WorldWideScience

Sample records for pion-nucleus interactions progress

  1. The pion-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afnan, I.R.

    1977-04-01

    The latest developments in the construction of pion-nucleus optical potential are presented and a comparison with the latest data on π+ 12 C is made. The suggested mechanisms for the (p,π) reaction are discussed with a comparison of the theoretical results with experiment. (Author)

  2. Experimental studies of nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies: Annual progress report, 1988--1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear and particle physics carried out by New Mexico State University in 1988 under a grant from the US Department of Energy. The nucleon-nucleon research has involved studies of interactions between polarized neutrons and polarized protons. Its purpose is to help complete the determination of the nucleon-nucleon amplitudes at energies up to 800 MeV, as part of a program currently in progress at LAMPF, as well as to investigate the possibility of the existence of dibaryon resonances. The pion-nucleus research involves studies of this interaction in regions where it has not been adequately explored. These include experiments on elastic and double charge exchange scattering at energies above the /Delta/(1232) resonance, interactions with polarized nuclear targets, and investigations of pion absorption using a detector covering nearly the full solid angle region. 21 refs., 4 figs

  3. Pion, pion-pion, and pion-nucleus interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhin, K N; Tikhonov, V N

    2002-01-01

    This survey is devoted to describing the early studies of 1.1. Gurevich on pion physics that were performed by the photoemulsion method and the studies of the pion-pion interaction that were made by his colleagues on the basis of the hydrogen-bubble-chamber and the magnetic-spectrometer method (as well-as on the basis of the photoemulsion method). Two approaches-an extrapolation of experimental data from the physical region to the pion pole and a theoretical calculation based on the Roy integral equations-are used to deduce information about the pion-pion interaction. The first results obtained for pion-pion and pion-nucleus interactions in the experiments that are being currently performed in Brookhaven and at CERN ( pi pi interaction) and at TRIUMF (Canada) and in Brookhaven (pion-nucleus interaction) are presented, along with the existing theoretical concepts in these realms of physics. (80 refs).

  4. Experimental studies of nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies: Progress report, January 1, 1985-December 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear and particle physics carried out by New Mexico State University in 1985-87. These studies have involved investigations of nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleus interactions. They have been carried out at the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, at the SIN laboratory near Zurich, Switzerland, and at the TRIUMF accelerator in Vancouver, Canada. 86 refs., 5 figs

  5. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics carried out at New Mexico State University in 1991 under a great from the US Department of Energy. Most of these studies have involved investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions. The work has been carried out both with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and with the cyclotron at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland. Part of the experimental work involves measurements of new data on double-charge-exchange scattering, using facilities at LAMPF which we helped modify, and on pion absorption, using a new detector system at PSI that covers nearly the full solid-angle region which we helped construct. Other work involved preparation for future experiments using polarized nuclear targets and a new high-resolution spectrometer system for detecting π 0 mesons. We also presented several proposals for works to be done in future years, involving studies related to pi-mesonic atoms, fundamental pion-nucleon interactions, studies of the difference between charged and neutral pion interactions with the nucleon, studies of the isospin structure of pion-nucleus interactions, and pion scattering from polarized 3 He targets. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of the pion-nucleon interaction, of the pion-nucleus interaction mechanism, and of nuclear structure

  6. On the hadron formation time in pion-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravina, L.V.; Korotkikh, V.L.; Sarycheva, L.I.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.

    1992-01-01

    Differences in the observable characteristics of pion-nucleus interactions at high energy are investigated for two definitions of the hadron formation time. The Monte Carlo simulation of hadron-nucleus interactions and quark-gluon string model for hadron-hadron collisions are used. It is shown that the momentum spectrum of the protons in the target fragmentation region is most sensitive to the definition of the formation time. The inclusive meson and meson resonance spectra are similar in the both versions. 20 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus and nucleon-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies. Progress report, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics carried out at New Mexico State University in 1991-94 under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. Most of these studies involved investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions. The work was carried out with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the cyclotrons at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland, at Indiana University (IUCF), and at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada, as collaborative efforts among several laboratories and universities. We have also worked on plans and preparations for new experiments involving studies of the quark structure of nucleons and nuclei, which would be carried out at Fermilab (FNAL), near Chicago, and at the HERA facility at the DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Germany. The NMSU personnel included two faculty members, five postdoctoral research associates, nine graduate students, and one undergraduate student

  8. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions. The work was carried out with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the cyclotrons at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland, and at Indiana University (IUCF), as a collaborative effort among several laboratories and universities. The experimental activity at LAMPF involved measurements of new data on pion double-charge-exchange scattering, some initial work on a new Neutral Meson Spectrometer system, a search for deeply-bound pionic atoms, measurements of elastic scattering, and studies of the (n,p) reaction on various nuclei. At PSI measurements of pion quasielastic scattering were carried out, with detection of the recoil proton. Work on the analysis of data from a previous experiment at PSI on pion absorption in nuclei was continued. This experiment involved using a detector system that covered nearly the full solid angle

  9. Pion inelastic scattering and the pion-nucleus effective interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    This work examines pion inelastic scattering with the primary purpose of gaining a better understanding of the properties of the pion-nucleus interaction. The main conclusion of the work is that an effective interaction which incorporates the most obvious theoretical corrections to the impulse approximation does a good job of explaining pion elastic and inelastic scattering from zero to 200 MeV without significant adjustments to the strength parameters of the force. Watson's multiple scattering theory is used to develop a theoretical interaction starting from the free pion-nucleon interaction. Elastic scattering was used to calibrate the isoscalar central interaction. It was found that the impulse approximation did poorly at low energy, while the multiple scattering corrections gave good agreement with all of the data after a few minor adjustments in the force. The distorted wave approximation for the inelastic transition matrix elements are evaluated for both natural and unnatural parity excitations. The isoscalar natural parity transitions are used to test the reaction theory, and it is found that the effective interaction calibrated by elastic scattering produces good agreement with the inelastic data. Calculations are also shown for other inelastic and charge exchange reactions. It appears that the isovector central interaction is reasonable, but the importance of medium corrections cannot be determined. The unnatural parity transitions are also reasonably described by the theoretical estimate of the spin-orbit interaction, but not enough systematic data exists to reach a firm conclusion

  10. A study of compound particles in pion-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Tufail

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the phenomenon of multiparticle production has been studied using the nuclear emulsion technique. Nuclear emulsion is a material which memorises the tracks of charged particles. When an incident particle interacts with the nuclei of the emulsion, secondary particles are produced. These secondary particles are classified into three categories viz., shower (Ns), grey (Ng) and black (Nb) particles. The investigation of particle-nucleus collisions is fundamental for understanding the nature of the interaction process. In such studies most of the attention was paid to the relativistic charged particles that is showers (1-3). From the survey of literature it is found that slow particles (grey and black) are less studied in comparison to charged shower particles. Grey particles may provide some valuable information and it may be taken as good measure of number of collisions made by the incident particle

  11. Experimental studies of nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear and particle physics carried out by New Mexico State University in 1988--91. Most of these studies have involved investigations of neutron-proton and pion-nucleus interactions. The neutron-proton research is part of a program of studies of interactions between polarized nucleons that we have been involved with for more than ten years. Its purpose has been to help complete the determination of the full set of ten complex nucleon-nucleon amplitudes at energies up to 800 MeV, as well as to continue investigating the possibility of the existence of dibaryon resonances. The give complex isospin-one amplitudes have been fairly well determined, partly as a result of this work. Our work in this period has involved measurements and analysis of data on elastic scattering and total cross sections for polarized neutrons on polarized protons. The pion-nucleus research continues our studies of this interaction in regions where it has not been well explored. One set of experiments includes studies of pion elastic and double-charge-exchange scattering at energies between 300 and 550 MeV, where our data is unique. Another involves elastic and single-charge-exchange scattering of pions from polarized nuclear targets, a new field of research which will give the first extensive set of information on spin-dependent pion-nucleus amplitudes. Still another involves the first set of detailed studies of the kinematic correlations among particles emitted following pion absorption in nuclei

  12. Low and intermediate energy pion-nucleus interactions in the cascade-exciton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashnik, S.G.

    1993-01-01

    A large variety of experimental data on pion-nucleus interactions in the bombarding energy range of 0-3000 MeV, on nucleon-induced pion production and on cumulative nucleon production, when a two-step process of pion production followed by absorption on nucleon pairs within a target is taken into account, are analyzed with the Cascade-Exciton Model of nuclear reactions.Comparison is made with other up-to-date models of these processes. The contributions of different pion absorption mechanisms and the relative role of different particle production mechanisms in these reactions are discussed

  13. Experimental studies of nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burleson, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    We are applying for a three-year grant from the US Department of Energy to New Mexico State University to continue its support of our work on experimental studies of nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies, which has been carried out in collaboration with groups from various laboratories and universities. The nucleon-nucleon work is aimed at making measurements that will contribute to a determination of the isospin-zero amplitudes, as well as continuing our investigations of evidence for dibaryon resonances. It is based at the LAMPF accelerator in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Current and planned experiments include measurements of total cross-section differences in pure spin states and of spin parameters in neutron-proton scattering. The pion-nucleus work is aimed at improving our understanding both of the nature of the pion-nucleus interaction and of nuclear structure. It consists of two programs, one based at LAMPF and one based principally at the SIN laboratory in Switzerland. The LAMPF-based work involves studies of large-angle scattering, double-charge-exchange scattering, including measurements at a new energy range above 300 MeV, and a new program of experiments with polarized nuclear targets. The SIN-based work involves studies of quasielastic scattering and absorption, including experiments with a new large-acceptance detector system planned for construction there. We are requesting support to continue the LAMPF-based work at its current level and to expand the SIN-based work to allow for increased involvement in experiments with the new detector system. 57 refs

  14. Pion-nucleus cross sections approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashenkov, V.S.; Polanski, A.; Sosnin, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical approximation of pion-nucleus elastic and inelastic interaction cross-section is suggested, with could be applied in the energy range exceeding several dozens of MeV for nuclei heavier than beryllium. 3 refs.; 4 tabs

  15. Deeply Bound 1s and 2p Pionic States in 205Pb and Determination of the s-Wave Part of the Pion-Nucleus Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissel, H.; Gilg, H.; Gillitzer, A.; Hayano, R. S.; Hirenzaki, S.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Münch, M.; Münzenberg, G.; Schott, W.; Suzuki, K.; Tomono, D.; Weick, H.; Yamazaki, T.; Yoneyama, T.

    2002-03-01

    We observed well-separated 1s and 2p π- states in 205Pb in the 206Pb(d,3He) reaction at Td = 604.3 MeV. The binding energies and the widths determined are B1s = 6.762+/-0.061 MeV, Γ1s = 0.764+0.171-0.154 MeV, B2p = 5.110+/-0.045 MeV, and Γ2p = 0.321+0.060-0.062 MeV. They are used to deduce the real and imaginary strengths of the s-wave part of the pion-nucleus interaction, which translates into a positive mass shift of π- in 205Pb.

  16. Deeply bound 1s and 2p pionic states in 205Pb and determination of the s-wave part of the pion-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissel, H.; Gilg, H.; Gillitzer, A.

    2001-06-01

    We observed well separated 1s and 2p π - states in 205 Pb in the 206 Pb(d, 3 He) reaction at T d = 604.3 MeV. The binding energies and the widths determined are: B 1s = 6.768 ± 0.044 (stat) ± 0.041 (syst) MeV, Γ 1s = 0.778 -0.130 +0.150 (stat) ± 0.055 (syst) MeV, B 2p = 5.110 ± 0.015 (stat) ± 0.042 (syst) MeV, and Γ 2p = 0.371 ± 0.037 (stat) ± 0.048 (syst) MeV. They are used to deduce the real and imaginary strengths of the s-wave part of the pion-nucleus interaction, yielding 26.1 -1.5 +1.7 MeV as a pion mass shift in the center of 205 Pb. (orig.)

  17. Recent developments in the understanding of pion-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    A development of the theory of pion-nucleus scattering is given in a field theoretical framework. The theory is designed to describe pion elastic scattering and single- and double-charge exchange to isobaric analog states. An analysis of recent data at low and resonance energies is made. Strong modifications to the simple picture of the scattering as a succession of free pion-nucleon interactions are required in order to understand the data. The extent to which the experiment is understood in terms of microscopic theory is indicated. 71 references

  18. Pion-nucleus cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashenkov, V.S.

    1990-01-01

    The tables of inelastic and total cross sections of π ± mesons interactions with nuclei 4 He- 238 U are presented. The tables are obtained by theoretical analysis of known experimental data for energies higher some tens of MeV. 1 ref.; 1 tab

  19. Invariant potential for elastic pion--nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cammarata, J.B.; Banerjee, M.K.

    1976-01-01

    From the Wick-Dyson expansion of the exact propagator of a pion in the presence of a nucleus, an invariant potential for crossing symmetric elastic pion-nucleus scattering is obtained in terms of a series of pion-nucleon diagrams. The Chew-Low theory is used to develop a model in which the most important class of diagrams is effectively summed. Included in this model is the exclusion principle restriction on the pion-bound nucleon interaction, the effects of the binding of nucleons, a kinematic transformation of energy from the lab to the πN center of mass frame, and the Fermi motion and recoil of the target nucleons. From a numerical study of the effects of these processes on the π- 12 C total cross section, the relative importance of each is determined. Other processes contributing to the elastic scattering of pions not included in the present model are also discussed

  20. Investigation of pion-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.F.

    1991-09-01

    The double isovector giant state has been observed in the (π - , π + ) ΔT z = +2 double-charge-exchange reaction on 13 C, 27 Al, 40 Ca, 56 Fe, 59 Co, and 93 Nb. The resonances observed in the (π - , π + ) reaction are closely related via Coulomb displacement energy and isospin symmetry to the resonances measured in the inverse (π + , π - ) reaction on the same nuclei. The new observations provide a direct determination of the upper isospin component of the double giant dipole state, which is generally very weak in the (π + , π - ) reaction. The comparison between the double dipole in the two double-charge-exchange modes gives valuable information on the isospin splitting and the Pauli-blocking effects for isotensor transitions

  1. Investigation of pion-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.F.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out by personnel from the University of Texas at Austin at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The research activities involved experiments done with the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS), the Low Energy Pion Channel (LEP), the Pion and Particle Physics Channel (P 3 ), the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS), and planning a new experimental program associated with the new high-resolution Neutral Meson Spectrometer (NMS) at LAMPF. A brief overview of work supported by this grant is given followed by an account of the study of the double giant resonances in pion double charge exchange on 51 V, 115 In, and 197 Au. This report contains a list of published papers and preprints, abstracts, and invited talks. These papers summarize experiments involving participants supported by this grant and indicate the work accomplished by these participants in this program of medium energy nuclear physics research. Lists of the most recent proposals on which we have participation at LAMPF, proposals which have been approved this past year to run as experiments, personnel who have participated in this research program are included. The research cited in this report is, in many cases, the collaborative effort of many groups associated with research at LAMPF

  2. Pion-nucleus total cross sections in the (3, 3) resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, A.S.; Chiang, I.; Dover, C.B.; Kycia, T.F.; Li, K.K.; Mazur, P.O.; Michael, D.N.; Mockett, P.M.; Rahm, D.C.; Rubinstein, R.

    1976-01-01

    The results of total cross section measurements are presented for π +- on targets of natural Li, C, Al, Fe, Sn, and Pb in the region of 65--320 MeV laboratory kinetic energy. The data are fitted with a simple phenomenological model, which allows one to extract the A dependence of the peak energy and the width which characterize the pion-nucleus interaction

  3. Pion-nucleus scatter and the Pauli principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, C.B.; Lemmer, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    A density expansion of the pion self-energy for pions in nuclear matter is reexamined. It is shown that a single hole-line expansion of the self-energy (i) is equivalent to using a strongly quenched πN scattering amplitude in the medium, and (ii) results in an inconsistent treatment of the virtual pions necessarily present in a field-theoretic description of the problem. Exchange of intermediate pions gives rise to nucleon-nucleon, as well as pion-nucleon scattering diagrams that both contribute to the pion self-energy in an essential way. The nucleon-nucleon scattering proceeds, for instance, via a one-pion-exchange potential that is, however, highly nonstatic for energy transfers between nucleons close to the incident energy. Such interactions are singled out automatically for special treatment in a field-theory approach to the problem, and should not be introduced in an ad hoc manner as part of an empirical NN interaction in nuclear matter. We evaluate the coherent and charge exchange contributions to the pion-nucleus optical potential, proportional to the total density and the neutron-proton density difference, respectively. The Pauli principle is found to provide a small correction to the coherent part, both in the hole-line and density expansion formalisms. However, the charge exchange part of the potential is almost completely damped at low energies in the hole-line expansion, while the inclusion of backward-going graphs (random-phase-approximation-type correlations) restores it to its value based on free space πN charge exchange amplitudes (i.e., no net Pauli effect)

  4. Invariant potential for elastic pion--nucleus scattering. Technical report No. 75-075

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cammarata, J.B.; Banerjee, M.K.

    1975-04-01

    From the Wick-Dyson expansion of the exact propagator of a pion in the presence of a nucleus an invariant potential for crossing symmetric, elastic pion-nucleus scattering is obtained in terms of a series of pion-nucleon diagrams. The Chew-Low theory is used to develop a model in which the most important class of diagrams is effectively summed. Included in this model is the Exclusion Principle restriction on the pion-bound nucleon interaction, the effects of the binding of nucleons, a kinematic transformation of energy from the lab to the πN center of mass frames, and the Fermi motion and recoil of the target nucleons. From a numerical study of the effects of these processes on the π- 12 C total cross section, the relative importance of each is determined. Other processes contributing to the elastic scattering of pions not included in the present model are also discussed. (9 figures) (U.S.)

  5. [Pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon transfer reactions primarily at LAMPF, TRIUMF, and IUCF]: Technical progress report, [October 1, 1986-October 1, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraushaar, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes work carried out between October 1, 1986 and October 1, 1987 in the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the Department of Physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Other efforts in the laboratory, such as development of an R.F. cavity for an advanced hadron facility accelerator, beam pickoff devices, a buncher for the LAMPF proton beam, and the US-Brazil Cooperative Science Program are described

  6. Pion-nucleus interactions and the STAR experiment at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.F.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out by personnel from the University of Texas at Austin at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) during the calendar years 1990--1993 and on the STAR experiment at RHIC under grant DE-FGO5-87ER40343 between the University of Texas at Austin and the United States Department of Energy. A brief overview of work supported by this grant is given in Section 2. An account of the study of the double giant resonances in pion double charge exchange forms Section 3. This report contains a list of published papers and preprints in Section 6, invited talks in Section 7, and abstracts in Section 8. These papers summarize experiments involving participants supported by this grant and indicate the work accomplished by these participants in this program of medium energy nuclear physics research. Section 9 contains a list of personnel who have participated in this research program

  7. Off-shell sensitivity, repulsive correlations and the pion-nucleus optical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keister, B D [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Physics

    1977-07-01

    Repulsive nucleon-nucleon correlations tend to reduce the dependence of pion-nucleus elastic scattering upon the off-shell pion-nucleon dynamics. However, optical potential calculations can in practice be quite sensitive to the particular choice of off-shell model parameters. It is argued that this sensitivity results from the nature of the optical potential as a one-body operator which introduces extra off-shell dependence not found in physical many-body process itself. Thus, one must be very careful in any attempt to extract correlation or off-shell information, or to predict pion-nucleus phase shifts, by means of an optical potential theory. Results of model calculations are presented for purposes of illustration.

  8. Kinematic aspects of pion-nucleus elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, D.L.; Ernst, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The inclusion of relativistic kinematics in the theory of elastic scattering of pions from nuclei is examined. The investigation is performed in the context of the first order impulse approximation which incorporates the following features: (1) Relative momentum are defined according to relativistic theories consistent with time reversal invariance. (2) The two-nucleon interaction is a new, multichannel, separable potential model consistent with the most recent data derived from a recent nonpotential model of Ernst and Johnson. (3) The recoil of the pion-nucleon interacting pair and its resultant nonlocality are included. (4) The Fermi integral is treated by an optimal factorization approximation. It is shown how a careful definition of an intrinsic target density leads to an unambiguous method for including the recoil of the target. The target recoil corrections are found to be large for elastic scattering from 4 He and not negligible for scattering from 12 C. Relativistic potential theory kinematics, kinematics which result from covariant reduction approaches, and kinematics which result from replacing masses by energies in nonrelativistic formulas are compared. The relativistic potential theory kinematics and covariant reduction kinematics are shown to produce different elastic scattering at all pion energies examined (T/sub π/<300 MeV). Simple extensions of nonrelativistic kinematics are found to be reasonable approximations to relativistic potential theory

  9. On the imaginary part of the S-wave pion-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germond, J.F.; Lombard, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of pion absorption to the imaginary part of the S-wave pion-nucleus optical potential is calculated with Slater determinantal antisymmetrized nuclear wave funtions, taking fully into accout the spin and isospin degrees of freedom. The potential obtained has an explicit dependence on the proton and neutron nuclear densities whose coefficients are directly related to the two-nucleon absorption coupling constants. The values of these coefficients extracted from mesic atoms data are in good agreement with those deduced from exclusive pion absorption experiments in 3 He, but larger than the predictions of the pion rescattering model. (orig.)

  10. A new version of PIRK (elastic pion-nucleus scattering) to handle differing proton and neutron radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funsten, H.O.

    1979-01-01

    This program is a modification of the Eisenstein-Miller program (1974) for calculating elastic pion-nucleus differential cross sections using free π-N scattering amplitudes. This revision permits the use of separate proton and neutron radii for the nuclear density function rho(r). (Auth.)

  11. Pion-nucleus double charge exchange and the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, N.; Gibbs, W.R.; Ginocchio, J.N.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1988-01-01

    The pion-nucleus double charge exchange reaction is studied with special emphasis on nuclear structure. The reaction mechanism and nuclear structure aspects of the process are separated using both the plane-wave and distorted-wave impulse approximations. Predictions are made employing both the seniority model and a full shell model (with a single active orbit). Transitions to the double analog state and to the ground state of the residual nucleus are computed. The seniority model yields particularly simple relations among double charge exchange cross sections for nuclei within the same shell. Limitations of the seniority model and of the plane-wave impulse approximation are discussed as well as extensions to the generalized seniority scheme. Applications of the foregoing ideas to single charge exchange are also presented

  12. Nuclear structure studies with pions and light ions: Progress report for the period June 1, 1984-May 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehnhard, D.

    1986-11-01

    Pion and proton scattering experiments were done on a variety of nuclei at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The data were used to test nuclear structure models and models of the pion-nucleus interaction, as well as assumptions about the basic nucleon-nucleon interaction. Included in this report are descriptions of completed work, work in progress, and a list of publications. 63 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab

  13. New entropic uncertainty relations and tests of PMD-SQS-optimal limits in pion-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, D.B.; Ion, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we define a new kind of quantum entropy, namely, the nonextensivity conjugated entropy S Jθ (p,q) bar.Then we prove the optimal nonextensivity conjugated entropic uncertainty relations (ONC-EUR) as well as optimal nonextensivity conjugated entropic uncertainty bands (ONC E UB). The results of the first experimental test of ONC-EUB in the pion-nucleus scattering, obtained by using 49-sets of experimental phase shift analysis, are presented. So, strong evidences for the saturation of the PMD-SQS-optimum limit are obtained with high accuracy (confidence level > 99%) for the nonextensivities: 1/2 ≤ p ≤ 2/3 and q = p/(2p-1). (authors)

  14. A new version of DWPI (inelastic pion-nucleus scattering) to incorporate microscopic form factors and differing proton and neutron radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funsten, H.O.

    1979-01-01

    This is a modification of the Eisenstein-Miller program for calculation of collective inelastic pion-nucleus differential cross sections using free π-N scattering amplitudes. This revision permits the additional use of microscopic (shell model) proton and neutron form factors. It also incorporates separate proton and neutron radii for the nuclear density rho(r) generating the distorted wave optical potential. (Auth.)

  15. Theoretical nuclear physics. Task B. Technical progress report, August 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following studies: (a) double delta interactions in pion double charge exchange; (b) isovector correlations in pion-nucleus scattering; (c) nuclear structure effects in pion single charge exchange; (d) a perspective on sequential transfer reactions; (e) inelastic and charge exchange scattering theory; (f) magnitude of the first order DWBA description of the two nuclear transfer reactions; (g) nonlocality effects on deuteron transfer reactions; (h) evaluation of external radial integrals in inelastic electron scattering; (i) experimental observables as a function of Dirac invariant amplitudes; (j) Dirac shell-model wavefunctions in inelastic electron scattering; and (k) impulse approximation Dirac theory of inelastic proton nucleus collective excitations. Publications are listed

  16. Binding and Pauli principle corrections in subthreshold pion-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, J. de

    1981-01-01

    In this investigation I develop a three-body model for the single scattering optical potential in which the nucleon binding and the Pauli principle are accounted for. A unitarity pole approximation is used for the nucleon-core interaction. Calculations are presented for the π- 4 He elastic scattering cross sections at energies below the inelastic threshold and for the real part of the π- 4 He scattering length by solving the three-body equations. Off-shell kinematics and the Pauli principle are carefully taken into account. The binding correction and the Pauli principle correction each have an important effect on the differential cross sections and the scattering length. However, large cancellations occur between these two effects. I find an increase in the π- 4 He scattering length by 100%; an increase in the cross sections by 20-30% and shift of the minimum in π - - 4 He scattering to forward angles by 10 0 . (orig.)

  17. Pion nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, J. de.

    1981-01-01

    The main goal of the investigations, presented is to establish the contributions to the optical potential, coming from scattering processes which involve 1p-1h nuclear states in the intermediate scattering system. The effects of the Pauli principle corrections and the binding corrections are studied in detail. A phenomenological study of pion absorption effects is also presented. The calculations all concern π- 4 He scattering. The simplicity of the 4 He structure makes the π- 4 He system quite an ideal tool for studying the reaction mechanism. (Auth.)

  18. Pion nucleus scattering lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.T.; Levinson, C.A.; Banerjee, M.K.

    1971-09-01

    Soft pion theory and the Fubini-Furlan mass dispersion relations have been used to analyze the pion nucleon scattering lengths and obtain a value for the sigma commutator term. With this value and using the same principles, scattering lengths have been predicted for nuclei with mass number ranging from 6 to 23. Agreement with experiment is very good. For those who believe in the Gell-Mann-Levy sigma model, the evaluation of the commutator yields the value 0.26(m/sub σ//m/sub π/) 2 for the sigma nucleon coupling constant. The large dispersive corrections for the isosymmetric case implies that the basic idea behind many of the soft pion calculations, namely, slow variation of matrix elements from the soft pion limit to the physical pion mass, is not correct. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  19. Theoretical research in intermediate-energy nuclear physics. [Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses progress that has been made on the following seven problems: (1) (e, e'p) at high momentum transfer; (2) post,acceleration effects in two-nucleon interferometry of heavy-ion collisions; (3) pion-nucleus interactions above 0.5 GeV; (4) chiral symmetry breaking in nuclei and picnic atom anomaly; (5) atomic screening on nuclear astronomical reactions; (6) QCD related work (coherent pion production from skyrmion-antiskyrmion annihilation, QCD in 1 + 1 dimensions, and correlation functions in the QCD vacuum), and (7) kaonic hydrogen atom experiment. The problems deal with various topics mostly in intermediate-energy nuclear physics. We place priority on (1) and (2), and describe them somewhat in detail below. Other problems are our on-going projects, but we are placing lower priority on them in the second and third year

  20. Electron and pion interactions with nuclei. Progress report and research plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, J.S.

    1982-08-01

    A series of electron scattering experiments is proposed for a quantitative investigation of the structure and dynamics of nuclei. The information developed from the electromagnetic interaction will be used as complement to a series of experiments at LAMPF in which a systematic investigation of the reaction dynamics of pion-nucleus interactions is carried out. Pion induced reactions can supply information on inelastic channels of the nucleon-nucleon interaction which are not as readily available to an electromagnetic probe. Pion absorption experiments designed to measure the off-shell behavior are complemented with a program on pion elastic and inelastic scattering to pursue the on-shell aspect of the π + N interaction. The single (SCE) and double charge exchange (DCE) reactions are unique aspects of π interactions in nuclei. The complementarity of information from different reactions is emphasized in our studies of (e,e'), (p,p'), (π,p) and (p,d) reactions at large momentum transfers (Q greater than or equal to 0.5 GeV/c). Along with the search for the reaction dynamics, the question of new nuclear structure is pursued. We now plan to start a series of experiments that will detect hadrons in the final state along with the scattered electrons. The present success of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) gives increased impetus to pursue experiments that can result in a synthesis of nuclear structure within the framework of the elementary quark; carrying the charge and weak currents within hadrons

  1. Nuclear theory research. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Progress is briefly described on the following studies: (1) Dirac phenomenology for deuteron elastic scattering, (2) Dirac wave functions in nuclear distorted wave calculations, (3) impulse approximation for p→p → dπ + reaction above the 3-3 resonance, (4) coherent π production, (5) nuclear potentials from Dirac bound state wavefunctions, (6) nonlocality effects in nuclear reactions, (7) unhappiness factors in DWBA description of (t,p) and (p,t) reactions, (8) absolute normalization of three-nucleon transfer reactions, (9) formulation of a finite-range CCBA computer program, (10) crossing symmetric solutions of the low equations, (11) pion scattering from quark bags, (12) study of the p 11 channel in the delta model, (13) isovector corrections in pion-nucleus scattering, (14) pionic excitation of nuclear giant resonances, and (15) isospin dependence of the second-order pion-nucleus optical potential

  2. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out by personnel at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado from about August 1, 1981 to October 1, 1982, under contract with the Department of Energy. The intermediate energy studies summarized in this report were carried out at the meson physics facilities at Los Alamos (LAMPF), the cyclotron at Indiana University (IUCF), and the meson physics facilities at Vancouver (TRIUMF). This year, for the first time, intermediate energy experimental studies are being reported in separate documents from the low energy and theoretical nuclear physics efforts. Experimental studies are reported on pion-nucleus interactions, charge exchange reactions, nucleon transfer reactions, and apparatus development

  3. Some progress towards ''universal'' effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, J.M.G.

    1983-01-01

    The approximation methods introduced to treat the nuclear many-body problem usually imply that the appropriate nuclear force is an effective interaction, different from the free nucleon-nucleon interaction. An effective interaction is thus intimately related to a given nuclear model and its scope is generally confined to the description of a limited number of nuclei or nuclear states. However, in recent years there has been some progress towards ''universal'' effective nucleon-nucleon interactions, in the sense that they may be reasonably suitable to describe bulk properties of nuclear ground states throughout the periodic table and also properties of excited states. The authors conclude that a finite-range density-dependent effective interaction of the Gogny's type is capable of describing a large number of static and dynamical nuclear properties throughout the periodic table, including open-shell nuclei. Hopefully it may provide clues for the definition of some ''universal'' effective force

  4. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  5. Nuclear structure theory: Technical progress report for period September 1, 1986-August 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1987-08-01

    This report summarizes progress in the following areas of research: (1) quark theory of nuclear matter, including further development of models in one-dimension with analytic solutions, numerical studies, bound properties, inclusion of spin and isospin degrees of freedom, excitation properties and response function; electron scattering, including application of sum rules to deeply inelastic scattering, and of quark models of nuclei; charge exchange in pion-nucleus reactions, including models of isotensor optical potential, optical theorem for double charge exchange, and coupled-channel calculations of single charge exchange; a unified theory of reaction dynamics and nuclear structure for intermediate energies, including diagrammatic formulation and development of appropriate computer programs; weak interactions: a study of the neutrino mass-matrix; bounds for time reversal noninvariance in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, obtained from spectral and strength fluctuations in complex nuclei, and separately from detailed balance in compound nuclear reactions. The relative sensitivities of the two methods are discussed; fluctuation measures for the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator; random matrices and symmetry-breaking in atomic spectra data; saturation effects for spectral measures in many-particle systems; and finally fluctuation-free statistical spectroscopy, applied to state densities and partition functions, including accurate absolute calculations of nuclear level spacings

  6. Electron interactions with nuclei: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    This paper contains information on the following topics: inclusive electron scattering; electroexcitation of Δ in nuclei; longitudinal and transverse response in the quasi-elastic region; electron scattering at MIT-Bates; detector development at LEGS; electron scattering at Saclay; intermediate energy nuclear interactions; research and development at CEBAF; and computing facilities

  7. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ana L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  8. Experimental studies of the quark-gluon structure of nucleons and nuclei and of pion- and proton-nucleus interactions. Progress report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics carried out by New Mexico State University from April 1, 1994, through March 31, 1996 under a grant from the US Department of Energy. During this period we began phasing out our programs of study of pion-nucleus and pion-nucleon interaction and of nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions, which have been our major focus of the past two or three years. At the same time we continued moving in a new direction of research on studies of the internal structure of nucleons and nuclei in terms of quarks and gluons. The pion and nucleon work has been aimed at improving our understanding of the nature of pion and proton interactions in the nuclear medium and of various aspects of nuclear structure. The studies of the quark-gluon structure of nucleons are aimed at clarifying such problems as the nature of the quark sea and the relation of the nucleon spin to the spins of the quarks within the nucleon, questions which are of a very fundamental nature

  9. Interactive reliability analysis project. FY 80 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmuson, D.M.; Shepherd, J.C.

    1981-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress to date in the interactive reliability analysis project. Purpose is to develop and demonstrate a reliability and safety technique that can be incorporated early in the design process. Details are illustrated in a simple example of a reactor safety system

  10. Deeply bound π- states in 207Pb formed in the 208Pb(d,3He) reaction. II. Deduced binding energies and widths and the pion-nucleus interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itahashi, K.; Oyama, K.; Hayano, R. S.; Gilg, H.; Gillitzer, A.; Knülle, M.; Münch, M.; Schott, W.; Kienle, P.; Geissel, H.; Iwasa, N.; Münzenberg, G.; Hirenzaki, S.; Toki, H.; Yamazaki, T.

    2000-08-01

    We find a remarkable agreement of the excitation energy spectrum of the 208Pb(d,3He) reaction measured at Td=600 MeV near the π- production threshold with its theoretical prediction. Their comparison leads us to assign the distinct narrow peak observed at about 5 MeV below the threshold to the formation of bound pionic states π-⊗207Pb of the quasisubstitutional configurations (2p)π-(3p3/2,3p1/2)-1n. A small bump observed on the tail of the peak is assigned to the pionic 1s state. The binding energies (Bnl) and the widths (Γnl) of the pionic orbitals are deduced to be B2p=5.13+/-0.02 (stat)+/-0.12 (syst) MeV and Γ2p=0.43+/-0.06 (stat)+/-0.06 (syst) MeV by decomposing the experimental spectrum into the pionic 1s and 2p components. While B2p and Γ2p are determined with small ambiguity, B1s and Γ1s are strongly correlated with each other, and are affected by the relative 1s/2p cross section ratio assumed, since the 1s component is observed only as an unresolved bump. Thus, we have to allow large uncertainties 6.6 MeV

  11. Research progress in neuro-immune interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-ling CAI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune response may be activated quickly once the organism is invaded by exotic pathogens. An excessive immune response may result in inflammation and tissue damage, whereas an insufficient immune response may result in infection. Nervous system may regulate the intensity of innate immune responses by releasing neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Compared with the complicated neuro-immune system in mammals, it is much simpler in Caenorhabditis elegans. Besides, C. elegans is accessible to genetic, molecular biology and behavioral analyses, so it has been used in studies on neuro-immune interactions. It has been revealed recently in the studies with C. elegans that the neuronal pathways regulating innate immune responses primarily include a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β pathway, an insulin/insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF pathway and dopaminergic neurotransmission. Since these pathways are evolutionally conservative, so it might be able to provide some new ideas for the research on neuro-immune interactions at molecular levels. The recent progress in this field has been reviewed in present paper.

  12. Intermediate energy nuclear physics (Task C) and charge exchange reactions (Task W). Technical progress report, October 1, 1985-October 1, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraushaar, J.J.

    1986-10-01

    This report describes the experimental work in intermediate energy research carried out over the past year at the University of Colorado. The experimental program is very broad in nature, ranging from investigations in pion-nucleus interactions, nucleon charge exchange, inelastic electron scattering, and nucleon transfer reactions. The experiments were largely carried out at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility, but important programs were conducted at the Tri-University Meson Facility at the University of British Columbia, the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility and Netherlands Institute for Nuclear Physics Research (NIKHEF-K)

  13. Experiments on the nuclear interactions of pion and electrons. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehart, R.C.

    1998-05-01

    The work in this report is grouped into four categories. (1) The experiments in pion nucleus physics were primarily studies of pion absorption and scattering in light nuclei, carried out at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). (2) The experiments on fundamental particle properties were carried out at LAMPF and at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland, the pion-beta decay experiment is still under construction and will begin taking data in 1999. (3) The experiments in electro-nuclear physics were performed at the Stanford Linear Electron Accelerator (SLAC), at the Saclay Laboratory in France, at the LEGS facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Jefferson Laboratory. These experiments relate mainly to the question of the role of longitudinal and transverse strength for inelastic scattering from nuclei, measurements of fundamental nuclear properties with tagged polarized photons, and to the quark structure of the nucleon and its excited states. (4) Experiments on absorption of antiprotons in heavy nuclei, were carried out by K. Ziock primarily while on a sabbatical leave in Munich, Germany

  14. Information on pion-nucleus optical potentials from elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, E.

    1983-02-01

    Data on the elastic scattering of pions by nuclei between 20 and 230 MeV is analyzed in an almost model-independent fashion. The real part of the potential, which is described by a bias-free Fourier-Bessel series, is found to have the typical Kisslinger or Laplacian-like shape between 30 and 80 MeV

  15. Probing nuclear correlations with pion-nucleus double charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginocchio, J.N.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we have calculated the lowest order pion double charge reaction mechanism using shell model wavefunctions of medium weight nuclei. We have the sequential reaction mechanism in which the pion undergoes two single-charge exchange scatterings on the valence neutrons. The distortion of the incoming, intermediate, and outgoing pion are included. The closure approximation is made for the intermediate states with an average excitation energy used in the pion propagator. The double-charge exchange is assumed to take place on the valence nucleons which are assumed to be in one spherical shell model orbital. 34 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Pion-nucleus scattering around the (3,3) resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.A.; Sen Gupta, H.M.; Rahman, M.

    1989-09-01

    Elastic scattering of π ± are studied on 28 Si, 40 Ar, 40,48 Ca, 90 Zr and 208 Pb at energies around the (3,3) resonance within the framework of the strong absorption model of Frahn and Venter. The parameters thus obtained are used in the analysis of the inelastic scattering of pions leading to the lowest 2 ± state in 28 Si. A reasonably good account of the scattering processes (elastic and inelastic) is given by the simple model. (author). 13 refs, 8 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Pion-nucleus scattering in the isobar formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moniz, E.J.

    1978-06-01

    Lectures on the isobar-hole model for pion reactions include the isobar as an explicit degree of freedom and the connection with a purely pion and nucleon system, the formalism and its relation to the pion optical potential, the extended schematic model for pion scattering, a simple spinless s-wave model, application to pion-oxygen 16 scattering and comparison with elastic scattering data. In this way the extent is shown to which microscopic treatment of the many-body dynamics explains the data and the extent to which additional physical input is required. Another test is the various inelastic processes. Inclusive reactions are briefly discussed. 37 references

  18. High resolution studies of pion-nucleus reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    Pion inelastic scattering is generally well described as a first order process using the DWIA. This is especially true for a large body of inelastic scattering data to low-lying collective states which is well-described by form factors obtained in (e,e') and the DWIA. Some data for which this model does not work are presented. Higher order reaction mechanisms have been invoked to explain some of these data. However, no model of these second order processes gives a satisfactory explanation of the entire data set. Experimentally, more data for pion-induced transitions to low-spin unnatural-parity states which have been studied by other probes would be useful in sorting out the reaction mechanisms responsible for the anomalous cross sections observed for the 1 + states in 12 C. Theoretically, a consistent evaluation of possible second-order diagrams in inelastic scattering, such as is being attempted for DCX 22 , would be useful

  19. Electron-dislocation interaction at low temperatures. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Studies of the interaction of mobile dislocations with electrons have shown that dislocation motion can be, in part, described by treating the dislocation as an underdamped oscillator. In particular, studies in lead alloys have shown tht dislocation motion can be considered as the motion of string, slightly damped by electrons, without regard for any other lattice friction. In addition we have shown that silver solutes, in lead crystals, occupy, partially, interstitial sites. Finally, we have shown that dislocations in copper interact, unexpectedly, with electrons. This is shown by measuring the influence of a magnetic field on the flow stress of copper crystals at 4.2 0 K

  20. Progress report 1986. Laser-matter interaction Greco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Basic researches are based on laser-matter interaction, generation and study of dense and hot plasmas. The main aim is inertial fusion by laser; many researches are also engaged in other ways, basic ones such as X-ray laser and laser acceleration of particles, or applied ones such as X-ray sources or laser processing of materials [fr

  1. Electron-dislocation interaction at low temperatures. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The interaction of mobile dislocations with electrons in copper and copper alloys has shown that dislocation motion in copper, at low temperature, can be treated as an analog of an underdamped oscillator. We have also shown that the viscous drag on mobile dislocations in type II superconductors can be treated as an acoustic attenuation of an elastic wave

  2. Progress in Long Scale Length Laser-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenzer, S H; Arnold, P; Bardsley, G; Berger, R L; Bonanno, G; Borger, T; Bower, D E; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S.; Burkhart, S C; Campbell, K; Chrisp, M P; Cohen, B I; Constantin, G; Cooper, F; Cox, J; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Dixit, S; Duncan, J; Eder, D; Edwards, J; Erbert, G; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Froula, D H; Gardner, S D; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Gregori, G; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Hall, T; Hammel, B A; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermes, G; Hinkel, D; Holder, J; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hsing, W; Huber, S; James, T; Johnson, S; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R; Kelleher, T; Knight, J; Kirkwood, R K; Kruer, W L; Labiak, W; Landen, O L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lee, F D; Lund, D; MacGowan, B; Marshall, S; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Mackinnon, A J; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mertens, E; Meezan, N; Miller, G; Montelongo, S; Moody, J D; Moses, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Ng, E; Niemann, C; Nikitin, A; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rekow, V; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Rhodes, M.

    2003-01-01

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 mm and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3ω) with a total intensity of 2 x 10 15 W cm -2 . The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO 2 producing of up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of n e = 6 x 10 20 cm -3 and temperatures of T e = 2 keV. The high energy in a NIF quad of beams of 16kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last ∼1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 6% for the smallest length (∼2 mm). increasing to 12% for ∼7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modeling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths

  3. Progress at the WITCH experiment towards weak interaction studies

    CERN Document Server

    Tandecki, Michaël

    A measurement of the $\\beta$–ν angular correlation in nuclear $\\beta$- decay is a good probe to search for physics beyond the Standard Model, independent of assumptions like parity, charge and time reversal violation. The WITCH (Weak Interaction Trap for Charged Particles) experiment will measure this correlation with the aim of further constraining the possible existence of scalar currents in the weak interaction or find a positive indication. The setup is located at ISOLDE/CERN and consists of a double Penning trap system combined with a retardation spectrometer to probe the energy of the recoil ions from the $\\beta$- decay. The shape of the recoil ion energy spectrum allows to determine the $\\beta$–ν angular correlation coefficient, $a$. Past experiments have allowed to measure this parameter with a precision of 0.5–1 %. The aim of the WITCH experiment is to measure $a$ with a precision of about 0.5 %.\\\\ A first step towards this goal has already been taken in 2006 with the measurement of a recoil ...

  4. Progress in EEG-Based Brain Robot Interaction Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqian Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The most popular noninvasive Brain Robot Interaction (BRI technology uses the electroencephalogram- (EEG- based Brain Computer Interface (BCI, to serve as an additional communication channel, for robot control via brainwaves. This technology is promising for elderly or disabled patient assistance with daily life. The key issue of a BRI system is to identify human mental activities, by decoding brainwaves, acquired with an EEG device. Compared with other BCI applications, such as word speller, the development of these applications may be more challenging since control of robot systems via brainwaves must consider surrounding environment feedback in real-time, robot mechanical kinematics, and dynamics, as well as robot control architecture and behavior. This article reviews the major techniques needed for developing BRI systems. In this review article, we first briefly introduce the background and development of mind-controlled robot technologies. Second, we discuss the EEG-based brain signal models with respect to generating principles, evoking mechanisms, and experimental paradigms. Subsequently, we review in detail commonly used methods for decoding brain signals, namely, preprocessing, feature extraction, and feature classification, and summarize several typical application examples. Next, we describe a few BRI applications, including wheelchairs, manipulators, drones, and humanoid robots with respect to synchronous and asynchronous BCI-based techniques. Finally, we address some existing problems and challenges with future BRI techniques.

  5. Effective pion--nucleon interaction in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celenza, L.S.; Liu, L.C.; Nutt, W.; Shakin, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    We discuss the modification of the interaction between a pion and a nucleon in the presence of an infinite medium of nucleons (nuclear matter). The theory presented here is covariant and is relevant to the calculation of the pion--nucleus optical potential. The specific effects considered are the modifications of the nucleon propagator due to the Pauli principle and the modification of the pion and nucleon propagators due to collisions with nucleons of the medium. We also discuss in detail the pion self-energy in the medium, paying close attention to off-shell effects. These latter effects are particularly important because of the rapid variation with energy of the fundamental pion--nucleon interaction. Numerical results are presented, the main feature being the appearance of a significant damping width for the (3, 3) resonance

  6. Normal and mutant HTT interact to affect clinical severity and progression in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aziz, N A; Jurgens, C K; Landwehrmeyer, G B

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HD gene (HTT). We aimed to assess whether interaction between CAG repeat sizes in the mutant and normal allele could affect disease severity and progression. METHODS: Using...... with less severe symptoms and pathology. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing CAG repeat size in normal HTT diminishes the association between mutant CAG repeat size and disease severity and progression in Huntington disease. The underlying mechanism may involve interaction of the polyglutamine domains of normal...

  7. Heavy ion interactions of deformed nuclei. Progress report, May 1, 1984-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberacker, V.E.

    1984-11-01

    This progress report describes the main topics that were investigated during the reporting period: (a) a new microscopic approach to the calculation of heavy ion interaction potentials; (b) the dynamical orientation of deformed heavy nuclei near the distance of closest approach; and (c) the theory of Coulomb fission (project finished in Sept.)

  8. Strongly interacting fermion systems. Progress report, November 15, 1994--November 14, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This paper is the progress report for the period November 15, 1993 to November 14, 1994 for a program which relates to studies of strongly interacting fermion systems. The author has made significant progress in three areas, which are discussed in the report. These are: (1) optical properties in the open-quotes electronic structure program,close quotes calculating optical properties of quartz and urea; (2) quasi-one-dimensional systems, discussing the tuning of the large-density-wave or Peierls distortion in transition-metal linear chain compounds and the universal subgap optical absorptance of classes of quasi-one-dimensional compounds; and (3) other strongly interaction fermion systems, emphasizing the study of the effect of many-body interactions on the low-temperature properties of metals and superconductors

  9. Research progress in machine learning methods for gene-gene interaction detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhe-Ye; Tang, Zi-Jun; Xie, Min-Zhu

    2018-03-20

    Complex diseases are results of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. However, the detection of high-dimensional gene-gene interactions is computationally challenging. In the last two decades, machine-learning approaches have been developed to detect gene-gene interactions with some successes. In this review, we summarize the progress in research on machine learning methods, as applied to gene-gene interaction detection. It systematically examines the principles and limitations of the current machine learning methods used in genome wide association studies (GWAS) to detect gene-gene interactions, such as neural networks (NN), random forest (RF), support vector machines (SVM) and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), and provides some insights on the future research directions in the field.

  10. Inhibitors of SOD1 Interaction as an Approach to Slow the Progressive Spread of ALS Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    the progression of ALS caused by mutations in this protein . To accomplish this goal, we developed an assay that is based on the observation that the...force. In our assay , this force is the normal interaction that occurs when 2 individual SOD1 proteins come together to form a normal active enzyme...Using recombinant DNA, we create fusion proteins of SOD1 and each half of the luciferase enzyme. In the past year, we have characterized and optimized

  11. Interactions of hadrons in nuclear emulsion in the energy range 60 GeV - 400 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holynski, R.

    1986-01-01

    Interactions of pions and protons in the energy range 60 GeV in nuclear emulsion have been analysed. The fragmentation process of the struck nucleus as well as the multiple production of relativistic particles have been investigated as a function of the primary energy and the effective thickness of the target. It is shown that both, the fragmentation of the target nucleus and particle production, can be described by models in which the projectile (or its constituents) undergoes multiple collisions inside the target nucleus. In particular the particle production in the projectile fragmentation region in pion-nucleus interactions is well described by the additive quark model. 47 refs., 35 figs., 2 tabs. (author)

  12. Progress of laser-plasma interaction simulations with the particle-in-cell code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakagami, Hitoshi; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Taguchi, Toshihiro

    2005-01-01

    As the laser-plasma interaction is a non-equilibrium, non-linear and relativistic phenomenon, we must introduce a microscopic method, namely, the relativistic electromagnetic PIC (Particle-In-Cell) simulation code. The PIC code requires a huge number of particles to validate simulation results, and its task is very computation-intensive. Thus simulation researches by the PIC code have been progressing along with advances in computer technology. Recently, parallel computers with tremendous computational power have become available, and thus we can perform three-dimensional PIC simulations for the laser-plasma interaction to investigate laser fusion. Some simulation results are shown with figures. We discuss a recent trend of large-scale PIC simulations that enable direct comparison between experimental facts and computational results. We also discharge/lightning simulations by the extended PIC code, which include various atomic and relaxation processes. (author)

  13. Glioblastoma progression is assisted by induction of immunosuppressive function of pericytes through interaction with tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdor, Rut; García-Bernal, David; Bueno, Carlos; Ródenas, Mónica; Moraleda, José M.; Macian, Fernando; Martínez, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of immune tolerance during Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) progression, is characterized by high levels expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, which suppress the function of tumor assocciated myeloid cells, and the activation and expansion of tumor antigen specific T cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the failed anti-tumor immune response around the blood vessels during GBM, are poorly understood. The consequences of possible interactions between cancer cells and the perivascular compartment might affect the tumor growth. In this work we show for the first time that GBM cells induce immunomodulatory changes in pericytes in a cell interaction-dependent manner, acquiring an immunosuppresive function that possibly assists the evasion of the anti-tumor immune response and consequently participates in tumor growth promotion. Expression of high levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected in vitro and in vivo in brain pericytes that interacted with GBM cells (GBC-PC). Furthermore, reduction of surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules and major histocompatibility complex molecules in GBC-PC correlated with a failure of antigen presentation to T cells and the acquisition of the ability to supress T cell responses. In vivo, orthotopic xenotransplant of human glioblastoma in an immunocompetent mouse model showed significant GBM cell proliferation and tumor growth after the establishment of interspecific immunotolerance that followed GMB interaction with pericytes. PMID:28978142

  14. Targeting androgen receptor and JunD interaction for prevention of prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Kegel, Stacy J; Church, Dawn R; Schmidt, Joseph S; Reuter, Quentin R; Saphner, Elizabeth L; Basu, Hirak S; Wilding, George

    2014-05-01

    Multiple studies show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Previously, we reported an induction of Spermidine/Spermine N(1) -Acetyl Transferase (SSAT) by androgen-activated androgen receptor (AR)-JunD protein complex that leads to over-production of ROS in PCa cells. In our current research, we identify small molecules that specifically block AR-JunD in this ROS-generating metabolic pathway. A high throughput assay based on Gaussia Luciferase reconstitution was used to identify inhibitors of the AR-JunD interaction. Selected hits were further screened using a fluorescence polarization competitor assay to eliminate those that bind to the AR Ligand Binding Domain (LBD), in order to identify molecules that specifically target events downstream to androgen activation of AR. Eleven molecules were selected for studies on their efficacy against ROS generation and growth of cultured human PCa cells by DCFH dye-oxidation assay and DNA fluorescence assay, respectively. In situ Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA), SSAT promoter-luciferase reporter assay, and western blotting of apoptosis and cell cycle markers were used to study mechanism of action of the lead compound. Selected lead compound GWARJD10 with EC(50) 10 μM against ROS production was shown to block AR-JunD interaction in situ as well as block androgen-induced SSAT gene expression at IC(50) 5 μM. This compound had no effect on apoptosis markers, but reduced cyclin D1 protein level. Inhibitor of AR-JunD interaction, GWARJD10 shows promise for prevention of progression of PCa at an early stage of the disease by blocking growth and ROS production. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Theory and phenomenology of strong and weak interaction high energy physics: Progress report, May 1, 1987-April 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, P.; Thews, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains progress information on the following topics in High Energy Physics: strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions; aspects of quark-gluon models for hadronic interactions, decays, and structure; the dynamical generation of a mass gap and the role and truthfulness of perturbation theory; statistical and dynamical aspects of hadronic multiparticle production; and realization of chiral symmetry and temperature effects in supersymmetric theories

  16. Neural protein gamma-synuclein interacting with androgen receptor promotes human prostate cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Junyi; Jiao, Li; Xu, Chuanliang; Yu, Yongwei; Zhang, Zhensheng; Chang, Zheng; Deng, Zhen; Sun, Yinghao

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-synuclein (SNCG) has previously been demonstrated to be significantly correlated with metastatic malignancies; however, in-depth investigation of SNCG in prostate cancer is still lacking. In the present study, we evaluated the role of SNCG in prostate cancer progression and explored the underlying mechanisms. First, alteration of SNCG expression in LNCaP cell line to test the ability of SNCG on cellular properties in vitro and vivo whenever exposing with androgen or not. Subsequently, the Dual-luciferase reporter assays were performed to evaluate whether the role of SNCG in LNCaP is through AR signaling. Last, the association between SNCG and prostate cancer progression was assessed immunohistochemically using a series of human prostate tissues. Silencing SNCG by siRNA in LNCaP cells contributes to the inhibition of cellular proliferation, the induction of cell-cycle arrest at the G1 phase, the suppression of cellular migration and invasion in vitro, as well as the decrease of tumor growth in vivo with the notable exception of castrated mice. Subsequently, mechanistic studies indicated that SNCG is a novel androgen receptor (AR) coactivator. It interacts with AR and promotes prostate cancer cellular growth and proliferation by activating AR transcription in an androgen-dependent manner. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that SNCG was almost undetectable in benign or androgen-independent tissues prostate lesions. The high expression of SNCG is correlated with peripheral and lymph node invasion. Our data suggest that SNCG may serve as a biomarker for predicting human prostate cancer progression and metastasis. It also may become as a novel target for biomedical therapy in advanced prostate cancer

  17. Progress in studies of the reciprocal interaction between sleep disorders and Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Zhen-yu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly, and is the most common cause of dementia. Epidemiological studies have discovered that, 44% of patients with AD are associated with sleep disorders and (or circadian rhythm disorders. Now there are growing evidences indicating that interstitial fluid amyloid-β protein (A β levels exhibit circadian rhythm fluctuation, and sleep disorders will accelerate the process of Aβ deposition, which may act as a risk factor of AD, suggesting the possible reciprocal interaction between sleep disorders and AD. The mechanism is not yet completely clear. Sleep disorders may be related with the impairments of both sleep-wake regulating system, circadian rhythm regulating system and the change of zeitgeber in AD. Sleep disorders would affect neuronal activity, neurotransmitter secretion, and as a stressor affecting A β processing and metabolism, thus accelerate the pathological process of AD. This paper reviewed the progress in the studies of reciprocal interaction between sleep disorders and Alzheimer's disease and the possible mechanisms.

  18. [Research Progress on the Interaction Effects and Its Neural Mechanisms between Physical Fatigue and Mental Fatigue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Chuncui; He, Feng; Zhao, Xin; Qi, Hongzhi; Wan, Baikun; Ming, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Fatigue is an exhaustion state caused by prolonged physical work and mental work, which can reduce working efficiency and even cause industrial accidents. Fatigue is a complex concept involving both physiological and psychological factors. Fatigue can cause a decline of concentration and work performance and induce chronic diseases. Prolonged fatigue may endanger life safety. In most of the scenarios, physical and mental workloads co-lead operator into fatigue state. Thus, it is very important to study the interaction influence and its neural mechanisms between physical and mental fatigues. This paper introduces recent progresses on the interaction effects and discusses some research challenges and future development directions. It is believed that mutual influence between physical fatigue and mental fatigue may occur in the central nervous system. Revealing the basal ganglia function and dopamine release may be important to explore the neural mechanisms between physical fatigue and mental fatigue. Future effort is to optimize fatigue models, to evaluate parameters and to explore the neural mechanisms so as to provide scientific basis and theoretical guidance for complex task designs and fatigue monitoring.

  19. Hadron-nucleus interactions in the nucleon resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessler, Stefanie

    2017-06-15

    Experiments with high-energy hadron beams have found renewed attention. In the near future nuclear studies with hadron beams are planned at least at two facilities, namely J-PARC in Japan and GSI/FAIR. The aim of this work is an exploratory investigation of interactions of mesons and baryons with nuclei at energies of interest for future research with antiprotons at FAIR. The theoretical discussion is started with an introductory presentation of the optical model and Eikonal theory as appropriate tools for the description of scattering processes at high energies. In antiproton interactions with nucleons and nuclei, annihilation processes into pions are playing the major role for the reaction dynamics. Therefore, we consider first the interactions of pions with nuclei by deriving an extended selfenergy scheme for a large range of incident pion energies. In order to have a uniform description over a broad energy interval, the existing approaches had to be reconsidered and in essential parts reformulated and extended. A central result is the treatment of pion-nucleus self-energies from high lying N{sup *} resonances. Only by including those channels in a proper manner into the extended pion optical potential, pion-nucleus scattering could be described over the required large energy range. At low energies the well known Kisslinger potential is recapped. Next, the same type of reaction theory is used to analyze antiproton-nucleon and nucleus scattering from low to highly relativistic energies. The reaction dynamics of antiproton interactions with nuclear targets is discussed. We start with a new approach to antiproton-nucleon scattering. A free-space antiproton-nucleon T-matrix is derived, covering an energy range as wide as from 100 MeV up to 15 GeV. Eikonal theory is used to describe the antiproton scattering amplitudes in momentum and in coordinate space. We consider, in particular, interactions with nuclei at energies around and well above 1 GeV. The antiproton

  20. Hadron-nucleus interactions in the nucleon resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessler, Stefanie

    2017-06-01

    Experiments with high-energy hadron beams have found renewed attention. In the near future nuclear studies with hadron beams are planned at least at two facilities, namely J-PARC in Japan and GSI/FAIR. The aim of this work is an exploratory investigation of interactions of mesons and baryons with nuclei at energies of interest for future research with antiprotons at FAIR. The theoretical discussion is started with an introductory presentation of the optical model and Eikonal theory as appropriate tools for the description of scattering processes at high energies. In antiproton interactions with nucleons and nuclei, annihilation processes into pions are playing the major role for the reaction dynamics. Therefore, we consider first the interactions of pions with nuclei by deriving an extended selfenergy scheme for a large range of incident pion energies. In order to have a uniform description over a broad energy interval, the existing approaches had to be reconsidered and in essential parts reformulated and extended. A central result is the treatment of pion-nucleus self-energies from high lying N * resonances. Only by including those channels in a proper manner into the extended pion optical potential, pion-nucleus scattering could be described over the required large energy range. At low energies the well known Kisslinger potential is recapped. Next, the same type of reaction theory is used to analyze antiproton-nucleon and nucleus scattering from low to highly relativistic energies. The reaction dynamics of antiproton interactions with nuclear targets is discussed. We start with a new approach to antiproton-nucleon scattering. A free-space antiproton-nucleon T-matrix is derived, covering an energy range as wide as from 100 MeV up to 15 GeV. Eikonal theory is used to describe the antiproton scattering amplitudes in momentum and in coordinate space. We consider, in particular, interactions with nuclei at energies around and well above 1 GeV. The antiproton

  1. Accelerating progress in Artificial General Intelligence: Choosing a benchmark for natural world interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Brandon

    2010-12-01

    Measuring progress in the field of Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) can be difficult without commonly accepted methods of evaluation. An AGI benchmark would allow evaluation and comparison of the many computational intelligence algorithms that have been developed. In this paper I propose that a benchmark for natural world interaction would possess seven key characteristics: fitness, breadth, specificity, low cost, simplicity, range, and task focus. I also outline two benchmark examples that meet most of these criteria. In the first, the direction task, a human coach directs a machine to perform a novel task in an unfamiliar environment. The direction task is extremely broad, but may be idealistic. In the second, the AGI battery, AGI candidates are evaluated based on their performance on a collection of more specific tasks. The AGI battery is designed to be appropriate to the capabilities of currently existing systems. Both the direction task and the AGI battery would require further definition before implementing. The paper concludes with a description of a task that might be included in the AGI battery: the search and retrieve task.

  2. Progressive and Regressive Developmental Changes in Neural Substrates for Face Processing: Testing Specific Predictions of the Interactive Specialization Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jane E.; Gathers, Ann D.; Bhatt, Ramesh S.

    2011-01-01

    Face processing undergoes a fairly protracted developmental time course but the neural underpinnings are not well understood. Prior fMRI studies have only examined progressive changes (i.e. increases in specialization in certain regions with age), which would be predicted by both the Interactive Specialization (IS) and maturational theories of…

  3. Host microenvironment in breast cancer development: Inflammatory cells, cytokines and chemokines in breast cancer progression: reciprocal tumor–microenvironment interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Baruch, A

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of breast cancer development and progression suggests that the process is influenced by intrinsic properties of the tumor cells, as well as by microenvironmental factors. Indeed, in breast carcinoma, an intensive interplay exists between the tumor cells on one hand, and inflammatory cells/cytokines/chemokines on the other. The purpose of the present review is to outline the reciprocal interactions that exist between these different elements, and to shed light on their potential involvement in breast cancer development and progression

  4. Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms. Report of progress, February 1, 1975--October 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Progress in the following areas of research is reported: Energies of giant isoscalar monopole and quadrupole excitations, energy-weighted sum rules, the random-phase approximation, Hartree-Fock calculations, spreading widths, physical consequences of the locality of current-density commutators and current-current sum rules. Electron-hydrogen scattering using the inhomogenous equation method; variational calculation of e - + H scattering using the symmetrized channel coupling array equation; K operators and unitary approximations for the 3-body problem; approximate calculation of model (d-p) and (dd) amplitudes and cross sections; multi-step processes in direct reactions; bound state calculations using the channel coupling array theory. Methods for determining nuclear charge distributions, relativistic effects in nuclei, dispersion corrections and recoil corrections to elastic electron scattering; unitarity of elastic scattering amplitudes; low energy theorems for two-photon processes; pion-exchange contributions to the charge density; recoil effects and energy-dependent Hamiltonians; pion-exchange contributions to two-photon processes; hypervirial theorems for the Dirac equation; Coulomb energies of nuclei. Pion-nucleus scattering, diagonalization of the Δ-(nucleon-hole) configurations, doorway states and doorway dominance, calculations for 4 He, discussion of experimental results

  5. Negative pion-nucleus elastic scattering at 30 and 50 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, K.K.; Barlow, D.; Iversen, S.; Kaletka, M.; Nann, H.; Smith, D.; Artuso, M.; Burleson, G.; Blanpied, G.; Daw, G.; Burger, W.J.; Redwine, R.P.; Saghai, B.; Anderson, R.

    1990-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of 30 and 50 MeV π - by nuclei ranging from 12 C to 208 Pb have been measured using a range spectrometer. Comparison is made with the predictions of a recent optical-model calculation and the general nature of discrepancies is discussed

  6. Negative pion-nucleus elastic scattering at 20 and 40 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burleson, G.; Blanpied, G.; Cottingame, W.; Daw, G.; Park, B.; Seth, K.K.; Barlow, D.; Iversen, S.; Kaletka, M.; Nann, H.; Saha, A.; Smith, D.; Redwine, R.P.; Burger, W.; Farkhondeh, M.; Saghai, B.; Anderson, R.

    1994-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of 20 and 40 MeV π - by nuclei ranging from 12 C to 208 Pb are reported. Comparisons are made with the predictions of the Michigan State University (MSU) optical potential

  7. Large-angle theory for pion-nucleus scattering at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoock, D.W. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An approximate solution for high-energy, projectile-nucleus, multiple scattering is developed from the exact Watson series and applied to pion scattering for 12 C and 4 He. Agreement with measured differential cross sections available from the literature for the range 150 to 260 MeV pion laboratory energies is surprisingly good. The approximation method expands the propagators of the Watson series about the transverse component of the momentum transfer. Contributions of each of the first two terms to double scattering from a Gaussian potential are compared to the exact solution. The purely plane-wave propagation produces a scattering amplitude that agrees to order (k 0 a) -1 with the exact solution at the forward and backward directions at high energies. The second (off-axis) propagation term produces an amplitude that is one order smaller at forward angles and two orders smaller at 180 0 than the exact amplitude. At intermediate angles it is of the same order. The general multiple-scattering series is approximated with selection of plane-wave propagation as the fundamental process at large and small angles. This model suggests that a single nucleon accepts most of the momentum transfer for backward scattering. The resulting multiple-scattering formula agrees with the well-known high-energy eikonal theory at small angles and the backward-angle scattering formula of Chen at exactly 180 0 . A lowest-order formula that includes off-axis propagation is also derived. Predicted differential cross sections are found to be sensitive to nucleon motion and binding. For 4 He the effect of the nuclear potential on the pion kinetic energy is also examined and found to produce significant changes in the predicted cross sections

  8. Galileo-invariant theory of low energy pion-nucleus scattering. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mach, R.

    1983-01-01

    Using two versions of the Galileo-invariant optical model, π - - 4 He elastic scattering cross sections were calculated in the energy interval 50 to 260 MeV. Level shifts and widths of several light π-mesoatoms were estimated in the Born approximation. Whereas the (A+1)-body model appears to be more suitable in the resonance region, the two-body model yields surprisingly good results for both the low-energy scattering and the characteristics of π-mesoatoms. (author)

  9. Galileo-invariant theory of low energy pion-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mach, R.

    1980-01-01

    Two classes of Galileo-invariant optical models are constructed for pion elastic scattering by nuclei. The first, the two-body model, has been obtained assuming that the pion-bound nucleon dynamics is determined by the pion-nucleon kinetic energy. In deriving the second model, the (A+1)-body dynamics has been taken into account. The technique of effective nucleon momenta maintains the nonlocal propagation of the pion-target nucleon subsystem through the nucleus in contrast with the standard static approximation

  10. Galileo-invariant theory of low energy pion-nucleus scattering. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mach, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two classes of Galileo-invariant optical models are constructed for pion elastic scattering by nuclei. The former, the two-body model, was obtained assuming that the pion-bound nucleon dynamics is determined by the pion-nucleon kinetic energy. In deriving the latter model, the (A+1)-body dynamics was taken into account. The technique of effective nucleon momenta maintains the nonlocal propagation of the pion-target nucleon subsystem through the nucleus in contrast with the standard static approximation. (author)

  11. An improved optical potential for low-energy pion-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khankhasaev, M.Kh.; Topil'skaya, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for calculating the imaginary part the of Stricker, McManus and Carr (SMC) optical potential is proposed. It is based on an approximate expression for the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude including nuclear structure effects. It is shown that the resulting potential with the absorption parameters fitted to the pionic atom data provides a good description of the scattering up to 50 MeV

  12. Is the quasielastic pion cross section really bigger than the pion-nucleus reaction cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbar, R.R.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that soft pion charge exchanges may increase the inclusive (π + ,π 0 ') cross section, relative to the total quasielastic (π + ,π + ') cross section, by as much as a factor of two. 4 references

  13. Galilei-invariant theory of low energy pion-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mach, R.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of a particle by a system of bound scatterers is investigated and reasons are given why the optical model and other models based on the standard impulse approximation violate the Galilei invariance. It is shown how this deficiency can be removed. Further, the validity of factojzation approximation is studied. In the case of Galilei-invariant models, there exists a unique combination of effective target particle momenta in the initial and final states, by means of which the optical potential can be expressed in factorized form (elementary scattering matrix by form factor of the composed target) while the error caused by the factorization procedure is of the order of projectile over target particle mass squared

  14. Theoretical aspects of electroweak and other interactions in medium energy nuclear physics. Interim progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1994-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the current project year in the development of chiral soliton model and its applications to the electroweak structure of the nucleon and the Delta (1232) resonance. Further progress also has been made in the application of the perturbative QCD (pQCD) and the study of physics beyond the standard model. The postdoctoral associate and the graduate student working towards his Ph.D. degree have both made good progress. The review panel of the DOE has rated this program as a ''strong, high priority'' one. A total of fifteen research communications -- eight journal papers and, conference reports and seven other communications -- have been made during the project year so far. The principal investigator is a member of the Physics Advisory Committee of two nuclear accelerator facilities

  15. Acclimation of photosynthesis to lightflecks in tomato leaves: interaction with progressive shading in a growing canopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, M.E.; Matsubara, Shizue; Harbinson, J.; Heuvelink, E.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2018-01-01

    Plants in natural environments are often exposed to fluctuations in light intensity, and leaf-level acclimation to light may be affected by those fluctuations. Concurrently, leaves acclimated to a given light climate can become progressively shaded as new leaves emerge and grow above them.

  16. Experimental studies of elementary particle interactions at high energies: Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses progress of experiments at CERN and Fermilab. At CERN, data accumulation and analysis is discussed for the UA-6 experiment, which involves proton-antiproton collisions. At Fermilab, the testing of a collider detector for the Tevatron is discussed

  17. Anisotropic intermolecular interaction and rotational ordering in hydrogen-containing solids. Progress report No. 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reviewed in these areas: nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in ortho-para mixtures of solid deuterium below T/sub lambda/; pulsed NMR experiments of matrix isolated HCl; stimulated Raman scattering in solid hydrogen and nitrogen; and infrared line broadening of matrix isolated molecules. (GHT)

  18. Theory of weak interactions and related topics. Progress report, January 1, 1982-February 28, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshak, R.E.

    1985-08-01

    Progress is reported in these areas: B-L vs V-A gauge groups; work on neutron oscillations; preon models of quarks and leptons; partial unification theory (PUT); extensions of standard electroweak group; composite weak bosons; quasi-solitons in electroweak gauge groups; and weak CP nonconservation. 18 refs

  19. Anisotropic intermolecular interaction and rotational ordering in hydrogen-containing solids. Progress report No. 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reviewed in these areas: nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in ortho-para mixtures of solid deuterium below T/sub lambda/; pulsed NMR experiments of matrix isolated HCl; stimulated Raman scattering in solid hydrogen and nitrogen; and infrared line broadening of matrix isolated molecules

  20. Elementary particle interactions. Progress report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Read, K.; Siopsis, G.; Ward, B.F.L.

    1995-10-01

    This year has been a busy and demanding one with completion of a long SLD run, much progress on light quark states from E-687 resulting in strong evidence for two new states, observation in E-144 of non-linear Compton scattering (multiphoton absorption by electrons) up to N-4 and initial evidence for e + e - pair production in Compton process. The authors have also made considerable progress toward preparation for a n-bar n oscillation experiment and have carried out experimental studies of quartz fiber calorimetry for SLD polarimeter and forward calorimeter for CMS and LHC including a thorough set of gamma ray and neutron radiation damage studies on quartz fiber. Two graduate students received their Ph.D.s this year, Kathy Danyo Blackett on data from Fermilab E-687 and Sharon White on SLD radiative Bhabha scattering

  1. ODICIS (One Display for a Cockpit Interactive Solution) - Final public progress report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bécouarn, Loïc; Dominici, Johanna; Bader, Joachim

    The ODICIS project aims at developing a single display cockpit associated with adequate means of interaction. This addresses three current major aeronautics needs: the system architecture flexibility, the useful surface optimisation and the information continuity. Therefore the project will improve...

  2. Research in particles and fields and their interactions: Technical progress report, November 1986--December 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildiz, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains information on the following topics: Weak interactions; Field theories; Particle phenomenology; and Cosmology and particle physics. In particular, vector mesons, superstring cosmology, quarkonia systems, and CP-violation are some specific topics discussed. (FL)

  3. Elementary particle interactions. Progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Read, K.; Ward, B.F.L.

    1992-10-01

    Work continues on strange particle production in weak interactions using data from a high-energy neutrino exposure in a freon bubble chamber. Meson photoproduction has also consumed considerable effort. Detector research and development activities have been carried out.

  4. Membrane-membrane interactions in a lipid-containing bacteriophage system. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, W.

    1979-06-01

    Progress is reported on research on two aspects of the life cycle of PM2, a lipid-containing bacteriophage. The first concerns the initial interaction of PM2 with the outer membrane of its host cell, Pseudomonas BAL-31. The second concerns the assembly of PM2 in infected cells and the structural features of hydrophobic membrane perturbers that inhibit PM2 assembly. Several other projects have been completed: distribution of PM2 receptors; effects of adamantance derivatives on PM2 production; hydrophobic membrane perturbers as antiviral and virucidal agents; hydrophobic photosensitizers; and other technique development

  5. Experiments on the nuclear interactions of pions. Progress report, December 1, 1980-November 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehart, R.C.; Ziock, K.O.H.

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reviewed in these research areas: π-d elastic scattering; π-elastic and quasi-free scattering from helium isotopes; pion charge exchange in 3 He; pion absorption in 3 He and 4 He; quasi-free pion scattering; π → μ + ν experiment; study of the π 0 → 2e decay; measurement of the π - - π 0 mass difference; design of a low energy pion spectrometer; π + d → p + p in the energy range 60 to 200 MeV

  6. The Interactions between Insulin and Androgens in Progression to Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H. Gunter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An association between the metabolic syndrome and reduced testosterone levels has been identified, and a specific inverse relationship between insulin and testosterone levels suggests that an important metabolic crosstalk exists between these two hormonal axes; however, the mechanisms by which insulin and androgens may be reciprocally regulated are not well described. Androgen-dependant gene pathways regulate the growth and maintenance of both normal and malignant prostate tissue, and androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT in patients exploits this dependence when used to treat recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer resulting in tumour regression. A major systemic side effect of ADT includes induction of key features of the metabolic syndrome and the consistent feature of hyperinsulinaemia. Recent studies have specifically identified a correlation between elevated insulin and high-grade PCa and more rapid progression to castrate resistant disease. This paper examines the relationship between insulin and androgens in the context of prostate cancer progression. Prostate cancer patients present a promising cohort for the exploration of insulin stabilising agents as adjunct treatments for hormone deprivation or enhancers of chemosensitivity for treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  7. The Interactions between Insulin and Androgens in Progression to Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Jennifer H.; Lubik, Amy A.; McKenzie, Ian; Pollak, Michael; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2012-01-01

    An association between the metabolic syndrome and reduced testosterone levels has been identified, and a specific inverse relationship between insulin and testosterone levels suggests that an important metabolic crosstalk exists between these two hormonal axes; however, the mechanisms by which insulin and androgens may be reciprocally regulated are not well described. Androgen-dependant gene pathways regulate the growth and maintenance of both normal and malignant prostate tissue, and androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients exploits this dependence when used to treat recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer resulting in tumour regression. A major systemic side effect of ADT includes induction of key features of the metabolic syndrome and the consistent feature of hyperinsulinaemia. Recent studies have specifically identified a correlation between elevated insulin and high-grade PCa and more rapid progression to castrate resistant disease. This paper examines the relationship between insulin and androgens in the context of prostate cancer progression. Prostate cancer patients present a promising cohort for the exploration of insulin stabilising agents as adjunct treatments for hormone deprivation or enhancers of chemosensitivity for treatment of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:22548055

  8. Environmental effects of ozone depletion and its interactions with climate change: progress report, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Effects Assessment Panel (EEAP) is one of three Panels that regularly informs the Parties (countries) to the Montreal Protocol on the effects of ozone depletion and the consequences of climate change interactions with respect to human health, animals, plants, bi...

  9. Synergistic interaction of fatty acids and oxysterols impairs mitochondrial function and limits liver adaptation during nafld progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bellanti

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The complete mechanism accounting for the progression from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has not been elucidated. Lipotoxicity refers to cellular injury caused by hepatic free fatty acids (FFAs and cholesterol accumulation. Excess cholesterol autoxidizes to oxysterols during oxidative stress conditions. We hypothesize that interaction of FAs and cholesterol derivatives may primarily impair mitochondrial function and affect biogenesis adaptation during NAFLD progression. We demonstrated that the accumulation of specific non-enzymatic oxysterols in the liver of animals fed high-fat+high-cholesterol diet induces mitochondrial damage and depletion of proteins of the respiratory chain complexes. When tested in vitro, 5α-cholestane-3β,5,6β-triol (triol combined to FFAs was able to reduce respiration in isolated liver mitochondria, induced apoptosis in primary hepatocytes, and down-regulated transcription factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. Finally, a lower protein content in the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes was observed in human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In conclusion, hepatic accumulation of FFAs and non-enzymatic oxysterols synergistically facilitates development and progression of NAFLD by impairing mitochondrial function, energy balance and biogenesis adaptation to chronic injury.

  10. Experiments on continuum electron capture in atomic hydrogen and collisional interaction of trapped ions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellin, I.A.; Elston, S.B.

    1981-01-01

    This section describes the background and scope of as well as progress made on experiments designed to test the present theory of charge exchange to continuum for the case of bare nuclei on atomic hydrogen. The charge transfer process is well known to be an essential ingredient of any attempt to understand the ionization of gaseous media traversed by highly-charged energetic ions. Surprisingly, a sometimes dominant contribution to such ionization remained undiscovered until the past decade. This process, known as charge transfer to the continuum, involves the ionization of electrons from the target species into unbound states closely matched in exit direction and speed to the charged particles which generate them. Subsequent measurements of the resultant forward electron production, performed by University of Tennessee searchers at Oak Ridge and Brookhaven National Laboratories, were unique in employing more highly charged projectiles than previously

  11. Interaction of heavy ions with matter. Progress report and summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boring, J.W.; Johnson, R.E.

    1976-07-01

    The processes that occur when a heavy atomic particle (ion, atom, etc.) interacts with matter, particularly the effects produced on biological systems, were investigated. Results of the investigations over a three year period are reviewed. Areas covered include: energy loss, straggling and stopping; projected ranges and first-order moments; damage cross section for inactivation of RNase; and spatial distribution of damage in RNase. History and objectives of the research program are included

  12. Interaction of radiation with matter. Research progress report, January 1, 1982-December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    The project is concerned with the mechanisms of dissipation of energy in organic and inorganic materials, and with the application of the technique developed to a study of selected problems of environmental concern in the production of energy from fossil fuels. The organic phase of this work falls into a series of closely related areas, all derived from a study of the interaction of radiation with matter. These are: (1) New techniques for the study of small particulates (approx. 1μ); composition, mass (to +- 1 pg) and charge (+- 1 electron) can be determined. (2) External photoelectric effects as a tool in arriving at the electronic structure of organic crystals. (3) The interaction of water with radical cations in organic crystals, producing reactive chemical species, such as OH and HSO 3 , NH 2 , and NO 3 radicals. (4) Mechanisms of interaction of air-pollutant polycyclic aromatic carcinogens with DNA and the study of the conformation of the adducts. (5) High excitation densities in organic systems and other photophysical phenomena, such as triplet exciton dynamics, and exoemission. (6) The interaction of #betta#-rays with protein solutions. In the inorganic phase of this work the research involves (1) measurements of cross-sections for K and L-shell ionization processes for heavy projectiles in the low velocity region, (2) experimental tests of target dependence of the effective-charge theory for light projectiles, (3) theoretical studies on the energy loss of swift particles in plasmas over a broad density and temperature range, and (4) studies of geminate recombination in alkane liquids as a function of alkane chain length

  13. Thermodynamics of T cell receptor – peptide/MHC interactions: progress and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Insaidoo, Francis K.; Baker, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    αβ T cell receptors (TCR) recognize peptide antigens presented by class I or class II major histocompatibility complex molecules (pMHC). Here we review the use of thermodynamic measurements in the study of TCR-pMHC interactions, with attention to the diversity in binding thermodynamics and how this is related to the variation in TCR-pMHC interfaces. We show that there is no enthalpic or entropic signature for TCR binding; rather, enthalpy and entropy changes vary in a compensatory manner that reflects a narrow free energy window for the interactions that have been characterized. Binding enthalpy and entropy changes do not correlate with structural features such as buried surface area or the number of hydrogen bonds within TCR-pMHC interfaces, possibly reflecting the myriad of contributors to binding thermodynamics, but likely also reflecting a reliance on van’t Hoff over calorimetric measurements and the unaccounted influence of equilibria linked to binding. TCR-pMHC binding heat capacity changes likewise vary considerably. In some cases the heat capacity changes are consistent with conformational differences between bound and free receptors, but there is little data indicating these conformational differences represent the need to organize commonly disordered CDR loops. In this regard, we discuss how thermodynamics may provide additional insight into conformational changes occurring upon TCR binding. Finally, we highlight opportunities for the further use of thermodynamic measurements in the study of TCR-pMHC interactions, not only for understanding TCR binding in general, but for understanding specifics of individual interactions and the engineering of T cell receptors with desired molecular recognition properties. PMID:18496839

  14. Interaction of radiation with matter. Research progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The mechanisms of dissipation of energy in organic and inorganic materials, and the application of the technique developed to a study of selected problems of environmental concern in the production of energy from fossil fuels were studied. In the Inorganic Phase of the work the research involves (1) measurements of cross-sections for K and L-shell ionization processes for heavy projectiles in the low velocity region, (2) experimental tests of target dependence of the effective-charge theory for light projectiles, (3) theoretical studies on the energy loss of swift particles in plasmas over a broad density and temperature range. The organic phase of the work falls into a series of closely related areas, all derived from a study of the interaction of radiation with matter. (1) New techniques for the study of small particulates (approx. 1μ); composition, mass (to +-1 pg) and charge (+-1 electron) can be determined. (2) External photoelectric effects as a tool in arriving at the electronic structure of organic crystals. (3) The interaction of water with charge carriers in organic crystals, producing reactive chemical species, such as Oh and HSO 3 radicals. (4) Mechanisms of interaction of air-pollutant polycyclic aromatic carcinogens with DNA and the study of the conformation of the adducts

  15. Interaction of radiation with matter. Research progress report, November 1, 1980-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The project is concerned with the mechanism of dissipation of energy in organic and inorganic materials, and with the application of the techniques developed to a study of selected problems of environmental concern in the production of energy from fossil fuels. In the inorganic phase of this work the research involves: (1) measurements of cross-section for K and L-shell ionization processes for heavy projectiles in the low velocity region; (2) experimental tests of target dependence of the effective-stopping-power charge theory for light projectiles; and (3) theoretical studies on the energy loss of swift particles in plasmas over a broad density and temperature range. The organic phase of this work falls into a series of closely related areas, all derived from a study of the interaction of radiation with matter: (1) new techniques for the study of small particulates (1 μ); composition, mass (to +- 1 pg) and charge (+- 1 electron) can be determined; (2) external photoelectric effects as a tool in arriving at the electronic structure of organic crystals; (3) the interaction of water with charge carriers in organic crystals, producing reactive chemical species, such as OH and HSO 3 radicals; and (4) mechanisms of interaction of air-pollutant polycyclic aromatic carcinogens with DNA and the study of the conformation of the adducts

  16. Toward Small-Molecule Inhibition of Protein-Protein Interactions: General Aspects and Recent Progress in Targeting Costimulatory and Coinhibitory (Immune Checkpoint) Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojadzic, Damir; Buchwald, Peter

    2018-05-30

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) that are part of the costimulatory and coinhibitory (immune checkpoint) signaling are critical for adequate T cell response and are important therapeutic targets for immunomodulation. Biologics targeting them have already achieved considerable clinical success in the treatment of autoimmune diseases or transplant recipients (e.g., abatacept, belatacept, and belimumab) as well as cancer (e.g., ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, durvalumab, and avelumab). In view of such progress, there have been only relatively limited efforts toward developing small-molecule PPI inhibitors (SMPPIIs) targeting these cosignaling interactions, possibly because they, as all other PPIs, are difficult to target by small molecules and were not considered druggable. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been achieved during the last decade. SMPPIIs proving the feasibility of such approaches have been identified through various strategies for a number of cosignaling interactions including CD40-CD40L, OX40-OX40L, BAFFR-BAFF, CD80-CD28, and PD-1-PD-L1s. Here, after an overview of the general aspects and challenges of SMPPII-focused drug discovery, we review them briefly together with relevant structural, immune-signaling, physicochemical, and medicinal chemistry aspects. While so far only a few of these SMPPIIs have shown activity in animal models (DRI-C21045 for CD40-D40L, KR33426 for BAFFR-BAFF) or reached clinical development (RhuDex for CD80-CD28, CA-170 for PD-1-PD-L1), there is proof-of-principle evidence for the feasibility of such approaches in immunomodulation. They can result in products that are easier to develop/manufacture and are less likely to be immunogenic or encounter postmarket safety events than corresponding biologics, and, contrary to them, can even become orally bioavailable. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Experimental studies of elementary particle interactions at high energies. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Work being done with respect to the CERN S anti ppS Collider experiment UA-6, which seeks to measure direct photon production, neutral pion and neutral eta inclusive cross sections from proton-antiproton interactions, is reported. Also reported is data analysis for alpha-alpha and p-p collisions performed at ISR. Work is being performed on the small angle silicon detector system of CDF. An experiment is described to determine the electron neutrino mass with the precision of a few electron volts by measuring the tritium beta decay energy distribution near the endpoint

  18. Strong interactions studies with medium energy probes. Progress report, 1993--1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, K.K.

    1994-09-01

    This progress report refers to the period August 1993 to September 1994, which includes the second year of the three year period December 1, 1992--November 30, 1995 of our existing research contract. The budget proposal for the third year, December 1, 1994 to November 30, 1995 as originally approved, is also presented. As anticipated in our 1992--1995 proposal, Fermilab E760/E835 on high precision charmonium spectroscopy has remained a major part of our preoccupation and commitment during the last year, and it will remain so in the forthcoming year. In early 1994 we joined the collaboration of the Brookhaven experiment E852 on the spectroscopy of states with exotic quantum numbers. The first successful three month run of E852 was completed on July 31 and preliminary data analysis has been started. Some new commitments have resulted from this collaboration and a separate proposal for supplemental financial support is being prepared for them. At Los Alamos our experiment number-sign 1274 on search of extremely neutron rich exotic nuclei by pion absorption began making initial measurements a month ago and is expected to take data during the period October 15--November 30, 1994. In addition to the above on-going programs, our Bates proposal (94-01) for a definitive measurement of the quenching of the longitudinal response in quasi-free scattering of electrons from nuclei has been approved with high priority for 600 hours of beam time, and we expect to start the experiment in late 1995

  19. New service of Earth Interactions offers sneak peek at work in progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new service of the all-electronic journal Earth Interactions (Web site http://EarthInter-actions.org) now provides online access to abstracts or preprints of selected papers being presented at various Earth system science conferences. The new service, “Earth Abstractions,” is separate from the peer-reviewed articles in Earth Interactions. The editors select the sessions that will be featured. AGU Spring Meeting abstracts are now highlighted on the site.The abstract titles in Earth Abstractions will link directly to online extended abstracts or preprints located on the authors' home servers if such abstracts are made available. As the author updates the preprint and posts it to the same URL, Earth Abstractions will continue to feature the most recent information from the author related to that work. Readers can preview an author's work as it evolves prior to the meeting as well as refer to it for a year after the meeting has ended. This exchange also provides a means for authors to receive positive feedback on their papers independent of the conference session, which may help those who plan to submit papers about their work to a peer-reviewed journal.

  20. Neutron interactions with biological tissue. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    An attempt is made to obtain information about the physical stage of neutron interactions with tissue through secondary charged particles. The authors use theoretical calculations whose input includes neutron cross section data; range, stopping power, ion yield, and straggling information; and geometrical properties. Outputs are initial and slowing-down spectra of charged particles, kerma factors, average values of quality factors, microdosimetric spectra, and integral microdosimetric parameters such as bar y F , bar y D , y * . Since it has become apparent that nanometer site sizes are more relevant to radiobiological effects, the calculations of event size spectra and their parameters have been extended to these smaller diameters. This information is basic to radiological physics, radiation biology, radiation protection of workers, and standards for neutron dose measurement

  1. High-level waste-basalt interactions. Annual progress report, February 1, 1977--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, G.J.; Scheetz, B.E.

    1978-05-01

    Commercial radioactive waste can be placed under ground in a basalt repository to contain significant amounts of radioactive decay heat for the first hundred or so years, which constitutes the ''thermal period'' of waste isolation, if the feasibility is determined that a basalt geology is a suitable medium for storage of radioactive wastes. Several physical-chemical changes analogous to natural geochemical processes can occur in and around this repository during the thermal period. The waste canister can act as a heat source and cause changes in the mineralogy and properties of the surrounding basalts. Geochemically, this is ''contact metamorphism.'' This phenomenon needs to be investigated because it could affect the behavior of the basalt with regard to migration of long-lived radionuclides away from the immediate repository. It is well known that even the relatively low-grade hydrothermal conditions possible in the repository (temperatures up to 400 degrees Centigrade; pressures up to 300 bars) can cause extensive modifications in rocks and minerals. At the end of the thermal period, the residue of the original waste plus the waste-basalt interaction products would constitute the actual waste form (or ''source term'') subject to the low-temperature leaching and migration processes under investigation in other laboratories. During the last eight months of fiscal year 1977, a program was initiated at The Pennsylvania State University which had as its objective the determination of the nature and implication of any chemical or mineralogical changes in, or interactions between, each candidate radioactive waste form and representative Columbia River Basalt under the various relevant repository conditions during the thermal period. Results of these investigations are given

  2. High-level waste-basalt interactions. Annual progress report, February 1, 1977--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, G.J.; Scheetz, B.E.

    1978-05-01

    Commercial radioactive waste can be placed under ground in a basalt repository to contain significant amounts of radioactive decay heat for the first hundred or so years, which constitutes the ''thermal period'' of waste isolation, if the feasibility is determined that a basalt geology is a suitable medium for storage of radioactive wastes. Several physical-chemical changes analogous to natural geochemical processes can occur in and around this repository during the thermal period. The waste canister can act as a heat source and cause changes in the mineralogy and properties of the surrounding basalts. Geochemically, this is ''contact metamorphism.'' This phenomenon needs to be investigated because it could affect the behavior of the basalt with regard to migration of long-lived radionuclides away from the immediate repository. It is well known that even the relatively low-grade hydrothermal conditions possible in the repository (temperatures up to 400 degrees Centigrade; pressures up to 300 bars) can cause extensive modifications in rocks and minerals. At the end of the thermal period, the residue of the original waste plus the waste-basalt interaction products would constitute the actual waste form (or ''source term'') subject to the low-temperature leaching and migration processes under investigation in other laboratories. During the last eight months of fiscal year 1977, a program was initiated at The Pennsylvania State University which had as its objective the determination of the nature and implication of any chemical or mineralogical changes in, or interactions between, each candidate radioactive waste form and representative Columbia River Basalt under the various relevant repository conditions during the thermal period. Results of these investigations are given.

  3. DNA Replication and Cell Cycle Progression Regulatedby Long Range Interaction between Protein Complexes bound to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsson, L

    2001-12-01

    A nonstationary interaction that controlsDNA replication and the cell cycle isderived from many-body physics in achemically open T cell. The model predictsa long range force F'(ξ) =- (κ/2) ξ(1 - ξ)(2 - ξ)between thepre-replication complexes (pre-RCs) boundby the origins in DNA, ξ = ϕ/N being the relativedisplacement of pre-RCs, ϕ the number of pre-RCs, N the number of replicons to be replicated,and κ the compressibilitymodulus in the lattice of pre-RCs whichbehaves dynamically like an elasticallybraced string. Initiation of DNAreplication is induced at the thresholdϕ = N by a switch ofsign of F''(ξ), fromattraction (-) and assembly in the G(1) phase (0force at ϕ = 2N, from repulsion inS phase back to attraction in G(2), when all primed replicons havebeen duplicated once. F'(0) = 0corresponds to a resting cell in theabsence of driving force at ϕ= 0. The model thus ensures that the DNAcontent in G(2) cells is exactlytwice that of G(1) cells. The switch of interaction at the R-point, at which N pre-RCs have been assembled, starts the release of Rb protein thus also explaining the shift in the Rb phosphorylation from mitogen-dependent cyclinD to mitogen-independent cyclin E.Shape,slope and scale of the response curvesderived agree well with experimental datafrom dividing T cells and polymerising MTs,the variable length of which is due to anonlinear dependence of the growthamplitude on the initial concentrations oftubulin dimers and guanosine-tri-phosphate(GTP). The model also explains the dynamic instabilityin growing MTs.

  4. Interaction between PNPLA3 I148M variant and age at infection in determining fibrosis progression in chronic hepatitis C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella De Nicola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The PNPLA3 I148M sequence variant favors hepatic lipid accumulation and confers susceptibility to hepatic fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect size of homozygosity for the PNPLA3 I148M variant (148M/M on the fibrosis progression rate (FPR and the interaction with age at infection in chronic hepatitis C (CHC. METHODS: FPR was estimated in a prospective cohort of 247 CHC patients without alcohol intake and diabetes, with careful estimation of age at infection and determination of fibrosis stage by Ishak score. RESULTS: Older age at infection was the strongest determinant of FPR (p<0.0001. PNPLA3 148M/M was associated with faster FPR in individuals infected at older age (above the median, 21 years; -0.64±0.2, n = 8 vs. -0.95±0.3, n = 166 log10 FPR respectively; p = 0.001; confirmed for lower age thresholds, p<0.05, but not in those infected at younger age (p = ns. The negative impact of PNPLA3 148M/M on fibrosis progression was more marked in subjects at risk of altered hepatic lipid metabolism (those with grade 2-3 steatosis, genotype 3, and overweight; p<0.05. At multivariate analysis, PNPLA3 148M/M was associated with FPR (incremental effect 0.08±0.03 log10 fibrosis unit per year; p = 0.022, independently of several confounders, and there was a significant interaction between 148M/M and older age at infection (p = 0.025. The association between 148M/M and FPR remained significant even after adjustment for steatosis severity (p = 0.032. CONCLUSIONS: We observed an interaction between homozygosity for the PNPLA3 I148M variant and age at infection in determining fibrosis progression in CHC patients.

  5. Recent Progress in Treating Protein–Ligand Interactions with Quantum-Mechanical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusret Duygu Yilmazer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We review the first successes and failures of a “new wave” of quantum chemistry-based approaches to the treatment of protein/ligand interactions. These approaches share the use of “enhanced”, dispersion (D, and/or hydrogen-bond (H corrected density functional theory (DFT or semi-empirical quantum mechanical (SQM methods, in combination with ensemble weighting techniques of some form to capture entropic effects. Benchmark and model system calculations in comparison to high-level theoretical as well as experimental references have shown that both DFT-D (dispersion-corrected density functional theory and SQM-DH (dispersion and hydrogen bond-corrected semi-empirical quantum mechanical perform much more accurately than older DFT and SQM approaches and also standard docking methods. In addition, DFT-D might soon become and SQM-DH already is fast enough to compute a large number of binding modes of comparably large protein/ligand complexes, thus allowing for a more accurate assessment of entropic effects.

  6. Recent Progress in Treating Protein-Ligand Interactions with Quantum-Mechanical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazer, Nusret Duygu; Korth, Martin

    2016-05-16

    We review the first successes and failures of a "new wave" of quantum chemistry-based approaches to the treatment of protein/ligand interactions. These approaches share the use of "enhanced", dispersion (D), and/or hydrogen-bond (H) corrected density functional theory (DFT) or semi-empirical quantum mechanical (SQM) methods, in combination with ensemble weighting techniques of some form to capture entropic effects. Benchmark and model system calculations in comparison to high-level theoretical as well as experimental references have shown that both DFT-D (dispersion-corrected density functional theory) and SQM-DH (dispersion and hydrogen bond-corrected semi-empirical quantum mechanical) perform much more accurately than older DFT and SQM approaches and also standard docking methods. In addition, DFT-D might soon become and SQM-DH already is fast enough to compute a large number of binding modes of comparably large protein/ligand complexes, thus allowing for a more accurate assessment of entropic effects.

  7. Nuclear structure studies via neutron interactions. Progress report, 1 July 1994--30 June 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlton, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron total cross section measurements of 122 Sn has been analyzed over the energy range 0.013 to 0.310 MeV. The R - matrix analysis has resulted in resonance and average parameters which provide for a complete representation of the neutron entrance the s 1/2 , p 1/2 , and p 3/2 contributions. The s - and p - neutron strength functions have been determined to be 0.123 ± 0.023 and 2.0 ± 0.200, respectively (in units of 10 -4 ). Limits are placed on level spacings and strength functions for the individual partial wave components. The s - wave potential scattering radius has been determined to be 6.3 ± 0.1 fm. Average scattering functions, deduced from the average parameters, have been used to determine the real well depth of an optical model potential which reproduces these functions. We find, as have others, that the real well depth is parity dependent. Two computer codes were developed: (1) a minimization program for finding parameters of a dispersive optical model which reproduce the high resolution data of the ORELA facility, and (2) an X-windows graphical user interface has been developed to permit interactive resonance analysis of the neutron total cross section data using analysis-and-minimization codes developed previously. These will contribute to the more routine analysis of ORELA data

  8. Heavy-ion interactions of deformed nuclei. Progress report and final report, January 1, 1985-December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberacker, V.E.

    1985-09-01

    This Progress Report describes the main topics that were investigated during the reporting period: (1) a new microscopic approach (many-body theory with two-center shell model basis) to the calculation of heavy-ion interaction potentials, primarily for heavy systems; (2) dynamic alignment of deformed nuclei during heavy-ion collisions; (3) the role of shell effects, static deformation and dynamic alignment in heavy-ion fusion reactions; (4) giant nuclear quasimolecules and the positron problem. The proposed research has direct relevance to experimental programs supported by DOE, e.g. the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) at Oak Ridge, the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory, the Double MP Tandem at Brookhaven and some of the smaller University-based accelerators. A discussion of a review article on Coulomb fission is presented. 36 refs., 7 figs

  9. Studies of particle interactions in bubble chamber, spark chambers and counter experiments. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, L.E.; O'Halloran, T.A. Jr.; Simmons, R.O.

    1983-07-01

    During the past six years we have carried out and planned experiments which predominantly studied the production and decay of particles containing charmed quarks. A series of photoproduction and neutron production experiments started with the very early observation of the production of J/psi by neutrons and by photons at Fermilab. From subsequent experiments using these neutral beams and the basic detecting system, we have reported results on the photoproduction of the Λ/sub c/ charmed baryon and the D and D* charmed mesons. More recent runs are studying the high energy photoproduction of vector mesons including the psi'. The present experiment in this sequence is using neutrons to produce a large number of D mesons. Another series of experiments at Fermilab set out to study the hadronic production of charmed mesons. The Chicago Cyclotron facility was modified with a detector sensitive to various possible production mechanisms. The experiments were a success; clean signals of D mesons were observed to be produced by pions, and also the production of chi/sub c/ with the subsequent decay via a γ-ray to psi was observed. The charmonium experiments run this year have better photon resolution for measuring the decays of chi/sub c/ to psi. We are part of a collaboration which is working on the Collider Detector Facility for Fermilab. The CDF at Fermilab is a possible source of (weak) intermediate vector bosons from the collisions of protons and anti-protons. Our responsibilities in the CDF include both the construction of the muon detector and the designing, planning, and testing of the FASTBUS electronics. The second part of our weak interaction program is the Neutrino Oscillation experiment which is now under construction at Brookhaven

  10. A Novel Interaction of Ecdysoneless (ECD) Protein with R2TP Complex Component RUVBL1 Is Required for the Functional Role of ECD in Cell Cycle Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Riyaz A; Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Srivastava, Shashank; Olou, Appolinaire A; Ammons, Shalis A; Kim, Jun Hyun; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B; Qiu, Fang; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2015-12-28

    Ecdysoneless (ECD) is an evolutionarily conserved protein whose germ line deletion is embryonic lethal. Deletion of Ecd in cells causes cell cycle arrest, which is rescued by exogenous ECD, demonstrating a requirement of ECD for normal mammalian cell cycle progression. However, the exact mechanism by which ECD regulates cell cycle is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ECD protein levels and subcellular localization are invariant during cell cycle progression, suggesting a potential role of posttranslational modifications or protein-protein interactions. Since phosphorylated ECD was recently shown to interact with the PIH1D1 adaptor component of the R2TP cochaperone complex, we examined the requirement of ECD phosphorylation in cell cycle progression. Notably, phosphorylation-deficient ECD mutants that failed to bind to PIH1D1 in vitro fully retained the ability to interact with the R2TP complex and yet exhibited a reduced ability to rescue Ecd-deficient cells from cell cycle arrest. Biochemical analyses demonstrated an additional phosphorylation-independent interaction of ECD with the RUVBL1 component of the R2TP complex, and this interaction is essential for ECD's cell cycle progression function. These studies demonstrate that interaction of ECD with RUVBL1, and its CK2-mediated phosphorylation, independent of its interaction with PIH1D1, are important for its cell cycle regulatory function. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Progress Report [2. Research Coordination Meeting on Heavy Charged-Particle Interaction Data for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Geant4 is a general purpose toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. Primary focus of Geant4 was on preparation of experiments for CERN Large Hadron Collider. Other areas of application are growing and include high energy, nuclear and accelerator physics, studies in hadronic therapy, tomography, space dosimetry, and others. Geant4 physics includes different models for simulation of interactions of hadrons with nuclei. For the simulation of reactions of interest in hadrontherapy, the Bertini-style cascade (BERT) and the binary cascade (BIC) models are available. Both of them include, as final stages after the kinetic cascade regime, sequential pre-equilibrium and de-excitation phases. Nevertheless, the high degree of accuracy required for practical applications needed for an overall improvement of the performance of the Geant4 hadronic models. In particular, our work has been concentrated in the pre-equilibrium and de-excitation models included in the binary cascade physics list. New physics has been included mainly through the implementation of more realistic inverse reaction cross sections for nucleons and light charged particles. An intensive bug-fixing effort has been made, which very much improved the description of charged particle emissions and fission. These achievements favoured the participation of Geant4 into the IAEA benchmark of spallation models. Low energy region of the benchmark (below 200 MeV) and some materials of interest are common to hadrontherapy (structural materials for shielding, collimators, etc.), which justifies its inclusion in the present brief report. For neutrons below 20 MeV, Geant4 High Precision parameterized model is recommended, although there is no direct access in Geant-4 to evaluated data in ENDF format; it uses some specific libraries which contain, in principle, the same type of information as the ENDF-6 format files, but they do not cover all presently evaluated nuclei and reactions

  12. Theoretical studies in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landau, R.H.; Madsen, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses: Imaginary Optical Potential; Isospin Effects; Scattering and Charge Exchange Reactions; Pairing Effects; bar K Interactions; Momentum Space Proton Scattering; Computational Nuclear Physics; Pion-Nucleus Interactions; and Antiproton Interactions

  13. Optical potentials derived from microscopic separable interactions including binding and recoil effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siciliano, E.R.; Walker, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    We first consider a projectile scattering from a nucleon bound in a fixed potential. A separable Galilean invariant projectile-nucleon interaction is adopted. Without using the fixed scatterer approximation or using closure on the intermediate target nucleon states we obtain various forms for the projectile-bound nucleon t matrix. Effects due to intermediate target excitation and nucleon recoil are discussed. By making the further approximations of closure and fixed scatterers we make connection with the work of previous authors. By generalizing to projectile interaction with several bound nucleons and examining the appropriate multiple scattering series we identify the optical potential for projectile elastic scattering from the many-body system. Different optical potentials are obtained for different projectile-bound nucleon t matrices, and we study the differences predicted by these dissimilar optical potentials for elastic scattering. In a model problem, we study pion-nucleus elastic scattering and compare the predictions obtained by adopting procedures used by (1) Landau, Phatak, and Tabakin and (2) Piepho-Walker to the predictions obtained in a less restrictive, but computationally difficult treatment

  14. Theoretical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear theory program deals with the properties of nuclei and with the reactions and interactions between nuclei and a variety of projectiles. The main areas of concentration are: heavy-ion direct reactions at nonrelativistic energies; nuclear shell theory and nuclear structure; nuclear matter and nuclear forces;intermediate-energy physics and pion-nucleus interactions; and high-energy collisions of heavy ions. Recent progress and plans for future work in these five main areas of concentration and a summary of other theoretical studies currently in progress or recently completed are presented

  15. Remote Sensing of Aerosols from Satellites: Why Has It Been Do Difficult to Quantify Aerosol-Cloud Interactions for Climate Assessment, and How Can We Make Progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2015-01-01

    The organizers of the National Academy of Sciences Arthur M. Sackler Colloquia Series on Improving Our Fundamental Understanding of the Role of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the Climate System would like to post Ralph Kahn's presentation entitled Remote Sensing of Aerosols from Satellites: Why has it been so difficult to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions for climate assessment, and how can we make progress? to their public website.

  16. Theoretical research in intermediate-energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, R.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses progress that has been made on the following six problems: (1) final state interactions in (e,e'p) at high momentum transfer; (2) a numerical calculation of skyrmion-antiskyrmion annihilation; (3) pion-nucleus interactions above 0.5 GeV/c; (4) pionic atom anomaly; (5) baryon interactions in Skyrme model; and (6) large N c quantum hydrodynamics. The problems deal with various topics in intermediate-energy nuclear physics. Since we plan to continue the investigation of these problems in the third year, we describe the plan of the investigation together

  17. Investigations of the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body systems. Progress report, 1 January 1980-1 October 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made on the long-range problems described in the original proposal document (1 February 1979 to 31 January 1980) and on the shorter-range problems described in the last renewal proposal (1 February 1980 to 31 January 1981). This progress concerns few-body structure problems (e.g., the existence of isobar components in 3 H, predictions of few-body-hypernuclei properties as a test of hyperon-nucleon interactions, investigation of the A = 6 ground states with exact three-body calculations, and the relation of triton D-state properties to the deuteron's D-state percentage) and electromagnetic properties and interactions of few-body nuclei (e.g., Coulomb effects in calculating and measuring asymptotic normalization constants, and γ + 3 He breakup reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies). Descriptions of the progress made indicate where each subject stands at present, and emphasize the significant results obtained. A publication list is attached

  18. Development of small-bore, high-current-density railgun as testbed for study of plasma-materials interaction. Progress report for October 16, 2000 - May 13, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyekyoon, Kim-Kevin

    2003-01-01

    The present document is a final technical report summarizing the progress made during 10/16/2000 - 05/13/2003 toward the development of a small-bore railgun with transaugmentation as a testbed for investigating plasma-materials interaction

  19. Plasma-wall interaction studies within the EUROfusion consortium: progress on plasma-facing components development and qualification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Schmid, K.; Kirschner, A.; Hakola, A.; Tabares, F. L.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Reinhart, M.; Tsitrone, E.; Ahlgren, T.; Aints, M.; Airila, M.; Almaviva, S.; Alves, E.; Angot, T.; Anita, V.; Arredondo Parra, R.; Aumayr, F.; Balden, M.; Bauer, J.; Ben Yaala, M.; Berger, B. M.; Bisson, R.; Björkas, C.; Bogdanovic Radovic, I.; Borodin, D.; Bucalossi, J.; Butikova, J.; Butoi, B.; Čadež, I.; Caniello, R.; Caneve, L.; Cartry, G.; Catarino, N.; Čekada, M.; Ciraolo, G.; Ciupinski, L.; Colao, F.; Corre, Y.; Costin, C.; Craciunescu, T.; Cremona, A.; De Angeli, M.; de Castro, A.; Dejarnac, R.; Dellasega, D.; Dinca, P.; Dittmar, T.; Dobrea, C.; Hansen, P.; Drenik, A.; Eich, T.; Elgeti, S.; Falie, D.; Fedorczak, N.; Ferro, Y.; Fornal, T.; Fortuna-Zalesna, E.; Gao, L.; Gasior, P.; Gherendi, M.; Ghezzi, F.; Gosar, Ž.; Greuner, H.; Grigore, E.; Grisolia, C.; Groth, M.; Gruca, M.; Grzonka, J.; Gunn, J. P.; Hassouni, K.; Heinola, K.; Höschen, T.; Huber, S.; Jacob, W.; Jepu, I.; Jiang, X.; Jogi, I.; Kaiser, A.; Karhunen, J.; Kelemen, M.; Köppen, M.; Koslowski, H. R.; Kreter, A.; Kubkowska, M.; Laan, M.; Laguardia, L.; Lahtinen, A.; Lasa, A.; Lazic, V.; Lemahieu, N.; Likonen, J.; Linke, J.; Litnovsky, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Loewenhoff, T.; Lungu, C.; Lungu, M.; Maddaluno, G.; Maier, H.; Makkonen, T.; Manhard, A.; Marandet, Y.; Markelj, S.; Marot, L.; Martin, C.; Martin-Rojo, A. B.; Martynova, Y.; Mateus, R.; Matveev, D.; Mayer, M.; Meisl, G.; Mellet, N.; Michau, A.; Miettunen, J.; Möller, S.; Morgan, T. W.; Mougenot, J.; Mozetič, M.; Nemanič, V.; Neu, R.; Nordlund, K.; Oberkofler, M.; Oyarzabal, E.; Panjan, M.; Pardanaud, C.; Paris, P.; Passoni, M.; Pegourie, B.; Pelicon, P.; Petersson, P.; Piip, K.; Pintsuk, G.; Pompilian, G. O.; Popa, G.; Porosnicu, C.; Primc, G.; Probst, M.; Räisänen, J.; Rasinski, M.; Ratynskaia, S.; Reiser, D.; Ricci, D.; Richou, M.; Riesch, J.; Riva, G.; Rosinski, M.; Roubin, P.; Rubel, M.; Ruset, C.; Safi, E.; Sergienko, G.; Siketic, Z.; Sima, A.; Spilker, B.; Stadlmayr, R.; Steudel, I.; Ström, P.; Tadic, T.; Tafalla, D.; Tale, I.; Terentyev, D.; Terra, A.; Tiron, V.; Tiseanu, I.; Tolias, P.; Tskhakaya, D.; Uccello, A.; Unterberg, B.; Uytdenhoven, I.; Vassallo, E.; Vavpetič, P.; Veis, P.; Velicu, I. L.; Vernimmen, J. W. M.; Voitkans, A.; von Toussaint, U.; Weckmann, A.; Wirtz, M.; Založnik, A.; Zaplotnik, R.; PFC contributors, WP

    2017-11-01

    The provision of a particle and power exhaust solution which is compatible with first-wall components and edge-plasma conditions is a key area of present-day fusion research and mandatory for a successful operation of ITER and DEMO. The work package plasma-facing components (WP PFC) within the European fusion programme complements with laboratory experiments, i.e. in linear plasma devices, electron and ion beam loading facilities, the studies performed in toroidally confined magnetic devices, such as JET, ASDEX Upgrade, WEST etc. The connection of both groups is done via common physics and engineering studies, including the qualification and specification of plasma-facing components, and by modelling codes that simulate edge-plasma conditions and the plasma-material interaction as well as the study of fundamental processes. WP PFC addresses these critical points in order to ensure reliable and efficient use of conventional, solid PFCs in ITER (Be and W) and DEMO (W and steel) with respect to heat-load capabilities (transient and steady-state heat and particle loads), lifetime estimates (erosion, material mixing and surface morphology), and safety aspects (fuel retention, fuel removal, material migration and dust formation) particularly for quasi-steady-state conditions. Alternative scenarios and concepts (liquid Sn or Li as PFCs) for DEMO are developed and tested in the event that the conventional solution turns out to not be functional. Here, we present an overview of the activities with an emphasis on a few key results: (i) the observed synergistic effects in particle and heat loading of ITER-grade W with the available set of exposition devices on material properties such as roughness, ductility and microstructure; (ii) the progress in understanding of fuel retention, diffusion and outgassing in different W-based materials, including the impact of damage and impurities like N; and (iii), the preferential sputtering of Fe in EUROFER steel providing an in situ W

  20. Electric quadrupole moments and strong interaction effects in pionic atoms of 165Ho, 175Lu, 176Lu, 179Hf and 181Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olaniyi, B.; Shor, A.; Cheng, S.C.; Dugan, G.; Wu, C.S.

    1981-05-01

    The effective quadrupole moments Q sub(eff) of the nuclei of 165 Ho, 175 Lu, 176 Lu, 179 Hf and 181 Ta were accurately measured by detecting the pionic atom 5g-4f x-rays of the elements. The spectroscopic quadrupole moments, Q sub(spec), were obtained by correcting Q sub(eff) for nuclear finite size effect, distortion of the pion wave function by the pion-nucleus strong interaction, and contribution to the energy level splittings by the strong interaction. The intrinsic quadrupole moments, Q 0 , were obtained by projecting Q sub(spec) into the frame of reference fixed on the nucleus. The shift, epsilon 0 , and broadening, GAMMA 0 , of the 4f energy level due to the strong interactions between the pion and the nucleons for all the elements were also measured. Theoretical values of epsilon 0 and GAMMA 0 were calculated and compared to the experimental values. The measured values of Q 0 were compared with the existing results in muonic and pionic atoms. The measured values of epsilon 0 and GAMMA 0 were also compared with existing values. (auth)

  1. Studies of particle interactions in bubble chamber, spark chambers and counter experiments: Task P. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.M.; Holloway, L.; O'Halloran, T.A. Jr.; Simmons, R.O.

    1983-07-01

    Our current work reflects the general aim of this task, which is to calculate phenomenological theories of interest to present experiments. Recently, this has emphasized the jet calculus approach to properties of quark and gluon jets. Progress is reviewed

  2. A Scoping Analysis Of The Impact Of SiC Cladding On Late-Phase Accident Progression Involving Core–Concrete Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The overall objective of the current work is to carry out a scoping analysis to determine the impact of ATF on late phase accident progression; in particular, the molten core-concrete interaction portion of the sequence that occurs after the core debris fails the reactor vessel and relocates into containment. This additional study augments previous work by including kinetic effects that govern chemical reaction rates during core-concrete interaction. The specific ATF considered as part of this study is SiC-clad UO2.

  3. Nuclear structure theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1990-06-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past ten months in the following areas of research: pion double charge exchange reactions, including a theory of the isotensor term in the pion-nucleus optical potential, and a study of meson exchange contributions to the reactions at low energies. Nuclear inelastic scattering, using quark models to calculate nuclear structure functions, and to test for sensitivity to the substructure of nucleons in nuclei. Fluctuation-free statistical spectroscopy including the theory and computer programs for interacting-particle densities, spin cutoff factors, occupancies, strength sums, and other expectation values

  4. Investigations of the dynamics and electromagnetic interactions of few-body systems. Progress report, June 30, 1994--September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehman, D.R.

    1995-10-01

    This progress report summarizes the work of The George Washington University (GW) nuclear theory group during the period 1 July 1994 - 30 September 1995 under DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-95-ER40907 mainly dealing with photonuclear reactions and few-body problems of nuclei. This report contains: papers published or in press, submitted for publication, and in preparation; invited talks at conferences and meetings; invited talks at universities and laboratories; contributed papers or abstracts at conferences; visitors to the group; and research progress by topic

  5. Nursing documentation in inpatient psychiatry: The relevance of nurse-patient interactions in progress notes-A focus group study with mental health staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, Kjellaug K; Bjørkly, Stål; Råheim, Målfrid

    2018-02-01

    To gain insight into mental health staff's perception of writing progress notes in an acute and subacute psychiatric ward context. The nursing process structures nursing documentation. Progress notes are intended to be an evaluation of a patient's nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes. Within this template, a patient's status and the care provided are to be recorded. The therapeutic nurse-patient relationship is recognised as a key component of psychiatric care today. At the same time, the biomedical model remains strong. Research literature exploring nursing staff's experiences with writing progress notes in psychiatric contexts, and especially the space given to staff-patient relations, is sparse. Qualitative design. Focus group interviews with mental health staff working in one acute and one subacute psychiatric ward were conducted. Systematic text condensation, a method for transverse thematic analysis, was used. Two main categories emerged from the analysis: the position of the professional as an expert and distant observer in the progress notes, and the weak position of professional-patient interactions in progress notes. The participants did not perceive that the current recording model, which is based on the nursing process, supported a focus on patients' resources or reporting professional-patient interactions. This model appeared to put ward staff in an expert position in relation to patients, which made it challenging to involve patients in the recording process. Essential aspects of nursing care related to recovery and person-centred care were not prioritised for documentation. This study contributes to the critical examination of the documentation praxis, as well as to the critical examination of the documentation tool as to what is considered important to document. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia disease progression is accelerated by APRIL-TACI interaction in the TCL1 transgenic mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lascano, Valeria; Guadagnoli, Marco; Schot, Jan G.; Luijks, Dieuwertje M.; Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Cameron, Katherine; Hahne, Michael; Pals, Steven; Slinger, Erik; Kipps, Thomas J.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Eldering, Eric; Medema, Jan Paul; Kater, Arnon P.

    2013-01-01

    Although in vitro studies pointed to the tumor necrosis factor family member APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) in mediating survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells, clear evidence for a role in leukemogenesis and progression in CLL is lacking. APRIL significantly prolonged in

  7. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, September 1980-April 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, A.

    1981-01-01

    Progress made in the past eight months is reported for the following research areas: (1) the evaluation of 11 C labeled acid-ester analogue of arachidonic acid (AA) as a potential agent for the studies of cardiac pathophysiology; and (2) the evaluation of new radioactive agents for improving methods of radiolabeling cellular blood elements

  8. Experimental study of pion-nucleus elastic scattering above the Δ-resonance with the SKS spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki

    1995-11-01

    Differential cross sections of the pion elastic scattering in the GeV/c region were systematically measured by using a newly constructed superconducting kaon spectrometer at KEK. The pion incident momenta were 610, 710, 790, and 895 MeV/c for 12 C(π - , π - ) 12 C and 790 MeV/c for 208 Pb(π ± , π ± ) 208 Pb. We have obtained the cross sections with absolute normalization uncertainty of about 10%. The π - -p scattering data measured with a CH target agree well with the phase-shift calculations, which confirms the accuracy of the absolute values of the cross sections. The angular distributions of the differential cross sections for 12 C were compared with calculations by a first-order optical potential model. The calculation reproduces the data at forward scattering-angle regions except at 610 MeV/c, although it underestimates at large-angle region. The present data at 790 MeV/c are in between the BNL data at 800 MeV/c and the calculation, although our data are consistent with the BNL data within their systematic errors. The incident momentum dependence of σ total , σ R , and σ elastic , which were extracted by fitting the angular distributions, is different from that of the calculation with free π-N elementary amplitudes. It is well explained by taking account of Fermi motion. The 208 Pb data are well reproduced by the optical potential model. The root mean square radius of the neutron distribution has been deduced from π + and π - elastic scattering for the first time. Although the result has a model ambiguity, it agrees with that deduced from the proton elastic scattering. It is, however, smaller than the prediction of the relativistic Hartree calculation. (author). 55 refs

  9. Investigations of the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body systems. Progress report, 1 January 1980-1 October 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, E P; Lehman, D R; Prats, F

    1980-11-07

    Considerable progress has been made on the long-range problems described in the original proposal document (1 February 1979 to 31 January 1980) and on the shorter-range problems described in the last renewal proposal (1 February 1980 to 31 January 1981). This progress concerns few-body structure problems (e.g., the existence of isobar components in /sup 3/H, predictions of few-body-hypernuclei properties as a test of hyperon-nucleon interactions, investigation of the A = 6 ground states with exact three-body calculations, and the relation of triton D-state properties to the deuteron's D-state percentage) and electromagnetic properties and interactions of few-body nuclei (e.g., Coulomb effects in calculating and measuring asymptotic normalization constants, and ..gamma.. + /sup 3/He breakup reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies). Descriptions of the progress made indicate where each subject stands at present, and emphasize the significant results obtained. A publication list is attached.

  10. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, June 1981-July 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: (1) evaluation of /sup 14/C-labelled carboxyethyl ester 2-cardoxy methyl ester of arachidonic acid; (2) the effects of drug intervention on cardiac inflammatory response following experimental myocardial infarction using indium-111 labeled autologous leukoyctes; (3) the evaluation of /sup 97/Ru-oxine to label human platelets in autologous plasma; and (4) the specific in vitro radiolabeling of human neutrophils. (ACR)

  11. Experimental study of interactions of highly charged ions with atoms at keV energies: Progress report, February 16, 1987-January 15, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostroun, V.O.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the progress made during the past year towards the understanding of the behavior of electron beam ion sources and using the sources constructed in this laboratory to investigate interactions of highly charged ions with atoms at keV energies. The operational status of the two sources in use, CEBIS I and CEBIS II is described. At present, the sources are producing beams of bare, hydrogen and helium like ions of C, N, and O, and argon ions up to Ar 13+ with peak current pulses in the electric nanoampere range. Some of the problems encountered in the development of the sources and their resolution are discussed, and a brief description of experimental apparatus and ion beam transport line is presented. Experiments in progress are described

  12. Annexin A4 fucosylation enhances its interaction with the NF-kB p50 and promotes tumor progression of ovarian clear cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huimin; Deng, Lu; Cai, Mingbo; Zhuang, Huiyu; Zhu, Liancheng; Hao, Yingying; Gao, Jian; Liu, Juanjuan; Li, Xiao; Lin, Bei

    2017-12-08

    To study the structural relationship between annexin A4 and the Lewis y antigen and compare their expression and significance in ovarian clear cell carcinoma, and to explore how annexin A4 fucose glycosylation effects the interaction between annexin A4 and NF-kB p50, and how it promotes tumour progression of ovarian clear cell carcinoma. Structural relationships between annexin A4 and Lewis y antigen were detected using immunoprecipitation. Annexin A4 and Lewis y antigen expression in various subtypes of ovarian cancer tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry, and the relation between their expression was examined. Any interactions between annexin A4 and NF-kB p50 in ovarian clear cell carcinoma were detected by co-immunoprecipitation. Then looked for changes in expression of Lewis y antigen, annexin A4, NF-kB p50 and a number of downstream related molecules before and after transfection annexin A4 or FUT1, and also analyzed changes in biological processes. Lewis y antigen is a part of annexin A4 structure. The expression rate of both annexin A4 and Lewis y antigen was significantly higher in ovarian clear cell carcinoma than in other subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer, and are associated with the clinical stages, chemotherapy resistance and poor prognostic. The interaction between annexin A4 and NF-kB p50 promoted cell proliferation, adhesion, invasion, metastasis ability and autophagy, and inhibits apoptosis, Lewis y enhanced this interaction. Annexin A4 contains Lewis y structure, Lewis y antigen modification of annexin A4 enhances its interaction with NF-kB p50, which promotes ovarian clear cell carcinoma malignancy progression.

  13. Experimental study of interactions of highly charged ions with atoms at keV energies. Progress report, February 16, 1993--April 15, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostroun, V.O.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental study of low energy, highly charged ions with other atomic species requires an advanced ion source such as an electron beam ion source, EBIS or an electron cyclotron ion source, ECRIS. Five years ago we finished the design and construction of the Cornell superconducting solenoid, cryogenic EBIS (CEBIS). Since then, this source has been in continuous operation in a program whose main purpose is the experimental study of interactions of highly charged ions with atoms at keV energies. This progress report for the period February 16, 1993 to April 15, 1994 describes the work accomplished during this time in the form of short abstracts

  14. Radiation/turbulence interactions in pulverized-coal flames. Second year technical progress report, September 30, 1994--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menguec, M.P.; McDonough, J.M.; Manickavsagam, S.; Mukerji, S.; Wang, D.; Ghosal, S.; Swabb, S.

    1995-12-31

    Our goal in this project is to investigate the interaction of radiation and turbulence in coalfired laboratory scale flames and attempt to determine the boundaries of the ``uncertainty domain`` in Figure 3 more rigorously. We have three distinct objectives: (1) To determine from experiments the effect of turbulent fluctuations on the devolatilization/pyrolysis of coal particles and soot yield, and to measure the change in the ``effective`` radiative properties of particulates due to turbulence interactions; (2) To perform local small-scale simulations to investigate the radiation-turbulence interactions in coal-fired flames starting from first principles; and (3) To develop a thorough and rigorous, but computationally practical, turbulence model for coal flames, starting from the experimental observations and small scale simulations.

  15. An interactive, multitask computer system for heavy-ion physics research with the spin spectrometer: [Progress report, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    The scope of this proposal is to assemble an interactive off-line data analysis system based on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer interfaced with an array processor, which is capable of meeting the needs of modern heavy-ion physics experiments involving data of large dimensionality as created in the Spin Spectrometer at the Holifield Heavy-ion Research Facility, to adapt the existing PDP 11 software for the Spin Spectrometer for this computer system in a form completely compatible with other laboratories with VAX 11 computers, and to develop new general and efficient software for automatic but fully interactive data analysis making use of an attach array processor

  16. Aging/Systems Interaction Study, Component Residual Lifetime Evaluation and Feasibility of Relicensing. Progress report, FY 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, J.A.; Jacobs, P.T.; Korth, G.E.; Mudlin, J.M.; Server, W.L.; Spaletta, H.W.

    1985-10-01

    This report documents the work performed on four research tasks in Fiscal Year 1985 (FY-1985) which were part of the Aging/Systems Interaction Study, Component Residual Lifetime Evaluation and Feasibility of Relicensing Project. The technical and management/institutional objectives for the project are described, followed by a description of the results of each task. The work on Task 1 involved identifying and prioritizing new research activities for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. A proposed methodology and plan for aging-system interaction studies was developed in Task 2. The description of Task 3 work comprises a summary of nuclear plant life extension activities in the US, the technical basis associated with the residual life of metallic materials and a proposed plan for research on residual life assessment. Task 4 describes the initial evaluation of selected Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800) sections to investigate the feasibility of relicensing. 14 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs

  17. Progress in nano-electro optics characterization of nano-optical materials and optical near-field interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2005-01-01

    This volume focuses on the characterization of nano-optical materials and optical-near field interactions. It begins with the techniques for characterizing the magneto-optical Kerr effect and continues with methods to determine structural and optical properties in high-quality quantum wires with high spatial uniformity. Further topics include: near-field luminescence mapping in InGaN/GaN single quantum well structures in order to interpret the recombination mechanism in InGaN-based nano-structures; and theoretical treatment of the optical near field and optical near-field interactions, providing the basis for investigating the signal transport and associated dissipation in nano-optical devices. Taken as a whole, this overview will be a valuable resource for engineers and scientists working in the field of nano-electro-optics.

  18. Interaction between EphrinB1 and CNK1 Found to Play Role in Tumor Progression | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The family of proteins known as ephrins plays a critical role in a variety of biological processes. In a recent article in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Hee Jun Cho, Ph.D., and colleagues report on the interaction between proteins CNK1 and ephrinB1 that promotes cell movement. Their findings may have an important implication in developing

  19. [Experimental studies of elementary particle interactions at high energies]: Technical Progress Report, October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beg, M.A.B.; Dolan, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bulk of our work is in the major areas of strength with which our group is identified: symmetry breaking in unified gauge theories of strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions, especially the scalar sector of the canonical theory, related supercomputer-aided studies of local quantum field theory, unification inclusive of gravity, infinite dimensional algebras and superstring theory. We have made contributions to cosmology and phenomenology as well. A detailed account is contained in this paper

  20. Study of plasma convection and wall interactions in magnetic-confinement systems. Progress report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, T.M.; Klevans, E.H.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of plasma interactions with magnetic fields and end walls have been carried out. The final effort for studying flow on open-ended theta pinches has resulted in: (1) new understanding of collisional flow processes; and (2) has presented unique measurements of density and temperature near the end wall. An orignal effort to use Nd-glass lasers for Thomson scattering diagnostics is reported. Laser system conversion and efficiencies of frequency doubling are reported. The development of a compact toroid discharged is reported; this will be used as a plasma source to study transport, convection and wass interactions at plasma conditions appropriate for large scale fusion experiments. Computer codes predict compact toroid plasma scaling and magnetic field distribution resulting from guiding coils added at the ends of the theta pinch coil. The development of a multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer using visible light from a He-Ne laser is reported here. Theoretical study has been completed on an extension of a collisionless plasma flow model to include collision effects. Initial studies directed to analysis of plasma wall interactions are reported

  1. Recent progress in particle acceleration from the interaction between thin-foil targets and J-KAREN laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Sakaki, Hironao; Ogura, Koichi; Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Tanimoto, Tsuyoshi; Yogo, Akifumi; Hori, Toshihiko; Sagisaka, Akito; Fukuda, Yuji; Kanasaki, Masato; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Shimomura, Takuya; Tanoue, Manabu; Nakai, Yoshiki; Sasao, Hajime; Sasao, Fumitaka; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Kondo, Shuji; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Seiji; Brenner, Ceri; Neely, David; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Kondo, Kiminori

    2012-07-01

    From the interaction between the high-contrast (˜more than 1010) 130 TW Ti:sapphire laser pulse and Stainless Steel-2.5 um-thick tape target, proton beam with energies up to 23 MeV with the conversion efficiency of ˜1% is obtained. After plasma mirror installation for contrast improvement, from the interaction between the 30 TW laser pulse and thin-foil target installed on the target holder with the hole whose shape is associated with the design of the well-known Wehnelt electrode of electron-gun, a 7 MeV intense proton beam is controlled dynamically and energy selected by the self-induced quasi-static electric field on the target holder. From the highly divergent beam having continuous spectrum, which are the typical features of the laser-driven proton beams from the interactions between the short-pulse laser and solid target, the spatial distribution of 7 MeV proton bunch is well manipulated to be focused to an small spots with an angular distribution of ˜10 mrad. The number of protons included in the bunch is >106.

  2. Investigations of the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body systems. Progress report, 1 July 1991--30 June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehman, D.R.; Haberzettl, H.; Maximon, L.C.; Parke, W.C.; Bennhold, C.; Ito, Hiroshi; Pratt, R.K.; Najmeddine, M.; Rakei, A.

    1994-07-01

    In order to make it easy for the reader to see the specific research carried out and the progress made, the following report of progress is done by topic. Each item has a format layout of Topic, Investigators, Objective, Significance, and Description of Progress, followed at the end by the relevant references. As is clear from the topics listed, the emphasis of the GW nuclear theory group has been on the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body nuclei. Both low- and intermediate-energy electromagnetic disintegration of these nuclei is considered, including coherent photoproduction of π mesons. When the excitation energy of the target nucleus is low, the aim has been to handle the continuum part of the theoretical work numerically with no approximations, that is, by means of full three- or four-body dynamics. When structure questions are the issue, numerically accurate calculations are always carried through, limited only by the underlying two-body or three-body interactions used as input. Implicit in our work is the question of how far one can go within the traditional nuclear physics framework i.e., nucleons and mesons in a nonrelativistic setting. Our central goal is to carry through state-of-the-art few-body calculations that will serve as a means of determining at what point standard nuclear physics requires introduction of relativity and/or quark degrees of freedom in order to understand the phenomena in question. So far, the problems considered were mostly concerned with low- to medium-energy regimes where little evidence was found that requires going beyond the traditional approach

  3. Interaction of slow electrons with high-pressure gases ('Quasi-liquids'): synthesis of our knowledge on slow electron-molecule interactions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCorkle, D.L.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    A crucial step in our efforts to develop not only a coherent picture of radiation interaction with matter, but also to understand radiation effects and mechanisms, as well as the effects of chemical pollutants and toxic compounds, is to relate the often abundant knowledge on isolated molecules (low pressure gases) to that on liquids or solids. To understand the roles of the physical and chemical properties of molecules in biological reactions, we must know how these isolated-molecule properties change as molecules are embedded in gradually thicker and thicker (denser and denser) gaseous and, finally, liquid environments. The work initiated by us both at the Physics Department of The University of Tennessee and at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory addresses itself to this question. At both places, high pressure (40 to approx.8000 kPa) electron swarm experiments are currently in operation yielding information as to the effects of the density and nature of the environment on fundamental electron-molecule interaction processes at densities intermediate to those corresponding to low pressure gases and liquids, and the gradual transition from isolated molecule to condensed phase behavior

  4. Investigations of the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body systems. Progress report, September 1, 1983-August 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, E.P.; Lehman, D.R.; Prats, F.

    1984-01-01

    The George Washington University nuclear theory group proposes to conduct investigations of the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body systems. The structural properties of the very light nuclei are examined by developing theoretical models that begin from the basic interactions between the constituents and that are solved exactly (numerically), i.e., full three or four-body dynamics. Such models are then used in an attempt to understand the details of the strong and electromagnetic interactions of the few-nucleon nuclei after the basic underlying reaction mechanisms are understood with simpler models. Examples of specific work proposed are the following: (1) From exact four-body dynamics, derive the equations that will permit calculation of the 4 He→ 3 He+n and 4 He→d+d asymptotic normalization constants; (2) Develop a unified picture of the p + d → 3 He = γ, p + d → 3 He = π 0 , p + d → 3 H + π + reactions at intermediate energies; (3) Calculate the elastic and inelastic (1 + →0 + ) form factors for 6 Li with three-body (αNN) wave functions; (4) Calculate static properties (RMS radius, magnetic moment, and quadrupole moment) of 6 Li with three-body wave functions; and (5) Develop the theory for the coincidence reactions 6 Li(p,2p)nα, 6 Li(e,e'p)nα, and 6 Li(e,e'd)α. It is anticipated that these efforts will expand the frontiers of our knowledge about few-body nuclei

  5. The Hippo/YAP pathway interacts with EGFR signaling and HPV oncoproteins to regulate cervical cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunbo; Mao, Dagan; Hua, Guohua; Lv, Xiangmin; Chen, Xingcheng; Angeletti, Peter C; Dong, Jixin; Remmenga, Steven W; Rodabaugh, Kerry J; Zhou, Jin; Lambert, Paul F; Yang, Peixin; Davis, John S; Wang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway controls organ size and tumorigenesis through a kinase cascade that inactivates Yes-associated protein (YAP). Here, we show that YAP plays a central role in controlling the progression of cervical cancer. Our results suggest that YAP expression is associated with a poor prognosis for cervical cancer. TGF-α and amphiregulin (AREG), via EGFR, inhibit the Hippo signaling pathway and activate YAP to induce cervical cancer cell proliferation and migration. Activated YAP allows for up-regulation of TGF-α, AREG, and EGFR, forming a positive signaling loop to drive cervical cancer cell proliferation. HPV E6 protein, a major etiological molecule of cervical cancer, maintains high YAP protein levels in cervical cancer cells by preventing proteasome-dependent YAP degradation to drive cervical cancer cell proliferation. Results from human cervical cancer genomic databases and an accepted transgenic mouse model strongly support the clinical relevance of the discovered feed-forward signaling loop. Our study indicates that combined targeting of the Hippo and the ERBB signaling pathways represents a novel therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26417066

  6. Recent progress in the development of protein-protein interaction inhibitors targeting androgen receptor-coactivator binding in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biron, Eric; Bédard, François

    2016-07-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key regulator for the growth, differentiation and survival of prostate cancer cells. Identified as a primary target for the treatment of prostate cancer, many therapeutic strategies have been developed to attenuate AR signaling in prostate cancer cells. While frontline androgen-deprivation therapies targeting either the production or action of androgens usually yield favorable responses in prostate cancer patients, a significant number acquire treatment resistance. Known as the castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), the treatment options are limited for this advanced stage. It has been shown that AR signaling is restored in CRPC due to many aberrant mechanisms such as AR mutations, amplification or expression of constitutively active splice-variants. Coregulator recruitment is a crucial regulatory step in AR signaling and the direct blockade of coactivator binding to AR offers the opportunity to develop therapeutic agents that would remain effective in prostate cancer cells resistant to conventional endocrine therapies. Structural analyses of the AR have identified key surfaces involved in protein-protein interaction with coregulators that have been recently used to design and develop promising AR-coactivator binding inhibitors. In this review we will discuss the design and development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting the AR-coactivator interactions for the treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, October 1976-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A.

    1979-01-01

    DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4078 was started in October 1976 to set up an investigative radiochemical facility at the Yale Medical Center which would bridge the gap between current investigation with radionuclides at the Yale School of Medicine and the facilities in the Chemistry Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. To facilitate these goals, Dr. Mathew L. Thakur was recruited who joined the Yale University faculty in March of 1977. This report briefly summarizes our research accomplishments through the end of June 1979. These can be broadly classified into three categories: (1) research using indium-111 labelled cellular blood components; (2) development of new radiopharmaceuticals; and (3) interaction with Dr. Alfred Wolf and colleagues in the Chemistry Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  8. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, October 1976-June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, A.

    1979-01-01

    DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4078 was started in October 1976 to set up an investigative radiochemical facility at the Yale Medical Center which would bridge the gap between current investigation with radionuclides at the Yale School of Medicine and the facilities in the Chemistry Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. To facilitate these goals, Dr. Mathew L. Thakur was recruited who joined the Yale University faculty in March of 1977. This report briefly summarizes our research accomplishments through the end of June 1979. These can be broadly classified into three categories: (1) research using indium-111 labelled cellular blood components; (2) development of new radiopharmaceuticals; and (3) interaction with Dr. Alfred Wolf and colleagues in the Chemistry Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory

  9. Simulated high-level waste-basalt interaction experiments. Annual progress report, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheetz, B.E.; Smith, D.K.; Barnes, M.W.; Komarneni, S.; Stull, L.M.; Smith, C.A.

    1978-11-01

    Reconnaissance experiments suggested that the observed reactivity of calcine and glass as 300 0 C would be anticipated at lower temperatures but only after longer times of hydrothermal treatment. Long-duration experiments at 100 0 and 300 0 C were initiated to determine the time dependence of the alterations at lower temperatures. The reconnaissance experiments also suggested that equilibrium conditions were not yet achieved in these closed system experiments. Glass was observed to alter readily with the formation of acmite-augite pyroxene; a uranyl silicate, weeksite; and a rare-earth slicate-phosphate hydroxyapatite. Nearly all of the B, ca. 70% of the Mo and ca. 50% of the Na in the original glass were dissolved. A simulated reduced SURF (spent unreprocessed fuel) was utilized in hydrothermal experiments. Analyses of the solutions confirmed that soluble fission products phases were leached from the UO 2 matrix and all of the alkali metals were leached from the SURF. In the presence of basalt, however, the released alkalis react with aluminosilicates and are removed from solution. Individual phases believed to be present in SURF have been hydrothermally treated, with the reference basalts and with major primary and secondary minerals. Cs(OH), Cs 2 MoO 4 and Cs 2 U 2 O 7 were used as potential cesium phases. In some cases as much as 99.9% of the cesium can be removed from solution by interacting with the rocks and minerals to form pollucite. The interaction of strontium zirconate under hydrothermal conditions with the above rock and basalt minerals indicates that in all cases 99.9% of the available strontium is retained in the strontium zirconate or as alteration products. 11 figures, 8 tables

  10. Magnetism and molecular interactions at solid surfaces: Progress report for period June 1, 1987--May 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothberg, G.M.

    1988-08-01

    Measurements of photoemission EXAFS (PEXAFS) and spin polarized photoemission EXAFS (SPEXAFS) have been carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source and in Japan at the Photon Factory. The SPEXAFS measurements made on thin films of MnO show the expected dependence on electron spin and magnetic state of the sample but must be analyzed further before they can be accepted. For the first time PEXAFS has been applied to a single crystal surface. An ordered array of one-third of a monolayer of chlorine on the (111) surface of nickel was studied using the Cl is photoelectrons and with two different polarizations of the light. PEXAFS results agreed with SEXAFS measurements using the Cl KLL Auger electrons. The effects of heat treatments on the oxidation of polycrystalline aluminum were also studied by making use of the chemical sensitivity of PEXAFS and it was shown that the gamma alumina structure forms on heating at 450/degree/C. In our laboratory electron energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) measurements have been made of nickel and its interaction with carbon monoxide and oxygen and of the influence of potassium predosing. 1 ref., 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Localization of aPKC lambda/iota and its interacting protein, Lgl2, is significantly associated with lung adenocarcinoma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Naoko; Horikoshi, Yosuke; Matsuzaki, Tomohiko; Toriumi, Kentaro; Kitatani, Kanae; Ogura, Go; Masuda, Ryota; Nakamura, Naoya; Takekoshi, Susumu; Iwazaki, Masayuki

    2013-12-20

    Atypical protein kinase C lambda/iota (aPKC λ/ι) is expressed in several human cancers; however, the correlation between aPKC λ/ι localization and cancer progression in human lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) remains to be clarified. We found that patients with a high level of aPKC λ/ι expression in LAC had significantly shorter overall survival than those with a low level of aPKC λ/ι expression. In addition, localization of aPKC λ/ι in the apical membrane or at the cell-cell contact was associated with both lymphatic invasion and metastasis. The intercellular adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, was decreased in LACs with highly expressed aPKC λ/ι at the invasion site of tumor cells. This result suggested that the expression levels of aPKC λ/ι and E-cadherin reflect the progression of LAC. On double-immunohistochemical analysis, aPKC λ/ι and Lgl2, a protein that interacts with aPKC λ/ι, were co-localized within LACs. Furthermore, we found that Lgl2 bound the aPKC λ/ι-Par6 complex in tumor tissue by immune-cosedimentation analysis. Apical membrane localization of Lgl2 was correlated with lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis. These results thus indicate that aPKC λ/ι expression is altered upon the progression of LAC. This is also the first evidence to show aPKC λ/ι overexpression in LAC and demonstrates that aPKC λ/ι localization at the apical membrane or cell-cell contact is associated with lymphatic invasion and metastasis of the tumor.

  12. Advanced methods for the computation of particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Progress report, July 1993--August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragt, A.J.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    1994-08-01

    The University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group has been carrying out long-term research work in the general area of Dynamical Systems with a particular emphasis on applications to Accelerator Physics. This work is broadly divided into two tasks: the computation of charged particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Each of these tasks is described briefly. Work is devoted both to the development of new methods and the application of these methods to problems of current interest in accelerator physics including the theoretical performance of present and proposed high energy machines. In addition to its research effort, the Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group is actively engaged in the education of students and postdoctoral research associates. Substantial progress in research has been made during the past year. These achievements are summarized in the following report

  13. Theory of ultra dense matter and the dynamics of high energy interactions involving nuclei. Progress report, December 15, 1993--December 14, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made during the second year of the three year DOE agreement DE-FG02-93ER40764 on theoretical nuclear physics research performed at the Columbia University and presents a detailed budget adjustment for the third year period December 15, 1994 to December 14, 1995. Sections 1.1 to 1.8 highlight the technical progress made on the following general areas: Multiple scattering and radiative processes in QCD; the quark-gluon plasma transition in nuclear matter; QCD transport theory and dissipative mechanism in dense matter; phenomenological models of high energy interactions involving nuclei; signatures of quark-gluon plasma formation in A+A; neurocomputation theory. Section 2 contains a bibliography of published papers and invited conference papers. Section 3 lists the Columbia nuclear theory members for the December 15, 1994 to December 14, 1995 period. Finally, the budget adjustment requesting $319,830 for the third year relative to the original $320,000 is presented in section 6. Copies of the research papers accompany this report

  14. Theory of ultra dense matter and the dynamics of high energy interactions involving nuclei. Progress report, December 15, 1993--December 14, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1994-09-12

    This report summarizes the progress made during the second year of the three year DOE agreement DE-FG02-93ER40764 on theoretical nuclear physics research performed at the Columbia University and presents a detailed budget adjustment for the third year period December 15, 1994 to December 14, 1995. Sections 1.1 to 1.8 highlight the technical progress made on the following general areas: Multiple scattering and radiative processes in QCD; the quark-gluon plasma transition in nuclear matter; QCD transport theory and dissipative mechanism in dense matter; phenomenological models of high energy interactions involving nuclei; signatures of quark-gluon plasma formation in A+A; neurocomputation theory. Section 2 contains a bibliography of published papers and invited conference papers. Section 3 lists the Columbia nuclear theory members for the December 15, 1994 to December 14, 1995 period. Finally, the budget adjustment requesting $319,830 for the third year relative to the original $320,000 is presented in section 6. Copies of the research papers accompany this report.

  15. Experimental study of interactions of highly charged ions with atoms at keV energies. Progress report, April 16, 1994--August 1, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostroun, V.O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this program is the experimental study of interactions of low energy, highly charged ions with other atomic species. The Cornell superconducting solenoid, cryogenic electron beam ion source CEBIS designed and built in our laboratory is the major piece of apparatus used in these investigations. This progress report describes the work accomplished during the period April 16, 1994 and August 1, 1994. This includes both finished experiments and preparatory work for planned future experiments using the source. During this time, we have completed measurements of the angular distributions and energy gains in Ar q+ (11≤q≤14) on Ar collisions at 72 qeV laboratory energy. In particular, energy gain spectra at different laboratory scattering angles were obtained for Ar( q-1 ) + projectiles, i.e. projectiles whose final charge state had decreased by one unit. The experimental technique used, and the method of analysis are described elsewhere. The raw spectra are similar to those observed for Ar 8+ and Ar l0+ on Ar at comparable energies, as well as those described in the last progress report for Ar l2+ on Ar

  16. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  17. Baicalein suppresses the androgen receptor (AR)-mediated prostate cancer progression via inhibiting the AR N-C dimerization and AR-coactivators interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Defeng; Chen, Qiulu; Liu, Yalin; Wen, Xingqiao

    2017-12-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Androgen deprivation therapy with antiandrogens to reduce androgen biosynthesis or prevent androgens from binding to AR are widely used to suppress AR-mediated PCa growth. However, most of ADT may eventually fail with development of the castration resistance after 12-24 months. Here we found that a natural product baicalein can effectively suppress the PCa progression via targeting the androgen-induced AR transactivation with little effect to AR protein expression. PCa cells including LNCaP, CWR22Rv1, C4-2, PC-3, and DU145, were treated with baicalein and luciferase assay was used to evaluate their effect on the AR transactivation. Cell growth and IC 50 were determined by MTT assay after 48 hrs treatment. RT-PCR was used to evaluate the mRNA levels of AR target genes including PSA, TMPRSS2, and TMEPA1. Western blot was used to determine AR and PSA protein expression. The natural product of baicalein can selectively inhibit AR transactivation with little effect on the other nuclear receptors, including ERα, and GR. At a low concentration, 2.5 μM of baicalein effectively suppresses the growth of AR-positive PCa cells, and has little effect on AR-negative PCa cells. Mechanism dissection suggest that baicalein can suppress AR target genes (PSA, TMPRSS2, and TMEPA1) expression in both androgen responsive LNCaP cells and castration resistant CWR22Rv1 cells, that may involve the inhibiting the AR N/C dimerization and AR-coactivators interaction. Baicalein may be developed as an effective anti-AR therapy via its ability to inhibit AR transactivation and AR-mediated PCa cell growth.

  18. The SEMA5A gene is associated with hippocampal volume, and their interaction is associated with performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bi; Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui; Moyzis, Robert K; Dong, Qi; Chen, Chunhui; Li, Jin; He, Qinghua; Lei, Xuemei; Wang, Yunxin; Lin, Chongde

    2014-03-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas shows that the semaphorin 5A (SEMA5A) gene, which encodes an important protein for neurogenesis and neuronal apoptosis, is predominantly expressed in the human hippocampus. Structural and functional neuroimaging studies have further shown that the hippocampus plays an important role in the performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM), a measure of reasoning ability and general fluid intelligence. Thus far, however, no study has examined the relationships between the SEMA5A gene polymorphism, hippocampal volume, and RPM performance. The current study collected both structural MRI, genetic, and behavioral data in 329 healthy Chinese adults, and examined associations between SEMA5A variants, hippocampal volume, and performance on RAPM (the advanced form of RPM). After controlling for intracranial volume (ICV), sex, and age, SEMA5A genetic polymorphism at the SNP rs42352 had the strongest association with hippocampal volume (p=0.00000552 and 0.000103 for right and left hippocampal volumes, respectively), with TT homozygotes having higher hippocampal volume than the other genotypes. Furthermore, there was a high correlation between right hippocampal volume and RAPM performance (r=0.42, p=0.0000509) for SEMA5A rs42352 TT homozygotes. This study provides the first evidence for the involvement of the SEMA5A gene in hippocampal structure and their interaction on RAPM performance. Future studies of the hippocampus-RPM associations should consider genetic factors as potential moderators. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of possible interaction among drugs contemplated for use during manned space flights. Part 1: Summary from progress report dated 31 October 1973. Part 2: Progress report for the period November 1973 to June 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    Possible interactions among drugs contemplated for use during manned spaceflights have been studied in several animal species. The following seven drugs were investigated: nitrofurantoin, chloral hydrate, hexobarbital, phenobarbital, flurazepam, diphenoxylate, and phenazopyridine. Particular combinations included: chloral hydrate, hexobarbital or flurazepam with nitrofurantoin; phenobarbital or flurazepam with phenazopyridine; and diphenoxylate with two dose formulations of nitrofurantoin. The mechanism of action and an explanation of the interaction between diphenoxylate and nitrofurantoin still remains unclear. In man, the interaction does not appear to be significant, affecting only two subjects out of six and with only one dose formulation (Furadantin).

  20. Physiopathology of blood platelets: a model system for studies of cell-to-cell interaction. Progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, M G

    1979-01-01

    In this report, we will limit ourselves to the detailed description of four major sections of our research done during the past year: platelet interaction with tumor cells; studies of the interaction of platelets with macrophages; interaction of platelets with vessel walls; and further studies of cyclic nucleotides on stored platelets.

  1. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.C.; Saharia, A.N.; Thomas, A.W.

    1979-12-01

    Invited talks presented at a two-week workshop on pion-nucleon interactions are briefly presented and a summary of the discussions that took place is added. Topics covered include quantum chromodynamics and the weak NNπ vertex, pionic effects in the weak decays of nuclei, the isobar-doorway approach to the pion-nucleus interaction, multiple scattering approaches, the phenomenology of non-elastic reactions within the isobar-doorway picture, a field theory of pion-nucleus interaction, and the quark structure of the nucleon in nuclei. (LL)

  2. Nuclear Physics Laboratory technical progress report, [August 15, 1991--October 1, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes work carried out between August 15, 1991 and October 1, 1992 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contracts DE-FG02-86ER-40269 and DE-FG02-87ER-40335 with the United States Department of Energy. These contracts support experimental and theoretical work in intermediate energy nuclear physics. The experimental program is very broadly based; it includes pion-nucleon and pion-nucleus studies at Los Alamos and TRIUMF inelastic pion scattering and charge exchange reactions at LAMPF, kaon-nucleus scattering at the AGS, and nucleon charge exchange at LAMPF/NTOF

  3. Pions in the nuclear medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanfray, G.

    1996-07-01

    We discuss various aspects of pion physics in the nuclear medium. We first study s-wave pion-nucleus interaction in connection with chiral symmetry restoration and quark condensate in the nuclear medium. We then address the question of p-wave pion-nucleus interaction and collective pionic modes in nuclei and draw the consequences for in medium ππ correlations especially in the scalar-isoscalar channel. We finally discuss the modification of the rho meson mass spectrum at finite density and/or temperature in connection with relativistic heavy ion collisions

  4. Progress Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999.......Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999....

  5. Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-16

    This report summarizes the annual progress of EPA’s Clean Air Markets Programs such as the Acid Rain Program (ARP) and the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR). EPA systematically collects data on emissions, compliance, and environmental effects, these data are highlighted in our Progress Reports.

  6. Progress in inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.; Storm, E.

    1985-10-01

    The requirements for high gain in inertial confinement are given in terms of target implosion requirements. Results of experimental studies of the laser/target interaction and of the dynamics of laser implosion. A report of the progress of advanced laser development is also presented. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  7. Study of the neutron-proton interaction in the 300 to 700 MeV energy region. Annual progress report, 1975--76

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northcliffe, L.C.

    1976-01-01

    Research is summarized on n-p differential cross sections for charge-exchange interactions, meson production in nucleon-nucleon collisions, the spectra of charged particles produced in the bombardment of various targets by monoenergetic neutrons

  8. Study of the neutron-proton interaction in the 300 to 700 MeV energy region. Annual progress report, 1981-1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northcliffe, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations of the nucleon-nucleon interaction at LAMPF energies, in both elastic and inelastic channels, are briefly described. Experiments and results are reviewed, and abstracts of papers presented are included

  9. Theoretical studies of multistep processes, isospin effects in nuclear scattering, and meson and baryon interactions in nuclear physics. Interim progress report, May 1, 1984-April 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, V.A.; Landau, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is briefly described on the following research topics: a theory for proton -3 He scattering, momentum space Dirac equation, atomic and nuclear bound states of kaonic hydrogen and helium, calculation of the absorptive charge-exchange potential, role of higher-order processes in the absorptive optical potential W, the deformation-parameter reversal effect, and interference effect in T/sub i/ (p,n) reactions. Publications are listed. 23 refs

  10. Progressive Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian O.

    2016-01-01

    Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015.......Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015....

  11. Pion-nucleus forward scattering amplitudes at Δ(3,3) energies for π+---12C, 40Ca and 48Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragoset, W.H. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Using the LAMPF P 3 channel, small angle elastic cross sections and total cross sections were measured for π +- -- 12 C, 40 Ca and 48 Ca at incident pion kinetic energies spanning the energy region of the Δ(3,3) resonance. The sigma/sub EL/ experiment employed a spectrometer consisting of two magnets and six MWPC to measure scattering angles and momenta. For the sigma/sub T/ experiment six MWPC were positioned about the target in the beam to measure the deflection or absorption of the incident pions. Both experiments monitored the Jacobian cusp of the π → μ + ν decay to achieve absolute normalization. The two complementary data sets allowed the nuclear forward scattering amplitudes, f/sub N/(0), to be completely determined. The sigma/sub EL/ data were fit by a phenomenological small angle scattering model developed by Bethe and modified by West and Yennie. Due to the presence of nuclear-Coulomb interference in the elastic cross sections, both the magnitude and sign of Re f/sub N/ were determined by the fits. The Re f/sub N/ results were used in the sigma/sub T/ analysis to calculate corrections for the nuclear and nuclear-Coulomb interference amplitudes. Im f/sub N/ was calculated from the sigma/sub T/ results via the optical theorem. The overall self-consistencies of the data were checked by inserting IM f/sub N/ as a fixed parameter into the sigma/sub EL/ fits and comparing the resulting Re f/sub N/ to the original Re f/sub N/. It was determined that Re f/sub N/(0) has a zero near 180 MeV for both 12 C and 40 Ca. For 48 Ca, however, the Re f/sub N/ obtained by fitting with the West-Yennie formula was quite charge dependent and did not exhibit a zero in the energy range investigated. The differences in the 40 Ca, 48 Ca total cross sections were compared to a simple Kisslinger optical model calculation. The model indicated that the RMS neutron radius of 48 Ca exceeds the proton radius by 0.10 +- 0.06 fm

  12. Characteristics of Forward Energy Production in Proton - Nucleus and Pion - Nucleus Collisions at $S^{1/2}$ = 31.5-GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Richard Scott [Minnesota U.

    1989-12-01

    The construction and performance of a high energy particle calorimeter is described. Its operation in Fermilab's experiment 706 during 1987 through 1988 is discussed in the context of the experimental objectives. Correlations between the measured energy of particles striking this detector with kinematics of the remainder of the event is investigated. Comparisons to a monte carlo simulation are presented.

  13. Theory and phenomenology of strong and weak interaction high energy physics: [Technical progress report, 5/1/86-4/30/87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thews, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The research reported includes: low energy quark-hadron dynamics; quark-gluon models for hadronic interactions, decays and structure; mathematical and physical properties of nonlinear sigma models, Yang-Mills theories, and Coulomb gases, which are of interest in both particle physics and condensed matter physics; statistical and dynamical aspects of hadronic multiparticle production. 28 refs

  14. [Atomic beam studies of the interaction of hydrogen with transition metal surfaces]: Technical progress report for the period August 1, 1985--September 1, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the interactions of helium beams with metal surfaces. Particular topics covered are: improvement in He scattering facilities; spin polarized metastable He beam---a new probe of surface magnetism; and molecular dynamics simulations of the structure and dynamical properties of Cu, Ag and Au surfaces. 6 figs

  15. Investigations of the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few body systems. Annual progress report, 1 September 1982-31 August 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, E.P.; Lehman, D.R.; Prats, F.

    1983-01-01

    The George Washington University nuclear theory group proposes to conduct investigations of the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body systems. The structural properties of the very light nuclei are examined by developing theoretical models that begin from the basic interactions between the constituents and that are solved exactly (numerically), i.e., full three- or four-body dynamics. Such models are then used in an attempt to understand the details of the strong and electromagnetic interactions of the few-nucleon nuclei after the basic underlying reaction mechanisms are understood with simpler models. These efforts are becoming increasingly important with the advent of high duty cycle, high current electron accelerators from which valuable data will be forthcoming that should permit unraveling the structure and interactions of the very-light nuclei. Examples of specific work proposed are the following: 1) Set up the equations for the low-energy photodisintegration of 3 He and 3 H including final-state interactions and the E1 plus E2 operators; 2) Develop a unified picture of the p + d → 3 He + γ, p + d → 3 He + π 0 , p + d → 3 H + π + reactions at intermediate energies; 3) Calculate the elastic and inelastic (1 + →0 + ) form factors for 6 Li with three-body (αNN) wave functions; 4) Calculate static properties (RMS radius, magnetic moment, and quadrupole moment) of 6 Li with three-body wave functions; and 5) Develop the theory for the coincidence reactions 6 Li(p,2p)nα, 6 Li(e,e'p)nα, and 6 Li(e,e'd)α. It is anticipated that these efforts will expand the frontiers of our knowledge about few-body nuclei

  16. Theoretical studies of multistep processes, isospin effects in nuclear scattering, and meson and baryon interactions in nuclear physics: [Annual] progress report, May 1, 1986 to April 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, V.A.; Landau, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    A progress report on a grant from the DOE supporting theoretical studies in nuclear physics at Oregon State University in 1986, 1987 is presented. The research was led by Professors Landau and Madsen and carried out in collaboration with graduate students in Corvallis and scientists at LLNL-Livermore, KFA-Juelich, Purdue University, Florida State University and TRIUMF. The studies included meson exchange current effects deduced from spin observables in p- 3 He scattering, coupled bound and continuum eigenstates in momentum space for kaons and antiprotons, and charge symmetry violation in π scattering from trinucleons. Additional studies included microscopic optical potential calculations, multiple step processes, and differences in neutron and proton multipole matrix elements and transition densities in low lying collective states and in giant resonances

  17. Experimental study of interactions of highly charged ions with atoms at keV energies: Progress report for period May 15, 1985-February 15, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostroun, V.O.

    1987-01-01

    Interest in interactions of low energy highly charged ions with electrons, atoms or ions is due to their importance to controlled thermonuclear fusion research and the interesting nature of the fundamental processes involved. Studies of such interactions have long been hampered by a lack of suitable ions sources. A superconducting solenoid, cryogenic Electron Beam Ion Source, CEBIS, has been constructed at Cornell University to produce low energy very highly charged ions. At present, using a pulsed 0.5A,8.5 keV electron beam, the source is capable of producing highly charged ions of C,N,O, including bare nuclei, and ions of Ar up to charge state 11 + in 1 millisecond of confinement time. The source is being used in experiments to investigate charge transfer and accompanying processes in low energy, highly charged ion-atom collisions

  18. An interactive physics-based unmanned ground vehicle simulator leveraging open source gaming technology: progress in the development and application of the virtual autonomous navigation environment (VANE) desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Mitchell M.; Crawford, Justin; Toschlog, Matthew; Iagnemma, Karl D.; Kewlani, Guarav; Cummins, Christopher L.; Jones, Randolph A.; Horner, David A.

    2009-05-01

    It is widely recognized that simulation is pivotal to vehicle development, whether manned or unmanned. There are few dedicated choices, however, for those wishing to perform realistic, end-to-end simulations of unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs). The Virtual Autonomous Navigation Environment (VANE), under development by US Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), provides such capabilities but utilizes a High Performance Computing (HPC) Computational Testbed (CTB) and is not intended for on-line, real-time performance. A product of the VANE HPC research is a real-time desktop simulation application under development by the authors that provides a portal into the HPC environment as well as interaction with wider-scope semi-automated force simulations (e.g. OneSAF). This VANE desktop application, dubbed the Autonomous Navigation Virtual Environment Laboratory (ANVEL), enables analysis and testing of autonomous vehicle dynamics and terrain/obstacle interaction in real-time with the capability to interact within the HPC constructive geo-environmental CTB for high fidelity sensor evaluations. ANVEL leverages rigorous physics-based vehicle and vehicle-terrain interaction models in conjunction with high-quality, multimedia visualization techniques to form an intuitive, accurate engineering tool. The system provides an adaptable and customizable simulation platform that allows developers a controlled, repeatable testbed for advanced simulations. ANVEL leverages several key technologies not common to traditional engineering simulators, including techniques from the commercial video-game industry. These enable ANVEL to run on inexpensive commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware. In this paper, the authors describe key aspects of ANVEL and its development, as well as several initial applications of the system.

  19. Study of neutron-proton interaction in the 300-700 MeV energy region: Progress report, July 1987-August 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northcliffe, L.C.

    1988-08-01

    The experimental program supported by the present grant is a continuation of the work supported under DOE Contract AS05-76ER04449. More detailed discussion of the experimental apparatus and earlier activities can be found in annual reports for that contract. The primary objective of the program the is investigation of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction, in the medium-energy region, in both elastic and inelastic channels. This paper reviews experiments dealing with these types of high energy collisions. 41 refs

  20. Study of the neutron-proton interaction in the 300 to 700 MeV energy region. Annual progress report, 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northcliffe, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Progress by the LAMPF user group from Texas A and M University is described. The principal activities since last year's report have included four months of data taking to complete LAMPF Experiment No. 518 (Polarized Beam and Target Experiments in the p-p System. Phase II. Measurements of A/sub zz/ and A/sub xz/ for the d/sub π/ + Channel and for the Elastic Channel from 500 to 800 MeV) which began running in mid-June 1982. There were also about six weeks of data taking on LAMPF Experiment No. 664 (The Measurement of the Polarization Transfer Coefficients A/sub t/' and D/sub t/ at 500, 650 and 800 MeV for the Reaction d(polarized p, polarized n)2p), and one week of data taking at 800 MeV on LAMPF Experiment No. 590 (Measurement of D(theta) in p-n and n-p Scattering at 800, 650 MeV and Other Energies with Associated p-p Measurements). In addition there were preparations for LAMPF Experiment No. 665 (The Measurement of np Elastic Scattering Spin Correlation Parameters with L- and S-Type Polarized Beam and Target between 500 and 800 MeV) which began running last month and will continue until the end of the year

  1. Interaction with CCNH/CDK7 facilitates CtBP2 promoting esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) metastasis via upregulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Zhu, Junya; Yang, Lei; Guan, Chengqi; Ni, Runzhou; Wang, Yuchan; Ji, Lili; Tian, Ye

    2015-09-01

    CtBP2, as a transcriptional corepressor of epithelial-specific genes, has been reported to promote tumor due to upregulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells. CtBP2 was also demonstrated to contribute to the proliferation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells through a negative transcriptional regulation of p16(INK4A). In this study, for the first time, we reported that CtBP2 expression, along with CCNH/CDK7, was higher in ESCC tissues with lymph node metastases than in those without lymph node metastases. Moreover, both CtBP2 and CCNH/CDK7 were positively correlated with E-cadherin, tumor grade, and tumor metastasis. However, the concrete mechanism of CtBP2's role in enhancing ESCC migration remains incompletely understood. We confirmed that CCNH/CDK7 could directly interact with CtBP2 in ESCC cells in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, our data demonstrate for the first time that CtBP2 enhanced the migration of ESCC cells in a CCNH/CDK7-dependent manner. Our results indicated that CCNH/CDK7-CtBP2 axis may augment ESCC cell migration, and targeting the interaction of both may provide a novel therapeutic target of ESCC.

  2. The Gcn2 Regulator Yih1 Interacts with the Cyclin Dependent Kinase Cdc28 and Promotes Cell Cycle Progression through G2/M in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Silva

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Yih1, when overexpressed, inhibits the eIF2 alpha kinase Gcn2 by competing for Gcn1 binding. However, deletion of YIH1 has no detectable effect on Gcn2 activity, suggesting that Yih1 is not a general inhibitor of Gcn2, and has no phenotypic defect identified so far. Thus, its physiological role is largely unknown. Here, we show that Yih1 is involved in the cell cycle. Yeast lacking Yih1 displays morphological patterns and DNA content indicative of a delay in the G2/M phases of the cell cycle, and this phenotype is independent of Gcn1 and Gcn2. Accordingly, the levels of phosphorylated eIF2α, which show a cell cycle-dependent fluctuation, are not altered in cells devoid of Yih1. We present several lines of evidence indicating that Yih1 is in a complex with Cdc28. Yih1 pulls down endogenous Cdc28 in vivo and this interaction is enhanced when Cdc28 is active, suggesting that Yih1 modulates the function of Cdc28 in specific stages of the cell cycle. We also demonstrate, by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation, that endogenous Yih1 and Cdc28 interact with each other, confirming Yih1 as a bona fide Cdc28 binding partner. Amino acid substitutions within helix H2 of the RWD domain of Yih1 enhance Yih1-Cdc28 association. Overexpression of this mutant, but not of wild type Yih1, leads to a phenotype similar to that of YIH1 deletion, supporting the view that Yih1 is involved through Cdc28 in the regulation of the cell cycle. We further show that IMPACT, the mammalian homologue of Yih1, interacts with CDK1, the mammalian counterpart of Cdc28, indicating that the involvement with the cell cycle is conserved. Together, these data provide insights into the cellular function of Yih1/IMPACT, and provide the basis for future studies on the role of this protein in the cell cycle.

  3. Measuring progress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Ayo

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, sociological examinations of genetics, therapeutic cloning, neuroscience and tissue engineering have suggested that 'life itself' is currently being transformed through technique with profound implications for the ways in which we understand and govern ourselves and others...... in much the same way that mortality rates, life expectancy or morbidity rates can. By analysing the concrete ways in which human progress has been globally measured and taxonomised in the past two centuries or so, I will show how global stratifications of countries according to their states...

  4. Progress in Development of C60 Nanoparticle Plasma Jet for Diagnostic of Runaway Electron Beam-Plasma Interaction and Disruption Mitigation Study for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Thompson, J. R.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    We produced a C60 nanoparticle plasma jet (NPPJ) with uniquely fast response-to-delivery time (~ 1 - 2 ms) and unprecedentedly high momentum (~ 0 . 6 g .km/s). The C60 NPPJ was obtained by using a solid state TiH2/C60 pulsed power cartridge producing ~180 mg of C60 molecular gas by sublimation and by electromagnetic acceleration of the C60 plasma in a coaxial gun (~35 cm length, 96 kJ energy) with the output of a high-density (>1023 m-3) hyper-velocity (>4 km/s) plasma jet. The ~ 75 mg C60/C plasma jet has the potential to rapidly and deeply deliver enough mass to significantly increase electron density (to ne ~ 2 . 4 ×1021 m-3, i.e. ~ 60 times larger than typical DIII-D pre-disruption value, ne 0 ~ 4 ×1019 m-3), and to modify the 'critical electric field' and the runaway electrons (REs) collisional drag during different phases of REs dynamics. The C60 NPPJ, as a novel injection technique, allows RE beam-plasma interaction diagnostic by quantitative spectroscopy of C ions visible/UV line intensity. The system is scalable to ~ 1 - 2 g C60/C plasma jet output and technology is adaptable to ITER acceptable materials (BN and Be) for disruption mitigation. Work supported by US DOE DE-FG02-08ER85196 grant.

  5. Correlated charge changing interactions and K x-ray emission in ion-atom collisions. Progress report, August 15, 1983-March 15, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, E.M.; Tanis, J.A.

    1984-03-01

    Correlations between K x-ray emission and charge-changing interactions have been investigated for highly charged vanadium and sulfur ions incident on gas targets under single collision conditions. From measurements of K x-rays coincident with single electron capture, significant new evidence was obtained for the existence of resonant-transfer-and-excitation (RTE) in 180 to 460 MeV V 19+ 20+ 21+ + He collisions and 70 to 160 MeV S 13+ + He collisions. The RTE process, which proceeds via an inverse Auger transition, is qualitatively analogous to dielectronic recombination. For both vanadium and sulfur, the cross section for coincidences between K x rays and capture showed strong resonant behavior. Of particular significance is the observation that for V + He all three charge states exhibited two maxima in the coincidence cross section. Calculations show that these maxima are correlated to intermediate states in the RTE process for which the excited and captured electrons have principal quantum numbers n = 2,2 and n = 2, greater than or equal to 3, respectively. In these same experiments, coincidences between K x-rays and ions which lose an electron were also measured, as well as cross sections for total K x-ray production and total electron capture and loss

  6. Progressivity Enhanced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Hren

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rather than a scientific text, the author contributes a concise memorandum from the originator of the idea who has managed the campaign for the conversion of the military barracks into a creative cluster between 1988 and 2002, when he parted ways with Metelkova due to conflicting views on the center’s future. His views shed light on a distant period of time from a perspective of a participant–observer. The information is abundantly supported by primary sources, also available online. However, some of the presented hypotheses are heavily influenced by his personal experiences of xenophobia, elitism, and predatorial behavior, which were already then discernible on the so-called alternative scene as well – so much so that they obstructed the implementation of progressive programs. The author claims that, in spite of the substantially different reality today, the myths and prejudices concerning Metelkova must be done away with in order to enhance its progressive nature. Above all, the paper calls for an objective view on internal antagonisms, mainly originating in deep class divisions between the users. These make a clear distinction between truly marginal ndividuals and the overambitious beau-bourgeois, as the author labels the large part of users of Metelkova of »his« time. On these grounds, he argues for a robust approach to ban all forms of xenophobia and self-ghettoization.

  7. The lncRNA PDIA3P Interacts with miR-185-5p to Modulate Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Progression by Targeting Cyclin D2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Cao Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are emerging as important regulators during tumorigenesis by serving as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs. In this study, the qRT-PCR results indicated that the lncRNA protein disulfide isomerase family A member 3 pseudogene 1 (PDIA3P was overexpressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and decreased the survival rate of OSCC patients. CCK-8 and clonal colony formation assays were used to detect the effects of PDIA3P on proliferation. Results revealed that silencing PDIA3P by small interfering RNA (siRNA inhibited OSCC cell proliferation and repressed tumor growth and reduced the expression of proliferation antigen Ki-67 in vivo. Furthermore, the interaction between PDIA3P and miRNAs was then analyzed by qRT-PCR and luciferase reporter gene assay. We found that PDIA3P negatively regulated miR-185-5p in OSCC cells. Simultaneously, we found that silencing PDIA3P by siRNA suppressed proliferation via miR-185-5p in OSCC cells. Moreover, silencing PDIA3P by siRNA inhibited CCND2 protein (no influence on mRNA levels expression via miR-185-5p in OSCC cells, and CCND2 facilitated cell proliferation of SCC4 and SCC15 cells induced by sh-PDIA3P#1. Therefore, our study demonstrated that PDIA3P may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of OSCC.

  8. Soil-structural interaction analysis of RBMK type NPP for seismic event. Progress report. From 1 July 1998 - 30 June 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the project is to assess the structural behavior and safety capacity of a RBMK-1000 MW Main Building Complex under critical combination of loads including seismic events. This project is part of the Coordinated Research Program carried out by International Atomic Energy Agency on safety of RBMK Type Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) in Relation to External Events. The nuclear power plant considered for this study is the Sosnovy Bor NPP, located near St.Petersburg, Russia. The Soviet standard design RBMK-1000 MW type units installed in Sosnovy Bor NPP were originally designed for a Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) with a peak ground acceleration (PGA) of 0.1 g. The relevant response spectra are not available for reference and assessment. The new international requirements for nuclear power plants in operation require site specific seismic hazard studies as a basis for the definition of a Review Level Earthquake (RLE) for reassessment of the structures and safety related equipment Ell - As the RLE site specific seismic data is still not available, the RLE earthquake spectra for Kozloduy NPP scaled to PGA=0.1 g were used in this study. This value is intentionally chosen for comparison purposes. The Russian design requirements (if design floor response spectra are available) will be compared with the international regulations. The scope of the study is to perform a Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) seismic response analysis of the referenced RBMK-11000 MW. Main Building Complex to evaluate the effect on the structural response of a greater than design earthquake. The analysis is focused on a realistic assessment of the structural response to a potentially higher earthquake level instead of a conservative design type analysis. Special attention is paid on the seismic response of the sub-structures in the safe shutdown path, as well as on the locations of the heavy equipment

  9. Interaction of slow electrons with high-pressure gases (Quasi-liquids). Synthesis of our knowledge on slow electron-molecule interactions. Progress report for year ending June 15, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCorkle, D.L.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    A crucial step in efforts to develop not only a coherent picture of radiation interaction with matter, but also to understand radiation effects and mechanisms, as well as the effects of chemical pollutants and toxic compounds, is to relate the often abundant knowledge on isolated molecules (low pressure gases) to that on liquids or solids. To understand the roles of the physical and chemical properties of molecules in biological reactions, the way these isolated-molecule properties change as molecules are embedded in gradually thicker and thicker (denser and denser) gaseous and, finally, liquid environments must be known. The work reported here, carried out both at the Physics Department of the University of Tennessee and at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory addresses itself to this question. At both places, high pressure (40 to approx. 8000 kPa) electron swarm experiments are currently in operation yielding the first information as to the effects of the density and nature of the environment on fundamental electron-molecule interaction processes at densities intermediate to those corresponding to low pressure gases and liquids, and the gradual transition from isolated molecule to condensed phase behavior. Basic physical data on the electronic states of atmospheric halocarbons in general, and of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particular were also studied. Such data are of special significance because of the occurrence of these molecules in the atmosphere, and are presently lacking

  10. An ADH1B variant and peer drinking in progression to adolescent drinking milestones: evidence of a gene-by-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfson, Emily; Edenberg, Howard J; Nurnberger, John; Agrawal, Arpana; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Almasy, Laura A; Chorlian, David; Dick, Danielle M; Hesselbrock, Victor M; Kramer, John R; Kuperman, Samuel; Porjesz, Bernice; Schuckit, Marc A; Tischfield, Jay A; Wang, Jen-Chyong; Wetherill, Leah; Foroud, Tatiana M; Rice, John; Goate, Alison; Bierut, Laura J

    2014-10-01

    Adolescent drinking is an important public health concern, one that is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. The functional variant rs1229984 in alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) has been associated at a genome-wide level with alcohol use disorders in diverse adult populations. However, few data are available regarding whether this variant influences early drinking behaviors and whether social context moderates this effect. This study examines the interplay between rs1229984 and peer drinking in the development of adolescent drinking milestones. One thousand five hundred and fifty European and African American individuals who had a full drink of alcohol before age 18 were selected from a longitudinal study of youth as part of the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). Cox proportional hazards regression, with G × E product terms in the final models, was used to study 2 primary outcomes during adolescence: age of first intoxication and age of first DSM-5 alcohol use disorder symptom. The minor A allele of rs1229984 was associated with a protective effect for first intoxication (HR = 0.56, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.76) and first DSM-5 symptom (HR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.77) in the final models. Reporting that most or all best friends drink was associated with a hazardous effect for first intoxication (HR = 1.81, 95% CI 1.62 to 2.01) and first DSM-5 symptom (HR = 2.17, 95% 1.88 to 2.50) in the final models. Furthermore, there was a significant G × E interaction for first intoxication (p = 0.002) and first DSM-5 symptom (p = 0.01). Among individuals reporting none or few best friends drinking, the ADH1B variant had a protective effect for adolescent drinking milestones, but for those reporting most or all best friends drinking, this effect was greatly reduced. Our results suggest that the risk factor of best friends drinking attenuates the protective effect of a well-established ADH1B variant for 2 adolescent drinking

  11. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1979-01-01

    Progress Report, covering the period up to the end of 1979 year, was sent to the IAEA according to the research agreement No. 1971 /CF. This work covered the following fields: preparation and dummy irradiation experiments with a new experimental capsule of ''CHOUCA-M'' type; measurement of temperature fields and design of specimen holders; measurement of neutron energy spectrum in the irradiation place in our experimental reactor of VVR-S type (Nuclear Research Institute) using a set of activation detectors; unification and calibration of the measurement of neutron fluence with the use of Fe, Cu, Mn-Mg and Co-Al monitors; development and improvement of the measuring apparatus and technique for the dynamic testing of pre-cracked specimens with determination of dynamic parameters of fracture mechanics; preparation and manufacture of testing specimens from the Japanese steels - forging, plate and weld metal; preparation of the irradiation capsule for assembling

  12. ARGUS progress report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darden, C.W. III.

    1982-01-01

    On September 7th, 1982, following four years of planning and construction, the magnetic solenoid detector ARGUS was moved into one of the two interaction regions of the electron-positron storage ring DORIS. A month later the ring started delivering luminosity for physics research, specifically, the study of the formation and decay of members of the Upsilon family of mesons. These mesons are bound states, b anti b, of the heaviest of the five known quarks and therefore of considerable interest. This report describes the progress made during the year from March 1982 to March 1983 with emphasis on the experience gained during the first running period

  13. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    Despite an austerity program sound research continues to be done. Notable is a successful demonstration of direct injection from the ECR ion source into the RFQ accelerator with an accelerated current of 55 mA. The electron beam for the Laser Plasma Beatwave Accelerator has now been successfully transported through the interaction chamber with synchronization of the electron and laser pulses. The challenge for this research is the development of practical accelerators with high accelerating gradients. The neutron scattering program has returned to full normal operation following the restart of NRU. Commissioning of DUALSPEC has reached the stage where the C2 and C5 spectrometers can now be used for experiments. Improvements taking DUALSPEC beyond design specifications are continuing to be made. Work in the area of theoretical physics is reviewed

  14. Progress in nanophotonics 4

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsui, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the recent progress in the field of nanophotonics. It contains review-like chapters focusing on various but mutually related topics in nanophotonics written by the world’s leading scientists. Following the elaboration of the idea of nanophotonics, much theoretical and experimental work has been carried out, and several novel photonic devices, high-resolution fabrication, highly efficient energy conversion, and novel information processing have been developed in these years. Novel theoretical models describing the nanometric light-matter interaction, nonequilibrium statistical mechanical models for photon breeding processes and near-field‐assisted chemical reactions as well as light‐matter interaction are also explained in this book. It describes dressed photon technology and its applications, including implementation of nanophotonic devices and systems, fabrication methods and performance characteristics of ultrathin, ultraflexible organic light‐emitting diodes, organic solar cells ...

  15. Pion interactions at medium energies: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, J.C.; Goodman, C.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerating equipment, radiation detectors, and data acquisition equipment are described for a proposed study of 300 MeV pion scattering on deuterium targets at the Space Radiation Effects Laboratory in Newport News, Virginia. A key concept in the proposed program of measurements is a proposal by G.C Phillips to develop planes of proportional counters compatible with fast scintillation logic from pre-existing counters. The impetus for the research is the eventual use of the LAMPF accelerator at Los Alamos

  16. Electron interactions with nuclei: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, J.S.

    1987-08-01

    High energy is being conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This includes inclusive electron scattering, electroexcitation of the delta in nuclei, longitudinal and transverse response in the quasi-elastic region, the q 2 dependence of 4 He(e,e'p), deep inelastic scattering from nuclei, transverse and longitudinal response in the resonance region, nuclear physics at PEP and 1.6 GeV spectrometer properties. Additional high energy research on electron scattering on 3 H and 3 He and the nuclear structure of 205 Tl and 206 Pb are being conducted at MIT-Bates. Other activities are being carried out at Saclay and research and development for Monte Carlo studies of Hall A spectrometers for CEBAF is being conducted

  17. Electron interactions with nuclei. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    Research includes work at SLAC, Bates, and Saclay research facilities. The high energy program at SLAC concerns inclusive electron scattering from nuclei, electroexcitation of the delta in nuclei, and the design of an electron detection system for the SLAC 1.6 GeV/c magnetic spectrometer. The high energy program at Bates includes quasielastic electron scattering from 1 H, 2 H, 3 He, and 4 He, and electron scattering from 3 H and 3 He. Nuclear structure studies are based on high resolution inelastic electron scattering and include electron scattering from 208 Pb and mercury isotopes, charge densities from low lying states in 86 Sr, and magnetization densities of 205 Tl and 207 Pb. (DWL) 72 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab

  18. Expression of RIZ1 protein (Retinoblastoma-interacting zinc-finger protein 1) in prostate cancer epithelial cells changes with cancer grade progression and is modulated in vitro by DHT and E2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Valentina; Staibano, Stefania; Abbondanza, Ciro; Pasquali, Daniela; De Rosa, Caterina; Mascolo, Massimo; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Visconti, Daniela; De Bellis, Annamaria; Moncharmont, Bruno; De Rosa, Gaetano; Puca, Giovanni Alfredo; Bellastella, Antonio; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino

    2009-12-01

    The nuclear protein methyl-transferase Retinoblastoma-interacting zinc-finger protein 1 (RIZ1) is considered to be a downstream effector of estrogen action in target tissues. Silencing of RIZ1 expression is common in many tumors. We analyzed RIZ1 expression in normal and malignant prostate tissue and evaluated whether estradiol (E2) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment modulated RIZ1 in cultured prostate epithelial cells (PEC). Moreover, we studied the possible involvement of RIZ1 in estrogen action on the EPN prostate cell line, constitutively expressing both estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and beta. RIZ1 protein, found in the nucleus of normal PECs by immunohistochemistry, was progressively lost in cancer tissues as the Gleason score increased and was only detected in the cytoplasmic compartment. RIZ1 transcript levels, as assayed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in primary PEC cultures, were significantly reduced in cancer cells (P DHT treatment significantly increased RIZ1 transcript and protein levels (P DHT or E2 treatment in vitro. Furthermore, the E2 effects on ER-expressing prostate cells involve RIZ1, which confirms a possible role for ER-mediated pathways in a non-classic E(2)-target tissue.

  19. Total pion cross section measurements. Annual progress report, 1 January 1977--31 December 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobson, M.J.; Jeppesen, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    The pion-nucleus total cross section runs were completed. The principal effort for the past year has been devoted to data analysis. The experiment was primarily designed to provide an accurate measurement of total cross section differences for pairs of isotopes. Data were published on neutron radii of calcium isotopes and on pion cross section measurements for aligned holmium. The π+- data to be published include targets and energies for 4 He, 23 → 90 MeV; 12 C, 13 C, 23 → 240 MeV; 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, 10 B, 11 B, 43 → 215 MeV; 16 O, 18 O, 40 Ca, 44 Ca, 48 Ca, 43 → 240 MeV; 45 Sc, 51 V, Al, Cu, Sn, Ho, Pb, 60 → 215 MeV

  20. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics. Progress report, October 1, 1980-June 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The high energy physics program at the University of Minnesota is reviewed. The Soudan 1 baryon decay experiment was converted from a concept demonstrated by a small prototype into a working experiment, which has already yielded interesting data about underground cosmic ray events. Fermilab E-629 acquired data on direct photon production in pion-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions. Preliminary analysis of that experiment indicates a signal for direct photon events at transverse momenta as large as 4 GeV/c. The hyperon program continued its very fruitful studies of both the mechanisms for inclusive hyperon polarization and precision measurements of the hyperon magnetic moments with analyses of data from both Fermilab and Brookhaven experiments

  1. 1985. Progress annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    Tore Supra construction has been vigorously continued. The whole cryogenic system has been entirely delivered. On TFR priority has been given to electron cyclotron resonance heating; but also neutral heating mechanisms, pellet injection, plasma-wall interaction in the presence of pumped limiter, impurity transport and plasma turbulence have been studied and progress on diagnostics have been made. On Petula, with lower hybrid wave, the numerous results on ion heating, current drive, plasma stability in the presence of non-inductive current and on Tore Supra technical problems are important. At last, theoretical and numerical results are concerned with plasma equilibrium macroscopic evolution of plasma, RF heating, plasma instabilities, magnetic islands, turbulence, transport coefficients and spectroscopy [fr

  2. Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Progress is reported on the following: electrical uses, direct-heat uses, drilling activities, leases, geothermal loan guarantee program, general activities, and legal, institutional, and regulatory activites. (MHR)

  3. Experimental nuclear and radiochemistry. Progress report, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karol, P.J.

    1981-09-01

    Research progress is reported on the following topics: (1) the importance of classical nucleon-nucleon spatial correlations on nuclear interactions; (2) mathematical development of properly behaved skewed Gaussian function; (3) cluster interactions and true pion absorption; and (4) anomalous relativistic heavy-ion projectile fragments

  4. Progressive Pigmentary Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Progressive Pigmentary Purpura Share | Progressive pigmentary purpura (we will call it PPP) is a group ... conditions ( Schamberg's disease , Lichenoid dermatitis of Gourgerot-Blum, purpura annularis telangiectodes of Majocchi and Lichen aureus). Schamberg's ...

  5. Primary Progressive Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which cause different symptoms. Semantic variant primary progressive aphasia Symptoms include these difficulties: Comprehending spoken or written ... word meanings Naming objects Logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia Symptoms include: Having difficulty retrieving words Frequently pausing ...

  6. The progressive tax

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the argumentative structure of Hayek on the relationship between power to tax and the progressive tax. It is observed throughout its work giving special attention to two works: The Constitution of Liberty (1959) and Law, Legislation and Liberty, vol3; The Political Order of Free People, 1979) Hayek describes one of the arguments most complete information bout SFP progressive tax systems (progressive tax). According to the author the history of the tax progressive system...

  7. Isobar propagation in the nuclear medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moniz, E.J.

    1976-01-01

    It is argued that introduction of the isobar degree of freedom in describing pion-nucleus interactions provides a convenient, unified framework within which to discuss both many-body corrections to the standard multiple scattering approach and the properties of the Δ(1232) in nuclear matter. Important aspects of isobar-nucleus dynamics, namely, isobar-hole interactions and Δ self-energy modifications, are discussed in the context of pion elastic scattering and incoherent pion production

  8. Monotonous braking of high energy hadrons in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1979-01-01

    Propagation of high energy hadrons in nuclear matter is discussed. The possibility of the existence of the monotonous energy losses of hadrons in nuclear matter is considered. In favour of this hypothesis experimental facts such as pion-nucleus interactions (proton emission spectra, proton multiplicity distributions in these interactions) and other data are presented. The investigated phenomenon in the framework of the hypothesis is characterized in more detail

  9. Pion condensation in symmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, K.; Saha, S.; Nath, L.M.

    1987-09-01

    Using a model which is based essentially on the chiral SU(2)xSU(2) symmetry of the pion-nucleon interaction, we examine the possibility of pion condensation in symmetric nucleon matter. We find that the pion condensation is not likely to occur in symmetric nuclear matter for any finite value of the nuclear density. Consequently, no critical opalescence phenomenon is expected to be seen in the pion-nucleus interaction. (author). 20 refs

  10. Pion condensation in symmetric nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, K.; Saha, S.; Nath, L. M.

    1988-01-01

    Using a model which is based essentially on the chiral SU(2)×SU(2) symmetry of the pion-nucleon interaction, we examine the possibility of pion condensation in symmetric nucleon matter. We find that the pion condensation is not likely to occur in symmetric nuclear matter for any finite value of the nuclear density. Consequently, no critical opalescence phenomenom is expected to be seen in the pion-nucleus interaction.

  11. Self-consistent theory of hadron-nucleus scattering. Application to pion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The requirement of using self-consistent amplitudes to evaluate microscopically the scattering of strongly interacting particles from nuclei is developed. Application of the idea to a simple model of pion-nucleus scattering is made. Numerical results indicate that the expansion of the optical potential converges when evaluated in terms of fully self-consistent quantities. A comparison of the results to a recent determination of the spreading interaction in the phenomenological isobar-hole model shows that the theory accounts for the sign and magnitude of the real and imaginary part of the spreading interaction with no adjusted parameters. The self-consistnt theory has a strong density dependence, and the consequences of this for pion-nucleus scattering are discussed. 18 figures, 1 table

  12. Reduction of the chiral order parameter by a nuclear medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienle, P.; Yamazaki, Toshimizu

    2001-01-01

    We propose a model independent procedure to deduce from the 1s-binding energy of heavy, neutron rich pionic atoms, the isovector scattering length b 1 of the pion nucleus interaction. It is related to the pion decay constant f π , the order parameter of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and thus to the value of the chiral quark condensate. Based on the results with pionic 205 Pb, we find with the assertion that only the isovector part of the pion-nucleus interaction be modified by a QCD effect, a reduction of the quark condensate by 30% in a 205 Pb nucleus. Forthcoming experiments to measure pionic 1s-binding energies in Sn-isotopes, including isotope shifts, will yield decisive information on the quark condensate without assertion. (orig.)

  13. Progress report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the laboratory during 1981 are briefly reported in high energy physics: neutrinos interactions, quark fusion in hadron interactions, photon interactions at high energy, instrumentation needed for new research programs [fr

  14. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a disease of the white matter of the brain, caused by a virus infection ...

  15. 2004 Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    Fusion research is undertaken all over the world with the objective of realising an environmentally responsible source of energy with essentially unlimited and widely distributed fuel reserves. The results of the worldwide efforts made in recent years are now embodied in ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, designed to produce at least 500 MW of fusion power with a power gain of ten. ITER will test for the first time the interaction of fusion plasma physics with power station technology. In this international framework, during 2004 Fusion Technical and Scientific Unit of ENEA obtained important results in several keys areas. At the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade the lower hybrid microwave system was fully exploited to study the generation and control of the plasma current, and the electron cyclotron heating system reached full power (1.5 MW). With the simultaneous injection of the two waves, good energy confinement regimes with internal transport barriers were obtained at the highest plasma densities ever achieved. Advanced scenario regimes were also addressed in the activities of ENEA at JET. The engineering design of the IGNITOR machine was finalised, and significant progress was made in understanding the plasma physics regimes. Among the technology activities, the qualification of the deposition process of a copper liner on carbon fibre composite (CFC) hollow tiles may be mentioned as the most important achievement. This innovative pre brazed casting process is a competitive candidate for the fabrication of the CFCbased ITER divertor components. ENEA participated in the European activity for the definition and production on an industrial scale of an advanced Nb3Sn strand for the ITER superconducting central solenoid and toroidal field coils. Contributions were also made to the design of the final conductor layout and the characterisation tests. Inertial fusion studies continued along the previous lines, namely, the study of the implosion

  16. 2004 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo [ed.

    2005-07-01

    Fusion research is undertaken all over the world with the objective of realising an environmentally responsible source of energy with essentially unlimited and widely distributed fuel reserves. The results of the worldwide efforts made in recent years are now embodied in ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, designed to produce at least 500 MW of fusion power with a power gain of ten. ITER will test for the first time the interaction of fusion plasma physics with power station technology. In this international framework, during 2004 Fusion Technical and Scientific Unit of ENEA obtained important results in several keys areas. At the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade the lower hybrid microwave system was fully exploited to study the generation and control of the plasma current, and the electron cyclotron heating system reached full power (1.5 MW). With the simultaneous injection of the two waves, good energy confinement regimes with internal transport barriers were obtained at the highest plasma densities ever achieved. Advanced scenario regimes were also addressed in the activities of ENEA at JET. The engineering design of the IGNITOR machine was finalised, and significant progress was made in understanding the plasma physics regimes. Among the technology activities, the qualification of the deposition process of a copper liner on carbon fibre composite (CFC) hollow tiles may be mentioned as the most important achievement. This innovative pre brazed casting process is a competitive candidate for the fabrication of the CFCbased ITER divertor components. ENEA participated in the European activity for the definition and production on an industrial scale of an advanced Nb3Sn strand for the ITER superconducting central solenoid and toroidal field coils. Contributions were also made to the design of the final conductor layout and the characterisation tests. Inertial fusion studies continued along the previous lines, namely, the study of the implosion

  17. 1982. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The research programs of the laboratory are presented: interactions of neutrinos, quark fusion in hadronic interactions, proton instability, development of instrumentation for experiments at the LEP [fr

  18. Intermediate-energy nuclear photoabsorption and the pion optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christillin, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear photoabsorption around the pion threshold is schematised as photoproduction of a pion which undergoes final-stae interaction with the nucleus, accounted for by the pion optical potential. It is shown that real pion photoproduction and exchange effects are naturally described by the same mechanism with a non-static pion. The complementarity of photoabsorption to pion physics and its usefulness in gaining new information about pion-nucleus dynamics are stressed. (author)

  19. Scattering of low-energy pions by p-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khankhasaev, M.Kh.

    1987-01-01

    Low-energy pion-carbon scattering (up to 50 MeV) is analysed in the framework of the unitary approach based on the method of evolution in the coupling constant. It is shown that at pion energy ∼ 50 MeV the differential cross section arises as a result of the strong interference between the pure potential scattering and absorption channels. In this energy region the scattering data are very sensitive to the dynamics of the pion-nucleus interaction

  20. Progressive geometric algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alewijnse, S.P.A.; Bagautdinov, T.M.; de Berg, M.T.; Bouts, Q.W.; ten Brink, Alex P.; Buchin, K.A.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive algorithms are algorithms that, on the way to computing a complete solution to the problem at hand, output intermediate solutions that approximate the complete solution increasingly well. We present a framework for analyzing such algorithms, and develop efficient progressive algorithms

  1. Progressive geometric algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alewijnse, S.P.A.; Bagautdinov, T.M.; Berg, de M.T.; Bouts, Q.W.; Brink, ten A.P.; Buchin, K.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive algorithms are algorithms that, on the way to computing a complete solution to the problem at hand, output intermediate solutions that approximate the complete solution increasingly well. We present a framework for analyzing such algorithms, and develop efficient progressive algorithms

  2. Evolutionary Game Theory Analysis of Tumor Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Sturm, James; Austin, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Evolutionary game theory applied to two interacting cell populations can yield quantitative prediction of the future densities of the two cell populations based on the initial interaction terms. We will discuss how in a complex ecology that evolutionary game theory successfully predicts the future densities of strains of stromal and cancer cells (multiple myeloma), and discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression. Supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Cancer Institute.

  3. White matter lesion progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofer, Edith; Cavalieri, Margherita; Bis, Joshua C

    2015-01-01

    10 cohorts. To assess the relative contribution of genetic factors to progression of WML, we compared in 7 cohorts risk models including demographics, vascular risk factors plus single-nucleotide polymorphisms that have been shown to be associated cross-sectionally with WML in the current......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter lesion (WML) progression on magnetic resonance imaging is related to cognitive decline and stroke, but its determinants besides baseline WML burden are largely unknown. Here, we estimated heritability of WML progression, and sought common genetic variants...... associated with WML progression in elderly participants from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium. METHODS: Heritability of WML progression was calculated in the Framingham Heart Study. The genome-wide association study included 7773 elderly participants from...

  4. Information Loss from Technological Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, P D

    2014-01-01

    Progress in electronics and optics offers faster computers, and rapid communication via the internet that is matched by ever larger and evolving storage systems. Instinctively one assumes that this must be totally beneficial. However advances in software and storage media are progressing in ways which are frequently incompatible with earlier systems and the economics and commercial pressures rarely guarantee total compatibility with earlier systems. Instead, the industries actively choose to force the users to purchase new systems and software. Thus we are moving forward with new technological variants that may have access to only the most recent systems and we will have lost earlier alternatives. The reality is that increased processing speed and storage capacity are matched by an equally rapid decline in the access and survival lifetime of older information. This pattern is not limited to modern electronic systems but is evident throughout history from writing on stone and clay tablets to papyrus and paper. It is equally evident in image systems from painting, through film, to magnetic tapes and digital cameras. In sound recording we have variously progressed from wax discs to vinyl, magnetic tape and CD formats. In each case the need for better definition and greater capacity has forced the earlier systems into oblivion. Indeed proposed interactive music systems could similarly relegate music CDs to specialist collections. The article will track some of the examples and discuss the consequences as well as noting that this information loss is further compounded by developments in language and changes in cultural views of different societies

  5. Information Loss from Technological Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Progress in electronics and optics offers faster computers, and rapid communication via the internet that is matched by ever larger and evolving storage systems. Instinctively one assumes that this must be totally beneficial. However advances in software and storage media are progressing in ways which are frequently incompatible with earlier systems and the economics and commercial pressures rarely guarantee total compatibility with earlier systems. Instead, the industries actively choose to force the users to purchase new systems and software. Thus we are moving forward with new technological variants that may have access to only the most recent systems and we will have lost earlier alternatives. The reality is that increased processing speed and storage capacity are matched by an equally rapid decline in the access and survival lifetime of older information. This pattern is not limited to modern electronic systems but is evident throughout history from writing on stone and clay tablets to papyrus and paper. It is equally evident in image systems from painting, through film, to magnetic tapes and digital cameras. In sound recording we have variously progressed from wax discs to vinyl, magnetic tape and CD formats. In each case the need for better definition and greater capacity has forced the earlier systems into oblivion. Indeed proposed interactive music systems could similarly relegate music CDs to specialist collections. The article will track some of the examples and discuss the consequences as well as noting that this information loss is further compounded by developments in language and changes in cultural views of different societies.

  6. Hadron-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Qualitative picture of high energy hadron-nucleus collision process, emerging from the analysis of experimental data, is presented. Appropriate description procedure giving a possibility of reproducing various characteristics of this process in terms of the data on elementary hadron-nucleon interaction is proposed. Formula reproducing hadron-nucleus collision cross sections is derived. Inelastic collision cross sections for pion-nucleus and proton-nucleus reactions at wide energy interval are calculated for Pb, Ag, and Al targets. A-dependence of cross sections for pion-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions at nearly 50 GeV/c momentum were calculated and compared with existing experimental data. Energy dependence of cross sections for hadron-nucleus collisions is determined simply by energy dependence of corresponding cross sections for hadron-nucleon collisions; A-dependence is determined simply by nuclear sizes and nucleon density distributions in nuclei

  7. Progress in MELCOR development and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, R.M.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Elsbernd, A.E.; Stuart, D.S.; Thompson, S.L.

    1995-01-01

    MELCOR models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants. Recent efforts in MELCOR development to incorporate CORCON-Mod3 models for core-concrete interactions, new models for advanced reactors, and improvements to several other existing models have resulted in release of MELCOR 1.8.3. In addition, continuing efforts to expand the code assessment database have filled in many of the gaps in phenomenological coverage. Efforts are now under way to develop models for chemical interactions of fission products with structural surfaces and for reactions of iodine in the presence of water, and work is also in progress to improve models for the scrubbing of fission products by water pools, the chemical reactions of boron carbide with steam, and the coupling of flow blockages with the hydrodynamics. Several code assessment analyses are in progress, and more are planned

  8. 1984-85 ISN progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This progress report ISN 1984-1985 deals with the following subjects: nuclear physics theory, peripheral and intermediate energy physics, characteristics of reaction mechanisms in heavy ion collisions, nuclear structure, fundamental interactions, experimental methods and new instrumentation, some interdisciplinary research activities and technical activities, the SARA cyclotron and finally, technology transfer and valorisation [fr

  9. Interaction Between Hf Waves and Plasma in Delta-2; Interaction dans 'Delta-2' d'une Onde Progressive Electromagnetique de Haute Frequence et d'un Plasma; Vzaimodejstvie vysokochastotnoj ehlektromagnitnoj begushchej volny s plazmoj na ustanovke ''Del'ta-2'; Interaccion de una Onda Progresiva Electromagnetica de Alta Frecuencia con el Plasma en la Instalacion 'Delta-2'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breus, S. N.; Kurdjumov, V. N.; Levin, M. L.; Osovec, S. M.; Popova, N. Ja.; Popov, I. A.; Hodataev, K. V.; Shimchuk, V. P. [Radiotehnicheskij Institut AN SSSR, Moskva, SSSR (Russian Federation)

    1966-04-15

    than the phase velocity of the travelling wave, about 5 x 10{sup 7} cm/s, which is considerably smaller than the thermal velocity of the electrons. (author) [French] Le memoire expose les resultats de l'etude de l'interaction d'un plasma dense et du champ de haute frequenced'une onde magnetique progressant le long d'une chambre de decharge toroiedale (grand diametre - 700 mm, petit diametre - 85 mm). L'onde progressive est excitee a une frequence 2,4 MHz par un autogenerateur triphase d'une puissance d'environ 50 MW avec une duree d'impulsion comprise entre 250 et 350 {mu}s. Les pressions initiales etaient comprises entre 0,1 et 0,001 Tort, et le champ magnetique de haute frequence a la surface du plasma atteignait de 500 a '600 Oe. Dans ces conditions, les phenomenes essentiels qui determinent l'interaction sont lies aux effets non lineaires et avant tout a l'apparition d'une composante petmanente du courant longitudinal qui a atteint des valeurs de plusieurs milliers d'amperes. Au centre de la chambre, dans la zone des champs faibles, la conductivite du plasma etait de l'ordre de 3 a 4*10{sup 14} esu, ce qui pour un degre d'ionisation proche de 100% correspond a une temperature des electrons de 8 a 12 eV. Dans la zone des champs forts (zone de la couche ou se produit l'effet pelliculaite), la conductivite diminue d'un ordre de grandeur, ce qui produit une augmentation brutale de la puissance de haute frequence utilisable. Les auteurs ont decouvert aupres du courant longitudinal dans le plasma un champ magnetique longitudinal quasi stationnaire, forme par des courants transversaux. Ce champ a une structure complexe et il est possible qu'il soit conditionne, comme le montre la theorie de l'approximation, par un effet toroidal. Il est probable que les oscillations de plasma observees, de 20) a 500 kHz, correspondant par exemple aux oscillations particulieres d'Alfven dans ces champs, soient en rapportavecl'existencedeschampsmagnetiques quasi stationnaires. La presence

  10. Progress test utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vleuten, Cees; Freeman, Adrian; Collares, Carlos Fernando

    2018-04-01

    This paper discusses the advantages of progress testing. A utopia is described where medical schools would work together to develop and administer progress testing. This would lead to a significant reduction of cost, an increase in the quality of measurement and phenomenal feedback to learner and school. Progress testing would also provide more freedom and resources for more creative in-school assessment. It would be an educationally attractive alternative for the creation of cognitive licensing exams. A utopia is always far away in the future, but by formulating a vision for that future we may engage in discussions on how to get there.

  11. Waste management progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    During the Cold War era, when DOE and its predecessor agencies produced nuclear weapons and components, and conducted nuclear research, a variety of wastes were generated (both radioactive and hazardous). DOE now has the task of managing these wastes so that they are not a threat to human health and the environment. This document is the Waste Management Progress Report for the U.S. Department of Energy dated June 1997. This progress report contains a radioactive and hazardous waste inventory and waste management program mission, a section describing progress toward mission completion, mid-year 1997 accomplishments, and the future outlook for waste management

  12. Progress report. P6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manokhin, V.N.; Maev, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    In CJD the current work continued concerning EXFOR compilation and fulfillment of NRDC-2000 Recommendations and Actions. Much efforts were applied for restoring CJD Web page. Evaluation works were also in process. Compilation into EXFOR continues on steadily. Since March 2000 up to April 2001 four TRANS tapes containing 69 Entries were prepared and sent to other centers. 25 new EXFOR Entries were compiled. An analysis and an evaluation are made for the threshold reactions cross sections leading to production of the long-lived radioactive nuclides on the irradiation of steel by thermonuclear neutron spectrum. Fifty excitation functions were evaluated. Many of them are considerably different from available evaluations of other libraries. During two years, together with JAERI, comparative analysis was performed of (n,2n) and (n,3n) reactions for 150 fission products from available evaluated data libraries. The result of analysis will be published this year. The joint work on consistent evaluation of some (n,2n) and (n,np) excitation functions for even-even isotopes was made on the basis of empirical systematics. The work was completed on evaluation of the spectra and production cross sections of gamma-rays in inelastic interactions of 14-Mev neutrons with the number of nuclei: Li-6, Li-7, Al, Ti, Cr, Fe, Cu, Pb, Bi, U-235. CJD continues the work on evaluation of neutron data for minor actinides. This year Am-242m will be evaluated, and Np-237, Am-241, Am-243, Cm-243, Cm-244 will be tested and improved. Full file of Bi was prepared. Full files for Pb isotopes are in process of preparation. There exist a plan to analyze full files for isotopes of Cr, Fe, Ni from existing evaluated data libraries, to select more reliable cross sections, and to create improved files for these isotopes. Together with the Theoretical Department the work is in progress on the determination of uncertainties of existing evaluated data and development of covariance matrices for some important

  13. Progressive Finland sees progress with nuclear projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    The Finnish Hanhikivi-1 reactor project is firmly on track and a licence has been granted for construction of a final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel - the first final repository in the world to enter the construction phase. Significant progress has been made with plans for Finland to build its sixth nuclear reactor unit at Hanhikivi. Fennovoima's licensing manager Janne Liuko said the company expects to receive the construction licence for the Generation III+ Hanhikivi-1 plant in late 2017. The application was submitted to the Finnish Ministry of Employment and the Economy in June 2015.

  14. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now The Progression of Liver ...

  15. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  16. Progress report for '89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podest, M.

    1990-08-01

    The 1989 Progress Report presents the most important scientific and technical achievements of the Nuclear Research Institute's research work. Some specialized products prepared at or fabricated by the NRI are mentioned as well. (author). 24 figs., 8 tabs., 101 refs

  17. Progress report, Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This report reviews events and progress in the following areas: development of the TASCC facility; experimental and theoretical nuclear physics research; radionuclide standardization; condensed matter research; applied mathematics; and computer facility operation

  18. Progress for the Paralyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contents Latest Advances Help People Regain Function and Independence Founded in 2000, the National Institute for Biomedical ... More "NIBIB Robotics" Articles Progress for the Paralyzed / College Athlete Stands Again…On His Own! / Coffee to ...

  19. Progress report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress report on the meetings and working groups of DAF in 1979, e.g. engineering and industry, public and press, law and administration, business and industry, international cooperation in Europe and with the USA. (GL) [de

  20. Progress report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This progress report of the nuclear physics institute includes five basic subjects: theoretical physics, high energy and intermediate energy physics, nuclear physics, combined research physics and instrumentation (microelectronics, imaging, multidetectors, scintillators,...) [fr

  1. Modeling Progress in AI

    OpenAIRE

    Brundage, Miles

    2015-01-01

    Participants in recent discussions of AI-related issues ranging from intelligence explosion to technological unemployment have made diverse claims about the nature, pace, and drivers of progress in AI. However, these theories are rarely specified in enough detail to enable systematic evaluation of their assumptions or to extrapolate progress quantitatively, as is often done with some success in other technological domains. After reviewing relevant literatures and justifying the need for more ...

  2. [Progressive visual agnosia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Futamura, Akinori; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2011-10-01

    Progressive visual agnosia was discovered in the 20th century following the discovery of classical non-progressive visual agnosia. In contrast to the classical type, which is caused by cerebral vascular disease or traumatic injury, progressive visual agnosia is a symptom of neurological degeneration. The condition of progressive visual loss, including visual agnosia, and posterior cerebral atrophy was named posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) by Benson et al. (1988). Progressive visual agnosia is also observed in semantic dementia (SD) and other degenerative diseases, but there is a difference in the subtype of visual agnosia associated with these diseases. Lissauer (1890) classified visual agnosia into apperceptive and associative types, and it in most cases, PCA is associated with the apperceptive type. However, SD patients exhibit symptoms of associative visual agnosia before changing to those of semantic memory disorder. Insights into progressive visual agnosia have helped us understand the visual system and discover how we "perceive" the outer world neuronally, with regard to consciousness. Although PCA is a type of atypical dementia, its diagnosis is important to enable patients to live better lives with appropriate functional support.

  3. Progress report and renewal proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signell, P.

    1982-01-01

    We have been working mainly on five inter-related subprojects: (1) derivation of the intermediate range nucleon-nucleon interaction with the new dramatically altered ππ s-wave interaction and using a new method that utilizes much shorter and simpler analytic continuation through the unphysical region that lies between the πN and ππ physical regions of the N anti N→ππ amplitude (with significantly improved accuracy for the nucleon-nucleon interaction); (2) construction of a short range phenomenological potential that, with the theoretical part mentioned above, gives a precise fit to the nucleon-nucleon data and is parameterized for easy use in nucleon calculations; (3) phase shift analyses of the world data below 400 MeV, especially the large amount of very precise data below 20 MeV and the new data near 55 MeV that have never been analyzed properly, and determining which phrases are given by theory at which energies; (4) the introduction of our K-matrix formulation of the Optimal Polynomial Expansion in order to accelerate convergence of the partial wave series at LAMPF energies; and (5) setting up of a cooperatively evaluated and verified permanent nucleon-nucleon data bank in the 0-1200 range that can be used by all nucleon-nucleon researchers (or anyone else) via Telenet dial-in and by means of a published compendium. Progress is reported

  4. Electron-beam-fusion progress report, January--June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-10-01

    Research progress is reported for the following areas: (1) Proto I, (2) Proto II, (3) EBFA, (4) power flow, (5) contract progress reports, (6) progress in the Sandia program, (7) repetitively operated pulse generator development, (8) electron beam power from inductive storage, (9) fusion target design, (10) beam physics research, (11) power flow, (12) heavy ion fusion, (13) particle beam source development, (14) beam target interaction and target response studies, (15) diagnostic development, and (16) hybrid systems

  5. Theoretical research in nuclear collective motion. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Progress is summarized on the following research projects: generalized density matrix method, large amplitude collective motion, boson mappings for the Interacting Boson Model, and semi-classical method for testing IBM hypothesis

  6. Characterization of calculation of in-situ retardation factors of contaminant transport using naturally-radionuclides and rock/water interaction occurring U-Series disequilibria timescales. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, S.; Ku, T.L.; Luo, S.; Murrel, M.; Roback, R.

    1997-01-01

    'The research is directed toward a quantitative assessment of contaminant transport rates in fracture-rock systems using uranium-series radionuclides. Naturally occurring uranium-and thorium-series radioactive disequilibria will provide information on the rates of adsorption-desorption and transport of radioactive contaminants as well as on fluid transport and rock dissolution in a natural setting. This study will also provide an improved characterization of preferential flow and contaminant transport at the Idaho Environmental and Engineering Lab. (INEEL) site. To a lesser extent, the study will include rocks in the unsaturated zone. The authors will produce a realistic model of radionuclide migration under unsaturated and saturated field conditions at the INEEL site, taking into account the retardation processes involved in the rock/water interaction. The major tasks are to (1) determine the natural distribution of U, Th, Pa and Ra isotopes in rock minerals. sorbed phases on the rocks, and in fluids from both saturated and unsaturated zones at the site, and (2) study rock/water interaction processes using U/Th series disequilibrium and a statistical analysis-based model for the Geologic heterogeneity plays an important role in transporting contaminants in fractured rocks. Preferential flow paths in the fractured rocks act as a major pathway for transport of radioactive contaminants in groundwaters. The weathering/dissolution of rock by groundwater also influences contaminant mobility. Thus, it is important to understand the hydrogeologic features of the site and their impact on the migration of radioactive contaminants. In this regard, quantification of the rock weathering/dissolution rate and fluid residence time from the observed decay-series disequilibria will be valuable. By mapping the spatial distribution of the residence time of groundwater in fractured rocks, the subsurface preferential flow paths (with high rock permeability and short fluid residence

  7. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Cadenhead, D A

    1973-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 6 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the progress in surface and membrane science; the solid state chemistry of the silver halide surface; and the experimental and theoretical aspects of the double layer at the mercury-solution interface. The text also describes contact-angle hysteresis; ion binding and ion transport produced by neutral lipid-soluble molecules; and the biophysical interactions of blood proteins with polymeric and artificial surfaces. Physical chemists, biophysicists, and phys

  8. International Study Group Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O

    2000-07-18

    The focus of the ISG work was on advancing the accelerator design and supporting technologies. This is a complex process which involves a close interaction between theoretical analysis of the collider design and R and D progress on hardware components. The sequence of efforts took place roughly in the following order: (1) Optimization of the collider parameters and definition of system and subsystem requirements, (2) Identification of design strategies and options, and (3) Development of specific technologies to achieve these requirements. Development and testing of the required components, and R and D on manufacturing techniques have been important activities of the ISG. Experiments at the major test facilities such as the ATF at KEK and ASSET at SLAC have also played a significant role in the ISG studies.

  9. Physicians’ Progress Notes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen; Havn, Erling C.; Mønsted, Troels

    2013-01-01

    in patient care, they have not dealt specifically with the role, structure, and content of the progress notes. As a consequence, CSCW research has not yet taken fully into account the fact that progress notes are coordinative artifacts of a rather special kind, an open-ended chain of prose texts, written...... sequentially by cooperating physicians for their own use as well as for that of their colleagues. We argue that progress notes are the core of the medical record, in that they marshal and summarize the overwhelming amount of data that is available in the modern hospital environment, and that their narrative...... format is uniquely adequate for the pivotal epistemic aspect of cooperative clinical work: the narrative format enables physicians to not only record ‘facts’ but also—by filtering, interpreting, organizing, and qualifying information—to make sense and act concertedly under conditions of uncertainty...

  10. Chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffoli, A.; Micheletti, E.; Capra, R.; Mattioli, F.; Marciano', N.

    1991-01-01

    A long-lasting immunological suppression action seems to be produced by total lymphoid irradiation; some authors emphasize the favorable effect of this treatment on chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to evaluate the actual role of TLI, 6 patients affected with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis were submitted to TLI with shaped and personalized fields at the Istituto del Radio, University of Brescia, Italy. The total dose delivered was 19.8 Gy in 4 weeks, 1.8 Gy/day, 5d/w; a week elapsed between the first and the second irradiation course. Disability according to Kurtzke scale was evaluated, together with blood lymphocyte count and irradiation side-effects, over a mean follow-up period of 20.8 months (range: 13-24). Our findings indicate that: a) disease progression was not markedly reduced by TLI; b) steroid hormones responsivity was restored after irradiation, and c) side-effects were mild and tolerable

  11. LIFE: Recent Developments and Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anklam, T.M.

    2011-01-01

    Test results from the NIF show excellent progress toward achieving ignition. Experiments designed to verify coupling of the laser energy to the fusion target have shown that the efficiency meets that needed for ignition. Several tests with the cryogenic targets needed for ignition have been performed, and world-record neutron output produced. The National Ignition Campaign is on schedule to meet its 2012 ignition milestone, with the next phase in the campaign due to start later this month. It has been a busy and very productive year. The NIF is in full 24/7 operations and has progressed markedly in the path toward ignition. The long-standing goal of the National Ignition Campaign to demonstrate ignition by the end of FY 2012 is on track. The LIFE plant design has matured considerably, and a delivery plan established based on close interactions with vendors. National-level reviews of fusion are underway, and are due to present initial findings later this year. A value proposition has been drafted for review. The LIFE project is ready to move into the delivery phase.

  12. Progress in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Hempelmann, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Progress in Physical Chemistry is a collection of recent ""Review Articles"" published in the ""Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie"". The second volume of Progress in Physical Chemistry is a collection of thematically closely related minireview articles written by the members of the Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 277 of the German Research Foundation (DFG). These articles are based on twelve years of intense coordinated research efforts. Central topics are the synthesis and the characterization of interface-dominated, i.e. nanostructured materials, mainly in the solid state but also as

  13. Progress report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupka, A.; Dirninger, G.

    1982-01-01

    The progress report describes the scientific work and research results of the institute for radium research and nuclear physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences for the period of 1981. The progress report covers the subject areas of nuclear theory, nuclear model calculations, experimental nuclear physics and neutron involved reactions, medium energy physics, instrumentation and detectors, evaluation of nuclear data and numerical data processing, dating, applications in medicine, dosimetry and environmental studies. A list of publications of this institute is given. (A.N.)

  14. Annual progress report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This annual progress report of the CEA Protection and Nuclear Safety Institut outlines a brief description of the progress made in each section of the Institut. Research activities of the Protection department include, radiation effects on man, radioecology and environment radioprotection techniques. Research activities of the Nuclear Safety department include, reactor safety analysis, fuel cycle facilities safety analysis, safety research programs. The third section deals with nuclear material security including security of facilities, security of nuclear material transport and monitoring of nuclear material management [fr

  15. Progress report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupka, A.; Wild, E.; Dirninger, G.

    1983-01-01

    The progress report describes the scientific work and research results of the institute for radium research and nuclear physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences for the period of 1982. The progress report covers the subject areas of nuclear theory, nuclear model calculations, experimental nuclear physics and neutron involved reactions, medium energy physics, instrumentation and detectors, evaluation of nuclear data and numerical data processing, dating, applications in medicine, dosimetry and environmental studies. A list of publications of this institute is given. (A.N.)

  16. 1985. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This annual progress report of the CEA Protection and Nuclear Safety Institut outlines a description of the progress made in each sections of the Institut Research activities of the different departments include: reactor safety analysis, fuel cycle facilities analysis; and associated safety research programs (criticality, sites, transport ...), radioecology and environmental radioprotection techniques; data acquisition on radioactive waste storage sites; radiation effects on man, studies on radioprotection techniques; nuclear material security including security of facilities, security of nuclear material transport, and monitoring of nuclear material management; nuclear facility decommissioning; and finally the public information [fr

  17. Interactive Environment Design in Smart City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, DeXiang; Chen, LanSha; Zhou, Xi

    2017-08-01

    The interactive environment design of smart city is not just an interactive progress or interactive mode design, rather than generate an environment such as the “organic” life entity as human beings through interactive design, forming a smart environment with perception, memory, thinking, and reaction.

  18. BARC progress report - 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyane, V L [comp.; Library and Information Services Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1999-04-01

    This report is a compilation of the progress in various major activities and Research and Development programmes of the different Divisions of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops and papers published in journal by the staff members of the Divisions are also given. (author) figs., tabs.

  19. BARC progress report - 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyane, V.L.

    1999-04-01

    This report is a compilation of the progress in various major activities and Research and Development programmes of the different Divisions of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops and papers published in journal by the staff members of the Divisions are also given. (author)

  20. Internationalisering og progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilken, Lisanne; Tange, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    means that programs can attract students from outside Denmark, and these students often come from different academic backgrounds. To investigate how these changes are affecting the way professors who teach on interdisciplinary international masters programs conceive student progress, we carried out semi...

  1. Progress report of CJD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This paper is the progress report of the Russian Nuclear Data Center at F.E.I., Obninsk. Evaluations have been made for dosimetry reactions and neutron reactions. Analysis of the spectra and the production cross sections were made. (a.n.)

  2. Progress report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, H.

    1983-01-01

    This progress report describes the scientific work and research results done by the institute for experimental physics, atom and nuclear physics of the Johannes-Kepler-Universitaet Linz in the period of 1982. The covered subject areas are ionization by cations, investigations of surface areas by light ions, measurement of stopping power in solids, data acquisition and aerosol physics. (A.N.)

  3. Recent progress in Biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bemski, G.

    1980-03-01

    Recent progress in biophysics is reviewed, and three examples of the use of physical techniques and ideas in biological research are given. The first one deals with the oxygen transporting protein-hemoglobin, the second one with photosynthesis, and the third one with image formation, using nuclear magnetic resonance. (Author) [pt

  4. MCNP Progress & Performance Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bull, Jeffrey S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Twenty-eight slides give information about the work of the US DOE/NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program on MCNP6 under the following headings: MCNP6.1.1 Release, with ENDF/B-VII.1; Verification/Validation; User Support & Training; Performance Improvements; and Work in Progress. Whisper methodology will be incorporated into the code, and run speed should be increased.

  5. Scales of Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Lee Ann

    2018-01-01

    What is Goal Attainment Scaling? In this article, Lee Ann Jung defines it as a way to measure a student's progress toward an individualized goal. Instead of measuring a skill at a set time (for instance, on a test or other assignment), Goal Attainment Scaling tracks the steps a student takes over the course of a year in a targeted skill. Together,…

  6. Progressive Retirement Programme

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Following the Standing Concertation Committee meeting of 2 December 2008, please note that the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, i.e. until 31 March 2010. Further information is available on : https://hr-services.web.cern.ch/hr-services/services-Ben/prp/prp.asp HR Department, tel. 73903

  7. Progress Report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document is the 1994 annual progress report of the CEA-Direction of Waste Management (DGD). It comprises four chapters. The first chapter is a general presentation of radioactive wastes, of the management of liquid effluents, solid wastes, sealed sources, of the relations with the ANDRA (The French Agency for the Management of Radioactive Wastes), and of the research and development studies in progress for the improvement of waste management. The second chapter concerns the spent fuels and their reprocessing, in particular AGR and PWR type reactor fuels, the ''Caramel'' fuel from Osiris reactor and the cover elements from the Rapsodie reactor core. The long time storage of ancient fuels is also discussed. The third chapter concerns the dismantling of decommissioned installations, the actions in progress and the planning of dismantling actions up to the year 2000. Chapter four is devoted to the management of wastes from the Direction of Military Applications (DAM), the actions in progress in the different DAM centers and the cleansing projects at Marcoule plant. (J.S.). 5 figs., 28 tabs., 21 photos., 3 appendix

  8. Progress report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This progress report deals with technical and research work done at the AAEC Research Establishment in the twelve month period ending September 30, 1979. Work done in the following research divisions is reported: Applied Maths and Computing, Chemical Technology, Engineering Research, Environmental Science, Instrumentation and Control, Isotope, Materials and Physics

  9. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2015-01-01

    The Progress in Optics series contains more than 300 review articles by distinguished research workers, which have become permanent records for many important developments, helping optical scientists and optical engineers stay abreast of their fields. Comprehensive, in-depth reviewsEdited by the leading authority in the field

  10. Progress report 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The Studsvik Science Research Laboratory herewith presents its progress report for 1978. The report summarizes the current projects carried out by the research groups working at the laboratory. Projects within the following fields are presented: neutron physics, neutron absorption and scattering, radiation chemistry, radiation damage studies, radioactivity and theoretical studies of condensed matter. (E.R.)

  11. Progress report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After giving a brief description of operations of an improvements to the University of Alberta nuclear physics facilities, this report summarizes the principal research programs. These include work on neutron scattering, thorium 232 fission, iodine 123 production. Progress towards the construction of MARIA, the Medical Accelerator Research Institute in Alberta, is described, and research on relativistic heavy ions is summarized

  12. BARC progress report - 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyane, V L [comp.; Library and Information Services Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1998-07-01

    This report is a compilation of the progress in various major activities and Research and Development programmes of the different Divisions of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops and papers published in journal by the staff members of the Divisions are also given. (author) figs., tabs.

  13. BARC progress report - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyane, V.L.

    1998-07-01

    This report is a compilation of the progress in various major activities and Research and Development programmes of the different Divisions of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops and papers published in journal by the staff members of the Divisions are also given. (author)

  14. Response: Progress Takes Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rist, Marilee C.

    1984-01-01

    Although declining enrollment and administrative seniority have hampered efforts to eliminate sex discrimination in employment practices in three Long Island, New York, school systems (Commack, Smithtown, and Bay Shore), progress is being made. Because of the Reagan administration's lack of support for affirmative action, however, litigation…

  15. Progressive Web applications

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Progressive Web Applications are native-like applications running inside of a browser context. In my presentation I would like describe their characteristics, benchmarks and building process using a quick and simple case study example with focus on Service Workers api.

  16. "Paideia," Progress, Puzzlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrachovec, Herbert

    2018-01-01

    Platonic "paideia" is a mainstream concept in traditional philosophy and humanistic circles generally. It is closely connected with social progress brought about by the dynamics of enlightenment and self-fulfillment, symbolized by the allegory of the cave. The main contention of this paper is that the philosophical grammar of this simile…

  17. Are Forecast Updates Progressive?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMacro-economic forecasts typically involve both a model component, which is replicable, as well as intuition, which is non-replicable. Intuition is expert knowledge possessed by a forecaster. If forecast updates are progressive, forecast updates should become more accurate, on average,

  18. Progress report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This progress report deals with service oriented work performed at the AAEC Research Establishment in the twelve month period ending September 30, 1979. Services provided by the Engineering Services Division, the Safety Department, Site Information Services Department and Commercial Applications are described

  19. Progression og underviserkompetencer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Tortzen Bager

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available På baggrund af en kvalitativ interviewundersøgelse af undervisere ved Aarhus Universitet lavet i 2012, tematiserer artiklen, hvordan undervisere udvikler deres faglige og pædagogiske kompetencer i forhold til at kunne skabe progression inden for innovation og entreprenørskab forstået enten som didaktik, arbejdsformer i faglige forløb eller som fag på universitetet. I arbejdet med progression er det en udfordring at integrere de nye faglige dimensioner i det kernefaglige felt. Den seneste model for progression inden for innovation og entreprenør-skab siger, at det er den lærendes generelle erfaringsniveau, der er den afgørende progressionsskabende faktor (Progressionsmodellen, Fonden for Entreprenørskab, 2013b. Samtidig skelner international forskning inden for studiekompetenceområdet mellem niveauer, hvor indlejret viden er det mest avancerede kompetenceniveau (Barrie, 2002.Ifølge progressionsmodellen og den nævnte kompetenceforskning er erfaring og dybt integreret læring altså centrale dimensioner i progression. Men hvad er underviserens rolle heri? Underviserens professionelle udviklingsarbejde forekommer at være underbelyst i forhold til, at underviseren er den legitime garant for integrationen af nye faglige dimensioner og for den studerendes kompetenceniveau. Interviewundersøgelsen forholder sig til spørgsmålet om progression gennem de deltagende underviseres beskrivelse af betydningslag i entreprenørskabsbegrebet koblet til de praksisformer i undervisningen, der knytter sig hertil samt et indblik i undervisernes refleksioner over deres kompetenceudviklingsprocesser. Artiklens bidrag til progression er at se underviserens motivation og kompetenceudvikling som forudsætninger herfor.     Based on a qualitative study of five teachers in the Faculty of Arts at Aarhus University that took place during 2012, the article thematizes how teachers develop their professional and educational qualifications in innovation and

  20. Evaluation of keratoconus progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajari, Mehdi; Steinwender, Gernot; Herrmann, Kim; Kubiak, Kate Barbara; Pavlovic, Ivana; Plawetzki, Elena; Schmack, Ingo; Kohnen, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    To define variables for the evaluation of keratoconus progression and to determine cut-off values. In this retrospective cohort study (2010-2016), 265 eyes of 165 patients diagnosed with keratoconus underwent two Scheimpflug measurements (Pentacam) that took place 1 year apart ±3 months. Variables used for keratoconus detection were evaluated for progression and a correlation analysis was performed. By logistic regression analysis, a keratoconus progression index (KPI) was defined. Receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed and Youden Index calculated to determine cut-off values. Variables used for keratoconus detection showed a weak correlation with each other (eg, correlation r=0.245 between RPImin and Kmax, pKPI). KPI was defined by logistic regression and consisted of a Pachymin coefficient of -0.78 (p=0.001), a maximum elevation of back surface coefficient of 0.27 and coefficient of corneal curvature at the zone 3 mm away from the thinnest point on the posterior corneal surface of -12.44 (both pKPI: D-index had a cut-off of 0.4175 (70.6% sensitivity) and Youden Index of 0.606. Cut-off for KPI was -0.78196 (84.7% sensitivity) and a Youden Index of 0.747; both 90% specificity. Keratoconus progression should be defined by evaluating parameters that consider several corneal changes; we suggest D-index and KPI to detect progression. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Progress in JT-60 joint research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Haruyuki; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Inutake, Masaaki

    2007-01-01

    It consists of five chapters; 1) introduction, 2) management system of joint plan and researches, 3) progress of joint researches, 4) results of researches and 5) summary. The second chapter stated the structure of management system of JT-60 joint researches, progress of management of the JT-60 experimental theme system, invitation the public to joint researches and selection of the subjects. The progress of joint researches contained the number of subjects, research members and organizations, change of joint research fields, remote control system of experiments, analysis code group, and number of reports. The main results of researches such as development of operation without center solenoid, Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD) control by electron cyclotron wave, plasma-wall interaction, application of laser technologies to plasma measurement, and comparison between tokamak and helical are reported. (S.Y.)

  2. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A; Rosenberg, M D

    1975-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 9 covers the developments in surface and membrane science. The book discusses the physical adsorption of gases and vapors in micropores; the chemisorption theory; and the role of radioisotopes in the studies of chemisorption and catalysis. The text also describes the interaction of ions with monolayers; and the isolation and characterization of mycoplasma membranes. Chemists, physical chemists, and microbiologists will find the book useful.

  3. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal and ventral (occipito-temporal pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction, complete Balint's syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right . Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD.

  4. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Fábio Henrique de Gobbi; Machado, Gislaine Cristina Lopes; Morillo, Lilian Schafirovits; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi

    2010-01-01

    Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD) is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal) and ventral (occipito-temporal) pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction), complete Balint’s syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right. Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD. PMID:29213665

  5. ISABELLE: a progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the ISABELLE project, which has the objective of constructing a high-energy proton colliding beam facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major technical features of the intersecting storage accelerators with their projected performance are described. Application of over 1000 superconducting magnets in the two rings represents the salient characteristic of the machine. The status of the entire project, the technical progress made so far, and difficulties encountered are reviewed.

  6. ISABELLE: a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the ISABELLE project, which has the objective of constructing a high-energy proton colliding beam facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major technical features of the intersecting storage accelerators with their projected performance are described. Application of over 1000 superconducting magnets in the two rings represents the salient characteristic of the machine. The status of the entire project, the technical progress made so far, and difficulties encountered are reviewed

  7. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2009-01-01

    In the fourty-seven years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. The volumes in this series which have appeared up to now contain more than 300 review articles by distinguished research workers, which have become permanent records for many important developments.- Backscattering and Anderson localization of light- Advances in oliton manipulation in optical lattices- Fundamental quantum noise in optical amplification- Invisibility cloaks

  8. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2008-01-01

    In the fourty-six years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. The volumes in this series which have appeared up to now contain more than 300 review articles by distinguished research workers, which have become permanent records for many important developments.- Metamaterials- Polarization Techniques- Linear Baisotropic Mediums- Ultrafast Optical Pulses- Quantum Imaging- Point-Spread Funcions- Discrete Wigner Functions

  9. Recent progress in microcalorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Calvet, E; Skinner, H A

    2013-01-01

    Recent Progress in Microcalorimetry focuses on the methodologies, processes, and approaches involved in microcalorimetry, as well as heat flow, temperature constancy, and chemistry of alumina and cements.The selection first offers information on the different types of calorimeters; measurement of the heat flow between the calorimeter and jacket boundaries by means of a thermoelectric pile; and constructional details of the microcalorimeter. Discussions focus on classification of calorimeters, use of thermoelectric piles as thermometers, correct measurement of heat flow from a calorimeter conta

  10. Clean Energy Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    For the past several years, the IEA and others have been calling for a clean energy revolution to achieve global energy security, economic growth and climate change goals. This report analyses for the first time progress in global clean energy technology deployment against the pathways that are needed to achieve these goals. It provides an overview of technology deployment status, key policy developments and public spending on RDD&D of clean energy technologies.

  11. Progress in nanophotonics 1

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2011-01-01

    This book focuses on the recent progress in nanophotonics technology to be used to develop novel nano-optical devices, fabrication technology, and security systems. It begins with a review of the concept of dressed photons and applications to devices, fabrication, and systems; principles and applications. Further topics include: DNA process for quantum dot chain, photon enhanced emission microscopy, near field spectroscopy of metallic nanostructure, self-organized fabrication of composite semiconductor quantum dots, formation of metallic nanostructure, and nanophotonic information systems with

  12. Three year progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    Progress is reported on the following studies: x-ray and uv effects in photosynthetic organisms; effects of alcohols and oxygen concentration on transforming DNA; free radical studies; sensitization by metal ions; role of the solvated electron in radiation damage to cells; effectiveness of organic and inorganic compounds in sensitizing bacterial spores to high energy radiation; oxygen effects; radiosensitivity of enzyme systems in Chlorella; and effects of pre-irradiation of solutions on spores

  13. Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mampaey, S.; De Schepper, A.; Vanhoenacker, F.; Boven, K.; Hul, W. van

    2000-01-01

    A rare case of progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) in a 9-year-old girl is presented. Clinically, chronic painless swollen joints, accompanied by progressive motion restriction and progressive walking difficulties, were found. Radiologically, there was enlargement of the epimetaphyseal portions of the large joints, metacarpal heads, and phalanges, and generalized platyspondyly with irregular delineation of the endplates of the vertebral bodies. The radioclinical features at the peripheral joints were originally misdiagnosed as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), and the structural spinal abnormalities were neglected and interpreted as Scheuermann's disease. However, the absence of active inflammatory parameters argues against JRA, whereas the low age of onset of the irregularities at the vertebral endplates is an argument against the diagnosis of Scheuermann's disease. The combination of the dysplastic abnormalities of the spine, with platyspondyly and Scheuermann-like lesions at an unusually low age of onset, and radiological features mimicking JRA of the peripheral joints, is the clue to the diagnosis of this rare autosomal-recessive disease. This case is the first to document the MRI features of PPD of the spine. (orig.)

  14. Some applications of the multiple scattering theory to the study of the hadron-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedonder, J.-P.

    1979-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of elastic hadron nucleus scattering. At first, an asymptotic evaluation leads to a closed, analytic expression of the eikonal amplitude. This approximate expression displays the role and the influence of the nuclear paremeters in, e.g., p-nucleus scattering around 1 GeV. Pion-nucleus scattering around the 3-3 resonance is then studied. A 3 body model calculation (pion, bound nucleon and residual nucleus represented by a potential) allows to study the importance of binding effects in this problem dominated by the strong energy dependence of the elementary amplitude. The last part is devoted to the construction in momentum space of a realistic optical potential and its comparison with experimental data. The scalling of π + and π - on neighbouring isotopes should allow the measure of the differences between the proton and neutron distributions in nuclei [fr

  15. ENTREPRENEURSHIP AS SOCIAL INTERACTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henry; Lima, Patricia; Olsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore how entrepreneurs work with innovation; to explore and develop attention points in understanding entrepreneurship as social processes of interaction between people. Through interviews and engagement with entrepreneurs and key stakeholders, their actual social practices...... entrepreneurship as socially constructed through local interactions between players and identify key themes in these interactions within the organisation, such as leadership, becoming part of the initiative and trust/mistrust. By doing so, this paper contributes to an understanding of entrepreneurship as social...... and the influence on the progress as innovators are explored. It is focused on a new local activity in a Danish town, named the I-factory which has within a year gathered almost 40 entrepreneurs. As a part of the interaction, there were created activities to encourage even more collaboration. We see...

  16. Quark-quark interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, M.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter discusses interactions only at the constituent level, as observed in hadron-hadron collisions. It defines quarks and gluons as constituents of the colliding hadrons, reviews some applications of perturbative OCD, discussing in turn lepton pair production, which in lowest order approximation corresponds to the Drell-Yan process. It investigates whether quark-quark interactions could not lead to some new color structure different from those prevalent for known baryons and mesons, which could be created in hadron interactions, and whether color objects (not specifically quarks or gluons) could not appear as free particles. Discussed is perturbative QCD in hadron collisions; the quark approach to soft processes; and new color structures. It points out that perturbative QCD has been at the origin of much progress in the understanding of hadron interactions at the constituent level

  17. HSX progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Brief statements on the progress of the design and construction of the HSX experiment are reported. Topics covered include the modular and auxiliary coil systems, the coil support structure, vacuum vessel, the ECH system, the magnet power supply and site. The proposed budget for Year 2 (August 1, 1994 through July 31, 1995) is presented. The effects of a flat funding profile (based on Year 2 budget level of $1137K) on out-years and the HSX project schedule are discussed. The stretching out of the program to accommodate the reduced funding profile should result in only a slight delay in HSX operations

  18. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    1977-01-01

    In the thirty-seven years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. At the time of inception of this series, the first lasers were only just becoming operational, holography was in its infancy, subjects such as fiber optics, integrated optics and optoelectronics did not exist and quantum optics was the domain of only a few physicists. The term photonics had not yet been coined. Today these fields are flourishing and have become areas of specialisation for many science and engineering students and n

  19. [Research progress on fascioliasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Cheng, Na; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Xue-Nian

    2013-06-01

    Fascioliasis is an important zoonosis caused by Fasciola spp. It can cause pathological damages to human liver and gallbladder, as well as economic loss in animal husbandry. Fascioliasis can be easily misdiagnosed with other hepatobiliary diseases. The appearance of resistance to triclabendazole is an issue problem for fascioliasis control. Therefore, research for better diagnostic methods, effective drugs and vaccines become to the focus of fascioliasis control. This article summarizes the progress on epidemiological status, diagnostic method, therapy, drug resistance, vaccine and omics of fascioliasis.

  20. Mathieu Progressive Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, B. Utkin

    2011-10-01

    A new family of exact solutions to the wave equation representing relatively undistorted progressive waves is constructed using separation of variables in the elliptic cylindrical coordinates and one of the Bateman transforms. The general form of this Bateman transform in an orthogonal curvilinear cylindrical coordinate system is discussed and a specific problem of physical feasibility of the obtained solutions, connected with their dependence on the cyclic coordinate, is addressed. The limiting case of zero eccentricity, in which the elliptic cylindrical coordinates turn into their circular cylindrical counterparts, is shown to correspond to the focused wave modes of the Bessel-Gauss type.

  1. Mathieu Progressive Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utkin, Andrei B.

    2011-01-01

    A new family of exact solutions to the wave equation representing relatively undistorted progressive waves is constructed using separation of variables in the elliptic cylindrical coordinates and one of the Bateman transforms. The general form of this Bateman transform in an orthogonal curvilinear cylindrical coordinate system is discussed and a specific problem of physical feasibility of the obtained solutions, connected with their dependence on the cyclic coordinate, is addressed. The limiting case of zero eccentricity, in which the elliptic cylindrical coordinates turn into their circular cylindrical counterparts, is shown to correspond to the focused wave modes of the Bessel-Gauss type. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  2. TASCC Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.

    1992-10-01

    The TASCC (Tandem Accelerator-Superconducting Cyclotron) facility is devoted to developing and providing beams for an experimental program of basic nuclear research. Beam was on target for 2901 hours during the period of interest. The cyclotron provided beam for 524 hours, and tandem beams were used for a total of 3940 hours. The most exciting experimental result was the first evidence of a rotational band with the characteristics of hyperdeformation: a ridge-valley structure in 152 Dy. This progress report details experimental results and instrumentation and facility development over the period. (L.L.) (refs., tabs., figs.)

  3. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2006-01-01

    In the thirty-seven years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. At the time of inception of this series, the first lasers were only just becoming operational, holography was in its infancy, subjects such as fiber optics, integrated optics and optoelectronics did not exist and quantum optics was the domain of only a few physicists. The term photonics had not yet been coined. Today these fields are flourishing and have become areas of specialisation for many science and engineering students and n

  4. Progress in nanophotonics 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsu, Motoichi (ed.) [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    2011-07-01

    This book focuses on the recent progress in nanophotonics technology to be used to develop novel nano-optical devices, fabrication technology, and security systems. It begins with a review of the concept of dressed photons and applications to devices, fabrication, and systems; principles and applications. Further topics include: DNA process for quantum dot chain, photon enhanced emission microscopy, near field spectroscopy of metallic nanostructure, self-organized fabrication of composite semiconductor quantum dots, formation of metallic nanostructure, and nanophotonic information systems with security. These topics are reviewed by seven leading scientists. This overview is a variable resource for engineers and scientists working in the field of nanophotonics. (orig.)

  5. Caffeine, creatine, GRIN2A and Parkinson's disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, David K; Wu, Cai; Tilley, Barbara C; Lohmann, Katja; Klein, Christine; Payami, Haydeh; Wills, Anne-Marie; Aminoff, Michael J; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn; Dewey, Richard; Hauser, Robert A; Schaake, Susen; Schneider, Jay S; Sharma, Saloni; Singer, Carlos; Tanner, Caroline M; Truong, Daniel; Wei, Peng; Wong, Pei Shieen; Yang, Tianzhong

    2017-04-15

    Caffeine is neuroprotective in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) and caffeine intake is inversely associated with the risk of PD. This association may be influenced by the genotype of GRIN2A, which encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit. In two placebo-controlled studies, we detected no association of caffeine intake with the rate of clinical progression of PD, except among subjects taking creatine, for whom higher caffeine intake was associated with more rapid progression. We now have analyzed data from 420 subjects for whom DNA samples and caffeine intake data were available from a placebo-controlled study of creatine in PD. The GRIN2A genotype was not associated with the rate of clinical progression of PD in the placebo group. However, there was a 4-way interaction between GRIN2A genotype, caffeine, creatine and the time since baseline. Among subjects in the creatine group with high levels of caffeine intake, but not among those with low caffeine intake, the GRIN2A T allele was associated with more rapid progression (p=0.03). These data indicate that the deleterious interaction between caffeine and creatine with respect to rate of progression of PD is influenced by GRIN2A genotype. This example of a genetic factor interacting with environmental factors illustrates the complexity of gene-environment interactions in the progression of PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia misdiagnosed as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia misdiagnosed as seronegative juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ozgur Taspinar, Fatih Kelesoglu, Yasar Keskin, Murat Uludag. Abstract. Background: Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) is a rare spondylo- epi-metaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD). It can be confused with juvenile ...

  7. Slowly progressive fluent aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa; Momose, Toshimitsu; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Iwata, Makoto; Bando, Mitsuaki.

    1991-01-01

    Three patients with slowly progressive fluent aphasia are reported. One of the patients presented with memory disturbance. They were characterized clinically by having selective deficits in vocabulary, which resulted in impairment of confrontation naming, and auditory comprehension. MRI showed an atrophy not only in the left temporal lobe (including the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyri), hippocampus, parahippocampual gyrus, and fusiform gyrus, but also in the left parietal lobe. I-123 IMP SPECT and F-18 FDG PET were used to determine regional cerebral blood flow and regional cerebral metabolic rate, respectively. In addition to the decreased tracer uptake in the left temporal and/or parietal lobe, a decreased uptake was seen in the bilateral basal ganglia, the inner side of the temporal lobe (including the bilateral hippocampus), the right anterior temporal lobe, and the left thalamus. These findings may deny the previous thought that lesions are localized in slowly progressive fluent aphasia. Furthermore, noticeable difficulty in naming, i.e., patients unable to recognize the right answer, are considered attributable to widespread lesions from the whole left temporal lobe, including the hippocampus, to the right temporal lobe. (N.K.)

  8. Progress in computational toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Computational methods have been widely applied to toxicology across pharmaceutical, consumer product and environmental fields over the past decade. Progress in computational toxicology is now reviewed. A literature review was performed on computational models for hepatotoxicity (e.g. for drug-induced liver injury (DILI)), cardiotoxicity, renal toxicity and genotoxicity. In addition various publications have been highlighted that use machine learning methods. Several computational toxicology model datasets from past publications were used to compare Bayesian and Support Vector Machine (SVM) learning methods. The increasing amounts of data for defined toxicology endpoints have enabled machine learning models that have been increasingly used for predictions. It is shown that across many different models Bayesian and SVM perform similarly based on cross validation data. Considerable progress has been made in computational toxicology in a decade in both model development and availability of larger scale or 'big data' models. The future efforts in toxicology data generation will likely provide us with hundreds of thousands of compounds that are readily accessible for machine learning models. These models will cover relevant chemistry space for pharmaceutical, consumer product and environmental applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russek, A.

    1975-06-01

    Progress has been made in calculation of cross-sections for dielectronic and radiative recombination when hot electrons are incident on partially stripped impurity ions. Calculations were completed for the cases of 1 keV and 10 keV electrons incident on ions of arbitrary Z with ionization state consistent with a 1 keV plasma temperature. It was found that dielectronic recombination dominates radiative recombination by a factor of 100 at 1 keV incident electron energy to a factor of 1000 at 10 keV incident electron energy. The work is now being extended to other plasma temperatures and is being improved by more accurate calculation of the matrix elements involved. Progress was also made in the calculation of accurate bremsstrahlung and higher order radiative processes which also occur when hot electrons are incident on partially stripped impurity ions. Formal expressions for the matrix elements have been obtained for cross-sections in a fully relativistic partial wave analysis for bremsstrahlung radiation both with and without electron excitation of the target ion. Final evaluation now awaits the evaluation of the relativistic radial integrals involved in these matrix elements. (U.S.)

  10. Ghrelin and cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-Chieh; Hsiao, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Ghrelin is a small peptide with 28 amino acids, and has been characterized as the ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). In addition to its original function in stimulating pituitary growth hormone release, ghrelin is multifunctional and plays a role in the regulation of energy balance, gastric acid release, appetite, insulin secretion, gastric motility and the turnover of gastric and intestinal mucosa. The discovery of ghrelin and GHSR expression beyond normal tissues suggests its role other than physiological function. Emerging evidences have revealed ghrelin's function in regulating several processes related to cancer progression, especially in metastasis and proliferation. We further show the relative GHRL and GHSR expression in pan-cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), suggesting the potential pathological role of the axis in cancers. This review focuses on ghrelin's biological function in cancer progression, and reveals its clinical significance especially the impact on cancer patient outcome. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Annual progress report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The technical support activities of the IPSN to competent administrations in 1980 has been marked: namely by the authorizations of divergence for 9 units EdF-PWR of 900 MW, the authorization project of creation and extension of reprocessing plant of COGEMA at the Hague UP 2 -800 and the authorization of starting up of the third unit of production of the EURODIF enrichment plant at Tricastin. On the other hand, IPSN has participated at the elaboration of a certain number of legislative and regulation texts relative to the control of nuclear matter, to radioprotection standards and to criteria of safety. For the safety of breeder, the test made at CABRI pile, in the international research program has given confirmation of the validity of theoretical models used in accidents calculations, hypothetical accidents which has allowed to reactualize safety criteria which have to be used for the development of this type of reactor. In worker radioprotection the results obtained in laboratory on the effect of radon, the progress made in personal dosimetry and the action of radioprotection undertaken in uranium mines constitutes a coherent effort. The deep drilling in granit (1000 m) and the experimental associated program which has finished the indispensable scientific data for the future policy in matter of storage of radioactives wastes. IPSN has contributed to progress made in the rules of exploitation of reactors, in the definition of wastes containment -specially at the output of reprocessing plant- in handling machines in hazardeous areas and in the study of environment [fr

  12. Nuclear theory progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research performed at University of Washington in nuclear theory. Some of the topics discussed are: nuclear astrophysics; symmetry; time reversal invariance; quark matter; superallowed beta decay; exclusive reactions; nuclear probes; soliton model; relativistic heavy ion collisions; supernova explosions; neutrino processes in dense matter; field theories; weak interaction physics; and nuclear structure

  13. Nuclear chemistry progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A brief administrative review is given of work in the following areas: investigations of the chemical effects accompanying muon capture in atoms and molecules, quadrupole interaction in metal and semimetal systems using perturbed gamma-ray angular correlation, and nuclear structure research using nuclear reaction spectroscopy. Detailed research reports were published in appropriate places; a publication list is included. 2 figures

  14. Scientific progress report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the results of research and development at the named institute concerning theoretical physics, nuclear reactions, hyperfine interactions, atomic collision processes, and the VICKSI accelerator together with a list of publications and speeches. (HSI) [de

  15. 1982 - Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This report briefly presents the activities of the laboratory of ionized medium physics during the year 1982: laser-matter interaction and compression of targets by laser; plasma turbulence; high intensity beams of ions and electrons; negative ions produced in plasma [fr

  16. Theory of the low-energy pion-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, M.K.; Cammarata, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    A once-subtracted form of the Low equation for the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude is derived, with partial conservation of axial-vector current used to define the amplitude when one pion is off the mass shell. The static approximation is not made and both the seagull terms and the antinucleon contribution (z graphs) are retained. The theory is applied to calculate the S-wave amplitudes in the elastic scattering region. Good agreement is found with the phase shift fits to the data when we use vertical-barg/sub π/(4M 2 ) vertical-bar = 11.69 and 25.5 MeV for the πN sigma commutator. The implications of this work for the analysis of low-energy elastic scattering of pions form nuclei are discussed. In particular, we point out how this work establishes the presence of a Laplacian term in the pion-nucleus optical potential with a magnitude that is fixed from the value of the sigma commutator

  17. Association for Progressive Communication : Institutional ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Monitoring Progress Toward the Information Society : Digital Divide Index. Orbicom's Digital Divide Index is a rigorous statistical tool for benchmarking access to and use of information and communication technologies (ICT), and monitoring progress toward the... View moreMonitoring Progress Toward the Information ...

  18. Juvenile myopia progression, risk factors and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrowitz, Elliott H

    2012-07-01

    The development and progression of early onset myopia is actively being investigated. While myopia is often considered a benign condition it should be considered a public health problem for its visual, quality of life, and economic consequences. Nearly half of the visually impaired population in the world has uncorrected refractive errors, with myopia a high percent of that group. Uncorrected visual acuity should be screened for and treated in order to improve academic performance, career opportunities and socio-economic status. Genetic and environmental factors contribute to the onset and progression of myopia. Twin studies have supported genetic factors and research continues to identify myopia genetic loci. While multiple myopia genetic loci have been identified establishing myopia as a common complex disorder, there is not yet a genetic model explaining myopia progression in populations. Environmental factors include near work, education levels, urban compared to rural location, and time spent outdoors. In this field of study where there continues to be etiology controversies, there is recent agreement that children who spend more time outdoors are less likely to become myopic. Worldwide population studies, some completed and some in progress, with a common protocol are gathering both genetic and environmental cohort data of great value. There have been rapid population changes in prevalence rates supporting an environmental influence. Interventions to prevent juvenile myopia progression include pharmacologic agents, glasses and contact lenses. Pharmacological interventions over 1-2 year trials have shown benefits. Peripheral vision defocus has been found to affect the emmetropization process and may be affected by wearing glasses or contacts. Accommodation accuracy also has been implicated in myopia progression. Further research will aim to assess both the role and interaction of environmental influences and genetic factors.

  19. Research progress of antagonistic interactions among root canal irrigations disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen QU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Root canal therapy is the most effective way to treat various pulposis and periapical disease. Simple mechanical apparatus can not clean root canal thoroughly, but may affect tight filling instead. It can achieve a satisfactory cleansing effect only when it is combined with a chemical solution. Irrigation fluid for root canal should possess the properties of tissue dissolution, antimicrobial, lubrication, and removal of smear layer. So far, no solution is able to fulfill all these functions. Therefore, a combined use of multiple irrigation solutions is suggested. It can not only achieve good effect in cleaning and disinfection, also it can lower the concentration of different solutions, thus reducing the side effects. Nevertheless, some experiments proved that antagonism existed among the chemicals used for irrigations. The purpose of present article is to review the antagonistic effect among the chemicals used for irrigation when they are used together for root canal treatment.

  20. Instrumental interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani , Annie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The expression instrumental interaction as been introduced by Claude Cadoz to identify a human-object interaction during which a human manipulates a physical object - an instrument - in order to perform a manual task. Classical examples of instrumental interaction are all the professional manual tasks: playing violin, cutting fabrics by hand, moulding a paste, etc.... Instrumental interaction differs from other types of interaction (called symbolic or iconic interactio...

  1. Progress report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The O.P.R.I. is in charge of environmental general surveillance and follow-up of natural exposures; To monitor the nuclear installations, it carries out samples campaigns. The technical follow-up of medical installations concerns it too. The workers radiation protection as well as the public protection are in its attributions. We find in particular, three sanitary studies: about the North Cotentin, (the question of excess of leukemia or not, and due or not to the facility of La hague) Nogent-sur-Marne (the case of a nursery school built on a old factory using radium), and the situation of populations living in French Polynesia, areas that have worried the public with alarmist announcements published in newspapers. All the results relative to the radiations measurements for 1998 appear in this progress report. (N.C.)

  2. Progress report 1981 - 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, G.; Rauch, H.; Balcar, E.; Buchtela, K.; Schwertfuehrer, W.; Vana, N.

    1984-06-01

    This progress report describes the research activities of the Atom-institute of the Austrian Universities of the period 1981-1983. The chapter headings are: (1) Electron- and X-ray physics, thermoluminescence and archeometry. (2) Nuclear physics. (3) Nuclear techniques, electronics and EDP. (4) Neutron- and solid state physics with neutron scattering, low temperature physics, theoretical solid state physics and preparation technique. (5) Radiation chemistry. (6) Radiation protection and dosimetry. Each chapter gives a comprimated overview about the research work done in the described period, illustrated by diagrams and tables, a comprehensive list of publications, each citation provided with an (mostly English) Abstract and a comprehensive list of thesis, which are completed or under preparation in the corresponding working group. Additional chapters give lists of educational work, verbal presentation, cooperations with other institutions and personnel. An annex of photos gives an additional impression of the institute. (A.N.)

  3. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  4. Progressive amusia and aprosody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confavreux, C; Croisile, B; Garassus, P; Aimard, G; Trillet, M

    1992-09-01

    We report a case of slowly progressive amusia and aprosody in association with orofacial and eyelid apraxias. The patient was independent in daily living activities. Insight, judgment, and behavior were intact. Her language was normal, and she demonstrated no limb, dressing, or constructional apraxia. She had no prosopagnosia, no visuospatial disturbances, and no memory impairment. Imaging studies (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography) indicated a selective disorder of the right frontal and temporal regions. Review of the literature shows an increasing number of reports of this degenerative syndrome affecting the left dominant hemisphere and language areas, whereas cases of the syndrome affecting the right hemisphere are rare. To our knowledge, this is the first case in which aprosody and amusia were associated with a focal cortical degeneration.

  5. Vivitron - Progress report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 activity report of the Strasbourg Nuclear Research, concerning the Vivitron project, is presented. After having mounted all the Van de Graaff elements of the Vivitron needed for the generator tests, the tank was closed in July 1990. It was then put under vacuum, leaks were searched for and repaired. Voltage tests started in December and a voltage of 17.6 MV was reached in February. Modifications on the charging system and to improvement of the column protection against sparks are necessary before the voltage tests can be carried on. Great progress has been made in the setting up of the new Vivitron injector and analysing magnet. In this report are included the description of project different development steps, the Vivitron budget and the list of publications, congress contributions and internal reports. 18 figs

  6. Progressive brain compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thuomas, K.AA.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo; Vlajkovic, S.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo; Ganz, J.C.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo; Nilsson, P.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo; Bergstroem, K.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo; Ponten, U.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo; Zwetnow, N.N.; Inst. of Surgical Research, National Hospital, Oslo

    1993-01-01

    Continuous recording of vital physiological variables and sequential MR imaging were performed simultaneously during continuous expansion of an epidural rubber balloon over the left hemisphere in anaesthetised dogs. Balloon expansion led to a progressive and slgithly nonlinear rise in intracranial CSF pressures and a full in local perfusion pressures. Changes in systemic arterial pressure, pulse rate, and respiration rate usually appeared at a balloon volume of 4% to 5% of the intracranial volume (reaction volume), together with a marked transtentorial pressure gradient and MR imaging changes consistent with tentorial herniation. Respiratory arrest occurred at a balloon volume of approximately 10% of the intracranial volume (apnoea volume), which was associated with occulsion of the cisterna magna, consistent with some degree of foramen magnum herniation. Increase in tissue water was observed beginning at approximately the reaction volume, presumably due to ischaemic oedema, due to the fall in perfusion pressures. (orig.)

  7. Muon collider progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  8. Progress in nanophotonics 3

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the recent progress in nanophotonics technology to be used to develop novel nano-optical devices, fabrication technology and advanced systems. It reviews light-emitting diodes and lasers made of silicon bulk crystals in which the light emission principle is based on dressed-photon-phonons. Further topics include: theoretical studies of optoelectronic properties of molecular condensates for organic solar cells and light-emitting devices, the basics of topological light beams together with their important properties for laser spectroscopy, spatially localized modes emerging in nonlinear discrete dynamic systems and theoretical methods to explore the dynamics of nanoparticles by the light-induced force of tailored light fields under thermal fluctuations. These topics are reviewed by leading scientists. This overview is a variable resource for engineers and scientists working in the field of nanophotonics.

  9. Progress report 1979 - 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are reported obtained by staff of the IPP-Prague in the years 1979-1980 concerning high-frequency heating of plasma in tokamaks, interaction of relativistic electron beams with a plasma, and applied plasma physics. Preliminary experiments on additional hf heating in a small TM-1-MH tokamak and the new data acquisition and processing system Andromeda are described in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3 the specifications of the high-power electron accelerator REBEX 2 and some of the applied diagnostic systems (X-ray detectors and equipment for the Thomson scattering of laser light) are described in detail. Work in applied plasma physics is concentrated to thin film formation and plasma chemistry (Chpt.4). In theoretical papers in the last chapter several interesting questions of high-frequency plasma heating and beam plasma interaction are discussed (e.g., particle transport in hf-heated plasma, reflexing electron beam phenomena, particle trapping). (;.U.)

  10. Progress report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the work of these last three years of research in physics conducted in the DRF-G (Department of Fundamental Research of Grenoble). The research activities are conducted in five sections or laboratories: Solid-State physics Section, Magnetic Resonance Section, Hyperfine Interaction Laboratory and Nuclear Physics Laboratory. Researchs in nuclear physics is according to 3 axes: -fission study, -heavy ion physics at intermediate energies, -antiproton-nucleus interactions, field not explored between 5 MeV and 1 GeV. In physical metallurgy, studies are essentially concerned with crystalline and amorphous systems. Semi conductors are also the object of deepened investigations. Magnetism is a priority topic in fundamental research. In this field, rare earths and actinides studies are dominating researches. A topic introduced recently is hydrogen influence on magnetism. The molecular physico-chemical aspect is also studied [fr

  11. Annual progress report 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives a general survey of the activities and research work done in 1975 at Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay. It is divided in 5 parts. The first one is concerned with the Nuclear Physics Division and the research fields are: nuclear reactions, nuclear spectroscopy (heavy ions, on-line analog isobaric states, transfer reactions), hyperfine interactions, exotic nuclei search... The second part is concerned with the work of the High Energy Physics Division and reports the creation in Annecy of the Particle Physics Laboratory (L.A.P.P.). The third one about the Radiochemistry Division reports the research work done in nuclear chemistry (new nuclear species research, fusion, quasi-elastic transfer reactions) and in radiochemistry (cis- and trans-uranium elements, natural superheavy element research). The fourth part is concerned with theoretical research in nuclear physics (nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, weak interactions, intermediate energies) and in particle physics (field theory, gauge theory, chiral symmetry, current algebra, off-shell amplitudes and strong interactions dynamics). The fifth part reports technical research about accelerators, separators, ion sources, semiconductors and the activities of the technical departments of the Institute [fr

  12. Dynamically prioritized progressive transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, Ronald

    1992-04-01

    Retrieval of image data from a centralized database may be subject to bandwidth limitations, whether due to a low-bandwidth communications link or to contention from simultaneous accesses over a high-bandwidth link. Progressive transmission can alleviate this problem by encoding image data so that any prefix of the data stream approximates the complete image at a coarse level of resolution. The longer the prefix, the finer the resolution. In many cases, as little at 1 percent of the image data may be sufficient to decide whether to discard the image, to permit the retrieval to continue, or to restrict retrieval to a subsection of the image. Our approach treats resolution not as a fixed attribute of the image, but rather as a resource which may be allocated to portions of the image at the direction of a user-specified priority function. The default priority function minimizes error by allocating more resolution to regions of high variance. The user may also point to regions of interest requesting priority transmission. More advanced target recognition strategies may be incorporated at the user's discretion. Multispectral imagery is supported. The user engineering implications are profounded. There is immediate response to a query that might otherwise take minutes to complete. The data is transmitted in small increments so that no single user dominates the communications bandwidth. The user-directed improvement means that bandwidth is focused on interesting information. The user may continue working with the first coarse approximations while further image data is still arriving. The algorithm has been implemented in C on Sun, Silicon Graphics, and NeXT workstations, and in Lisp on a Symbolics. Transmission speeds reach as high as 60,000 baud using a Sparc or 68040 processor when storing data to memory; somewhat less if also updating a graphical display. The memory requirements are roughly five bytes per image pixel. Both computational and memory costs may be reduced

  13. Interactive Karyotyping Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kotwaliwale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the wide use of newer techniques in genetic diagnostics, there remains a need for technologists to learn human chromosome morphology, identify abnormal metaphases and report clinical abnormalities. Global short age of cytogenetic trainers and a time consuming training process makes Karyotyping training difficult. We have developed a web based interactive Karyotyping training tool, KaryoTutor©, that allows technologists to learn karyotyping in an interactive environment and aids the trainer in the training process. KaryoTutor©provides visual clues for identifying abnormal chromosomes, provides instant test scores and includes a reference library of ideograms,sample chromosome images and reference materials. Trainees are able to recursively work on a case till a satisfactory result is achieved,with KaryoTutor providing interactive inputs.Additionally, trainers can assign cases and monitor trainee progress using audit trail management and other administrative features.

  14. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanda, R.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidences to form a basis for Lagrangian Quantum field theory for Weak Interactions are discussed. In this context, gauge invariance aspects of such interactions are showed. (L.C.) [pt

  15. IPY Progress and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, D.

    2008-12-01

    We can summarize the IPY goals as: (a) make major advances in polar knowledge and understanding; (b) leave a legacy of new or enhanced observational systems, facilities and infrastructure; (c) excite a new generation of polar scientists and engineers, and (d) elicit exceptional interest and participation from polar residents, schoolchildren, the general public, and decision-makers, worldwide. This talk reports on the progress and prospects in each of those areas from an overall international view; separate talks will describe details of future researcher and the IPY outreach efforts. To achieve major advances in knowledge, IPY has entrained the intellectual resources of thousands of scientists, many more than expected, often from 'non- polar' nations, and representing an unprecedented breadth of scientific specialties; integration of those efforts across disciplines to achieve integrated system-level understanding remains a substantial challenge. Many national and international organizations prepare plans to sustain new and improved observational systems, but clear outcomes and the necessary resources remain elusive. International outreach networks gradually build breadth and strength, largely through IPY Polar Science Days and other internationally- coordinated IPY events. A new Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) devotes talent and energy to shaping the future of polar research. These activities and networks may, with time and with continued international coordination, achieve an exceptional level of interest and participation. In all areas, much work remains.

  16. CERN: LHC progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The push for CERN's next major project, the LHC proton collider to be built in the 27-kilometre LEP tunnel, is advancing on a wide front. For the machine itself, there has been considerable progress in the detailed design. While the main thrust is for proton-proton collisions, heavy ions are also on the LHC collision menu. On the experimental side, proposals are coming into sharper focus. For the machine, the main aim is for the highest possible proton collision energies and collision rates in the confines of the existing LEP tunnel, and the original base design looked to achieve these goals in three collision regions. Early discussions on the experimental programme quickly established that the most probable configuration would have two collision regions rather than three. This, combined with hints that the electronics of several detectors would have to handle several bunch crossings at a time, raised the question whether the originally specified bunch spacing of 15 ns was still optimal

  17. Progress in neuromorphic photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira de Lima, Thomas; Shastri, Bhavin J.; Tait, Alexander N.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2017-03-01

    As society's appetite for information continues to grow, so does our need to process this information with increasing speed and versatility. Many believe that the one-size-fits-all solution of digital electronics is becoming a limiting factor in certain areas such as data links, cognitive radio, and ultrafast control. Analog photonic devices have found relatively simple signal processing niches where electronics can no longer provide sufficient speed and reconfigurability. Recently, the landscape for commercially manufacturable photonic chips has been changing rapidly and now promises to achieve economies of scale previously enjoyed solely by microelectronics. By bridging the mathematical prowess of artificial neural networks to the underlying physics of optoelectronic devices, neuromorphic photonics could breach new domains of information processing demanding significant complexity, low cost, and unmatched speed. In this article, we review the progress in neuromorphic photonics, focusing on photonic integrated devices. The challenges and design rules for optoelectronic instantiation of artificial neurons are presented. The proposed photonic architecture revolves around the processing network node composed of two parts: a nonlinear element and a network interface. We then survey excitable lasers in the recent literature as candidates for the nonlinear node and microring-resonator weight banks as the network interface. Finally, we compare metrics between neuromorphic electronics and neuromorphic photonics and discuss potential applications.

  18. Progress report, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The report describes a number of areas of research at the TRIUMPH facility. Substantial progress has been made in the experiment to measure charge symmetry breaking in the n-p system. The investigations on polarized nucleon radiative capture on light nuclei have been ongoing with results of the excitation function for p + d→γ + 3 He reaction being published. Studies of the n + p→d + γ reactions are continuing. Results have been obtained in the determination of structure in the three nucleon system by studying the reaction anti d + p using tensor polarized deuterons. The Wolfenstein R-parameter in proton - 4 He elastic scattering has been measured at 500 MeV from 15 to 50 degrees (lab.) using the focal plane polarimeter on the MRS. Other experiments involving quasi-elastic scattering of polarized protons at 300 MeV, fission evaporation competition in heavy nuclei and proton-proton bremsstrahlung have been carried out. The status of the Bevelac heavy ion collaboration and the MWPC facility is also included

  19. Progressive myoclonic epilepsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelucci, Roberto; Canafoglia, Laura; Striano, Pasquale; Gambardella, Antonio; Magaudda, Adriana; Tinuper, Paolo; La Neve, Angela; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Visani, Elisa; Panzica, Ferruccio; Avanzini, Giuliano; Tassinari, Carlo Alberto; Bianchi, Amedeo; Zara, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To define the clinical spectrum and etiology of progressive myoclonic epilepsies (PMEs) in Italy using a database developed by the Genetics Commission of the Italian League against Epilepsy. Methods: We collected clinical and laboratory data from patients referred to 25 Italian epilepsy centers regardless of whether a positive causative factor was identified. PMEs of undetermined origins were grouped using 2-step cluster analysis. Results: We collected clinical data from 204 patients, including 77 with a diagnosis of Unverricht-Lundborg disease and 37 with a diagnosis of Lafora body disease; 31 patients had PMEs due to rarer genetic causes, mainly neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. Two more patients had celiac disease. Despite extensive investigation, we found no definitive etiology for 57 patients. Cluster analysis indicated that these patients could be grouped into 2 clusters defined by age at disease onset, age at myoclonus onset, previous psychomotor delay, seizure characteristics, photosensitivity, associated signs other than those included in the cardinal definition of PME, and pathologic MRI findings. Conclusions: Information concerning the distribution of different genetic causes of PMEs may provide a framework for an updated diagnostic workup. Phenotypes of the patients with PME of undetermined cause varied widely. The presence of separate clusters suggests that novel forms of PME are yet to be clinically and genetically characterized. PMID:24384641

  20. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work in basic nuclear physics carried out between October 1, 1995, the closing of our last Progress Report, and September 30, 1996 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contracts DE-FG03-93ER-40774 and DE-FG03-95ER-40913 with the United States Department of Energy. The experimental contract supports broadly-based experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics. This report includes results from studies of Elementary Systems involving the study of the structure of the nucleon via polarized high-energy positron scattering (the HERMES experiment) and lower energy pion scattering from both polarized and unpolarized nucleon targets. Results from pion- and kaon-induced reactions in a variety of nuclear systems are reported under the section heading Meson Reactions; the impact of these and other results on understanding the nucleus is presented in the Nuclear Structure section. In addition, new results from scattering of high-energy electrons (from CEBAF/TJNAF) and pions (from KEK) from a broad range of nuclei are reported in the section on Incoherent Reactions. Finally, the development and performance of detectors produced by the laboratory are described in the section titled Instrumentation

  1. Resistance to technological progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isensee, J.

    1983-01-01

    This article deals with the tolerance test the constitutional system (Basic Law) of the Federal Republic of Germany is currently put to as a consequence of the resistance to the power structure of this country, which is expressed in the name of protection and defense for the environment and world peace. This biopacifistic resistance movment, the author says, has nothing to do with the legal right to resist, as laid down in art. 20 (4) of the Basic Law. According to the author, this attitude is an offspring of fear of the hazards of technological progress, primarily of nuclear hazards. Practical resistance, the author states, is preceded by theoretical resistance in speech: De-legitimation of the democratic legality, of the parliamentary functions, of the supreme power of the government, and denial of the citizens duty of obedience. The author raises the question as to whether this attitude of disobedience on ecological grounds marks the onset of a fourth stage of development of the modern state, after we have passed through stages characterised by fear of civil war, of tyranny, and of social privation and suffering. There are no new ideas brought forward by the ecologically minded movement, the author says, for re-shaping our institutions or constitutional system. (HP) [de

  2. Progress in Pasotron Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkvarunets, A.G.; Carmel, Y.; Nusinovich, G.S.; Abu-elfadl, T.M.; Rodgers, J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Granatstein, V.; Bliokh, Y.; Goebel, D.M.; Verboncoeur, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional microwave sources utilize strong axial magnetic field to guide an electron beam through an interaction region. A plasma-assisted slow-wave microwave oscillator (Pasotron) can operate without external magnetic field because the presence of ions neutralizes the beam space charge and allows for radial motion of electrons under the action of transverse fields of the wave. The inherent efficiency of conventional microwave sources based on interaction of the backward wave with a 1-D electron flow is typically limited to 15-20%. By taking advantage of the 2-D electron motion in the pasotron, a 50% conversion efficiency of beam to microwave energy was demonstrated experimentally in a megawatt class device operating at a beam voltage of 40kV. Furthermore, theoretical studies indicated that an efficiency of 60-70% might be possible. A research effort is now under way with the goal of extending this remarkable performance to even higher power and energy levels. The challenges associated with efficient, higher voltage/current operation of the pasotron are: beam dynamics and stability; spectral purity and mode competition; limiting currents. Most recent activities will be reviewed, with an emphasis on stationary and transient beam dynamics and scaling laws for high power pasotrons

  3. Multiparton interactions. Theory and experimental findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, Markus

    2013-06-15

    I give an introduction to multiparton interactions in proton-proton collisions, with a focus on the perturbative regime. Recent experimental results are discussed, as well as progress and open questions in theory.

  4. Intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, I.G.; Rodimova, O.B.; AN SSSR, Tomsk. Inst. Optiki Atmosfery)

    1978-01-01

    The present state of the intermolecular interaction theory is described. The general physical picture of the molecular interactions is given, the relative contributions of interactions of different types are analyzed (electrostatic, resonance, induction, dispersion, relativistic, magnetostatic and exchange), and the main ones in each range of separations are picked out. The methods of the potential curve calculations are considered, specific for definite separations between the interacting systems. The special attention is paid to the analysis of approximations used in different theoretical calculation methods

  5. Interactive Nonlinear Multiobjective Optimization Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Miettinen, Kaisa; Hakanen, Jussi; Podkopaev, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    An overview of interactive methods for solving nonlinear multiobjective optimization problems is given. In interactive methods, the decision maker progressively provides preference information so that the most satisfactory Pareto optimal solution can be found for her or his. The basic features of several methods are introduced and some theoretical results are provided. In addition, references to modifications and applications as well as to other methods are indicated. As the...

  6. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science II

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Agostini, Pierre; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2007-01-01

    This book series addresses a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field, Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. Its progress is being stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Highlights of this second volume include Coulomb explosion and fragmentation of molecules, control of chemical dynamics, high-order harmonic generation, propagation and filamentation, and laser-plasma interaction. All chapters are authored by foremost experts in their fields and the texts are written at a level accessible to newcomers and graduate students, each chapter beginning with an introductory overview.

  7. The 1989 progress report: theoretical Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, G.

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 progress report of the laboratory of theoretical Physics of the Polytechnic School (France) is presented. The investigations reported concern the following subjects: the transport of a passive vector by a flow, the conformal field theories, the dynamics of wetting, the electromagnetic properties of composite materials, the neutrino oscillations, the heavy ion collision phenomenology, the laser-plasma interaction, the construction of a code for simulating the evolution of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in plasmas. The published papers, the conferences and the Laboratory staff are listed [fr

  8. The 1989 progress report: quantum optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flytzanis, C.

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 progress report of the laboratory of Quantum Optics of the Polytechnic School (France) is presented. The main research activity of the Laboratory is the study of processes controlling the behavior of matter under the action of high intensity light fields and under space-time constraints. The reported investigations were performed in the following fields: dynamics and vibrational relaxation modes in dense phases; nonlinear optical properties of composite materials; surface energy transfer and distribution in molecule surface interactions. Techniques relating to femtosecond impulsions, pulsating Raman and nonlinear optics were developed. The published papers, the conferences and the Laboratory staff are listed [fr

  9. Progress in photon science basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book features chapters based on lectures presented by world-leading researchers of photon science from Russia and Japan at the first “STEPS Symposium on Photon Science” held in Tokyo in March 2015. It describes recent progress in the field of photon science, covering a wide range of interest to experts in the field, including laser-plasma interaction, filamentation and its applications, laser assisted electron scattering, exotic properties of light, ultrafast imaging, molecules and clusters in intense laser fields, photochemistry and spectroscopy of novel materials, laser-assisted material synthesis, and photon technology.

  10. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Cadenhead, D A

    1971-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 4 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses waves at interfaces; recent investigations on the thickness of surface layers; and surface analysis by low-energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. The text also describes the anode electrolyte interface; the interactions of adsorbed proteins and polypeptides at interfaces; and peptide-induced ion transport in synthetic and biological membranes. The monolayer adsorption on crystalline surfaces is also considered. Chemists and metallurgi

  11. Progress report 1999-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This document presents the activities of the CENBG for the 1999 and 2000 years. The activities are arranged into 7 topics: 1) astro-particles, 2) high spins and big deformations, 3) fundamental interactions, 4) exotic nuclei, 5) the down end of the nuclear fuel cycle and ADS (accelerator driven system), 6) theoretical physics and 7) at the interface between physics and biology. Among a lot of achievements relevant to INIS we can note: -) the investigation of 2 new modes of decay: the bound internal conversion and the Pauli forbidden bound internal conversion, -) the progress made on the Nemo-3 experiment whose purpose is the possibility of detecting the neutrinoless double beta decay from the kinematics specificities of the 2 electrons released, -) the first observation of the doubly-magic nucleus Ni 48 , -) the beta delayed proton and gamma -ray spectroscopy of Mg 21 and Si 25 nuclei, -) the identification of the fundamental state of Li 10 , -) the measurement of the masses of nuclei close to N = Z line in the region A = 80, -) the measurement of the beta decay of Ga 62 (T = 116 ms), and concerning ADS technology: -) the neutron capture cross-section of Th 232 has been measured in the energy range from 60 keV to 2 MeV, -) the determination of neutron induced fission cross-section of Pa 233 in the fast neutron energy range from 0.5 to 10 MeV, and -) the measurement of isotopic distributions for all residual elements from Ti to Pb produced in the reaction 1 A.GeV Pb 208 on proton. (A.C.)

  12. Towards empathic neurofeedback for interactive storytelling

    OpenAIRE

    Cavazza, Marc; Aranyi, Gabor; Charles, Fred; Porteous, Julie; Gilroy, Stephen; Klovatch, Ilana; Jackont, Gilan; Soreq, Eyal; Keynan, Nimrod Jakob; Cohen, Avihay; Raz, Gal; Hendler, Talma

    2014-01-01

    Interactive Narrative is a form of digital entertainment based on AI techniques which support narrative\\ud generation and user interaction. Despite recent progress in the field, there is still a lack of unified models\\ud integrating narrative generation, user response and interaction.\\ud This paper addresses this issue by revisiting existing Interactive Narrative paradigms, granting explicit\\ud status to users’ disposition towards story characters. We introduce a novel Brain-Computer Interfac...

  13. Progress in fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    thermonuclear research, the work was being conducted on more or less similar lines, the basic problems encountered were the same and the results obtained were strikingly similar. Commenting on this fact, Professor Edward Teller of the United States said: 'it is remarkable how closely parallel the developments are. This is of course due to the fact that we all live in the same world and all obey the same laws of nature'. And this underlined, more than ever before, the need for a wide exchange of knowledge and experience so that duplication of effort could be avoided and progress made quicker by a pooling of information on the latest experimental results and theoretical deductions. A major concrete step in this direction has been taken by the Scientific Advisory Committee of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which recommended that the Agency should serve as the world focal point for the exchange of information on progress in thermonuclear research and plasma physics. Among the Committee's specific recommendations was that the Agency should start a scientific journal devoted exclusively to this subject. The proposed journal is expected to make its first appearance next year. It will contain, among other things, original papers on theoretical and applied research as well as on related engineering developments. Also the need arises for a permanent forum need will be met in large measure by IAEA's programme of work in this field

  14. The Thermochronologist's Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    We owe our current understanding of thermochronology less to a series of revolutionary insights than to a somewhat uneven intellectual pilgrimage that over fifty years has progressed in fits and starts. Though hampered at times by overenthusiasm, oversimplification, and misunderstandings, on balance the field advanced thanks to a blend of curiosity-driven research, tool-building motivated by new ideas about Earth science, and improvements in technology. But now that we've exploited most radiogenic systems and the major minerals that host them, and now that our models can devour CPU time along with the best of them, are we done? Have we reached peak thermochron? The answer of course is no, and papers in this session will demonstrate what new technologies and techniques might have to offer in the coming years. However, I will argue that the discipline as a whole has matured to a point where if thermochronology is to remain a mainstream tool as opposed to a weekend sport, we need to get serious about several challenges. The most fundamental challenge is that current geodynamic models (and even more complex models we can envision coding) have outpaced our meagre stockpile of kinetic calibrations, our understanding of detailed isotope systematics, and our ability to generate data with sufficient throughput. These issues will not be addressed adequately through the business-as-usual approach that brought us to our current knowledge, and some community effort will probably be needed to coordinate the hard work that will be required. But any serious attempt to answer important questions with accurate thermal histories that have low and well-defined uncertainties will require that we actually know the kinetics for the specific samples we are analyzing, that we fully understand scatter in the data, that we work with the large sample numbers that are required for some problems like landscape evolution, and that inversion tools fully explore the important aspects of both the

  15. Medulloblastoma: progress over time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smee, Robert I.; Williams, Janet R.; De-loyde, Katie J.; Meagher, Nicola S.; Cohn, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common central nervous system tumour in children aged 0–4 years, with 75% of cases occurring in patients <16 years, and rare in adults. The intent of this audit is to review a single centre's experience and to compare outcomes with other centres' outcomes. This Ethics approved retrospective audit evaluates the paediatric population aged <16 years who received radiotherapy as their initial or salvage treatment at the Prince of Wales Hospital Cancer Centre between 1972 and 2007. The primary and secondary end-points were progression-free survival (PFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS), with comparisons made between patients treated before and after 1990, and the impact of high- and low-risk disease. There were 80 eligible patients, 78 who had radiotherapy at initial presentation, and 2 at the time of recurrence. Median age was 6.5 years, 52 were boys and 28 were girls. Seventy-eight patients had a surgical procedure and ultimately received craniospinal radiotherapy. Of these 78 patients, 32 (40%) had a macroscopically complete resection. The 5-year PFS was 69.7%. The 5-year PFS for patients treated pre and post 1990 was 66.1% and 71.8%, respectively. The 5-year CSS for high- and low-risk patients was 61.1% and 78.4%, respectively. Ultimately, 33% of patients were dead due to disease. This audit demonstrates those children referred to this facility for treatment have comparable survival to that of other major centres.

  16. 1997 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchini, M.; Crescentini, L.; Ghezzi, L. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Nuclear fusion division

    1997-12-31

    1997 was another year of intense activity for the ENEA Nuclear Fusion Division in the evolving scenario of fusion research. With respect to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), a major review process has started, originate by the wide perception that the difficult financial situation affecting some of the parties would make it very difficult, practically impossible, to secure funding for the project as it stands. To scale down the size and cost of the machine by reducing the technical objectives, while keeping to the programmatic goal of constructing a demonstration reactor (DEMO) as the following step, appears achievable. Progress in physics was substantial during 1997. Analysis of the huge existing database, complemented by the latest results, had led to a better, more accurate scaling for the confinement time on which to base extrapolation to ITER. Studies of the very promising advanced regimes have been pursued on many tokamaks. The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is well placed in this respect since it is equipped with the right tools, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating and current drive systems, to explore the new promised land of low transport from the plasma core. The main highlights of FTU operation in 1997 were related to providing information relevant to these future developments. Transient production of low transport regimes with electron temperatures of 8-9 keV at the plasma center was obtained by taking advantage of the plasma skin effect and precise electron cyclotron power deposition. High-efficiency current drive at high density using lower hybrid waves was demonstrated. High-confinement pellet-enhanced modes of operation and good ion Bernstein wave coupling through the waveguide-type coupler were also achieved. Concerning the IGNITOR experiment, funds were made available only for continuation of the engineering design activities, and nothing has been released so far for manufacturing the additional

  17. 1997 Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchini, M.; Crescentini, L.; Ghezzi, L.

    1997-01-01

    1997 was another year of intense activity for the ENEA Nuclear Fusion Division in the evolving scenario of fusion research. With respect to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), a major review process has started, originate by the wide perception that the difficult financial situation affecting some of the parties would make it very difficult, practically impossible, to secure funding for the project as it stands. To scale down the size and cost of the machine by reducing the technical objectives, while keeping to the programmatic goal of constructing a demonstration reactor (DEMO) as the following step, appears achievable. Progress in physics was substantial during 1997. Analysis of the huge existing database, complemented by the latest results, had led to a better, more accurate scaling for the confinement time on which to base extrapolation to ITER. Studies of the very promising advanced regimes have been pursued on many tokamaks. The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is well placed in this respect since it is equipped with the right tools, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating and current drive systems, to explore the new promised land of low transport from the plasma core. The main highlights of FTU operation in 1997 were related to providing information relevant to these future developments. Transient production of low transport regimes with electron temperatures of 8-9 keV at the plasma center was obtained by taking advantage of the plasma skin effect and precise electron cyclotron power deposition. High-efficiency current drive at high density using lower hybrid waves was demonstrated. High-confinement pellet-enhanced modes of operation and good ion Bernstein wave coupling through the waveguide-type coupler were also achieved. Concerning the IGNITOR experiment, funds were made available only for continuation of the engineering design activities, and nothing has been released so far for manufacturing the additional

  18. HYLIFE-2 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Adamson, M.G.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bieri, R.L.; Condit, R.H.; Hartman, C.W.; House, P.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Logan, B.G.; Orth, C.D.; Petzoldt, R.W.; Pitts, J.H.; Post, R.F.; Sacks, R.A.; Tobin, M.T.; Williams, W.H.; Dolan, T.J.; Longhurst, G.R.; Hoffman, M.A.; Meier, W.R.

    1991-12-01

    LIFE-II inertial confinement fusion power plant design study uses a liquid fall, in the form of jets to protect the first structural wall from neutron damage, x rays, and blast to provide a 30-y lifetime. This is a progress report of an incomplete and ongoing study. HYLIFE-I used liquid lithium. HYLIFE-11 avoids the fire hazard of lithium by using a molten salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium (Li 2 Be 4 ) called Flibe. Access for heavy-ion beams is provided. Calculations for assumed heavy-ion beam performance show a nominal gain of 70 at 5 MJ producing 350 MJ, about 5.2 times less yield than the 1.8 GJ from a driver energy of 4.5 MJ with gain of 400 for HYLIFE-I. The nominal 1 GWe of power can be maintained by increasing the repetition rate by a factor of about 5.2, from 1.5 to 8 Hz. A higher repetition rate requires faster re-establishment of the jets after a shot, which can be accomplished in part by decreasing the jet fall height and increasing the jet flow velocity. Multiple chambers may be required.In addition, although not considered for HYLIFE-I there is undoubtedly liquid splash that must be forcibly cleared because gravity is too slow, especially at high repetition rates. Splash removal can be accomplished by either pulsed or oscillating jet flows. The cost of electricity is estimated to be 0.10 $/kW· in constant 1990 dollars, about twice that of future coal and light water reactor nuclear power. The driver beam cost is about one-half the total cost

  19. Progress report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Clean Air Hamilton is the new name of the Hamilton-Wentworth Air Quality Initiative and its implementation committee, which began in 1995 as a collaborative, multi-sectoral effort to identify and examine important air quality issues and to implement strategies to reduce many of the harmful emissions that endanger human health. During the year 2000 Clean Air Hamilton focused on nine program areas. Strategies were initiated to (1) reduce single occupancy auto trips, (2) purchase low emission vehicles, (3) model transportation emissions, (4) reduce smog-causing emissions, (5) plant trees, (6) provide advice on air quality related land use and transportation issues for consideration in city-wide planning, (7) promote public awareness through social marketing, (8) study fugitive road dust, and (9) reduce transboundary air pollution. A number of indicators to measure progress in efforts to improve air quality have been developed; many of these indicators show significant improvements which, taken collectively, show a positive trend toward cleaner air. The report highlights major accomplishment of Clean Air Hamilton; reports trends in ambient air quality data; assesses human health impacts of air quality, and recommends strategies for further improvements. Among major improvements, inhalable particulate (PM10) levels have decreased by about 20 per cent since 1991; sulphur dioxide levels dropped by 40 per cent since 1989 at industrial sampling sites and 20 per cent at the downtown sampling site; the air pollution index has remained under the advisory level of 32 at all API stations in Hamilton since June 1996. Benzene levels in air decreased by over 50 per cent near the Dofasco plant compared to the five-year composite average from 1994-1998. Given these accomplishments, participants in Clean Air Hamilton believe that while there is much room for improvement, the efforts to date have been worthwhile and provide encouragement for the future. 14 figs., 4 appendices

  20. 1997 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchini, M; Crescentini, L; Ghezzi, L [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Nuclear fusion division

    1998-12-31

    1997 was another year of intense activity for the ENEA Nuclear Fusion Division in the evolving scenario of fusion research. With respect to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), a major review process has started, originate by the wide perception that the difficult financial situation affecting some of the parties would make it very difficult, practically impossible, to secure funding for the project as it stands. To scale down the size and cost of the machine by reducing the technical objectives, while keeping to the programmatic goal of constructing a demonstration reactor (DEMO) as the following step, appears achievable. Progress in physics was substantial during 1997. Analysis of the huge existing database, complemented by the latest results, had led to a better, more accurate scaling for the confinement time on which to base extrapolation to ITER. Studies of the very promising advanced regimes have been pursued on many tokamaks. The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is well placed in this respect since it is equipped with the right tools, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating and current drive systems, to explore the new promised land of low transport from the plasma core. The main highlights of FTU operation in 1997 were related to providing information relevant to these future developments. Transient production of low transport regimes with electron temperatures of 8-9 keV at the plasma center was obtained by taking advantage of the plasma skin effect and precise electron cyclotron power deposition. High-efficiency current drive at high density using lower hybrid waves was demonstrated. High-confinement pellet-enhanced modes of operation and good ion Bernstein wave coupling through the waveguide-type coupler were also achieved. Concerning the IGNITOR experiment, funds were made available only for continuation of the engineering design activities, and nothing has been released so far for manufacturing the additional

  1. Effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter attempts to describe and compare some of the more important nucleon-nucleon interactions that have been used in nuclear structure calculations, and to relate them where possible to the real nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explains that different interactions have been used depending on whether one is fitting to total binding energies and densities with a Hartree Fock (HF) calculation or fitting to spectra and spectroscopic data in a shell model calculation. Examines both types of calculation after two preliminary sections concerned with notation and with the philosophy underlying the use of model spaces and effective interactions. Discusses Skyrme interactions, finite range interactions, small model space, large model space, and the Sussex potential matrix elements. Focuses on the more empirical approaches in which a simple form is chosen for the effective interaction in a given model space and the parameters are deduced from fitting many-body data

  2. Cancer nanomedicine: progress, challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinjun; Kantoff, Philip W; Wooster, Richard; Farokhzad, Omid C

    2017-01-01

    The intrinsic limits of conventional cancer therapies prompted the development and application of various nanotechnologies for more effective and safer cancer treatment, herein referred to as cancer nanomedicine. Considerable technological success has been achieved in this field, but the main obstacles to nanomedicine becoming a new paradigm in cancer therapy stem from the complexities and heterogeneity of tumour biology, an incomplete understanding of nano-bio interactions and the challenges regarding chemistry, manufacturing and controls required for clinical translation and commercialization. This Review highlights the progress, challenges and opportunities in cancer nanomedicine and discusses novel engineering approaches that capitalize on our growing understanding of tumour biology and nano-bio interactions to develop more effective nanotherapeutics for cancer patients.

  3. Research in theoretical nuclear physics: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    In April 1988 we, along with the nuclear theory groups of Brookhaven and MIT, submitted a proposal to the Department of Energy for a national Institute of Theoretical Nuclear Physics. The primary areas of investigation proposed for this Institute are: Strong Interaction Physics--including (1) The physics of hadrons, (2) QCD and the nucleus, (3) QCD at finite temperatures and high density; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure and nuclear many-body theory; and nuclear tests of fundamental interactions. It is, of course, no coincidence that these are the main areas of activity of the three groups involved in this proposal and of our group in particular. Here, we will organize an outline of the progress made at Stony Brook during the past year along these lines. These four areas do not cover all of the activities of our group

  4. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XII

    CERN Document Server

    Roso, Luis; Li, Ruxin; Mathur, Deepak; Normand, Didier

    2015-01-01

    This  volume covers a broad range of topics focusing on atoms, molecules, and clusters interacting in intense laser field, laser induced filamentation, and laser plasma interaction and application. The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. .

  5. Scientific Progress in Strategic Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul

    Does the RBV represent a case of scientific progress? And has it emerged as the dominant approach to the analysis of competitive advantage for this reason? Conventional criteria for scientific progress, notably those of the growth of knowledge literature, are not particularly helpful for understa...

  6. Periodic progress report, 6 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    This is the first progress report of the BriteEuram project named "High Power Laser Cutting for Heavy Industry" ("Powercut"). The report contains a summary of the objectives of the first period, an overview of the technical progress, a comparison between the planed and the accomplished work...

  7. Sepsis progression and outcome: a dynamical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessler Damian DG

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis (bloodstream infection is the leading cause of death in non-surgical intensive care units. It is diagnosed in 750,000 US patients per annum, and has high mortality. Current understanding of sepsis is predominately observational and correlational, with only a partial and incomplete understanding of the physiological dynamics underlying the syndrome. There exists a need for dynamical models of sepsis progression, based upon basic physiologic principles, which could eventually guide hourly treatment decisions. Results We present an initial mathematical model of sepsis, based on metabolic rate theory that links basic vascular and immunological dynamics. The model includes the rate of vascular circulation, a surrogate for the metabolic rate that is mechanistically associated with disease progression. We use the mass-specific rate of blood circulation (SRBC, a correlate of the body mass index, to build a differential equation model of circulation, infection, organ damage, and recovery. This introduces a vascular component into an infectious disease model that describes the interaction between a pathogen and the adaptive immune system. Conclusion The model predicts that deviations from normal SRBC correlate with disease progression and adverse outcome. We compare the predictions with population mortality data from cardiovascular disease and cancer and show that deviations from normal SRBC correlate with higher mortality rates.

  8. Skyhook project: progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, E.J.; Prioleau, J.C.; Mahlmann, L.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have initiated two types of animal experiments to complement and extend the existing data base comparing low- and high-LET radiations, and the studies utilize the Harderian gland model and range-finding or pilot studies on life-span shortening after exposure to heavy charged particles characterized by different LETs. Results from the animal studies have yielded new information concerning relationships between LET and carcinogenic effects and the animal studies are of themselves complementary. The Harderian gland model yields information on in-vivo transformation under conditions of tumor promotion that result from excess pituitary hormones, while the life-span studies, involving no extraneous promotion, indicate interactions between tumor induction and expression. Comparison of tumorigenic results on the Harderian gland and life shortening responses are expected to be highly informative. The purpose of the Skyhook Project was to test the hypothesis that LET was an adequate predictor for life shortening and that low-energy charged particles characterized by a LET approximately the same as that for fission neutrons would produce quantitatively similar life-shortening results after single or multifractionated doses. Another purpose was to evaluate life shortening, using comparatively high doses, over a LET range from less than 1 to approximately 200 keV/μm

  9. CRN: 1987 Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In the Nuclear Research Center activity report, the research works effected in each of the following departments are shown: Nuclear Physics: theoretical and experimental Nuclear Physics Works, technical studies, accomplishments and applications, the Vivitron, publications, conferences and diplomas. High Energies: theoretical and experimental Physics, the LEP-DELPHI project, the NA36 experiment (strange baryons and antibaryons production in relativistic ions collisions), technical developments, publications, conferences and diplomas. Radiation Chemistry and Physics (research reports are separated in six sections): (1) Molecular and Atomic Physics and Physical Chemistry, where the main subjects are Molecular Physics, matter-radiation interactions, positon and positronium chemistry and radiochemistry; (2) Materials Science and condensed matter studies, in which the main topics are the materials elaboration and characterization, Mossbauer spectroscopy and defect implantations; (3) Analysis and instrumentation describing short time applied Optics and sensors; (4) The nuclear reactor service with neutron activation analysis and short life radioisotopes; (5) Publications, communications, conferences, thesis and researchers' stay; (6) Technology transfers concerning accelerators, dosimetry and aliments ionization [fr

  10. LHC progress report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Last weekend saw a record physics fill with a tenfold increase in instantaneous luminosity (event rate from collisions), marking an important milestone for the LHC. This physics fill did not only establish luminosities above 1.1 x 1028 cm-2 s-1 in all four experiments but was also kept in "stable beam" mode for a new record length of 30 hours. The particle physics experiments were able to more than double the total number of events so far recorded at 3.5 TeV.   The LHC screen indicating that squeezed stable beams have been achieved for the first time. The very successful weekend had been preceded by hard work on the accelerator side. A factor 5 improvement in luminosity was achieved by "squeezing" (reducing) the beam sizes at all four interaction points. This process, one of the most complex stages in the operation of the accelerator, was finalised the week before. Once the machine is "squeezed", the experimental insertions become aperture bot...

  11. Progress report 1998 - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This document reviews the activities of CPPM (center of particle physics in Marseille) for the years 1998 - 1999. The main axis of research are particle physics, elementary components of the matter and their interactions, and astro-particles. The laboratory takes part in international collaborations concerning experiments at CERN, DESY (Hamburg) and Fermilab (Chicago), it also contributes to the design of particle detectors for the large hadron collider (LHC) and for the undersea detection of cosmic neutrinos (Antares). The activities of CPPM have been reported under 8 topics : 1) the Aleph experiment, 2) the Antares project, 3) the Atlas experiment, 4) the Cplear experiment (dedicated to the study of CP, T and CPT symmetries in the system of neutral kaons), 5) the DO experiment (whose aim is to detect supersymmetric particles at the Tevatron), 6) the H1 detector (its main aim is the study of the proton structure at the Hera electron-proton collider), 7) LHCb (it is a second generation experiment dedicated to the study of CP breaking and rare decays in the beauty sector), and 8) Susy, Susy is a working group inside the CNRS, it gathers theoricians and experimenters from different backgrounds, its aim is to study supersymmetry in order to catch a glimpse of the physics beyond the standard model. (A.C.)

  12. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the use of weak interaction laws to study models of elementary particles is discussed. The most typical examples of weak interaction is beta-decay of nucleons and muons. Beta-interaction is presented by quark currents in the form of universal interaction of the V-A type. Universality of weak interactions is well confirmed using as examples e- and μ-channels of pion decay. Hypothesis on partial preservation of axial current is applicable to the analysis of processes with pion participation. In the framework of the model with four flavours lepton decays of hadrons are considered. Weak interaction without lepton participation are also considered. Properties of neutral currents are described briefly

  13. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  14. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  15. CBM progress report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, N.; Rami, F.; Roehrich, D.; Stroth, J.; Wessels, J.; Zaitsev, Yu

    2008-02-15

    This report documents the activities within the CBM project in 2007. Significant progress has been made in the optimization of the simulation software, the layout and development of detectors, the design of front-end electronics, and the concepts for data acquisition. The simulation and analysis routines have been completely integrated into the software framework (FAIRoot and CBMroot), and can be used now easily by users outside GSI. A breakthrough has been achieved in the development of fast algorithms for track and vertex reconstruction which have been improved in speed by a factor of 10{sup 5}. These fast routines permit to perform high-statistics simulations for detailed detector layout optimization. Full event reconstruction based on realistic detector properties and particle multiplicities as given by microscopic transport models are routinely used in the feasibility studies. A version of the Silicon Tracking System is now implemented in the simulation software comprising 8 detector layers based on microstrip technology only, including the readout cables, and the mechanical detector structure. The studies of open charm detection have been extended to D{sub s}{sup +} and {lambda}{sub c}, taking into account a realistic layout of the Silicon Pixel Microvertex detector. The identification of electrons has been optimized by improved ring recognition algorithms and transition radiation simulations. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector has been redesigned, resulting in a reduction by a factor of two in mirror size and number of readout channels without reducing the pion rejection capability. The muon detection system has been optimized with respect to the number of detector layers. The muon simulations take into account detector inefficiencies and a segmentation of the muon chambers into pads according to a nominal occupancy of 5% for central Au+Au collisions. Studies for a dimuon trigger show promising results. Radiation dose simulations using the FLUKA

  16. CBM progress report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, N.; Rami, F.; Roehrich, D.; Stroth, J.; Wessels, J.; Zaitsev, Yu

    2008-02-01

    This report documents the activities within the CBM project in 2007. Significant progress has been made in the optimization of the simulation software, the layout and development of detectors, the design of front-end electronics, and the concepts for data acquisition. The simulation and analysis routines have been completely integrated into the software framework (FAIRoot and CBMroot), and can be used now easily by users outside GSI. A breakthrough has been achieved in the development of fast algorithms for track and vertex reconstruction which have been improved in speed by a factor of 10 5 . These fast routines permit to perform high-statistics simulations for detailed detector layout optimization. Full event reconstruction based on realistic detector properties and particle multiplicities as given by microscopic transport models are routinely used in the feasibility studies. A version of the Silicon Tracking System is now implemented in the simulation software comprising 8 detector layers based on microstrip technology only, including the readout cables, and the mechanical detector structure. The studies of open charm detection have been extended to D s + and Λ c , taking into account a realistic layout of the Silicon Pixel Microvertex detector. The identification of electrons has been optimized by improved ring recognition algorithms and transition radiation simulations. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector has been redesigned, resulting in a reduction by a factor of two in mirror size and number of readout channels without reducing the pion rejection capability. The muon detection system has been optimized with respect to the number of detector layers. The muon simulations take into account detector inefficiencies and a segmentation of the muon chambers into pads according to a nominal occupancy of 5% for central Au+Au collisions. Studies for a dimuon trigger show promising results. Radiation dose simulations using the FLUKA transport code have been

  17. Progress in the leukemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galton, D.A.G.; Spiers, A.S.D.

    1971-01-01

    Recent work on the epidemiology of leukemia is reviewed in relation to factors of possible etiologic importance. There is still much geographic variation in the accuracy of diagnosis, the reliability of death certification, and the provision of national registries for classifying leukemia according to cytologic type. This variation and the low incidence of all types of leukemia make difficult the recognition of potentially significant distributions or trends that might suggest the operation of environmental leukemogens and their interaction with genetically determined susceptibility. Exposure to ionizing radiation remains the only predisposing factor beyond doubt for acute and chronic granulocytic leukemia, but its exact role remains obscure. There is no evidence that radiation plays a part in the etiology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In the population of survivors of the Hiroshima atomic bomb explosion of 1945, the incidence of leukemia (mainly CGL), though declining in the second 10-year period, was still higher than that of Japan as a whole. The suggestion that the exposure of women to radiation could increase the likelihood of leukemia in their still unconceived children was examined by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in a prospective study of 17,700 children, and no increase in the incidence of leukemia was found in the children of parents who had been heavily exposed to radiation before conception. In the 1960's a decline in the United States mortality rates for leukemia among the white population was recorded. This decline was most marked in children below age 5, and it was suggested that the decline could have resulted from a drop in the use of diagnostic radiology in pregnant women following the reports in 1956 of the Medical Research Council and the National Academy of Sciences on the biologic hazards of radiation. A similar decline in mortality was reported from Norway. (464 references) (U.S.)

  18. Interactive Realism | Ruttkamp | South African Journal of Philosophy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I investigate a new understanding of realism in science, referred to as 'interactive realism', and I suggest the 'evolutionary progressiveness' of a theory as novel criterion for this kind of realism. My basic claim is that we cannot be realists about anything except the progress affected by myriad science-reality interactions that ...

  19. Psychological functioning in primary progressive versus secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vleugels, L; Pfennings, L E; Pouwer, F

    1998-01-01

    Psychological functioning in two types of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is assessed: primary progressive (PP) and secondary progressive (SP) patients. On the basis of differences in clinical course and underlying pathology we hypothesized that primary progressive patients and secondary...... progressive patients might have different psychological functioning. Seventy patients treated in an MS centre were examined cross-sectionally. Forty had an SP course of MS and 30 a PP course. The 33 male and 37 female patients had a mean age of 48.4 years (SD 11.2) and mean age of onset of MS of 30.7 years...... (SD 11.1). Patients completed questionnaires measuring among others the following aspects of psychological functioning: depression (BDI, SCL-90), anxiety (STAI, SCL-90), agoraphobia (SCL-90), somatic complaints (SCL-90), hostility (SCL-90) and attitude towards handicap (GHAS). Patients with a PP...

  20. Federal Facility Agreement progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The (SRS) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) was made effective by the US. Environmental Protection Agency Region IV (EPA) on August 16, 1993. To meet the reporting requirements in Section XXV of the Agreement, the FFA Progress Report was developed. The FFA Progress Report is the first of a series of quarterly progress reports to be prepared by the SRS. As such this report describes the information and action taken to September 30, 1993 on the SRS units identified for investigation and remediation in the Agreement. This includes; rubble pits, runoff basins, retention basin, seepage basin, burning pits, H-Area Tank 16, and spill areas.

  1. Progressive Taxation and Tax Morale

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp Doerrenberg; Andreas Peichl

    2010-01-01

    As the link between tax compliance and tax morale is found to be robust, finding the determinants of tax morale can help to understand and fight tax evasion. In this paper we analyze the effect of progressive taxation on tax morale in a cross-country approach - which has not been investigated before. Our theoretical analysis leads to two testable predictions. First, an individual's tax morale is higher, the more progressive the tax schedule is. Second, the impact of tax progressivity on tax m...

  2. Federal Facility Agreement progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The (SRS) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) was made effective by the US. Environmental Protection Agency Region IV (EPA) on August 16, 1993. To meet the reporting requirements in Section XXV of the Agreement, the FFA Progress Report was developed. The FFA Progress Report is the first of a series of quarterly progress reports to be prepared by the SRS. As such this report describes the information and action taken to September 30, 1993 on the SRS units identified for investigation and remediation in the Agreement. This includes; rubble pits, runoff basins, retention basin, seepage basin, burning pits, H-Area Tank 16, and spill areas

  3. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter

    2004-01-01

    , as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  4. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  5. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction as an interp...

  6. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... practical examples of designing for bodily potential. This paper presents Kinesthetic Interaction as a unifying concept for describing the body in motion as a foundation for designing interactive systems. Based on the theoretical foundation for Kinesthetic Interaction, a conceptual framework is introduced...... to reveal bodily potential in relation to three design themes – kinesthetic development, kinesthetic means and kinesthetic disorder; and seven design parameters – engagement, sociality, movability, explicit motivation, implicit motivation, expressive meaning and kinesthetic empathy. The framework is a tool...

  7. Tumor heterogeneity and progression: conceptual foundations for modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greller, L D; Tobin, F L; Poste, G

    1996-01-01

    A conceptual foundation for modeling tumor progression, growth, and heterogeneity is presented. The purpose of such models is to aid understanding, test ideas, formulate experiments, and to model cancer 'in machina' to address the dynamic features of tumor cell heterogeneity, progression, and growth. The descriptive capabilities of such an approach provides a consistent language for qualitatively reasoning about tumor behavior. This approach provides a schema for building conceptual models that combine three key phenomenological driving elements: growth, progression, and genetic instability. The growth element encompasses processes contributing to changes in tumor bulk and is distinct from progression per se. The progression element subsumes a broad collection of processes underlying phenotypic progression. The genetics elements represents heritable changes which potentially affect tumor character and behavior. Models, conceptual and mathematical, can be built for different tumor situations by drawing upon the interaction of these three distinct driving elements. These models can be used as tools to explore a diversity of hypotheses concerning dynamic changes in cellular populations during tumor progression, including the generation of intratumor heterogeneity. Such models can also serve to guide experimentation and to gain insight into dynamic aspects of complex tumor behavior.

  8. Accelerator physics analysis with interactive tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.A.; Michelotti, L.

    1993-05-01

    Work is in progress on interactive tools for linear and nonlinear accelerator design, analysis, and simulation using X-based graphics. The BEAMLINE and MXYZPTLK class libraries, were used with an X Windows graphics library to build a program for interactively editing lattices and studying their properties

  9. Early detection of emphysema progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Jacobs, Sander S A M; Lo, Pechin

    2010-01-01

    Emphysema is one of the most widespread diseases in subjects with smoking history. The gold standard method for estimating the severity of emphysema is a lung function test, such as forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1). However, several clinical studies showed that chest CT scans offer...... more sensitive estimates of emphysema progression. The standard CT densitometric score of emphysema is the relative area of voxels below a threshold (RA). The RA score is a global measurement and reflects the overall emphysema progression. In this work, we propose a framework for estimation of local...... emphysema progression from longitudinal chest CT scans. First, images are registered to a common system of coordinates and then local image dissimilarities are computed in corresponding anatomical locations. Finally, the obtained dissimilarity representation is converted into a single emphysema progression...

  10. Zolpidem in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip K. Dash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by motor symptoms, postural instability, personality changes, and cognitive impairment. There is no effective treatment for this disorder. Reduced neurotransmission of GABA in the striatum and globus pallidus may contribute to the symptoms of motor and cognitive symptoms seen in PSP. Zolpidem is a GABA agonist of the benzodiazepine subreceptor BZ1. Here a nondiabetic, normotensive case of PSP is (Progressive Supranuclear Palsy described, which showed improvement in swallowing, speech, and gaze paresis after zolpidem therapy and possible mechanism of actions are discussed. However, more trials are needed with large number of patients to confirm the effectiveness of zolpidem in progressive supranuclear palsy.

  11. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, L. S., E-mail: flidia@ist.utl.pt [Center of Physics and Engineering of Advanced Materials, CeFEMA and Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Maglione, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei”, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  12. Nitrate | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  13. Sunburn | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  14. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

  15. Defining active progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Börnsen, Lars; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether disease activity according to consensus criteria (magnetic resonance imaging activity or clinical relapses) associate with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) changes in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: To compare CSF biomarkers in active and inactive...

  16. Annual Progress report - General Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesnousky, S.G.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides a summary of progress for the project open-quotes Evaluation of the Geologic Relations and Seismotectonic Stability of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI).close quotes A similar report was previously provided for the period of 1 October 1991 to 30 September 1992. The report initially covers the activities of the General Task and is followed by sections that describe the progress of the other ongoing tasks

  17. Progressive technologies in furniture design

    OpenAIRE

    Šebková, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Šebková, M. Progressive technologies in furniture design. Diploma thesis, Brno, Mendel University in Brno, 2014 Diploma thesis 'Progressive technologies in furniture design' is focused on the use of modern technologies in furniture production. The theoretical part explains the basic terms, technology and material options. It focuses mainly on the production of 3D printed furniture and possibilities of virtual testing, measurements, scanning and rapid prototyping. Practical part of diploma the...

  18. Targeting ECM Disrupts Cancer Progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venning, Freja A; Wullkopf, Lena; Erler, Janine T

    2015-01-01

    , the extracellular matrix (ECM). Many ECM proteins are significantly deregulated during the progression of cancer, causing both biochemical and biomechanical changes that together promote the metastatic cascade. In this review, the influence of several ECM proteins on these multiple steps of cancer spread...... is summarized. In addition, we highlight the promising (pre-)clinical data showing benefits of targeting these ECM macromolecules to prevent cancer progression....

  19. Scientific progress as increasing verisimilitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiniluoto, Ilkka

    2014-06-01

    According to the foundationalist picture, shared by many rationalists and positivist empiricists, science makes cognitive progress by accumulating justified truths. Fallibilists, who point out that complete certainty cannot be achieved in empirical science, can still argue that even successions of false theories may progress toward the truth. This proposal was supported by Karl Popper with his notion of truthlikeness or verisimilitude. Popper's own technical definition failed, but the idea that scientific progress means increasing truthlikeness can be expressed by defining degrees of truthlikeness in terms of similarities between states of affairs. This paper defends the verisimilitude approach against Alexander Bird who argues that the "semantic" definition (in terms of truth or truthlikeness alone) is not sufficient to define progress, but the "epistemic" definition referring to justification and knowledge is more adequate. Here Bird ignores the crucial distinction between real progress and estimated progress, explicated by the difference between absolute (and usually unknown) degrees of truthlikeness and their evidence-relative expected values. Further, it is argued that Bird's idea of returning to the cumulative model of growth requires an implausible trick of transforming past false theories into true ones.

  20. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  1. High-energy-accelerator and colliding-beam user group. Progress report, March 1, 1982-February 28, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Three major areas are covered, progress report, budget report, and proposed research program. The progress report covers the following major topics: electron-positron interactions at PETRA with PLUTO; neutrino-deuterium interactions in the 15 foot bubble chamber; hadron jet physics experiment at Fermilab; status of neutrino-electron and proton-proton scattering experiments at Los Alamos; and work on future projects

  2. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  3. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...

  4. Diffractive interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.; Marage, P.

    1996-08-01

    The general framework of diffractive deep inelastic scattering is introduced and reports given in the session on diffractive interactions at the international workshop on deep-inelastic scattering and related phenomena, Rome, April 1996, are presented. (orig.)

  5. Interaction Widget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Mads

    2003-01-01

    This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced...... in the pattern. The intended audience of the pattern is developers and researchers within the field of human computer interaction....

  6. Hair Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Cani , Marie-Paule; Bertails , Florence

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Processing interactions is one of the main challenges in hair animation. Indeed, in addition to the collisions with the body, an extremely large number of contacts with high friction rates are permanently taking place between individual hair strands. Simulating the latter is essential: without hair self-interactions, strands would cross each other during motion or come to rest at the same location, yielding unrealistic behavior and a visible lack of hair volume. This c...

  7. Numerical simulation of progressive debonding in fiber reinforced composite under transverse loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kushch, V.; Shmegera, S.V.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2011-01-01

    . Then, the effect on debonding progress of local stress redistribution due to interaction between the fibers was studied in the framework of two-inclusion model. Simulation of progressive debonding in fiber reinforced composite using the many-fiber models of composite has been performed. It has been...... shown that the developed model provides detailed analysis of the progressive debonding phenomenon including the interface crack cluster formation, overall stiffness reduction and induced anisotropy of the effective elastic moduli of composite....

  8. Implementing a Progressive Consumption Tax: Advantages of Adopting the VAT Credit-Method System

    OpenAIRE

    Grinberg, Itai

    2006-01-01

    A credit–method value–added tax, a payroll tax, and a business–level wage subsidy can approximate the economic and distributional consequences of a subtraction–method X–tax. Such a credit–method progressive consumption tax has administrative advantages as compared to a subtraction–method progressive consumption tax, once certain political factors are taken into account. Further, unlike a subtraction–method system, a credit–method progressive consumption tax could easily interact with other ta...

  9. New Approaches for Early Detection of Breast Tumor Invasion or Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Man, Yan-Gao

    2003-01-01

    To assess interactions between epithelial (EP) and myoepithelial (ME) cells in association with breast tumor progression and invasion, a double immunostaining technique with antibodies to smooth muscle actin (SMA...

  10. Theoretical particle physics. Technical progress report, May 1, 1985-April 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottlieb, S.A.; Hendry, A.W.; Kostelecky, V.A.; Lichtenberg, D.B.

    1986-05-01

    Research activities during this past year included theoretical work in lattice gauge theory, EMC effect, supersymmetry and supergravity, weak interactions including CP violation, and superstrings. Progress in all these areas is reported

  11. Symbol manipulation by computer applied to plasma physics. Technical progress report 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, B.

    1977-09-01

    Progress has been made in automating the calculation of parametric processes analytically by computer. The computations are performed automatically to lowest order quickly and efficiently. Work has started on a method for solving the nonlinear differential equations describing interacting modes

  12. Particle theory and cosmology. Progress report, April 1, 1985-March 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaisser, T.K.; Steigman, G.

    1985-01-01

    A review of work in progress is given for models, using properties of particle interactions to extrapolate to energy realms which exceed accelerator limits. In addition models are discussed for cosmology and astrophysics. 28 refs.,

  13. Progression of chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, R M; Lazarus, J M

    1989-11-01

    Rates of progression of renal failure were calculated for a group of 277 patients who had five or more clinic visits. The goals of therapy in the absence of ongoing immunological processes were control of blood pressure to diastolic pressures less than 85 mm Hg and serum phosphate less than 1.60 mmol/L (5 mg/dL). The mean rate of progression expressed as the slope of the reciprocal creatinine versus time was -0.0054 +/- 0.0009 dL/mg/mo (mean +/- SEM), and the median was -0.00315 dL/mg/mo. Approximately 25% of these patients had rates of progression less than -0.001 dL/mg/mo. The rate of progression was inversely correlated with the creatinine concentration at entry (P less than 0.004) and with the frequency of clinic visits (P less than 0.01). The "renal survival" time from a creatinine of 880 mumol/L (10 mg/dL) to dialysis was 10.0 +/- 1.2 months (mean +/- SEM). These data provide rates of progression for a group of patients without specific dietary intervention but with vigorous control of blood pressure and phosphorus.

  14. Progress of highly charged atomic physics at IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, X; Zhu, X L; Liu, H P; Li, B; Wei, B R; Sha, S; Cao, S P; Chen, L F; Zhang, S F; Feng, W T; Zhang, D C; Qian, D B

    2007-01-01

    The progress of atomic physics researches at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) is reviewed, covering the studies on ion-atom/molecule collisions, ion-cluster interaction, negative ion formation, state-selective electron capture studied by COLTRIMS, as well as the progress of a new experimental area dedicated for atomic researches at moderate energies, and the advances of the cooler storage rings at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). New opportunities to study collision dynamics from femto-second to atto-second regime are opened based on the present facilities and the on-going projects

  15. Agnosia for accents in primary progressive aphasia☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Phillip D.; Downey, Laura E.; Agustus, Jennifer L.; Hailstone, Julia C.; Tyndall, Marina H.; Cifelli, Alberto; Schott, Jonathan M.; Warrington, Elizabeth K.; Warren, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    As an example of complex auditory signal processing, the analysis of accented speech is potentially vulnerable in the progressive aphasias. However, the brain basis of accent processing and the effects of neurodegenerative disease on this processing are not well understood. Here we undertook a detailed neuropsychological study of a patient, AA with progressive nonfluent aphasia, in whom agnosia for accents was a prominent clinical feature. We designed a battery to assess AA's ability to process accents in relation to other complex auditory signals. AA's performance was compared with a cohort of 12 healthy age and gender matched control participants and with a second patient, PA, who had semantic dementia with phonagnosia and prosopagnosia but no reported difficulties with accent processing. Relative to healthy controls, the patients showed distinct profiles of accent agnosia. AA showed markedly impaired ability to distinguish change in an individual's accent despite being able to discriminate phonemes and voices (apperceptive accent agnosia); and in addition, a severe deficit of accent identification. In contrast, PA was able to perceive changes in accents, phonemes and voices normally, but showed a relatively mild deficit of accent identification (associative accent agnosia). Both patients showed deficits of voice and environmental sound identification, however PA showed an additional deficit of face identification whereas AA was able to identify (though not name) faces normally. These profiles suggest that AA has conjoint (or interacting) deficits involving both apperceptive and semantic processing of accents, while PA has a primary semantic (associative) deficit affecting accents along with other kinds of auditory objects and extending beyond the auditory modality. Brain MRI revealed left peri-Sylvian atrophy in case AA and relatively focal asymmetric (predominantly right sided) temporal lobe atrophy in case PA. These cases provide further evidence for the

  16. Agnosia for accents in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Phillip D; Downey, Laura E; Agustus, Jennifer L; Hailstone, Julia C; Tyndall, Marina H; Cifelli, Alberto; Schott, Jonathan M; Warrington, Elizabeth K; Warren, Jason D

    2013-08-01

    As an example of complex auditory signal processing, the analysis of accented speech is potentially vulnerable in the progressive aphasias. However, the brain basis of accent processing and the effects of neurodegenerative disease on this processing are not well understood. Here we undertook a detailed neuropsychological study of a patient, AA with progressive nonfluent aphasia, in whom agnosia for accents was a prominent clinical feature. We designed a battery to assess AA's ability to process accents in relation to other complex auditory signals. AA's performance was compared with a cohort of 12 healthy age and gender matched control participants and with a second patient, PA, who had semantic dementia with phonagnosia and prosopagnosia but no reported difficulties with accent processing. Relative to healthy controls, the patients showed distinct profiles of accent agnosia. AA showed markedly impaired ability to distinguish change in an individual's accent despite being able to discriminate phonemes and voices (apperceptive accent agnosia); and in addition, a severe deficit of accent identification. In contrast, PA was able to perceive changes in accents, phonemes and voices normally, but showed a relatively mild deficit of accent identification (associative accent agnosia). Both patients showed deficits of voice and environmental sound identification, however PA showed an additional deficit of face identification whereas AA was able to identify (though not name) faces normally. These profiles suggest that AA has conjoint (or interacting) deficits involving both apperceptive and semantic processing of accents, while PA has a primary semantic (associative) deficit affecting accents along with other kinds of auditory objects and extending beyond the auditory modality. Brain MRI revealed left peri-Sylvian atrophy in case AA and relatively focal asymmetric (predominantly right sided) temporal lobe atrophy in case PA. These cases provide further evidence for the

  17. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XIII

    CERN Document Server

    III, Wendell; Paulus, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    This thirteenth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on atoms, molecules, and clusters interacting in intense laser field and high-order harmonics generation and their applications. The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, the interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries.   .

  18. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Li, Ruxin; Chin, See Leang

    2009-01-01

    The PUILS series presents Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. PUILS has been stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume contains approximately 15 chapters, authored by researchers at the forefront. Each chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers, who are not experts in the specific topics, as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of this sub-field of research, and these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This fourth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on strong field ionization of atoms; excitation, ionization and fragmentation of molecules; nonlinear intense optical phenomena and attosecond pulses; and laser - solid interactions and photoemission.

  19. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science III

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Agostini, Pierre; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2008-01-01

    The PUILS series presents Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. PUILS has been stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume contains approximately 15 chapters, authored by researchers at the forefront. Each chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers, who are not experts in the specific topics, as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of this sub-field of research, and these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This third volume covers a diverse range of disciplines, focusing on such topics as strong field ionization of atoms, ionization and fragmentation of molecules and clusters, generation of high-order harmonics and attosecond pulses, filamentation and laser plasma interaction, and the development of ultrashort and ultrahigh-intensity light sources.

  20. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science VIII

    CERN Document Server

    Nisoli, Mauro; Hill, Wendell; III, III

    2012-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science and optical science which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand. These are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This eighth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on molecules interacting with ultrashort and intense laser fields, advanced technologies for the characterization of ultrashort laser pulses and their applications, laser plasma formation and laser acceleration.

  1. Progress of inflammatory cytokines in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glaucomais a group of diseases characterized by optic nerve damage and visual field defect, and pathological high intraocular pressure is a risk factor for glaucoma. Glaucoma is affected by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors, and inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. A great deal of studies have confirmed that high expression of connective tissue growth factor(CTGF, tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α, interleukins(ILs, nuclear factor-kappa B(NF-κBand various cytokines in the aqueous humor of patients with glaucoma, which have a close correlation with pathogenesis of glaucoma.This article reviews the progress of inflammatory cytokines and their relationship with glaucoma.

  2. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science VI

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Bandrauk, André D

    2010-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This sixth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on responses of molecules to ultrashort intense laser pulses, generation and characterization of attosecond pulses and high-order harmonics, and filamentation and laser-plasma interaction.

  3. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

  4. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities

  5. Pion condensation in symmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsunnahar, T.; Saha, S.; Kabir, K.; Nath, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of pion condensation in symmetric nuclear matter using a model of pion-nucleon interaction based essentially on chiral SU(2) x SU(2) symmetry. We have found that pion condensation is not possible for any finite value of the density. Consequently, no critical opalescence phenomenon is likely to be seen in pion-nucleus scattering nor is it likely to be possible to explain the EMC effect in terms of an increased number of pions in the nucleus. (author)

  6. Tracking Clean Energy Progress 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    Tracking Clean Energy Progress 2013 (TCEP 2013) examines progress in the development and deployment of key clean energy technologies. Each technology and sector is tracked against interim 2020 targets in the IEA Energy Technology Perspectives 2012 2°C scenario, which lays out pathways to a sustainable energy system in 2050. Stark message emerge: progress has not been fast enough; large market failures are preventing clean energy solutions from being taken up; considerable energy efficiency remains untapped; policies need to better address the energy system as a whole; and energy-related research, development and demonstration need to accelerate. Alongside these grim conclusions there is positive news. In 2012, hybrid-electric vehicle sales passed the 1 million mark. Solar photovoltaic systems were being installed at a record pace. The costs of most clean energy technologies fell more rapidly than anticipated.

  7. Building a progressive vertical integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charette, D.

    2008-01-01

    AAER Inc. is a Quebec-based company that manufactures turbines using proven European designs. This presentation discussed the company's business model. The company places an emphasis on identifying strategic and key components currently available for its turbines. Market analyses are performed in order to determine ideal suppliers and define business strategies and needs. The company invests in long-term relationships with its suppliers. Business partners for AAER are of a similar size and have a mutual understanding and respect for the company's business practices. Long-term agreements with suppliers are signed in order to ensure reliability and control over costs. Progressive vertical integration has been achieved by progressively manufacturing key components and integrating a North American supply chain. The company's secure supply chain and progressive vertical integration has significantly reduced financial costs and provided better quality control. It was concluded that vertical integration has also allowed AAER to provide better customer service and reduce transportation costs. tabs., figs

  8. Rapidly Progressive Quadriplegia and Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, DonRaphael; McCorquodale, Donald; Peters, Angela; Juster-Switlyk, Kelsey; Smith, Gordon; Ansari, Safdar

    2016-11-01

    A woman aged 77 years was transferred to our neurocritical care unit for evaluation and treatment of rapidly progressive motor weakness and encephalopathy. Examination revealed an ability to follow simple commands only and abnormal movements, including myoclonus, tongue and orofacial dyskinesias, and opsoclonus. Imaging study findings were initially unremarkable, but when repeated, they demonstrated enhancement of the cauda equina nerve roots, trigeminal nerve, and pachymeninges. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed mildly elevated white blood cell count and protein levels. Serial electrodiagnostic testing demonstrated a rapidly progressive diffuse sensory motor axonopathy, and electroencephalogram findings progressed from generalized slowing to bilateral periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges. Critical details of her recent history prompted a diagnostic biopsy. Over time, the patient became completely unresponsive with no further abnormal movements and ultimately died. The differential diagnosis, pathological findings, and diagnosis are discussed with a brief review of a well-known yet rare diagnosis.

  9. World progress toward fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses international progress in fusion research during the last three years. Much of the technical progress has been achieved through international collaboration in magnetic fusion research. This progress has stimulated political interest in a multinational effort, aimed at designing and possibly constructing the world's first experimental fusion reactor. This interest was reflected in recent summit-level discussions involving President Mitterand, General Secretary Gorbachev, and President Reagan. Most recently, the European Community (EC), Japan, the United States, and the U.S.S.R. have decided to begin serious preparation for taking the next step toward practical fusion energy. These parties have agreed to begin the design and supporting R and D for an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The initiation of this international program to prepare for a fusion test reactor is discussed

  10. Progress in video immersion using Panospheric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Stephen L.; Southwell, David T.; Penzes, Steven G.; Brosinsky, Chris A.; Anderson, Ron; Hanna, Doug M.

    1998-09-01

    Having demonstrated significant technical and marketplace advantages over other modalities for video immersion, PanosphericTM Imaging (PI) continues to evolve rapidly. This paper reports on progress achieved since AeroSense 97. The first practical field deployment of the technology occurred in June-August 1997 during the NASA-CMU 'Atacama Desert Trek' activity, where the Nomad mobile robot was teleoperated via immersive PanosphericTM imagery from a distance of several thousand kilometers. Research using teleoperated vehicles at DRES has also verified the exceptional utility of the PI technology for achieving high levels of situational awareness, operator confidence, and mission effectiveness. Important performance enhancements have been achieved with the completion of the 4th Generation PI DSP-based array processor system. The system is now able to provide dynamic full video-rate generation of spatial and computational transformations, resulting in a programmable and fully interactive immersive video telepresence. A new multi- CCD camera architecture has been created to exploit the bandwidth of this processor, yielding a well-matched PI system with greatly improved resolution. While the initial commercial application for this technology is expected to be video tele- conferencing, it also appears to have excellent potential for application in the 'Immersive Cockpit' concept. Additional progress is reported in the areas of Long Wave Infrared PI Imaging, Stereo PI concepts, PI based Video-Servoing concepts, PI based Video Navigation concepts, and Foveation concepts (to merge localized high-resolution views with immersive views).

  11. Sludge Treatment Evaluation: 1992 Technical progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, L.J.; Felmy, A.R.; Ding, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents Fiscal Year 1992 technical progress on the Sludge Treatment Evaluation Task, which is being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of this task is to develop a capability to predict the performance of pretreatment processes for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste stored at Hanford and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Significant cost savings can be achieved if radionuclides and other undesirable constituents can be effectively separated from the bulk waste prior to final treatment and disposal. This work is initially focused on chemical equilibrium prediction of water washing and acid or base dissolution of Hanford single-shell tank (SST) sludges, but may also be applied to other steps in pretreatment processes or to other wastes. Although SST wastes contain many chemical species, there are relatively few constituents -- Na, Al, NO 3 , NO 2 , PO 4 , SO 4 , and F -- contained in the majority of the waste. These constituents comprise 86% and 74% of samples from B-110 and U-110 SSTS, respectively. The major radionuclides of interest (Cs, Sr, Tc, U) are present in the sludge in small molal quantities. For these constituents, and other important components that are present in small molal quantities, the specific ion-interaction terms used in the Pitzer or NRTL equations may be assumed to be zero for a first approximation. Model development can also be accelerated by considering only the acid or base conditions that apply for the key pretreatment steps. This significantly reduces the number of chemical species and chemical reactions that need to be considered. Therefore, significant progress can be made by developing all the specific ion interactions for a base model and an acid dissolution model

  12. Sludge Treatment Evaluation: 1992 Technical progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, L J; Felmy, A R; Ding, E R

    1993-01-01

    This report documents Fiscal Year 1992 technical progress on the Sludge Treatment Evaluation Task, which is being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of this task is to develop a capability to predict the performance of pretreatment processes for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste stored at Hanford and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Significant cost savings can be achieved if radionuclides and other undesirable constituents can be effectively separated from the bulk waste prior to final treatment and disposal. This work is initially focused on chemical equilibrium prediction of water washing and acid or base dissolution of Hanford single-shell tank (SST) sludges, but may also be applied to other steps in pretreatment processes or to other wastes. Although SST wastes contain many chemical species, there are relatively few constituents -- Na, Al, NO[sub 3], NO[sub 2], PO[sub 4], SO[sub 4], and F -- contained in the majority of the waste. These constituents comprise 86% and 74% of samples from B-110 and U-110 SSTS, respectively. The major radionuclides of interest (Cs, Sr, Tc, U) are present in the sludge in small molal quantities. For these constituents, and other important components that are present in small molal quantities, the specific ion-interaction terms used in the Pitzer or NRTL equations may be assumed to be zero for a first approximation. Model development can also be accelerated by considering only the acid or base conditions that apply for the key pretreatment steps. This significantly reduces the number of chemical species and chemical reactions that need to be considered. Therefore, significant progress can be made by developing all the specific ion interactions for a base model and an acid dissolution model.

  13. Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-12-01

    In support of the Obama Administration's Climate Action Plan, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and U.S. Department of Agriculture jointly released the Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report, updating the federal government's progress to reduce methane emissions through biogas systems since the Biogas Opportunities Roadmap was completed by the three agencies in July 2014. The report highlights actions taken, outlines challenges and opportunities, and identifies next steps to the growth of a robust biogas industry.

  14. Communication of nuclear data progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This is the 26th issue of Communication of Nuclear Data Progress (CNDP), in which the progress and achievements in nuclear data field from the last year up to now in China are carried. It includes the measurements of 71 Ga, 94 Zn, 191 Ir, 174 Hf(n, γ) and 114 Cd(n, 2n) cross sections, fission product yields of n + 235,238 U, DPA cross section calculated with UNF code, fission barrier parameter evaluation of some nuclides, production and transmission of covariance in the evaluation processing of fission yield data and transition analysis of Ne-like Ge XXIII

  15. Interactive governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Torfing, Jacob; Peters, B. Guy

    Governance has become one of the most commonly used concepts in contemporary political science. It is, however, often used to mean a variety of different things. This book helps to clarify this conceptual muddle by concentrating on one variety of governance-interactive governance. The authors argue...... that although the state may remain important for many aspects of governing, interactions between state and society represent an important, and perhaps increasingly important, dimension of governance. These interactions may be with social actors such as networks, with market actors or with other governments......, but all these forms represent means of governing involving mixtures of state action with the actions of other entities.This book explores thoroughly this meaning of governance, and links it to broader questions of governance. In the process of explicating this dimension of governance the authors also...

  16. Multiquark interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk'yanov, V.K.

    1984-01-01

    To study multiquark interactions (MQI) the data of experiments confirming the presence of 3q, 6q, 12q states in interacting nuclear nucleons, in hadron- and lepton-nuclear processes at high energies and high momentum transfers are considered. Experimental data on cumulative processes pointing to the existence of MQI are analyzed. Two-channel model of a nucleus (the model of interacting nucleons) in the theory of coupled channels is discussed. The behaviour of form factor of deuteron and NQI (6q) contributions to ed scattering as well as deep inelastic scattering on nuclei are studied. The data known as EMC effect are discussed. It is pointed out that introduction of the notion MQI and consideration of a nucleus as a system of nucleons with a low MQI addition will help to explain such processes as cumulative reactions, form factors of a deuteron and light nuclei, deep inelastic scattering on nuclei

  17. Interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The Interaction Region Group addressed the basic questions of how to collide the SLC beams, how to maximize and monitor the luminosity, and how to minimize the detector backgrounds at the interaction region. In practice, five subgroups evolved to study these questions. The final focus group provided three alternative designs to acheive the 1 to 2 micron beam spot size required by the SLC, as well as studying other problems including: eta, eta' matching from the collider arcs, the implementation of soft bends near the interaction region, beam emittance growth, and magnet tolerances in the final focus. The beam position monitor group proposed two devices, a strip line monitor, and a beamstrahlung monitor, to bring the beams into collision. The luminosity monitor group reviewed the possible QED processes that would be insensitive to weak interaction (Z 0 ) effects. The beam dumping group proposed locations for kicker and septum magnets in the final focus that would achieve a high dumping efficiency and would meet the desired beam tolerances at the Moller scattering target in the beam dump line. Working with the Polarization Group, the Moller experiment was designed into the beam dump beam line. A beam dump was proposed that would maintain radiation backgrounds (penetrating muons) at acceptible levels. The detector backgrounds group proposed soft-bend and masking configurations to shield the detector from synchrotron radiation from the hard/soft bends and from the final focus quadrupoles and evaluated the effectiveness of these designs for the three final focus optics designs. Backgrounds were also estimated from: large angle synchrotron radiation, local and distant beam-gas interactions, 2-photon interactions, and from neutrons and backscattered photons from the beamstrahlung dump

  18. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Make cool stuff. If you're a designer or artist without a lot of programming experience, this book will teach you to work with 2D and 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, and electronic circuitry to create all sorts of interesting and compelling experiences -- online and off. Programming Interactivity explains programming and electrical engineering basics, and introduces three freely available tools created specifically for artists and designers: Processing, a Java-based programming language and environment for building projects on the desktop, Web, or mobile phonesArduino, a system t

  19. Interacting binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleton, P.P.; Pringle, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This volume contains 15 review articles in the field of binary stars. The subjects reviewed span considerably, from the shortest period of interacting binaries to the longest, symbiotic stars. Also included are articles on Algols, X-ray binaries and Wolf-Rayet stars (single and binary). Contents: Preface. List of Participants. Activity of Contact Binary Systems. Wolf-Rayet Stars and Binarity. Symbiotic Stars. Massive X-ray Binaries. Stars that go Hump in the Night: The SU UMa Stars. Interacting Binaries - Summing Up

  20. Tracking the follow-up of work in progress papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubin, Omar; Arsalan, Mudassar; Al Mahmud, Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    Academic conferences offer numerous submission tracks to support the inclusion of a variety of researchers and topics. Work in progress papers are one such submission type where authors present preliminary results in a poster session. They have recently gained popularity in the area of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) as a relatively easier pathway to attending the conference due to their higher acceptance rate as compared to the main tracks. However, it is not clear if these work in progress papers are further extended or transitioned into more complete and thorough full papers or are simply one-off pieces of research. In order to answer this we explore self-citation patterns of four work in progress editions in two popular HCI conferences (CHI2010, CHI2011, HRI2010 and HRI2011). Our results show that almost 50% of the work in progress papers do not have any self-citations and approximately only half of the self-citations can be considered as true extensions of the original work in progress paper. Specific conferences dominate as the preferred venue where extensions of these work in progress papers are published. Furthermore, the rate of self-citations peaks in the immediate year after publication and gradually tails off. By tracing author publication records, we also delve into possible reasons of work in progress papers not being cited in follow up publications. In conclusion, we speculate on the main trends observed and what they may mean looking ahead for the work in progress track of premier HCI conferences.

  1. Hadron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.; Kolar, P.; Kundrat, V.

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings contain invited lectures and papers presente at the symposium. Attention was devoted to hadron interactions a high energy in QCD, to the structure and decay of hadrons, the production of hadrons and supersymmetric particles in e + e - and ep collisions, to perturbation theory in quantum field theory, and new supersymmetric extensions of relativistic algebra. (Z.J

  2. Interactive Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik; Reng, Lars

    2015-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2015, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in November/December 2015. The 18 revised full papers and 13 short papers presented together with 9 posters, 9 workshop descriptions, an...

  3. Progressive macular hypomelanosis: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Relyveld, Germaine N.; Menke, Henk E.; Westerhof, Wiete

    2007-01-01

    Progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH) is a common skin disorder that is often misdiagnosed. Various authors have written about similar skin disorders, referring to them by different names, but we believe that all these similar disorders are part of the same entity.PMH is characterized by

  4. Progress Report 1985-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The research directions in the Physics Institute of Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul are presented. The progress reports cavied out in the follow areas are presented: perturbed angular correlation; Moessbauer spectroscopy; ion implantation; magnetism and electronic transport; microelectronics; condensed matter theory; quantum field theory; plasma physics; nuclear physics; astronomy and astrophysics; and instrumentation. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Technological Progress, Exit and Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp; Sørensen, Allan

    productivity exporters are more likely to continue to export, and market exit is typically preceded by periods of contracting market shares. We show that the simple inclusion of exogenous economy wide technological progress into the standard Melitz (2003) model generates a tractable dynamic framework...

  6. Progress in color night vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of our recent progress and the current state-of-the-art techniques of color image fusion for night vision applications. Inspired by previously developed color opponent fusing schemes, we initially developed a simple pixel-based false color-mapping scheme that yielded fused

  7. Recent progress in sodium technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallett, W. J.

    1963-10-15

    Progress over the past year in U. S. laboratories studying some of the materials and engineering problems that must be resolved in bringing the technology of sodium to an economically and technically attractive point is reviewed. The status of sodium cooled power reactors in the U. S. is described. (P.C.H.)

  8. Progress report 1971/72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    The progress report comprises reports from interdisciplinary task groups on radiation protection, isotope application and radiation measurement technique, microscopy, linear accelerators, process computers, biophysics and nuclear physics. The last task group reports on work with the electron linear accelerator, nuclear spectroscopy, neutron physics, work with polarized particles, and experiments with the GSI heavy ion accelerator. (orig./AK) [de

  9. Popular support for progressive taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Marhuenda Hurtado, Francisco; Ortuño Ortín, Ignacio Isidro

    1995-01-01

    The popular support obtained by two parties who propose two qualitatively different tax schernes is analyzed. We show that if the median voter is below the mean, then any progressive proposal always wins over a regressive one, provided it leaves the poorest agent at least as well off as the latter does.

  10. Progress at the Shanghai EBIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Mianhong; Liu Yong; Yang Yang; Wu Shimin; Chen Weidong; Hu Wei; Guo, Panlin; Lu Di; Fu Yunqing; Huang Min; Zhang Xuemei; Hutton, Roger; Liljeby, Leif; Zou Yaming

    2007-01-01

    In this report, a brief description of the progress of the Shanghai EBIT project is presented. This is followed by short discussions on the X ray spectra at several electron beam energies and the ion densities in the EBIT at a specific running condition

  11. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements

  12. Annual progress report FY 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, K.F.; Henry, A.F.

    1977-07-01

    Progress is summarized in a project directed toward development of numerical methods suitable for the computer solution of problems in reactor dynamics and safety. Specific areas of research include methods of integration of the time-dependent diffusion equations by finite difference and finite element methods; representation of reactor properties by various homogenization procedures; application of synthesis methods; and development of response matrix techniques

  13. Minority Student Progress Report, 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Porfirio R.; Luan, Jing

    This report offers a consolidated systemwide analysis of key issues and recommendations for improvement of minority recruitment and retention at Arizona State Universities and an evaluation of progress toward achieving Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR) approved recruitment and graduation goals. A description of ABOR system goals notes three goals:…

  14. Nuclear Physics Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, D.; Cookson, J.A.; Findlay, D.J.S.

    1984-06-01

    The 1983 progress report of the Nuclear Physics Division, UKAEA Harwell, is divided into four main topics. These are a) nuclear data and technology for nuclear power; b) nuclear studies; c) applications of nuclear and associated techniques, including ion beam techniques and moessbauer spectroscopy; and d) accelerator operation, maintenance and development. (U.K.)

  15. Progress in pulsed power fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintenz, J P; Adams, R G; Bailey, J E [Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

    1997-12-31

    Pulsed power offers an efficient, high energy, economical source of x-rays for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. Two main approaches to ICF driven with pulsed power accelerators are pursued: intense light ion beams and z-pinches. Recent progress in each approach and plans for future development is described. (author). 2 figs., 10 refs.

  16. Ultrasonic flowmeters. Progress report II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittekind, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    This progress report presents results of in-plant testing of the prototype ultrasonic flowmeter and describes modifications to the prototype as a result of these tests. The modified prototype, designated MOD-I, is described in detail including the principle of operation, equipment used and the results of both laboratory and in-plant demonstrations

  17. Progress: Its Glories and Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Steven Pinker, a cognitive psychologist and linguist at Harvard and a savant of big ideas, is one of the latest to take on the idea of progress. He does it under the aegis of "enlightenment," which comes down to a kind of holy trinity of reason, science, and humanism. His new book, Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress, is ambitious and cantankerous and heady with hope. On the whole, Pinker makes a good case for the benefits of progress, but with an overdose of feel-good prose. His greatest failure comes in exaggerating the threats to science and in avoiding some problems altogether. He ignores its complexity, its shadows, its creation of new problems raised by its solutions to old ones. Pinker has a particular animus against bioethics, and he misses what has been, I would argue, at the heart of bioethics from its beginning fifty or so years ago. Bioethics was prompted by a new class of medical dilemmas that require a difficult balancing of harms and benefits. Most of them are still with us, and most of them are the result of the progress of postwar medical research and fast-changing clinical practices. © 2018 The Hastings Center.

  18. Progress in pulsed power fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintenz, J.P.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed power offers an efficient, high energy, economical source of x-rays for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. Two main approaches to ICF driven with pulsed power accelerators are pursued: intense light ion beams and z-pinches. Recent progress in each approach and plans for future development is described. (author). 2 figs., 10 refs

  19. FMIT Test assemblies. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.; Opperman, E.K.

    1978-08-01

    This progress report is a reference document for a number of inter-related tasks supporting the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility being developed by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. The report describes the basic configuration of test assemblies and supporting rationale based on the neutron flux distribution. Perturbed and unperturbed flux profiles are discussed as well as heating rates and cooling requirements

  20. Monitoring Students' Academic & Disciplinary Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Fred; Kellogg, Larry J.

    This document outlines the objectives and procedures of a program at a New Mexico school district whose purpose is to enable school personnel to systematically monitor students' academic and disciplinary progression. The objectives of the program are to diagnose academic or disciplinary problems and prescribe remedies, to establish an oncampus…

  1. Progress report 1977-1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This annual report surveys briefly the studies for the year 1977-78 in Corpuscular Physics Laboratory. The results of different experiments made in collaboration with other laboratories are reported: long range hadron interactions, baryonium states put into evidence by baryon exchange, two-body interactions, excited baryons, quark transverse momentum, quark annihilations [fr

  2. Progressive Classification Using Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri; Kocurek, Michael

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm for progressive classification of data, analogous to progressive rendering of images, makes it possible to compromise between speed and accuracy. This algorithm uses support vector machines (SVMs) to classify data. An SVM is a machine learning algorithm that builds a mathematical model of the desired classification concept by identifying the critical data points, called support vectors. Coarse approximations to the concept require only a few support vectors, while precise, highly accurate models require far more support vectors. Once the model has been constructed, the SVM can be applied to new observations. The cost of classifying a new observation is proportional to the number of support vectors in the model. When computational resources are limited, an SVM of the appropriate complexity can be produced. However, if the constraints are not known when the model is constructed, or if they can change over time, a method for adaptively responding to the current resource constraints is required. This capability is particularly relevant for spacecraft (or any other real-time systems) that perform onboard data analysis. The new algorithm enables the fast, interactive application of an SVM classifier to a new set of data. The classification process achieved by this algorithm is characterized as progressive because a coarse approximation to the true classification is generated rapidly and thereafter iteratively refined. The algorithm uses two SVMs: (1) a fast, approximate one and (2) slow, highly accurate one. New data are initially classified by the fast SVM, producing a baseline approximate classification. For each classified data point, the algorithm calculates a confidence index that indicates the likelihood that it was classified correctly in the first pass. Next, the data points are sorted by their confidence indices and progressively reclassified by the slower, more accurate SVM, starting with the items most likely to be incorrectly classified. The user

  3. Report of the 7. Workshop on hadron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Y.; Navarra, F.S.; Nielsen, M.

    1994-06-01

    A report on the 7. workshop on hadron interactions is presented. Several works, both theoretical and experimental, on progress in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions at very high energies are discussed. This includes cosmic ray interaction also

  4. Geothermal Progress Monitor report No. 5. Progress report, June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    Updated information is presented on activities and progress in the areas of electric power plants, direct heat applications, deep well drilling, leasing of federal lands, legislative and regulatory actions, research and development, and others. Special attention is given in this report to 1980 highlights, particularly in the areas of electric and direct heat uses, drilling, and the Federal lands leasing program. This report also includes a summary of the DOE FY 1982 geothermal budget request to Congress.

  5. Progress towards localization in the attractive Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morong, W.; Xu, W.; Demarco, B.

    2017-04-01

    The interplay between fermionic superfluidity and disorder is a topic of long-standing interest that has recently come within reach of ultracold gas experiments. Outstanding questions include the fate of Cooper pairs in a localized superfluid and the effect of disorder on the superfluid transition temperature. We report progress on tackling this problem using a realization of the Hubbard model with attractive interactions. Our system consists of two spin states of fermionic potassium-40 trapped in a cubic optical lattice. Disorder is introduced using an optical speckle potential, and interactions are controlled via a Feshbach resonance. We study the binding and unbinding of Cooper pairs in this system using rf spectroscopy, changes in Tc by measuring the condensate fraction, and transport properties by observing the response to an applied impulse. We will discuss progress towards these measurements.

  6. Interactive cinema : engagement and interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vosmeer, M.; Schouten, B.; Mitchell, A.

    2014-01-01

    Technologies that were initially developed to be applied within the domain of video games are currently being used in experiments to explore their meaning and possibilities for cinema and cinema audiences. In this position paper we examine how narrativity, interactivity and engagement are mutually

  7. The Efficient Side of Progressive Income Taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Corneo, Giacomo

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the allocative implications of progressive income taxation when individuals care about their relative income. It shows that tax progressivity might improve efficiency, and the more so in egalitarian economies. Introducing a progressive income tax can yield a Pareto improvement if pre-tax income is evenly distributed. Implementing undistorted choices of working hours requires a progressive tax schedule, and the optimal degree of progressivity decreases with pre-tax income i...

  8. Progress in elementary particle theory, 1950-1964

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gell-Mann, M.

    1989-01-01

    This final chapter of the book lists advances in elementary particle theory from 1950 to 1964 in an order of progressive understanding of ideas rather than chronologically. Starting with quantum field theory and the important discoveries within it, the author explains the connections and items missing in this decade, but understood later. The second part of the chapter takes the same pattern, but deals with basic interactions (strong, electromagnetic, weak and gravitational) and elementary particles, including quarks. By 1985, theory had developed to such a degree that it was hoped that the long-sought-after unified field theory of all elementary particles and interactions of nature might be close at hand. (UK)

  9. A progressive diagonalization scheme for the Rabi Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Feng; Guan, Xin; Wang, Yin; Draayer, J P

    2010-01-01

    A diagonalization scheme for the Rabi Hamiltonian, which describes a qubit interacting with a single-mode radiation field via a dipole interaction, is proposed. It is shown that the Rabi Hamiltonian can be solved almost exactly using a progressive scheme that involves a finite set of one variable polynomial equations. The scheme is especially efficient for the lower part of the spectrum. Some low-lying energy levels of the model with several sets of parameters are calculated and compared to those provided by the recently proposed generalized rotating-wave approximation and a full matrix diagonalization.

  10. Interactive Macroeconomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guilmi, Corrado; Gallegati, Mauro; Landini, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Preface; List of tables; List of figures, 1. Introduction; Part I. Methodological Notes and Tools: 2. The state space notion; 3. The master equation; Part II. Applications to HIA Based Models: 4. Financial fragility and macroeconomic dynamics I: heterogeneity and interaction; 5. Financial fragility and macroeconomic Dynamics II: learning; Part III. Conclusions: 6. Conclusive remarks; Part IV. Appendices and Complements: Appendix A: Complements to Chapter 3; Appendix B: Solving the ME to solve the ABM; Appendix C: Specifying transition rates; Index.

  11. Research program in elementary particle theory. Progress report, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Dicus, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    Research progress is reported on the following topics: gauge theory and monopole physics; supersymmetry and proton decay; strong interactions and model of particles; quantum rotator and spectrum generating group models of particles; geometric foundations of particle physics and optics; and application of particle physics to astrophysics. The titles of DOE reports are listed, and research histories of the scientific staff of the Center for Particle Theory are included

  12. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-04-01

    Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

  13. Thermodynamic Activity-Based Progress Curve Analysis in Enzyme Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiss, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    Macrokinetic Michaelis-Menten models based on thermodynamic activity provide insights into enzyme kinetics because they separate substrate-enzyme from substrate-solvent interactions. Kinetic parameters are estimated from experimental progress curves of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Three pitfalls are discussed: deviations between thermodynamic and concentration-based models, product effects on the substrate activity coefficient, and product inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Progress of MICE RFCC Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Green, M.; Li, N.; Niinikoski, T.; Pan, H.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Bross, A.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikhin, V.; Sylvester, C.; Chen, A. B.; Guo, Bin; Li, Liyi; Xu, Fengyu; Cao, Y.; Sun, S.; Wang, Li; Yin, Lixin; Luo, Tianhuan; Summers, Don; Smith, B.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Kaplan, D.

    2012-05-20

    Recent progress on the design and fabrication of the RFCC (RF and superconducting Coupling Coil) module for the international MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment) are reported. The MICE ionization cooling channel has two RFCC modules, each having four 201- MHz normal conducting RF cavities surrounded by one superconducting coupling coil (solenoid) magnet. The magnet is designed to be cooled by three cryocoolers. Fabrication of the RF cavities is complete; preparation for the cavity electro-polishing, low power RF measurements, and tuning are in progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Fabrication of the cold mass of the first coupling coil magnet has been completed in China and the cold mass arrived at LBNL in late 2011. Preparations for testing the cold mass are currently under way at Fermilab. Plans for the RFCC module assembly and integration are being developed and are described.

  15. Progress on alternative energy resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, H. T.

    1982-03-01

    Progress in the year 1981 toward the development of energy systems suitable for replacing petroleum products combustion and growing in use to fulfill a near term expansion in energy use is reviewed. Coal is noted to be a potentially heavy pollution source, and the presence of environmentally acceptable methods of use such as fluidized-bed combustion and gasification and liquefaction reached the prototype stage in 1981, MHD power generation was achieved in two U.S. plants, with severe corrosion problems remaining unsolved for the electrodes. Solar flat plate collectors sales amounted to 20 million sq ft in 1981, and solar thermal electric conversion systems with central receivers neared completion. Solar cells are progressing toward DOE goals of $.70/peak W by 1986, while wind energy conversion sales were 2000 machines in 1981, and the industry is regarded as maturing. Finally, geothermal, OTEC, and fusion systems are reviewed.

  16. Infrastructures of progress and dispossession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Astrid Oberborbeck

    2016-01-01

    and organizational infrastructural arrangements, it is argued, can open up for understanding how local and beyond-local processes tangle in complex ways and are productive of new subjectivities; how relations are reconfi gured in neoliberal landscapes of progress and dispossession. Such an approach makes evident how...... to reposition small and medium-scale farmers as backward. Th is article analyzes how farmers struggle to fi nd their place within a neoliberal urban ecology where diff erent conceptions of what constitutes progress in contemporary Peru infl uence the landscape. Using an analytical lens that takes material...... and organizational infrastructures and practices into account, and situates these in specifi c historical processes, the article argues that farmers within the urban landscape of Arequipa struggle to reclaim land and water, and reassert a status that they experience to be losing. Such a historical focus on material...

  17. Communication of nuclear data progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-15

    This is the 30th issue of Communication of Nuclear Data Progress (CNDP), in which the progress and achievements in nuclear data field in China during 2004 are carried. It includes the evaluations and model calculations of neutron data for n+{sup 31}P, {sup 59}Co, {sup 92-106}Mo, {sup Nat-116}Cd, {sup 233}U and the covariance data evaluation of experimental data for {sup 27}Al, update the decay data for radionuclide {sup 7}Be. Some results of studies for nuclear evaluation tool and model are also included in this issue, i.e. reaction mechanism studies of {sup 5}He, a new method of evaluating the discrepant data, linear fit of correlative data by least squared method et al. (authors)

  18. Progress in Heavy Ion Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1988-09-01

    The progress of the field of Heavy Ion Fusion has been documented in the proceedings of the series of International Symposia that, in recent years, have occurred every second year. The latest of these conferences was hosted by Gesellshaft fuer Schwerionenforshung (GSI) in Darmstadt, West Germany, June 28-30, 1988. For this report, a few highlights from the conference are selected, stressing experimental progress and prospects for future advances. A little extra time is devoted to report on the developments at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is the center for most of the HIFAR program. The Director of the HIFAR program at LBL is Denis Keefe, who presented the HIF report at the last two of the meetings in this series, and in whose place the author is appearing now. 4 refs., 1 fig

  19. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: an Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Melissa J

    2018-02-17

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a 4R tau neuropathologic entity. While historically defined by the presence of a vertical supranuclear gaze palsy and falls in the first symptomatic year, clinicopathologic studies identify alternate presenting phenotypes. This article reviews the new PSP diagnostic criteria, diagnostic approaches, and treatment strategies. The 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PSP criteria outline 14 core clinical features and 4 clinical clues that combine to diagnose one of eight PSP phenotypes with probable, possible, or suggestive certainty. Evidence supports the use of select imaging approaches in the classic PSP-Richardson syndrome phenotype. Recent trials of putative disease-modifying agents showed no benefit. The new PSP diagnostic criteria incorporating the range of presenting phenotypes have important implications for diagnosis and research. More work is needed to understand how diagnostic evaluations inform phenotype assessment and identify expected progression. Current treatment is symptomatic, but tau-based therapeutics are in active clinical trials.

  20. Communication of nuclear data progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    This is the 30th issue of Communication of Nuclear Data Progress (CNDP), in which the progress and achievements in nuclear data field in China during 2004 are carried. It includes the evaluations and model calculations of neutron data for n+ 31 P, 59 Co, 92-106 Mo, Nat-116 Cd, 233 U and the covariance data evaluation of experimental data for 27 Al, update the decay data for radionuclide 7 Be. Some results of studies for nuclear evaluation tool and model are also included in this issue, i.e. reaction mechanism studies of 5 He, a new method of evaluating the discrepant data, linear fit of correlative data by least squared method et al. (authors)