers of the Neolithic expansion, whose genetic signature would have reached both the Iberian coasts and the Central European plain. Moreover, the observed genetic affinities between the PPNB samples and the modern populations of Cyprus and

  18. Comparative Analysis of Atmospheric Glyoxal Column Densities Retrieved from MAX-DOAS Observations in Pakistan and during MAD-CAT Field Campaign in Mainz, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Fahim Khokhar; Syeda Ifraw Naveed; Junaid Khayyam Butt; Zain Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Photolysis of glyoxal (CHOCHO) and other volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the presence of NOx results in tropospheric ozone and secondary organic pollutants formation. Glyoxal, with a relatively short lifetime, plays an important role in VOC formation in the planetary boundary layer. This study presents a comparative analysis of CHOCHO retrieval from mini MAX-DOAS observations at two different monitoring sites in Germany and Pakistan. Firstly, CHOCHO differential slant column densities (DS...

  19. The Now Frontier. Pioneer to Jupiter. Man Links Earth and Planets. Issue No. 1-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973

    This packet of space science instructional materials includes five issues related to the planet Jupiter. Each issue presents factual material about the planet, diagramatic representations of its movements and positions relative to bright stars or the earth, actual photographs and/or tables of data collected relevant to Pioneer 10, the spacecraft…

  20. The Solar House: Pioneering Sustainable Design. By Anthony Denzer. New York: Rizzoli, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Koehler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This review of The Solar House: Pioneering Sustainable Design, by Anthony Denzer, discusses the important contributions of this book to the history of midcentury modern architecture, and considers the role of solar houses in the context of current debates over sustainability.

  1. Results of Pioneer 10 and 11 meteoroid experiments - Interplanetary and near-Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The meteoroid penetration detectors on Pioneer 10 (channel 0) recorded 95 penetrations through the 25-micron stainless steel test material while the spacecraft was between 1 and 18 AU. The spatial density of 10 to the -9 g meteoroids is found to be essentially constant between 1 and 18 AU. The meteoroid penetration detectors on Pioneer 11 recorded 87 penetrations (55 on channel 0 and 32 on channel 1) through the 50-micron stainless steel test material while the spacecraft was between 1 and 9 AU. It is found that the meteoroids between 4 and 5 AU are not in direct circular or near-circular orbits near the ecliptic plane. The Pioneer 11 data obtained between 4 and 5 AU are best explained by the meteoroids being in randomly inclined orbits of high eccentricity. If meteoroids are in these cometlike orbits, the great increase in penetration flux previously measured near Jupiter with the Pioneer 10 experiment cannot be attributed to gravitational focusing unless the size distribution of meteoroids changes substantially between 1 and 5 AU. At Saturn encounter, the penetration flux increased by about three orders of magnitude, probably as the result of impacts from ring particles. Saturn's ring E is estimated to be 1800 km thick with an optical thickness greater than 10 to the -8.

  2. An Interview with Sunny Hansen: Pioneer and Innovator in Counseling and Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovholt, Thomas S.; Hage, Sally M.; Kachgal, Mera M.; Gama, Elizabeth Pinheiro

    2007-01-01

    During her 45-year career, Sunny Hansen was a pioneer and innovator in counseling and career development. She has lived the holistic life about which she writes and teaches. In this interview, she discussed the major influences on her life, the evolution of her professional career from English and journalism teacher to counselor and counselor…

  3. A Tribute to Professor Rene H. Miller - A Pioneer in Aeromechanics and Rotary Wing Flight Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.; Johnson, Wayne; Scully, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Rene H. Miller (May 19, 1916 January 28, 2003), Emeritus H. N. Slater Professor of Flight Transportation, was one of the most influential pioneers in rotary wing aeromechanics as well as a visionary whose dream was the development of a tilt-rotor based short haul air transportation system. This paper pays a long overdue tribute to his memory and to his extraordinary contributions.

  4. De Vries & Mul, A.M. Cooper, Pioneer of Puppet Animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, Paul

    2012-01-01

    abstractReview of Tjitte de Vries and Ati Mul, ‘They Thought it was a Marvel’. Arthur Melbourne Cooper (1874-1961) Pioneer of Puppet Animation. Amsterdam (Pallas Publications/AmsterdamUniversity Press) 2009, 576 p., 105 ill.; includesdvd of 6 films, isbn 978 908 555016 7

  5. CRED Gridded Bathymetry near Lisianski Island and Pioneer Bank (100-002), Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — File 100-002b is a 60-m ASCII grid of depth data collected near Lisianski Island and Pioneer Bank in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands as of May 2003. This grid has...

  6. CRED Gridded Bathymetry near South Pioneer Bank (100-003), Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — File 100-003b is a 60-m ASCII grid of depth data collected near south Pioneer Bank in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands as of May 2003. This grid has been produced...

  7. Giuseppe Pasta (1742-1823): protophysician and pioneer of psychological studies in the medical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Veneroni, Laura; Poli, Marco

    2009-11-01

    Giuseppe Pasta was a pioneer of psychological support in physical disease. Born in Bergamo, Italy, he was a cousin of the physician Andrea Pasta who was a pupil of Giovanni Battista Morgagni. Giuseppe's cultural and clinical resources were the teachings of Francesco Redi's medical school in Tuscany. This paper discusses the courage and philosophical tolerance of disease and the etiquette of the physician.

  8. Turning Points in the Lives of Two Pioneer Arab Women Principals in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arar, Khalid Husny; Abu-Rabia-Queder, Sarab

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the managerial career development of two Arab women, pioneer principals within the Arab education system in Israel. Using in-depth interviews relating to the characteristics of the different stages leading up to and within their careers as school principals (childhood and academic studies; the struggle to achieve the…

  9. The effects of inter-industry and country difference in supplier relationships on pioneering innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ying; Vanhaverbeke, Wim

    2009-01-01

    and their suppliers in Canada are likely to result in pioneering innovations. The knowledge difference is decomposed into two dimensions: the inter-industrial dimension and the geographic dimension in national context. Using the Canadian Innovation database, we found the inter-industry difference has a positive...

  10. Pioneering the human development revolution: Analysing the trajectory of Mahbub ul Haq

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMahbub ul Haq's work to coordinate, establish and propagate the human development approach offers an example of effective leadership in promoting more ethical socio-economic development. This article reviews Pioneering the Human Development Revolution-An Intellectual Biography of Mahbub

  11. Age-dependent radial increases in wood specific gravity of tropical pioneers in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce G. Williamson; Michael C. Wiemann

    2010-01-01

    Wood specific gravity is the single best descriptor of wood functional properties and tree life-history traits, and it is the most important variable in estimating carbon stocks in forests. Tropical pioneer trees produce wood of increasing specific gravity across the trunk radius as they grow in stature. Here, we tested whether radial increases in wood specific gravity...

  12. Pioneer CESA Guidance Project: A Staff Development Program for School Counselors. Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Wallace S., Sr.

    This document on consultation is one of seven staff development programs which target performance skills of school counselors. The staff development programs are one component of a comprehensive student-needs-based guidance system developed by the Pioneer Cooperative Educational Service Agency Guidance Project. The staff development programs are…

  13. Pioneer CESA Guidance Project: A Staff Development Program for School Counselors. Legal and Ethical Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Carl; Van Hoose, William

    This document on legal and ethical concerns is one of seven staff development programs which target performance skills of school counselors. The staff development programs are one component of a comprehensive student-needs-based guidance system developed by the Pioneer Cooperative Educational Service Agency Guidance Project. The staff development…

  14. Bronislawa and Mieczyslaw Konopacki - pioneers of the application of histochemistry to embryology in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielanska-Osuchowska, Zofia

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we review the life and work of Mieczyslaw Konopacki and his wife Bronislawa Konopacka. These Polish scientists introduced histochemical methods to embryological studies at the beginning of the XXth century; they were pioneers in this regard in Poland and among the first in the world to implement such methods in this way.

  15. Pioneering Mars: Turning the Red Planet Green with Earth's Smallest Settlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikla, Julie; Milroy, Scott; Reider, David; Skelton, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Pioneering Mars: Turning the Red Planet Green with the Earth's Smallest Settlers (http://pioneeringmars.org) provides a partnership model for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) learning that brings university scientists together with high school students to investigate whether cyanobacteria from Antarctica could survive on…

  16. De Vries & Mul, A.M. Cooper, Pioneer of Puppet Animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, Paul

    2012-01-01

    abstractReview of Tjitte de Vries and Ati Mul, ‘They Thought it was a Marvel’. Arthur Melbourne Cooper (1874-1961) Pioneer of Puppet Animation. Amsterdam (Pallas Publications/AmsterdamUniversity Press) 2009, 576 p., 105 ill.; includesdvd of 6 films, isbn 978 908 555016 7

  17. Pioneering Mars: Turning the Red Planet Green with Earth's Smallest Settlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikla, Julie; Milroy, Scott; Reider, David; Skelton, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Pioneering Mars: Turning the Red Planet Green with the Earth's Smallest Settlers (http://pioneeringmars.org) provides a partnership model for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) learning that brings university scientists together with high school students to investigate whether cyanobacteria from Antarctica could survive…

  18. The mechanical design of an imaging photopolarimeter for the Jupiter missions (Pioneer 10 and 11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodak, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical design and fabrication are discussed of the imaging photopolarimeter (IPP), a multifunction space-qualified instrument used on the Jupiter Pioneer missions. The extreme environmental requirements for the structural design, optical system, and mechanisms are described with detailed discussion of some of the design and fabrication problems encountered.

  19. Huang Kun (1919-2005)A Pioneer of Solid-state and Semiconductor Physics in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Prof. Huang Kun made many pioneering contributions in solid-state physics. In the late 1940s, for example, he theoretically predicted diffuse X-ray reflection due to point defects in crystal lattices, which was experimentally confirmed in the 1960s. Known as "Huang Scattering," the theory has already developed into a method for studying micro-defects in solids.

  20. Science Park of Universities in Jiangsu Province Nanjing Jingang Science Pioneering Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> The Nanjing Jingang Science Pioneering Center was estab-lished in August 2000. It is located at Tower A, Jingang Building, 251 Heyan Road, Nanjing, and has a 28-story and 25,000m2 of space for the incubation of projects of

  1. Robert Owen: A Historiographic Study of a Pioneer of Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the ideals and activities of the nineteenth century Welsh industrialist and reformer Robert Owen (1771-1858), and how they informed modern human resource development (HRD) concepts and practices and provided evidence of Owen as a HRD pioneer. Design/methodology/approach: Historiography provided…

  2. Pioneering the red planet; adventures on Martian soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Peijl, I.; Veraart, M.

    2013-01-01

    Mars has always obsessed humankind - the Red planet, the ‘New Earth’. And with the recent successful landing of NASA’s Curiosity rover, Mars is closer than ever. Ever since 1960, we have actively been sending probes and rovers to observe the planet, but not without defeat. The road to the red planet

  3. Pioneering the red planet; adventures on Martian soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Peijl, I.; Veraart, M.

    2013-01-01

    Mars has always obsessed humankind - the Red planet, the ‘New Earth’. And with the recent successful landing of NASA’s Curiosity rover, Mars is closer than ever. Ever since 1960, we have actively been sending probes and rovers to observe the planet, but not without defeat. The road to the red planet

  4. Peter Scheglov --- pioneer of site testing in the Central Asia

    CERN Document Server

    Tokovinin, A

    2011-01-01

    The multi-faceted contributions of Dr. Peter Scheglov (1932-2002) in the area of site testing are briefly reviewed. He discovered and studied astronomical sites in the Central Asia, developed new site-testing instruments, promoted new methods and techniques among his colleagues and teached new generation of observational astronomers.

  5. Comparative Effectiveness of Second-Line Targeted Therapies for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Real-World Observational Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Y Heng

    Full Text Available The optimal sequencing of targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC is unknown. Observational studies with a variety of designs have reported differing results. The objective of this study is to systematically summarize and interpret the published real-world evidence comparing sequential treatment for mRCC.A search was conducted in Medline and Embase (2009-2013, and conference proceedings from American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO, ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium (ASCO-GU, and European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO (2011-2013. We systematically reviewed observational studies comparing second-line mRCC treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi versus vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI. Studies were evaluated for 1 use of a retrospective cohort design after initiation of second-line therapy, 2 adjustment for patient characteristics, and 3 use of data from multiple centers. Meta-analyses were conducted for comparisons of overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS.Ten studies reported OS and exhibited significant heterogeneity in estimated second-line treatment effects (I2 = 68%; P = 0.001. Four of these were adjusted, multicenter, retrospective cohort studies, and these showed no evidence of heterogeneity (I2 = 0%; P = 0.61 and a significant association between second-line mTORi (>75% everolimus and longer OS compared to VEGF TKI (>60% sorafenib (HR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.68 to 0.98 in a meta-analysis. Seven studies comparing PFS showed significant heterogeneity overall and among the adjusted, multicenter, retrospective cohort studies. Real-world observational data for axitinib outcomes was limited at the time of this study.Real-world studies employed different designs and reported heterogeneous results comparing the effectiveness of second-line mTORi and VEGF TKI in the treatment of mRCC. Within the subset of adjusted

  6. A prospective, observational study comparing the PK/PD relationships of generic Meropenem (Mercide® to the innovator brand in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mer M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mervyn Mer,1 Jacques Rene Snyman,2 Constance Elizabeth Jansen van Rensburg,2 Jacob John van Tonder,3 Ilze Laurens2 1Department of Medicine, Divisions of Critical Care and Pulmonology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 2Office of the Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; 3Scientific Affairs Department, Triclinium Clinical Development (Pty Ltd, Centurion, South Africa Introduction: Clinicians’ skepticism, fueled by evidence of inferiority of some multisource generic antimicrobial products, results in the underutilization of more cost-effective generics, especially in critically ill patients. The aim of this observational study was to demonstrate equivalence between the generic or comparator brand of meropenem (Mercide® and the leading innovator brand (Meronem® by means of an ex vivo technique whereby antimicrobial activity is used to estimate plasma concentration of the active moiety. Methods: Patients from different high care and intensive care units were recruited for observation when prescribed either of the meropenem brands under investigation. Blood samples were collected over 6 hours after a 30 minute infusion of the different brands. Meropenem concentration curves were established against United States Pharmacopeia standard meropenem (Sigma-Aldrich by using standard laboratory techniques for culture of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Patients’ plasma samples were tested ex vivo, using a disc diffusion assay, to confirm antimicrobial activity and estimate plasma concentrations of the two brands. Results: Both brands of meropenem demonstrated similar curves in donor plasma when concentrations in vials were confirmed. Patient-specific serum concentrations were determined from zones of inhibition against a standard laboratory Klebsiella strain ex vivo, confirming at least similar in vivo concentrations as the concentration curves (90% confidence interval overlapped; however

  7. Determination of value of bovine respiratory disease control using a remote early disease identification system compared with conventional methods of metaphylaxis and visual observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, B J; Amrine, D E; Goehl, D R

    2015-08-01

    Mitigation of the deleterious effects of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an important issue in the cattle industry. Conventional management of calves at high risk for BRD often includes mass treatment with antimicrobials at arrival followed by visual observation for individual clinical cases. These methods have proven effective; however, control program efficacy is influenced by the accuracy of visual observation. A remote early disease identification (REDI) system has been described that monitors cattle behavior to identify potential BRD cases. The objective of this research was to compare health and performance outcomes using either traditional BRD control (visual observation and metaphylaxis) or REDI during a 60-d postarrival phase in high-risk beef calves. The randomized controlled clinical trial was performed in 8 replicates at 3 different facilities over a 19-mo period. In each replicate, a single load of calves was randomly allocated to receive either conventional management (CONV; total = 8) or REDI (total = 8) as the method for BRD control. Cattle were monitored with each diagnostic method for the first 30 d on feed and performance variables were collected until approximately 60 d after arrival. Statistical differences ( 0.10) in risk of BRD treatment and REDI calves were not administered antimicrobials at arrival; therefore, REDI calves had a lower ( < 0.01) average number of doses of antimicrobials/calf (0.75 ± 0.1 doses) compared with CONV calves (1.67 ± 0.1 doses). In this trial, the REDI system was comparable to conventional management with the potential advantages of earlier BRD diagnosis and decreased use of antimicrobials. Further research should be performed to evaluate the longer-term impacts of the 2 systems.

  8. Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) Ionosphere Evidence for Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hoegy, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    An early estimate of escape of H2O from Venus [McElroy et al., 1982] using observed hot oxygen densities inferred by Nagy et al. [1981] from PVO OUVS 1304 Å dayglow and using ionization rates from photoionization and electron impact. This resulted in an estimated oxygen ionization rate planet-wide above the plasmapause of 3x1025 atoms/s. Based on the energetic O+ being swept up and removed by solar wind, McElroy et al. [1982] gave an estimate of a loss rate for O of 6x106 atoms/cm2/s. Using a different method of estimating escape based data in the ionotail of Venus, Brace et al. [1987] estimated a total planetary O+ escape rate of 5x1025 ions/s. Their estimate was based on PVO measurements of superthermal O+ (energy range 9-16 eV) in the tail ray plasma between 2000 and 3000 km. Their estimated global mean flux was 107 atoms/cm2/s. The two escape rates are remarkably close considering all the errors involved in such estimates of escape. A study of escape by Luhmann et al. [2008] using VEX observations at low solar activity finds modest escape rates, prompting the authors to reconsider the evidence from both PVO and VEX of the possibility of enhanced escape during extreme interplanetary conditions. We reexamine the variation of escape under different solar wind conditions using ion densities and plasma content in the dayside and nightside of Venus using PVO ionosphere density during times of high solar activity. Citations: Brace, L.H., W. T. Kasprzak, H.A. Taylor, R. F. Theis, C. T. Russess, A. Barnes, J. D. Mihalov, and D. M. Hunten, "The Ionotail of Venus: Its Configuration and Evidence for Ion Escape", J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15-26, 1987. Luhmann, J.G., A. Fedorov, S. Barabash, E. Carlsson, Y. Futaana, T.L. Zhang, C.T. Russell, J.G. Lyon, S.A. Ledvina, and D.A. Brain, “Venus Express observations of atmospheric oxygen escape during the passage of several coronal mass ejections”, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008. McElroy, M. B., M. J. Prather, J. M. Rodiquez, " Loss

  9. Earth Observation-Based Dwelling Detection Approaches in a Highly Complex Refugee Camp Environment — A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Spröhnle

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For effective management of refugee camps or camps for internally displaced persons (IDPs relief organizations need up-to-date information on the camp situation. In cases where detailed field assessments are not available, Earth observation (EO data can provide important information to get a better overview about the general situation on the ground. In this study, different approaches for dwelling detection were tested using the example of a highly complex camp site in Somalia. On the basis of GeoEye-1 imagery, semi-automatic object-based and manual image analysis approaches were applied, compared and evaluated regarding their analysis results (absolute numbers, population estimation, spatial pattern, statistical correlations and production time. Although even the results of the visual image interpretation vary considerably between the interpreters, there is a similar pattern resulting from all methods, which shows same tendencies for dense and sparse populated areas. The statistical analyses revealed that all approaches have problems in the more complex areas, whereas there is a higher variance in manual interpretations with increasing complexity. The application of advanced rule sets in an object-based environment allowed a more consistent feature extraction in the area under investigation that can be obtained at a fraction of the time compared to visual image interpretation if large areas have to be observed.

  10. Domenico Pacini, uncredited pioneer of the discovery of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    During a series of experiments performed between 1907 and 1911, Domenico Pacini (Marino 1878-Roma 1934), at that time researcher at the Central Bureau of Meteorology and Geodynamics in Roma, studied the origin of the radiation today called "cosmic rays", the nature of which was unknown at that time. In his conclusive measurements in June 1911 at the Naval Academy in Livorno, and confirmed in Bracciano a couple of months later, Pacini, proposing a novel experimental technique, observed the radiation strength to decrease when going from the surface to a few meters underwater (both in the sea and in the lake), thus demonstrating that such radiation could not come from the Earth's crust. Pacini's work was largely overlooked. Hess was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1936, two years after the death of Pacini, who had become a full professor of Experimental Physics at the University of Bari. The discovery of cosmic rays -a milestone in science- involved several scientists in Europe and in the United States of ...

  11. Jose de Acosta (1539”1600): A pioneer of geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udías, Agustín

    One of the first books written about the American continent was by Father José de Acosta. Entitled Historia Natural y Moral de las Indias (i.e., Natural and Moral History of the Indias), it was published in Seville, Spain, in 1590 (Figure 1). The rapid printing of four editions in Spain in less than 20 yr and the translation of the book into French, Italian, German, Dutch, and Latin less than 15 yr after the first Spanish edition are signs of the rapid popularity that was achieved by this book in Europe.José de Acosta was born in 1539 in Medina del Campo, Spain. He joined the Jesuit Order in 1553 and travelled to America in 1572. He remained there for 15 yr, travelling frequently and visiting the territories that today belong to Peru, Bolivia, Chile, and Mexico. During his journeys, he took note of his observations of natural phenomena, many of them related to the geophysical sciences, such as the aspect of the skies, distribution of temperature, rain, and winds, volcanic activity, earthquakes, and a variety of new minerals, plants, and animals, as well as on the social behavior of the inhabitants of those lands.

  12. Atmospheric parameters in a subtropical cloud regime transition derived by AIRS+MODIS – observed statistical variability compared to ERA-Interim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Schreier

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud occurrence, microphysical and optical properties and atmospheric profiles within a subtropical cloud regime transition in the northeastern Pacific Ocean are obtained from a synergistic combination of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS and the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS. The observed cloud parameters and atmospheric thermodynamic profile retrievals are binned by cloud type and analyzed based on their probability density functions (PDFs. Comparison of the PDFs to data from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting Re-analysis (ERA-Interim shows a strong difference in the occurrence of the different cloud types compared to clear sky. An increasing non-Gaussian behavior is observed in cloud optical thickness (τc, effective radius (re and cloud top temperature (Tc distributions from Stratocumulus to Trade Cumulus, while decreasing values of lower tropospheric stability are seen. However, variations in the mean, width and shape of the distributions are found. The AIRS potential temperature (θ and water vapor (q profiles in the presence of varying marine boundary layer (MBL cloud types show overall similarities to the ERA-Interim in the mean profiles, but differences arise in the higher moments at some altitudes. The differences between the PDFs from AIRS+MODIS and ERA-Interim make it possible to pinpoint systematic errors in both systems and helps to understand joint PDFs of cloud properties and coincident thermodynamic profiles from satellite observations.

  13. [Armauer Hansen (1841-1912), portrait of a Nordic pioneer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Willy; Freney, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Desending from a Danish family, Gerhard Henrik Armauer Hansen was born in Bergan, Norway, on 29 July, 1841. Graduated in medicine in 1866 from the University at Christiana (the former name of Oslo), he started his medical career as an assistant physician at the National Hospital of Oslo for one year, working afterwards as a medical officer for a fishing company outside the Arctic Circle. Taking not well his routine job, he soon returned to Bergen where he began his work on a disease known as leprosy at the age of 26 and as an assistant of D.C. Danielssen at the Lungegaarden Hospital. There he engaged in research and investigations on the nature of the disease. Studying the various types of leprosy (skin, nerve and visceral lesions), he was awarded, one year after beginning his work, the gold metal of the University for his first publication on the disease. While Danielssen leaned toward heredity as a dominant factor in leprosy, Hansen's conviction was that the disease must have an infectious causal agent. In about 1871, Hansen began to observe tiny little rods in tissue specimens and considered they could be the ethiologic agent of leprosy, the more he found these rods in all the infiltrated nodular lesions in his patients. Finally, he proposed on February 28, 1873, that the rods were bacilli, responsible of leprosy. Promoted to the rank of Chief of the Leprosy Service in 1875, he held his job for 37 years; Hansen's entire adult life was spent at work in leprosy. He edited the journal . Hansen was also an eminent zoologist engaged in studies involving mollusks and worms; Since 1874, he was president of the Bergen Museum of Natural History. Armauer Hansen died on February 12, 1912, and the funeral ceremonies took place in the Museum of Bergen where his ashes are still kept.

  14. Rise to dominance of angiosperm pioneers in European Cretaceous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiffard, Clément; Gomez, Bernard; Daviero-Gomez, Véronique; Dilcher, David L

    2012-12-18

    The majority of environments are dominated by flowering plants today, but it is uncertain how this dominance originated. This increase in angiosperm diversity happened during the Cretaceous period (ca. 145-65 Ma) and led to replacement and often extinction of gymnosperms and ferns. We propose a scenario for the rise to dominance of the angiosperms from the Barremian (ca. 130 Ma) to the Campanian (ca. 84 Ma) based on the European megafossil plant record. These megafossil data demonstrate that angiosperms migrated into new environments in three phases: (i) Barremian (ca. 130-125 Ma) freshwater lake-related wetlands; (ii) Aptian-Albian (ca. 125-100 Ma) understory floodplains (excluding levees and back swamps); and (iii) Cenomanian-Campanian (ca. 100-84 Ma) natural levees, back swamps, and coastal swamps. This scenario allows for the measured evolution of angiosperms in time and space synthesizing changes in the physical environment with concomitant changes in the biological environment. This view of angiosperm radiation in three phases reconciles previous scenarios based on the North American record. The Cretaceous plant record that can be observed in Europe is exceptional in many ways. (i) Angiosperms are well preserved from the Barremian to the Maastrichtian (ca. 65 Ma). (ii) Deposits are well constrained and dated stratigraphically. (iii) They encompass a full range of environments. (iv) European paleobotany provides many detailed studies of Cretaceous floras for analysis. These factors make a robust dataset for the study of angiosperm evolution from the Barremian to the Campanian that can be traced through various ecosystems and related to other plant groups occupying the same niches.

  15. Rise to dominance of angiosperm pioneers in European Cretaceous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiffard, Clément; Gomez, Bernard; Daviero-Gomez, Véronique; Dilcher, David L.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of environments are dominated by flowering plants today, but it is uncertain how this dominance originated. This increase in angiosperm diversity happened during the Cretaceous period (ca. 145–65 Ma) and led to replacement and often extinction of gymnosperms and ferns. We propose a scenario for the rise to dominance of the angiosperms from the Barremian (ca. 130 Ma) to the Campanian (ca. 84 Ma) based on the European megafossil plant record. These megafossil data demonstrate that angiosperms migrated into new environments in three phases: (i) Barremian (ca. 130–125 Ma) freshwater lake-related wetlands; (ii) Aptian–Albian (ca. 125–100 Ma) understory floodplains (excluding levees and back swamps); and (iii) Cenomanian–Campanian (ca. 100–84 Ma) natural levees, back swamps, and coastal swamps. This scenario allows for the measured evolution of angiosperms in time and space synthesizing changes in the physical environment with concomitant changes in the biological environment. This view of angiosperm radiation in three phases reconciles previous scenarios based on the North American record. The Cretaceous plant record that can be observed in Europe is exceptional in many ways. (i) Angiosperms are well preserved from the Barremian to the Maastrichtian (ca. 65 Ma). (ii) Deposits are well constrained and dated stratigraphically. (iii) They encompass a full range of environments. (iv) European paleobotany provides many detailed studies of Cretaceous floras for analysis. These factors make a robust dataset for the study of angiosperm evolution from the Barremian to the Campanian that can be traced through various ecosystems and related to other plant groups occupying the same niches. PMID:23213256

  16. W. Grey Walter, pioneer in the electroencephalogram, robotics, cybernetics, artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladin, Peter F

    2006-02-01

    With the announcement by William Lennox at the 1935 London International Neurology Congress of the use of electroencephalography in the study of epilepsy, it became evident that a new and powerful technique for the investigation of seizures had been discovered. William Grey Walter, a young researcher finishing his post-graduate studies at Cambridge, was selected to construct and study the EEG in clinical neurology at the Maudsley Hospital, London. His hugely productive pioneering career in the use of EEG would eventually lead to groundbreaking work in other fields --the emerging sciences of robotics, cybernetics, and early work in artificial intelligence. In this historical note his pioneering work in the fields of clinical neurophysiology is documented, both in the areas of epileptology and tumour detection. His landmark contributions to clinical neurophysiology are worthy of documentation.

  17. A pioneer in the development of modern ultrasound: Robert William Boyle (1883-1955).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, Roozbeh; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2007-01-01

    Robert William Boyle was one of the pioneers in the development and application of ultrasound. His remarkable career has not been previously traced in any depth, nor have his contributions, especially those during WWI, been carefully described. In collaboration with Lord Rutherford, his work on the development of ultrasound methods for submarine detection paralleled those in France under Paul Langevin (1872-1946), who many consider to be the father of modern ultrasound. This biographic account of Boyle's life focuses on his ultrasound research contributions, particularly the developments during WWI and those in the 10 years after. Evidence is presented that his pioneering research, along with that of Langevin, provided much of the foundation for modern ultrasound developments. Although this paper is partially based on somewhat dispersed biographic information performed by others, original letters and research papers, in addition to records and verbal accounts provided by relatives, have been used and consulted.

  18. PIONEER PLANTS FOR ECOSYSTEM RECOVERY IN DRAINAGE BASIN OF ERLONGSHAN RESERVOIR IN HEILONGJIANG PROVINCE, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xue-ping; ZHANG Yi; CAO Hui-cong

    2004-01-01

    This article reveals the ecological features and the theories and methods of introducing pioneer plants in the process of eco-restoring in different degenerative ecosystems in the drainage basin of Erlongshan Reservoir in Heilongjiang Province by systemically studying the deteriorative ecosystems and using recovery theory. The study shows that with the rise in degenerative degrees of the ecosystems, bio-species and bio-diversity sharply decrease in the study area and microclimate becomes warmer and drier in natural ecosystem. Therefore, we must attach importance to the construction of plants and biodiversity. In the study, different pioneer plants are selected for different degenerative ecosystems to restore and maintain the service functions of the ecosystems.

  19. Identification of pioneer viridans streptococci in the oral cavity of human neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, C; Bowden, G H; Evans, M; Fitzsimmons, S P; Johnson, J; Sheridan, M J; Wientzen, R; Cole, M F

    1995-01-01

    Three hundred and sixty-seven strains of pioneer streptococci isolated from the mouths of 40 healthy, full-term infants during the first month of life were examined by two taxonomic schemes that incorporated biochemical and physiological characteristics, IgA1 protease production and glycosidase activities. Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 and S. oralis comprised 55.0% of the pioneer streptococci isolated from neonates. S. salivarius constituted 25.3% of the isolates, while S. anginosus, S. mitis biovar 2, S. sanguis and S. gordonii accounted collectively for 11.4%. Difficulties in identifying streptococci were encountered and 8.4% of the 367 isolates could not be assigned to a recognised species.

  20. Study on Vegetation Root Strength of Pioneer Plants for Forest Areas in Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-bin; LIANG Da-qing; YE Xu-rong

    2005-01-01

    Forest plant roots may restrain the occurrence of shallow landslides for forest land and pioneer tree species can also reduce runoff and soil erosion;thus they are useful practical ecological materials for landslide control and erosion control.In this study,two important pioneer plant species;Formosan Alder (Alnus formosana Makino) and Roxburgh Sumac (Rhus chinensis Mill.Var.roxburghi i(DC.) Rehd.) were selected at landslide areas under vegetation treatments for soil and water conservation.In order to obtain the root strength model for the factors affecting pulling resistance and root tensile strength,experimental materials were tested and the data were analyzed using regression techniques.These models could be used to provide the index of slope stability and to quantify the root-strength using non-destructive methods.

  1. Observing Extended Sources with the \\Herschel SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Ronin; Etxaluze, Mireya; Makiwa, Gibion; Naylor, David A; Salji, Carl; Swinyard, Bruce M; Ferlet, Marc; van der Wiel, Matthijs H D; Smith, Anthony J; Fulton, Trevor; Griffin, Matt J; Baluteau, Jean-Paul; Benielli, Dominique; Glenn, Jason; Hopwood, Rosalind; Imhof, Peter; Lim, Tanya; Lu, Nanyao; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Pearson, Chris; Sidher, Sunil; Valtchanov, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) on the European Space Agency's Herschel Space Observatory utilizes a pioneering design for its imaging spectrometer in the form of a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS). The standard FTS data reduction and calibration schemes are aimed at objects with either a spatial extent much larger than the beam size or a source that can be approximated as a point source within the beam. However, when sources are of intermediate spatial extent, neither of these calibrations schemes is appropriate and both the spatial response of the instrument and the source's light profile must be taken into account and the coupling between them explicitly derived. To that end, we derive the necessary corrections using an observed spectrum of a fully extended source with the beam profile and the source's light profile taken into account. We apply the derived correction to several observations of planets and compare the corrected spectra with their spectral models to study the beam c...

  2. Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program regimens with and without directly observed treatment, short-course: A comparative study of therapeutic cure rate and adverse reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rengaraj Sivaraj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the therapeutic cure rate and adverse reactions in the regimens of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program (RNTCP with directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS and without DOTS. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients in the DOTS regimen and 50 patients in the non-DOTS regimen were enrolled in the study. All the participants were asked to come regularly for 3 consecutive days for sputum collection, and the sputum samples were examined for acid-fast bacilli. If tuberculosis (TB was confirmed, the disease status was confirmed through a chest X-ray (PA view. The participants were monitored for adverse events arising from the use of anti-TB drugs for the next 6 months. Results: The TB cure rates for RNTCP with DOTS and RNTCP with non-DOTS were 80% and 66%, respectively. The DOTS therapy had a better cure rate for radiologically positive, sputum-positive cases compared with the non-DOTS regimen group. The non-DOTS treatment regimen had significantly increased numbers of adverse events in the hepatic and hematinic systems. Conclusion: The DOTS regimen has higher cure rates and a lower incidence of adverse reactions compared with the non-DOTS regimen.

  3. Ecophysiological characteristics of the seed of the tropical forest pioneer Urera caracasana (Urticaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Segovia, A; Vàzquez-Yanes, C; Coates-Estrada, R; Pérez-Nasser, N

    1987-12-01

    Urera caracasana (Jacq.) Griseb is a small, fast-growing evergreen pioneer tree which colonizes openings in the tropical rain forest of 'Los Tuxtlas', Veracruz, Mèxico. Annual seed production by 10 trees was estimated to range from 0.4 x 10(5) to 1.6 x 10(6) seeds per tree. Fifteen species of resident and migratory birds were observed to visit the plants and disperse the seeds. Most seeds imbibed in petri dishes placed on the forest floor beneath a small opening in the canopy, where the red/far-red ratio of the light was around 1.0, germinated within 2 weeks. Germination beneath the forest canopy, where the red/far-red ratio of the light was approximately 0.2, was much slower and did not exceed 40%. A minimum of 4 h daily exposure to unfiltered natural light was required for rapid germination in the forest. In the laboratory rapid germination at 25 degrees C required a minimum of 4 h white light. However, if temperature during the light period was 35 degrees C, 30 min exposure to white light daily was sufficient to induce germination. Seeds that failed to germinate when imbibed for 60-360 days in petri dishes placed on the forest floor beneath the forest canopy, germinated rapidly in the laboratory when held at 25 degrees C and exposed daily to 12 h white or red light. Seeds imbibed for 120 days or more beneath the forest canopy were also induced to germinate by 12 h daily exposure to far-red light when this was combined with a 35/25 degrees C day/night temperature regime. Seeds buried in vermiculite-filled nylon mesh bags disappeared rapidly with few remaining after 2 months. Seeds that survived remained viable and germinated when incubated in petri dishes at 25 degrees C. Initially, buried seeds required light for germination. However, after 17 months' burial, seeds germinated in darkness when transferred to the laboratory and incubated on agar at 25 degrees C.

  4. Electrotherapy for melancholia: the pioneering contributions of Benjamin Franklin and Giovanni Aldini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolwig, Tom G; Fink, Max

    2009-03-01

    The electrical induction of seizures with a therapeutic aim began in 1938, but the history of electric currents to relieve mental illness began 2 centuries earlier with the pioneering work of the Italian Giovanni Aldini and the American Benjamin Franklin.These early experiments are described demonstrating that the electrical force encouraged hopeful applications. This history emphasizes the unique contribution in the induction of grand mal seizures as the therapeutic basis rather than the role of electricity alone.

  5. Pioneer:等离子电视风头仍劲

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Greg Tarr

    2008-01-01

    尽管今天宣布其将停止生产等离子面板模块组件,但是Pioneer Electronics的美国销售和产品开发高级副总裁Russ Johnston说,该公司并没有改变其对于等离子技术的热衷态度。

  6. Xinxing Cathay Group and Weiqiao Pioneering Group entered Global Fortune500Companies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Beijing time on 9th July 2012, United States Fortune- global officially released the 2012 Global Fortune 500 Companies list. Xinxing Cathay Group and Weiqiao Pioneering Group entered Global Fortune 500 Companies. In 2011, Xinxing Cathay Group topped the ranking of Global Fortune 500 Companies, ranked No. 484 by operating income of CNY 147.6 billion (equivalent to USD 22.832 billion). Xinxing Cathay Group is the country’s largest military supplier,

  7. Professor Mansour Ali Haseeb: Highlights from a pioneer of biomedical research, physician and scientist

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The article highlights the career of Professor Mansour Ali Haseeb (1910 – 1973; DKSM, Dip Bact, FRCPath, FRCP [Lond]), a pioneer worker in health, medical services, biomedical research and medical education in the Sudan. After his graduation from the Kitchener School of Medicine (renamed, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum [U of K]) in 1934, he devoted his life for the development of laboratory medicine. He became the first Sudanese Director of Stack Medical Research Laboratories (19...

  8. Electrotherapy for melancholia: the pioneering contributions of Benjamin Franklin and Giovanni Aldini

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, Tom G; Fink, Max

    2009-01-01

    The electrical induction of seizures with a therapeutic aim began in 1938, but the history of electric currents to relieve mental illness began 2 centuries earlier with the pioneering work of the Italian Giovanni Aldini and the American Benjamin Franklin.These early experiments are described...... demonstrating that the electrical force encouraged hopeful applications. This history emphasizes the unique contribution in the induction of grand mal seizures as the therapeutic basis rather than the role of electricity alone....

  9. George Ryerson Fowler: Brooklyn's surgical pioneer: a biographical sketch based on historical documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Mary E; Swan, Kenneth G; Kelleher, Denis P

    2011-06-01

    The Fowler position, widely used in surgery and obstetrics for patient placement, marks a fraction of 19th-century Brooklyn surgeon George Ryerson Fowler's prodigious accomplishments. Fowler was a pioneer who refined the appendectomy, performed the first lung decortication, advocated for sterile techniques, introduced first aid in the US Army, and helped start a precursor to Annals of Surgery. His publications include the first US textbook on appendicitis--ironically, the disease that killed him.

  10. Caroline B. Palmer: Pioneer Physician Anesthetist and First Chair of Anesthesia at Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jay B; Saidman, Lawrence J

    2015-12-01

    Caroline B. Palmer was appointed as Chief of Anesthesia at Cooper Medical College (soon renamed as Stanford Medical School) in 1909. For the next 28 years, she was an innovative leader, a clinical researcher, and a strong advocate for recognition of anesthesiology as a medical specialty. To honor her accomplishments, the operating room suite in the new Stanford Hospital will be named after this pioneering woman anesthesiologist.

  11. The History with Two Prehistories. On the design of the Moscow Palace of Young Pioneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Novikov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article refers to the history of design of the Moscow Palace of Young Pioneers architectural complex on Leninskie (now Vorobievy Gory viewed in the context of evolution of the national architecture. While speaking about how the project came into being and which way was chosen to find the architectural character, the author proves that the Palace was a pivotal point in the history of Russian architecture and became one of the symbols of Soviet Modernism.

  12. Modelling the reflective thermal contribution to the acceleration of the Pioneer spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco, F., E-mail: frederico.francisco@ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bertolami, O., E-mail: orfeu.bertolami@fc.up.pt [Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Gil, P.J.S., E-mail: p.gil@dem.ist.utl.pt [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica and IDMEC - Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Paramos, J., E-mail: paramos@ist.edu [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-05-23

    We present an improved method to compute the radiative momentum transfer in the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft that takes into account both diffusive and specular reflection. The method allows for more reliable results regarding the thermal acceleration of the deep-space probes, confirming previous findings. A parametric analysis is performed in order to set upper and lower bounds for the thermal acceleration and its evolution with time.

  13. Stable time patterns of railway suicides in Germany: comparative analysis of 7,187 cases across two observation periods (1995–1998; 2005–2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of fatalities on the European Union (EU) railways are suicides, representing about 60% of all railway fatalities. The aim of this study was to compare time patterns of suicidal behaviour on railway tracks in Germany between two observation periods (1995–1998 and 2005–2008) in order to investigate their stability and value in railway suicide prevention. Methods Cases were derived from the National Central Registry of person accidents on the German railway network (STABAG). The association of daytime, weekday and month with the mean number of suicides was analysed applying linear regression. Potential differences by observation period were assessed by adding observation period and the respective interaction terms into the linear regression. A 95% confidence interval for the mean number of suicides was computed using the t distribution. Results A total of 7,187 railway suicides were recorded within both periods: 4,102 (57%) in the first period (1995–1998) and 3,085 (43%) in the second (2005–2008). The number of railway suicides was highest on Mondays and Tuesdays in the first period with an average of 3.2 and 3.5 events and of 2.6 events on both days in the second period. In both periods, railway suicides were more common between 6:00 am and noon, and between 6:00 pm and midnight. Seasonality was only prominent in the period 1995–1998. Conclusions Over the course of two observation periods, the weekday and circadian patterns of railway suicides remained stable. Therefore, these patterns should be an integral part of railway suicide preventive measures, e.g. gatekeeper training courses. PMID:24498876

  14. Stable time patterns of railway suicides in Germany: comparative analysis of 7,187 cases across two observation periods (1995-1998; 2005-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukaschek, Karoline; Baumert, Jens; Erazo, Natalia; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-02-06

    The majority of fatalities on the European Union (EU) railways are suicides, representing about 60% of all railway fatalities. The aim of this study was to compare time patterns of suicidal behaviour on railway tracks in Germany between two observation periods (1995-1998 and 2005-2008) in order to investigate their stability and value in railway suicide prevention. Cases were derived from the National Central Registry of person accidents on the German railway network (STABAG). The association of daytime, weekday and month with the mean number of suicides was analysed applying linear regression. Potential differences by observation period were assessed by adding observation period and the respective interaction terms into the linear regression. A 95% confidence interval for the mean number of suicides was computed using the t distribution. A total of 7,187 railway suicides were recorded within both periods: 4,102 (57%) in the first period (1995-1998) and 3,085 (43%) in the second (2005-2008). The number of railway suicides was highest on Mondays and Tuesdays in the first period with an average of 3.2 and 3.5 events and of 2.6 events on both days in the second period. In both periods, railway suicides were more common between 6:00 am and noon, and between 6:00 pm and midnight. Seasonality was only prominent in the period 1995-1998. Over the course of two observation periods, the weekday and circadian patterns of railway suicides remained stable. Therefore, these patterns should be an integral part of railway suicide preventive measures, e.g. gatekeeper training courses.

  15. FIREBALL-2: Pioneering Space UV Baryon Mapping (Lead Institution)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher

    This is the lead proposal of a multi-institutional submission. The Faint Intergalactic-medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBall-2) is designed to discover and map faint emission from the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) for low redshift galaxies. This balloon is a modification of FIREBall-1 (FB-1), a path-finding mission built by our team with two successful flights. FB-1 provided the strongest constrains on IGM emission available from any instrument at the time. FIREBall-2 has been significantly upgraded compared to FB-1, and is nearly ready for integration and testing before an anticipated Spring 2016 launch from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico. The spectrograph has been redesigned and an upgraded detector system including a groundbreaking high QE, low-noise, UV CCD detector is under final testing and will improve instrument performance by more than an order of magnitude. CNES is providing the spectrograph, gondola, and flight support team, with construction of all components nearly complete. The initial FIREBall-2 launch is now scheduled for Spring 2016. FIREBall-2 combines several innovations: -First ever multi-object UV spectrograph -Arcsecond quality balloon pointing system, developed from scratch, improved from FB-1 -Partnership of national space agencies (NASA & CNES); highly leveraged NASA resources -A Schmidt corrector built into the UV grating for better optical performance and throughput -A total of four women trained in space experimental astrophysics, including 3 Columbia Ph.Ds. and 1 Caltech Ph.D. -A total of 7 graduate students trained on FIREBall-1 (3) and FIREBall-2 (4), with opportunities for more in future flights. FIREBall-2 will test key technologies and science strategies for a future mission to map IGM emission. Its flights will provide important training for the next generation of space astrophysicists working in UV instrumentation. Most importantly, FIREBall-2 will detect emission from the CGM of nearby galaxies, providing the first census of the

  16. Autoinducer-2 influences interactions amongst pioneer colonizing streptococci in oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadra-Saenz, Giancarlo; Rao, Dhana L; Underwood, Adam J; Belapure, Sneha A; Campagna, Shawn R; Sun, Zhichao; Tammariello, Steven; Rickard, Alexander H

    2012-07-01

    Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus oralis are among the first bacterial species to colonize clean tooth surfaces. Both produce autoinducer-2 (AI-2): a family of inter-convertible cell-cell signal molecules synthesized by the LuxS enzyme. The overall aim of this work was to determine whether AI-2 alters interspecies interactions between S. gordonii DL1 and S. oralis 34 within dual-species biofilms in flowing human saliva. Based upon AI-2 bioluminescence assays, S. gordonii DL1 produced more AI-2 activity than S. oralis 34 in batch culture, and both were able to remove AI-2 activity from solution. In single-species, saliva-fed flowcell systems, S. oralis 34 formed scant biofilms that were similar to the luxS mutant. Conversely, S. gordonii DL1 formed confluent biofilms while the luxS mutant formed architecturally distinct biofilms that possessed twofold greater biovolume than the wild-type. Supplementing saliva with 0.1-10 nM chemically synthesized AI-2 (csAI-2) restored the S. gordonii DL1 luxS biofilm phenotype to that which was similar to the wild-type; above or below this concentration range, biofilms were architecturally similar to that formed by the luxS mutant. In dual-species biofilms, S. gordonii DL1 was always more abundant than S. oralis 34. Compared with dual-species, wild-type biofilms, the biovolume occupied by S. oralis 34 was reduced by greater than sevenfold when neither species produced AI-2. The addition of 1 nM csAI-2 to the dual-species luxS-luxS mutant biofilms re-established the biofilm phenotype to resemble that of the wild-type pair. Thus, this work demonstrates that AI-2 can alter the biofilm structure and composition of pioneering oral streptococcal biofilms. This may influence the subsequent succession of other species into oral biofilms and the ecology of dental plaque.

  17. Exploration of pioneering as a major element of ethical leadership in nursing: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhordari-Sharifabad, Maasoumeh; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, Foroozan

    2017-07-01

    Commitment to ethical behavior is considered as an essential part of occupational responsibilities of nursing, and leaders' pioneering in ethical growth and development has led to the emergence of the concept of ethical leadership. The purpose of this study was to explain the nursing leaders' perception and experiences of pioneering in the field of ethical leadership. In this qualitative study, data were collected through semi-structured individual interviews. A total of 14 nursing leaders at different levels who were selected by purposeful sampling method participated in the study. Latent content analysis was used to analyze the data. Of 14 participants of the study, 8 were male and 6 were female aged 38 to 56 years old with a mean managerial experience of 12 years. In the analysis of interviews, 4 subcategories of "Role Modeling", "Empowerment", "Knowledge and Skill", and "Recognition" were obtained which formed two main categories. These categories included "Leader as mentor" and "Professional insight". Pioneering leaders are an important part of ethical leadership, and nursing leaders should not only be moral people, but also go a step further and actively promote moral behavior with a role as a mentor and model as well as having professional insight. Nursing leaders with a better understanding of these aspects can develop their capacity of strong ethical leadership and consider the aspects in their activities.

  18. A comparative hospital-based observational study of mono- and co-infections of malaria, dengue virus and scrub typhus causing acute undifferentiated fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S; Dhar, M; Mittal, G; Bhat, N K; Shirazi, N; Kalra, V; Sati, H C; Gupta, V

    2016-04-01

    Positive serology for dengue and/or scrub typhus infection with/without positive malarial smear (designated as mixed or co-infection) is being increasingly observed during epidemics of acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses (AUFIs). We planned to study the clinical and biochemical spectrum of co-infections with Plasmodium sp., dengue virus and scrub typhus and compare these with mono-infection by the same organisms. During the period from December 2012 to December 2013, all cases presenting with AUFIs to a single medical unit of a referral centre in Garhwal region of the north Indian state of Uttarakhand were retrospectively selected and categorised aetiologically as co-infections, malaria, dengue or scrub typhus. The groups thus created were compared in terms of demographic, clinical, biochemical and outcome parameters. The co-infection group (n = 49) was associated with milder clinical manifestations, fewer, milder and non-progressive organ dysfunction, and lesser need for intensive care, mechanical ventilation and dialysis as compared to mono-infections. When co-infections were sub-grouped and compared with the relevant mono-infections, there were differences in certain haematological and biochemical parameters; however, this difference did not translate into differential outcomes. Scrub typhus mono-infection was associated with severe disease in terms of both morbidity and mortality. Malaria, dengue and scrub typhus should be routinely tested in all patients with AUFIs. Co-infections, whether true or due to serological cross-reactivity, appear to be a separate entity so far as presentation and morbidity is concerned. Further insight is needed into the mechanism and identification of the protective infection.

  19. Methanol and isoprene emissions from the fast growing tropical pioneer species Vismia guianensis (Aubl.) Pers. (Hypericaceae) in the central Amazon forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Kolby J.; Jardine, Angela B.; Souza, Vinicius F.; Carneiro, Vilany; Ceron, Joao V.; Gimenez, Bruno O.; Soares, Cilene P.; Durgante, Flavia M.; Higuchi, Niro; Manzi, Antonio O.; Gonçalves, José F. C.; Garcia, Sabrina; Martin, Scot T.; Zorzanelli, Raquel F.; Piva, Luani R.; Chambers, Jeff Q.

    2016-05-01

    Isoprene (Is) emissions by plants represent a loss of carbon and energy resources leading to the initial hypothesis that fast growing pioneer species in secondary tropical forests allocate carbon primarily to growth at the expense of isoprenoid defenses. In this study, we quantified leaf isoprene and methanol emissions from the abundant pantropical pioneer tree species Vismia guianensis and ambient isoprene concentrations above a diverse secondary forest in the central Amazon. As photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was varied (0 to 3000 µmol m-2 s-1) under standard leaf temperature (30 °C), isoprene emissions from V. guianensis increased without saturation up to 80 nmol m-2 s-1. A nonlinear increase in isoprene emissions with respect to net photosynthesis (Pn) resulted in the fraction of Pn dedicated to isoprene emissions increasing with light intensity (up to 2 % of Pn). Emission responses to temperature under standard light conditions (PAR of 1000 µmol m-2 s-1) resulted in the classic uncoupling of isoprene emissions (Topt, iso > 40 °C) from net photosynthesis (Topt, Pn = 30.0-32.5 °C) with up to 7 % of Pn emitted as isoprene at 40 °C. Under standard environmental conditions of PAR and leaf temperature, young V. guianensis leaves showed high methanol emissions, low Pn, and low isoprene emissions. In contrast, mature leaves showed high Pn, high isoprene emissions, and low methanol emissions, highlighting the differential control of leaf phenology over methanol and isoprene emissions. High daytime ambient isoprene concentrations (11 ppbv) were observed above a secondary Amazon rainforest, suggesting that isoprene emissions are common among neotropical pioneer species. The results are not consistent with the initial hypothesis and support a functional role of methanol during leaf expansion and the establishment of photosynthetic machinery and a protective role of isoprene for photosynthesis during high temperature extremes regularly experienced in

  20. Classification of Particle Shapes from Lidar Depolarization Ratios in Convective Ice Clouds Compared to in situ Observations During CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Vincent; Winker, David; McGill, Matthew; Lawson, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This manuscript describes a method to class@ cirrus cloud ice particle shape using lidar depolarization measurements as a basis for segregating different particle shape regimes. Measurements from the ER-2 Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) system during CRYSTAL-FACE provide the basis for this work. While the CPL onboard the ER-2 aircraft was providing remote sensing measurements of cirrus clouds, the Cloud Particle Imager (CPI) onboard the WB-57 aircraft was flying inside those same clouds to sample particle sizes. The results of classifying particle shapes using the CPL data are compared to the in situ measurements made using the CPI , and there is found to be good agreement between the particle shape inferred from the CPL data and that actually measured by the CPI. If proven practical, application of this technique to spaceborne observations could lead to large-scale classification of cirrus cloud particle shapes.

  1. Curiosity, Hope, and Vision: The Role of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Pioneer Portfolio in Funding Early Health Game Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarini, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Games for Health Journal Editor Bill Ferguson recently discussed The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's important role in funding health game research with Paul Tarini, Senior Program Officer for the Foundation's Pioneer Portfolio.

  2. 对五株典型霉菌形态的观察和比较研究%Observation and Comparative Study on Morphology of Five Typical Mould

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路红波

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the observation and comparative study on the five typical mould always used for teaching-Rhizopus, Mucor, Henei Baiqu (Aspergillus oryzae), Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. After separation, purification and cultivation, their morphology have been observed and studied. The result showed that the rhizoid of Rhizopus is flourishing, the columella of Mucor is clear, the podocyte of Henei Baiqu is strong, the vesicle of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus is good.%对教学常用的五株典型霉菌,即根霉,毛霉,河内白曲(米曲霉),黑曲霉和黄曲霉经分离、纯化、培养后,对它们的形态进行了观察和比较研究。其结果是根霉的假根发达,毛霉的囊轴清晰,河内白曲的足细胞健壮,黑曲霉和黄曲霉的顶囊良好。

  3. Comparative Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA): Interplay of discourses (D/D1) as third grade urban and suburban science students engage in hypothesis formulation and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Carmen Irene Reyes

    This qualitative research project is a comparative analysis of Discourses (D/D1) while focused upon the science processes of hypothesis generation and observation in an urban versus suburban elementary science classroom. D designates the instructional and formal academic science Discourse and D1 represents the students' informal, social or home language D1iscourses. In particular, this research study is a critical discourse analysis that examines how the science processes of hypothesis formulation and observation are constituted through the interplay of classroom Discourses (D/D1) as two third grade science teachers teach the same kit-based, inquiry science lessons with their respective urban and suburban students. The research also considers ethnicity, social class, language, and the central role science teachers play mediating between children's everyday world and the world of science. Communicative approach and distinctive patterns of interaction between the European American teachers and their respective students are analyzed through a critical lens to examine underlying issues of equity and power embedded in the instructional Discourse of science. Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) provides both the theoretical framework and analytical lens. The research informs development of linguistic-based "best" practices to contribute toward promoting greater science teacher awareness in creating linguistic environments that support all students' learning science Discourse and to serve as a springboard for future educational science researchers' use of CDA.

  4. Comparative analysis of land, marine, and satellite observations of methane in the lower Atmosphere in the Russian Arctic under conditions of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, O. A.; Kokorev, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Land, marine, and satellite observations have been used to study changes in methane concentrations in the lower atmosphere during the warm months of the year (July through October) in Arctic regions having different potentials for methane production. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data for 2002-2013 are used to explore the interplay between local methane sources in the terrestrial region of the Eurasian Arctic and on the Arctic shelf over the warm period of the year. Linear trends in atmospheric methane concentrations over different Arctic regions are calculated, and a hypothesis of the relation of concentration variations to climatic parameters is tested. The combination of land, marine, and satellite observation is used to develop a conceptual model of the atmospheric methane field in the terrestrial part of the Russian Arctic and on the Arctic shelf. It is shown that the modern methane growth rate in the Arctic does not exceed the Northern Hemisphere mean. It is concluded that the methane emission in the Arctic has little effect on global climate compared to other factors.

  5. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST-CLASH observations of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431: implications for stellar mass versus dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmese, A.; Lahav, O.; Banerji, M.; Gruen, D.; Jouvel, S.; Melchior, P.; Aleksić, J.; Annis, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Hartley, W. G.; Jeltema, T.; Romer, A. K.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Seitz, S.; Suchyta, E.; Zhang, Y.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.

    2016-12-01

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (five filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey (CLASH; 17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25 per cent of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensing studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f⋆ = (6.8 ± 1.7) × 10-3 within a radius of r200c ≃ 2 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both data sets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of view. The technique developed to derive the stellar mass fraction in galaxy clusters can be applied to the ˜100 000 clusters that will be observed within this survey and yield important information about galaxy evolution.

  6. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST{CLASH observations of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7{4431: implications for stellar mass versus dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmese, A.; Lahav, O.; Banerji, M.; Gruen, D.; Jouvel, S.; Melchior, P.; Aleksic, J.; Annis, J; Diehl, H. T.; Jeltema, T.; Vikram, Vinu

    2016-12-01

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (five filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey (CLASH; 17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25 per cent of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensing studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f(star) = (6.8 +/- 1.7) x 10(-3) within a radius of r(200c) similar or equal to 2 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both data sets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of view. The technique developed to derive the stellar mass fraction in galaxy clusters can be applied to the similar to 100 000 clusters that will be observed within this survey and yield important information about galaxy evolution.

  7. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST-CLASH Observations of the Galaxy Cluster RXC J2248.7-4431: Implications for Stellar Mass Versus Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmese, A.; et al.

    2016-01-04

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (5 filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope CLASH (17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25% of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensing studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f*=7.0+-2.2x10^-3 within a radius of r_200c~3 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both datasets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of view. The technique developed to derive the stellar mass fraction in galaxy clusters can be applied to the ~100 000 clusters that will be observed within this survey. The stacking of all the DES clusters would reduce the errors on f* estimates and deduce important information about galaxy evolution.

  8. Comparative genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the oral antidiabetic drugs sitagliptin, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone in patients with type-2 diabetes: a cross-sectional, observational pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz Gul, Ozen; Cinkilic, Nilufer; Gul, Cuma Bulent; Cander, Soner; Vatan, Ozgur; Ersoy, Canan; Yılmaz, Dilek; Tuncel, Ercan

    2013-09-18

    This cross-sectional, observational pilot study was designed to investigate the frequency of different endpoints of genotoxicity (sister-chromatid exchange, total chromosome aberrations, and micronucleus formation) and cytotoxicity (mitotic index, replication index, and nuclear division index) in the peripheral lymphocytes of patients with type-2 diabetes treated with different oral anti-diabetic agents for 6 months. A total of 104 patients who met the American Diabetes Association criteria for type-2 diabetes were enrolled in the study. Of the 104 patients, 33 were being treated with sitagliptin (100mg/day), 25 with pioglitazone (30mg/day), 22 with rosiglitazone (4mg/day), and 24 with medical nutrition therapy (control group). The results for all the genotoxicity endpoints were significantly different across the four study groups. Post hoc analysis revealed that the genotoxicity observed in the sitagliptin group was significantly higher than that observed in the medical nutrition therapy group, but lower than that occurring in subjects who received thiazolidinediones. All of the three cytotoxicity endpoints were significantly lower in patients treated by oral anti-diabetic agents compared with those who received medical nutrition therapy. However, the three indexes did not differ significantly in the sitagliptin, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone groups. Taken together, these pilot data indicate that sitagliptin and thiazolidinediones may exert genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in patients with type-2 diabetes. Further investigations are necessary to clarify the possible long-term differences between oral anti-diabetic drugs in terms of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity, and how these can modulate the risk of developing diabetic complications in general and cancer in particular.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Atmospheric Glyoxal Column Densities Retrieved from MAX-DOAS Observations in Pakistan and during MAD-CAT Field Campaign in Mainz, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Fahim Khokhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Photolysis of glyoxal (CHOCHO and other volatile organic compounds (VOC in the presence of NOx results in tropospheric ozone and secondary organic pollutants formation. Glyoxal, with a relatively short lifetime, plays an important role in VOC formation in the planetary boundary layer. This study presents a comparative analysis of CHOCHO retrieval from mini MAX-DOAS observations at two different monitoring sites in Germany and Pakistan. Firstly, CHOCHO differential slant column densities (DSCDs were retrieved by using differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS technique during a field campaign called MAD-CAT (Multi Axis DOAS-Comparison Campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases from 18 June to 17 July 2013 in Mainz, Germany (49.965387°N, 8.242531°E. A second dataset was acquired from 18 June to 17 July 2015 at ground-based measurements taken with mini MAX-DOAS at IESE (Institute of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, NUST (National University of Sciences and Technology Islamabad (33.6416°N, 72.9835°E, Pakistan. Tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs of CHOCHO were derived from measured DSCDs by using geometric air mass factor approach. Results show that CHOCHO emissions from biogenic sources are largely driven by actinic flux. Covariance of ambient temperature and relative humidity was also investigated at both sites. Significant correlation between actinic flux and CHOCHO VCDs (r > 0.8 along with similar diurnal variation was observed at both monitoring sites. Quantitative difference observed in CHOCHO VCDs is primarily triggered by the difference in actinic flux and vegetation profiles of both monitoring sites.

  10. New results on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter February 10--11, 1982 events: A solar wind disturbance not a comet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intriligator, D.S.

    1985-04-01

    We study the characteristics of a series of disturbances observed on February 10--11, 1982 by the plasma analyzer and the magnetometer on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) obtained in the solar wind upstream of Venus. We conclude that the events were associated with the propagation of a solar wind disturbance of coronal origin and not with an encounter with a comet or other local outgassing object (Russell et al., 1983). The plasma analyzer spectra clearly show the presence of increases in He/sup + +/ and they argue strongly against Russell et al.'s interpretation. The peak in magnetic field magnitude on February 11 is identified as the magnetic signature of a thin, trailing ''filament'' at the end of a series of solar initiated events. Corresponding increases in He/sup + +/ and magnetic field fluctuations were observed near earth by ISEE-3 about a day later, and this strongly supports the concept of a solar origin.

  11. Autotrophic biofilm development on superficial samples of the gold-silver mine tailings, Valenciana (Mexico): pioneers in tailings remediation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Meza, Jessica Viridiana

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of long term bio-assays on microorganism colonization of mine tailings samples, taken from the Valenciana mine tailings (Guanajuato, Mexico), under stable laboratory conditions (humidity, temperature, light exposure). In order to identify the main metabolic groups of the potentially colonizing microorganisms and the implications of their growth on the main tailing's characteristics related to biological succession, organic matter (OM) content, cationic exchange capacity (CEC), and pH values were measured as the colonization took place. We observe that photosynthetic biofilms (cyanobacteria, green algae, and diatoms) successfully colonize the mine tailings samples as pioneers; moreover, bacteria, yeast and fungi were also identified. Biofilm colonization significantly improved the OM contents, whereas the pH value is not modified during the entire observed colonization process. The results suggest that biofilms are useful during the first steps of the mine tailings remediation. This is the first report of microalgae and cyanobacteria grown of on tailings samples obtained from a semiarid region.

  12. An observational retrospective/horizontal study to compare oxygen-ozone therapy and/or global postural re-education in complicated chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apuzzo, Dario; Giotti, Chiara; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Ferrazza, Paolo; Soldati, Paola; Zucco, Gesualdo M

    2014-01-01

    Acute low back pain (LBP) is the fifth most common reason for physician visits and about nine out of ten adults experience back pain at some point in their life. In a large number of patients LBP is associated with disc herniation (DH). Recently, oxygen-ozone (O2O3) therapy has been used successfully in the treatment of LBP, reducing pain after the failure of other conservative treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of O2O3 therapy in back pain rehabilitation, comparing three groups of patients suffering from chronic back pain associated with DH submitted to three different treatments: intramuscular O2O3 infiltrations, global postural An observational retrospective/horizontal study to compare oxygen-ozone therapy and/or global postural re-education in complicated chronic low back pain re-education (GPR), or a combination of the two (O2O3+GPR). The data show that pain severity before treatment was significantly lower in the patients treated with GPR alone (VAS score 7.4) than in the O2O3+GPR patients (VAS score 8.5) and the O2O3 patients (VAS score 8.6). At the end of treatment, pain severity was lower in the O2O3 patients than in the GPR-alone patients. After some years of follow-up only the difference between O2O3+GPR and GPR-alone remained significant.

  13. Outcomes of mitral valve repair compared with replacement in patients undergoing concomitant aortic valve surgery: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurav, Alok; Alla, Venkata Mahesh; Kaushik, Manu; Hunter, Claire C; Mooss, Aryan V

    2015-09-01

    Long-term superiority of mitral valve (MV) repair compared with replacement is well established in degenerative MV disease. In rheumatic heart disease, its advantages are unclear and it is often performed in conjunction with aortic valve (AV) replacement. Herein, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing outcomes of MV repair vs replacement in patients undergoing concomitant AV replacement. PubMed, Cochrane and Web of Science databases were searched up to 25 January 2014 for English language studies comparing outcomes of MV repair vs replacement in patients undergoing simultaneous AV replacement. Data of selected studies were extracted. Study quality, publication bias and heterogeneity were assessed. Analysis was performed using a random effects model (meta-analysis of observational studies in epidemiology recommendation). A total of 1202 abstracts/titles were screened. Of these, 20 were selected for full text review and 8 studies (3924 patients) were included in the final analysis: 1255 underwent MV repair and 2669 underwent replacement. Late outcome data were available in seven studies (cumulative follow-up: 15 654 patient-years). The early (in hospital and up to 30 days post-surgery) mortality [risk ratio (RR): 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53-0.87, P = 0.003] and late (>30 days post-surgery) mortality (RR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.64-0.90 P = 0.001) were significantly lower in the MV repair group compared with the MV replacement group. The MV reoperation rate (RR: 1.89, 95% CI: 0.87-4.10, P = 0.108), thromboembolism (including valve thrombosis) (RR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.38-1.13, P = 0.128) and major bleeding rates (RR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.49-1.57, P = 0.659) were found to be comparable between the two groups. In a separate analysis of studies with exclusively rheumatic patients (n = 1106), the early as well as late mortality benefit of MV repair was lost (RR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.44-1.90, P = 0.81 and RR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.39-1.22, P = 0.199, respectively

  14. Changes in serum lipids in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with a combination of tocilizumab and methotrexate compared with methotrexate alone for 24 weeks of observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Udachkina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. According to the some studies tocilizumab therapy (TCZ in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA is accompanied by deterioration of blood lipid profile. Aim. To study changes in serum lipid parameters in patients with RA treated with a combination of tocilizumab and methotrexate compared with methotrexate alone for 24 weeks of observation. Material and methods. Patients (n=72 with RA were included into the pilot non-randomized 24-week study and divided in two groups: 1 TCZ+MTX group (n=39; women 30; median age 51 [43-55] years; 6 i.v. infusions of TCZ 8 mg/kg + МТX 10-20 mg/week; 2 MTX group (n=33; women 23; mеdian age 56 [48-63] years; MTX 7.5-20 mg/week. Results. At the baseline, similar proatherogenic blood profile was observed in both groups. The patients of MTX group more frequently took statins (n=19; 57.6% compared with the group TCZ+MTX (n=7; 18%, (p<0.05. The lipid levels correlated positively with traditional risk factors (p<0.05. RA activity and duration correlated negatively with high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, (p<0.05. Good/satisfactory anti-inflammatory effect was achieved in both groups after 24 weeks of treatment. Patients of TCZ+MTX group showed an increase in total cholesterol and HDL-C levels by 11% and 110%, respectively and decrease in plasma atherogenic index (PAI by 47%, (p<0.05. HDL-C level increased by 22% and PAI decreased by 16% in patients of MTX group (p<0.05. Among patients of MTX group without statin therapy HDL-C as well as non-HDL-C levels were increased by 24% and 27%, respectively (p<0.05; PAI did not change significantly in this subgroup. Among patients of MTX group treated with statins isolated increase in HDL-C level by 22% and decrease in PAI by 37.3% (p<0.05 were observed. A number of patients with achieved target levels of all studied lipid parameters did not change significantly in both groups. Conclusions. TCZ+MTX combined therapy as well as MTX monotherapy are associated

  15. Health-Risk Behaviour in Deprived Neighbourhoods Compared with Non-Deprived Neighbourhoods: A Systematic Literature Review of Quantitative Observational Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Holst Algren

    Full Text Available There has been increasing interest in neighbourhoods' influence on individuals' health-risk behaviours, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity and diet. The aim of this review was to systematically review recent studies on health-risk behaviour among adults who live in deprived neighbourhoods compared with those who live in non-deprived neighbourhoods and to summarise what kind of operationalisations of neighbourhood deprivation that were used in the studies.PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews were followed. Systematic searches were performed in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Sociological Abstracts using relevant search terms, Boolean operators, and truncation, and reference lists were scanned. Quantitative observational studies that examined health-risk behaviour in deprived neighbourhoods compared with non-deprived neighbourhoods were eligible for inclusion.The inclusion criteria were met by 22 studies. The available literature showed a positive association between smoking and physical inactivity and living in deprived neighbourhoods compared with non-deprived neighbourhoods. In regard to low fruit and vegetable consumption and alcohol consumption, the results were ambiguous, and no clear differences were found. Numerous different operationalisations of neighbourhood deprivation were used in the studies.Substantial evidence indicates that future health interventions in deprived neighbourhoods should focus on smoking and physical inactivity. We suggest that alcohol interventions should be population based rather than based on the specific needs of deprived neighbourhoods. More research is needed on fruit and vegetable consumption. In future studies, the lack of a uniform operationalisation of neighbourhood deprivation must be addressed.

  16. Effects of case management in community aged care on client and carer outcomes: a systematic review of randomized trials and comparative observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen; Hsueh, Arthur

    2012-11-14

    Case management has been applied in community aged care to meet frail older people's holistic needs and promote cost-effectiveness. This systematic review aims to evaluate the effects of case management in community aged care on client and carer outcomes. We searched Web of Science, Scopus, Medline, CINAHL (EBSCO) and PsycINFO (CSA) from inception to 2011 July. Inclusion criteria were: no restriction on date, English language, community-dwelling older people and/or carers, case management in community aged care, published in refereed journals, randomized control trials (RCTs) or comparative observational studies, examining client or carer outcomes. Quality of studies was assessed by using such indicators as quality control, randomization, comparability, follow-up rate, dropout, blinding assessors, and intention-to-treat analysis. Two reviewers independently screened potentially relevant studies, extracted information and assessed study quality. A narrative summary of findings were presented. Ten RCTs and five comparative observational studies were identified. One RCT was rated high quality. Client outcomes included mortality (7 studies), physical or cognitive functioning (6 studies), medical conditions (2 studies), behavioral problems (2 studies) , unmet service needs (3 studies), psychological health or well-being (7 studies) , and satisfaction with care (4 studies), while carer outcomes included stress or burden (6 studies), satisfaction with care (2 studies), psychological health or well-being (5 studies), and social consequences (such as social support and relationships with clients) (2 studies). Five of the seven studies reported that case management in community aged care interventions significantly improved psychological health or well-being in the intervention group, while all the three studies consistently reported fewer unmet service needs among the intervention participants. In contrast, available studies reported mixed results regarding client physical

  17. A Comparative Assessment of Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership and Mini-Sentinel Common Data Models and Analytics: Implications for Active Drug Safety Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yihua; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Suehs, Brandon T; Hartzema, Abraham G; Kahn, Michael G; Moride, Yola; Sauer, Brian C; Liu, Qing; Moll, Keran; Pasquale, Margaret K; Nair, Vinit P; Bate, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    An often key component to coordinating surveillance activities across distributed networks is the design and implementation of a common data model (CDM). The purpose of this study was to evaluate two drug safety surveillance CDMs from an ecosystem perspective to better understand how differences in CDMs and analytic tools affect usability and interpretation of results. Humana claims data from 2007 to 2012 were mapped to Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) and Mini-Sentinel CDMs. Data were described and compared at the patient level by source code and mapped concepts. Study cohort construction and effect estimates were also compared using two different analytical methods--one based on a new user design implementing a high-dimensional propensity score (HDPS) algorithm and the other based on univariate self-controlled case series (SCCS) design--across six established positive drug-outcome pairs to learn how differences in CDMs and analytics influence steps in the database analytic process and results. Claims data for approximately 7.7 million Humana health plan members were transformed into the two CDMs. Three health outcome cohorts and two drug cohorts showed differences in cohort size and constituency between Mini-Sentinel and OMOP CDMs, which was a result of multiple factors. Overall, the implementation of the HDPS procedure on Mini-Sentinel CDM detected more known positive associations than that on OMOP CDM. The SCCS method results were comparable on both CDMs. Differences in the implementation of the HDPS procedure between the two CDMs were identified; analytic model and risk period specification had a significant impact on the performance of the HDPS procedure on OMOP CDM. Differences were observed between OMOP and Mini-Sentinel CDMs. The analysis of both CDMs at the data model level indicated that such conceptual differences had only a slight but not significant impact on identifying known safety associations. Our results show that differences at

  18. Industrial pioneers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, J.

    2014-01-01

    With their knowledge of metallurgy, mechanics and thermodynamics, mechanical engineers had to give shape to the industrial revolution in the Netherlands 150 years ago. This revolution only slowly gathered momentum, however, especially in comparison with England.

  19. Aerosols optical properties in dynamic atmosphere in the northwestern part of the Indian Himalaya: A comparative study from ground and satellite based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleria, Raj Paul; Kuniyal, Jagdish Chandra; Rawat, Pan Singh; Thakur, Harinder Kumar; Sharma, Manum; Sharma, Nand Lal; Singh, Mahavir; Chand, Kesar; Sharma, Priyanka; Thakur, Ajay Kumar; Dhyani, Pitamber Prasad; Bhuyan, Pradip Kumar

    2011-08-01

    The present study deals with the aerosol optical property which carried out during April 2006 to March 2007 over Mohal (31.9°N, 77.12°E) in the northwestern Indian Himalaya. The study was conducted using ground based Multi-wavelength Radiometer (MWR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. The daily average aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm was found to be (mean ± standard deviation) 0.24 ± 0.10. The afternoon AOD values have been noticed to be higher than the forenoon AOD values. Spectral AOD values exhibited larger day-to-day variation in finer aerosols during the observation period. The daily average value of Ångström exponent 'α' and turbidity coefficient 'β' obtained was 1.10 ± 0.38 and 0.12 ± 0.08 respectively. Higher value of AOD ~ 0.39 ± 0.06 during summer associated with low α ~ 0.73 ± 0.28 has attributed to the increase in the relative dominance of coarse size particles. In winter α ~ 1.21 ± 0.32 indicating a considerable increase in fine size particles, attributed to the anthropogenic activities. The AOD spectra seem to be more wavelength dependent in winter as compared to summer. Comparison of MWR observation with MODIS observation indicates a good conformity between ground-based and satellite derived AOD. The root mean square deviation (RMSD), mean absolute bias deviation (MABD) and correlation coefficient have been found to be ~ 0.08, ~ 0.06 and ~ 0.77 respectively. These results suggest that the AOD retrieval through satellite can be able to characterize AOD distribution over Mohal. However, further efforts to eliminate systematic errors in the existing MODIS products are needed. During the observation period ~ 30%, ~ 47% and ~ 62% air parcels drawn at 4000, 5500 and 8000 m above ground level respectively reached at Mohal which passed through or originated from The Great Sahara. The maximum AOD at 500 nm occurred on 8 May 2006. This has caused a significant reduction in surface reaching solar irradiance by

  20. Comparative effectiveness of adrenal sparing radical nephrectomy and non-adrenal sparing radical nephrectomy in clear cell renal cell carcinoma: Observational study of survival outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, Gregory J.; Walsh, Leon G.; Redmond, Ciaran E.; Kelly, Niall P.; McGuire, Barry B.; Sharma, Vidit; Kelly, Michael E.; Galvin, David J.; Mulvin, David W.; Lennon, Gerald M.; Quinlan, David M.; Flood, Hugh D.; Giri, Subhasis K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We compare the survival outcomes of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with adrenal sparing radical nephrectomy (ASRN) and non-adrenal sparing radical nephrectomy (NASRN). Methods: We conducted an observational study based on a composite patient population from two university teaching hospitals who underwent RN for RCC between January 2000 and December 2012. Only patients with pathologically confirmed RCC were included. We excluded patients undergoing cytoreductive nephrectomy, with loco-regional lymph node involvement. In total, 579 patients (ASRN = 380 and NASRN = 199) met our study criteria. Patients were categorized by risk groups (all stage, early stage and locally advanced RCC). Overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were analyzed for risk groups. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: The median follow-up was 41 months (range: 12–157). There were significant benefits in OS (ASRN 79.5% vs. NASRN 63.3%; p = 0.001) and CSS (84.3% vs. 74.9%; p = 0.001), with any differences favouring ASRN in all stage. On multivariate analysis, there was a trend towards worse OS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.759, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.943–2.309, p = 0.089) and CSS (HR 1.797, 95% CI 0.967–3.337, p = 0.064) in patients with NASRN (although not statistically significant). Of these patients, only 11 (1.9%) had adrenal involvement. Conclusions: The inherent limitations in our study include the impracticality of conducting a prospective randomized trial in this scenario. Our observational study with a 13-year follow-up suggests ASRN leads to better survival than NASRN. ASRN should be considered the gold standard in treating patients with RCC, unless it is contraindicated. PMID:26425218

  1. Comparing the odds of postpartum haemorrhage in planned home birth against planned hospital birth: results of an observational study of over 500,000 maternities in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nove Andrea

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to compare the odds of postpartum haemorrhage among women who opt for home birth against the odds of postpartum haemorrhage for those who plan a hospital birth. It is an observational study involving secondary analysis of maternity records, using binary logistic regression modelling. The data relate to pregnancies that received maternity care from one of fifteen hospitals in the former North West Thames Regional Health Authority Area in England, and which resulted in a live or stillbirth in the years 1988–2000 inclusive, excluding ‘high-risk’ pregnancies, unplanned home births, pre-term births, elective Caesareans and medical inductions. Results Even after adjustment for known confounders such as parity, the odds of postpartum haemorrhage (≥1000ml of blood lost are significantly higher if a hospital birth is intended than if a home birth is intended (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 3.8. The ‘home birth’ group included women who were transferred to hospital during labour or shortly after birth. Conclusions Women and their partners should be advised that the risk of PPH is higher among births planned to take place in hospital compared to births planned to take place at home, but that further research is needed to understand (a whether the same pattern applies to the more life-threatening categories of PPH, and (b why hospital birth is associated with increased odds of PPH. If it is due to the way in which labour is managed in hospital, changes should be made to practices which compromise the safety of labouring women.

  2. Comparative primate obstetrics: Observations of 15 diurnal births in wild gelada monkeys (Theropithecus gelada) and their implications for understanding human and nonhuman primate birth evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nga; Lee, Laura M; Fashing, Peter J; Nurmi, Niina O; Stewart, Kathrine M; Turner, Taylor J; Barry, Tyler S; Callingham, Kadie R; Goodale, C Barret; Kellogg, Bryce S; Burke, Ryan J; Bechtold, Emily K; Claase, Megan J; Eriksen, G Anita; Jones, Sorrel C Z; Kerby, Jeffrey T; Kraus, Jacob B; Miller, Carrie M; Trew, Thomas H; Zhao, Yi; Beierschmitt, Evan C; Ramsay, Malcolm S; Reynolds, Jason D; Venkataraman, Vivek V

    2017-05-01

    The birth process has been studied extensively in many human societies, yet little is known about this essential life history event in other primates. Here, we provide the most detailed account of behaviors surrounding birth for any wild nonhuman primate to date. Over a recent ∼10-year period, we directly observed 15 diurnal births (13 live births and 2 stillbirths) among geladas (Theropithecus gelada) at Guassa, Ethiopia. During each birth, we recorded the occurrence (or absence) of 16 periparturitional events, chosen for their potential to provide comparative evolutionary insights into the factors that shaped birth behaviors in humans and other primates. We found that several events (e.g., adopting standing crouched positions, delivering infants headfirst) occurred during all births, while other events (e.g., aiding the infant from the birth canal, licking infants following delivery, placentophagy) occurred during, or immediately after, most births. Moreover, multiparas (n = 9) were more likely than primiparas (n = 6) to (a) give birth later in the day, (b) isolate themselves from nearby conspecifics while giving birth, (c) aid the infant from the birth canal, and (d) consume the placenta. Our results suggest that prior maternal experience may contribute to greater competence or efficiency during the birth process. Moreover, face presentations (in which infants are born with their neck extended and their face appearing first, facing the mother) appear to be the norm for geladas. Lastly, malpresentations (in which infants are born in the occiput anterior position more typical of human infants) may be associated with increased mortality in this species. We compare the birth process in geladas to those in other primates (including humans) and discuss several key implications of our study for advancing understanding of obstetrics and the mechanism of labor in humans and nonhuman primates. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. {sup 177}Lu-immunotherapy of experimental peritoneal carcinomatosis shows comparable effectiveness to {sup 213}Bi-immunotherapy, but causes toxicity not observed with {sup 213}Bi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, Christof; Zoeckler, Christine; Beck, Roswitha; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Institute for Pathology, Tuebingen (Germany); Bruchertseifer, Frank [Institute for Transuranium Elements, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb-immunoconjugates targeting gastric cancer cells have effectively cured peritoneal carcinomatosis in a nude mouse model following intraperitoneal injection. Because the {beta}-emitter {sup 177}Lu has proven to be beneficial in targeted therapy, {sup 177}Lu-d9MAb was investigated in this study in order to compare its therapeutic efficacy and toxicity with those of {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb. Nude mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with HSC45-M2 gastric cancer cells expressing d9-E-cadherin and were treated intraperitoneally 1 or 8 days later with different activities of specific {sup 177}Lu-d9MAb immunoconjugates targeting d9-E-cadherin or with nonspecific {sup 177}Lu-d8MAb. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by monitoring survival for up to 250 days. For evaluation of toxicity, both biodistribution of {sup 177}Lu-d9MAb and blood cell counts were determined at different time points and organs were examined histopathologically. Treatment with {sup 177}Lu-immunoconjugates (1.85, 7.4, 14.8 MBq) significantly prolonged survival. As expected, treatment on day 1 after tumour cell inoculation was more effective than treatment on day 8, and specific {sup 177}Lu-d9MAb conjugates were superior to nonspecific {sup 177}Lu-d8MAb. Treatment with 7.4 MBq of {sup 177}Lu-d9MAb was most successful, with 90% of the animals surviving longer than 250 days. However, treatment with therapeutically effective activities of {sup 177}Lu-d9MAb was not free of toxic side effects. In some animals lymphoblastic lymphoma, proliferative glomerulonephritis and hepatocarcinoma were seen but were not observed after treatment with {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb at comparable therapeutic efficacy. The therapeutic efficacy of {sup 177}Lu-d9MAb conjugates in peritoneal carcinomatosis is impaired by toxic side effects. Because previous therapy with {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb revealed comparable therapeutic efficacy without toxicity it should be preferred for the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis. (orig.)

  4. Comparative incidence of a first thrombotic event in purely obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome with pregnancy loss: the NOH-APS observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gris, Jean-Christophe; Bouvier, Sylvie; Molinari, Nicolas; Galanaud, Jean-Philippe; Cochery-Nouvellon, Eva; Mercier, Erik; Fabbro-Peray, Pascale; Balducchi, Jean-Pierre; Marès, Pierre; Quéré, Isabelle; Dauzat, Michel

    2012-03-15

    The incidence of thrombosis in the purely obstetric form of antiphospholipid syndrome is uncertain. We performed a 10-year observational study of 1592 nonthrombotic women who had experienced 3 consecutive spontaneous abortions before the 10th week of gestation or 1 fetal death at or beyond the 10th week of gestation. We compared the frequencies of thrombotic events among women positive for antiphospholipid Abs (n = 517), women carrying the F5 6025 or F2 rs1799963 polymorphism (n = 279), and women with negative thrombophilia screening results (n = 796). The annual rates of deep vein thrombosis (1.46%; range, 1.15%-1.82%), pulmonary embolism (0.43%; range, 0.26%-0.66%), superficial vein thrombosis (0.44%; range, 0.28%-0.68%), and cerebrovascular events (0.32%; range, 0.18%-0.53%) were significantly higher in aPLAbs women than in the other groups despite low-dose aspirin primary prophylaxis. Women carrying 1 of the 2 polymorphisms did not experience more thrombotic events than women who screened negative for thrombophilia. Lupus anticoagulant was a risk factor for unprovoked proximal and distal deep and superficial vein thrombosis and women in the upper quartile of lupus anticoagulant activity had the highest risk. Despite data suggesting that aPLAbs may induce pregnancy loss through nonthrombotic mechanisms, women with purely obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome are at risk for thrombotic complications.

  5. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST-CLASH observations of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431: implications for stellar mass versus dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Palmese, A; Banerji, M; Gruen, D; Jouvel, S; Melchior, P; Aleksić, J; Annis, J; Diehl, H T; Jeltema, T; Romer, K; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E S; Seitz, S; Suchyta, E; Zhang, Y; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Gerdes, D W; Goldstein, D A; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Li, T S; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Vikram, V

    2016-01-01

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (5 filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope CLASH (17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25% of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensing studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f*=7.0+-2.2x10^-3 within a radius of r_200c~3 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both datasets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of vie...

  6. Determining the degree of satisfaction of project Good Business entrepreneurs in Paraná’s North Pioneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rogério Alves Brene

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to assess the determinants of satisfaction of entrepreneurs with training/course project called Good Northern Paraná Business Pioneer. As an analytical tool, the research used a factor analysis, which had a role in evaluating the consistency of the questionnaire and add the 11 questions in two groups (Structure and consultants. With these two explanatory variables, they were crossed with the note of satisfaction with the course (dependent variable first from the adjustment rates (Pearson and Spearman and later with the regression analysis. It is noteworthy that the regression determined which of the variables are shown more relevant, or even if both are significant. As a result it is observed that the variable Consultants has a moderate Pearson correction (0,413 with the note of satisfaction, being larger than the structure (0,268, classified as poor. About Spearman, both had the hypothesis H1 (linking the variables accepted. Regarding the regression is possible to infer that both overall and in individual aspect, the variables are significant, highlighting the structure presented coefficient (1,13 higher than that of consultants (1,07, both explaining 27.2% of the satisfaction score (0,5 points from an average of 1,86.

  7. Louis Sébastien Tredern de Lézérec (1780-18?), a forgotten pioneer of chick embryology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beetschen, J C

    1995-04-01

    Tredern's thesis on chick embryo development was submitted in Jena (Germany) in 1808 and seems to have been completely overlooked by historians of embryology during the 20th century. However, K.E. von Baer and C. Pander were much interested in that thesis in 1816-1817, when they resumed work on the chick embryo. Tredern, who was born in France in 1780, had then left Germany and abandoned his studies, but von Baer tried to find trace of him throughout his life, wanting to pay homage to his pioneer work. Von Baer published a short biographical notice (1874), which was later extended by Stieda (1901). The accuracy of Tredern's observations and the reasons that could have justified von Baer's interest are discussed. Tredern went back to Paris in 1811 to submit a second medical thesis, the value of which is also considered. It is also shown that, in the teaching of embryology, 18th century preformation concepts were still vivid, remaining in French textbooks of the period 1800-1830. This situation strongly contrasts with the new epigenetic views that were developed by the German scientists with whom Tredern had performed his studies.

  8. 张江台地表与深井地震观测对比分析%Comparative Analysis of Zhangjiang Station Surface and Deep Seismic Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴晓; 尹继尧; 杨庭春

    2013-01-01

    tools.In this study,the micro-tremor and dynamic range data of the Zhangjiang surface station and deep well station data are compared and analyzed systematically.We obtained the following preliminary results:The root mean square(RMS)value of background noise in the deep well is smaller in orders of magnitude than that at the surface station.It can accurately record micro-tremors because of only slight disturbances by the external environment.The seismic signals of deep well observation are the most accurate.The dynamic range of measurement stations effectively reflects the instrument's performance indicators to determine the background environment interference level recorded by the maximum dynamic range of the seismic signal.Due to the superposition station environment noise and seismic signal,the instrument is not up to the dynamic range of design and can only achieve an effective dynamic range of measurement.The effective dynamic range of the deep well station exceeds 30% of that of surface stations; therefore,it can produce a broader range of micro-tremors.Range surface frequency is within 0.3~2.5; the deep well station has low-frequency noise and nearly high-frequency at 25 Hz.A comparison of deep bench surface stations reveals that environment noise is much smaller,particularly in the low-frequency range.Moreover,with reference to analysis of data from the Shanghai telemetry seismic network of various types of base background noise,the dynamic range of noise at the Zhangjiang comprehensive deep well and those of the Shanghai network deep wells are consistent.Therefore,comprehensive visible data for the deep seismic section is unaffected by the noise integrated system.With the accelerated process of city development,environmental noise will increase; therefore,the deep well seismometer observation method is more reliable than surface seismometer observation.Completed construction of the seismic section of the deep borehole project can provide greater precision

  9. EFFECT OF INOCULANT PIONEER 1188 IN MAIZE SILAGE ON COW MILKING CAPACITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zimmer

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available First investigation part, started on 1 September 2001 by feeding 473 cows (401 dairy and 72 dry and finished on 13 November by feeding 474 cows (409 dairy and 65 dry, was characterized by the main ration consisting of maize silage without inoculant. This period was known for a maximum number of housed cows being 490 (423 dairy and 67 dry and minimum 469 (395 dairy and 74 dry. Daily average of stable milk production was 17.06 l with 3.48% of lactic fat on the average. Second part of the investigation, started on 14 November 2001 by feeding 474 cows (411 dairy and 63 dry and finished on 31 March 2002 by feeding 464 cows (395 dairy and 69 dry, was known for the basic ration contained maize silage enriched by inoculant Pioneer 1188.This period was characterized by a maximum number of housed cows being 482 (404 dairy and 57 dry. Daily average of stable milk production was 18.67 l and 3.58% of lactic fat. The main ration was composed of silage maize, highly wet maize, pearl barley, stock meal, sunflower cake, hay, salt and VAM. Inoculant Pioneer contained 6 strains of lactic-sour fermentation selected bacteria whose viability is basis of a successful product. In fact, it is a micro-granulated product added, by Gandy doser, to amount of 0.5 kg per green mass/t. Inoculant Pioneer 1188 was in this research added in a dose of 0.436 kg t-1 silage maize. Daily average of stable milk production increased by 1.61l i.e. 9.4% and lactic fat from 3.48% to 3.58% i.e. 2.9%.

  10. Robert Mandell: a pioneer and giant in the art and science of contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polse, Kenneth A

    2008-10-01

    Robert B. Mandell is the quintessential modern clinical scientist. Over his long academic career, he has pioneered many advances in contact lens practice, ranging from a more complete understanding of corneal shape to the effects of contact lenses on corneal health. His classic text, Contact Lens Practice, first published in 1965, was reprinted 14 times in four editions up to 1988. Mandell's contributions to the advancement of the profession of optometry have always been characterized by a genuine concern for the patient and a steadfast belief that his research must have relevance to the practice of optometry.

  11. XIA NAI, AN EARLY PIONEER IN THE FIELD OF EGYPTOLOGY IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Professor Xia Nai (1910-1985) was a prominent Chinese archaeologist of substantial scholarly achievement. He is generally regarded as the leader of archaeological matters of the People's Republic of China, and one of the important founders of modern Chinese archaeology. His great academic achievements gave him high prestige in academic circles both at home and abroad. Xia Nai was born on 7 February 1910, in Wenzhou, Zhejian province and died on 19 June 1985 in Beijing. In modern China, Xia Nai was a pioneer...

  12. Victor Kandinsky (1849-89): pioneer of modern Russian forensic psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Vladimir; Margolin, Jacob; Witztum, Eliezer

    2012-06-01

    The paper describes Victor Kandinsky's professional achievements within nineteenth-century Russian forensic psychiatry. A thorough review of nineteenth-century Russian psychiatry is presented, followed by a short biographical account of Kandinsky's personal life. Within the backdrop of Russian forensic psychiatry toward the end of nineteenth century, Kandinsky's pioneer innovations in psychopathology and classification as well as his contributions to Russian forensic psychiatry are reviewed. These are exemplified by two of his forensic case studies relating to forensic responsibility and malingering, which are included in his famous book 'On Irresponsibility'.

  13. Breaking the mould: profiles of six pioneer trainee or beginning teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLay, Margaret

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been much recent attention on increasing the diversity of teachers in the Lifelong Learning Sector (LLS in order to provide a more representative workforce. This is seen as vital not only in engaging learners from minorities but also in increasing the experience of others in working with underrepresented groups. There has been less attention on how to support and sustain teachers from minorities once in post. This study profiles six pioneering teachers/trainees, looking at how they came into their chosen profession and subsequently into teaching, and what processes and attitudes help or hinder them in their work.

  14. Jewish Family and Children's Services: a pioneering human service organization (1850-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sara L; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Jewish Family and Children's Services of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin, and Sonoma Counties is a pioneering nonprofit human service organization that has delivered services for 157 years. Over the course of its history, the organization has transformed itself from an all-volunteer agency delivering aid to immigrant families during the Gold Rush era to a $30 million nonprofit human service organization offering a full-range of services to adults, children, and families. The history of Jewish Family and Children's Services sheds light on the importance of strong leadership, strategic planning, external relationships, and strong donor support.

  15. Pioneer microbial communities of the Fimmvörðuháls lava flow, Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Laura C; Cockell, Charles S; Thorsteinsson, Thorsteinn; Marteinsson, Viggó; Stevenson, John

    2014-10-01

    Little is understood regarding the phylogeny and metabolic capabilities of the earliest colonists of volcanic rocks, yet these data are essential for understanding how life becomes established in and interacts with the planetary crust, ultimately contributing to critical zone processes and soil formation. Here, we report the use of molecular and culture-dependent methods to determine the composition of pioneer microbial communities colonising the basaltic Fimmvörðuháls lava flow at Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, formed in 2010. Our data show that 3 to 5 months post eruption, the lava was colonised by a low-diversity microbial community dominated by Betaproteobacteria, primarily taxa related to non-phototrophic diazotrophs such as Herbaspirillum spp. and chemolithotrophs such as Thiobacillus. Although successfully cultured following enrichment, phototrophs were not abundant members of the Fimmvörðuháls communities, as revealed by molecular analysis, and phototrophy is therefore not likely to be a dominant biogeochemical process in these early successional basalt communities. These results contrast with older Icelandic lava of comparable mineralogy, in which phototrophs comprised a significant fraction of microbial communities, and the non-phototrophic community fractions were dominated by Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria.

  16. Bioequivalence in dogs of a meloxicam formulation administered as a transmucosal oral mist with an orally administered pioneer suspension product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, P; Cheng, Z; Keefe, T J; Weich, E; Bryd, J; Cedergren, R; Cozzi, E

    2013-02-01

    A mucosal mist formulation of meloxicam, administered as a spray into the mouth (test article), was compared for bioequivalence to a pioneer meloxicam suspension for oral administration (reference article). Pharmacokinetic profiles and average bioequivalence were investigated in 20 dogs. The study design comprised a two-period, two-sequence, two-treatment cross-over design, with maximum concentration (C(max)) and area under plasma concentration-time curve to last sampling time (AUC(last)) used as pivotal bioequivalence variables. Bioequivalence of the products was confirmed, based on relative ratios of geometric mean concentrations (and 90% confidence intervals within the range 0.80-1.25) for C(max) of 101.9 (97.99-106.0) and for AUC(last) of 97.24 (94.44-100.1). The initial absorption of meloxicam was more rapid for the test article, despite virtually identical C(max) values for the two products. Mean elimination half-lives were 29.6 h (test article) and 30.0 h (reference article). The meloxicam plasma concentration-time profiles were considered in relation to published data on the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2 isoenzymes by meloxicam.

  17. WIN OVER study: Efficacy and safety of olmesartan in Indian hypertensive patients: results of an open label, non-comparative, multi-centric, post marketing observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbla, D K; Kumar, S; Reddy, Y V; Trailokya, A; Naik, M

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a global health problem. Multiple classes of drugs including angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are available for the treatment of hypertension. Olmesartan is a relatively newer ARB used in hypertension management. To assess the efficacy and safety of WIN-BP (Olmesartan 20 mg/40 mg) tablet in Indian patients with hypertension. An open label, non-comparative, multi-centric, real world post marketing observational study included Indian adult hypertensive patients who were treated with olmesartan 20 mg/40 mg tablet once daily for six months. The primary outcome was reduction of systolic blood pressure (SBP) to olmesartan. All reported adverse events were recorded. A total of 8940 patients were enrolled in this study. Baseline SBP of 164 mmHg was reduced to 153, 145, 134 and 130 mmHg at the end of 15 days, 1, 3 and 6 months respectively. Similarly, baseline DBP of 100 mmHg was reduced to 93, 89, 84 and 82 mmHg at the end of 15 days, 1, 3 and 6 months respectively. The reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure from day 15 to month 6 was statistically significant (p olmesartan treatment. The percentage of responders for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased consistently from day 15 to month 6. Only 0.08% patients reported the adverse events. No serious adverse event was reported in the study. Olmesartan 20 mg/40 mg is effective and well tolerated without any serious adverse events in patients with hypertension. Copyright © 2014 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparing modeled and observed changes in mineral dust transport and deposition to Antarctica between the Last Glacial Maximum and current climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albani, Samuel [University of Siena, Graduate School in Polar Sciences, Siena (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Environmental Sciences, Milano (Italy); Cornell University, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Ithaca, NY (United States); Mahowald, Natalie M. [Cornell University, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Ithaca, NY (United States); Delmonte, Barbara; Maggi, Valter [University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Environmental Sciences, Milano (Italy); Winckler, Gisela [Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States); Columbia University, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Mineral dust aerosols represent an active component of the Earth's climate system, by interacting with radiation directly, and by modifying clouds and biogeochemistry. Mineral dust from polar ice cores over the last million years can be used as paleoclimate proxy, and provide unique information about climate variability, as changes in dust deposition at the core sites can be due to changes in sources, transport and/or deposition locally. Here we present results from a study based on climate model simulations using the Community Climate System Model. The focus of this work is to analyze simulated differences in the dust concentration, size distribution and sources in current climate conditions and during the Last Glacial Maximum at specific ice core locations in Antarctica, and compare with available paleodata. Model results suggest that South America is the most important source for dust deposited in Antarctica in current climate, but Australia is also a major contributor and there is spatial variability in the relative importance of the major dust sources. During the Last Glacial Maximum the dominant source in the model was South America, because of the increased activity of glaciogenic dust sources in Southern Patagonia-Tierra del Fuego and the Southernmost Pampas regions, as well as an increase in transport efficiency southward. Dust emitted from the Southern Hemisphere dust source areas usually follow zonal patterns, but southward flow towards Antarctica is located in specific areas characterized by southward displacement of air masses. Observations and model results consistently suggest a spatially variable shift in dust particle sizes. This is due to a combination of relatively reduced en route wet removal favouring a generalized shift towards smaller particles, and on the other hand to an enhanced relative contribution of dry coarse particle deposition in the Last Glacial Maximum. (orig.)

  19. Observations and Processes Near the Snow-Air Interface: Insights Gained from New and Comparative Sensor Systems in View of Snow Surface Energy Balance Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Calaf-Bracons, M.; Parlange, M. B.

    2007-12-01

    Global warming drastically affects the seasonal snow cover in high altitude regions. The thermodynamic evolution of the snow pack is mainly controlled by the surface energy balance, however, most studies to date fail to close this budget on short time scales when using measurements of all its components. Also dynamic processes such as air movement in the snow pack associated with air exchange and the snow-atmosphere interface have to be taken into account. To investigate snow-atmosphere interaction, measurements of radiative and turbulent heat fluxes, and other meteorological quantities were obtained over a snow-covered glacier in the Swiss Alps during winter 2007. Humidity, air, surface, and snow temperature - quantities required to calculate energy fluxes for the surface energy budget - were measured with different sensors and techniques. Data revealed significant discrepancies between individual measurements at a location and time mainly due to solar heating of the sensors. We show that even shielded sensors overestimate air temperature during the day when compared to a radiation-independent reference sensor (sonic anemometer). Subsurface heat flux was determined from snow internal temperature and density data. High resolution temperature profiles were measured in the snow using traditional (thermocouple) and novel fiber optic distributed temperature instrumentation. To better understand the rate of gas exchange with the atmosphere controlling latent heat transport in the snow associated to phase changes (sublimation/deposition), air movement in the snow was investigated with using a new in-situ carbon monoxide trace gas measurement system providing high-resolution observation of snow transport process without gas extraction.

  20. 慢性支气管炎的临床疗效对比观察%Comparative Observation on Clinical Effects of Chronic Bronchitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛丹

    2015-01-01

    目的:对比分析核酪注射液治疗慢性支气管炎的临床疗效。方法选择慢性支气管炎296例,随机分组,核酪注射液组和常规治疗组,以咳嗽、咯痰为观察指标,疗前、疗后4天、用药结束后2天为时间点。结果两组比较,祛痰总积分及咳嗽有效率,核酪注射液组优于常规治疗组,P<0.05,差异具有统计学意义。结论治疗慢性支气管炎,辅助应用核酪注射液具有一定临床价值。%Objective Contrastive analysis the clinical effects on casein injection in treatmentof chronic bronchitis. Methods Selected 296 cases with chronic bronchitis, randomly divide into nuclear casein injection group and general therapy group. cough and expectoration were selected as outcome measures. The observation time point were set as the time before the treatment, the four days after the treatment and the second day after the end of treatment. Results Compared with two groups of cough and expectorant effect rate, the nuclear casein injection group was better than the conventional therapy group, P<0.05, had difference statistically signiifcance. Conclusion Casein injection has a certain value in treatment of chronic bronchitis.

  1. WIN OVER study: Efficacy and safety of olmesartan in Indian hypertensive patients: Results of an open label, non-comparative, multi-centric, post marketing observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbla, D.K.; Kumar, S.; Reddy, Y.V.; Trailokya, A.; Naik, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a global health problem. Multiple classes of drugs including angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are available for the treatment of hypertension. Olmesartan is a relatively newer ARB used in hypertension management. Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of WIN-BP (Olmesartan 20 mg/40 mg) tablet in Indian patients with hypertension. Material and methods An open label, non-comparative, multi-centric, real world post marketing observational study included Indian adult hypertensive patients who were treated with olmesartan 20 mg/40 mg tablet once daily for six months. The primary outcome was reduction of systolic blood pressure (SBP) to <140 mmHg and diastolic BP (DBP) to <90 mmHg at 3 and 6 months after initiation of treatment with olmesartan. All reported adverse events were recorded. Results A total of 8940 patients were enrolled in this study. Baseline SBP of 164 mmHg was reduced to 153, 145, 134 and 130 mmHg at the end of 15 days, 1, 3 and 6 months respectively. Similarly, baseline DBP of 100 mmHg was reduced to 93, 89, 84 and 82 mmHg at the end of 15 days, 1, 3 and 6 months respectively. The reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure from day 15 to month 6 was statistically significant (p < 0.0001) with olmesartan treatment. The percentage of responders for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased consistently from day 15 to month 6. Only 0.08% patients reported the adverse events. No serious adverse event was reported in the study. Conclusion Olmesartan 20 mg/40 mg is effective and well tolerated without any serious adverse events in patients with hypertension. PMID:24973841

  2. Minor amputation does not negatively affect health-related quality of life as compared with conservative treatment in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickwell, K; Siersma, V; Kars, M; Apelqvist, J; Bakker, K; Edmonds, M; Holstein, P; Jirkovská, A; Jude, E B; Mauricio, D; Piaggesi, A; Reike, H; Spraul, M; Uccioli, L; Urbancic, V; van Acker, K; van Baal, J; Schaper, N

    2017-03-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is poor in patients with persistent diabetic foot ulcers and poor HRQoL predicts worse outcomes in these patients. Amputation is often considered a treatment failure, which is why conservative treatment is generally preferred over amputation. However, it is unclear whether minor amputation negatively affects HRQoL compared with conservative treatment in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. In the cohort of the multicenter, prospective, observational Eurodiale study, we determined difference in change of HRQoL measured by EQ-5D between patients with a diabetic foot ulcers that healed after conservative treatment (n = 676) and after minor amputation (n = 145). Propensity score was used to adjust for known confounders, attempting to overcome lack of randomization. Baseline HRQoL was not significantly different between patients treated conservatively and undergoing minor amputation. In addition, there was no difference in the change of HRQoL between these groups. In patients who healed 6 to 12 months after the first visit, HRQoL on the anxiety/depression subscale even appeared to improve more in those who underwent minor amputation. Minor amputation was not associated with a negative impact on HRQoL in patients with a diabetic foot ulcers. It may therefore not be considered treatment failure in terms of HRQoL but rather a viable treatment option. A randomized controlled trial is warranted to further examine the influence of minor amputations on health-related quality of life. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A critical review of the works of pioneer physicians on kidney diseases in ancient Iran: Avicenna, Rhazes, Al-akhawayni, and Jorjani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changizi Ashtiyani, Saeed; Shamsi, Mohsen; Cyrus, Ali; Bastani, Bahar; Tabatabayei, Seyed Mohammad

    2011-09-01

    The history of kidney and urologic disorders dates back to the dawn of civilization. Throughout history of medicine, urine, the first bodily fluid to be examined, has continuously been studied as a means of understanding inner bodily function. The purpose of this review was to appraise the contributions of the ancient Iranian physician pioneers in the field of kidney and urological disorders, and to compare their beliefs and clinical methods with the modern medicine. We searched all available reliable electronic and published sources for the views of ancient Iranian physicians, Avicenna, Rhazes, Al-Akhawayni, and Jorjani, and compared them with recent medical literature. Our findings showed that ancient Iranian physicians described the symptoms, signs, and treatment of kidney and urological disorders; addressed bladder anatomy and physiology; and performed bladder catheterization and stone removal procedures in accordance with contemporary medicine. Ancient Iranian physicians pursued a comprehensive scientific methodology based on experiment, which is in compliance with the bases of modern medicine.

  4. Tijuca National Park: two pioneering restorationist initiatives in Atlantic forest in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Freitas

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the environmental history of the Tijuca National Park, we report on two pioneering restorationist initiatives and list its the mammal species now found in this urban park. The Tijuca National Park (TNP, a 3,200 ha urban park covered by secondary tropical forest, is located within Rio de Janeiro, in southeastern Brazil. The two restorationist initiatives were a pioneer tropical forest restoration project in the nineteenth century and a fauna management project in the 70' s. The mammal list presented here was based on specimens in the Museu Nacional do Rio de Janeiro and on publications. The mammal community of TNP is composed of 49 species, of which 11 are on regional red lists, and four are on the 2003 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Occurrence of these threatened species and the park history itself made the TNP a priority site for studying conservation, management, and monitoring. Besides maintaining fauna and flora (including threatened species diversity, the park benefits the population of Rio de Janeiro by providing water, green areas, and recreational and touristic opportunities.

  5. Orbital effects of the time-dependent component of the Pioneer anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    We work out the impact that the recently determined time-dependent component of the Pioneer anomalous acceleration may have on the orbital motions of some planets of the solar system in the hypothesis that it is a genuine phenomenon of gravitational origin. By assuming that it points towards the Sun, it turns out that both the semi-major axis a and the eccentricity e of the orbit of a test particle experience secular variations. For Saturn and Uranus, for which modern data records cover at least one full orbital revolution, such predicted anomalies are up to 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than the present-day accuracies in empirically determining their orbital parameters from the usual orbit determination procedures in which the Pioneer anomaly was not modeled. Given the predicted huge sizes of such signatures, it is unlikely that their absence from the presently available processed data can be attributable to an "absorption" for them in the estimated parameters caused by the fact that they were not explicitl...

  6. Professor Peter Choyce: an early pioneer of intraocular lenses and corneal/refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Suresh K; Apple, David J

    2005-06-01

    Professor Peter Choyce, FRCS, DOMS, MS, was one of the pioneers of intraocular lens implant surgery. He developed an interest in artificial lens implantation following cataract surgery, a procedure that was widely criticized by the ophthalmic establishment in the UK, Europe, North America and other countries. Owing to the opposition to the intraocular lenses, Peter Choyce together with Sir Harold Ridley co-founded the International Intraocular Implant Club in 1966, which was responsible for the gradual acceptance of artificial lens implantation. Peter Choyce developed several models of intraocular lens, but did not patent the majority of them. The Choyce Mark IX, manufactured by Rayner Intraocular Lenses, became the first US Food and Drug Administration-approved intraocular lens in 1981. A review of Peter Choyce's record confirms a significant number of original innovations in the field of anterior segment surgery, including many procedures taken for granted today, but not associated with his name. These include early work on both kerato- and intraocular lens-refractive procedures, keratoprosthesis, pioneering paediatric implant procedures and others. Unfortunately his tenacious adherence to anterior chamber lens technology, while in general clinically sound, caused many to question his influence and hence he remained poorly understood even until after his death. He passed away on 8 August 2001 after a long fight with colon cancer. In this article, we provide evidence and elaborate Peter Choyce's accomplishments, which places him as one of the most innovative ophthalmologist in his surgical field in the twentieth century.

  7. A mechanistic approach to understanding range shifts in a changing world: What makes a pioneer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, J C; Krause, J S; Perez, J H; Chmura, H E; Németh, Z; Word, K R; Calisi, R M; Meddle, S L

    2015-10-01

    A species' range can be thought of as a manifestation of the ecological niche in space. Within a niche, evolution has resulted in traits that maximize fitness. Across millennia, natural oscillations in temperature have caused shifts in the geographic location of appropriate habitat and with corresponding changes in species' ranges. Contemporary climate change and human disturbance may lead to rapid range expansion or contractions with largely unknown consequences. Birds provide an excellent case study of this phenomenon with some taxa expanding range and others contracting even to the point of extinction. What leads some populations to expand while others contract? Are there physiological and behavioral attributes of "pioneers" at the forefront of a range shift/expansion? The concept of allostasis provides a framework with which to begin to evaluate when a species will be able to successfully expand into new habitat. This tool allows the integration of normal energetic demands (e.g. wear and tear of daily and seasonal routines) with novel challenges posed by unfamiliar and human altered environments. Allostasis is particularly attractive because it allows assessment of how individual phenotypes may respond differentially to changing environments. Here, we use allostasis to evaluate what characteristics of individuals and their environment permit successful range expansion. Understanding variation in the regulatory mechanisms that influence response to a novel environment will be fundamental for understanding the phenotypes of pioneers.

  8. Long-term persistence of pioneer species in tropical forest soil seed banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalling, J W; Brown, T A

    2008-10-05

    In tropical forests, pioneer species regenerate from seeds dispersed directly into canopy gaps, and from seeds that persisted in soil seed banks before gap formation. However, life-history models suggest that selection for long-term persistence of seeds in soil should be weak, as persistence incurs a fitness cost resulting from prolonged generation time. We use a carbon dating technique to provide the first direct measurements of seed persistence in undisturbed tropical forest seed banks. We show that seeds germinate successfully from surface soil microsites up to 38 years after dispersal. Decades-long persistence may be common in pioneers with relatively large mass, and appears to be unrelated to specific regeneration requirements. In Croton billbergianus, a sub-canopy tree that recruits in abundant small gaps, long-term persistence is associated with short-distance ballistic seed dispersal. In Trema micrantha, a canopy tree with widespread dispersal, persistence is associated with a requirement for large gaps that form infrequently in old-growth forest.

  9. Elevation, Not Deforestation, Promotes Genetic Differentiation in a Pioneer Tropical Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, Antonio R.; Pope, Nathaniel; Jaffé, Rodolfo; Jha, Shalene

    2016-01-01

    The regeneration of disturbed forest is an essential part of tropical forest ecology, both with respect to natural disturbance regimes and large-scale human-mediated logging, grazing, and agriculture. Pioneer tree species are critical for facilitating the transition from deforested land to secondary forest because they stabilize terrain and enhance connectivity between forest fragments by increasing matrix permeability and initiating disperser community assembly. Despite the ecological importance of early successional species, little is known about their ability to maintain gene flow across deforested landscapes. Utilizing highly polymorphic microsatellite markers, we examined patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation for the pioneer understory tree Miconia affinis across the Isthmus of Panama. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of geographic distance, forest cover, and elevation on genetic differentiation among populations using circuit theory and regression modeling within a landscape genetics framework. We report marked differences in historical and contemporary migration rates and moderately high levels of genetic differentiation in M. affinis populations across the Isthmus of Panama. Genetic differentiation increased significantly with elevation and geographic distance among populations; however, we did not find that forest cover enhanced or reduced genetic differentiation in the study region. Overall, our results reveal strong dispersal for M. affinis across human-altered landscapes, highlighting the potential use of this species for reforestation in tropical regions. Additionally, this study demonstrates the importance of considering topography when designing programs aimed at conserving genetic diversity within degraded tropical landscapes. PMID:27280872

  10. Geochronology and Geomorphology of the Pioneer Archaeological Site (10BT676), Upper Snake River Plain, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, Joshua L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Pioneer site in southeastern Idaho, an open-air, stratified, multi-component archaeological locality on the upper Snake River Plain, provides an ideal situation for understanding the geomorphic history of the Big Lost River drainage system. We conducted a block excavation with the goal of understanding the geochronological context of both cultural and geomorphological components at the site. The results of this study show a sequence of five soil formation episodes forming three terraces beginning prior to 7200 cal yr BP and lasting until the historic period, preserving one cultural component dated to ~3800 cal yr BP and multiple components dating to the last 800 cal yr BP. In addition, periods of deposition and stability at Pioneer indicate climate fluctuation during the middle Holocene (~7200-3800 cal yr BP), minimal deposition during the late Holocene, and a period of increased deposition potentially linked to the Little Ice Age. In addition, evidence for a high-energy erosion event dated to ~3800 cal yr BP suggest a catastrophic flood event during the middle Holocene that may correlate with volcanic activity at the Craters of the Moon lava fields to the northwest. This study provides a model for the study of alluvial terrace formations in arid environments and their potential to preserve stratified archaeological deposits.

  11. [Sir Geoffrey Keynes 1887-1982. Surgical pioneer, medical historian, humanist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergljung, Lars

    2005-01-01

    Sir Geoffrey Keynes (1887 - 1982), was a pioneer in the surgery of breast cancer and thymic deseases, n.b. in patients suffering from myastenia gravis. He strongly disapproved of the longstanding dogma of so called radical mastectomy in breast cancer, and advocated a more limited surgical approach, followed by radiation therapy. This was done more than fifty years before breastconserving surgery has become the therapy of choice and against considerable opposition from the surgical establishment of his days. He also became a pioneer in the surgical treatment of myastenia gravis by thymectomy, at a time when there was no real understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and when considerable controversy existed as to the importance or non importance of concomitant tumour formation in the thymus. Besides being a busy surgeon Sir Geoffrey was a medical historian, writing the biography of among others William Harvey, a bibliographer with a special interest in the poet and artist William Blake and a bibliophil with a large book collection of great value to medical history.

  12. Estrogen receptor coregulators and pioneer factors: The orchestrators of mammary gland cell fate and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramanandam eManavathi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The 17-beta estradiol (E2, a steroid hormone, which play critical role in various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis, is essential for reproduction and mammary gland development. E2 actions are mediated by two classical nuclear hormone receptors, estrogen receptor alpha and beta (ERs. The activity of ERs depends on the coordinate activity of ligand binding, posttranslational modification, and importantly their interaction with their partner proteins called ‘coregulators’. Because majority of breast cancers are ERalpha positive and coregulators are proved to be crucial for ER transcriptional activity, an increased interest in the field has led to the identification of a large number of coregulators. In the last decade, gene knockout studies using mouse models provided impetus to our further understanding of the role of these coregulators in mammary gland development. Several coregulators appear to be critical for terminal end bud formation, ductal branching and alveologenesis during mammary gland development. The emerging studies support that, in addition to these coregulators, the other ER partner proteins ‘pioneering factors’ also seems to contribute significantly to E2 signaling and mammary cell fate. This review discusses emerging themes in coregulator- and pioneering factor-mediated action on ER functions, particularly their role in mammary gland cell fate and development.

  13. Doomed pioneers: Gravity-flow deposition and bioturbation in marine oxygen-deficient environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föilmi, Karl B.; Grimm, Kurt A.

    1990-11-01

    Isolated horizons of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes burrows appear in exclusive association with gravity-flow deposits within sequences of nonbioturbated hernipelagic sedimentary rocks of the Miocene Monterey Formation of California and the Oligocene-Miocene San Gregorio Formation of Baja California. These burrowed levels are not associated with other ichnogenera such as Zoophycos and Chondrites. We infer a causal relation between gravity flow deposition and the presence of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes and suggest that these gravity flows entrained thalassinidean crustacea. Upon deposition in oxygen-deficient environments, the surviving borrowers reworked substantial quantities of aminated, commonly organic-rich sediments in an environment from which they were previously excluded. The persistence of or the ecologically rapid return to oxygen-depleted conditions limited the survival time and ecological complexity of the transported infaunal dwellers and rendered them doomed pioneers. Ecological and physiological data support this hypothesis: thalassinidean crustacea have the capability to endure turbulent transport and survive up to 5-7 days of anoxia without being severely limited in their biological activities. The accurate recognition of doomed pioneer trace-fossil assemblages as ephemeral ecological phenomena in otherwise laminated successions may contribute to a better understanding and interpretation of paleo-oxygen levels and basin history.

  14. Readiness to adopt e-learning: pioneering a course in school librarianship education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Zinn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available E-learning has come of age in South African higher education but scepticism, caution and an inadequate reward system for innovative teaching methods have resulted in a slow uptake by academics. Within this milieu the author pioneered a course in the ACE School Librarianship programme. The study describes the e-learning experiences of the course participants gleaned from questionnaire responses to questions related to experiences of ICTs, the Internet and online learning, ability to navigate the e-learning environment, utilization of elements of the learning management system and implementation of course ideas in their respective schools and personal lives. The study also provides an opportunity for the author to reflect on her pioneering experiences with e-learning and how she would approach it differently next time. The main lessons learned were that 1 the e-learning environment is not necessarily intuitive and participants need opportunities to digest novel features such as the discussion forum; 2 several of the advantages and disadvantages of e-learning that appear in the research literature are identified in this study; and 3 setting up an e-learning course is best achieved incrementally.

  15. Local injection of bortulinum toxin A at multiple points for decreasing the muscular tension of children with spastic cerebral palsy A comparative observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More than 70% children with cerebral palsy belong to the spastic one, and the increased muscular tension results in motor dysfunction and posture abnormality.OBJECTIVE: To observe the assistant effect of the local injection of BTX-A at multiple points in the rehabilitative treatment of spastic cerebral palsy.DESIGN: A comparative observation on the clinical efficacy.SETTINGS: Rehabilitation Center,Loufeng Hospital, Suzhou Industrial Park; Gansu Rehabilitation Center Hospital.PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-nine children with cerebral palsy were selected from the outpatients and inpatients who accepted rehabilitative treatments in the Cerebral Palsy Treatment Center of Gansu Rehabilitation Center Hospital from April 2003 and October 2004. Inclusive criteria: ① Having high risk factors for brain injury before birth and within 1 month after birth, mainly manifested as central motor disorder and posture abnormality; ② Accompanied by increase of muscular tension in both lower limbs, appearing as tiptoes and scissors gaits while in standing position or walking; ③ Without fixed contracture of lower limb; ④ Had never been operated for lower limbs; ⑤ Had never been injected with BTX-A; ⑥ Clearly diagnosed to have spastic palsy. The enrolled children were not screened by disease conditions, course, age, etc., and informed consents were obtained from the parents of all the children. The children whose parents agreed to accept BTX-A treatment were taken as BTX-A treated group (n =45), and the others as control group (n = 24).METHODS: All the children accepted regular rehabilitative training after admission, 6 times a weeks,besides, those in the BTX-A treated group were given local injection of BTX-A at multiple points of target muscles, including bilateral adductor longus muscles, pectineal muscles, gastrocnemius muscles and soleus muscles. BTX-A was diluted with saline (5 U BTX-A in 0.1 mL), 3 - 4 U/kg for each piece of muscle. The number of injected sites

  16. REMODELING OF THE RIGHT HEART AND THE LEVEL OF BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC THROMBOEMBOLIC PULMONARY HYPERTENSION: A COMPARATIVE CROSS-SECTIONAL OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Klimenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the right heart remodeling and level of N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH. Material and methods. Patients (n=79 after pulmonary embolism were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients (n=43 with an increase in systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP >30 mm Hg: 30 (37.9%  patients had pulmonary hypertension (PH degree I, and 13 (16.5%  — PH degree II–III. Group of comparison con- sisted of 36 patients expired pulmonary embolism and having SPAP <30 mm Hg. The control group consisted of 20 people. 6-minute walk test (6-MWT and Doppler echocardiography were performed in all patients. Besides myocardial tissue Doppler echocardiography and assessment of Nt-proBNP level were performed in 38 and 71 patients, respectively. Results. Dyspnea occurred in 90.7% of patients with various degrees of PH and 80.5% of patients with normal SPAP. Patients without PH and with PH I complained of palpitations, weakness, fatigue, and dizziness with similar frequency. Patients with PH I were comparable with ones of comparison group in 6-MWT distance that dramatically decreased in patients with PH II–III. Enlargement of the right atrium (RA and/or right ventricular (RV was observed in 76.7% of patients with PH I and 100% of patients with PH II–III. RV diastolic function abnormalities (E/A<1 and E/A>2 were detected in 19.4%, 16.7% and 61.5% of patients of comparison group, PH I and PH II–III patients, respectively. According to myocardial tissue Doppler echocardiography Em/Am<1 was observed in 8 (72.7% patients of the comparison group and in 13 (76.4% patients with PH. Nt-proB-NP level was 17.3 [2.3, 33.9] fmol/ml in PH I patients and 142.1 [62.1, 171.8] fmol/ml in PH II–III patients. Nt-proBNP level was 6.5 [3.1, 18.3] fmol/mL in patients of the comparison group, and it was higher than this in patients of the control group (3.5 [1.8, 7

  17. Randomized, observer-blind, split-face study to compare the irritation potential of 2 topical acne formulations over a 14-day treatment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, William

    2012-08-01

    This randomized, observer-blind, split-face study assessed the irritation potential and likelihood of continued use of clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--benzoyl peroxide (BPO) 2.5% gel or adapalene 0.1%--BPO 2.5% gel once daily over a 14-day treatment period in 21 participants (11 males; 10 females) with acne who were 18 years or older. Investigator clinical assessment (erythema and dryness) and self-assessment (dryness and burning/stinging) were performed at baseline and each study visit (days 1-14) using a 4-point scale (O = none; 3 = severe). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and corneometry measurements were performed at baseline and days 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 14. Lesions were counted at baseline and on day 14. Participant satisfaction questionnaires were completed on days 7 and 14. At the end of the study, investigators reported none or only mild erythema in 86% (18/21) of participants treated with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel compared with 62% (13/21) of participants treated with adapalene 0.1%--BPO 2.5% gel. No severe erythema was reported with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel. Adapalene 0.1%--BPO 2.5% gel was prematurely discontinued due to severe erythema in 1 participant on day 5 and a second participant on day 9. Additionally, 2 more participants reported severe erythema on day 14. Mean erythema scores were 0.9 (mean change from baseline, 0.7) with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel and 1.4 (mean change from baseline, 1.3) with adapalene 0. 1%--BPO 2.5% gel on day 14 (P BPO 2.5% gel. Continued use and efficacy results for the treatment of acne were influenced by the potential of the product to cause irritation and the participant preferences. Irritation potential was more pronounced and severe with adapalene 0.1%--BPO 2.5% gel. Undoubtedly, as a result more participants preferred treatment with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel and were more likely to continue to use the product.

  18. Ordovician and Silurian Phi Kappa and Trail Creek formations, Pioneer Mountains, central Idaho; stratigraphic and structural revisions, and new data on graptolite faunas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dover, James H.; Berry, William B.N.; Ross, Reuben James

    1980-01-01

    clastic rocks reported in previously measured sections of the Phi Kappa, as well as the sequence along Phi Kappa Creek from which the name originates, are excluded from the Phi Kappa as revised and are reassigned to two structural plates of Mississippian Copper Basin Formation; other strata now excluded from the formation are reassigned to the Trail Creek Formation and to an unnamed Silurian and Devonian unit. As redefined, the Phi Kappa Formation is only about 240 m thick, compared with the 3,860 m originally estimated, and it occupies only about 25 percent of the outcrop area previously mapped in 1930 by H. G. Westgate and C. P. Ross. Despite this drastic reduction in thickness and the exclusion of the rocks along Phi Kappa Creek, the name Phi Kappa is retained because of widely accepted prior usage to denote the Ordovician graptolitic shale facies of central Idaho, and because the Phi Kappa Formation as revised is present in thrust slices on Phi Kappa Mountain, at the head of Phi Kappa Creek. The lithic and faunal consistency of this unit throughout the area precludes the necessity for major facies telescoping along individual faults within the outcrop belt. However, tens of kilometers of tectonic shortening seems required to juxtapose the imbricated Phi Kappa shale facies with the Middle Ordovician part of the carbonate and quartzite shale sequence of east central Idaho. The shelf rocks are exposed in the Wildhorse structural window of the northeastern Pioneer Mountains, and attain a thickness of at least 1,500 m throughout the region north and east of the Pioneer Mountains. The Phi Kappa is in direct thrust contact on intensely deformed medium- to high-grade metamorphic equivalents of the same shelf sequence in the Pioneer window at the south end of the Phi Kappa-Trail Creek outcrop belt. Along East Pass, Big Lake, and Pine Creeks, north of the Pioneer Mountains, some rocks previously mapped as Ramshorn Slate are lithologically and faunally equivalent to the P

  19. The Pioneer Transcription Factor FoxA Maintains an Accessible Nucleosome Configuration at Enhancers for Tissue-Specific Gene Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwafuchi-Doi, Makiko; Donahue, Greg; Kakumanu, Akshay; Watts, Jason A; Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B Franklin; Lee, Dolim; Kaestner, Klaus H; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear DNA wraps around core histones to form nucleosomes, which restricts the binding of transcription factors to gene regulatory sequences. Pioneer transcription factors can bind DNA sites on nucleosomes and initiate gene regulatory events, often leading to the local opening of chromatin. However, the nucleosomal configuration of open chromatin and the basis for its regulation is unclear. We combined low and high levels of micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion along with core histone mapping to assess the nucleosomal configuration at enhancers and promoters in mouse liver. We find that MNase-accessible nucleosomes, bound by transcription factors, are retained more at liver-specific enhancers than at promoters and ubiquitous enhancers. The pioneer factor FoxA displaces linker histone H1, thereby keeping enhancer nucleosomes accessible in chromatin and allowing other liver-specific transcription factors to bind and stimulate transcription. Thus, nucleosomes are not exclusively repressive to gene regulation when they are retained with, and exposed by, pioneer factors.

  20. A prospective multi-country observational trial to compare the incidences of diabetic ketoacidosis in the month of Ramadan, the preceding month, and the following month (DKAR international)

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelgadir, Elamin I. E.; Hassanein, Mohamed M.; Bashier, Alaaeldin M. K.; Abdelaziz, Sulaf; Baki, Salwa; Chadli, Asma; Askaoui, Sara; Nawal, El Ansari; Slim, Ines S.; Ghizlane, El Mghari; Hafidh, Khadija; Alawadi, Fatheya

    2016-01-01

    Background 1.7 billion Muslims worldwide obey divine commands of fasting for a month. This may increase the probability of the acute complications of diabetes during the fasting period. Design and methods We primarily aimed to compare the incidences and duration of Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) admissions during Ramadan compared to the month before (Shaaban) and the month after (Shawal) as well as the average pre-Ramadan six months' admissions. Our secondary objective was to assess the differen...